WorldWideScience

Sample records for culturally responsive classrooms

  1. Dealing with Difference: Building Culturally Responsive Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Burridge

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia continues to develop as a multicultural society with levels of immigration increasing significantly over recent years as a result of government policies. More recently, the new period of financial turmoil, continuing threats from terrorism and environmental concerns, have all exacerbated the challenges of dealing with difference in our society. In response, schools continue to face the challenges of the impact of a range of different cultures, languages and religions among their student and school communities. How effectively schools deal with difference and how well they are supported in their endeavours to build culturally response classrooms is a perennial issue for both teachers and educators. A major challenge for teachers is to at a minimum, understand cultural differences as they manifest in their particular school settings and to draw on approaches that support student learning in culturally appropriate ways so to assist them to better realise their full potential. In this paper we will consider cultural diversity in the context of recent school policies, highlight a number of frameworks for addressing cultural diversity in the classroom, in particular the approaches by Kalantzis and Cope’s (1999 and Hickling-Hudson (2003. We also draw on the findings from a recent qualitative study of representations of cultural diversity in a number of Sydney metropolitan schools to discuss the need for more greater resource and policy support for progressive teaching approaches that support the development of a more tolerant and inclusive multicultural society. Key words: cultural diversity, schools, teacher education, classroom practice, social inclusion

  2. Toward a More Culturally Responsive General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize culturally responsive teaching; consider how it differs from other pedagogical approaches in music education informed by culture, such as multicultural music education; and offer ideas for making the general music classroom more culturally responsive.

  3. Toward a More Culturally Responsive General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize culturally responsive teaching; consider how it differs from other pedagogical approaches in music education informed by culture, such as multicultural music education; and offer ideas for making the general music classroom more culturally responsive.

  4. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  5. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  6. Should we learn culture in chemistry classroom? Integration ethnochemistry in culturally responsive teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Yuli; Ridwan, Achmad; Nurbaity

    2017-08-01

    The papers report the first year of two-year longitudinal study of ethnochemistry integration in culturally responsive teaching in chemistry classrooms. The teaching approach is focusing on exploring the culture and indigenous knowledge in Indonesia from chemistry perspectives. Ethnochemistry looks at the culture from chemistry perspectives integrated into culturally responsive teaching has developed students' cultural identity and students' engagement in chemistry learning. There are limited research and data in exploring Indonesia culture, which has around 300 ethics, from chemistry perspectives. Students come to the chemistry classrooms from a different background; however, their chemistry learning disconnected with their background which leads to students' disengagement in chemistry learning. Therefore this approach focused on students' engagement within their differences. This research was conducted with year 10 and 11 from four classrooms in two secondary schools through qualitative methodology with observation, interviews, and reflective journals as data collection. The results showed that the integration of ethnochemistry in culturally responsive teaching approach can be implemented by involving 5 principles which are content integration, facilitating knowledge construction, prejudice reduction, social justice, and academic development. The culturally responsive teaching has engaged students in their chemistry learning and developed their cultural identity and soft skills. Students found that the learning experiences has helped to develop their chemistry knowledge and understand the culture from chemistry perspectives. The students developed the ability to work together, responsibility, curiosity, social awareness, creativity, empathy communication, and self-confidence which categorized into collaboration skills, student engagement, social and cultural awareness, and high order thinking skills. The ethnochemistry has helped them to develop the critical self

  7. Culturally Responsive Dance Pedagogy in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dance has an important place in multicultural education and the development of culturally responsive pedagogy. Through dance, children can explore and express their own and others' cultures and share their stories in ways other than the spoken and written word. This paper presents a case study concerning a professional development programme in…

  8. Ethnic and Urban Intersections in the Classroom: Latino Students, Hybrid Identities, and Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Jason G.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing from data collected through classroom observations and in-depth interviews, this article describes and analyzes practices identified as culturally responsive by Latinos students in an urban, multiethnic/racial context. The findings suggest that culturally responsive pedagogy must be more broadly conceptualized to address the cultural…

  9. Implementation and Acceptability of an Adapted Classroom Check-Up Coaching Model to Promote Culturally Responsive Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Elise T.; Larson, Kristine E.; Reinke, Wendy M.; Herman, Keith C.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests that improving teacher use of culturally responsive classroom management strategies may reduce the disproportionate number of racial and ethnic minority students who receive exclusionary discipline actions and are identified as needing special education, particularly for emotional and behavioral disorders. Coaching teachers is…

  10. Validierung einer deutschen Version der “Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale"

    OpenAIRE

    Civitillo, Sauro; Juang, Linda; Schachner, Maja; Börnert, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Die Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale (CRCMSES; Siwatu, Putman, Starker-Glass & Lewis, 2015) stellt ein neues Instrument zur Erfassung der Selbstwirksamkeit hinsichtlich kultursensiblen Classroom Managements von Lehrkräften dar. Die vorliegende Studie hat zum Ziel, die eindimensionale Struktur einer für den deutschsprachigen Raum adaptierten Version des CRCMSES mit Hilfe von explorativen und konfirmatorischen Faktorenanalysen zu bestätigen. Dazu wurde das Instrume...

  11. The Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale: Development and Initial Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga; Putman, S. Michael; Starker-Glass, Tehia V.; Lewis, Chance W.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the development and initial validation of the Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale. Data from 380 preservice and inservice teachers were used to examine the psychometric properties of the instrument. Exploratory factor analysis results suggested a one-factor structure consisting of 35 items and the…

  12. Urban Teachers' Professed Classroom Management Strategies: Reflections of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dave F.

    2004-01-01

    Thirteen urban educators teaching from 1st through 12th grade selected from 7 cities across the United States were interviewed in this qualitative research study to determine if the classroom management strategies they use reflect the research on culturally responsive teaching. Participants revealed using several management strategies that reflect…

  13. Measuring Early Childhood Teacher Candidates' Conceptualizations of a Culturally Responsive Classroom Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Belinda Bustos; Riojas-Cortez, Mari

    2009-01-01

    With the increase of Latino preschoolers, it is pressing that early childhood teachers are prepared to create a high quality environment in which all children can succeed. Using the frameworks of cultural responsiveness and classroom management, we developed the Early Childhood Ecology Scale (ECES) as an observational and reflective tool to…

  14. Validation of a German version of the “Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale”

    OpenAIRE

    Sauro Civitillo; Linda Juang; Maja Schachner; Moritz Börnert

    2016-01-01

    The Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale (CRCMSES; Siwatu, Putman, Starker-Glass, & Lewis, 2015) was developed to assess teacher self-efficacy in using culturally responsive classroom management skills. The present study aims at verifying the dimensional structure of the CRCMSES with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in a sample of 504 pre-service teachers in two German universities. Results indicated that the German version of the CRCMSES replicates well ...

  15. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  16. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  17. Validation of a German version of the “Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauro Civitillo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale (CRCMSES; Siwatu, Putman, Starker-Glass, & Lewis, 2015 was developed to assess teacher self-efficacy in using culturally responsive classroom management skills. The present study aims at verifying the dimensional structure of the CRCMSES with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in a sample of 504 pre-service teachers in two German universities. Results indicated that the German version of the CRCMSES replicates well in this cultural context, with an overall two-factor structure (I, instructional and relational adaptations; II, cooperative learning arrangements showing a better fit compared to a one-factor solution of the original scale. Moreover, the two subscales showed the expected negative correlations with a measure of cultural diversity-related stress. These results support the good psychometric properties of the German version of the CRCMSES.

  18. Response-Based Multimedia and the Culture of the Classroom: A Pilot Study of "Kid's Space" in Four Elementary Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskill, Carla; Swan, Karen

    1998-01-01

    Examines how software designed to complement resource-based approaches to reading and writing ("Kid's Space") fared in four elementary classrooms. Results of the pilot study indicate that given the right conditions, children write creatively in response to visual and auditory stimuli. Effective methods of integrating and valuing online work are…

  19. The nature of culturally responsive pedagogy in two urban African American middle school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondima, Michelle Harris

    This ethnographic in nature study explores how two middle school science teachers who have classes populated by urban African Americans teach their students and how their students perceive their teaching. Since urban African American students continue to perform lower than desired on measures of science achievement, there is an urgent need to understand what pedagogical methodologies assist and hinder urban African American students in achieving higher levels of success in science. A pedagogical methodology that theorists posit assists subordinated school populations is culturally responsive pedagogy. Culturally responsive pedagogy is defined as a teaching methodology concerned with preparing students to question inequality, racism, and injustice. Teachers who use culturally responsive pedagogy respect the culture students bring to the class, and require that the teachers willingly do whatever is necessary to educate students (Nieto, 2000). The teacher participants were two female African Americans who were identified by their school supervisors as being highly effective with urban African American students. The researcher presented the teachers in separate case studies conducted over a data collection period of nine months. Data were collected by participant observation, interviews, and artifact collection. Data were analyzed by application of grounded theory techniques. Findings of the teachers' (and the students') beliefs about pedagogy that both assisted and hindered the students' performance in science were reported in a rich and nuanced storytelling manner based on multiple perspectives (teachers', students', and the researcher's). Pedagogical methodologies that the teachers used that assisted their students were the use of cultural metaphors and images in science and applications of motivational techniques that encouraged a nurturing relationship between the teacher and her students. Pedagogical methodologies that hindered students varied by teacher

  20. CLASSROOM CULTURE OF PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia FĂT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results obtained during an enquiry based on a questionnaire about the classroom culture. This concept it is understood as a micro-society with its own characteristics derived from the dynamic of socialization and training process. This research aims to investigate certain specific aspects of micro-sociology and emphasis on classroom culture. A relatively new concept is reflected by the normative consensus or the integrated system of values that belongs to the teachers, pupils and school, as a social entity. The integrative ensemble of values, class cohesion degree and training strategies are only a few of the aspects described by 62 pupils aged 17-18 years old, from a very prestigious school in Bucharest. The perception of pupils regarding our concept is the effect of the relational practices and training used constantly by the teachers. Those practices reflect the school’s focus mostly on cognitive performance.

  1. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Understanding Disability Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2013-01-01

    To be culturally responsive teachers, we must first have an understanding of other cultures and how students from these cultures differ from one another. As we consider the many cultures represented in our classrooms, we might also consider students with disabilities as a cultural group. Within any main culture are subgroups differentiated by…

  2. Increasing the Writing Performance of Urban Seniors Placed At-Risk through Goal-Setting in a Culturally Responsive and Creativity-Centered Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Brittany; Warren, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to support marginalized students require not only identifying systemic inequities, but providing a classroom infrastructure that supports the academic achievement of all students. This action research study examined the effects of implementing goal-setting strategies and emphasizing creativity in a culturally responsive classroom (CRC) on…

  3. A Cultural Classroom Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Native American and other cultural stories provide students with a broader perspective on the world. In addition, cultural stories connect science content and knowledge about the world to cultural interpretations and people's life ways. By implementing the ideas suggested in this article, you can select books that both enrich your science library…

  4. Classroom Culture Promotes Academic Resiliency

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTullio, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Resiliency is what propels many students to continue moving forward under difficult learning and life conditions. We intuitively think that such resilience is a character quality that cannot be taught. On the contrary, when a teacher sets the right conditions and culture for it in the classroom by teaching collaboration and communication skills,…

  5. Towards the "Informed Use" of Information and Communication Technology in Education: A Response to Adams' "Powerpoint, Habits of Mind, and Classroom Culture"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Michael; Towndrow, Phillip A.

    2007-01-01

    PowerPoint, the widely-used slide-show software package, is finding increasing currency in lecture halls and classrooms as the preferred method of communicating and presenting information. But, as Adams [Adams, C. (2006) "PowerPoint, habits of mind, and classroom culture." "Journal of Curriculum Studies," 38(4), 389-411] attempts to show, users…

  6. Creation of Culturally Responsive Classrooms: Teachers' Conceptualization of a New Rationale for Cultural Responsiveness and Management of Diversity in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Ming-Tak; Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, there are a growing number of ethnic minority students in Hong Kong schools. This article examines teachers' views of the cross-cultural experience of ethnic minority students, their influence on the performance of these students, and how the diverse learning needs of these students are being addressed. Qualitative data were collected…

  7. CULTURE LEARNING IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ⅰ. Introduction Foreign language teachers in China nowadays are well aware that language learning cannot be separated from cultural learning. They start to deal with intercultural communication in the classroom and have undergone significant progress in the past two decades. A lot of excellent work has been done (see Hu Wenzhong 1990, 1997) on raising cultural awareness and pragmatic insights.

  8. Scientific culture, multiculturalism and the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugly-Smolska, Eva

    1996-01-01

    One possible way of encouraging underrepresented groups to participate in science is to ensure that science is seen to be inclusionary. To this end a distinction is made between science (as knowledge) and scientific culture. A description of how one obtains membership in that culture is provided. Including the contributions of many different groups to scientific culture, when teaching the history, philosophy and sociology of science, is one way to emphasize that everyone can do science; something critical in multicultural science classrooms.

  9. Promoting Cultural Responsiveness: Teachers' Constructs of an Assessment Classroom Environment for Ethnic Minority Students in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Ming-tak; Kennedy, Kerry John

    2015-01-01

    Many Hong Kong schools are concerned about how diverse learning needs of ethnic minority students could be better fulfilled. This study examines local teachers' constructs of assessment classroom environments. Using qualitative data collected from semi-structured interviews with 32 teachers from three secondary schools, this study shows ways in…

  10. Integrating Community in Culturally Conscientious Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rebecca M.

    2008-01-01

    Developing a trusting community of learners is vital for critical, inclusive, culturally conscientious social studies teaching. Social studies teachers work to create meaningful relationships among their students and themselves. The classroom community serves as a place where students and teachers learn together; disagree with one another; and…

  11. Essential Characteristics of a Culturally Conscientious Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukpokodu, Omiunota

    2006-01-01

    The increasing ethnic and cultural diversity of American society demands that classroom teachers prepare students for national and global citizenship. Students of the twenty-first century need to cultivate transformative and reflective knowledge, intellectual skills, and democratic attitudes and values needed to successfully navigate diverse…

  12. Defining culturally responsive teaching: The case of mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni L. Harding-DeKam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Elementary classroom teachers in eight school districts across Colorado, United States, share the knowledge of their students’ home and community life, define culturally responsive mathematics based on the children they instruct, and give examples of how students learn math through culture in their classrooms. Findings from two interviews, classroom observations, and student artifacts reveal that teachers have an intimate cultural knowledge of the students in their classrooms, define culturally responsive mathematical practices consistent with research, use culturally responsive mathematics teaching for authentic learning, and express a need for additional professional development and curriculum support for culturally responsive mathematics instruction. Culturally responsive mathematics is important in elementary classrooms because it allows students to make personal connections to mathematics content.

  13. Creation of Ideal Classroom Culture in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    浦惠红; 陆亚芳

    2011-01-01

    The quality of English teaching is related to many factors such as materials, techniques, linguistic elements and external environment. However, in this paper the author points out that the internal and recessive environment of the classroom is an important factor affecting English teaching. The paper begins with a brief introduction, followed by definitions of culture, organizational culture and classroom culture which are closely associated with the internal and recessive environment of the classroom. Then, the author offers their views concerning how to create ideal classroom culture. Finally, a conclusion is given.

  14. Celebrating Difference: Best Practices in Culturally Responsive Teaching Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Xeturah; Hernandez, Cecilia; Parra, Julia; Negash, Beyan

    2017-01-01

    Culturally responsive teaching and design practices flip the online classroom by creating an environment that acknowledges, celebrates, and builds upon the cultural capital that learners and teachers bring to the online classroom. Challenges exist in all phases of online course design, including the ability to create online courses that reflect…

  15. Rigor and Responsiveness in Classroom Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomspon, Jessica; Hagenah, Sara; Kang, Hosun; Stroupe, David; Braaten, Melissa; Colley, Carolyn; Windschitl, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: There are few examples from classrooms or the literature that provide a clear vision of teaching that simultaneously promotes rigorous disciplinary activity and is responsive to all students. Maintaining rigorous and equitable classroom discourse is a worthy goal, yet there is no clear consensus of how this actually works in a…

  16. The Teaching Methods of Cultural Factors in The Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Mengyang

    2014-01-01

    Culture knowledge plays an important role in linguistic proficiency and currently most teaching activities are stil happened inthe traditionalclassroom. So this paper introducedsome ofthe practicalteachingmethods ofChinese culture inthe Chinese language classroom.

  17. Making Culture Happen in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakup, Doganay; Ashirimbetova, Madina; Davis, Brent

    2013-01-01

    The issue of introducing the target culture into language classroom practice has long been an object of debates as well as the opinions of the learners towards it. Eventually, modern practitioners found a way of having the language learners acquainted with the target culture and introducing culture through culture-based textbook activities.…

  18. Culture in the Elementary School Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Carol Ann

    1991-01-01

    Explores ways in which elementary school foreign language programs can fully integrate cultural insights, skills, and understanding through an examination of instructional models and developmental factors in the teaching of culture, goal setting for teaching culture, and culture and curriculum in the foreign language classroom and in other areas.…

  19. Question Driven Instruction with Classroom Response Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, William; Beatty, Ian

    2007-10-01

    Essentially, a classroom response system is technology that: 1) allows an instructor to present a question or problem to the class; 2) allows students to enter their answers into some kind of device; and 3) instantly aggregates and summarizes students' answers for the instructor, usually as a histogram. Most response systems provide additional functionality. Some additional names for this class of system (or for subsets of the class) are classroom communication system (CCS), audience response system (ARS), voting machine system, audience feedback system, and--most ambitiously--CATAALYST system (for ``Classroom Aggregation Technology for Activating and Assessing Learning and Your Students' Thinking''). UMPERG has been teaching with and researching classroom response systems since 1993. We find that the technology has the potential to transform the way we teach science in large lecture settings. CRSs can serve as catalysts for creating a more interactive, student-centered classroom in the lecture hall, thereby allowing students to become more actively involved in constructing and using knowledge. CRSs not only make it easier to engage students in learning activities during lecture but also enhance the communication among students, and between the students and the instructor. This enhanced communication assists the students and the instructor in assessing understanding during class time, and affords the instructor the opportunity to devise instructional interventions that target students' needs as they arise.

  20. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  1. Becoming Culturally Responsive: A Framework for Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagle, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for the development of culturally responsive practices in beginning teachers to meet the needs of diverse students in multicultural classrooms. The framework describes the trajectory beginning teachers undergo toward becoming culturally responsive and discusses how teacher educators in liberal arts colleges can…

  2. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  3. Culturally Responsive Physics Teaching: Content or Conveyance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Taquan Seth

    2011-12-01

    This study, in response to the achievement gap in science and the lack of significant numbers of ethnic minorities in science fields, examined the effects of a Cultural Responsiveness Workshop and intervention on teacher practice, teacher discourse, and student perceptions and connectedness to physics. The sample was comprised of three high school physics teachers---2 teaching five 12th grade sections and one teaching five 9th grade sections of physics---in two separate urban schools in the same section of South Los Angeles. My research design was qualitative and examined eight culturally responsive indicators that, when applied, may increase student engagement and level of connectedness in urban high school physics classrooms: (1) proximity to students, (2) the ways in which they encouraged students, (3) positive reinforcement techniques, (4) modifications for individual learning types, (5) use of children's strengths, (6) scaffolding, (7) displaying an understanding of diverse cultures, and (8) displaying a personal regard for students of diverse cultures. When the study was completed and data was collected, I identified trends in the change in teacher discourse, behaviors, instructional practice, and perceptions of student engagement. My findings, discovered through classroom observations and focus groups, indicated a positive shift in each. Accompanying these shifts were positive shifts in level of student engagement and level of connectedness. There were also the unexpected findings of the need for teachers to receive feedback in a safe collaborative space and the use of culturally responsive teaching as a tool for behavioral management. My study found that there is a definite relationship between the use of the culturally responsive indicators observed, student engagement and student level of connectedness to physics when implemented in urban high school science classrooms.

  4. Teaching as a cultural practice: managing diverse classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María RODRÍGUEZ IZQUIERDO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a cultural process. Actions that take place in this process are influenced by some cultural assumptions which shape pre-defined objectives and affect content, educational treatment, assessments, and relationships among participants. It is, therefore, of utmost importance not only to make explicit the cultural reality of education, but also to think critically about it. In this paper, we focus on the issue of teaching and learning in the context of cultural diversity from a socio-cultural and socio-political theoretical framework. The keywords «classroom management» it generates over 6.5 million hits in google.com. However, when we type «managing diverse classrooms», there are only 200,000 hits. This divergence indicates that classroom management is a widely explored topic, while work about how to manage a cultural diverse classroom is still limited. The aim of this paper is to provide a framework for teachers to use and improve their cultural knowledge to manage classrooms more effectively. This article argues that growth in cultural awareness of the teaching process improves the quality of teaching and, therefore, students’ learning.

  5. Analysing students’ response times with classroom response systems

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Classroom response systems (‘clickers’ etc.) are well documented as having potential for developing knowledge and engagement in the classroom, so much so that they are ubiquitous, almost passé. The wealth of data gathered from such systems is beginning to be analysed and recent work in the peer instruction community (e.g. Miller et. al, 2014) suggests that in some contexts students answering correctly tend to have the shortest (quickest) response times. Recent work at Kingston University ...

  6. Crossing the Chasm with Classroom Response Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Marcy H.

    2010-01-01

    Research and literature on the adoption of technology provides a useful lens through which to view the adoption and implementation of classroom response systems (CRS). The technology adoption life cycle describes groups of adopters in ways that are helpful in understanding the adoption and sustained implementation of CRS in chemistry departments.…

  7. Modes and Models for Transcending Cultural Differences in International Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hook, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Educators of international students are frequently challenged to cope with a clashing diversity of cultures in a classroom setting. This study examined what sorts of themes and images might resonate across nationalities and cultures, which could then be used as transcultural tools for international educators. The study employed mixed qualitative…

  8. Culture Clash: Interactions between Afrocultural and Mainstream Cultural Styles in Classrooms Serving African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouland, Karmen; Matthews, Jamaal S.; Byrd, Christy M.; Meyer, Rika M. L.; Rowley, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relation between classroom cultural and achievement-related characteristics and their influence on social outcomes in a sample of 74 fifth grade African American youth (41 girls; 33 boys) ages 10-13 years. Trained observers rated classrooms according to Boykin's (Boykin, Tyler, & Miller, 2005) definition of mainstream…

  9. Culture Kits for the Elementary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M. Gail

    1997-01-01

    Outlines an instructional unit where students construct culture kits illustrating a specific culture. Culture kits are constructed out of realia and other material including maps, travel brochures, photographs, newspapers, souvenirs, and other items. Discusses collecting these items and possible multicultural applications. (MJP)

  10. English Classroom Culture Reformation: How Can It be Done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Amin Lestari

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available People say that the teaching of English in Indonesia is unsuccessful. Senor High School graduates, after having been studying English for six years, are unable to use the language in daily communication. One of the causes of the failure, in my opinion, is our classroom ‘culture' that is not conducive to the learning process. In the classroom students are supposed to sit nicely, listen to the teacher attentively and are obedient to him. The teacher is the only one who is supposed to know everything and therefore becomes the one who dominates the classroom. If this culture, especially during the English class, is not reformed, I think, whatever efforts under

  11. Authentic Materials and Cultural Content in EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçkaya, Ferit

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to answer the questions of when and how authentic materials should be used in EFL classrooms, and how cultural content may be included in the curriculum. To address these questions, the paper is organized in two parts. In the first part, the definition of authentic materials is given. Then advantages and disadvantages of the use of…

  12. Negotiating Language, Culture and Pupil Agency in Complementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytra, Vally

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the teaching of language and culture and in particular the use of songs as curriculum in two London Turkish complementary schools. Drawing on a series of interconnected classroom vignettes, I look at how children weave together their semiotic resources to negotiate and transform two songs and the talk and action around…

  13. "Knowing Your Students" in the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Robyn; Saltmarsh, David

    2016-01-01

    The population movement of globalization brings greater cultural and linguistic diversity (CALD) to communities and education systems. To address the growing diversity in school classrooms, beginning teachers need an expanded set of skills and attitudes to support effective learning. It is an expectation today that teachers know their students and…

  14. Evaluation of Bacterial & Fungal Culture Practices in School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, J. Scott

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of activities may be undertaken in elementary and secondary school science laboratories as part of regular curricular activities or optional classroom activities, including science fair projects. Among these is the culturing of microorganisms such as bacteria or fungi. There are various potential educational opportunities associated…

  15. Cultural Norms Affect Oral Communication in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ellen

    1997-01-01

    Students from different cultures follow differing norms for communication, affecting the classroom and students' grades. Such patterns are found in class discussions, question-and-answer sessions, small-group interactions (issues include cooperation, structure, competition, and gender), and formal class presentations. While no single teaching…

  16. High or low context culture in the EFL classroom?

    OpenAIRE

    Melih KARAKUZU; Pelin İRGİN

    2016-01-01

    Intercultural communicative competence (ICC) and high-low context culture situations are important for both EFL/ESL teachers and their students. In the EFL context, tertiary level students in Turkey are taught by both native and non-native English speakers, which might be challenging for foreign language students as it causes potential communication breakdowns in the classroom. By regarding cultural values, there is a need to examine how EFL tertiary level students successfully negotiate thes...

  17. Cultural Memory in the Classroom Public Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    How does the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) help teachers and students foster cultural memory? In this article, the author underscores three areas of NCTE that have facilitated the integration of his experiences and cultural background into his teaching mission. First, NCTE has published groundbreaking research in this area: most…

  18. Cultural competence knowledge and confidence after classroom activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Jagannath Mohan; Holiday-Goodman, Monica; Black, Curtis; Powers, Mary

    2010-10-11

    To determine change in cultural competency knowledge and perceived confidence of second-year pharmacy students to deliver culturally competent care after completing a required cultural competency curriculum. Cultural competence material was covered in the second-year PharmD curriculum through lectures, laboratories, and an experiential/out-of-class assignment. Eighty-five second-year (P2) pharmacy students completed a survey which assessed influence of classroom activities related to cultural competence. Mean values for knowledge and perceived confidence were significantly higher for posttest compared to pretest (p activities. Focus groups were used to solicit students' opinions on instructional effectiveness, relevance of activities, and areas for enhancement. The cultural competency curriculum increased pharmacy students' awareness of and confidence in addressing cultural diversity issues that affect pharmaceutical care delivery.

  19. Engaging students through the use of classroom response systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moredich, Cheryl; Moore, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Nursing faculty strive to stimulate learning and actively engage students in the classroom. Developing new approaches to student engagement in large classrooms can be a challenging task. The use of a classroom response system encourages students to actively participate while learning essential nursing knowledge in a way that adheres to principles of adult learning.

  20. My Name Is Not Michael: Strategies for Promoting Cultural Responsiveness in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Lisa L.; Hurt, Kara; Lindo, Natalya

    2014-01-01

    With the changing cultural demographics in U.S. classrooms, school counselors must develop innovative approaches to promote culturally responsive school climates and organizational change. A vision is offered of systemic cultural responsiveness and culturally relevant teaching practices that nurture and engage all learners. The role of the school…

  1. Doing Culture, Doing Race: Everyday Discourses of "Culture" and "Cultural Difference" in the English as a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ena

    2015-01-01

    While current conceptualisations of the inextricable connection between language and culture in English language education are largely informed by complex sociocultural theories that view culture as constructed in and through social practices among people, classroom practices continue to be influenced by mainstream discourses of culture that…

  2. Doing Culture, Doing Race: Everyday Discourses of "Culture" and "Cultural Difference" in the English as a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ena

    2015-01-01

    While current conceptualisations of the inextricable connection between language and culture in English language education are largely informed by complex sociocultural theories that view culture as constructed in and through social practices among people, classroom practices continue to be influenced by mainstream discourses of culture that…

  3. High or low context culture in the EFL classroom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melih KARAKUZU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intercultural communicative competence (ICC and high-low context culture situations are important for both EFL/ESL teachers and their students. In the EFL context, tertiary level students in Turkey are taught by both native and non-native English speakers, which might be challenging for foreign language students as it causes potential communication breakdowns in the classroom. By regarding cultural values, there is a need to examine how EFL tertiary level students successfully negotiate these cultural differences and how both native and non-native English-speaking teachers might respond to them in classroom situations. This study aimed to investigate what culture group the EFL tertiary level students belong to and to explore to what extent high- and low-context culture situations affect the EFL tertiary level students’ communication in the classroom. The participants of the study included 50 EFL tertiary level students, and 15 native and non-native English instructors at a state university in Turkey. The data were collected using the “High or Low Context Culture Questionnaire” (Hall, 1976, and semi structured interviews. A coding and classifying approach (Gay, Mills, & Airasian, 2012 was used for the data analysis. Three categories of cultural conflicts; misperception, misinterpretation, and misevaluation in communication were identified. The result of the current research is important for EFL tertiary level students, TESOL and ESOL teachers. Building ICC helps EFL/ESL students perceive information across cultures, develop strategies in communication and overcome challenging situations in various contexts. Future research in other EFL/ESL contexts would help to expand the findings of the current study.

  4. Designing for culturally responsive science education through professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-02-01

    Educational stakeholders across the globe are demanding science education reform that attends simultaneously to culturally diverse students' needs and promotes academic excellence. Although professional development programs can foster science teachers' growth as culturally responsive educators, effective supports to this end are not well identified. This study examined associations between specific Science Teachers are Responsive to Students (STARTS) program activities and United States high school life science teachers' understanding and enactment of culturally responsive science teaching. Findings suggest: (a) critically examining their practices while learning of students' needs and experiences enabled teachers to identify responsive instructional strategies and relevant science topics for culturally responsive teaching; (b) evaluating culturally responsive exemplars while identifying classroom-based needs allowed teachers to identify contextually appropriate instruction, thereby yielding a robust understanding of the purpose and feasibility of culturally responsive science teaching; and (c) by justifying the use of responsive and reform-based instructional strategies for their classrooms, teachers made purposeful connections between students' experiences and science instruction. We propose a set of empirically based design conjectures and theoretical conjectures to generate adaptable knowledge about preparing culturally responsive science teachers through professional development.

  5. Student Culture and Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Tilia

    2012-01-01

    Constructivism maintains that instruction is more meaningful when it is relevant, social and interactive. Formative assessment has been empirically demonstrated as being an effective form of instruction and assessment for learners (Black & Wiliam, 1998a, 1998b). Since assessment orients instruction and learning, combining student culture with…

  6. Exploring Cultural Heritage in a Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lynn E.

    2009-01-01

    Preschool and kindergarten classes in the United States are entering a time of unprecedented diversity and demographic transformation. Teachers must plan and implement a curriculum that reflects, supports, and values the varieties of cultural backgrounds, religious affiliations, socioeconomic classes, and language groups that children represent.…

  7. The Utility of Empathy for White Female Teachers' Culturally Responsive Interactions with Black Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Chezare A.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers aiming to become culturally responsive must be concerned with negotiating professional interactions that produce favorable outcomes for the culturally diverse students under their charge. Very few studies offer empirical evidence of empathy's utility in the culturally responsive classroom, especially when the teacher is culturally…

  8. ERIC/RCS: Reader Response in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Hilary Taylor

    1987-01-01

    Explores briefly the New Criticism that dominated literature instruction until recently and then provides an overview of reader response theory and how response approaches can be used in the classroom to enhance reading. (NKA)

  9. The C[superscript 3] Framework: Evaluating Classroom Response System Interactions in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fies, Carmen; Marshall, Jill

    2008-01-01

    The larger the classroom, the more likely is it that communications consist of a one-way flow from the instructor to students. Classroom Response Systems (CRSs) are frequently hailed as technologies capable of improving communications by opening the space for dialogic engagement; yet, a causal relationship is not documented in the literature. The…

  10. Enhancing the learning environment using classroom response systems

    OpenAIRE

    McLoughlin, Eilish

    2008-01-01

    Classroom response systems (CRS) offer a management tool for engaging students in the classroom. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of CRS questions are discussed, as well as the advantages to both students and instructors as a result of using them. These systems are especially valuable as a means of introducing and monitoring peer learning methods in the large lecture classroom. But the efficacy of using these systems depends ...

  11. Othering: Towards a Critical Cultural Awareness in the Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthephanny Moncada Linares

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the need of decentering language learners’ conceptions and practices of “othering” against the target culture, it has become necessary to help them grow in critical cultural understanding and positive appreciation towards the richness of difference and plurality, as a transversal dimension of their intercultural competence. Thus, this paper seeks to summarize the literature on the notion of othering and its pedagogical possibilities to promote critical cultural awareness raising in the language classroom. It initially presents some theoretical contributions on the concepts of the “Other” and the “Self” and its dialectical relation, and later, it proposes four pedagogical tools that could enable learners to achieve the already mentioned objective.

  12. A Comparison of Gains in Keypad Response Technology Classroom with Other Pedagogies in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbatogun, Alaba Olaoluwakotansibe

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from the socio-cultural theory of Vygotsky, this study compared the academic performance gains scores of pupils in a Keypad Response Technology (KRT) class with those in two other pedagogies to determine the learners' language proficiency level in ESL classroom. A sample of 99 Nigerian primary six pupils participated in the study.…

  13. Secondary English Learners: Strengthening Their Literacy Skills through Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    In high school English classrooms where English language learners may be at risk of academic failure, Culturally Responsive Teaching can help educators build an inclusive community in which all students can improve their literacy skills.

  14. Secondary English Learners: Strengthening Their Literacy Skills through Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    In high school English classrooms where English language learners may be at risk of academic failure, Culturally Responsive Teaching can help educators build an inclusive community in which all students can improve their literacy skills.

  15. Culture and the Language Classroom. Challenging Expectations of Cultural Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Culture is generally considered to be a necessary part of language teaching. The term embraces not only the way we present background information about native speakers of the foreign language, but also the methodology we employ and our concept of who is best qualified to teach the language. lt also has pragmatic implications for the functions and behavior we emphasize when we teach. lt is part of a whole ideology of language teaching. As long as we consider languages to be associated with the...

  16. Classroom Response Systems Facilitate Student Accountability, Readiness, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara J.; Crandall, Jason; Vogler, Jane S.; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    In three experiments using crossover designs, we investigated the effects of Classroom Response Systems (CRS) when presenting multiple-choice questions in real classrooms. In Experiment 1, students either used CRS for bonus points or simply saw the questions. There were no differences on a unit exam. In Experiment 2, students were told prior to a…

  17. Classroom Pivotal Response Teaching for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Reed, Sarah; Schreibman, Laura; Bolduc, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    This practical manual and accompanying DVD-ROM present a research-supported behavioral intervention for children with autism that teachers can easily integrate into their existing classroom curriculum. Classroom Pivotal Response Teaching (CPRT) enhances children's motivation and participation in learning; increases the number of learning…

  18. Photographs and Classroom Response Systems in Middle School Astronomy Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Feldman, Allan

    2015-01-01

    In spite of being readily available, photographs have played a minor and passive role in science classes. In our study, we present an active way of using photographs in classroom discussions with the use of a classroom response system (CRS) in middle school astronomy classes to teach the concepts of day-night and seasonal change. In this new…

  19. Innovative Use of a Classroom Response System during Physics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgren, Jay

    2011-01-01

    More and more physics instructors are making use of personal/classroom response systems or "clickers." The use of clickers to engage students with multiple-choice questions during lecture and available instructor resources for clickers have been well documented in this journal. Newer-generation clickers, which I refer to as classroom response…

  20. On techniques to integrate cultural learning within English language teaching classrooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹邱

    2015-01-01

    Culture is inseparable from language teaching and learning. Learning the target culture may arouse students’cultural awareness and avoid cultural misunderstanding in cross-cultural communications. It is important to integrate cultural learning within English language classrooms. This essay discusses the techniques of achieving this integration.

  1. Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by…

  2. Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by…

  3. A cultural historical theoretical perspective of discourse and design in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan

    2015-06-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser have initiated an important conversation in science education as they use sociocultural theory to introduce design based scenarios into the science classroom. This response seeks to expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article The discourse of design- based science classroom activities by using a specific perspective within a sociocultural framework. Through using a cultural historical (Vygotsky in The history and development of higher mental functions, Plenum Press, New York, 1987) reading of design based activity and discourse in the science classroom, it is proposed that learning should be an integral part of these processes. Therefore, everyday and scientific concepts are explained and expanded in relation to Inventing Graphing and discourse presented in Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article. This response reports on the importance of teacher's being explicit in relation to connecting everyday and scientific concepts alongside design based activity and related science concepts when teaching students. It is argued that explicit teaching of concepts should be instigated prior to analysis of discourse in the science classroom as it is only with experience and understanding these processes that students have the resources to call upon to argue like practicing scientists.

  4. Building classroom and organizational structure around positive cultural values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Badr F.; Corbo, Joel C.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Little, Angela; Zaniewski, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    The Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students-especially those from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. Compass fosters a diverse, collaborative student community by providing a wide range of services, including a summer program and fall/spring seminar courses. We describe Compass's cultural values, discuss how community members are introduced to and help shape those values, and demonstrate how a single set of values informs the structure of both our classroom and organization. We emphasize that all members of the Compass community participate in, and benefit from, our cultural values, regardless of status as student, teacher, or otherwise.

  5. Building Classroom and Organizational Structure Around Positive Cultural Values

    CERN Document Server

    Albanna, Badr F; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R; Little, Angela; Zaniewski, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    The Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students-especially those from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. Compass fosters a diverse, collaborative student community by providing a wide range of services, including a summer program and fall/spring seminar courses. We describe Compass's cultural values, discuss how community members are introduced to and help shape those values, and demonstrate how a single set of values informs the structure of both our classroom and organization.We emphasize that all members of the Compass community participate in, and benefit from, our cultural values, regardless of status as student, teacher, or otherwise.

  6. Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Ian D.; Gerace, William J.; Leonard, William J.; Dufresne, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom response systems can be powerful tools for teaching physics. Their efficacy depends strongly on the quality of the questions. Creating effective questions is difficult and differs from creating exam and homework problems. Each classroom response system question should have an explicit pedagogic purpose consisting of a content goal, a process goal, and a metacognitive goal. Questions can be designed to fulfill their purpose through four complementary mechanisms: directing students' attention, stimulating specific cognitive processes, communicating information to the instructor and students via classroom response system-tabulated answer counts, and facilitating the articulation and confrontation of ideas. We identify several tactics that are useful for designing potent questions and present four "makeovers" to show how these tactics can be used to convert traditional physics questions into more powerful questions for a classroom response system.

  7. Culture Orientation and Sociometry of the Classroom: A Possible Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Juanita Ross; Hajnal, Vivian

    Findings of a study that examined the relationship between classroom orientation and sociometric patterns within the classroom are presented in this paper. Methodology involved observation of 12 classrooms in Ontario and administration of two survey instruments to 20 fourth-year students. Classroom orientations were categorized as cooperative,…

  8. Effects of Teaching Literature on Culture Learning in the Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittra Muthusamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The role of literature in enhancing readers cultural understanding in the language classroom was explored. It was a part of an extensive research which focused mainly on language learning and creativity. It is argued that the interface of language, literature and culture are at the forefront of present-day language and literature learning and this facilitates inter-racial, intra-racial and global understanding. Approach: As method, a quasi-experimental study was conducted on two intact groups; the control (n = 30 and experimental (n = 30 groups. Both groups underwent an eight week experiment whereby one short story, The Burden of Sin by S. Karthigesu was taught to both groups. The control group was taught using the routine and traditional reading and comprehension teaching approach while the experimental group was taught using the reader response approach adapting Ibsens the I Model text exploration and literary devices. Results: Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted on the data collected using two non-parametric tests: The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test to determine the significant difference between the experimental groups pretest and posttest scores and the Mann-Whitney U test to determine the significant difference between the scores of the experimental and control groups. Conclusion: The results proved to be substantially significant. The findings revealed that cultural understanding can be taught through literature in a language classroom and it is a valuable instructional medium in the learning of culture.

  9. Global Nomads and the Search for Cultural Identity: Tips from the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Issa, Ahmad

    2004-01-01

    Understanding one's cultural system leads to greater skills in appreciating other cultures. When students and teachers from diverse cultural backgrounds come together, they bring diversity that can either improve or break down the process of learning and teaching. If handled properly, cultural diversity can enrich the classroom; if ignored,…

  10. Design and implementation of a low-cost classroom response system for a future classroom in the developing world

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Economic considerations and lack of adequate infrastructure impose unique design constraints on future classrooms of the developing world. Thus, future classrooms in underprivileged nations may differ significantly from their counterparts in the developed world. Classroom response systems (CRS) are an emerging technology for the future classroom. CRS are wireless, hand-held devices that help students provide immediate feedback to questions posed by a teacher. In their present form, due to the...

  11. Photographs and Classroom Response Systems in Middle School Astronomy Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Feldman, Allan

    2015-08-01

    In spite of being readily available, photographs have played a minor and passive role in science classes. In our study, we present an active way of using photographs in classroom discussions with the use of a classroom response system (CRS) in middle school astronomy classes to teach the concepts of day-night and seasonal change. In this new pedagogical method, students observe objects or phenomena in photographs and use the information to develop understanding of the scientific concepts. They share their ideas in classroom discussion with the assistance of the CRS. Pre- and posttest results showed that the new pedagogy helped students overcome primitive conceptions and enhanced their understanding of the concepts. The observation of the rich details of photographs played three pedagogical roles in classroom discussion: easing students' anxiety about learning a new scientific concept; continuous stimulus of learning; and as evidence or data.

  12. The Classroom as an Intersection of Individuals, Classroom Groups and Cultural Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    岸野, 麻衣; KISHINO, MATSUSHIMA Mai; キシノ, マイ

    2005-01-01

    Japanese elementary schools have class-based teacher assignments. Teachers must not only teach many subjects but also make the classroom a comfortable place to be. This paper reviews two approaches to examine classrooms where many complex phenomena occur. One approach examines phenomena in the classroom from a single perspective, such as the teacher's behavior. The other approach examines phenomena in the classroom from multiple perspectives. I review the former using units of individuals, cl...

  13. Literature and Lives: A Response-Based, Cultural Studies Approach to Teaching English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey-Webb, Allen

    Telling stories from secondary and college English classrooms, this book explores the new possibilities for teaching and learning generated by bringing together reader-response and cultural-studies approaches. The book connects William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, and other canonical figures to multicultural writers, popular culture,…

  14. Infusing Culturally Responsive Instruction to Improve Mathematics Performance of Latino Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumate, Lorraine; Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2012-01-01

    Culturally responsive instruction has the advantage of helping diverse students make academic gains. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of culturally infused mathematics lessons on the academic achievement of five middle school Latino students with specific learning disabilities in a resource classroom. We used an ABACACA…

  15. Culturally Responsive Teaching: The Harlem Renaissance in an Urban English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, Andrea J.

    2007-01-01

    Andrea J. Stairs advocates culturally responsive teaching, a practice that explicitly highlights "issues of race, ethnicity, and culture as central to teaching, learning, and schooling," and emphasizes the necessity of interrogating the themes of race, power, and privilege in the urban classroom. Stairs observes two student teachers as they…

  16. Challenges in Teaching Culture along with Language in the Foreign Lan-guage (FL) Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-qi

    2014-01-01

    Teaching culture along with language in the foreign language classroom is not an easy job. The definition of culture varies from different context, and non-native speakers do not share the same background with native speakers, thus it brings many difficulties to those who want to learn or teach culture along with a foreign language. Challenges in teaching culture along with English will be discussed as an exemplar in this essay. Meanwhile, suggestion on how to teach culture in the English class-room will be proposed at the end of this work.

  17. Incidental Displays of Cultural Knowledge in the Nonnative-English-Speaking Teacher's Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaraton, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Examines incidental cultural knowledge displays by two nonnative-English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) in their intensive English program classrooms. Focuses on the nature of the discourse produced in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) classes taught by NNESTs. Analysis of videotaped classroom data indicates that a wide and unpredictable range of…

  18. From Linguistic Analysis to Cultural Awareness: A Translation Framework for the Spanish Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Barbara N.; Rivera-Mills, Susana V.

    1999-01-01

    Proposes a translation framework to be used in the Spanish foreign-language classroom as a supplementary teaching technique. The use of translation techniques in the classroom can bridge the gap between language and culture by helping students develop metalinguistic skills that bring them to a higher level of awareness about the target language…

  19. Learning How to "Swallow the World": Engaging with Human Difference in Culturally Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oord, Lodewijk; Corn, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The perception of culture prevailing in the literature on international and intercultural education is often too limited to be effectively utilized by educators who wish to embrace the diversity in their classrooms. Only by reimagining the notions of "culture" and "cultural diversity" and by liberating them from the rigidities of dominant…

  20. A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihui

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of…

  1. Learning How to "Swallow the World": Engaging with Human Difference in Culturally Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oord, Lodewijk; Corn, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The perception of culture prevailing in the literature on international and intercultural education is often too limited to be effectively utilized by educators who wish to embrace the diversity in their classrooms. Only by reimagining the notions of "culture" and "cultural diversity" and by liberating them from the rigidities of dominant…

  2. Folklore, Literature, Ethnography, and Second-Language Acquisition: Teaching Culture in the ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholson, Rachel; Stumpf, Chris-Anne

    2005-01-01

    Recognizing that to learn about culture will aid the new Canadian in attaining cultural awareness, this article argues that it is imperative to develop strategies for teaching about culture. Using folklore as a critical methodology in the ESL classroom is such a strategy. Because folklore is an intrinsic part of everyday life, its use promotes and…

  3. The C3 Framework: Evaluating Classroom Response System Interactions in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fies, Carmen; Marshall, Jill

    2008-10-01

    The larger the classroom, the more likely is it that communications consist of a one-way flow from the instructor to students. Classroom Response Systems (CRSs) are frequently hailed as technologies capable of improving communications by opening the space for dialogic engagement; yet, a causal relationship is not documented in the literature. The data reported on here stem from a mixed methodology study and provide insights into motivations for CRS use and enacted CRS use across disciplines, as well as student and instructor perceptions of the tool's effects on teaching and learning. From these data emerged a framework of interaction (the C3 Framework) that situates CRS use from both the instructors' and learners' perspectives. The framework consists of an interdependent relationship between Concerns, Centeredness, and Control of discourse. Although this study took place in university classrooms, the C3 Framework presented here applies across educational settings.

  4. News Media as a Source of German Culture in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, John

    This article comments on the use of radio, television, films, newspaper, and other printed materials to supplement existing programs and textbooks. Specific references to television networks and newspapers illustrate the type of cultural material suggested for classroom use. (RL)

  5. Conceptual Question Response Times in Peer Instruction Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to…

  6. Beyond Clickers, Next Generation Classroom Response Systems for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Web-based classroom response systems offer a variety of benefits versus traditional clicker technology. They are simple to use for students and faculty and offer various question types suitable for a broad spectrum of chemistry classes. They facilitate active learning pedagogies like peer instruction and successfully engage students in the…

  7. Response Switching and Self-Efficacy in Peer Instruction Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Schell, Julie; Ho, Andrew; Lukoff, Brian; Mazur, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Peer Instruction, a well-known student-centered teaching method, engages students during class through structured, frequent questioning and is often facilitated by classroom response systems. The central feature of any Peer Instruction class is a conceptual question designed to help resolve student misconceptions about subject matter. We provide…

  8. Classroom Response Systems: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fies, Carmen; Marshall, Jill

    2006-01-01

    As the frequency with which Classroom Response Systems (CRSs) are used is increasing, it becomes more and more important to define the affordances and limitations of these tools. Currently existing literature is largely either anecdotal or focuses on comparing CRS and non-CRS environments that are unequal in other aspects as well. In addition, the…

  9. Responsive Classroom?: A Critique of a Social Emotional Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Clio

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks critically at the Responsive Classroom (RC) program, a social/emotional learning program used ubiquitously in elementary schools for teacher and student training, in the US as well as in Australia, the UK, and other parts of Western Europe. The paper examines empirical studies on RC's efficacy and outcomes, many of which were…

  10. How Much Culture Is Enough? Inuit Teachers' Perceptions on the State of Inuit Culture in Nunavik Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Blair

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights findings of a survey conducted with the Kativik School Board, Canada, to gain insight into the perceptions of Inuit teachers concerning how Inuit culture is taught in the classroom. While findings indicate that teachers are integrating Inuit culture to varying degrees, roughly half of respondents suggest that not enough Inuit…

  11. How Much Culture Is Enough? Inuit Teachers' Perceptions on the State of Inuit Culture in Nunavik Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Blair

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights findings of a survey conducted with the Kativik School Board, Canada, to gain insight into the perceptions of Inuit teachers concerning how Inuit culture is taught in the classroom. While findings indicate that teachers are integrating Inuit culture to varying degrees, roughly half of respondents suggest that not enough Inuit…

  12. Effectiveness of classroom response systems within an active learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Susan

    2013-11-01

    In nursing education, the inclusion of pedagogical tools is necessary to transform Millennial classrooms. One such pedagogical tool currently offered is classroom response systems (CRS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CRS as a pedagogical tool in improving nursing students' examination performance within an active learning environment. A pretest-posttest design was used to determine whether there was a relationship between the use of CRS (independent variable) and nursing students' examination performance in a first-year Professional Practice course (dependent variable). Paired t tests revealed no greater improvement in posttest scores. Therefore, the use of CRS technology was not effective in increasing nursing students' examination scores in the Professional Practice course. Additional research is needed to provide adequate understanding of the effectiveness of CRS within the nursing education classroom.

  13. Reader Response Theory and Classroom Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Harold K., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Presents annotations of nine journal articles, monographs, and "learning packages" (published between 1989 and 1993) that examine teaching approaches founded upon the insights of reader response theory. (RS)

  14. Cultural competence knowledge and confidence after classroom activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muzumdar, Jagannath Mohan; Holiday-Goodman, Monica; Black, Curtis; Powers, Mary

    2010-01-01

    To determine change in cultural competency knowledge and perceived confidence of second-year pharmacy students to deliver culturally competent care after completing a required cultural competency curriculum...

  15. Enhancing Oceanography Classrooms with "Captive and Cultured" Ocean Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, S. A.; Tuite, M.; O'Connell, M.

    2012-04-01

    Students in oceanography classes often request more direct exposure to actual ocean situations or field trips. During regular session (13 week) or shorter term (4 week) summer classes such long trips are logistically difficult owing to large numbers of students involved or timing. This new approach to such a course supplement addresses the requests by utilizing local resources and short field trips for a limited number of students (20) to locations in which Ocean experiences are available, and are often supported through education and outreach components. The vision of the class was a mixture of classroom time, readings, along with paper and actual laboratories. In addition short day-long trips to locations where the ocean was "captured" were also used to supplement the experience as well as speakers involved with aquaculture ("cultivated") . Central Virginia is a fortunate location for such a class, with close access for "day travel" to the Chesapeake Bay and numerous field stations, museums with ocean-based exhibits (the Smithsonian and National Zoo) that address both extant and extinct Earth history, as well as national/state aquaria in Baltimore, Washington and Virginia Beach. Furthermore, visits to local seafood markets at local grocery stores, or larger city markets) enhance the exposure to productivity in the ocean, and viability of the fisheries sustainability. The course could then address not only the particulars of the marine science, but also aspects of ethics, including keeping animals in captivity or overfishing of particular species and the special difficulties that arise from captive or culturing ocean populations. In addition, the class was encouraged to post web-based journals of experiences in order to share opinions of observations in each of the settings.

  16. Culturally Responsive Teaching for 21st-Century Art Education: Examining Race in a Studio Art Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, NaJuana

    2012-01-01

    In the art classroom--where art, identity, and culture are inextricably linked--racially and culturally responsive teaching play a critical role in how teachers interact with students and ultimately how students themselves come to understand cultural diversity, social inclusion, and antiracist behaviors. It is important that teachers understand…

  17. Raising Cultural Awareness in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jerrold

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers can incorporate cultural knowledge into English language classes, exploring elements of culture, intercultural phenomena, and high-context and low-context cultures. Activities offered by the author to raise cultural awareness include web quests, role plays, cultural observations, and culture journals.

  18. Formative Assessment as a Vehicle for Changing Classroom Practice in a Specific Cultural Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, I interpret Xinying Yin and Gayle Ann Buck's collaborative action research from a social-cultural perspective. Classroom implementation of formative assessment is viewed as interaction between this assessment method and the local learning culture. I first identify Yin and Buck's definition of the formative assessment, and then…

  19. Music and Cultural Analysis in the Classroom: Introducing Sociology through Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlkvist, Jarl A.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates that popular music's potential as a tool for teaching interactive introductory sociology courses is enhanced when a cultural analysis of a specific music genre is incorporated into the classroom. Presents a two-part model for integrating a cultural analysis of heavy metal music and its subculture into the introductory course. Includes…

  20. Literary Theory as Socio-Historical Convention and Cultural Transfer in the Classroom: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes-Brown, Malcolm; Innes-Brown, Angela

    1992-01-01

    Examines the implications of literary theory in light of social patterns defining the parameters of culture in the classroom. Considers literature a means of giving expression to the social forces at work in schools, providing a frame of reference for the transfer of culture. (DMM)

  1. Researching Contradictions: Cultural Historical Activity Theory Research (CHAT) in the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) is an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework for researchers in English interested in the social contexts of culture and its relationship with the formation of mind and activity in the English classroom. Two key concepts in Vygotsky's thought central to understanding…

  2. Do-It-Yourself World Music Curriculum: Collecting Children's Musical Culture for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Your integration of children's musical culture into the general music curriculum does not need to end with the song collections on your bookshelf. Consider expanding on the materials available by reaching out to friends, students, colleagues, and elders and collecting children's musical culture for yourself and your classroom.

  3. Building Bridges: A Peace Corps Classroom Guide to Cross-Cultural Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronhime, Raquel; Bennhold-Samaan, Laurette; Coratti, Nancy; Lazar, Cori; Flaccus, Trisha Tumulty; McGinnis, J. Randy; Scammahorn, Emmy; Soderstrom, Robert; Storti, Craig; Williams, Krystal

    2010-01-01

    The lessons presented in this book will: (1) Help students better understand their own culture and how it has shaped them; (2) Help students begin to understand the perspectives of other cultures, leading to increased respect for those who are different from them--in the classroom and worldwide; and (3) Provide an increased awareness of the value…

  4. Researching Contradictions: Cultural Historical Activity Theory Research (CHAT) in the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) is an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework for researchers in English interested in the social contexts of culture and its relationship with the formation of mind and activity in the English classroom. Two key concepts in Vygotsky's thought central to understanding…

  5. A Cultural Historical Theoretical Perspective of Discourse and Design in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser have initiated an important conversation in science education as they use sociocultural theory to introduce design based scenarios into the science classroom. This response seeks to expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article "The discourse of design-based science classroom activities" by…

  6. Everyone's Included: Supporting Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Responsive Classroom Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterman, Kathleen G.; Sapona, Regina H.

    2002-01-01

    This case study discusses how Jon, a boy with autism, was fully included into general education classrooms in grades K-2 that implemented tenets of the "Responsive Classroom." The guiding principles of a responsive classroom approach, benefits for children with autism, and the need for collaboration among professionals are discussed.…

  7. Going against the Grain in an Urban Arizona High School: Secondary Preservice Teachers Emerging as Culturally Responsive Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Boozer, April; Clark, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This one year study examines the journey of two preservice urban high-school teachers in Arizona as they enact Culturally Responsive Teaching in a year-long student teaching residency. Factors that influenced their Culturally Responsive Teaching practices are discussed along themes that emerged from interviews and classroom observations.…

  8. Teaching science in culturally diverse classrooms: The relevance of multicultural coursework on novice teachers' instructional choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Thais B. P. da

    Science education reform in the United States has been slow to reduce the troubling science achievement gap between students from mainstream and non-mainstream backgrounds. Recent data suggest the gap persists in spite of improved attention to the multicultural education of teachers, and in spite of recent, more culturally inclusive and responsive curricular materials and instructional recommendations. In this study, I examine the cases of two European American male novice science teachers in middle schools with highly diverse populations, exploring their perceptions of the necessity of adapting their instructional approaches and the science curricula in order to meet the needs of their predominantly Native American, Mexican American, and African American students. Two theoretical frameworks inform this study, Rodriguez's (2005) sociotransformative constructivism, and Freire's critical pedagogy. I apply a qualitative case study method, to better understand and analyze the classroom setting and power relations of the context. Data consist of semi-structured interviews with each teacher, classroom observation and other field notes, the science curricular and instructional materials, and teachers' lesson plans. Each teacher acknowledged the ethnicities of students positively and noticed distinctive ethnocultural features (e.g., quinceaneras, Mexican Americans). Yet, their teaching approaches were primarily teacher-centric and monocultural. Each followed the book, usually lecturing, and striving dutifully to "cover" the topics. They did not solicit students' knowledge or engage them in dialog to explore their thinking. Even when the curriculum guide detailed relevant science knowledge students of some cultural groups might have, both teachers declined to use it. These well-meaning teachers did not fully perceive that students whose culture was different from their own might have different and relevant knowledge, experiences, or histories which were resources for

  9. Cultural Competence Knowledge and Confidence After Classroom Activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jagannath Mohan Muzumdar; Monica Holiday-Goodman; Curtis Black; Mary Powers

    2010-01-01

      To determine change in cultural competency knowledge and perceived confidence of second-year pharmacy students to deliver culturally competent care after completing a required cultural competency curriculum...

  10. A Study on the Functions of Western Cultural Non-Verbal Behavior in English Classroom in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuehong

    2013-01-01

    In China, English classroom is the main place of English language acquisition. Therefore, how to improve English classroom teaching effectively has become the scholars' concern. This paper reports a study conducted at North China Electric Power University on the functions of western cultural nonverbal behaviors in English classroom in China.…

  11. Facilitating cultural border crossing in urban secondary science classrooms: A study of inservice teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Anna Karina

    Research acknowledges that if students are to be successful science, they must learn to navigate and cross cultural borders that exist between their own cultures and the subculture of science. This dissertation utilized a mixed methods approach to explore how inservice science teachers working in urban schools construct their ideas of and apply the concepts about the culture of science and cultural border crossing as relevant to the teaching and learning of science. The study used the lenses of cultural capital, social constructivism, and cultural congruency in the design and analysis of each of the three phases of data collection. Phase I identified the perspectives of six inservice science teachers on science culture, cultural border crossing, and which border crossing methods, if any, they used during science teaching. Phase II took a dialectical approach as the teachers read about science culture and cultural border crossing during three informal professional learning community meetings. This phase explored how teachers constructed their understanding of cultural border crossing and how the concept applied to the teaching and learning of science. Phase III evaluated how teachers' perspectives changed from Phase I. In addition, classroom observations were used to determine whether teachers' practices in their science classrooms changed from Phase I to Phase III. All three phases collected data through qualitative (i.e., interviews, classroom observations, and surveys) and quantitative (Likert items) means. The findings indicated that teachers found great value in learning about the culture of science and cultural border crossing as it pertained to their teaching methods. This was not only evidenced by their interviews and surveys, but also in the methods they used in their classrooms. Final conclusions included how the use of student capital resources (prior experiences, understandings and knowledge, ideas an interests, and personal beliefs), if supported by

  12. Classroom Response System (CRS) pilot ‘Responsiveness and meaning for all’

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Classroom Response Systems (CRS or “clickers”) enable teachers and learners to get an insight in how well learners have understood and learnt from learning activities that they carried out, and to what degree they achieved certain learning objectives. With a CRS system, a teacher can pose a question and receive an answer for every student in the classroom. More “traditional” systems like Socrative build on students voting or responding to questions with their mobile device. The Elena pilot di...

  13. Teaching Culture in the EFL/ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thu Hoang

    2010-01-01

    This article is intended to discuss prominent issues in teaching culture to second and foreign language students. The concepts of language and culture will be defined, respectively. Next, the characteristics and components of culture will be presented. In addition, commonly used terms in language and culture including enculturation, acculturation,…

  14. Culturally Responsive L2 Education: An Awareness-Raising Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Melina

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of multilingual, multiethnic, and multicultural classrooms in varied educational contexts worldwide points to the importance of cultural factors in language education and education in general. In the EFL/ESL classroom of this century, ELT is seen as including much more than purely linguistic aspects as it focuses also on…

  15. The Global Classroom and the Educational Challenge of Cultural Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Sonja S.

    2010-01-01

    Change in education is not going away; instead, it seems to be increasing exponentially. Technology has been the catalyst, and the changes with the greatest impact on education are the location and size of the classroom. The challenges associated with these changes involve working with students from potentially an unlimited number of countries and…

  16. The Global Classroom and the Educational Challenge of Cultural Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Sonja S.

    2010-01-01

    Change in education is not going away; instead, it seems to be increasing exponentially. Technology has been the catalyst, and the changes with the greatest impact on education are the location and size of the classroom. The challenges associated with these changes involve working with students from potentially an unlimited number of countries and…

  17. Digital and Media Literacy: Connecting Culture and Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Renee

    2011-01-01

    Today's students tweet, text, and navigate apps up to 12 hours each day, but they may not know how to effectively analyze a TV show or website. Award-winning author Renee Hobbs demonstrates how to incorporate media literacy into the secondary classroom, providing the tools teachers need to: (1) Effectively foster students' critical thinking,…

  18. Establishing the Unitary Classroom: Organizational Change and School Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Elizabeth M.; True, Joan H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the organizational changes introduced in two elementary schools to create unitary (desegregated) classrooms. The different models adopted by the two schools--departmentalization and team teaching--are considered as expressions of their patterns of interaction, behavior, and values. (Part of a theme issue on educational…

  19. An Exploratory Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices for Students Who Are ELLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Sushama

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether teacher characteristics such as teacher quality, skills in teaching English language learners (ELLs), knowledge of second language acquisition, and attitudes towards ELLs impacted teachers' perceived importance and reported use of culturally responsive practices within their classrooms. The numbers…

  20. Culturally Responsive Teaching in the Context of Mathematics: A Grounded Theory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Emily P.; Adams, Thomasenia L.

    2012-01-01

    In this grounded theory case study, four interconnected, foundational cornerstones of culturally responsive mathematics teaching (CRMT), communication, knowledge, trust/relationships, and constant reflection/revision, were systematically unearthed to develop an initial working theory of CRMT that directly informs classroom practice. These…

  1. "Katherine With-a-K and Little Nato": A Case Study of Culturally Responsible Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parscal, Jeannie N.

    This case study, one of four, is part of a larger study, "Ethnographic Case Studies of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (CRP) of At-Risk Students in Middle School Classrooms." The study provides relevant case literature regarding CRP for the enhancement of preservice teacher education and describes the characteristics of a multicultural…

  2. Culturally and linguistically responsive teaching: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2015-02-01

    As increasing numbers of culturally and linguistically diverse learners are enrolled in nursing programs and employed in nursing service agencies, nurse educators must be aware of their own culture and how it influences their teaching and understand the learning needs of a diverse group of learners. This article offers strategies for nurse educators for being culturally and linguistically responsive while also establishing an inclusive learning environment.

  3. Research for the Classroom: Analyzing Classroom Literacy Events--What Observing Classroom Conversations about Popular Culture Can Reveal about Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Mayer, a recently retired English language arts teacher, frequently used strategies described in John Golden's book "Reading in the Dark: Using Film as a Tool in the English Classroom." In this book, Golden suggests that ELA teachers "reverse the order: use a film clip to practice the reading and analytical skills that we want our students to…

  4. Not teaching, but coaching creating a self-development culture in a classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONIKA GROCHALSKA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays we hear a lot about coaching, but what does coaching really mean? Why does it matter? What is more, the notion of edu-coaching has also emerged in recent years, and this idea seems to be gaining popularity. But can coaching replace traditional classroom education? To what extent could it be useful at school? In the first part of this article I would like to define what coaching is, how it is different from mentoring and how it can be used to support pupils and teachers at personal, team and whole school levels. Undoubtedly, there are obvious benefits of coaching for students, staff, school as well as coaches. There are three core skills of coaching: listening, questioning and reviewing. To be a good coach, a teacher should understand how to be a good listener and how to ask proper coaching questions. They should ask questions that help them and the coached/the pupil to review, reflect and to clarify matters throughout the lesson. There are some coaching tools that can be used at various stages of the coaching process at school, including the balance wheel, rating scale, bisociation, viewpoints and motivational record. A teacher can successfully use coaching on the basis of the GROW (Goal, Reality, Options and Will model. It can support the teacher’s development and his practice as a coach. As indicated in the on-line articles for teachers, starting professional training is also worthwhile. During the training, a teacher can learn how to develop classroom practice that supports growth through the use of high level listening, questioning, reflecting and summarising. Most of professional training programs contain the following elements: - using active listening and open questions to tackle issues such as pupil behaviour, - reaching their full potential by putting in place realistic goals and plans to achieve them, - taking responsibility for their own progress through change, - building rapports that can turn previously difficult

  5. Assisting Preservice Teachers toward Becoming Culturally Responsive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starker, Tehia V.; Fitchett, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative study, researchers inquired about preservice teachers' (PST) experience in becoming culturally responsive in a graduate teacher-licensure social studies methods class (N = 20). Researchers examined PST lesson plans and reflections, and rated them based on Geneva Gay's (2002) framework for preparing culturally responsive…

  6. Towards a Culturally Situated Reader Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Browne, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a theory of how culture enables literary interpretations of texts. We begin with a brief overview of the reader response field. From there, we introduce the theory and provide illustrative participant data examples. These data examples illustrate the four cultural positions middle grade students in our research assumed when…

  7. Culture and Crisis Response in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Dean, Shelley; Henry, Geoff; McGhie, Desiree; Phillipson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    New Zealand is a bicultural nation, founded on the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by the native Maori and the British Crown. It is also home to people from many countries, cultures and ethnicities. Therefore, culturally-relevant response to crisis events has become a significant aspect of the Ministry of Education's interdisciplinary Traumatic…

  8. Examining the Effects of an Electronic Classroom Response System on Student Engagement and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Robert A.; Murphy, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    This experiment examines the causal effect an electronic classroom response system (ECRS) has on students. Previous studies using an ECRS in the classroom indicate improved performance; however, many have confounds typical of classroom studies. To complement these studies, we conducted a laboratory study to minimize these confounds and concentrate…

  9. A Counter-Curriculum for the Pop Culture Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertonneau, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    "Popular culture" and "culture studies" have become mainstays of the humanities in higher education. Like most other humanities courses, popular culture courses today mainly serve the usual politically correct program of the existing dominant class in the academy. Nevertheless, such courses can also be a powerful tool for instructors who wish to…

  10. Formative Evaluation des mobilen Classroom-Response-Systems SMILE

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Bezug nehmend auf das Hauptziel von Classroom-Response-Systems (CRS) – der Förderung der Interaktion in Massenlehrveranstaltungen – wird im vorliegenden Beitrag die Evaluation eines mobilen CRS namens SMILE dargestellt und diskutiert. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die Funktionalitäten der SMILE-App – Live-Feedback, Quizfragen und Question&Answer – von den Studierenden der Pilotvorlesung unterschiedlich häufig genutzt wurden. Darüber hinaus wurden die Akzeptanz der Studierenden gegenüber dem Ein...

  11. Response switching and self-efficacy in Peer Instruction classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Schell, Julie; Ho, Andrew; Lukoff, Brian; Mazur, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Peer Instruction, a well-known student-centered teaching method, engages students during class through structured, frequent questioning and is often facilitated by classroom response systems. The central feature of any Peer Instruction class is a conceptual question designed to help resolve student misconceptions about subject matter. We provide students two opportunities to answer each question—once after a round of individual reflection and then again after a discussion round with a peer. The second round provides students the choice to "switch" their original response to a different answer. The percentage of right answers typically increases after peer discussion: most students who answer incorrectly in the individual round switch to the correct answer after the peer discussion. However, for any given question there are also students who switch their initially right answer to a wrong answer and students who switch their initially wrong answer to a different wrong answer. In this study, we analyze response switching over one semester of an introductory electricity and magnetism course taught using Peer Instruction at Harvard University. Two key features emerge from our analysis: First, response switching correlates with academic self-efficacy. Students with low self-efficacy switch their responses more than students with high self-efficacy. Second, switching also correlates with the difficulty of the question; students switch to incorrect responses more often when the question is difficult. These findings indicate that instructors may need to provide greater support for difficult questions, such as supplying cues during lectures, increasing times for discussions, or ensuring effective pairing (such as having a student with one right answer in the pair). Additionally, the connection between response switching and self-efficacy motivates interventions to increase student self-efficacy at the beginning of the semester by helping students develop early mastery or

  12. DIAGNOSING THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žana Prutina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary business environment places demands on companies to go beyond economic survival and self-interest and satisfy the needs of various stakeholders. Organizations embark on the path of responsibility and sustainability, but many argue that CSR becomes embedded in an organization when it permeates all aspects of organization, including the organizational culture. Existing organizational culture typologies only provide the framework for analysis within the traditional business paradigm, but they are of limited use in the context of corporate social responsibility. After the analysis of major scholarship in the field, this paper defines CSR culture and identifies four types of organizational cultures based on companies’ CSR orientations, namely CSR-related values and strategy. In order to fully embed CSR culture, CSR has to be both strategic and value driven. This paper explores different CSR orientations and makes recommendations needed in order to achieve the desired state. Furthermore, through exploratory factor analysis, it identifies two cultural elements, CSR values and employee engagement in CSR, which indicate the existence of CSR culture. Identification of these cultural elements is intended to help in analyzing the direct and indirect effect of CSR culture on organizational outcomes, especially employee attitudinal and behavioral outcomes.

  13. The Dilemma of Cultural Responsiveness and Professionalization: Listening Closer to Immigrant Teachers Who Teach Children of Recent Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Jennifer Keys; Tobin, Joseph; Arzubiaga, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Many scholars in the fields of teacher education, multicultural education, and bilingual education have argued that children of recent immigrants are best served in classrooms that have teachers who understand the cultural background and the home language of their students. Culturally knowledgeable and responsive teachers are…

  14. AN ANALYSIS OF IRF (INITIATION-RESPONSE-FEEDBACK ON CLASSROOM INTERACTION IN EFL SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Rustandi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at analyzing the reflection of IRF (Initiation-Response-Feedback in speaking class and investigating the dominant sequence among I, R and F. IRF is a pattern of classroom interaction found by Sinclair and Coulthard in 1975 that stands for teacher initiation, students’ response and feedback by teacher. Initiation is the movement in which teacher initiates an interaction to get the response of the students, then teacher gives feedback to the students’ response. To obtain the data, the researcher conducted classroom observation in speaking class in one university in West Java. The result showed that student response becomes the dominant sequence of IRF in speaking class. Furthermore, it is recommended that the teachers should maintain the effectiveness of classroom interaction and give much opportunity to the students to take role in classroom verbal interaction through reflecting the IRF pattern in teaching learning process particularly in speaking classroom. Keywords: IRF, classroom interaction, speaking class

  15. Between the Lines: When Culture, Language and Poetry Meet in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Teaching poetry in second language (L2) classrooms raises theoretical and practical questions about how best to treat literature when target language and culture is also being negotiated. Current pedagogy derives from disparate sources, including the experientially-driven practices of individual teachers, the quantitative and qualitative research…

  16. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Jansma, E.P.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012.

  17. Cross-Cultural Comparison of Teachers' Views upon Integration and Use of Technology in Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayalar, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare teachers' views upon integration and use of technology in classroom. To make cross-cultural comparison of teachers' views, we interviewed with nine teachers in a primary school in city of Erzincan, Turkey and compared the views of the teachers with those of the teachers living in foreign countries. To obtain…

  18. Understanding Synchronous Computer-Mediated Classroom Discussion through Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yangjoo

    2015-01-01

    This study is about graduate students' discourse practices in classroom text-based synchronous computer mediated discussions (SCMD). Cultural historical activity theory (in short, Activity Theory) is the primary theoretical lens through which the data are analyzed. Engeström's (1987) Activity System model among the various theoretical positions or…

  19. Formative Assessment in Confucian Heritage Culture Classrooms: Activity Theory Analysis of Tensions, Contradictions and Hybrid Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Pham, Thi Hong; Renshaw, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Formative assessment has recently become a preferred assessment strategy in educational institutions worldwide. However, it is not easy to implement in Asian classrooms, because local cultures and institutional constraints potentially hinder the practice. This one-semester study aimed to use the "third space", as the core of the third…

  20. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Jansma, E.P.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012.

  1. Belief, Knowledge and Understanding: How to Deal with the Relations between Different Cultural Perspectives in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-dos-Santos, Frederik; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses how to deal with the relations between different cultural perspectives in classrooms, based on a proposal for considering understanding and knowledge as goals of science education, inspired by Dewey's naturalistic humanism. It thus combines educational and philosophical interests. In educational terms, our concerns relate to…

  2. Doing Number 5: From Process to Cultural Texts in an Urban Writing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Brett Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    States the importance of content in the process writing classroom. Demonstrates with "cultural texts" (texts about the daily realities of the students on topics of domesticity and family, violence, evolving sexuality, and future aspirations) that not only how children write, but also what they write about, is of critical importance in helping them…

  3. The Chinese Classroom Paradox: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Teacher Controlling Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Lam, Shui-Fong; Chan, Kam Chi

    2012-01-01

    Chinese classrooms present an intriguing paradox to the claim of self-determination theory that autonomy facilitates learning. Chinese teachers appear to be controlling, but Chinese students do not have poor academic performance in international comparisons. The present study addressed this paradox by examining the cultural differences in…

  4. Revisiting Cognitive Strategy Instruction in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms: Cautions and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handsfield, Lara J.; Jimenez, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the authors raise concerns regarding the use of cognitive strategy instruction (CSI) in culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) classrooms. The authors recognize the potential benefits afforded by CSI. At the same time, they argue that counter to the intentions of those who have developed CSI, it may be implemented in ways that…

  5. Pop Culture in the Classroom: "American Idol," Karl Marx, and Alexis de Tocqueville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centellas, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the use of pop culture in the classroom as a means to teach foundational political science authors and concepts. I focus on my experience using "American Idol" as a point of reference to discuss Marx and Engel's "The Communist Manifesto" and Tocqueville's "Democracy in America" in undergraduate comparative politics courses.…

  6. Benefits of Using Online Student Response Systems in Japanese EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Cathrine-Mette

    2014-01-01

    Online student response systems (OSRSs) are fast replacing classroom response systems (CRSs), also known as personal or audience response systems or "clickers". OSRSs can more easily be implemented in the classroom because they are web-based and allow students to use any browser and device to do the "clicking" required to…

  7. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  8. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  9. Using Quick Response Codes in the Classroom: Quality Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurmehly, Joyce; Adams, Kellie

    2017-10-01

    With smart device technology emerging, educators are challenged with redesigning teaching strategies using technology to allow students to participate dynamically and provide immediate answers. To facilitate integration of technology and to actively engage students, quick response codes were included in a medical surgical lecture. Quick response codes are two-dimensional square patterns that enable the coding or storage of more than 7000 characters that can be accessed via a quick response code scanning application. The aim of this quasi-experimental study was to explore quick response code use in a lecture and measure students' satisfaction (met expectations, increased interest, helped understand, and provided practice and prompt feedback) and engagement (liked most, liked least, wanted changed, and kept involved), assessed using an investigator-developed instrument. Although there was no statistically significant correlation of quick response use to examination scores, satisfaction scores were high, and there was a small yet positive association between how students perceived their learning with quick response codes and overall examination scores. Furthermore, on open-ended survey questions, students responded that they were satisfied with the use of quick response codes, appreciated the immediate feedback, and planned to use them in the clinical setting. Quick response codes offer a way to integrate technology into the classroom to provide students with instant positive feedback.

  10. Teaching Culture in the Classroom to Arabic Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Ahmad Abdel Tawwab Sharaf

    2015-01-01

    Arabic language learning comprises of certain elements, including syntactic ability, oral capability, dialect proficiency, and a change in state of mind towards different culture or society. For teachers and laymen alike, cultural competence, i.e., the knowledge of the customs, beliefs, and systems of another country, is indisputably an integral…

  11. Cultural Learning in the EFL Classroom: The Role of Visuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Tamás; Weninger, Csilla

    2017-01-01

    Visual texts are part of everyday communication and they have the potential to carry multiple layers of meaning. This complexity is what makes them an ideal resource not only for language learning, but also for developing learners' intercultural communicative competence and cultural awareness. Cultural meanings are not locked into these materials;…

  12. Start with Us! Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in the Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Tonia R.; Escalante, Elsita; Blitch, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Using an ethnographic case study approach, we examined how teachers and parents within an ethnically diverse early childhood program conceptualized and implemented culturally relevant pedagogy and how these primary caregivers were encouraging children's socio-cultural development and awareness. Data sources included questionnaires, interview…

  13. Cultural Awareness and EFL Learning: Classroom Observation and Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuYunian

    2004-01-01

    Cultural awareness of the learners affects their EFL learning process in various ways. Nunan (2001) defines the culture as norms and rules that govern the interactional and personal behavior between groups of individuals. Littlewood (2000) analyses the causes for differences among the learners of second language, such as motivations, opportunities and

  14. Towards culturally relevant classroom science: a theoretical framework focusing on traditional plant healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, Vongai; Otulaja, Femi S.; Mushayikwa, Emmanuel

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical framework is an important component of a research study. It grounds the study and guides the methodological design. It also forms a reference point for the interpretation of the research findings. This paper conceptually examines the process of constructing a multi-focal theoretical lens for guiding studies that aim to accommodate local culture in science classrooms. A multi-focal approach is adopted because the integration of indigenous knowledge and modern classroom science is complex. The central argument in this paper is that a multi-focal lens accommodates the multifaceted nature of integrating indigenous knowledge and western oriented classroom science. The objective of the paper, therefore, is to construct a theoretical framework that can be used to guide and inform the integration of indigenous knowledge and western science at classroom science level. The traditional plant healing form of indigenous knowledge is used as a case study. The paper is important for raising the complexities, tensions and dilemmas inherent in the design and implementation of indigenous knowledge-science integrated curricula. An understanding of the issues raised will pave the way towards achieving culturally relevant classroom science.

  15. The Digital Culture and Communication: More than just Classroom Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Snyder

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a conceptual model of the digital culture that reflects the multi-dimensionality of ICT in education: pedagogy, communication, technology and organizational systems. The model grew out of a three-year study of an online professional development program for educators in seven countries. The focus of the paper is to explore the relationship between human dynamics and technological systems for advancing the school as an organization. Considering the digital culture of schools from an organizational communication culture perspective awakens us to the importance of looking at the subculture that emerges through human exchange reflecting core values and beliefs. When we consider the digital world in which students already live, and match it against the challenge of schools for human citizen development, we begin to see that a digital culture is more than technological. It is organizational, it is communicative, and it is cultural. Through the creation of cultural webs, motivated by humans, and assisted by technology, online communication has the possibility to shape a collective space for cross cultural connections that support a shared democracy.

  16. Classroom Response System (CRS) pilot ‘Responsiveness and meaning for all’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen; Ternier, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    Classroom Response Systems (CRS or “clickers”) enable teachers and learners to get an insight in how well learners have understood and learnt from learning activities that they carried out, and to what degree they achieved certain learning objectives. With a CRS system, a teacher can pose a

  17. Classroom Response System (CRS) pilot ‘Responsiveness and meaning for all’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusman, Ellen; Ternier, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    Classroom Response Systems (CRS or “clickers”) enable teachers and learners to get an insight in how well learners have understood and learnt from learning activities that they carried out, and to what degree they achieved certain learning objectives. With a CRS system, a teacher can pose a question

  18. Culture moderates children's responses to ostracism situations

    OpenAIRE

    Over, Harriet; Uskul, Ayse K.

    2016-01-01

    Across a series of studies, we investigate cultural differences in children’s responses to ostracism situations. Working with the children of farmers and herders, we focus on how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 1a showed that that 3- to 8-year-old children from a socially interdependent farming community estimated ostracism to be less painful than did children from an independent herding community. Study 1b showed that this cultural difference was specific to social pain and ...

  19. Culture moderates children's responses to ostracism situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Harriet; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-05-01

    Across a series of studies, we investigated cultural differences in children's responses to ostracism situations. Working with the children of farmers and herders, we focused on how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 1a showed that 4- to 8-year-old children from a socially interdependent farming community estimated ostracism to be less painful than did children from an independent herding community. Study 1b showed that this cultural difference was specific to social pain and did not apply to physical pain. Study 2 replicated the results of Study 1a and showed that individual differences in parents' level of social interdependence mediated the relationship between cultural group and how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 3 replicated this effect again and showed that children's tendency to recommend seeking social support following ostracism mediated the relationship between cultural group and the perceived pain of being excluded. Finally, Study 4 investigated cultural differences in moral responses to ostracism and showed that children from the farming community punished an individual who ostracized someone else less harshly than did children from the independent herding community. Thus different economic cultures are associated with striking differences in social interdependence and responses to ostracism from early in development. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Perezhivanie and classroom discourse: a cultural-historical perspective on "Discourse of design based science classroom activities"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan; March, Sue

    2015-06-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser challenge the `argumentation focus of science lessons' and propose that through a `design-based approach' emergent conversations with the teacher offer possibilities for different types of discussions to enhance pedagogical discourse in science classrooms. This important paper offers a "preliminary contribution to a general theory" regarding the link between activity types and discourse practices. Azevedo, Martalock and Keser offer a general perspective with a sociocultural framing for analysis of classroom discourse. Interestingly the specific concepts drawn upon are from conversation analysis; there are few sociocultural concepts explored in detail. Therefore, in this article we focus on a cultural historical (Vygotsky in The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky. The history and development of higher mental functions, vol 4. Plenum Press, New York, 1987; The Vygotsky reader. Black, Cambridge, 1994) methodology to explore, analyse and explain how we would use a different theoretical lens. We argue that a cultural historical reading of argumentation in science lessons and design based activity will expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's proposed general theory of activity types and discourse practices. Specifically, we use Lev Vygotksy's idea of perezhivanie as the unit of analysis to reconceptualise this important paper. We focus on the holistic category of students' emotional experience through discourse while developing scientific awareness.

  1. Culturing Fern Gametophytes on Solid Mineral Media for Classroom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Glen; Graham, Lane C.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the techniques and results of using this tissue culture activity. Discusses the advantages of using such techniques in teaching alternation of generation life cycles to biology students. (CW)

  2. The role of culture in the foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Küçükönal, Hatice

    1989-01-01

    Ankara : The Faculty of Letters and The Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent Univ., 1989. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1989. Includes bibliographical references leaves 37-40. Communication like many human activities is constrained by individual and cultural factors- It is not enough to learn only the form of a language to communicate. Moreover, many commun ica t ion faiJures are the result of lack of cross-cultural understanding rather than a lack of ling...

  3. Design and implementation of a low-cost classroom response system for a future classroom in the developing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran A. Zualkernan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Economic considerations and lack of adequate infrastructure impose unique design constraints on future classrooms of the developing world. Thus, future classrooms in underprivileged nations may differ significantly from their counterparts in the developed world. Classroom response systems (CRS are an emerging technology for the future classroom. CRS are wireless, hand-held devices that help students provide immediate feedback to questions posed by a teacher. In their present form, due to their relatively high cost and high infrastructural requirements, such systems are not sustainable in most developing countries. This paper presents the design and implementation of a CRS based on an open-source, low-cost, and easily manufactured hardware. The CRS design is based on a hybrid wireless/wired platform using Bluetooth with the 1-Wire networking technology. This design significantly reduces the cost, and is consistent with existing conditions in a typical developing country.

  4. Cultural politics: Linguistic identity and its role as gatekeeper in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton-Brown, Bryan Anthony

    This dissertation investigated how participation in the cultural practices of science classrooms creates intrapersonal conflict for ethnic minority students. Grounded in research perspectives of cultural anthropology, sociocultural studies of science education, and critical pedagogy, this study examined the cultural tensions encountered by minority students as they assimilate into the culture of the science classroom. Classroom interaction was viewed from the perspective of instructional congruence---the active incorporation of students' culture into science pedagogy. Ogbu's notion of "oppositional identity", Fordham's "fictive kinship", Bahktin's "antidialogics", and Freire's "critical consciousness" were brought together to examine how members of marginalized cultures develop non-normative behaviors as a means of cultural resistance. Choice of genre for public discourse was seen as a political act, representing students' own cultural affiliations. Conducted in a diverse Southern Californian high school with an annual population of over 3,900 students, this study merged ethnographic research, action research, and sociolinguistic discourse analysis. Post hoc analysis of videotaped classroom activities, focus group interviews, and samples of student work revealed students' discursive behavior to shift as a product of the context of their discursive exchanges. In whole class discussions students explained their understanding of complex phenomena to classmates, while in small group discussions they favored brief exchanges of group data. Four domains of discursive identities were identified: Opposition Status, Maintenance Status, Incorporation Status, and Proficiency Status. Students demonstrating Opposition Status avoided use of science discourse. Those students who demonstrated Maintenance Status were committed to maintaining their own discursive behavior. Incorporation Status students were characterized by an active attempt to incorporate science discourse into

  5. A study of culturally syntonic variables in the bilingual/bicultural science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Robertta H.

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a needs assessment of bilingual/bicultural elementary science classrooms in order to determine if the current instructional environment addresses the educational needs of Hispanic/Latino children. This study examined 57 randomly selected elementary bilingual/bicultural science classrooms in a large metropolitan area of the southwestern United States in terms of culturally syntonic variables (i.e., culture-of-origin beliefs and/or practices that impact the teaching/learning process). Findings from this study indicate that Hispanic/Latino children are receiving science instruction: (a) with culturally asyntonic printed materials, teaching strategies, and supplementary materials, (b) in classrooms that do not use the child's native language, familia learning groups, peer tutoring, or manipulative materials, and (c) with oral and verbal instruction that lack culturally syntonic role models, examples, analogies, and elaborations. Findings from this study imply that changes are needed in pre-service and in-service teacher training, in science textbook formats, and in the scope and focus of elementary school bilingual/bicultural science curriculum and instructional strategies.

  6. Teaching Mathematics, Volume I: Culture, Motivation, History and Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Edwin J.; And Others

    Independent neighborhood schools in inner-city areas serve primarily minority students. They are in a position to assist American educators in understanding the best methods of teaching minorities who usually do not reach their full academic potential in public schools. Teachers in independent schools use culture and sometimes religion as a basis…

  7. Lessons in Pop: Does Pop Culture Belong in the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    Many teachers are finding that weaving in examples from current movies, television, music, and popular fiction makes their lessons come alive for students. A clip from "The Daily Show" or rap lyrics can be vehicles to talk about politics and poetry. Pop culture is what students talk about in the hallways, so why not harness that interest and…

  8. Greening the German Classroom: Starting Points for a Cultural Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Angelika; DeMaris, Sarah Glenn; Moller-Tank, Beth

    2013-01-01

    The article presents and discusses materials for a cultural lesson about Green Germany. An introductory mini-unit frames the over-all student learning objective: students should be able to respond to the questions "Where are we?" and "Where are we going?" with regard to the natural environment. Three different units then help…

  9. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and the Public Speaking Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Janet Weston; Tobler, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    From the earliest roots of rhetoric, practitioners emphasized the need for analyzing one's audience before developing a speech. Textbooks for most basic public speaking courses spend at least one chapter discussing audience analysis. Authors discuss adapting messages to various demographic, cultural, and individual differences. As a result,…

  10. Where Cultural Games Count: The Voices of Primary Classroom Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabie, Michael Johnson

    2015-01-01

    This study explored Ghanaian primary school teachers' values and challenges of integrating cultural games in teaching mathematics. Using an In-depth conversational interview, ten (10) certificated teachers' voices on the values and challenges of integrating games were examined. Thematic data analysis was applied to the qualitative data from the…

  11. Designing Effective Questions for Classroom Response System Teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, I D; Gerace, W J

    2005-01-01

    Classroom response systems (CRSs) can be potent tools for teaching physics. Their efficacy, however, depends strongly on the quality of the questions used. Creating effective questions is difficult, and differs from creating exam and homework problems. Every CRS question should have an explicit pedagogic purpose consisting of a content goal, a process goal, and a metacognitive goal. Questions can be engineered to fulfil their purpose through four complementary mechanisms: directing students' attention, stimulating specific cognitive processes, communicating information to instructor and students via CRS-tabulated answer counts, and facilitating the articulation and confrontation of ideas. We identify several tactics that help in the design of potent questions, and present four "makeovers" showing how these tactics can be used to convert traditional physics questions into more powerful CRS questions.

  12. Schools and Marketization: Cultural Challenges and Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foskett, Nicholas H.

    1998-01-01

    Develops an analytical methodology for service organizations by examining four key cultural and managerial developments: understandings of markets and marketing held within the school; organizational responses to the market; use of analytical tools; and development of appropriate marketing strategies. Shows variations in schools' development of a…

  13. Culturally Responsive Computing: A Theory Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kimberly A.; Sheridan, Kimberly M.; Clark, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Despite multiple efforts and considerable funding, historically marginalized groups (e.g., racial minorities and women) continue not to enter or persist in the most lucrative of fields--technology. Understanding the potency of culturally responsive teaching (CRT), some technology-enrichment programs modified CRP principles to establish a…

  14. Language Classroom Risk-Taking Behavior in a Performed Culture-Based Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Luft

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While several studies have investigated the role of risk-taking in language learning, the findings of these studies may not be generalizable to language learning where the performed culture approach (PCA is used. This study describes the relationship between language learning and risk-taking in PCA, and the relationship between risk-taking and personal study habits, teaching style, daily grading, and classroom dynamics. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire. This study finds that risk-taking behavior has a moderate positive relationship with student performance in PCA. While questionnaire items related to teaching style and classroom dynamics are not found to significantly correlate with students’ risk-taking behavior, some items related to daily grading and personal study habits are found to have a moderate positive relationship with risk-taking behavior. Based on these findings, it is recommended that further research investigate the relationship between assessment and risktaking in language learning. As second language acquisition researchers have investigated the role of affective variables in language learning, risk-taking has frequently been identified as a variable linked with success (Beebe, 1983; Ely, 1986; Naiman, Frolich, Stern, & Todesco, 1978; Rubin, 1975; Samimy & Pardin, 1994; Samimy & Tabuse, 1992. However, it is difficult to apply these findings to language classrooms that use the performed culture approach (PCA, an approach to the teaching of East Asian languages, for two reasons: (a PCA’s focus on the learning of a foreign culture could mean that greater risk is involved in 106 Luft language learning than in a typical language classroom; (b PCA creates a language learning experience for which the risks involved are different than those in language classrooms where other approaches are used.

  15. Conceptual question response times in Peer Instruction classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to in-class, conceptual questions [ConcepTests (CTs)] in two introductory physics courses taught using Peer Instruction and use item response theory to determine the difficulty of the CTs. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers both before and after the peer discussion for CTs of varying difficulty. We also determine the relationship between response time and student performance on a standardized test of incoming physics knowledge, precourse self-efficacy, and gender. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response time for correct answers is significantly faster than for incorrect answers, both before and after peer discussion, especially for easy CTs. Second, students with greater incoming physics knowledge and higher self-efficacy respond faster in both rounds. Third, there is no gender difference in response rate after controlling for incoming physics knowledge scores, although males register significantly more attempts before committing to a final answer than do female students. These results provide insight into effective CT pacing during Peer Instruction. In particular, in order to maintain a pace that keeps everyone engaged, students should not be given too much time to respond. When around 80% of the answers are in, the ratio of correct to incorrect responses rapidly approaches levels indicating random guessing and instructors should close the poll.

  16. Kia Kaha: Improving Classroom Performance through Developing Cultural Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie, Christine

    A study of 24 Maori children in grades 3-6 who were invited to perform at a children's festival in Turkey and two control groups (control 1, n=24; control 2, n=23) of Maori children who did not participate in the festival examined the effect of an intense cultural program on children's self-esteem, locus of control, and academic performance.…

  17. Using Advertising to Explore French Language and Culture in the Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognized that authentic materials such as advertisements are beneficial to language learners. In addition to stimulating students’ interest and motivation, advertising in the target language exposes students to different styles of expression and offers a window into another culture. This article proposes a more comprehensive approach to integrating commercial advertisements into the foreign language classroom through content-based learning. In an effort to develop its internati...

  18. Teaching culture in the Japanese language classroom: A NSW case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Mahoney

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines, through a qualitative case study approach, how non-native- speaking (NNS Japanese language teachers in New South Wales (NSW teach culture and why. The study seeks to understand the pedagogy used to teach culture, teachers’ attitudes and beliefs on teaching culture and how these attitudes and beliefs have been influenced by past experiences. This study also explores how the NSW K-10 Japanese syllabus and concepts of Intercultural Language Learning (IcLL are being implemented in teachers’ classrooms. Two non-native-speaking (NNS Japanese language teachers from a selective secondary school in NSW were interviewed and their classes observed over three days. Analysis of interview and observation data shows that these teachers teach culture as determined by language content, integrate language and culture teaching and teach culture as observable and factual. The study shows that both teachers view culture teaching as easier than language teaching, however their views on the influence of the syllabus differ. The study explores the teachers’ past experiences and how these affect how they feel towards, and teach culture. Finally, this study looks at how the teachers’ practices reflect concepts of IcLL such as integrating language and culture, student-centered learning and how their status as NNS teachers affects their culture teaching.

  19. Addressing Culture in the efl Classroom: A Dialogic Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez Valencia José Aldemar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Language teaching has gone from a linguistic centered approach towards a lingo-cultural experience in which learning a language goes hand in hand with the understanding of not only the target culture, but the learner’s own culture. This paper attempts to describe and reflect upon a collaborative and dialogical experience carried out between two teachers of the Languages Program of Universidad de la Salle, in Bogotá. The bilateral enrichment of such a pedagogical experience helped the teachers to improve their language teaching contexts and prompted the construction of a theoretical proposal to enhance intercultural awareness. It also opened the way for the development of critical intercultural competence in fl (foreign language learners. Key words: Interculturality, critical intercultural awareness, critical intercultural competence, dialogical process La enseñanza de lengua ha pasado de un enfoque centrado en lo lingüístico hacia uno linguocultural, en el que el aprendizaje de una lengua va de la mano del entendimiento no sólo de la cultura objetivo, sino también de la propia cultura. Este artículo intenta describir y reflexionar alrededor de una experiencia colaborativa y dialógica que se realizó entre dos profesores del Programa de Lenguas de la Universidad de La Salle, en Bogotá. El enriquecimiento recíproco de esta experiencia pedagógica, permitió mejorar los contextos de enseñanza y la construcción de una propuesta teórica para promover la conciencia intercultural. También abrió las puertas para desarrollar competencia crítica intercultural en estudiantes de inglés como lengua extranjera. Palabras clave: Interculturalidad, conciencia crítica intercultural, competencia crítica intercultural, proceso dialógico

  20. Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini J. Negi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of social justice educators is to engage students in a process of self-discovery, with the goal of helping them recognize their own biases, develop empathy, and become better prepared for culturally responsive practice. While social work educators are mandated with the important task of training future social workers in culturally responsive practice with diverse populations, practical strategies on how to do so are scant. This article introduces a teaching exercise, the Ethnic Roots Assignment, which has been shown qualitatively to aid students in developing self-awareness, a key component of culturally competent social work practice. Practical suggestions for classroom utilization, common challenges, and past student responses to participating in the exercise are provided. The dissemination of such a teaching exercise can increase the field’s resources for addressing the important goal of cultural competence training.

  1. From EFL Classroom into the Mainstream: A Socio-Cultural Investigation of Speaking Anxiety among Female EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with the aim of examining the rate of foreign language anxiety in male and female language learners. FLCAS (Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale was administered to two groups of male and female learners. The mean scores of FLCAS indicated a significant difference with females having considerably higher levels of anxiety than males. From 38 female learners, 22 were recognized as experiencing anxiety, 14 of whom were invited to attend interviews as high-anxious learners. In addition to the learners, six language instructors were interviewed. From among the responses, socio-cultural reasons were deduced as being responsible for the noticeable level of females' anxiety. With regard to the findings, this study invites language teachers to be more sensitive and considerate about their female learners' social status, their senses of identity, and their self-perceptions, and take account of all these when judging their language performance, particularly as to the speaking activities and communicative tasks.

  2. Communication Across Cultures: Classroom Dilemmas from a Global Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Karen L.; Rodgers, Jacci L.

    1999-01-01

    Examined whether formal intervention would alleviate graduate business administration students' subjective choice strategies when choosing group members. Students in the study represented five racioethnic identity groups. Although intervention showed some effectiveness, the overall response of Caucasian subjects was parochial, suggesting the…

  3. Crossroads: Literature and Language in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Carole; Boyd-Batstone, Paul

    This book is an exploration of the crossroads of reader-response and second language acquisition theories and research as a foundation for practice. It provides a model for teaching with literature that supports language and literacy development for students learning English as a first or second language. The book is organized in three parts. Part…

  4. Classroom Response System-Mediated Science Learning with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langman, Juliet; Fies, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    We report on a case study examining the effects of a technology adaptation on patterns of discourse in a sheltered English high school science unit on electricity. The focus here is on how the tool, a classroom response system (CRS), affected access to and participation in classroom discourse with regard to developing science literacy among…

  5. Classroom Response Systems: Using Task Technology Fit to Explore Impact Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kenneth D., II.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine how students are impacted by the use of Classroom Response System (CRS) technology. This research explores the nature of the outcomes experienced by students and their perceptions on the leading pedagogy and practices for using CRS technology in the classroom. The research is both quantitative and…

  6. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek-van Noord, Inge; de Bruijne, Martine C; Zwijnenberg, Nicolien C; Jansma, Elise P; van Dyck, Cathy; Wagner, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012. The Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews was used to assess the risk of bias in the individual studies. In total, 22 manuscripts were included for review. Training settings, study designs, and evaluation methods varied widely. Most studies reporting only a selection of culture dimensions found mainly positive results, whereas studies reporting all safety culture dimensions of the particular survey found mixed results. On average, studies were at moderate risk of bias. Evidence of the effectiveness of Crew Resource Management training in health care on safety culture is scarce and the validity of most studies is limited. The results underline the necessity of more valid study designs, preferably using triangulation methods.

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and c...

  8. Cooperative Learning in Mediterranean European Cultural Settings:Taking Classroom Teaching in UMA as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Guang-hai

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an exploration of cooperative learning (CL) in a Mediterranean European cultural setting, taking classroom teaching in the University of Málaga (UMA) as an example. An important part of the paper is on the definitions of CL, second language acquisition (SLA) and relative literature by scholars or educators home and abroad, such as historical and contemporary views of CL, its development and application in a variety of classrooms, esp. in multi-lingual settings, in UMA. It also puts much emphasis on sociocultural aspects of CL. Besides, this paper compares the application of CL with that in SWUST, one public university in Southwest China. In views of current problems and awkward situations in the application of CL, the pa-per argues that the qualified teachers and quality monitoring systems are the two major decisive factors that affect the achievement of CL in Spanish institutions. This paper also analyzes the main characteristics of the classroom teaching in Mediterranean Europe-an Cultural Settings. Thus, the paper suggests that CL may be one of the most efficient approaches to improving the quality of ed-ucation in UMA. Finally, the paper concludes with recommendations and suggestions that Spanish institutions train more well-qualified teachers to meet the increasing demand of CL approach in multi-contextual or multi-lingual settings.

  9. Using critical race theory to analyze science teachers culturally responsive practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tamara; Brand, Brenda R.

    2012-06-01

    Culturally responsive science teaching is using knowledge about the culture and life experiences of students to structure learning that is conducive to their needs. Understanding what teachers need to prepare them to be culturally responsive is a matter of continuous debate. As the focus of multicultural education ventures farther away from its roots, advocating the civil rights of historically oppressed groups, concerns about the gravity of racial inequity on schooling continues. How will this shift in focus influence teachers' capacity to accommodate students' needs resulting from racial inequities in this society, particularly African American students? What knowledge is essential to their effectiveness? This qualitative study examined the instructional practices of two effective middle school science teachers deemed culturally responsive by their administrator on the basis of classroom observations, students' responses and standardized assessment results. Both teachers' classrooms consisted primarily of African American students. Grounded theory was used to analyze the teachers' beliefs and practices in order to identify existing commonalties. Critical race theory was used to identify whether there was any influence of the students' racial identities on the teachers' beliefs and practices. The analysis reveals that the teachers' beliefs and practices were informed by their critical awareness of social constraints imposed upon their African American students' identities. These findings communicate the significance of sociocultural awareness to informing the teachers' instruction, as well as their strategies for managing the varying dynamics occurring in their classrooms. It can be deduced from the findings that an understanding of racial inequities is crucial to the development of sociocultural awareness, and is the foundation for the culturally responsive dispositions and practices of these middle school science teachers.

  10. I Like the Way This Feels: Using Classroom Response System Technology to Enhance Tactile Learners' Introductory American Government Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbig, Stacy G.

    2016-01-01

    Do individual-level student learning styles affect appreciation for and benefit from the use of classroom response system technology? This research investigates the benefit of in-class electronic classroom response systems ("classroom clickers"). With these systems, students answer questions posed to them in a PowerPoint presentation…

  11. Cultur(ally) Jammed: Culture Jams as a Form of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ulyssa

    2012-01-01

    Does the person become the name or does the name become the person? This question was asked by a participant of my culture jam entitled, "What's my name?" In this culture jam, I asked people to discern the name of a person based solely on their appearance and a list of possible names below their picture. This article aims to show how culture jams…

  12. Pre-Service Teachers: Does Cultural Responsiveness Affect Anticipated Self-Determination to Teach in Specific Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation to teach is essential to educating all children in the public schools. This study examined the anticipated self-determination of pre-service teachers to teach in classroom settings that varied in the ethnic and racial composition of the students in the classes. Additionally the cultural responsiveness of participants was measured to…

  13. Turning Reader-Response Theory into Student-Centered Classroom Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Murdo William

    1986-01-01

    Describes how reader response theory can be easily adapted to classroom practice, thereby sharpening student interest in reading, increasing their capacity to reason and write, and fostering greater regard for different points of view. (HOD)

  14. Co-Teaching Partnerships: How Culture of Schools and Classrooms Affect Practices in Co-Planning and Co-Implementing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalo, Cecilia Gray

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how the school and classroom cultures affected practices of inclusion for students with disabilities and how the inclusionary practice of co-teaching was influenced by the school culture. This study sought to investigate school and classroom cultures and their impact on practices of inclusion. It also…

  15. Enhancing student schematic knowledge of culture through literature circles in a foreign language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham-Marr Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving student understanding of a foreign language culture is anything but a peripheral issue in the teaching of a foreign language. This pilot study reports on a second year required English course in a university in Japan that took a Literature Circles approach, where students were asked to read short stories out of class and then discuss these stories in class. Although students reported that they did not gain any special insights into the target language culture presented, they did report that reading fiction as source material for classroom activity helps with the acquisition of a vocabulary set that is more closely associated with lifestyle and culture. The results suggest that further study is warranted. Procedures of this pilot study are described and interpreted in the context of the English education system in Japan.

  16. Formative assessment as a vehicle for changing classroom practice in a specific cultural context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingping

    2015-09-01

    In this commentary, I interpret Xinying Yin and Gayle Ann Buck's collaborative action research from a social-cultural perspective. Classroom implementation of formative assessment is viewed as interaction between this assessment method and the local learning culture. I first identify Yin and Buck's definition of the formative assessment, and then analyze the role of formative assessment in the change of local learning culture. Based on the practice of Yin and Buck I emphasize the significance of their "bottom up" strategy to the teachers' epistemological change. I believe that this strategy may provide practicable solutions to current Chinese educational problems as well as a means for science educators to shift toward systematic professional development.

  17. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  18. A Case Study of the Role of Reader Response in Two Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delony, Sheila; Smith Morgan, Ellen; Howell, Kaitlyn Leah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to identify the role of reading response in two elementary classrooms: one first-grade and one fourth-grade. The study examined the structured and incidental opportunities students had for response, the formats of their responses and the utility of the responses to each teacher. Qualitative data collection…

  19. Discussing the Unfathomable: Classroom-based Responses to Tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardia, Diana; Bierwert, Crisca; Cook, Constance E.; Miller, A. T.; Kaplan, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    Describes how, when asked to devote the day following the September 11 tragedy to class discussions, University of Michigan instructors benefited from the skills and classroom strategies honed by colleagues whose classes regularly deal with complex human realities. (EV)

  20. Creating learner-centered classrooms: use of an audience response system in pediatric dentistry education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey T

    2005-03-01

    Research suggests that the exclusive use of lecture in the classroom hinders student learning. The advent of compact electronic wireless audience response systems has allowed for increased student participation in the classroom. Such technology is utilized in medical education. This article describes the use of an audience response system in a "quiz bowl" format to facilitate and improve the comprehension of student dentists in core concepts in pulp therapy for the pediatric patient.

  1. A Psychoanalyst in the Classroom: On the Human Condition in Education. Transforming Subjects: Psychoanalysis, Culture, and Studies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britzman, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    "A Psychoanalyst in the Classroom" provides rich descriptions of the surprising ways individuals handle matters of love and hate when dealing with reading and writing in the classroom. With wit and sharp observations, Deborah P. Britzman advocates for a generous recognition of the vulnerabilities, creativity, and responsibilities of…

  2. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and corporate ethics programs for CSR.

  3. Aboriginal Education as Cultural Brokerage: New Aboriginal Teachers Reflect on Language and Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Julian; Cherubini, Lorenzo; Trudeau, Lyn; Hodson, Janie M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a Talking Circle of six beginning Aboriginal teachers who discussed their roles as teachers. Participants criticized teacher education programs for not preparing them to teach in ways that are respectful of Aboriginal languages and culture. They discussed the importance of coming to know themselves and their culture. The…

  4. Cultural Match or Culturally Suspect: How New Teachers of Color Negotiate Sociocultural Challenges in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achinstein, Betty; Aguirre, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Background: The call to recruit and retain teachers of color in urban high-minority schools is based on an assumption of a cultural match with students. Yet new teachers of color may find themselves challenged by students with whom they are supposedly culturally matched. Although past research has examined recruitment, preservice, and veteran…

  5. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of an organization to effectively move from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy may well depend on the organization having the ability to balance these two apparently dichotomous cultural styles. The organization which is most capable of making the necessary transition in an optimal manner may well exhibit some aspects of both cultural styles during normal operations. Data collected at one NPP does exhibit this pattern of results, with the organization exhibiting a clear hierarchical chain of command and perceived conventional behavioral expectations as well as exhibiting a more decentralized and collegial approach to decisionmaking, a team work orientation, and informal communications. Thus, it is expected that this organization possesses the capabilities to make a successful transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. Data collected at a second NPP more strongly exhibits the traditional style suggested as being important during the anticipatory strategy, with more formal communications and bureaucratically controlled decision-making. This organization may experience difficulty if faced with the need to make a transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. These conclusions are further validated based on observation of Emergency Preparedness Exercise Inspections, which suggest that the more anticipatory types of behaviors actually inhibit successful performance during an ad hoc response. The final validation of these hypotheses needs to be demonstrated with cultural data collected during emergency simulations. The mechanism to obtain such data during these types of situations is an area for future research.

  6. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1992-08-01

    The ability of an organization to effectively move from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy may well depend on the organization having the ability to balance these two apparently dichotomous cultural styles. The organization which is most capable of making the necessary transition in an optimal manner may well exhibit some aspects of both cultural styles during normal operations. Data collected at one NPP does exhibit this pattern of results, with the organization exhibiting a clear hierarchical chain of command and perceived conventional behavioral expectations as well as exhibiting a more decentralized and collegial approach to decisionmaking, a team work orientation, and informal communications. Thus, it is expected that this organization possesses the capabilities to make a successful transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. Data collected at a second NPP more strongly exhibits the traditional style suggested as being important during the anticipatory strategy, with more formal communications and bureaucratically controlled decision-making. This organization may experience difficulty if faced with the need to make a transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. These conclusions are further validated based on observation of Emergency Preparedness Exercise Inspections, which suggest that the more anticipatory types of behaviors actually inhibit successful performance during an ad hoc response. The final validation of these hypotheses needs to be demonstrated with cultural data collected during emergency simulations. The mechanism to obtain such data during these types of situations is an area for future research.

  7. Flipping the classroom: Case-based learning, accountability, assessment, and feedback leads to a favorable change in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokadam, Nahush A; Dardas, Todd F; Hermsen, Joshua L; Pal, Jay D; Mulligan, Michael S; Jacobs, L Myria; Wood, Douglas E; Verrier, Edward D

    2017-04-01

    The 88-week Thoracic Surgery Curriculum is challenging to implement because of the large content in a traditional lecture format. This study investigates flipping the classroom by using a case-based format designed to stimulate resident preparation and engagement. The didactic conference format was altered. Curricular reading assignments, case review, and conference participation prepared residents for novel formative assessment quizzes. Ten residents participated, and faculty served as controls. Scores were compared with the use of linear regression adjusted for clustering of responses for each person. A survey was administered to determine impressions of this educational technique. A majority of residents completed curricular readings (82%) and reviewed case presentations (79%). Resident performance initially lagged behind faculty but exceeded faculty performance by the conclusion (interaction P = .047). Junior resident overall performance was superior to senior residents over the entire analysis (P = .026); however, both groups improved over time similarly (P = .34) Increased reading from the curriculum (5% increase per level, P = .001) and case presentation review (6% increase per level, P Assessment scores increased at both resident levels, and resident performance exceeded faculty performance with time. By using experiential learning principles, flipping the classroom in this manner may improve educational culture by enhancing accountability, assessment, and feedback. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Managing the Classroom a Very Salient Responsibility in Teaching and Learning Situations Is Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2013-01-01

    A knowledgeable teacher may fail in teaching due to inability to work effectively with pupils. Thus, pupils may be entertaining each other during class time, talking aloud incessantly, walking around aimlessly in the classroom, and bothering others, among other annoyances. When supervising university student teachers in the public schools, the…

  9. Managing the Classroom a Very Salient Responsibility in Teaching and Learning Situations Is Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2013-01-01

    A knowledgeable teacher may fail in teaching due to inability to work effectively with pupils. Thus, pupils may be entertaining each other during class time, talking aloud incessantly, walking around aimlessly in the classroom, and bothering others, among other annoyances. When supervising university student teachers in the public schools, the…

  10. The Use of Culture Portfolio Project in a Korean Culture Classroom: Evaluating Stereotypes and Enhancing Cross-Cultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byon, Andrew Sangpil

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates a case of designing, implementing, and evaluating a semester-long culture portfolio project in a Korean culture class in an American university setting. The paper addresses the following four issues: (1) How does the project help the students gain insights into a particular aspect of Korean culture and encourage them to…

  11. Using Classroom Response Technology to Create an Active Learning Environment in Marketing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muncy, James A.; Eastman, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom response systems (CRS), also called student/audience response systems or clickers, have been used by business instructors, particularly in larger classes, to allow instructors to ask students questions in class and have their responses immediately tabulated and reported electronically. While clickers have typically been used to measure…

  12. Public science of the savage mind: contesting cultural anthropology in the Cold War classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Erika Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    "What is human about human beings? How did they get that way? How can they be made more so?" These three questions formed the basis of a fifth-grade social studies curriculum project developed in the 1960s called Man: A Course of Study, or MACOS. In the years between the curriculum's development in the 1960s and its controversial implementation in the 1970s, two separate sets of concerns served to problematize the use of anthropological materials in public school classrooms. On the one hand, MACOS designers were wary of the possibly racist interpretations of exploring so-called "primitive" cultures in the classroom. On the other, conservative textbook reformers objected to claims that all cultural solutions to biological problems were morally equivalent. Once MACOS earned a place in national news, it came to embody both hopes for the redemption of American democratic society and fears about the violent nature of humans, depending on one's political perspective. These mixed messages eventually undermined the long-term success of the program as public science. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cultural border crossing in three urban classrooms: A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, Rupnarain

    This study examined the effects of the instruction of four youth cultural border crossing behaviors: flexibility, being at ease, playfulness, and citizenship as an intervention aimed at helping students to transition across three borders, student to student, student to science, and student to teacher. The research involved 12 ninth- and 10th-grade students in a large urban school district in three diverse classrooms, A, B, and C. Four students in each classroom volunteered for the study. The students in Groups A and B were in 9th grade Living Environment and students in Group B were in 10th grade chemistry. These students participated in this instructional intervention for three months. The study was conducted using both quantitative and qualitative methods based on participant observations, interviews, and questionnaire. The result indicated that there was no significant effect of the cultural border crossing instructions on the students' interactions across the three borders examined. However, the instructions helped Group A and Group B to be more flexible but not group C. Also, the instructions helped Group A to be more playful and at ease but not Group B and C. The instructions also helped Group A to show more citizenship but not Group B and C. In addition, there was no difference between the pretest and posttest cultural bother crossing behavior. Moreover, qualitative data analysis showed that the participants were more flexible, at ease, and playful among peers than across student to teacher and student to science borders. Also, the use of citizenship in the three groups showed no effect on the participants' interaction with peers. Although, the findings showed no effect of cultural border crossing instructions on students' interactions, it is suggested that we continue to find ways to help students feel more comfortable in science.

  14. Six Easy and Beneficial Strategies for an Interculturally Responsive (IR) Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn; Mixon, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    This scenario is a reflection of many classrooms throughout the United States. This heterogeneous population of students is Linguistically, Culturally, and Educationally Diverse. Some are Native Born, and others have immigrated for various reasons. These reasons include new Employment Opportunities, a United States Education, Political Refuge, and…

  15. Error Management Behavior in Classrooms: Teachers' Responses to Student Mistakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Only a few studies have focused on how teachers deal with mistakes in actual classroom settings. Teachers' error management behavior was analyzed based on data obtained from direct (Study 1) and videotaped systematic observation (Study 2), and students' self-reports. In Study 3 associations between students' and teachers' attitudes towards…

  16. Developing Culturally Responsive Leaders through Online Learning and Teaching Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Alisa

    2011-01-01

    The article will discuss culturally responsive leadership theory as a means to developing pre-service Master of School Administration (MSA) students as culturally responsive leaders who understand and are able to bridge differences that arise in diverse educational settings. The issues explored include those related to the cultural heritages and…

  17. The development of critical and cultural literacies in a study of Mariama Ba's So Long a Letter in the South African literature classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.H. Latha

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The Languages, Literacy and Communication learning area of Curriculum 2005 endorses “intercultural understanding, access to different world views and a critical understanding of the concept of culture” (National Department of Education, 2001:44. Although this curriculum is learner-centred and tries to create a better balance in the previously asymmetrical relationship between teacher and student, it does place great demands on the educator to avoid reinforcing cultural and multipolitical ideals which are not concomitant with the principles of a multicultural democracy. Since learners are expected to respond to the aesthetic, affective, cultural and social values in texts, the educator has to act responsibly in choosing texts which promote the values inherent in Curriculum 2005. Implicit in the curriculum statement is a commitment to critical pedagogy in the literature classroom with the general aim of promoting societal transformation. As the cultural assumptions underlying particular texts are often not known or shared by all learners, it is important for the educator to facilitate an examination of these assumptions in order to promote cultural understanding and values such as religious tolerance. This article will therefore investigate the development of cultural and critical literacies in the South African literature classroom with particular focus on So Long a Letter by the postcolonial African Muslim woman writer, Mariama Ba.

  18. Cultural Speak: Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Experiential Learning in a Public Speaking Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Janet; Tobler, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the efficacy of modifications made to a higher education Latina/o public speaking course to enhance student growth and understanding. The changes included the addition of a service-learning component and the incorporation of culturally relevant pedagogy. Selected research, particularly related to college students, on…

  19. Chinese Culture in ELT Classroom-The Influence of Chinese Culture on Student's Answering Questions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁玲萍

    2005-01-01

    Based on personal observation and students self-reports,this article studies the characteristics presented by students in answering questions.It is found that Chinese culture plays an important part in explaining their specific behaviors. Hence, in order to lessen the negative effect of it,the author offers her own suggestions.

  20. Social Media in the Science Classroom: Using Instagram With Young Women to Incorporate Visual Literacy and Youth Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpagli, Lauren Paola

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact that a digital, picture sharing platform, specifically Instagram, can have on the learning experience in the biology classroom. Students are surrounded by a societal culture inundated with technology, including smart phones and social media, and science educators need to find ways to harness the popularity of these tools in the classroom. The theoretical frameworks guiding this study are Culturally Relevant Pedagogy (CRP), Digital Visual Literacy, and a Critical Feminism. To understand the many ways of social media, specifically Instagram, could influence science content understanding in the classroom, the research methodology used was a connective ethnography. This approach allowed for analysis for the creation of the dual-setting of the classroom and the digital platform and the emerging culture that resulted. As Instagram was used as the virtual component of the classroom, this gave rise to a new identity for the classroom, one in which a digital culture was established. Instagram served as an extension of the classroom space that was not limited by time, location, or teacher availability. The participants in this study were female high school biology students in New York City. An Instagram profile was created for the course and used in different ways: To post homework reminders, lab pictures, biology memes, current events, and discoveries, thereby exposing students to science in "nontraditional" ways. Students discussed their reactions and feelings of the uses and effectiveness of Instagram in the class and made suggestions for future applications through questionnaires, focus groups, and individual interviews. Findings reveal Instagram to ease access for review and reminders, integrate teenage culture into learning, and serve as an effective supplement tool to traditional classroom instruction. One chief goal of this research project was to help educators increase their understanding of the role that social

  1. 生态哲学视域下课堂文化的内涵%The Denotation of Classroom Culture from the Perspective of Ecological Philosophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨虹; 丘名实

    2013-01-01

    Classroom culture is the core element that affects the classroom teaching. A scientific knowledge of the classroom culture is the premier to improve the quality of classroom teaching. What's more, constructing"the classroom culture is also the key to the success of the classroom reform. Based on the perspective of the ecological philosophy, the classroom culture can be defined as"an ecosystem that is made up of teachers and students interaction with the classroom environment and the formation of values". The implication of this reveals that the classroom culture in essence is a kind of ecological system, mainly consisting of teachers, students and the classroom environment.%  课堂文化是影响课堂教学的核心因素,对课堂文化的科学认识是提高课堂教学质量的前提,变革课堂文化是教学改革成功的关键。以生态哲学为视角,课堂文化可定义为“师生以价值观为引领与课堂环境相互作用而形成的生态系统”,此内涵揭示了课堂文化的本质是一种生态系统,主要由有机体师生和课堂环境构成。

  2. Raising Pasifika Achievement: Teacher Cultural-Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter-Samuels, Tute

    2013-01-01

    Pasifika learners, along with Maori, continue to experience high disparities in New Zealand's education system. Furthermore, it is predicted that over the next few decades, the majority of students in New Zealand primary schools will be Maori and Pasifika. The implications for classroom teachers are enormous. In reviewing a range of literature,…

  3. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Verbeek-van Noord

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012. The Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews was used to assess the risk of bias in the individual studies. Results: In total, 22 manuscripts were included for review. Training settings, study designs, and evaluation methods varied widely. Most studies reporting only a selection of culture dimensions found mainly positive results, whereas studies reporting all safety culture dimensions of the particular survey found mixed results. On average, studies were at moderate risk of bias. Conclusion: Evidence of the effectiveness of Crew Resource Management training in health care on safety culture is scarce and the validity of most studies is limited. The results underline the necessity of more valid study designs, preferably using triangulation methods.

  4. Relationship of Children's Social Desirability Response Tendencies to Their Expectations of Response to Achievement Behaviors in Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Ellen F.

    This study clarifies the relationship between children's social desirability (CSD) response tendencies and their withdrawal from classroom achievement situations by investigating the effects of the child's expectations of peer response. Data gathered included scores on the Children's Social Desirability Scale, scores on an expectancy of response…

  5. Identity, culture and shared experiences: The power of cogenerative dialogues in urban science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Gillian Ursula

    2007-05-01

    The research presented in this dissertation details four major examples of work that took place during a three-year longitudinal study in a small urban New York City public high school for high achieving youth. It aims to play a role in contributing to the understanding of the breakdown between and amongst those parties involved in urban science education. The work outlined herein responds to the calls for improvement within urban education, utilizing the experiences, knowledge and practices of its students, in order to help inform and improve science teaching and learning. Theoretical lenses upon which this critical ethnographic research is grounded primarily involve those that are socio-cultural in nature and examine the sociology of emotions. In this research, I address how urban students, who have been historically alienated by science, develop forms of culture, enact them in science classes and then make transitions from participating marginally toward participating more centrally, demonstrating increasing science and science-like practices with higher levels of expertise. This work involves investigating human agency and its expansion as it becomes increasingly incorporated and internalized into individual and collective habitus. The protocol utilized in this critical ethnography (videotapes of cogenerative dialogues, classroom practices and interviews; journal entries, field notes, student and teacher generated artifacts) facilitates the exploration and understanding of the ways by which aligning culture and expanding student roles, both inside and outside of the classroom can occur. The results of this study include concrete examples and interpretations of these expansions and, provide suggestions by which more adaptable forms of teaching and learning can be enacted. These practices ultimately benefit a wider variety of students who as result will become better at creating their own structures to succeed.

  6. Classroom Response Systems for Implementing "Interactive Inquiry" in Large Organic Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Richard W.; Caughran, Joel A.; Sauers, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors have developed "sequence response applications" for classroom response systems (CRSs) that allow instructors to engage and actively involve students in the learning process, probe for common misconceptions regarding lecture material, and increase interaction between instructors and students. "Guided inquiry" and…

  7. Academic Instruction or Behavioral Control: An Experimental Study of Teacher Responses to Classroom Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natriello, Gary; Dornbusch, Sanford M.

    An examination of teachers' responses to questionnaires identifying sixteen classroom academic and social behavior problems revealed different reactions to each type. A system was developed to measure the responses which were coded in terms of the extent to which they evidenced the presentation of standards or evidenced warmth. Teachers presented…

  8. The Psychometric Properties of Classroom Response System Data: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Classroom response systems (often referred to as "clickers") have slowly gained adoption over the recent decade; however, critics frequently doubt their pedagogical value starting with the validity of the gathered responses: There is concern that students simply "click" random answers. This case study looks at different…

  9. Culturally Responsive Dispositions in Prospective Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Desha L.; Edwards, Belinda; Kuhel, Karen A.; Lim, Woong

    2016-01-01

    Sustaining teachers in culturally and linguistically diverse schools has been a prominent issue for years. This qualitative study focused on the impact of an enhanced preparation program on the cultural dispositions of five pre-service mathematics teachers. It is postulated that if positive cultural dispositions are developed in teacher…

  10. Belief, Knowledge and Understanding. How to Deal with the Relations Between Different Cultural Perspectives in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-dos-Santos, Frederik; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2017-05-01

    This article discusses how to deal with the relations between different cultural perspectives in classrooms, based on a proposal for considering understanding and knowledge as goals of science education, inspired by Dewey's naturalistic humanism. It thus combines educational and philosophical interests. In educational terms, our concerns relate to how science teachers position themselves in multicultural classrooms. In philosophical terms, we are interested in discussing the relations between belief, understanding, and knowledge under the light of Dewey's philosophy. We present a synthesis of Dewey's theory of inquiry through his naturalistic humanism and discuss its implications for the concepts of belief, understanding, and knowledge, as well as for the goals of science teaching. In particular, we highlight problems arising in the context of possible conflicts between scientific and religious claims in the school environment that result from totalitarian positions. We characterize an individual's position as totalitarian if he or she takes some way of thinking as the only one capable of expressing the truth about all that exists in the world, lacks open-mindedness to understand different interpretative perspectives, and attempts to impose her or his interpretation about the facts to others by violent means or not. From this stance, any other perspective is taken to be false a priori and, accordingly, as a putative target to be suppressed or adapted to the privileged way of thinking. We argue, instead, for a more fallibilist evaluation of our own beliefs and a more respectful appraisal of the diversity of students' beliefs by both students and teachers.

  11. Silencing the Everyday Experiences of Youth? Deconstructing Issues of Subjectivity and Popular/Corporate Culture in the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of popular/corporate culture texts and discourses on the subjectivities and everyday social experiences of young people, and the extent to which such influences are critically analysed in the English classroom. I present two levels of synthesised information using data analysis born of a mixed-methods…

  12. Gender Literacy in the Cultural Studies Composition Classroom: "Fashioning" the "Self" through an Analysis of Popular Magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langstraat, Lisa

    In the writing classroom, students and instructors alike must not only theorize experience but must also experience theory. This is no easy task, for despite cultural studies' emphasis on the "subjective side of social relations," contemporary theory is heavily directed toward signifying practices, and, as Lawrence Grossberg argues,…

  13. A Cross-Cultural Study of Students' Behaviors and Classroom Management Strategies in the USA and Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sunwoo; Koh, Myung-sook

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-cultural study is to investigate comparative students' problem behaviors and classroom behavior management strategies for students in urban public schools between teachers in the United States and Korea. This study incorporated data collected from two different teacher self-reported survey questionnaires, the Student…

  14. Emotional Intelligence and Cross-Cultural Communication Competence: An Analysis of Group Dynamics and Interpersonal Relationships in a Diverse Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Melvin C.; Okoro, Ephraim A.; Okoro, Sussie U.

    2013-01-01

    This study discusses the significance of emotional intelligence and intercultural communication competence in globally diverse classroom settings. Specifically, the research shows a correlation between degrees of emotional intelligence and human communication competence (age, gender, and culture). The dataset consists of 364 participants. Nearly…

  15. Exploring Culture-Related Content in the COCA with Task-Based Activities in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, António

    2013-01-01

    The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) at the Brigham Young University website has been used in the English as a Foreign language (EFL) classroom to help learners better understand how language works at different levels of analysis and also to develop their writing skills. However, it also allows learners to explore culture-related…

  16. Culturally Responsive Social Skill Instruction for Latino Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Correa, Vivian I.; Anderson, Adrienne L.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural friendships and peer interactions are important skills for Latino students to become socially adjusted in U.S. schools. Culturally responsive social skill instruction allows educators to teach essential social skills while attending to the native culture and personal experiences of the students. The present study examined the…

  17. Experiences of faculty and students using an audience response system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Monturo, Cheryl; Conroy, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The advent of innovative technologies, such as the audience response system, provides an opportunity to engage students and enhance learning. Based on their experiences, three nursing faculty evaluated the use of an audience response system in four distinct nursing courses through the use of informal survey results. When using the audience response system, the faculty experienced an increased perception of student attentiveness and engagement, high level of class attendance, and enhanced learning. Faculty feelings were mixed concerning the burden in adapting to increased classroom time and increased preparation time. Students' perception of the value of audience response system use was mostly positive, except when responses were included as part of the grade. The majority of the students indicated that use of the audience response system enhanced learning and was a helpful learning method when used with NCLEX-style questions. Overall, faculty believed that the benefits of student engagement and enhanced learning outweighed the burdens of incorporating this new technology in the classroom.

  18. The Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparedness Scale: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the competencies of culturally responsive teaching and construct a Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparedness Scale (CRTPS) for the use of teacher preparation programs and preservice teachers. Competencies listed in the scale were identified through literature reviews and input from experts. The…

  19. Reader Response Theory in the High School English Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Karen Yvonne

    A study examined the theory concerning reader response and the rationale and practice of reader response in the high school English curriculum. Formal experimental studies existed that explored reader response practices in the high school setting, but no formal studies existed on the questioning practices of potential reader response teachers. A…

  20. Socially Responsible Rage: "Postcolonial" Feminism, Writing, and the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasseler, Terri A.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses students' reactions to rage focusing on their responses to bell hooks' collection of essays, "Killing Rage." Believes that by studying postcolonial responses to rage feminist teachers can learn how to responsibly articulate and respond to rage. Considers postcolonial and western feminist responses to rage and addresses using…

  1. CRiSP: An Instrument for Assessing Student Perceptions of Classroom Response Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Alice M.; Dunn, Peter K.; McDonald, Christine; Oprescu, Florin

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of an instrument for evaluating classroom response systems (CRS). While a number of studies evaluating CRS have been published to date, no standardised instrument exists as a means of evaluating the impact of using the CRS. This means that comparing the different systems, or evaluating the…

  2. Classroom Response Systems Have Not "Crossed the Chasm": Estimating Numbers of Chemistry Faculty Who Use Clickers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emenike, Mary E.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Results of a national survey of faculty usage of assessment tools are presented and framed within the concept of the technology adoption life cycle. Specifically, the use of classroom response systems as reported by survey participants suggests that the adoption of this technique in chemistry is still at the "early adopters" stage, or perhaps is…

  3. Classroom Response Systems: Effects on the Critical Analysis Skills of Students in Introductory Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cindy Chesworth; Columba, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    College instructors often teach scientific thinking by asking students to review and analyze a primary research article. The main purpose of this study was to explore how classroom response systems (CRS) could help impact the quality of written analysis papers submitted for this assignment by students taking 100-level biology courses at a…

  4. Clickers 201: Exploring the Next Levels of Using Classroom Response Systems in Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    While there is a wealth of information and resources for new users of classroom response systems, much is yet to be explored, particularly for experienced instructors hoping to leverage this technology further in support of effective learning. In this paper, I highlight recent literature findings, and suggest some areas for future exploration and…

  5. Pre-Service Teachers' Perception of Quick Response (QR) Code Integration in Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nagla; Santos, Ieda M.; Areepattamannil, Shaljan

    2017-01-01

    Quick Response (QR) codes have been discussed in the literature as adding value to teaching and learning. Despite their potential in education, more research is needed to inform practice and advance knowledge in this field. This paper investigated the integration of the QR code in classroom activities and the perceptions of the integration by…

  6. A New Approach to Using Photographs and Classroom Response Systems in Middle School Astronomy Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Ju

    2012-01-01

    This study reports middle school astronomy classes that implemented photographs and classroom response systems (CRSs) in a discussion-oriented pedagogy with a curriculum unit for the topics of "day-night" and "cause of seasons." In the new pedagogy, a teacher presented conceptual questions with photographs, her 6th grade…

  7. Efficacy of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach: Results from a 3-Year, Longitudinal Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Baroody, Alison E.; Curby, Timothy W.; Ko, Michelle; Thomas, Julia B.; Merritt, Eileen G.; Abry, Tashia; DeCoster, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled field trial examined the efficacy of the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach on student achievement. Schools (n = 24) were randomized into intervention and control conditions; 2,904 children were studied from end of second to fifth grade. Students at schools assigned to the RC condition did not outperform students at…

  8. Rhetorical Dissent as an Adaptive Response to Classroom Problems: A Test of Protection Motivation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkan, San; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    Protection motivation theory (PMT) explains people's adaptive behavior in response to personal threats. In this study, PMT was used to predict rhetorical dissent episodes related to 210 student reports of perceived classroom problems. In line with theoretical predictions, a moderated moderation analysis revealed that students were likely to voice…

  9. Evaluating Impact of Small-Group Discussion on Learning Utilizing a Classroom Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flosason, Thorhallur O.; McGee, Heather M.; Diener-Ludwig, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Classroom response systems (also referred to as clickers) can enhance learning outcomes and are generally viewed favorably by students and instructors alike. The current study used an alternating treatments design to examine whether discussing questions in small groups before responding to clicker questions during lecture improved accurate…

  10. Rhetorical Dissent as an Adaptive Response to Classroom Problems: A Test of Protection Motivation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkan, San; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    Protection motivation theory (PMT) explains people's adaptive behavior in response to personal threats. In this study, PMT was used to predict rhetorical dissent episodes related to 210 student reports of perceived classroom problems. In line with theoretical predictions, a moderated moderation analysis revealed that students were likely to voice…

  11. Managing Classroom Behavior of Head Start Children Using Response Cost and Token Economy Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Jennifer D.; Fortson, Beverly L.; McNeil, Cheryl B.; Humphreys, Lisa A.

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of three behavior management techniques used in a Head Start classroom was examined. The three techniques included: (a) techniques currently used by the teacher, (b) response cost, and (c) the Level System (token economy). The current study used an ABACA single subject withdrawal design with follow-up where all conditions were…

  12. Developmental Interdependence Hypothesis Revisited in the Brunei Classroom [and] A Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Elizabeth M.; Saravanan, Vanithamani

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the importance of developing the native language (L1), i.e., "Bahasa Melayu," as a firm foundation for the learning of a second language (L2) in Brunei and analyzes problems facing learners of "Bahasa Melayu" and English in Brunei classrooms. Saravanan's response focuses on the structure of the Brunesian bilingual…

  13. The Meaning of Mathematics Instruction in Multilingual Classrooms: Analyzing the Importance of Responsibility for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Ase

    2012-01-01

    In the multilingual mathematics classroom, the assignment for teachers to scaffold students by means of instruction and guidance in order to facilitate language progress and learning for all is often emphasized. In Sweden, where mathematics education is characterized by a low level of teacher responsibility for students' performance, this…

  14. Using a "Classroom Response System" to Improve Active Student Participation in a Large Sexual Health Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail-Smith, Karen; Blumell, Charla; Elmore, Barry

    2006-01-01

    Larger class sizes are often the solution to the greater enrollments and fewer resources that many colleges and universities face today. These large classes present special challenges to courses that were typically and most effectively taught in small, interactive and open settings. A "Classroom Response System" (CRS), an instructional tool that…

  15. Features of Application of Classroom Response System at the Lectures in Russia and Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starichenko, Boris E.; Egorov, Artem N.; Yavich, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the study of teaching opportunities of classroom response systems (?RS) and the conditions for their effective use in the teaching process. In the course of research more than 260 students of Ural State Pedagogical University (Russia, Yekaterinburg) and Ariel University Center of Samaria (Israel, Ariel) were surveyed to…

  16. Evaluating Impact of Small-Group Discussion on Learning Utilizing a Classroom Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flosason, Thorhallur O.; McGee, Heather M.; Diener-Ludwig, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Classroom response systems (also referred to as clickers) can enhance learning outcomes and are generally viewed favorably by students and instructors alike. The current study used an alternating treatments design to examine whether discussing questions in small groups before responding to clicker questions during lecture improved accurate…

  17. Analysis of Classroom Response System Questions via Four Lenses in a General Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Aaron D.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2009-01-01

    General Chemistry lecture questions used in an electronic classroom response system (CRS) were analyzed using three theoretical frameworks and the pedagogical context in which they were presented. The analytical lenses included whether students were allowed to collaborate, Bloom's Taxonomy, a framework developed by Robinson and Nurrenbern, and an…

  18. Visual Inspirations: The Pedagogical and Cultural Significance of Creative Posters in the Art Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasio, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Creative posters in the classroom can inspire students to become engaged and motivated in learning art. Within the classroom, there are many places to put posters so that students can read them (especially when they get bored in the classroom) - on the cabinets, near the chalkboard, on the teacher's desk and any spare space on the wall. There is…

  19. Culturally responsive instruction for english language learners with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Michael John; O'Connor, Rollanda

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes the culturally responsive instruction of one special education teacher with Latino English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities in an urban elementary school setting. This study was situated in a social constructivist research based framework. In investigating this instruction with ELLs, this study focused on how one teacher's knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy affected her special education instruction. Findings resulted in three major themes that were aligned with the current literature in this area: Cultural Aspects of Teaching Reading, Culturally Relevant Skills-Based Instruction, and Collaborative Agency Time. The results indicated that the success of special education with ELLs at the elementary education level might be dependent on how well the special education teacher integrates culturally responsive instruction with ELLs' cultural and linguistic needs. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  20. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLESIA O. GRYGORIEVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Grygorieva OO, Berezovsjka MA, Dacenko OI. 2015. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 38-42. Two cultures of Chlamydomonas actinochloris Deason et Bold in the lag-phase were exposed to the microwave irradiation. One of them (culture 1 was not treated beforehand, whereas the other (culture 2 was irradiated by microwaves 2 years earlier. The measurement of cell quantity as well as measurement of change of intensities and spectra of cultures photoluminescence (PL in the range of chlorophyll a emission was regularly conducted during the cell cultures development. Cell concentration of culture 1 exposed to the microwave irradiation for the first time has quickly restored while cell concentration of culture 2 which was irradiated repeatedly has fallen significantly. The following increasing of cell concentration of culture 2 is negligible. Cell concentration reaches the steady-state level that is about a half of the cell concentration of control culture. Initially the PL efficiency of cells of both cultures decreases noticeable as a result of irradiation. Then there is the monotonic increase to the values which are significantly higher than the corresponding values in the control cultures. The ratio of the intensities at the maxima of the main emission bands of chlorophyll for control samples of both cultures remained approximately at the same level. At the same time effect of irradiation on the cell PL spectrum appears as a temporary reduction of this magnitude.

  1. Affective response to social comparison in the classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham (Bram); Kuyper, H.; Van der Zee, Y.G.

    2005-01-01

    In a study among 609 secondary school students, the affective reactions to social comparisons of grades were examined. Overall, the students reported more frequent responses to upward than to downward comparison, more identification than contrast in their comparisons, and more frequent responses imp

  2. 浅谈体育课堂文化构建%Discussion on the Construction of Sports Classroom Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏文军

    2016-01-01

    The development of school sports culture to guide the direction of school physical education curriculum reform, school physical education curriculum reform promote the development of school sports culture. Only by establishing scientific and reasonable physical classroom culture, in order to deepen the reform of school sports, school sports to promote cultural de-velopment, and accelerating the construction of socialist spiritual civilization. Therefore, how to scientifically reasonable con-struction sports classroom culture of campus sports culture development is particularly important.%学校体育文化发展引导着学校体育课程改革的方向,学校体育课程改革的过程推动着学校体育文化的发展。只有构建科学合理的体育课堂文化,才能深化学校体育改革,推动学校体育文化发展,加快社会主义精神文明建设。因此,如何科学合理地构建体育课堂文化学对校体育文化的发展尤为重要。

  3. An Empirical Perspective on the Culture - Corporate Social Responsibility Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru ZAIȚ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Business competition and pressure of European directives put Romanian company in a position to find answers to issues related to long-term survival and development. In this context we believe it is necessary to analyze some of the most important components that should be taken into consideration at the strategic level: national and organizational culture. The results indicate that corporate social responsibility is supported by learning and change-oriented organizational culture, but also by a favorable cultural and national economic framework. Based on these theoretical considerations we intent to emphasize the relationships between national culture / corporate culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR, elaborating an empirical argument by analyzing the results provided by Global 100, an annual project initiated by Corporate Knights Inc. (Davos. Starting with 2005, it has the largest database in the world and an appropriate evaluation methodology that provides a ranking of the top 100 most responsible companies in the world.

  4. Climate Change, Individual Responsibilities and Cultural Frameworks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Heyd

    2010-01-01

    .... On the assumption that, in the light of accelerating climate change, individuals have both ethical and prudential responsibilities, the limited advances in mitigation and adaptation of international...

  5. What Are Middle School Students Talking about during Clicker Questions? Characterizing Small-Group Conversations Mediated by Classroom Response Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth-Cohen, Lauren A.; Smith, Michelle K.; Capps, Daniel K.; Lewin, Justin D.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using classroom response systems or clickers in science classrooms at both the university and K-12 levels. Typically, when instructors use this technology, students are asked to answer and discuss clicker questions with their peers. The existing literature on using clickers at the K-12 level has largely focused on…

  6. Manifestations of Differential Cultural Capital in a University Classroom: Views from Classroom Observations and Focus Group Discussions in a South African University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmore Mutekwe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Based predominantly on Pierre Bourdieu’s social and cultural reproduction theory, particularly his notions of cultural capital and symbolic violence, this paper explores how first year post graduate Diploma in Higher Education (PGDHE university students from diverse socio-linguistic backgrounds differ in the levels at which they understand and express themselves in classroom activities. The paper’s thesis is that the diverse nature of South African classrooms presents a number of challenges not only for students but also for educators in terms of the use of English as a medium of instruction or the language for learning and teaching (LOLT. Owing to the fact that the South African Language in Education Policy (LiEP of 1997 empowers both learners and educators in schools to use any of the eleven South African official languages as a LOLT wherever that is reasonably possible, students whose English backgrounds were deficient in enculturating them in the use of English as a learning tool often encounter challenges in expressing their ideas in the classroom, whether in writing or in oral presentations. The discussion is anchored in the data elicited through two data collection methods, lesson observations in a Diploma in Higher Education, Research class composed of students from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and through focus group discussion sessions with 40 multi-ethnic Diploma in Higher Education students from the same classroom. The data management and analysis for this study was done thematically, with views emerging from the observations and focus group discussions being clustered into superordinate themes for convenience of the discussion of the findings. The findings of this study were that students from affluent socio-economic backgrounds who enter university with a rich and relevant English linguistic capital, values and attitudes enjoy an enormous advantage compared to their counterparts whose social class and linguistic

  7. Crisis and Man: Literary Responses Across Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnaswami, Mallika

    2012-01-01

    Myth of Sisyphus exemplifies the situation man finds himself in irrespective of his ethnic and geographical background. Art and cultural forms gave expression to this situation and the intensity of the expression depended upon the political and social dimensions. War or peace, man is always condemned to struggle with his problems, moral or otherwise. Post war English writers focused on the social problems the British society found itself in and its helplessness in dealing with them. It was th...

  8. A Validation Study of the Culturally Responsive Teaching Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2017-01-01

    Amidst the ethnic and linguistic diversity in adult English language classes, there is heightened importance to using culturally responsive teaching practices. However, there are limited quantitative examinations of this approach in adult learning environments. The purpose of this investigation was to describe patterns of culturally responsive…

  9. Identity Affirmed, Agency Engaged: Culturally Responsive Performance-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Performance-based assessment is unquestionably superior to the instrumental rationality of high-stakes standardized testing and the audit culture that testing regimes inspire. It is more likely to engender opportunities to witness the un-measureable: vision, imagination, and compassion. Performance assessments must be culturally responsive in…

  10. Culturally Responsive Collegiate Mathematics Education: Implications for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author utilizes the culturally congruent work of Gay (2010) and Ladson-Billings (2009) to highlight culturally responsive teaching as a viable option for African American students in higher education mathematics spaces. He offers translations of Gay and Ladson-Billings' work to Africana mathematics and argues that these…

  11. Cultured articular chondrocytes sheets for partial thickness cartilage defects utilizing temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kaneshiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of articular cartilage has several functions that are unique to joints. Although a technique for transplanting cultured chondrocytes has already been introduced, it is difficult to collect intact ECM when using enzymes to harvest samples. Temperature-responsive culture dishes have already been clinically applied in the fields of myocardial and corneal transplantation. Earlier studies have shown that a sheet of cultured cells with intact ECM and adhesive factors can be harvested using such culture dishes, which allow the surface properties of the dish to be reversibly altered by changing the temperature. Human chondrocytes were subjected to enzymatic digestion and then were seeded in temperature-responsive culture dishes. A sheet of chondrocytes was harvested by only reducing the temperature after the cultured cells reached confluency. A real-time PCR analysis of the chondrocyte sheets confirmed that type II collagen, aggrecan, and fibronectin were present. These results suggested that, although chondrocytes undergo dedifferentiation in a monolayer culture, multilayer chondrocyte sheets grown in a similar environment to that of three-dimensional culture may be able to maintain a normal phenotype. A histological examination suggested that multilayer chondrocyte sheets could thus prevent the loss of proteoglycans because the area covered by the sheets was well stained by safranin-O. The present experiments suggested that temperature-responsive culture dishes are useful for obtaining cultured chondrocytes, which may then be clinically employed as a substitute for periosteal patches because such sheets can be applied without a scaffold.

  12. The Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teaching (REACT): the dimensionality of student perceptions of the instructional environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter M; Demers, Joseph A; Christ, Theodore J

    2014-06-01

    This study details the initial development of the Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teachers (REACT). REACT was developed as a questionnaire to evaluate student perceptions of the classroom teaching environment. Researchers engaged in an iterative process to develop, field test, and analyze student responses on 100 rating-scale items. Participants included 1,465 middle school students across 48 classrooms in the Midwest. Item analysis, including exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, was used to refine a 27-item scale with a second-order factor structure. Results support the interpretation of a single general dimension of the Classroom Teaching Environment with 6 subscale dimensions: Positive Reinforcement, Instructional Presentation, Goal Setting, Differentiated Instruction, Formative Feedback, and Instructional Enjoyment. Applications of REACT in research and practice are discussed along with implications for future research and the development of classroom environment measures. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. The Black Box of Schooling: A Cultural History of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braster, Sjaak, Ed.; Grosvenor, Ian, Ed.; del Mar del Pozo Andres, Maria, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This book is about the classroom, the most important meeting place for teachers and pupils in an education building. Individuals' knowledge, however, about what happens inside this space is limited. In many respects the classroom is still the black box of the educational system. To open up this box, this volume brings together scholars from the…

  14. A Cross-Cultural Study of Learning Behaviours in the Classroom: From a Thinking Style Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongyu; Andrade, Heidi L.; Yan, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Chinese students were often portrayed as passive learners in the classroom, whereas their American peers have been viewed as active learners. This study was designed to examine and explain the distinct learning behaviours in the classroom between these two student groups in relation to thinking style. Surveys of learning behaviours and thinking…

  15. Employing a Classroom Response System to Teach Law: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Classroom Response Systems (CRSs) can be used to promote engagement and interaction in a teaching environment. This article builds on previous work to present a case study of CRS use in a large LLB lecture series. It focuses upon issues of accessibility, summative assessment and the possibility of employing signals transmitted by students’ mobile phones. This discussion leads into a short best practice guide, drawing upon practical observations of CRS use. Finally, some specific examples of C...

  16. 'Passivity' or 'Potential'?: Teacher responses to learner identity in the low-level ESL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Ollerhead

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores some initial findings from a multi-site, classroom-based case study research project into English as a Second Language (ESL literacy provision to very low-literate adult learners within Australia’s Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program (LLNP. The aim of the research is to report on the researcher’s observations of teachers’ pedagogical practices and to investigate the extent to which they are responsive to learners’ developing and multiple identities.

  17. 'Passivity' or 'Potential'?: Teacher responses to learner identity in the low-level ESL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Ollerhead

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores some initial findings from a multi-site, classroom-based case study research project into English as a Second Language (ESL literacy provision to very low-literate adult learners within Australia’s Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program (LLNP. The aim of the research is to report on the researcher’s observations of teachers’ pedagogical practices and to investigate the extent to which they are responsive to learners’ developing and multiple identities.

  18. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  19. Total Physical Response in Storytelling and the Second Language Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董媛媛

    2012-01-01

    Total Physical Response Storytelling(TPRS) is a language teaching method built around the coordination of speech and action:it attempts to teach language through physical activity.Developed in the 1990’s by Blaine Ray of Bakersfield,California,it draws on several traditions including developmental psychology,learning theory,and humanistic pedagogy.It provides the critical vehicle of storytelling;_-to utilize andéxpand ’acquired vocabulary by contextualizing it in high-interest,stories which students can hear,see,act out,retell,revise and rewrite.

  20. Classroom response systems: What do they add to an active learning environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fies, Carmen Hedwig

    This study investigated the impact of completely anonymous Classroom Response System (CRS) use on learning outcomes and student attitudes in a large university physical science course for pre-service teachers. As students were expected to have read the textbook prior to class, class time was devoted primarily to conceptual introductions followed by small group discussions of qualitative questions. In the treatment condition, each group provided a single response anonymously using the CRS. The control group responded individually and publicly by show of hands. Responses formed the basis for further discussion in both cases. Anonymity of responses in the control condition was expected to enhance participation and to provide more reliable formative assessment for the instructor, thus enhancing subsequent instruction and learning. The overwhelmingly female study population comprised two course sections with the same instructor. The sections reversed treatment and control group roles for units on Newtonian mechanics and thermodynamics. Students took pre- and posttests for each unit, completed Response System Surveys once and the VASS twice, and submitted weekly mini-reflections and one metareflection. These were analyzed for evidence of attitudes toward science and learning. Whole-class discussions were video-recorded and analyzed for evidence of participation and use of student responses for "just-in-time" teaching. Although CRS use did not improve learning outcomes over the control as measured by pre and posttests, it improved participation, as reflected in the video record and as self-reported by students in reflections, while it was in use. When they were using the CRS, students also indicated greater interest in learning for understanding, as opposed to preferring authoritarian delivery of information by the instructor and opportunities for procedural drills. A framework for classroom interactions emerged. This "C3" framework comprised three dimensions interacting

  1. Teachers’ intended classroom management strategies for students with ADHD: a cross-cultural study between South Korea and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of this study was to investigate Korean and German teachers’ intentions of using classroom management strategies (CMS for students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD based on the theory of reasoned action (TRA and the theory of planned behavior (TPB. Participants and procedure Participants were 639 Korean and 317 German teachers. Disproportional stratified sampling was used. As a result, 264 Korean and 264 German matched teachers were obtained. Kos’s questionnaire was slightly modified. The survey instrument was distributed from September 2012 to December 2013. SPSS 22.0 was used to analyze the data. Results Korean teachers were more influenced by norms of colleagues and parents than German teachers were. Teachers in both countries have more favorable attitudes towards positive-oriented CMS compared to negative-oriented CMS, and perceived themselves as being able to control all CMS in the classroom. The TRA proved to better predict both Korean and German teachers’ intentions of using CMS compared to the TPB. Conclusions This study is an important step towards understanding teachers’ CMS in the cultural context of Korea and Germany. The findings of this study will be an essential resource to develop an ADHD management manual based on theoretical and cultural perspectives, so that teachers in both countries are prepared for students with ADHD in their classroom, rather than give up on them.

  2. Perspective-Taking and Meaning-Making through Engagement with Cultural Narratives: Bringing History to Life in a Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The MLA Report (2007) accords considerable weight to the role of culture in a transformed approach to language education in the U.S. and outlines “one possible model” for developing transculturalunderstanding that involves the interpretation of the “cultural narratives” inherent in all forms of cultural representation (p. 238). How exactly students might be engaged in interpreting cultural narratives in the foreign language classroom, though, remains to be further specified, imagined, practic...

  3. Cultural differences in responses to a Likert scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jerry W; Jones, Patricia S; Mineyama, Yoshimitsu; Zhang, Xinwei Esther

    2002-08-01

    Cultural differences in responses to a Likert scale were examined. Self-identified Chinese, Japanese, and Americans (N=136, 323, and 160, respectively) recruited at ethnic or general supermarkets in Southern California completed a 13-question Sense of Coherence scale with a choice of either four, five, or seven responses in either Chinese, Japanese, or English. The Japanese respondents more frequently reported difficulty with the scale, the Chinese more frequently skipped questions, and both these groups selected the midpoint more frequently on items that involved admitting to a positive emotion than did the Americans, who were more likely to indicate a positive emotion. Construct validity of the scale tended to be better for the Chinese and the Americans when there were four response choices and for the Japanese when there were seven. Although culture affected response patterns, the association of sense of coherence and health was positive in all three cultural groups. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The influence of behavior preceding a reinforced response on behavior change in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdin, A E

    1977-01-01

    The influence of behavior that immediately precedes a reinforced target response on the effectiveness of a reinforcement contingency was examined in two experiments with mentally retarded children in a special-education classroom. Two reinforcement schedules were examined in each experiment. For each schedule, a prespecified period of attentive behavior served as the target response. The schedules differed in whether inattentive or attentive behavior was required immediately to precede the target response. These schedules were examined with one child in a simultaneous treatment design using praise as the reinforcer (Experiment I), and with two children in separate reversal designs using tokens as the reinforcer (Experiment II). While attentive behavior increased under each schedule, the increase was greater when attentive rather than inattentive behavior preceded the reinforced response. The results indicated that the effect of a contingency may be determined not only by the specific response reinforced but also by the behavior that immediately precedes that response.

  5. From Deliberative Democracy to Communicative Democracy in the Classroom. A Response to "Education for Deliberative Democracy: A Typology of Classroom Discussions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weasel, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    This response to Samuelsson's typology for assessing deliberative democracy in classroom discussions views his analysis through an equity lens. It offers Young's model of communicative democracy as a resource and argues that incorporating that model's emphasis on greeting, rhetoric, and storytelling into the typology can help to promote more…

  6. Responsive Play: Exploring Play as Reader Response in a First Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Tori K.

    2016-01-01

    Play in the school setting is a highly contested issue in today's restrictive academic environment. Although many early childhood educators advocate the use of play in their classrooms and emphasize the importance of play for children's learning and development, children beyond the preschool and kindergarten years are not often afforded…

  7. Exploring an In-Service Staff Development System for Classroom Teachers in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligenstein, Janna X.

    2010-01-01

    Population data across the nation demonstrates the growing number of students in public schools who are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, while public school data reflects a teacher population that is mainly white, middle class and female. While new teacher programs are beginning to respond to this diversity, in-service…

  8. Problems with Peer Response of Writing-as-a-Process Approach in an EFL Writing Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utami Widiati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of reflection on personal experience in teaching writing using the process approach at the Department of English, State University of Malang, Indonesia. It firstly describes the current practice of teaching writing courses at the Department. Following this, ESL writing literature is explored to show how process approaches have been accepted in ESL composition. Then, the paper discusses some problems in teaching writing at the Department using the approach, referring more specifically to peer response activities. Finally, it offers a pedagogic proposal in the form of training strategies for peer response through classroom action research.

  9. Investigating Nigerian Primary School Teachers’ Preparedness to Adopt Personal Response System in ESL Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaba Olaoluwakotansibe Agbatogun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the extent to which computer literacy dimensions (computer general knowledge, documents and documentations, communication and surfing as well as data inquiry, computer use and academic qualification as independent variables predicted primary school teachers’ attitude towards the integration of Personal Response System in English as a second language (ESL classroom. Seventeen (17 Nigerian primary school teachers trained on why and how to effectively use Personal Response System (PRS in ESL classrooms was the sample for the study. Data for the studywere gathered through the use of Clickers Attitude Questionnaire (CAQ, Teachers’ Computer Literacy Questionnaire (TCLQ and Computer Use Questionnaire (CUQ. Descriptive statistics such as simplepercentage, mean and standard deviation, and inferential statistics such as Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient, and Multiple regression were used for data analysis at 0.05 significance level.The results show that the teachers’ computer literacy was more in the areas of documents and documentation as well as communication and surfing than in general knowledge and data inquiry. Further findings of the study indicated that general computer knowledge, documents anddocumentation, communication and surfing, and data inquiry combined to contribute to the prediction of teachers’ attitude towards the integration of PRS. Relatively, documents and documentation dimension was the potent predictor, while data inquiry was not a significant predictor of the outcome variable. Similarly, computer use, computer literacy and academic qualification jointly contributed to the prediction of the teachers’ attitude towards the integration of PRS in ESL classroom. Meanwhile, computer use made the most significant contribution to the prediction of teachers’ attitude towards PRS integration, while academic qualification did not make any significantcontribution to the teachers’ attitude

  10. 课堂应答系统在大学课堂教学中的应用%Introduction of classroom response systems in the college classroom teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武鲁卫; 叶子郁; 徐南; 张轶炳

    2013-01-01

    Information technology has been widely used in today's higher education, but college teaching has not been changed much in China in building the classroom of teacher-student interaction. As a means of skilled teaching abroad, classroom response system should be a good complement for the improvement of university teaching. As a means of skilled teaching abroad, classroom response system should be a good complement for the improvement of university teaching. This paper describes that what classroom response system is, its applied environment and the use of processes, the two most commonly used mode of teaching based on classroom response system and the strengths and weaknesses of the system.%  信息技术在当今高校教育中已经得到广泛应用,但是在构建师生互动课堂方面,中国高校教学方式没有太大改变。课堂应答系统作为在国外教学中应用比较成熟的一种教学手段,对于改进我国高校教学是一个很好的补充。主要介绍了什么是课堂应答系统,其应用环境及使用流程,介绍了两种基于课堂应答系统的最常用教学模式,并对此系统在应用过程中的优势与不足进行了分析。

  11. Investigation of urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements: Are urban science teachers culturally responsive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udokwu, Chukwudi John

    This study utilized mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative research approach to explore the current pedagogical engagements of twenty middle school urban science teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. It qualitatively examined twelve of these teachers' knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy. The study investigated the following questions: What are the current pedagogical practices of urban middle school science teachers? To what extent are middle school science teachers' pedagogical practices in urban schools culturally responsive? What are urban students' perspectives of their teachers' current pedagogical engagements? The design of the study was qualitative and quantitative methods in order to investigate these teachers' pedagogical practices. Data collections were drawn from multiple sources such as lesson plans, students' sample works, district curriculum, surveys, observational and interview notes. Analysis of collected data was a mixed methodology that involved qualitative and quantitative methods using descriptive, interpretative, pattern codes, and statistical procedures respectively. Purposeful sampling was selected for this study. Thus, demographically there were twenty participants who quantitatively took part in this study. Among them were seven (35%) males and thirteen (65%) females, three (15%) African Americans and seventeen (85%) Caucasians. In determining to what extent urban science teachers' pedagogical practices were culturally responsive, eight questions were analyzed based on four cluster themes: (a) teachers' social disposition, (b) culturally responsive curriculum, (c) classroom interactions, and (d) power pedagogy. Study result revealed that only five (25%) of the participants were engaged in culturally responsive pedagogy while fifteen (75%) were engaged in what Haberman (1991) called the pedagogy of poverty. The goal was to investigate urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements and to examine urban

  12. Cultural variations in motivational responses to felt misunderstanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Janetta; Oishi, Shigehiro; Coan, James A; Akimoto, Sharon; Miao, Felicity F

    2010-07-01

    Three studies examined cultural variations in the motivational consequences of being misunderstood by others. Study 1 found that European American students who felt misunderstood by others performed progressively better academically, whereas Asian and Asian American students who felt misunderstood by others performed progressively worse. In Studies 2 and 3, felt misunderstanding was experimentally manipulated, and motivational responses were measured with a handgrip task (Study 2) and prefrontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry (Study 3). Across the two studies, Asians and Asian Americans showed more withdrawal-related responses but European Americans showed either no difference (Study 2) or more motivated responses (Study 3) after being misunderstood versus being understood. Together, these studies demonstrate systematic cultural variations in motivational responses to felt misunderstanding.

  13. A Culturally Responsive Counter-Narrative of Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gist, Conra D.

    2014-01-01

    How do you recognize an effective teacher's sociocultural consciousness? Tamara Wallace's and Brenda Brand's argument that sociocultural consciousness is the "brain" of effective culturally responsive instruction for students of color comes at a time when the system of teacher evaluation is being overhauled nationwide.…

  14. Examining Preservice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Teaching Self-Efficacy Doubts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga; Chesnut, Steven Randall; Alejandro, Angela Ybarra; Young, Haeni Alecia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to add to the research on teachers' self-efficacy beliefs by examining preservice teachers' culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy doubts. We examined the tasks that preservice teachers felt least efficacious to successfully execute and explored the reasoning behind these self-efficacy doubts. Consequently, we were…

  15. German financial media's responsiveness to Deutsche Bank's cultural change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strauß, N.

    2015-01-01

    Based on first-order and second-order agenda building theory, this study analyzes the responsiveness of German financial media to frames of the "cultural change" proclaimed in the banking industry, exemplified by Deutsche Bank. Findings suggest a difference between the two major German financial med

  16. Preparing Special Educators for Culturally Responsive School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bridgie A.

    2004-01-01

    Today's increasingly multicultural student population requires that school-community partnerships operate from culturally responsive frameworks. Incorporating significant resources from multicultural communities is an essential component within school-community partnership. Although such a partnership is an essential strategy, it has not been…

  17. Behavioral Theory and Culture Special Issue: Authors' Response to Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasick, Rena J.; Burke, Nancy J.; Joseph, Galen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to commentaries that focus on the "Behavioral Constructs and Culture in Cancer Screening" (3Cs) study. The 3Cs study had an unremarkable beginning, with two colleagues discussing their frustration over the narrow range of behavioral theories and the limited guidance the theories offered for a study…

  18. Fostering Culturally and Developmentally Responsive Teaching through Improvisational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth; Whyte, Kristin; Delaney, Kate Kresin

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore an effort to rethink curricular decision-making with a group of public pre-K teachers working in a context of curriculum escalation and commitment to play-based pedagogy. Through a professional development program designed to support developmentally and culturally responsive early mathematics, we examine how teachers…

  19. Culturally Responsive Evaluation Meets Systems-Oriented Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veronica G.; Parsons, Beverly A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors of this article each bring a different theoretical background to their evaluation practice. The first author has a background of attention to culturally responsive evaluation (CRE), while the second author has a background of attention to systems theories and their application to evaluation. Both have had their own evolution of…

  20. Faculty Perspectives on Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices in Developmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the perspectives of developmental math faculty at a two-year technical college regarding culturally responsive beliefs and instructional practices. Thirteen faculty who taught the developmental class Elementary Algebra with Applications were surveyed. Nine of the 13 faculty responded. One section of Wisconsin's…

  1. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  2. Culturally Responsive Online Design: Learning at Intercultural Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morong, Gail; DesBiens, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents evidence-based guidelines to inform culturally responsive online learning design in higher education. Intercultural understanding is now a recognised core learning outcome in a large majority of Canadian public universities; however, supporting design methodology is underdeveloped, especially in online contexts. Our search…

  3. Culturally Responsive Education in Music Education: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Vanessa L.

    2017-01-01

    Demographic shifts in public school enrollment within the United States necessitate preparing preservice teachers to teach students with backgrounds that differ from their own ethnically, linguistically, racially, and economically. Culturally responsive education (CRE) is a pedagogy used to validate students' varied experiences, and to teach to…

  4. Toward a Better Understanding of Culture: Wikis in the Beginning German Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducate, Lara; Steckenbiller, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    The questions of how to teach culture, which culture(s) to teach and how to lead students to intercultural competence and understanding are common questions for language teachers. The current project employed wikis to systematically integrate culture and authentic texts into beginning German courses at a large south-eastern university in the…

  5. Acute Effects of Classroom Exercise Breaks on Executive Function and Math Performance: A Dose-Response Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Erin K; Schatz, Jeffrey; Pate, Russell R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute dose-response relationship of classroom exercise breaks with executive function and math performance in 9- to 12-year-old children by comparing 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min classroom exercise breaks to 10 min of sedentary classroom activity. This study used a within-subjects experimental design conducted in the spring of 2012. Ninety-six 4th- and 5th-grade students in 5 classrooms in South Carolina were randomized to receive each of 4 treatments: 5-min, 10-min, or 20-min exercise breaks or 10 min of a sedentary lesson led by research staff. Students completed the Trail-Making Test, an Operational Digit Recall test, and a math fluency test immediately before and after each condition. Planned linear contrasts were used to compare posttest scores between conditions using a repeated-measures mixed model, adjusted for gender, classroom, and the time-varying pretest scores. Potential effect modifiers were added as interaction terms. Math scores were higher after the 10-min and 20-min exercise breaks compared with the sedentary condition (d = 0.24, p = .04, and d = 0.27, p = .02, respectively), and an interaction was observed with gender, IQ, aerobic fitness, and lower engagement in some of the conditions. There were no improvements in executive function tasks. A 10-min and 20-min classroom exercise break moderately improved math performance in students compared with a seated classroom lesson.

  6. Response to Cultures Continuum and the Development of Intercultural Responsiveness (IR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kathryn; Mixon, Jason R.; Henry, Lula; Butcher, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study investigated the perceptions of pre-service teachers' intercultural responsiveness. Findings from this study affirmed that pre-service teachers believed that positive dispositions, being culturally aware, and responding by incorporating cultural differences is a key to achieving Intercultural…

  7. 运用现代教育技术演绎数学课堂文化%The Use of Modern Education Technology, Deductive Mathematics Classroom Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈舫

    2014-01-01

    In primary school mathematics classroom, should use what kind of technological means of modern education fully played out the primary school mathematics classroom culture,is a new problem in the research of primary school mathematics classroom culture. The article from the primary school mathematics classroom culture perspective, mainly talk about how to use the technological means of modern education fully complete interpretation in the primary school mathematics classroom culture.%在小学数学课堂中,运用怎样的现代教育技术手段将小学数学课堂文化充分演绎出来,是当前有关小学数学课堂文化研究的一个新问题。文章从小学数学课堂文化的角度出发,重点谈论了如何运用现代教育技术手段将小学数学课堂文化充分完整地演绎出来。

  8. Bridging Theory and Practice: Using Hip-Hop Pedagogy As A Culturally Relevant Approach In The Urban Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjapong, Edmund S.

    This dissertation explores the context of urban science education as it relates to the achievement and engagement of urban youth. This study provides a framework for Hip-Hop Pedagogy, an approach to teaching and learning anchored in the creative elements of Hip-Hop culture, in STEM as an innovative approach to teaching and learning demonstrates the effect that Hip-Hop Pedagogy, as a culturally relevant approach to teaching has on teaching and learning in an urban science classroom. This study establishes practical tools and approaches, which were formed from by theory and research that transcend the traditional monolithic approaches to teaching science. Participants in this study are middle school students who attend an urban school in one of the largest school systems in the country. This research showed that as result of utilizing Hip-Hop pedagogical practices, students reported that they developed a deeper understanding of science content, students were more likely to identify as scientists, and students were provided a space and opportunities to deconstruct traditional classroom spaces and structures.

  9. Examples of Current Issues in the Multicultural Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2015-01-01

    Classrooms are becoming increasingly multicultural, and this leads to new challenges for teachers. Traditionally, students coming into the multicultural classroom are at a deficit because they must learn how to navigate unfamiliar people, their cultures, and language. Thus, teachers have the added responsibility of leading students through this…

  10. Reimagining Reading: Creating a Classroom Culture That Embraces Independent Choice Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Many of us are plagued by negative memories of sustained silent reading. In some of these memories, we are the students, attempting to read a book that didn't hold our interest or trying to read over the din of our disengaged classmates. In other memories, we are the teachers, suffering through a ten-minute classroom management nightmare, deciding…

  11. Developing Dialogue in the Classroom: A Cultural Tool for Learning Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Alison

    2011-01-01

    The recent publication of "The New Zealand Curriculum" calls for students to become connected, creative, confident life-long learners. To realise this vision, fundamental change is required in the way teachers and students think about and participate in classroom-based teaching and learning. This paper discusses one aspect of an action…

  12. Using Popular Culture Texts in the Classroom to Interrogate Issues of Gender Transgression Related Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel-Parkins, Alison; Esposito, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how undergraduate instructors of pre-service educators can address complex issues of sexuality and sexual orientation within the classroom. First, we explain our own backgrounds and positionalities to provide a context for our ensuing ideas and discussions. Second, by reviewing the literature on homophobic bullying, we…

  13. Cross-Cultural Interface Design and the Classroom-Learning Environment in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Lin; Su, Yelin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether using localized interface designs would make a difference in users' learning results and their perceptions of the interface design in a classroom learning environment. This study also sought to learn more about users' attitudes toward the localized interface features. To assess the impact of using localized interfaces…

  14. Towards a Pedagogy for the Application of Empathy in Culturally Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Chezare A.

    2014-01-01

    Empathy is theorized to improve the teaching effectiveness of teachers in urban and multicultural classroom settings. However, the field has few models useful for training and preparing teachers to cultivate empathy as a professional disposition. This study examines the academic, behavioral, and social/relational interactions of four White female…

  15. Cultural Differences, Nonverbal Regulation, and Classroom Interaction: Sociolinguistic Interference in American Indian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Paul E.; Greenbaum, Susan D.

    1983-01-01

    Various studies of interaction between teachers and American Indian students indicate that nonverbal behaviors interfere with classroom communication and educational performance. American Indian children exhibit such behaviors as less talking, low voice tones, and averted gaze during conservations. These behaviors seem to hinder students in the…

  16. Diversifying Instruction and Shifting Authority: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) Analysis of Classroom Participant Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchen, Terri; Smithenry, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent calls asking science teachers to increase student authority by diversifying instruction appear stalled by a lack of empirical evidence supporting the actual implementation of any such shifts. To better support the practical integration of more student-directed inquiry into the science classroom, we consider one teacher's day-to-day…

  17. Using Popular Culture Texts in the Classroom to Interrogate Issues of Gender Transgression Related Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel-Parkins, Alison; Esposito, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how undergraduate instructors of pre-service educators can address complex issues of sexuality and sexual orientation within the classroom. First, we explain our own backgrounds and positionalities to provide a context for our ensuing ideas and discussions. Second, by reviewing the literature on homophobic bullying, we…

  18. Media Literacy in the ESL/ESL Classroom: Reading Images and Cultural Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlisk, Carla Chamberlin

    2003-01-01

    Stresses the importance of developing media literacy in the English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classroom, not only as a way to incorporate mass media as a source of linguistic input, but also as a tool for learning to interpret multiple layers of messages and to separate mediated images of people, places, things, ideas, and values from those of…

  19. From Bearers of Problems to Bearers of Culture: Developing Community in the Community Development Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevellar, Lynda

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings together the impact of two major changes in higher education: the massification of the higher education system and the accompanying increase in international student mobility. Utilising collective narrative practice (CNP) as a classroom intervention, this research demonstrates a movement from teacher-centred and student-centred…

  20. Towards a Pedagogy for the Application of Empathy in Culturally Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Chezare A.

    2014-01-01

    Empathy is theorized to improve the teaching effectiveness of teachers in urban and multicultural classroom settings. However, the field has few models useful for training and preparing teachers to cultivate empathy as a professional disposition. This study examines the academic, behavioral, and social/relational interactions of four White female…

  1. Harnessing Emotions to Deliberative Argumentation in Classroom Discussions on Historical Issues in Multi-Cultural Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Tsafrir; Schwarz, Baruch B.

    2016-01-01

    This theoretical paper is about the role of emotions in historical reasoning in the context of classroom discussions. Peer deliberations around texts have become important practices in history education according to progressive pedagogies. However, in the context of issues involving emotions, such approaches may result in an obstacle for…

  2. Classroom norms of bullying alter the degree to which children defend in response to their affective empathy and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, Kätlin; Pöyhönen, Virpi; Juvonen, Jaana; Salmivalli, Christina

    2015-07-01

    This study examined whether the degree to which bullying is normative in the classroom would moderate associations between intra- (cognitive and affective empathy, self-efficacy beliefs) and interpersonal (popularity) factors and defending behavior. Participants were 6,708 third- to fifth-grade children (49% boys; Mage = 11 years) from 383 classrooms. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that children were more likely to defend in response to their affective empathy in classrooms with high levels of bullying. In addition, popular students were more likely to support victims in classrooms where bullying was associated with social costs. These findings highlight the importance of considering interactions among individual and contextual influences when trying to understand which factors facilitate versus inhibit children's inclinations to defend others.

  3. Click it: assessment of classroom response systems in physician assistant education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, Evelyn C; Vail, Marianne; Maldonado, Ana; Lund, Maha; Galante, Steve; Tataronis, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The effect that classroom response systems, or clickers, have on knowledge retention and student satisfaction was studied in a physician assistant program. A clicker, a device similar to a remote control, was used by students to answer questions during lectures. This new technology has been marketed to educators as beneficial in keeping students actively involved and increasing their attentiveness in the classroom. To date, the results of studies on knowledge retention with the use of clickers have been mixed. For this pilot study, the students were divided into two groups with a pre- and post-test given in order to evaluate knowledge retention. One group received lectures in a traditional format, while the other group received the lectures incorporating clicker response questions. After the test scores from four lectures were analyzed, the incorporation of clickers did not alter knowledge retention. Retention of knowledge from both groups was similar and no statistical difference was found. However, student satisfaction regarding the use of clickers was positive. Students reported that clickers kept them more actively involved, increased attentiveness, and made lectures more enjoyable. Although the pilot study did not show a greater improvement in knowledge retention with the use of clickers, further research is needed to assess their effectiveness.

  4. Engagement in Training as a Mechanism to Understanding Fidelity of Implementation of the Responsive Classroom Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, Shannon B; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Abry, Tashia; Larsen, Ross A; Patton, Christine L

    2015-11-01

    Fidelity of implementation of classroom interventions varies greatly, a reality that is concerning because higher fidelity of implementation relates to greater effectiveness of the intervention. We analyzed 126 fourth and fifth grade teachers from the treatment group of a randomized controlled trial of the Responsive Classroom® (RC) approach. Prior to training in the intervention, we assessed factors that had the potential to represent a teacher's readiness to implement with fidelity. These included teachers' observed emotional support, teacher-rated use of intervention practices, teacher-rated self-efficacy, teacher-rated collective responsibility, education level, and years of experience, and they were not directly related to observed fidelity of implementation 2 years later. Further analyses indicated, however, that RC trainers' ratings of teachers' engagement in the initial weeklong RC training mediated the relation between initial observed emotional support and later observed fidelity of implementation. We discuss these findings as a way to advance understanding of teachers' readiness to implement new interventions with fidelity.

  5. Using personal response systems to assess speech perception within the classroom: an approach to determine the efficacy of sound field amplification in primary school classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Deborah A; Backus, Bradford C; Macdonald, Nora K; Rostamzadeh, Niloofar K; Mason, Nisha K; Pandya, Roshni; Marriage, Josephine E; Mahon, Merle H

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of the combined effect of classroom acoustics and sound field amplification (SFA) on children's speech perception within the "live" classroom poses a challenge to researchers. The goals of this study were to determine: (1) Whether personal response system (PRS) hand-held voting cards, together with a closed-set speech perception test (Chear Auditory Perception Test [CAPT]), provide an appropriate method for evaluating speech perception in the classroom; (2) Whether SFA provides better access to the teacher's speech than without SFA for children, taking into account vocabulary age, middle ear dysfunction or ear-canal wax, and home language. Forty-four children from two school-year groups, year 2 (aged 6 years 11 months to 7 years 10 months) and year 3 (aged 7 years 11 months to 8 years 10 months) were tested in two classrooms, using a shortened version of the four-alternative consonant discrimination section of the CAPT. All children used a PRS to register their chosen response, which they selected from four options displayed on the interactive whiteboard. The classrooms were located in a 19th-century school in central London, United Kingdom. Each child sat at their usual position in the room while target speech stimuli were presented either in quiet or in noise. The target speech was presented from the front of the classroom at 65 dBA (calibrated at 1 m) and the presented noise level was 46 dBA measured at the center of the classroom. The older children had an additional noise condition with a noise level of 52 dBA. All conditions were presented twice, once with SFA and once without SFA and the order of testing was randomized. White noise from the teacher's right-hand side of the classroom and International Speech Test Signal from the teacher's left-hand side were used, and the noises were matched at the center point of the classroom (10sec averaging [A-weighted]). Each child's expressive vocabulary age and middle ear status were measured

  6. Geoethics and geological culture: awareness, responsibility and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Peppoloni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The international debate in the field of geoethics focuses on some of the most important environmental emergencies, while highlighting the great responsibilities of geoscientists, whatever field they work in, and the important social, cultural and economic repercussions that their choices can have on society. The GeoItalia 2009 and 2011 conferences that were held in Rimini and Turin, respectively, and were organized by the Italian Federation of Earth Science, were two important moments for the promotion of geoethics in Italy. They were devoted to the highlighting of how, and with what tools and contents, can the geosciences contribute to the cultural renewal of society. They also covered the active roles of geoscientists in the dissemination of scientific information, contributing in this way to the correct construction of social knowledge. Geology is culture, and as such it can help to dispel misconceptions and cultural stereotypes that concern natural phenomena, disasters, resources, and land management. Geological culture consists of methods, goals, values, history, ways of thinking about nature, and specific sensitivity for approaching problems and their solutions. So geology has to fix referenced values, as indispensable prerequisites for geoethics. Together, geological culture and geoethics can strengthen the bond that joins people to their territory, and can help to find solutions and answers to some important challenges in the coming years regarding natural risks, resources, and climate change. Starting from these considerations, we stress the importance of establishing an ethical criterion for Earth scientists, to focus attention on the issue of the responsibility of geoscientists, and the need to more clearly define their scientific identity and the value of their specificities.

  7. Living Language and Culture: Concordia Language Villages--One Example of Learning outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippe, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    At Concordia Language Villages, language and culture are inextricably intertwined, as they are in life. Participants "live" and "do" language and culture 16 hours per day. The experiential, residential setting immerses the participants in the culture of the country or countries where the target language is spoken through food, music, sports,…

  8. Expressive Practices: The Local Enactment of Culture in the Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Karen; Milburn, Trudy; Wilkins, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As students participate in corporate communication classes, they may, on occasion, use the term culture to make sense of their experiences. The authors use Mino's idea of a learning paradigm to shift the emphasis away from teaching traditional theories of culture and use student-centered experiences to teach culture as an expressive practice.…

  9. Cultural responsiveness in EFL teaching: reflections from native instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinarbas H. Ibrahim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many international students from different parts of the world have been studying at Turkish universities, which creates a multicultural educational setting. Due to the multicultural educational setting, English has become the most widely used language for exchanging and sharing knowledge, therefore many international universities in Turkey put a great emphasis on English language education and offer English preparatory courses to students. In order to succeed at better language education, universities employ native English instructors to provide a richer language experience with cultural components embedded in language content. In this qualitative case study, cultural reflections of native English instructors at a Turkish university were investigated. Individual and focus group interviews were data sources for the study. Findings indicated that cultural responsiveness was considered to be constructed through time, and a necessity of orientation process was emphasized. However, the native instructors’ presumptions cause intolerance and underestimation of the host culture. In addition, educational issues and students’ misbehaviors, such as cheating and calling their instructors by their first name, were attributed to cultural background of the students.

  10. Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Császi, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    In his paper "Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence" Lajos Császi argues that media violence is not a reification of social violence; rather, a popular ritual allowing contemporary societies to sublimate, to substitute, and to discuss aggression in the public sphere. Császi reviews the central questions of contemporary debates about television violence including Stuart Hall's thought on this topic and introduces the ideas of Elias, Geertz, Turner, Bettelhei...

  11. The extent to which Latina/o preservice teachers demonstrate culturally responsive teaching practices during science and mathematics instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cecilia M.

    2011-12-01

    Complex social, racial, economic, and political issues involved in the practice of teaching today require beginning teachers to be informed, skilled, and culturally responsive when entering the classroom. Teacher educators must educate future teachers in ways that will help them teach all children regardless of language, cultural background, or prior knowledge. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) novice teachers described and demonstrated culturally responsive teaching strategies using their students' cultural and academic profiles to inform practice in science and mathematics instruction. This qualitative exploratory case study considered the culturally responsive teaching practices of 12, non-traditional, Latina/o students as they progressed through a distance-based collaborative teacher education program. Qualitative techniques used throughout this exploratory case study investigated cultural responsiveness of these student teachers as they demonstrated their abilities to: a) integrate content and facilitate knowledge construction; b) illustrate social justice and prejudice reduction; and c) develop students academically. In conclusion, student teachers participating in this study demonstrated their ability to integrate content by: (1) including content from other cultures, (2) building positive teacher-student relationships, and (3) holding high expectations for all students. They also demonstrated their ability to facilitate knowledge construction by building on what students knew. Since there is not sufficient data to support the student teachers' abilities to assist students in learning to be critical, independent thinkers who are open to other ways of knowing, no conclusions regarding this subcategory could be drawn. Student teachers in this study illustrated prejudice reduction by: (1) using native language support to assist students in learning and understanding science and math content

  12. The Responsive Classroom approach and fifth grade students' math and science anxiety and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Marissa Swaim; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Merritt, Eileen G; Patton, Christine L

    2013-12-01

    Self-efficacy forecasts student persistence and achievement in challenging subjects. Thus, it is important to understand factors that contribute to students' self-efficacy, a key factor in their success in math and science. The current cross-sectional study examined the contribution of students' gender and math and science anxiety as well as schools' use of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) practices to students' math and science self-efficacy. Fifth graders (n = 1,561) completed questionnaires regarding their feelings about math and science. Approximately half of the students attended schools implementing the Responsive Classroom® (RC) approach, an SEL intervention, as part of a randomized controlled trial. Results suggested no difference in math and science self-efficacy between boys and girls. Students who self-reported higher math and science anxiety also reported less self-efficacy toward these subjects. However, the negative association between students' anxiety and self-efficacy was attenuated in schools using more RC practices compared with those using fewer RC practices. RC practices were associated with higher science self-efficacy. Results highlight anxiety as contributing to poor self-efficacy in math and science and suggest that RC practices create classroom conditions in which students' anxiety is less strongly associated with negative beliefs about their ability to be successful in math and science.

  13. Localizing nearby sound sources in a classroom: Binaural room impulse responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.; Kopco, Norbert; Martin, Tara J.

    2005-05-01

    Binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) were measured in a classroom for sources at different azimuths and distances (up to 1 m) relative to a manikin located in four positions in a classroom. When the listener is far from all walls, reverberant energy distorts signal magnitude and phase independently at each frequency, altering monaural spectral cues, interaural phase differences, and interaural level differences. For the tested conditions, systematic distortion (comb-filtering) from an early intense reflection is only evident when a listener is very close to a wall, and then only in the ear facing the wall. Especially for a nearby source, interaural cues grow less reliable with increasing source laterality and monaural spectral cues are less reliable in the ear farther from the sound source. Reverberation reduces the magnitude of interaural level differences at all frequencies; however, the direct-sound interaural time difference can still be recovered from the BRIRs measured in these experiments. Results suggest that bias and variability in sound localization behavior may vary systematically with listener location in a room as well as source location relative to the listener, even for nearby sources where there is relatively little reverberant energy. .

  14. The Psychometric Properties of Classroom Response System Data: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-08-01

    Classroom response systems (often referred to as "clickers") have slowly gained adoption over the recent decade; however, critics frequently doubt their pedagogical value starting with the validity of the gathered responses: There is concern that students simply "click" random answers. This case study looks at different measures of response reliability, starting from a global look at correlations between formative clicker responses and summative examination performance to how clicker questions are used in context. It was found that clicker performance is a moderate indicator of course performance as a whole, and that while the psychometric properties of clicker items are more erratic than those of examination data, they still have acceptable internal consistency and include items with high discrimination. It was also found that clicker responses and item properties do provide highly meaningful feedback within a lecture context, i.e., when their position and function within lecture sessions are taken into consideration. Within this framework, conceptual questions provide measurably more meaningful feedback than items that require calculations.

  15. Engaging millennial learners: Effectiveness of personal response system technology with nursing students in small and large classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Susan M Hunter; McCurry, Mary K

    2010-05-01

    Nurse educators must explore innovative technologies that make the most of the characteristics and learning styles of millennial learners. These students are comfortable with technology and prefer interactive classrooms with individual feedback and peer collaboration. This study evaluated the perceived effectiveness of personal response system (PRS) technology in enhancing student learning in small and large classrooms. PRS technology was integrated into two undergraduate courses, nursing research (n = 33) and junior medical-surgical nursing (n = 116). Multiple-choice, true-false, NCLEX-RN alternate format, and reading quiz questions were incorporated within didactic PowerPoint presentations. Data analysis of Likert-type and open-response questions supported the use of PRS technology as an effective strategy for educating millennial learners in both small and large classrooms. PRS technology promotes active learning, increases participation, and provides students and faculty with immediate feedback that reflects comprehension of content and increases faculty-student interaction.

  16. A comparison of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior to reduce disruptive behavior in a preschool classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Carole; Miltenberger, Raymond; Maki, Amber; Barenz, Rebecca; Jurgens, Mandy; Sailer, Angela; Haugen, Meredith; Kopp, Brandon

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) in reducing the disruptive behaviors of 25 children in a preschool classroom. Using an alternating treatments design, disruptive behavior was reduced when the participants earned tokens for the absence of disruptive behavior (DRO) or lost tokens for the occurrence of disruptive behavior (response cost). Initially, DRO was more successful in reducing the number of disruptive behaviors; however, over time, response cost proved to be more effective.

  17. A Study of Classroom Response System Clickers: Increasing Student Engagement and Performance in a Large Undergraduate Lecture Class on Architectural Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Leonard; Bachman, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a classroom response system (CRS) and architecture students' perceptions of real-time feedback. CRS is designed to increase active engagement of students by their responses to a question or prompt via wireless keypads. Feedback is immediately portrayed on a classroom projector for discussion. The authors…

  18. A Study of Classroom Response System Clickers: Increasing Student Engagement and Performance in a Large Undergraduate Lecture Class on Architectural Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Leonard; Bachman, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a classroom response system (CRS) and architecture students' perceptions of real-time feedback. CRS is designed to increase active engagement of students by their responses to a question or prompt via wireless keypads. Feedback is immediately portrayed on a classroom projector for discussion. The authors…

  19. The role of cultural background and team divisions in developing social learning relations in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Rienties, Bart; Nanclares, Núria Hernández; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Alcott, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A common assumption is that students prefer to work together with students from similar cultural backgrounds. In a group work context, students from different cultural backgrounds are “forced” to work together. This might lead to stress and anxiety but at the same time may allow students to learn from different perspectives. The prime goal of this article is to understand how international and home students from different cultural backgrounds build learning and work relationships with other s...

  20. Exploring Influences of Mathematics Coach-Teacher Interactions on the Development of Teacher Pedagogical Knowledge, Effective Mathematical Teaching Practices, and a Classroom Culture of Mathematical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    This study set out to examine how interactions between a mathematics instructional coach and a teacher influence teacher pedagogical content knowledge, instructional practices, and a classroom culture of mathematical inquiry (CCMI). The research literature on mathematics instructional coaching was limited, but showed promise in supporting…

  1. Do Instructors’ Perceptions on Teaching Culture in Foreign Language Classroom Make a Difference: Lessons from a Qualitative Study of Language Instructors and Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xinxiao; Chen, Dianbing

    2016-01-01

    The Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century (1996; 2006) listed culture as one of five goals of learning a foreign language. However, the perceptions of foreign language instructors towards the teaching of culture and their effects on students’ foreign language learning remain unclear. This study involved six instructors from five different foreign language programs and four undergraduate students who are enrolled in the current language programs. Documents, classroom obse...

  2. Cultural and academic meetings in the writing classroom : China and the West

    OpenAIRE

    Mattisson Ekstam, Jane

    2015-01-01

    With growing numbers of Chinese students entering Western universities, cultural understanding is of increasing importance, not least in higher education. Without a good understanding of the academic conventions of Western universities, Chinese students, and undergraduates in particular, are at a disadvantage in the multi-cultural classroom. Lack of knowledge of structural influences on higher education, including teacher-student relations, reference management practices, and assessment proce...

  3. Journalism in the Community Classroom: A Curriculum Model for Cultural Journalism in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Linda C.

    This paper introduces the medium of cultural journalism as an effective means of intensified basic communication training and community involvement. Part one contains a report of a needs assessment and a subsequent pilot project on cultural journalism that was conducted at an Oklahoma high school. The needs assessment also reports on similar…

  4. From Keats to Kanye: Romantic Poetry and Popular Culture in the Secondary English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowmer, Megan E.; Curwood, Jen Scott

    2016-01-01

    This case study examined a Romanticism unit within a Year 9 English class in Sydney, Australia. It considered whether popular culture could build connections between students' lives and Romanticism, and whether the process of remixing "high" Romantic poetry with "low" popular culture could foster student engagement. Thematic…

  5. The Role of Cultural Background and Team Divisions in Developing Social Learning Relations in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienties, Bart; Nanclares, Núria Hernández; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Alcott, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A common assumption is that students prefer to work together with students from similar cultural backgrounds. In a group work context, students from different cultural backgrounds are "forced" to work together. This might lead to stress and anxiety but at the same time may allow students to learn from different perspectives. The prime…

  6. Incorporating the Culture of American Indian/Alaska Native Students into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Raphael M.; Williams, Garnet L.

    2014-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted with educators and stakeholders for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students, including teachers, elementary and high school principals, tribal community leaders, and parents, to determine a global definition of culture and ways of infusing culture into curriculum to better educate AI/AN students. Focus…

  7. Perceptions and Practices of Culturally Relevant Science Teaching in American Indian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Younkyeong; Roehrig, Gillian; Kern, Anne; Reynolds, Bree

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of culturally relevant science teaching of 35 teachers of American Indian students. These teachers participated in professional development designed to help them better understand climate change science content and teaching climate change using both Western science and traditional and cultural knowledge. Teacher…

  8. Female Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching Culture in EFL Classrooms at a Saudi University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amir, Bayan Al-Hashemi

    2017-01-01

    In the literature of second language teaching and learning, culture and language have always been assumed to be interdependent. Their interdependence comes from the fact that language is not a code free from culture, but an embodiment of it. However, there is still a need, from the part of teachers, to realize the importance of integrating culture…

  9. From Keats to Kanye: Romantic Poetry and Popular Culture in the Secondary English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowmer, Megan E.; Curwood, Jen Scott

    2016-01-01

    This case study examined a Romanticism unit within a Year 9 English class in Sydney, Australia. It considered whether popular culture could build connections between students' lives and Romanticism, and whether the process of remixing "high" Romantic poetry with "low" popular culture could foster student engagement. Thematic…

  10. Inquiry-Based Projects in the Spanish Heritage Language Classroom: Connecting Culture and Community through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belpoliti, Flavia; Fairclough, Marta

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the development and implementation of inquiry-based cultural projects in a Spanish Heritage Language (SHL) Program. Four different inquiry-based curricula are described to illustrate how university students in an SHL program advance their knowledge of Spanish while carrying out research to understand Hispanic cultures. First-,…

  11. The Role of Culture in Second or Foreign Language Teaching: Moving Beyond the Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    Second Language (L2) and Foreign Language (FL) curricula have a cultural component intricately woven into the fabric of the language syllabus. To teach language, one must also teach the culture inherent in the language, including the verbal as well as the non-verbal aspects. A review of the literature will show that studying the target culture…

  12. Incorporating the Culture of American Indian/Alaska Native Students into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Raphael M.; Williams, Garnet L.

    2014-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted with educators and stakeholders for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students, including teachers, elementary and high school principals, tribal community leaders, and parents, to determine a global definition of culture and ways of infusing culture into curriculum to better educate AI/AN students. Focus…

  13. Non-Native English Language Teachers' Perspective on Culture in English as a Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the importance of raising non-native English language teachers' awareness of different dimensions of culture in the teaching of English as an international language. The author believes that the more critical English language teachers become about the involvement of culture in their English language teaching, the more they…

  14. Reading in a Participatory Culture: Remixing "Moby-Dick" in the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Henry, Ed.; Kelley, Wyn, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Building on the groundbreaking research of the MacArthur Foundation's Digital Media & Learning initiative, this book crosses the divide between digital literacies and traditional print culture to engage a generation of students who can read with a book in one hand and a mouse in the other. "Reading in a Participatory Culture" tells the story of an…

  15. Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment: A Research-Based Pedagogy for Teaching Science with Classroom Response Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Ian D.; Gerace, William J.

    2009-01-01

    "Classroom response systems" (CRSs) are a promising instructional technology, but most literature on CRS use fails to distinguish between technology and pedagogy, to define and justify a pedagogical perspective, or to discriminate between pedagogies. "Technology-enhanced formative assessment" (TEFA) is our pedagogy for CRS-based science…

  16. Using a Classroom Response System for Promoting Interaction to Teaching Mathematics to Large Groups of Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Adolfo; Barragués, José Ignacio; Guisasola, Jenaro

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the design and evaluation of a proposal to use Classroom Response Systems (CRS), intended to promote participative classes of Mathematics at University. The proposal is based on Problem Based Learnig (PBL) and uses Robert's six hypotheses for mathematical teaching-learning. The results show that PBL is a relevant strategy to…

  17. Using Systems Thinking to Evaluate Formative Feedback in UK Higher Education: The Case of Classroom Response Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Rosane; Paucar-Caceres, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Providing high quality formative feedback to large and very diverse cohorts of students taking short intensive blocks of teaching (block release) has become crucial in management education provision. The paper proposes the exploitation of classroom response technology (CRT) to evaluate learning activities of students taking block release modules.…

  18. A Comparison of Response Cost and Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior to Reduce Disruptive Behavior in a Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Carole; Miltenberger, Raymond; Maki, Amber; Barenz, Rebecca; Jurgens, Mandy; Sailer, Angela; Haugen, Meredith; Kopp, Brandon

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) in reducing the disruptive behaviors of 25 children in a preschool classroom. Using an alternating treatments design, disruptive behavior was reduced when the participants earned tokens for the absence of disruptive behavior (DRO) or…

  19. Mobile-Phone-Based Classroom Response Systems: Students' Perceptions of Engagement and Learning in a Large Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter K.; Richardson, Alice; Oprescu, Florin; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Using a Classroom Response System (CRS) has been associated with positive educational outcomes, by fostering student engagement and by allowing immediate feedback to both students and instructors. This study examined a low-cost CRS (VotApedia) in a large first-year class, where students responded to questions using their mobile phones. This study…

  20. Writing in the Music Classroom: Educators Can--And Should--Encourage Their Students to Give Music a Written Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dee

    2009-01-01

    Writing in a music classroom may seem counterintuitive, but most researchers consider writing to be an effective instructional strategy for teaching and reinforcing reading skills, and so administrators frequently ask music teachers to include it in their classes. In this article, the author explores ways to initiate written responses to music and…

  1. Mobile-Phone-Based Classroom Response Systems: Students' Perceptions of Engagement and Learning in a Large Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter K.; Richardson, Alice; Oprescu, Florin; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Using a Classroom Response System (CRS) has been associated with positive educational outcomes, by fostering student engagement and by allowing immediate feedback to both students and instructors. This study examined a low-cost CRS (VotApedia) in a large first-year class, where students responded to questions using their mobile phones. This study…

  2. What's All the Clicking About? A Study of Classroom Response System Use at the University of Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Jason; Kushnir, Lena Paulo; Bank, Charly; Browning, Scott; Clarke, Jim; Cordon, Anne; Harrison, David; Ing, Karen; Kutas, Cecilia; Serbanescu, Ruxandra

    2009-01-01

    Classroom response systems (clickers) are used in many courses at the University of Toronto (U of T), primarily to introduce interactive pedagogy and to engage students in lecture courses. We examined the use of clickers in various courses at U of T and interviewed over 30 instructors about their use of clickers in classes with a total enrolment…

  3. Factors that Affect Science and Mathematics Teachers' Initial Implementation of Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment Using a Classroom Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Feldman, Allan; Beatty, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to uncover and understand the factors that affect secondary science and mathematics teachers' initial implementation of Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment (TEFA), a pedagogy developed for teaching with classroom response system (CRS) technology. We sought to identify the most common and strongest factors, and to…

  4. Instructor Perceptions of Using a Mobile-Phone-Based Free Classroom Response System in First-Year Statistics Undergraduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter K.; Richardson, Alice; McDonald, Christine; Oprescu, Florin

    2012-01-01

    Student engagement at first-year level is critical for student achievement, retention and success. One way of increasing student engagement is to use a classroom response system (CRS), the use of which has been associated with positive educational outcomes by fostering student engagement and by allowing immediate feedback to both students and…

  5. Developing cultural competence and social responsibility in preclinical dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W

    2004-04-01

    Dental student development of cultural competence and social responsibility is recognized by educators as an important element in the overall shaping of minds and attitudes of modem dental practitioners. Yet training modalities to achieve these competencies are not clearly defined, and outcome measurements are elusive. This article shows an effective method to meet these desired outcomes. Sixty-one freshmen (class of 2005) participated in forty hours of nondental community service, and reflective journals were completed by the end of second year. Competency outcomes were measured by selecting key words and phrases found in the individual journals. Key phrases were related to compassion, righteousness, propriety, and wisdom. Also, phrases had to be accompanied by written indications of direct program causation. The combination of active-learning (based upon service learning models) in public health settings outside of the dental realm, accompanied by reflective journaling, enhanced cultural understanding and community spirit in the majority of students.

  6. Perceived Cultural Responsiveness and Effectiveness of a Speech and Language Program for Indigenous Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Kent; Craft, Calli B.; MacKay, Leslie D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an increasing need for culturally relevant curricula, what is considered culturally responsive and how it is assessed is under-researched. The present study examined the perceived cultural responsiveness and effectiveness of an early intervention program designed to teach early language skills and expose students to Indigenous culture, the…

  7. Creating a classroom filled with culture to make students have security%创建让学生有安全感的教室文化环境

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洁

    2016-01-01

    Classroom atmosphere is whether good or not, in other words, the quality of the classroom environment has a close relationship with the establishment of students′classroom security.Not only in an appropriate physical environment, but also in a harmonious psychological environment, students will have belief in the classroom and feel safe, thus a better performance in the learning life.To make the students in classroom have a warm feeling and a sense of security, two aspects of classroom envi⁃ronment should be taken into consideration, the first cultural environment that′s to say the physical environment and the second cultural environment, named psychological environment. Learning in a sense of security in the classroom, students will feel that learning in class is an endless enjoyment rather than a chore.%教室氛围的好坏,或者说教室环境的优劣与学生课堂安全感的建立息息相关。不仅要有适宜的物质环境,还要有和谐的心理环境,学生才会信任教室,感到安全踏实,才能更好的完成学习生活。要让学生在教室里身心愉悦,产生温馨感、安全感,可以从教室的第一文化环境—物质环境和教室的第二文化环境—心理环境两个方面入手。在有安全感的教室里学习生活,学生才会觉得学习、上课其乐无穷,而不是件苦差事。

  8. "I'm Not Afraid to Come into Your World": Case Studies of Teachers Facilitating Engagement in Urban High School English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins-Coleman, Theresa A.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a vicarious experience in the classrooms of two teachers who successfully facilitated engagement in urban schools. With practices grounded in culturally responsive classroom management, the teachers created classroom environments in which students were motivated to participate, met high behavioral expectations, and remained…

  9. Teaching cultural competency through narrative medicine: intersections of classroom and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasGupta, Sayantani; Meyer, Dodi; Calero-Breckheimer, Ayxa; Costley, Alex W; Guillen, Sobeira

    2006-01-01

    Cultural competency and narrative medicine are perspectives that assist medical educators in teaching effective, empathetic communication and service delivery to a variety of patients. In this article, we describe a unique educational activity at the crossroads of these perspectives in which pediatric residents participated in a monthly reading and discussion group with staff members of an inner-city Dominican American community organization. By discussing a literary text rather than cases and facilitating discussions with particular attention to power, not only were historic conflicts between the groups circumvented, but an environment was created in which discussants drew heavily from personal and professional experiences. Qualitative evaluation of both groups revealed improved self-reported understanding of (a) issues of cultural diversity, (b) issues of medical culture, and (c) physicians' attitudes and behaviors in practice. Methodologies drawing from cultural competency and narrative medicine can be used to help physicians work in multidisciplinary, multicultural teams in and out of the medical institution.

  10. Discussing group work in the EFL classroom from a Chinese cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊宇; 张冬瑜

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help the EFL teachers, particularly those western teachers, who are teaching in China, to obtain a better understanding of group work by exploring and discussing its use from a Chinese cultural perspective.

  11. Assessing culturally sensitive factors in the learning environment of science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Darrell L.; Waldrip, Bruce G.

    1997-03-01

    As schools are becoming increasingly diverse in their scope and clientele, any examination of the interaction of culturally sensitive factors of students' learning environments with learning science assumes critical importance. The purpose of this exploratory study was to develop an instrument to assess learning environment factors that are culturally sensitive, to provide initial validation information on the instrument and to examine associations between students' perceptions of their learning environments and their attitudes towards science and achievement of enquiry skills. A measure of these factors of science student's learning environment, namely the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed from past learning environment instruments and influenced by Hofstede's four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Individualism, and Masculinity/Femininity). The reliability and discriminant validity for each scale were obtained and associations between learning environment, attitude to science and enquiry skills achievement were found.

  12. Effects of Teaching Literature on Culture Learning in the Language Classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chittra Muthusamy; Rasaya Marimuthu; Elangkeeran Sabapathy

    2011-01-01

    .... It is argued that the interface of language, literature and culture are at the forefront of present-day language and literature learning and this facilitates inter-racial, intra-racial and global understanding. Approach...

  13. Response to Marie Paz Morales' ``Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-12-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript.

  14. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  15. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  16. A comparison of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior to reduce disruptive behavior in a preschool classroom.

    OpenAIRE

    Conyers, Carole; Miltenberger, Raymond; Maki, Amber; Barenz, Rebecca; Jurgens, Mandy; Sailer, Angela; Haugen, Meredith; Kopp, Brandon

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of response cost and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) in reducing the disruptive behaviors of 25 children in a preschool classroom. Using an alternating treatments design, disruptive behavior was reduced when the participants earned tokens for the absence of disruptive behavior (DRO) or lost tokens for the occurrence of disruptive behavior (response cost). Initially, DRO was more successful in reducing the number of disruptive behavi...

  17. Bridging Communities: Culturing a Professional Learning Community that Supports Novice Teachers and Transfers Authentic Science and Mathematics to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, B. E.; Miller, H. R.; Loving, C. L.; Pedersen, S.

    2006-12-01

    Professional Learning Community Model for Alternative Pathways (PLC-MAP) is a partnership of North Harris Montgomery Community Colleges, Texas A&M University, and 11 urban, suburban, and rural school districts in the Greater Houston area focused on developing a professional learning community that increases the retention and quality of middle and high school mathematics and science teachers who are being certified through the NHMCCD Alternative Certification Program. Improved quality in teaching refers to increased use of effective inquiry teaching strategies, including information technology where appropriate, that engage students to ask worthy scientific questions and to reason, judge, explain, defend, argue, reflect, revise, and/or disseminate findings. Novice teachers learning to adapt or designing authentic inquiry in their classrooms face two enormous problems. First, there are important issues surrounding the required knowledgebase, habit of mind, and pedagogical content knowledge of the teachers that impact the quality of their lesson plans and instructional sequences. Second, many ACP intern teachers teach under challenging conditions with limited resources, which impacts their ability to implement authentic inquiry in the classroom. Members of our professional learning community, including scientists, mathematicians and master teachers, supports novice teachers as they design lesson plans that engage their students in authentic inquiry. The purpose of this research was to determine factors that contribute to success or barriers that prevent ACP secondary science intern and induction year teachers from gaining knowledge and engaging in classroom inquiry as a result of an innovative professional development experience. A multi-case study design was used for this research. We adopted a two-tail design where cases from both extremes (good and poor gains) were deliberately chosen. Six science teachers were selected from a total of 40+ mathematics and science

  18. CULTURAL BARRIERS TO THE APPLICATION OF COMMUNICATIVE APPROACH TO LANGUAGE TEACHING IN CHINESE CLASSROOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The communicative approach has been widely accepted andused in language teaching since the 1970s in western countriesand has proved to be quite effective.However,in Chineseclassrooms,it doesn’t seem as effective as it is in a westerncontext.This paper analyses the cultural barriers to theapplication of the communicative approach in Chineseclassrooms.Namely,the acceptance of relationships based onpower and authority;the collectivism orientation of Chinasociety and the concept of"face"are three cultural factors thathinder effective communicative language teaching in China.

  19. Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles: A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter B; Vignoles, Vivian L; Becker, Maja; Owe, Ellinor; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Brown, Rupert; Bourguignon, David; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B; Kreuzbauer, Robert; Cendales Ayala, Boris; Yuki, Masaki; Zhang, Jianxin; Lv, Shaobo; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit; Jaafar, Jas Laile; Fischer, Ronald; Milfont, Taciano L; Gavreliuc, Alin; Baguma, Peter; Bond, Michael Harris; Martin, Mariana; Gausel, Nicolay; Schwartz, Seth J; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Tatarko, Alexander; González, Roberto; Didier, Nicolas; Carrasco, Diego; Lay, Siugmin; Nizharadze, George; Torres, Ana; Camino, Leoncio; Abuhamdeh, Sami; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J; Koller, Silvia H; Herman, Ginette; Courtois, Marie; Fritsche, Immo; Espinosa, Agustín; Villamar, Juan A; Regalia, Camillo; Manzi, Claudia; Brambilla, Maria; Zinkeng, Martina; Jalal, Baland; Kusdil, Ersin; Amponsah, Benjamin; Çağlar, Selinay; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu; Möller, Bettina; Zhang, Xiao; Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Prieto Gil, Paula; Lorente Clemares, Raquel; Campara, Gabriella; Aldhafri, Said; Fülöp, Márta; Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin; Harb, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Variations in acquiescence and extremity pose substantial threats to the validity of cross-cultural research that relies on survey methods. Individual and cultural correlates of response styles when using 2 contrasting types of response mode were investigated, drawing on data from 55 cultural groups across 33 nations. Using 7 dimensions of self-other relatedness that have often been confounded within the broader distinction between independence and interdependence, our analysis yields more specific understandings of both individual- and culture-level variations in response style. When using a Likert-scale response format, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as similar to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour harmony, similarity with others and receptiveness to influence. However, when using Schwartz's (2007) portrait-comparison response procedure, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant but also connected to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour self-reliance and self-consistency. Extreme responding varies less between the two types of response modes, and is most prevalent among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant, and in cultures favouring self-reliance. As both types of response mode elicit distinctive styles of response, it remains important to estimate and control for style effects to ensure valid comparisons. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  20. Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching, Standards-Based Mathematics Teaching Practices, and Student Achievement in the Context of the "Responsive Classroom Approach"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmar, Erin R.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Larsen, Ross A.; Berry, Robert Q.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach, a social and emotional learning intervention, on changing the relations between mathematics teacher and classroom inputs (mathematical knowledge for teaching [MKT] and standards-based mathematics teaching practices) and student mathematics achievement. Work was…

  1. Exploring Middle School Teachers' Perceptions and Applications of a Site-Based, Technology-Related Professional Development Program Focused on Interactive Whiteboards and Classroom Response Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shreya J.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined five middle school teachers' perceptions of a site-based, technology-related professional development (TRPD) program focused on the interactive whiteboard (IWB) and the classroom response system (CRS) and the practices implemented in the teachers' classrooms as a result of participation in the TRPD…

  2. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  3. The Rationalizing Logics of Public School Reform: How Cultural Institutions Matter for Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridwell-Mitchell, E. N.

    2013-01-01

    The research herein uses a mixed methods approach to examine how organizational phenomena at the macro level of analysis translate into phenomena at the micro level. Specifically, the research attempts to explain how cultural institutions may translate into individual attitudes and actions, such as public school teachers' decisions about using…

  4. Building on Young Children's Cultural Histories through Placemaking in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Lenny

    2011-01-01

    This article suggests placemaking as a framework to more deeply understand how teaching and learning can take into account young children's cultural histories. Placemaking, a form of analysis commonly found in land development literature, critically interprets the relationship between power, politics and the production of place. In this article,…

  5. Bridging Linguistic and Cultural Differences through Reading: Multiethnic Literature in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Viola; Hadaway, Nancy L.

    The use of multicultural literature in school reading programs can enhance the regular reading program by providing students with an awareness for other cultures, and by making a contribution to overall competence in all areas of language arts and in reading comprehension. When schools use literature that reflects only mainstream majority values,…

  6. Cultural Conflict: The Indian Child in the Non-Indian Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockart, Barbetta L.

    American Indian children come from a cultural background and tradition that is quite different from that of the dominant society in America. These differences can cause varying degrees of confusion and conflict for Indian people, and these problems surface as soon as an Indian child begins his formal education, especially if the school is staffed…

  7. Immersion in Another Culture: Paradoxical Experiences Considered for Teachers and Students in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Russell, Catherine; Russell, Roger

    2009-01-01

    We have worked, learned, and lived in Indonesia. These experiences prompted Roger's PhD dissertation entitled: "Expatriate Managers' Immersion in Another Culture: A Phenomenological Study of Lived Experiences." The findings of this research uncovered eight paradoxical experiences that were lived by persons who were immersed in another…

  8. Preparing TESOL Students for the ESOL Classroom: A Cross-Cultural Project in Intercultural Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-López-Portillo, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Intercultural communication classes for TESOL students give them a solid foundation for their work with their own ESOL students. This article presents the cross-cultural project that TESOL students have to complete in a required intercultural communication class at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and the case study that was used to…

  9. On Dittmer's "Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity" as a Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzeck, Reecia; Craine, James; Dando, Christina; Somdahl-Sands, Katrinka

    2014-01-01

    In this intervention, four geographers, all of whom have used Jason Dittmer's book, "Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity", in their classes, assess its status as a teaching resource. All have had considerable success using Dittmer's book, alongside other resources, to cultivate critical thinking and critical knowledge…

  10. Multiple case study in seven European countries regarding culture-sensitive classroom quality assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, P.L.; Cadima, Joana; Salminen, Jenni; Pastori, Giulia; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a multiple case study, conducted in seven European countries to examine common and culturally differing aspects of curriculum, pedagogy, and quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) provisions in Europe. This multiple case study involved intensive dat

  11. The First World War in the Literacy-Focused Classroom: Teaching German through Cultural Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmann, Jennifer; Sederberg, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    This article offers approaches to the topic of the First World War at the intermediate and advanced levels of the German curriculum through thematically diverse WWI-era cultural texts. By situating the texts within a multiliteracies framework, the authors demonstrate how this historical and literary content can provide authentic material for…

  12. Popular Culture as Emotional Provocation: The Material Enactment of Queer Pedagogies in a High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the notion of popular culture as a form of queer emotional provocation, in this paper I suggest that attending to the material enactment of queer pedagogies in context enables an understanding of the importance of attending more fully to the emotional ramifications of queer pedagogies. Working within the context of a research project…

  13. Multiple case study in seven European countries regarding culture-sensitive classroom quality assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, P.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328192694; Cadima, Joana; Salminen, Jenni; Pastori, Giulia; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina

    This report presents the findings of a multiple case study, conducted in seven European countries to examine common and culturally differing aspects of curriculum, pedagogy, and quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) provisions in Europe. This multiple case study involved intensive

  14. An Overview of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) Use in Classroom Research 2000 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Western educational researchers have eagerly accepted activity theory (AT) also known as cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) to collect and analyze data in rich description of complex situations. As this theory is applicable to a wide variety of disciplines, this review is limited to education and specifically to qualitative studies of…

  15. Popular Culture as Emotional Provocation: The Material Enactment of Queer Pedagogies in a High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the notion of popular culture as a form of queer emotional provocation, in this paper I suggest that attending to the material enactment of queer pedagogies in context enables an understanding of the importance of attending more fully to the emotional ramifications of queer pedagogies. Working within the context of a research project…

  16. On Dittmer's "Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity" as a Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzeck, Reecia; Craine, James; Dando, Christina; Somdahl-Sands, Katrinka

    2014-01-01

    In this intervention, four geographers, all of whom have used Jason Dittmer's book, "Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity", in their classes, assess its status as a teaching resource. All have had considerable success using Dittmer's book, alongside other resources, to cultivate critical thinking and critical knowledge…

  17. Playing with Popular Culture -- An Ethnography of Children's Sociodramatic Play in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catharine Ann

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how ethnography allows for an understanding of the way children are empowered through the use of popular culture during sociodramatic play. The study discussed was conducted in an inner-city Primary school in regional New South Wales, Australia. The participants were a composite fifth-to-sixth grade class, and the research…

  18. Enhancing Cross Cultural Communication in the Marketing Classroom: A Case Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budden, Michael C.; Budden, Connie B.; Lopez, Tará Burnthorne

    2017-01-01

    The importance of effective communication skills in the workplace is widely documented and recognized as a success factor in many fields of endeavor. As the workplace becomes more diverse and more global in nature, the ability to communicate across cultures is gaining in importance. A class exercise in which Panamanian educators and US students…

  19. Selecting Chicano Children's Literature in a Bilingual Classroom: Investigating Issues of Cultural Authenticity and Avoiding Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamillo, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Before the Civil Rights movement, the lack of accurate representations of people of color was evident. Children's literature did not present accurate depictions of Mexican-Americans in the text. Sarapes, sombreros and fiestas were typical symbols used to identify Mexican culture and traditions. The Civil Rights Movement sparked a change for…

  20. Introducing Heuristics of Cultural Dimensions into the Service-Level Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A significant problem for practitioners of technical communication is to gain the skills to compete in a global, multicultural work environment. Instructors of technical communication can provide future practitioners with the tools to compete and excel in this global environment by introducing heuristics of cultural dimensions into the…

  1. Multiple case study in seven European countries regarding culture-sensitive classroom quality assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, P.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328192694; Cadima, Joana; Salminen, Jenni; Pastori, Giulia; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a multiple case study, conducted in seven European countries to examine common and culturally differing aspects of curriculum, pedagogy, and quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) provisions in Europe. This multiple case study involved intensive dat

  2. Preparing Early Childhood Educators for the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms and Communities of Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Amy; Kennedy, Adam; Lees, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Recent Illinois state policies call for mandatory preparation of early childhood educators to address the needs of the large and growing population of young English language learners. University-based early childhood teacher preparation programs across Illinois have responded by integrating content related to cultural and linguistic diversity into…

  3. Social and Emotional Learning around Technology in a Cross-Cultural, Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaosanurak, Chuanpob; Chanchalor, Sumalee; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported on in this paper was to design and test an intervention with elementary-aged children to promote social and emotional learning around technology. The intervention structured learning around technology as a catalyst and scaffolding tool that engages learners in cross-cultural, collaborative interaction, dialogue,…

  4. Language and Cultural Challenges Facing Business Faculty in the Ever-Expanding Global Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Glen M.

    2013-01-01

    More than 690,000 foreign students studied in the United States during the 2009-10 academic year. As non-native English-speaking students continue to pour into American educational institutions, one question many educators have is: are these international students adequately prepared for the language and cultural demands they will face when they…

  5. Reflecting Latino Culture in Our Classrooms: A Quick Start for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Christine; Salazar-Guenther, Mary; Polanco-Noboa, Julio

    This paper describes how the University of Northern Iowa's San Antonio Regional Student Teaching Program developed a course to provide cultural information on Hispanic Americans for its predominantly white student teachers. The course was delivered over 2 semesters, with students doing most work in five 2-hour meetings on campus. During the…

  6. Japanese Language and Culture: 9-Year Program Classroom Assessment Materials, Grade 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document is designed to provide assessment materials for specific Grade 4 outcomes in the Japanese Language and Culture Nine-year Program, Grades 4-5-6. The assessment materials are designed for the beginner level in the context of teaching for communicative competence. Grade 4 learning outcomes from the Japanese Language and Culture…

  7. Performing Race, Culture, and Gender in an Indigenous Australian Women's Music and Dance Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinlay, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    One perpetual concern among Indigenous Australian peoples is authenticity of voice. Who has the right to speak for, and to make representations about, the knowledges and cultures of Indigenous Australian peoples? Whose voice is more authentic, and what happens to these ways of knowing when they make the journey into mainstream Western academic…

  8. Exploring what stabilizes teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' scientific thinking in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jennifer

    Teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' disciplinary thinking is critical for promoting students' disciplinary engagement and learning, yet such attention is rare and fleeting in American classrooms. In this dissertation, I aim to learn more from teachers who do attend and respond to students' scientific ideas while teaching. I explore the classroom practices of three focal teachers in a professional development program who consistently place students' ideas at the core of their instruction with an eye toward the following research question: What might stabilize teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' scientific thinking during sustained classroom episodes? Examining three episodes from each teacher, I identify aspects within these episodes that are salient to the teachers and plausibly interrelated with their attention and responsiveness to student thinking. My primary data chapters include analyses of specific pairs of episodes that speak to my broader research question as well as other relevant topics in the literature on attending and responding to student thinking. The first data chapter makes the case that professional development efforts aimed at supporting responsiveness to student thinking primarily help teachers within planned discussions or progressions, but struggle to help teachers adapt their ongoing instruction in response to unexpected directions from students. I examine two episodes in which the discussions that emerged were not preplanned but rather emergent from students' contributions, with an eye toward what initiated and sustained teachers' responsiveness. The second data chapter contributes to discussions on what constitutes favorable change in attending and responding to the substance of student thinking, emphasizing the importance of disciplinary-specific considerations. Finally, I draw on the entire data set in noting specific commonalities within and across teachers, suggesting two

  9. Whole-Group Response Strategies to Promote Student Engagement in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagro, Sarah A.; Hooks, Sara D.; Fraser, Dawn W.; Cornelius, Kyena E.

    2016-01-01

    Students with learning disabilities are often educated in inclusive classrooms alongside their typically developing peers. Although differentiated small-group instruction is ideal for students with learning disabilities, whole-group instruction continues to be the predominant instructional model in inclusive classrooms. This can create major…

  10. Using Wireless Response Systems to Replicate Behavioral Research Findings in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    College instructors are increasingly relying on wireless clicker systems as instructional tools in the classroom. Instructors commonly use clicker systems for such classroom activities as taking attendance, giving quizzes, and taking opinion polls. However, these systems are uniquely well suited for the teaching of psychology and other courses…

  11. Predicting Student Misbehavior, Responsibility and Distraction from Schoolwork from Classroom Management Techniques: The Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van Dat

    2015-01-01

    This study reports students' perceptions of the classroom management techniques utilized in fourteen classrooms at eight junior high schools in one province in Vietnam. It examines data from 498 students in fifteen high schools in one district in Vietnam in grades 10 to 12 to identify how teachers' use of various management techniques, and the…

  12. The Impact of Cultural Differences on Chinese Classroom Teaching in the United States%文化差异对美国汉语课堂教学的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽萍

    2013-01-01

    Based on the author’ s own teaching experience and the proposal of Hofstede ( 1986 ) which con-cerns the differences between collectivist society and individualistic society reflected in language teaching class-room, this paper discusses how Chinese language teachers should adapt to the different social cultures of the students from alien countries in the classroom. Six aspects related to teaching activities are analyzed in this paper, including students’ s learning motivations, students’ responsive speaking in classrooms, question-answering, feed-back to questions from students, test scores and the principle of fairness in teaching.%文章基于Hofstede提出的集体主义社会文化和个人主义社会文化的差异在课堂中的具体反映,结合个体的教学经验,分析在美国本土的汉语教学中,教师如何适应这种不同的社会文化对课堂教学的影响。文章所讨论的具体内容包括学习动机、课堂发言、回答问题、学生提问、考试成绩和教学中的公平原则等六个方面。

  13. Minority students in the science classroom: Issues of language, class, race, culture and pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Aldrin Edward

    A considerable proportion of the educationally at-risk students in the K-12 public education system is composed of minority students, either in terms of cultural background, linguistic background, and frequently, both. In particular, satisfactory levels of achievement in science are not being attained by these students. The concerns of this study center on examining and understanding the reasons underlying this situation, with a view to suggesting how these problems of underachievement in science might be addressed. Previous and ongoing educational research concerning these issues suggest that such underachievement may be due to current pedagogical practices which seem to actively discourage these students from achieving any significant measure of academic, educational or professional success. The purpose of this study is thus to explore the beliefs and pedagogical practices of science teachers as they relate to minority students, especially those minority students for whom English is not a first language and who have limited English proficiency (LEP). In the course of this study, the terminology 'minority students' will refer to and be inclusive of cultural and/or language minorities, i.e. those students who differ from the mainstream white American student in terms of cultural background and a native language other than English. Culturally derived usages of non-standard forms of English (e.g. Black English Vernacular) also will be subsumed within this definition of cultural and language minority students. Particular attention will be given to emergent issues relating to current pedagogical practices, also to the science teacher beliefs and epistemological rationales underlying such practices. In exploring these beliefs and pedagogical practices, the study also will seek to delineate and to understand the various problems which are being encountered in the teaching of science to minority students. As the result of exploring the beliefs and pedagogical practices of

  14. Cultural Mythology Analysisof Media texts in the Classroom at the Student Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The author of this article presents the cultural mythology analysis of media texts: identification and analysis of mythologizing (including in the framework of the so-called folk sources - fairy tales, urban legends, etc. plot, those types of characters, etc. in media texts. In particular, the audience (for example, students offered by critical analysis to answer the question why so many entertainment media texts so popular with a mass audience? The author thinks that the media texts relating to the mass / popular culture, have success with the audience is not due to the fact that they supposedly only target people with low aesthetic taste, subject to psychological pressure, easy to believing the lie, etc., but because their authors respect and learning needs of the audience, including - information, compensatory, hedonistic, recreational, moral, aesthetic, etc.

  15. A Conspicuous Gap in Cultural Studies: Popular Music in the English Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippling, Jim

    2013-01-01

    For the author, the key analytic question about a popular song is not "What does it mean?" or "What hidden or coded meaning does it express?" but "What does its popularity tell us about the cultural moment when it resonated with its public?" How did the song "create its audience," so to speak? Obviously, a 1973 hit song, if it could time-travel,…

  16. The Kawa model: the power of culturally responsive occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Michael K; Thomson, Nicole A; Macdonald, Rona M

    2009-01-01

    The Kawa (Japanese for river) model, developed by Japanese and Canadian rehabilitation professionals, presents an important and novel alternative to contemporary 'Western' models of rehabilitation. Rather than focussing primarily on the individual client, the Kawa model focusses on 'contexts' that shape and influence the realities and challenges of peoples' dayto-day lives. The first substantial model of rehabilitation practice developed outside of the West illuminates the transactional quality of human-environment dynamics and the importance of inter-relations of self and others through the metaphor of a river's flow. The model's reflection of Eastern thought and views of nature presents a useful point of comparison to familiar rational and mechanical explanations of occupation and well-being. In this article, the rationale for an alternative model in rehabilitation is presented, followed by an explanation of the structure and concepts of the Kawa model. Implications for culturally responsive practice as well as the model's significance to the advancement of culturally safe rehabilitation worldwide are discussed.

  17. A Blueprint for Developing Culturally Proficient/Responsive School Administrators in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Jeffrey P.; Smith, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the important topic of culturally proficient/responsive school administrators for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students with learning disabilities (LD). Culturally proficient/responsive school administrators with knowledge and strong leadership skills in multicultural education are essential to impact school…

  18. Evaluating the impact of a classroom response system in a microbiology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchman, Erica; Uchiyama, Kay; Smith, Ralph; Bender, Kim

    2006-05-01

    The use of a Classroom Response System (CRS) was evaluated in two sections, A and B, of a large lecture microbiology course. In Section B the instructor used the CRS technology at the beginning of the class period posing a question on content from the previous class. Students could earn extra credit if they answered the question correctly. In Section A, the class also began with an extra credit CRS question. However, CRS questions were integrated into the lecture during the entire class period. We compared the two classes to see if augmenting lectures with this technology increased student learning, confidence, attendance, and the instructor's ability to respond to student's misconceptions, over simply using the CRS as a quizzing tool. Student performance was compared using shared examination questions. The questions were categorized by how the content had been presented in class. All questions came from instructors' common lecture content, some without CRS use, and some questions where Instructor A used both lecture and CRS questions. Although Section A students scored significantly better on both types of examination questions, there was no demonstrable difference in learning based on CRS question participation. However, student survey data showed that students in Section A expressed higher confidence levels in their learning and knowledge and indicated that they interacted more with other students than did the students in Section B. In addition, Instructor A recorded more modifications to lecture content and recorded more student interaction in the course than did Instructor B.

  19. Evaluating the Impact of a Classroom Response System in a Microbiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Suchman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of a Classroom Response System (CRS was evaluated in two sections, A and B, of a large lecture microbiology course. In Section B the instructor used the CRS technology at the beginning of the class period posing a question on content from the previous class. Students could earn extra credit if they answered the question correctly. In Section A, the class also began with an extra credit CRS question. However, CRS questions were integrated into the lecture during the entire class period. We compared the two classes to see if augmenting lectures with this technology increased student learning, confidence, attendance, and the instructor’s ability to respond to student’s misconceptions, over simply using the CRS as a quizzing tool. Student performance was compared using shared examination questions. The questions were categorized by how the content had been presented in class. All questions came from instructors’ common lecture content, some without CRS use, and some questions where Instructor A used both lecture and CRS questions. Although Section A students scored significantly better on both types of examination questions, there was no demonstrable difference in learning based on CRS question participation. However, student survey data showed that students in Section A expressed higher confidence levels in their learning and knowledge and indicated that they interacted more with other students than did the students in Section B. In addition, Instructor A recorded more modifications to lecture content and recorded more student interaction in the course than did Instructor B.

  20. Qualitative process evaluation of an Australian alcohol media literacy study: recommendations for designing culturally responsive school-based programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Chloe S; Kervin, Lisa K; Jones, Sandra C; Howard, Steven J

    2017-02-02

    Alcohol media literacy programs seek to mitigate the potentially harmful effects of alcohol advertising on children's drinking intentions and behaviours through equipping them with skills to challenge media messages. In order for such programs to be effective, the teaching and learning experiences must be tailored to their specific cultural context. Media in the Spotlight is an alcohol media literacy program aimed at 9 to 12 year old Australian children. This study evaluates the process and implementation of the program, outlining the factors that facilitated and inhibited implementation. From this evaluation, a pedagogical framework has been developed for health professionals implementing culturally responsive programs in school settings. Process measures included: semi-structured interviews with teachers before and after the program was implemented (n = 11 interviews), program evaluation questionnaires completed by children (n = 166), lesson observations completed by teachers (n = 35 observations), and reflective journal entries completed by the researcher (n = 44 entries). A thematic analysis approach was used to analyse all of the data sets using NVivo. Inductive coding was used, whereby the findings were derived from the research objectives and multiple readings and interpretations of the data. Five key pedagogical considerations were identified that facilitated implementation. These were: connecting to the students' life worlds to achieve cultural significance; empowering students with real-world skills to ensure relevance; ensuring programs are well structured with strong connections to the school curriculum; creating developmentally appropriate activities while providing a range of assessment opportunities; and including hands-on and interactive activities to promote student engagement. Three potential inhibitors to implementing the alcohol media literacy program in upper-elementary school classrooms were identified. These included topic

  1. Cogenerating fluency in urban science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavan, Sarah-Kate

    This critical ethnographic study employed the use of cogenerative dialogue (Roth & Tobin, 2002) as a means to allow participants of a science classroom to reflect on and transform classroom structures while at the same time create opportunities for all stakeholders to develop collective responsibility for teaching and learning. The research was situated in a science classroom in an inner city charter high school that was both a challenging place for the teacher (Jen Beers) and an oppressive place for the students as all struggled to reconcile issues related to power hierarchies and significant differences in social and cultural histories. As a result, cultural misinterpretations and the undervaluing of students' cultural capital served as a foundation for learning. This study examined the various fields and forms of practice that created opportunities for refining teaching practices and at the same time afforded the development of collective responsibility by addressing the roles, identities and agency of all classroom participants. Specifically, I asked the following questions: (1) How can co-generative dialogue can be used to involve all classroom participants in creating a learning community? (2) How does this shape the identities and roles of the participants who were involved? and (3) How do the changed roles and practices lead toward science fluency? The framework of cultural sociology, specifically the dialectical relationship of structure and agency, interaction ritual theory (Collins, 2003) and research on dispositions (Boykin, 1986), provided analytic tools to investigate the practices of the various stakeholders and the classroom structures as well as the historical and cultural contexts surrounding them. Multiple data resources such as field notes, videotape, interviews and artifacts were drawn on from two fields (the science classroom and cogenerative dialogues) to elicit and support findings at micro, meso and macroscopic levels. The major findings of

  2. Te Kotahitanga: Culturally Responsive Professional Development for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Russell; Berryman, Mere

    2010-01-01

    Te Kotahitanga is a research and professional development project that aims to support teachers to raise the achievement of New Zealand's indigenous Maori students in public/mainstream classrooms. An Effective Teaching Profile, developed from the voices of Maori students, their families, principals and some of their teachers, provides direction…

  3. Introducing Charly Palmer: Tar Baby and Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tanisha

    2012-01-01

    According to a report by the Congressional Research Service, the U.S. population is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. This increasing change is reflected in every aspect of people's lives, including the classroom. Now more than ever it is necessary for art educators to address the needs of the steadily increasing numbers of culturally…

  4. Learning To Read in Culturally Responsive Computer Environments. CIERA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkard, Nichole

    This report is a description and evaluation of two computer-based learning environments, Rappin' Reader and Say Say Oh Playmate, that build upon the lived literacy experiences African-American children bring to classrooms as scaffolds for early literacy instruction. When Rappin' Reader and Say Say Oh Playmate were used with…

  5. Placing Gifted Students At-Risk in Mixed-Ability Classrooms: A Sequential Mixed Methods Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers are held responsible for equitable and excellent education in classrooms that are increasingly diverse culturally and student academic ability. The purpose of this study was to better understand the attitudes and experiences of teachers in heterogeneous classrooms regarding teacher preparation in order to implement new research-based…

  6. From Discipline to Dynamic Pedagogy: A Re-conceptualization of Classroom Management

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jonathan Ryan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to re-conceptualize the definition of classroom management, moving away from its traditional definition rooted in discipline and control toward a definition that focuses on the creation of a positive learning environment. Integrating innovative, culturally responsive classroom management theories, frameworks, and strategies from contemporary educators, this article examines a new theoretical and conceptual foundation for classroom management—the Dynamic Classroo...

  7. Promoting Science Among English Language Learners: Professional Development for Today's Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Cory; Lee, Okhee; Santau, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    We describe a model professional development intervention currently being implemented to support 3rd- through 5th-grade teachers’ science instruction in 9 urban elementary schools with high numbers of English language learners. The intervention consists of curriculum materials for students and teachers, as well as teacher workshops throughout the school year. The curriculum materials and workshops are designed to complement and reinforce each other in improving teachers’ knowledge, beliefs, and practices in science instruction and English language development for ELL students. In addition to these primary goals, secondary goals of the intervention included supporting mathematical understanding, improving scientific reasoning, capitalizing on students’ home language and culture, and preparing students for high-stakes science testing and accountability through hands-on, inquiry-based learning experiences.

  8. Exploring "The Island": Mapping the Shifting Sands in the Landscape of English Classroom Culture and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gill

    2013-01-01

    I begin with an account of my own observation of an English lesson taught by one of my student teachers using a teaching resource, "The Island," that I used myself as a new teacher more than 20 years ago and of my own responses on finding it transformed by two decades of change in educational policy and practice. It has become almost a…

  9. Attitudes of Classroom Teachers to Cultural Diversity and Multicultural Education in Country New South Wales, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, James; Lean, Garth; Dunn, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Views of country school teachers towards multicultural education and anti-racism policy directives are examined against a background of a largely "white" landscape but increasing numbers of language background other than English (LBOTE) immigrants. A 10 per cent response from a self-administered online survey of government primary and…

  10. 75 FR 76997 - Public Consultation on Personnel Reliability and Culture of Responsibility Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Responsibility Issues AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Public Consultation on Guidance for Enhancing Personnel Reliability and Strengthening the Culture of Responsibility at the Local... culture of responsibility at facilities that conduct research with dangerous pathogens. The discussion...

  11. Culturally Responsive Pain Management for Black Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Lane, Sheria G; Booker, Staja Q

    2017-03-02

    pain for Black older adults has received inadequate attention by health care professionals despite evidence of greater pain intensity, depressive symptoms, and functional disability compared with White American older adults. Pain management for this population may be significantly improved with more careful attention to the provision of culturally responsive care. As professionals concerned with the optimization of health and reduction of suffering throughout the lifespan, nurses have an ethical, moral, and professional responsibility to provide culturally responsive care to the populations they serve-particularly when clear disparities in health exist. By considering how culture affects important health beliefs, values, preferences, and customs, and integrating this understanding into practice, quality of life is likely to be improved. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. The Culturally Responsive Teacher in Class-teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢桂梅

    2008-01-01

    <正>Successfully teaching students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds requires a new way of looking at teaching that is grounded in an understanding of the role of culture and language in learning.Teachers need to be familiar with constructivist views of learning,develop socio-cultural consciousnessuse instructional strategies.

  13. Understanding Semiotic Technology in University Classrooms: A Social Semiotic Approach to PowerPoint-Assisted Cultural Studies Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sumin; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a social semiotic approach to studying PowerPoint in university classrooms. Our approach is centred on two premises: (1) PowerPoint is a semiotic technology that can be integrated into the pedagogical discourse of classrooms, and (2) PowerPoint technology encompasses three interrelated dimensions of social semiotic…

  14. Cultural differences in interpersonal responses to depressives' nonverbal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanger, P; Summerfield, A B; Rosen, B K; Watson, J P

    1991-01-01

    The Social Impression and Interpersonal Attraction of British depressed patients was rated by British and German subjects on the basis of the patients' video-recorded nonverbal behaviour. Depressives were rated negatively by all subjects. Males in both cultural groups agreed in their ratings of depressives but German females expressed a more negative attitude than British females. This is attributed to cultural differences in sex-appropriate interactive behaviour. The importance of studying the expression of depression and its meaning within a particular cultural context is indicated and the role of cultural differences in interactive behaviour is discussed with respect to intercultural assessment and treatment of depression.

  15. Classroom Management and the Librarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Heidi; Hays, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    As librarians take on more instructional responsibilities, the need for classroom management skills becomes vital. Unfortunately, classroom management skills are not taught in library school and therefore, many librarians are forced to learn how to manage a classroom on the job. Different classroom settings such as one-shot instruction sessions…

  16. A Mirror of Voices: A Collaborative Learning Community of Culturally Responsive Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kim Diann

    2013-01-01

    This action research study acknowledged the possibilities of culturally responsive pedagogy by examining digital storytelling via online workshops that were facilitated for a group of educators and educational leaders. The presence of cultural biases and cultural discontinuities in Pre-K-12 education has the propensity to contribute to the…

  17. Three Curriculum and Organisational Responses to Cultural Pluralism in New Zealand Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, David

    1990-01-01

    Examines three educational responses to cultural diversity operating in New Zealand schools: incorporation of Maori culture programs in mainstream curriculums, organizational modification to accommodate Maori students, and the development of Maori culture and language immersion programs in primary schools. Application of similar programs to…

  18. Culturally Responsive Differentiated Instruction: Narrowing Gaps between Best Pedagogical Practices Benefiting All Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Lorri J.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Because of its special education association, differentiated instruction (DI) is a topic of concern for many educators working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners, whereby bilingual, multicultural, and culturally responsive teaching (CRT) is considered more appropriate for responding to cultural and…

  19. An examination of acquiescent response styles in cross-cultural research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Fischer; J.R.J. Fontaine; F.J.R. van de Vijver; D.A. van Hemert

    2006-01-01

    Response styles constitute a formidable challenge for cross-cultural research. In this article, three different response styles are discussed (acquiescence, extremity scoring, and social desirability). Acquiescence responding (ARS) is then integrated into a larger classical test theoretical framewor

  20. School Nurse Cultural Competence Needs Assessment: Results and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza, Maria; Maughan, Erin; Barrows, Beth M

    2015-11-01

    NASN conducted a needs assessment to learn about the cultural competence skills needed by school nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the results of the needs assessment and describe actions taken to address cultural competency needs for the U.S. school nurse workforce.

  1. Culturable bacteria in Himalayan ice in response to atmospheric circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Only recently has specific attention been given to culturable bacteria in Tibetan glaciers, but their relation to atmospheric circulation is less understood yet. Here we investigate the seasonal variation of culturable bacteria preserved in a Himalayan ice core. High concentration of culturable bacteria in glacial ice deposited during the pre-monsoon season is attributed to the transportation of continental dust stirred up by the frequent dust storms in Northwest China during spring. This is also confirmed by the spatial distribution of culturable bacteria in Tibetan glaciers. Culturable bacteria deposited during monsoon season are more diverse than other seasons because they derive from both marine air masses and local or regional continental sources. We suggest that microorganisms in Himalayan ice can be used to reconstruct atmospheric circulation.

  2. Cross-cultural pragmatics: compliments and compliment responses in English and Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张苏

    2012-01-01

    Language and culture are distinctly interdependent;one reflects the other.In cross-cultural communications,it is critical for language users to use and understand the language appropriately in a certain socio-cultural context.This paper aims to compare the similarities and differences of compliments and compliment responses in English and Chinese from the cross-cultural pragmatic perspective.The implications for teaching are also discussed so as to bridge the gap caused by cultural differences and minimize the occurrence of potential cross-cultural pragmatic failures.

  3. An Analysis of Classroom Culture of the Effective English Teaching Under the New Curriculum Reform%新课程英语有效教学课堂文化探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余德英

    2012-01-01

    The classroom culture has a profound impact on classroom teaching. In accordance with the New Curriculum Reform, it is essential for us to reconstruct the traditional classroom culture and endeavor to create a new classroom culture for the purpose of the effective English classroom teaching that highlights the six charac- teristics, namely, situation, openness, practice, mutuality, incentive and creativity. In addition, the formation of the classroom culture is an ever-developing and ever-improving process.%课堂文化对课堂教学有着非常深刻的影响,新课程英语有效教学要求改革传统课堂文化,努力构建具有情境性、开放性、实践性、互动性、激励性和创新性品质的课堂文化,并且,形成这种课堂文化需要一个不断发展和完善的过程。

  4. Thumbs Down. A Classroom Response to Violence towards Women = Pouce. La prevention en milieu scolaire de la violence faite aux femmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Teachers' Federation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet is designed to encourage age-appropriate classroom discussion and activities aimed at deterring violence against women. Teachers can address violence as an issue that touches the lives of teachers and students. Domestic violence against women cuts across socioeconomic, ethnic and cultural groups. Topics addressed by grade level…

  5. Considering Culturally Responsive Teaching, Children, and Place in the Music Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kimberly Friesen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author explores how culturally responsive teaching and the concept of children and place relate in the music room. The article begins with a brief explanation of both culturally responsive teaching and children and place. Through the use of anecdotes and ideas to consider, this article provides elementary music teachers with…

  6. Considering Culturally Responsive Teaching, Children, and Place in the Music Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kimberly Friesen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author explores how culturally responsive teaching and the concept of children and place relate in the music room. The article begins with a brief explanation of both culturally responsive teaching and children and place. Through the use of anecdotes and ideas to consider, this article provides elementary music teachers with…

  7. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  8. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  9. Consulting Pupils about Classroom Teaching and Learning: Policy, Practice and Response in One School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Bethan

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) doctoral study which investigated how teachers consulted pupils about teaching and learning in classrooms. Interest in consulting pupils has increased over the last decade; existing research suggests pupils have valuable perspectives on teaching and learning which teachers can…

  10. Clickers and CATs: Using Learner Response Systems for Formative Assessments in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Charlotte L.; Keyek-Franssen, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Formative assessment can play a critical role in fostering student success by engaging students in their own learning process, focusing their attention on what really matters, and helping instructors adjust to student learning needs in real time. Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are a powerful formative assessment tool, and many CATs can be…

  11. Resistance in the Classroom: A Phenomenological Analysis of Student Responses to Gender-Related Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobel, Christina

    Examining how students respond to gender-related issues, a study observed six classroom discussions of Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication, an introductory level college course which integrated gender issues. Four different classes, each consisting of 25-30 male and female students averaging 18-20 years of age, participated in the study.…

  12. Latina Bilingual Novice Teachers' First Year: Negotiating Relationships, Roles and Responsibilities within and beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Arcelia L.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes self reported transition experiences of five Latina bilingual novice teachers' into the classroom and documents how they participate in their own socialization as bilingual teachers. Informed by a sociocultural perspective of teaching and learning as socially constructed and mediated and by a critical perspective of education,…

  13. Authentic Research Experience and "Big Data" Analysis in the Classroom: Maize Response to Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevitch, Irina; Frechette, Cameo; Wiatros, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Integration of inquiry-based approaches into curriculum is transforming the way science is taught and studied in undergraduate classrooms. Incorporating quantitative reasoning and mathematical skills into authentic biology undergraduate research projects has been shown to benefit students in developing various skills necessary for future…

  14. Evangelism in the Classroom: A Response to John Tillson and Trevor Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Elmer John

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I reply to John Tillson's critique of my book, "The Ethics of Evangelism," and Trevor Cooling's critique of my article, "Evangelism in the Classroom," both found in this issue of the journal. (Contains 11 notes.)

  15. Clickers and CATs: Using Learner Response Systems for Formative Assessments in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Charlotte L.; Keyek-Franssen, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Formative assessment can play a critical role in fostering student success by engaging students in their own learning process, focusing their attention on what really matters, and helping instructors adjust to student learning needs in real time. Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are a powerful formative assessment tool, and many CATs can be…

  16. "Because That's Who I Am": Extending Theories of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy to Consider Religious Identity, Belief, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallavis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual article the author explores the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and religious school contexts. He extends theories of culturally responsive pedagogy to consider how religion, a dimension of student culture that has largely been overlooked in the literature surrounding culturally responsive pedagogy, can inflect…

  17. "Because That's Who I Am": Extending Theories of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy to Consider Religious Identity, Belief, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallavis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual article the author explores the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and religious school contexts. He extends theories of culturally responsive pedagogy to consider how religion, a dimension of student culture that has largely been overlooked in the literature surrounding culturally responsive pedagogy, can inflect…

  18. Potential Use of Classroom Response Systems (CRS, Clickers) in Foods, Nutrition, and Dietetics Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Susan Martin

    2016-10-01

    Although hundreds of articles have been published about the use of classroom response systems (CRS, clickers) in higher education, few address the use in foods, nutrition, and dietetics courses, especially upper-division, major courses. This technology has the potential to increase student engagement, motivation, assessment, and, possibly, learning. Thoughtfully designed questions may stimulate discussions, especially about challenging nutrition topics. This article presents the viability and potential benefits for the use of CRS in foods, nutrition, and dietetics classes through a brief literature summary, overview of the author's experiences, and guidance for implementing this technology. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 英语课堂教学中的文化教育——解读高三的一堂英语课%Cultural Education in English Classroom Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周芳

    2011-01-01

    Starting off from people-oriented educational idea and taking a classroom teaching case for example, this paper expounds cultural educahon in English classroom teaching.%本文从以人为本的教育理念出发,针对某一课的讲解,对英语课堂教学中的文化教育进行了阐述。

  20. The Polyacetylenes Falcarinol and Falcarindiol Affect Stress Responses in Myotube Cultures in a Biphasic Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Jette F; Christensen, Lars P.; Theil, Peter K.; Oksbjerg, Niels

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the bioactive polyacetylenes, falcarinol and falcarindiol, present in carrots, celery, celeriac and other umbelliferous vegetables, on the stress responses in primary myotube cultures, were studied. Biphasic responses on cellular stress responses in myotube cultures were investigated by exposing them to various concentrations of falcarinol and falcarindiol for 24 h before testing effects of 100 μM H2O2 on the intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), transcripti...

  1. Responsiveness of culture-based segmentation of organizational buyers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Jadczaková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much published work over the four decades has acknowledged market segmentation in business-to-business settings yet primarily focusing on observable segmentation bases such as firmographics or geographics. However, such bases were proved to have a weak predictive validity with respect to industrial buying behavior. Therefore, this paper attempts to add a debate to this topic by introducing new (unobservable segmentation base incorporating several facets of business culture, denoted as psychographics. The justification for this approach is that the business culture captures the collective mindset of an organization and thus enables marketers to target the organization as a whole. Given the hypothesis that culture has a merit for micro-segmentation a sample of 278 manufacturing firms was first subjected to principal component analysis and Varimax to reveal underlying cultural traits. In next step, cluster analysis was performed on retained factors to construct business profiles. Finally, non-parametric one-way analysis of variance confirmed discriminative power between profiles based on psychographics in terms of industrial buying behavior. Owing to this, business culture may assist marketers when targeting more effectively than some traditional approaches.

  2. Oviposition Attractancy of Bacterial Culture Filtrates: response of Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Poonam

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Oviposition attractants could be used for monitoring as well as controlling mosquitoes by attracting them to lay eggs at chosen sites. In the present study, culture filtrates of seven bacterial species were tested for their attractancy against gravid females of Culex quinquefasciatus. When their oviposition active indices (OAI were studied, the culture filtrates of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens exhibited oviposition attractancy (OAI = >0.3 at 100 ppm and the OAI were respectively 0.70 and 0.47. Culture filtrates of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis (wild type, B. t. var. israelensis (mutant and B. sphaericus showed attractancy at 2000 ppm with OAI of respectively 0.71, 0.59 and 0.68. However, the OAI of B. megaterium as well as Azospirillum brasilense was 0.13 (at 2000 ppm, which was less than 0.3 required to be considered them as attractants. When the oviposition attractancy of the bacterial culture filtrates were compared with that of a known oviposition attractant, p-cresol (at 10 ppm, the culture filtrates of B. t. var. israelensis (wild type and B. cereus were found to be more active than p-cresol, respectively with 64.2 and 54.3% oviposition.

  3. Inclusive Education Reform in Bangladesh: Pre-Service Teachers’ Responses to Include Students with Special Educational Needs in Regular Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Malak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive education (IE has been recognized as a key strategy to ensure education for all in the developing world for the last two decades. As a developing country, Bangladesh is striving to address IE by undergoing various initiatives such as policy reform, awareness creation and teacher development. This paper based on a qualitative approach attempts to explore pre-service teachers’ responses to include students with special educational needs (SEN in regular classrooms in primary schools. A one-on-one interview was conducted with 20 pre-service teachers who were enrolled in a teacher education program of one public university in Bangladesh. The findings revealed from the study indicate that majority of the pre-service teachers have unfavourable attitudes to include students with SEN in regular classrooms. Misconception and lack of knowledge about disabilities are revealed from most of the pre-service teachers’ responses. Further large class size, high workloads, inflexible curriculum policy of primary education and inadequate experiential learning facilities of teacher education program are identified as barriers to IE reform. Several issues are discussed as implications in order to promote better inclusive practices in regular primary education.

  4. Tissue Culture Responses from Different Explants of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiu-hong; SHI Xiang-yuan; WU Xian-jun

    2005-01-01

    Different culture explants, including anther, young panicle, young embryo, and mature embryo, from 19 rice varieties were used for callus induction and green plantlet differentiation. The culture efficiency differed significantly among the four types of explants, and varied from genotype to genotype. Callus induction frequency presented significantly positive correlation each between anther and young panicle, anther and mature embryo, and young panicle and young embryo. Green plantlet differentiation showed no relationship between different types of explants. In addition, no relationship was found between callus induction frequency and green plantlet differentiation frequency.

  5. Navigating the Unfamiliar in a Quest towards Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, Delia

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines a New Zealand "Pakeha" (European) teacher's professional development experience working with "Maori" (indigenous people of New Zealand), and their protocols and practices. A "Maori kaumatua" (male leader) experienced in theatre direction, acting, and psychiatric nursing led "Maori"…

  6. Teachers' Perceptions of Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Techniques to Impact the Achievement Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gear, Norman L.

    2012-01-01

    African American and Chicano/Latino American students score 10% or more below European American students on national and local standardized tests. Low-performing students also receive more frequent discipline referrals than their higher performing peers. This study examined teachers' perceived need for training to incorporate culturally…

  7. Research-Based, Culturally Responsive Reading Practice in Elementary Classrooms: A Yearlong Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Ellen; Hulan, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    In the field of elementary reading instruction, educators from varying theoretical perspectives have strived to promote instructional practices that "work" with diverse populations of students, with differing conclusions. In the present study, we examined elementary teachers' attempts at blending reading practices reflecting two philosophical…

  8. Cultural differences in survey responding: Issues and insights in the study of response biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmelmeier, Markus

    2016-12-01

    This paper introduces the special section "Cultural differences in questionnaire responding" and discusses central topics in the research on response biases in cross-cultural survey research. Based on current conceptions of acquiescent, extreme, and socially desirable responding, the author considers current data on the correlated nature of response biases and the conditions under which different response styles they emerge. Based on evidence relating different response styles to the cultural dimension of individualism-collectivism, the paper explores how research presented as part of this special section might help resolves some tensions in this literature. The paper concludes by arguing that response styles should not be treated merely as measurement error, but as cultural behaviors in themselves.

  9. Development of a Culturally Responsive Nutrition Promotion Course for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Gail C.; Beaudoin, Jessica; Rascon, Mayra; Garcia-Vega, Melawhy; Rios-Ellis, Britt

    2013-01-01

    The health of Hispanics is greatly influenced by level of education, socioeconomic status, and access to healthcare (United States Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2011). To address this issue and to reduce health disparities among all ethnic groups, community based interventions with culturally appropriate and linguistically…

  10. Socio-Cultural Norms for Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    Abstract – This paper considers the cultural resources for corporate action tied into stakeholder models, criticizes current stakeholder models, and develops a perspective based in ethics and the political model of the stakeholder. The purpose of this analysis is to lay out models which recognize...

  11. Socio-Cultural Norms for Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    Abstract – This paper considers the cultural resources for corporate action tied into stakeholder models, criticizes current stakeholder models, and develops a perspective based in ethics and the political model of the stakeholder. The purpose of this analysis is to lay out models which recognize...

  12. Development of a Culturally Responsive Nutrition Promotion Course for Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Gail C.; Beaudoin, Jessica; Rascon, Mayra; Garcia-Vega, Melawhy; Rios-Ellis, Britt

    2013-01-01

    The health of Hispanics is greatly influenced by level of education, socioeconomic status, and access to healthcare (United States Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2011). To address this issue and to reduce health disparities among all ethnic groups, community based interventions with culturally appropriate and linguistically…

  13. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  14. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  15. Collaborative Voices Exploring Culturally and Socially Responsive Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen L.; del Rocio Costa, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This piece shares preservice teachers and instructors reflections on their perceptions of a course on Spanish language arts methods in Puerto Rico. The course was redesigned to focus on interrelated curricular and pedagogical aspects such as literacies as situated social practice, funds of knowledge, popular culture and critical literacy. In…

  16. Standardization and Whiteness: One and the Same? A Response to "There Is No Culturally Responsive Teaching Spoken Here"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilbacher, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The article "There Is No Culturally Responsive Teaching Spoken Here: A Critical Race Perspective" by Cleveland Hayes and Brenda C. Juarez suggests that the current focus on meeting standards incorporates limited thoughtful discussions related to complex notions of diversity. Our response suggests a strong link between standardization and White…

  17. Talking Back: Shifting the Discourse of Deficit to a Pedagogy of Cultural Wealth of International Instructors in US Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yep, Gust A.

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of critical theory, poststructuralism, and critical pedagogy, this chapter calls for a shift in the ways we conceive, imagine, and represent international instructors in US classrooms. More specifically, it highlights the importance of the voices of international instructors themselves, proposes a shift from the current…

  18. "Don't Give up on Me": Critical Mentoring Pedagogy for the Classroom Building Students' Community Cultural Wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Daniel D.; Martinez, Antonio Nieves; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This one-year ethnographic case study focused on students of color from a West Coast High School who faced a variety of academic challenges. Collectively, they shared perspectives on school improvement, and among the recommendations was the importance of mentorship in the classroom to develop students' aspirational, navigational, and informational…

  19. Pedagogical and Political Encounters in Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Primary Classrooms: Examples from Quebec, Canada, and Gauteng, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton-Carbonneau, Gabrielle; Cleghorn, Ailie; Evans, Rinelle; Pesco, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Comparative research in multilingual urban primary schools indicates that the pedagogical and political goals of schooling may operate at cross-purposes. Classroom observations and teacher interview-discussions were conducted in classes for immigrant children in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where the language of instruction is French, and in classes…

  20. Temperature and photoperiod responses of soybean embryos cultured in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Patterson, R. P.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and photoperiod each have direct effects on growth rate of excised embryos of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill). To determine if the effects of photoperiod are altered by temperature, embryos of 'Ransom II' were cultured in vitro at 18, 24, and 30 degrees C under photoperiod durations of 12 and 18 h at an irradiance of 9 W m-2 (700 to 850 nm) and a photosynthetic photon flux density of 58 micromoles m-2 s-1 (400 to 700 nm). Accumulation rates of fresh and dry weight were greater under 18-h than 12-h photoperiods over the entire range of temperature. Water content of the culture embryos was not affected by photoperiod but was greater at 18 and 30 than 24 degrees C. The accumulation rate of dry weight increased from 18 to 26 but declined at 30 degrees C.