WorldWideScience

Sample records for culturally competent practices

  1. Cultural Competence in Child Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Michael S.; Henderson, Schuyler W.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. faces a changing demographic landscape that is increasingly multiracial. The application of a cultural competence model for assessing and treating the psychiatric disorders of minority youths in light of this demographic change is discussed.

  2. Pharmacy students' perceptions of cultural competence encounters during practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Loren-Ashley; Vellurattil, Rosalyn Padiyara; Quiñones-Boex, Ana

    2014-03-12

    To determine pharmacy students' perceptions regarding cultural competence training, cross-cultural experiences during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and perceived comfort levels with various cultural encounters. Fourth-year pharmacy (P4) students were asked to complete a questionnaire at the end of their fourth APPE. Fifty-two of 124 respondents (31.9%) reported having 1 or more cultural competence events during their APPEs, the most common of which was caring for a patient with limited English proficiency. Students reported high levels of comfort with specific types of cultural encounters (disabilities, sexuality, financial barriers, mental health), but reported to be less comfortable in other situations.

  3. Historical and Theoretical Development of Culturally Competent Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Hermeet K.; Huber, Ruth; Faul, Anna C.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a detailed review of the historical and theoretical context in which culturally competent practice has evolved in the social work profession and enables educators and practitioners to see holistic connections between the past and present. Historical review of the inclusion of diversity content is followed by definitions of…

  4. Pharmacy Students’ Perceptions of Cultural Competence Encounters During Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Loren-Ashley; Vellurattil, Rosalyn Padiyara; Quiñones-Boex, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine pharmacy students’ perceptions regarding cultural competence training, cross-cultural experiences during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and perceived comfort levels with various cultural encounters. Methods. Fourth-year pharmacy (P4) students were asked to complete a questionnaire at the end of their fourth APPE. Results. Fifty-two of 124 respondents (31.9%) reported having 1 or more cultural competence events during their APPEs, the most common of which was caring for a patient with limited English proficiency. Conclusion. Students reported high levels of comfort with specific types of cultural encounters (disabilities, sexuality, financial barriers, mental health), but reported to be less comfortable in other situations. PMID:24672064

  5. Performance-based competencies for culturally responsive interprofessional collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Valerie; Lackie, Kelly

    2009-11-01

    This paper will highlight how a literature review and stakeholder-expert feedback guided the creation of an interprofessional facilitator-collaborator competency tool, which was then used to design an interprofessional facilitator development program for the Partners for Interprofessional Cancer Education (PICE) Project. Cancer Care Nova Scotia (CCNS), one of the PICE Project partners, uses an Interprofessional Core Curriculum (ICC) to provide continuing education workshops to community-based practitioners, who as a portion of their practice, care for patients experiencing cancer. In order to deliver this curriculum, health professionals from a variety of disciplines required education that would enable them to become culturally sensitive interprofessional educators in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice. The Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre (RN-PDC), another PICE Project partner, has expertise in performance-based certification program design and utilizes a competency-based methodology in its education framework. This framework and methodology was used to develop the necessary interprofessional facilitator competencies that incorporate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for performance. Three main competency areas evolved, each with its own set of competencies, performance criteria and behavioural indicators.

  6. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations.

  7. Practice parameter for cultural competence in child and adolescent psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumariega, Andrés J; Rothe, Eugenio; Mian, Ayesha; Carlisle, Lee; Toppelberg, Claudio; Harris, Toi; Gogineni, Rama Rao; Webb, Sala; Smith, Jacqueline

    2013-10-01

    The United States faces a rapidly changing demographic and cultural landscape, with its population becoming increasingly multiracial and multicultural. In consequence, cultural and racial factors relating to mental illness and emotional disturbances deserve closer attention and consideration. This Practice Parameter outlines clinical applications of the principle of cultural competence that will enable child and adolescent mental health clinicians to better serve diverse children, adolescents, and their families. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Culture and Cultural Competence in Nursing Education and Practice: The State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkess, Linda; Kaddoura, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    The concept of cultural competency has developed a substantial presence in nursing education and practice since first attracting widespread attention in the 1990s. While several theories and corresponding measures of cultural competency have been advanced and tried, much work remains, as many nursing professionals continue to call for greater evidence-based research and attention to patient perspectives and outcomes. Using a method provided by Hawker et al. to appraise articles, this paper compares nine recent (2008-2013) studies (including two composite studies) related to cultural competency, undergraduate curricula, and teaching strategies in nursing to assess the state of the art in this important area of care. The studies applied phenomenological, study abroad, online, and service learning strategies, four of which relied on some version of Campinha-Bacote's IAPCC© model. These studies reported a general improvement in competency among students, though generally only to a level of cultural awareness, and admitted being constrained by several common limitations. Improved results and more realistic expectations in this area may require a closer understanding of the nature of the "culture" that underlies cultural competence. Harkess Kaddoura. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comparing Higher Education Practices and Cultural Competences in Kenya and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musamali, Kennedy; Martin, Barbara N.

    2016-01-01

    Examined within this paper are effective leadership practices across two cultures. Specifically, this study examined the relationship between cultural competency and effective leadership practices in higher education institutions. A quantitative design was used to investigate and compare effective practices of educational leaders in two distinct…

  10. The relationship between cultural competence education and increasing diversity in nursing schools and practice settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacquiao, Dula

    2007-01-01

    This article attempted to examine the relationship between cultural competence education and increasing diversity in nursing schools and practice settings. In addition to the review of the literature, a panel of experts was interviewed regarding institutional practices in response to the challenge of increasing diversity and cultural competence education. Evidence of positive outcomes of cultural competent care and impact of race and ethnic concordance between patients and providers are presented. The challenge of increasing underrepresented minorities in health care professions remains elusive. An ecological analysis is recommended to address the social and cultural barriers that transcend the micro system of the school and the macro system of the society. The challenge of increasing diversity and realizing outcomes of cultural competence education requires social and comprehensive remedies to level life inequities that perpetuate a history of disadvantages in some groups.

  11. Cultural Competence Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garran, Ann Marie; Werkmeister Rozas, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) adopted 10 discrete standards of culturally competent practice which undergird our commitment to diversity and social justice. The concept of intersectionality is newly emerging in social work, though, causing us to reflect on our current conceptualizations of cultural competence.…

  12. The Challenge of Cultural Competency in the Multicultural 21st Century: A Conceptual Model to Guide Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesam Darawsheh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available bstract Background: Occupational therapists increasingly encounter clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and need to meet their professional obligation of delivering culturally competent practice. Yet the process of cultural competency is poorly understood in occupational therapy practice. There is a need for a clear understanding of the meaning and process of cultural competency as it is enacted in practice with a wide range of individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds. Aim: To investigate the process, stages, characteristics, and requirements of cultural competency as practiced by experienced occupational therapists. Method: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 13 community occupational therapists experienced in delivering occupational therapy services in clients’ homes in a culturally diverse area in London, England. Findings: Interview data were analyzed and ordered into the format of a conceptual process model where cultural competency formed the core concept. The model of cultural competency that emerged from this study comprised six stages: cultural awareness, cultural preparedness, a cultural picture of the person, cultural responsiveness, cultural readiness, and cultural competence. Conclusion: Cultural competency is a complex process that needs to be based on underpinning occupational theory and actualized at the level of practice. Further research is needed to test out the model and illuminate the process of cultural competency in different areas of occupational therapy practice.

  13. Managerial capacity and adoption of culturally competent practices in outpatient substance abuse treatment organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G

    2010-12-01

    The field of cultural competence is shifting its primary emphasis from enhancement of counselors' skills to management, organizational policy, and processes of care. This study examined managers' characteristics associated with adoption of culturally competent practices in the nation's outpatient substance abuse treatment field. Findings indicate that in 1995, supervisors' cultural sensitivity played the most significant role in adopting practices, such as matching counselors and clients based on race and offering bilingual services. Staff's exposure to cross-cultural training increased from 1995 to 2005. In this period, positive associations were found between managers' cultural sensitivity and connection with the community and staff receiving cross-cultural training and the number of training hours completed. However, exposure to and investment in this training were negatively correlated with managers' formal education. Health administration policy should consider the extent to which the decision makers' education, community involvement, and cultural sensitivity contribute to building culturally responsive systems of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cultural Competence in the Treatment of Addictions: Theory, Practice and Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsbury, Sally M

    2017-07-01

    Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) populations often have high rates of addictive disorders, but lower rates of treatment seeking and completion than the mainstream population. A significant barrier to treatment is the lack of culturally relevant and appropriate treatment. A literature review was conducted to identify relevant literature related to cultural competence in mental health services delivery and specifically treatment for addictive disorders. Several theoretical models of cultural competence in therapy have been developed, but the lack of rigorous research limits the empirical evidence available. Research indicates that culturally competent treatment practices including providing therapy and materials in the client's language, knowledge, understanding and appreciation for cultural perspectives and nuances, involving the wider family and community and training therapists can enhance client engagement, retention and treatment outcomes for substance use and gambling. Further methodologically rigorous research is needed to isolate the impact of cultural competence for the treatment of addictions and guide research to determine treatment efficacy within specific CALD populations. Training therapists and recruiting therapists and researchers from CALD communities is important to ensure an ongoing focus and improved outcomes for CALD populations due to the importance of engaging these populations with addiction treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Key Practitioner Message: The treatment needs of culturally diverse individuals with addictions are often not met. Theoretical models can guide therapists in incorporating cultural competence. Culturally targeted treatments increase recruitment, retention and treatment outcomes. Cultural competence includes matching clinicians and clients on linguistic and cultural backgrounds as well as being mindful of the impact of culture on client's experience of addiction problems. Few methodologically

  15. The Cultivation of Cross-Cultural Communication Competence in Oral English Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the main problems and difficulties in current college English oral English teaching practice, illustrates the relationship between oral English teaching and cross-cultural communication competence. On the one hand, cross-cultural communication plays an essential role in oral English teaching; besides, oral English teaching…

  16. Identifying Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Culturally Competent Practice for School Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasley, Martell; Gourdine, Ruby; Canfield, James

    2010-01-01

    This study presents descriptive findings from self-reported qualitative and quantitative data on barriers and facilitators to culturally competent school social work practice. The study highlights the need for the development of evaluative methods for the purpose of examining how elements within the practice environment affect school social work…

  17. Developing and Testing the Short-Form Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument for Assessing Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvan, Gerard J; Garvan, Cynthia W; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2016-10-01

    The importance of educating dental students in cultural competence has been widely emphasized, but there is a need to assess cultural competence in a consistent and reliable way. The aims of this study were to determine latent constructs for the initial measure of cultural competence for oral health providers, the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument (KEPI), and to determine how well these factors related to previously identified latent constructs. Data were collected in surveys of dental students and from dental hygiene, dental assisting, and dental faculty members in 44 academic dental institutions from 2012 to 2015. There were a total of 1,786 respondents to the surveys; response rates to individual surveys ranged from 35% to 100%. There were 982 (55%) female and 804 (45%) male respondents, 286 (16%) underrepresented minority (URM) and 1,500 (84%) non-URM respondents, and 339 (19%) faculty and 1,447 (81%) student respondents. Three latent constructs were identified. Female respondents scored significantly higher on the culture-centered practice and efficacy of assessment factors, while URM respondents had significantly higher scores on all three of the KEPI factors. Measurements indicated that the long-form KEPI could be shortened by ten questions and still have three meaningful measurements. Continued research in assessing other health care providers' cultural competence is needed to expand the KEPI to measure providers' cultural competence with patients with minority sexual orientation and gender identity issues and those with physical disabilities, mental illness, and autism to advance patient-centric communication.

  18. Religious competence as cultural competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Definitions of cultural competence often refer to the need to be aware and attentive to the religious and spiritual needs and orientations of patients. However, the institution of psychiatry maintains an ambivalent attitude to the incorporation of religion and spirituality into psychiatric practice. This is despite the fact that many patients, especially those from underserved and underprivileged minority backgrounds, are devotedly religious and find much solace and support in their religiosity. I use the case of mental health of African Americans as an extended example to support the argument that psychiatric services must become more closely attuned to religious matters. I suggest ways in which this can be achieved. Attention to religion can aid in the development of culturally competent and accessible services, which in turn, may increase engagement and service satisfaction among religious populations. PMID:22421686

  19. Promoting Cultural Competence, Health Behaviors, and Professional Practice in Undergraduate Education through Peer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) has been identified as an important skill for all healthcare and public health professionals, and it must be integrated into all aspects of health practice. However, few university and college health education programs in North America have included CC education in their curriculums. This article describes an…

  20. Promoting Cultural Competence, Health Behaviors, and Professional Practice in Undergraduate Education through Peer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; FitzPatrick, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) has been identified as an important skill for all healthcare and public health professionals, and it must be integrated into all aspects of health practice. However, few university and college health education programs in North America have included CC education in their curriculums. This article describes an…

  1. "Shattering culture": perspectives on cultural competence and evidence-based practice in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio; Hannah, Seth Donal

    2015-04-01

    The concept of culture as an analytic concept has increasingly been questioned by social scientists, just as health care institutions and clinicians have increasingly routinized concepts and uses of culture as means for improving the quality of care for racial and ethnic minorities. This paper examines this tension, asking whether it is possible to use cultural categories to develop evidenced-based practice guidelines in mental health services when these categories are challenged by the increasing hyperdiversity of patient populations and newer theories of culture that question direct connection between group-based social identities and cultural characteristics. Anthropologists have grown concerned about essentializing societies, yet unequal treatment on the basis of cultural, racial, or ethnic group membership is present in medicine and mental health care today. We argue that discussions of culture-patients' culture and the "culture of medicine"-should be sensitive to the risk of improper stereotypes, but should also be sensitive to the continuing significance of group-based discrimination and the myriad ways culture shapes clinical presentation, doctor-patient interactions, the illness experience, and the communication of symptoms. We recommend that mental health professionals consider the local contexts, with greater appreciation for the diversity of lived experience found among individual patients. This suggests a nuanced reliance on broad cultural categories of racial, ethnic, and national identities in evidence-based practice guidelines. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Cultural competence: a constructivist definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet Garneau, Amélie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-01-01

    In nursing education, most of the current teaching practices perpetuate an essentialist perspective of culture and make it imperative to refresh the concept of cultural competence in nursing. The purpose of this article is to propose a constructivist definition of cultural competence that stems from the conclusions of an extensive critical review of the literature on the concepts of culture, cultural competence, and cultural safety among nurses and other health professionals. The proposed constructivist definition is situated in the unitary-transformative paradigm in nursing as defined by Newman and colleagues. It makes the connection between the field of competency-based education and the nursing discipline. Cultural competence in a constructivist paradigm that is oriented toward critical, reflective practice can help us develop knowledge about the role of nurses in reducing health inequalities and lead to a comprehensive ethical reflection about the social mandate of health care professionals.

  3. Cultural Competence and Social Work Education: Moving toward Assessment of Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Jayshree S.; Osteen, Philip; Shipe, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Social work educators are responsible for ensuring that future practitioners are culturally competent and have the ability to work effectively with people from different backgrounds. The purpose of this article is to address the current limitations in measuring cultural competence and to report the results of a qualitative study examining…

  4. Defining cultural competence: a practical framework for addressing racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care.

    OpenAIRE

    Betancourt, Joseph R.; Green, Alexander R.; Carrillo, J. Emilio; Ananeh-Firempong, Owusu

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Racial/ethnic disparities in health in the U.S. have been well described. The field of "cultural competence" has emerged as one strategy to address these disparities. Based on a review of the relevant literature, the authors develop a definition of cultural competence, identify key components for intervention, and describe a practical framework for implementation of measures to address racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care. METHODS: The authors conducted a literature...

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine practices, traditional healing practices, and cultural competency in pediatric oncology in Hawai' i

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asad Ghiasuddin; Joyce Wong; Andrea M Siu

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hawai’i is an ethnicaly diverse island state with a high rate of both traditional healing (TH) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use. The aim of this project was to assess TH and CAM use within the pediatric oncology population in Honolulu and improve the delivery of culturaly competent care. METHODS: A 9-item survey was distributed to al pediatric oncology patients at Kapi’olani Medical Center for Women and Children for 3 months. The survey inquired about patient ethnicity, TH practices, CAM practices and perception of cultural competence of the care received. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the survey items. Qualitative analysis was done with participant comments to identify themes. RESULTS:Sixty-two surveys were completed. TH was used by 39% of the respondents in the home, and 10% in the hospital (top method was traditional foods). CAM was used by 27% of the respondents in the home, and 68% in the hospital (top method was healing touch). Ninety-seven percent of the respondents reported receiving culturaly competent care. Areas for improvement included language services and dietary choices. CONCLUSION: CAM and TH are used frequently by pediatric oncology patients in Hawai’i, and the vast majority of patients and families felt that the care they received was culturaly competent.

  6. Cultural competence and simulated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paroz, Sophie; Daele, Amaury; Viret, Francine; Vadot, Sara; Bonvin, Raphaël; Bodenmann, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Cultural competence education is central in addressing the socio-cultural factors that affect health care; however, there is little agreement over the best teaching approach. Although simulated patients are widely used in medical education, little is known about their application to cultural competence education. At the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine, University of Lausanne, the content of a cultural competence education module for resident doctors was recently restructured, with a final session emphasising previous principles through a simulated patient-doctor encounter. We tested the feasibility of cultural competence training with simulated patients. We created two complementary case scenarios based on real clinical practice and focused on specific clinical skills. An interdisciplinary team trained two simulated patients, and a 90-minute pilot session took place. General satisfaction was high and the increased opportunity for interaction was greatly appreciated. According to the learners, the simulated case setting was relevant for improving self-reflection and cultural sensitivity: applying skills in the session enhanced perceived impact for 'real-world' practice. We tested the feasibility of cultural competence training with simulated patients The use of patient-centred simulated clinical practice as a teaching approach seems to be advantageous in increasing providers' self-reflection about cultural competence and intensifying the impact of cultural competence education in clinical practice, and hopefully will improve the quality of care for every patient. Case scenarios based on a diversity of socio-cultural factors and oriented towards a broad skills set would seem preferable to avoid cultural drift and to enhance the learning of cultural approaches that are adaptable to every patient. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Conducting Spiritual Assessments with Native Americans: Enhancing Cultural Competency in Social Work Practice Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.; Limb, Gordon E.

    2010-01-01

    Developing competency in diversity and assessment are key educational priorities. With Native American clients a spiritual assessment is typically required because spirituality is often instrumental to health and wellness in Native cultures. In keeping with the movement toward competency-based education, this qualitative study sought to answer the…

  8. Theoretical and Practical Advances in the Assessment of Cross-Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    region-specific knowledge; (3) attitudinal and motivational dispositions such as ethnocentrism , interest in culture, and motivation to learn; and (4...behavioral competencies is the classic assessment center, this method is costly and time consuming . By including antecedent measurement in the mix

  9. Self-Awareness, Self-Compassion, and Cultural Competence: Implications for Social Work Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Mara

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relationships among the constructs of self-awareness, self-compassion, and cultural competence within the NYU MSW student population, as measured by three separate scales. An anonymous Qualtrics survey containing the three scales and five demographic questions was sent via university e-mail to…

  10. Self-Awareness, Self-Compassion, and Cultural Competence: Implications for Social Work Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Mara

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relationships among the constructs of self-awareness, self-compassion, and cultural competence within the NYU MSW student population, as measured by three separate scales. An anonymous Qualtrics survey containing the three scales and five demographic questions was sent via university e-mail to…

  11. Practitioner characteristics and organizational contexts as essential elements in the evidence-based practice versus cultural competence debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Vivian Hopkins

    2015-04-01

    The different pathways chosen to efficiently and effectively provide relief to those struggling with mental health challenges reflect different assumptions about the human condition and have led to disagreements over which intervention strategies are best suited to particular individuals or populations. Evidence-based practice and culturally competent services, as discussed within the United States, have been characterized as opposites. However, neither approach captures all of the elements that embody the full treatment experience. This article offers a framework that includes the personal identity of the practitioner and the organizational context as two elements that serve as active agents in the helping relationship, although they have rarely been included in the discourse about evidence-based practice or cultural competence. Suggestions for practice, education, and research are included based on this analysis. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Developing Soldier Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-03

    providing Soldiers a “ tourist ” level of understanding which does not adequately prepare them to be culturally competent and effective. The one exception is...cultures use high-context, indirect communications. High- 7 context groups view the low context groups as abrupt and rude in their messages, while low

  13. Reconciling evidence-based practice and cultural competence in mental health services: introduction to a special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Joseph P

    2015-04-01

    The calls for evidence-based practice (EBP) and cultural competence (CC) represent two increasingly influential mandates within the mental health professions. Advocates of EBP seek to standardize clinical practice by ensuring that only treatment techniques that have demonstrated therapeutic outcomes under scientifically controlled conditions would be adopted and promoted in mental health services. Advocates of CC seek to diversify clinical practice by ensuring that treatment approaches are designed and refined for a multicultural clientele that reflects a wide variety of psychological orientations and life experiences. As these two powerful mandates collide, the fundamental challenge becomes how to accommodate substantive cultural divergences in psychosocial experience using narrowly prescriptive clinical practices and approaches, without trivializing either professional knowledge or cultural difference. In this Introduction to a special issue of Transcultural Psychiatry, the virtue of an interdisciplinary conversation between and among anthropologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social work researchers in addressing these tensions is extolled. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Cultural competence and evidence-based practice in mental health: epistemic communities and the politics of pluralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2012-07-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) and cultural competence (CC) aim to improve the effectiveness of mental health care for diverse populations. However, there are basic tensions between these approaches. The evidence that purports to ground EBP is limited, often in ways that are biased by specific disciplinary, economic or political interests and cultural assumptions. In particular, the paucity of evidence regarding cultural minorities results in standard practices based on data from the majority population that have uncertain relevance for specific cultural groups. As well, research evidence about intervention outcomes tends to focus on individual symptoms and behaviors and may not reflect culturally relevant outcomes. To some extent, these limitations can be addressed by refining and extending current methods of evidence production. However, consideration of culture raises two deeper problems for EBP: 1) The diagnostic and conceptual frameworks used to pose questions, devise interventions, and determine outcomes in EBP are themselves culturally determined and therefore potentially biased or inappropriate; and 2) Cultural communities may have "ways of knowing" that do not rely on the kinds of observational and experimental measures and methods that characterize EBP. Attention to the nature of clinical evidence and to the importance of cultural context in illness and healing can help both EBP and CC move beyond their current limitations and contribute to the evolution of mental health services that respond effectively to cultural diversity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The ethics of cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2004-04-01

    Cultural competence curricula have proliferated throughout medical education. Awareness of the moral underpinnings of this movement can clarify the purpose of such curricula for educators and trainees and serve as a way to evaluate the relationship between the ethics of cultural competence and normative Western medical ethics. Though rarely stated explicitly, the essential principles of cultural competence are (1) acknowledgement of the importance of culture in people's lives, (2) respect for cultural differences, and (3) minimization of any negative consequences of cultural differences. Culturally competent clinicians promote these principles by learning about culture, embracing pluralism, and proactive accommodation. Generally, culturally competent care will advance patient autonomy and justice. In this sense, cultural competence and Western medical ethics are mutually supportive movements. However, Western bioethics and the personal ethical commitments of many medical trainees will place limits on the extent to which they will endorse pluralism and accommodation. Specifically, if the values of cultural competence are thought to embrace ethical relativity, inexorable conflicts will be created. The author presents his view of the ethics of cultural competence and places the concepts of cultural competence in the context of Western moral theory. Clarity about the ethics of cultural competence can help educators promote and evaluate trainees' integration of their own moral intuitions, Western medical ethics, and the ethics of cultural competence.

  16. Cultural competence models and cultural competence assessment instruments in nursing: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zuwang

    2015-05-01

    The author reviewed cultural competence models and cultural competence assessment instruments developed and published by nurse researchers since 1982. Both models and instruments were examined in terms of their components, theoretical backgrounds, empirical validation, and psychometric evaluation. Most models were not empirically tested; only a few models developed model-based instruments. About half of the instruments were tested with varying levels of psychometric properties. Other related issues were discussed, including the definition of cultural competence and its significance in model and instrument development, limitations of existing models and instruments, impact of cultural competence on health disparities, and further work in cultural competence research and practice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Cultural Competence of Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Ella T

    To measure the cultural competence level of obstetric and neonatal nurses, explore relationships among cultural competence and selected sociodemographic variables, and identify factors related to cultural competence. Descriptive correlational study. Online survey. A convenience sample of 132 obstetric and neonatal registered nurses practicing in the United States. Nurse participants completed the Cultural Competence Assessment (CCA) instrument, which included Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity (CAS) and Cultural Competence Behaviors (CCB) subscales, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted. The average CCA score was 5.38 (possible range = 1.00-7.00). CCA scores were negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with self-ranked cultural competence, years of nursing experience, years of experience within the specialty area, and number of types of previous cultural diversity training. CCB subscale scores were correlated positively with age, years of nursing experience, years of experience within the specialty area, and number of types of previous diversity training. CAS subscale scores were positively correlated with number of types of previous diversity training. Standard multiple linear regression explained approximately 10%, 12%, and 11% of the variance in CCA, CAS, and CCB scores, respectively. Obstetric and neonatal registered nurses should continue to work toward greater cultural competence. Exposing nurses to more types of cultural diversity training may help achieve greater cultural competence. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cultural competencies for graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lauren; Calvillo, Evelyn; Dela Cruz, Felicitas; Fongwa, Marie; Kools, Susan; Lowe, John; Mastel-Smith, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Nursing is challenged to meet the health needs of ethnic and socioculturally diverse populations. To this end, American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) charged an expert nursing faculty advisory group to formulate competencies for graduate nursing education, expanding them to integrate leadership and scholarship. The Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education served as the springboard for the initiative. In formulating the graduate cultural competencies and the toolkit, the advisory group reviewed all AACN Essentials documents and the cultural competency literature, drew upon their collective experiences with cultural diversity, and used cultural humility as the supporting framework. Six core competencies were formulated and endorsed by the AACN board of directors and key professional nursing organizations. A companion toolkit was compiled to provide resources for the implementation of the competencies. A 1-day conference was held in California to launch the cultural competencies and toolkit. Dissemination to graduate nursing programs is in process, with emphasis on faculty readiness to undertake this graduate educational transformation. The AACN Cultural Competencies for Graduate Nursing Education set national standards to prepare culturally competent nurses at the graduate level who will contribute to the elimination of health disparities through education, clinical practice, research, scholarship, and policy.

  19. Exploring the 'cultural' in cultural competencies in Pacific mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samu, Kathleen Seataoai; Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau

    2009-02-01

    Cultural competency is about the ability of individuals and systems to respond respectfully and effectively to the cultural needs of peoples of all cultures. Its general attributes include knowledge, attitudes, skills and professional judgment. In Pacific mental health, 'the cultural' is generally understood to be ethnic culture. Accordingly, Pacific cultural competencies assume ethnic specific markers. In mental health Pacific cultural competencies has seen a blending of cultural and clinical beliefs and practices. This paper provides an overview of five key theme areas arising from Auckland-based ethnic-specific Pacific workshop data: language, family, tapu relationships, skills and organisation policy. Workshop participants comprised of Pacific mental health providers, Pacific consumers, family members of Pacific consumers and members of the Pacific community members. This paper purports that identifying the perceptions of different Pacific groups on ethnic-specific elements of cultural competencies are necessary to build and strengthen the capacity and capability of mental health services to provide culturally relevant services.

  20. Cultural competency training in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, A; Collazos, F; Ramos, M; Casas, M

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that the quality of care provided to immigrant and ethnic minority patients is not at the same level as that provided to majority group patients. Although the European Board of Medical Specialists recognizes awareness of cultural issues as a core component of the psychiatry specialization, few medical schools provide training in cultural issues. Cultural competence represents a comprehensive response to the mental health care needs of immigrant and ethnic minority patients. Cultural competence training involves the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that can improve the effectiveness of psychiatric treatment. Cognitive cultural competence involves awareness of the various ways in which culture, immigration status, and race impact psychosocial development, psychopathology, and therapeutic transactions. Technical cultural competence involves the application of cognitive cultural competence, and requires proficiency in intercultural communication, the capacity to develop a therapeutic relationship with a culturally different patient, and the ability to adapt diagnosis and treatment in response to cultural difference. Perhaps the greatest challenge in cultural competence training involves the development of attitudinal competence inasmuch as it requires exploration of cultural and racial preconceptions. Although research is in its infancy, there are increasing indications that cultural competence can improve key aspects of the psychiatric treatment of immigrant and minority group patients.

  1. Constructivism in cultural competence education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer L; Krantz, Steven

    2010-04-01

    A graduate course on cultural diversity, based in constructivist theory and structured on the Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services model, was developed and taught through classroom and online methods. The following research questions were explored: 1) Can an educational experience, built on constructivist learning theory tenets, change students' perceptions, attitudes, knowledge, and skills in the area of cultural competence? 2) Does the delivery method, online or traditional classroom, influence the degree of change? The study used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest control group design using the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among healthcare Professionals Revised. Findings showed significant changes (p<0.001) in cultural competence scores and subscores for all learners with both teaching modalities based on interval scale and in categories of cultural knowledge, skills, desire, and overall competence based on a nominal scale. The untaught construct of cultural desire showed the most significant improvement.

  2. EPA guidance on cultural competence training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouler-Ocak, Meryam; Graef-Calliess, Iris T; Tarricone, Ilaria; Qureshi, Adil; Kastrup, Marianne C; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2015-03-01

    The stress of migration as well as social factors and changes related to the receiving society may lead to the manifestation of psychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals after migration. The diversity of cultures, ethnicities, races and reasons for migration poses a challenge for those seeking to understand how illness is experienced by immigrants whose backgrounds differ significantly from their clinicians. Cultural competence represents good clinical practice and can be defined as such that a clinician regards each patient in the context of the patient's own culture as well as from the perspective of the clinician's cultural values and prejudices. The EPA Guidance on cultural competence training outlines some of the key issues related to cultural competence and how to deal with these. It points out that cultural competence represents a comprehensive response to the mental health care needs of immigrant patients and requires knowledge, skills and attitudes which can improve the effectiveness of psychiatric treatment. To reach these aims, both individual and organizational competence are needed, as well as teaching competence in terms of educational leadership. The WPA Guidance on Mental Health and Mental Health Care for Migrants and the EPA Guidance on Mental Health Care for Migrants list a series of recommendations for policy makers, service providers and clinicians; these are aimed at improving mental health care for immigrants. The authors of this paper would like to underline these recommendations and, focusing on cultural competency and training, believe that they will be of positive value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Childrens Engagement in Digital Practices in Leisure Time and School. A Socio-Cultural Perspective on Development of Digital Competencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mette Bjørgen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on questionnaire data, this article analyses to what extent, and in relation to which digital tasks, pupils engage in four digital practices in leisure time and school. The results indicated differences between, and similarities in, their engagement within and across the two contexts, as well as differences related to gender and school level. In future research digital competencies should be understood as situated in social practices in order to understand how pupils’ digital competencies can be developed within school.

  4. Using Qualitative Research to Develop Culturally Competent Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Louise Bordeaux; Auerbach, Carl F.

    2009-01-01

    Kazdin pointed out that the requirement for evidence-based practice (EBP) has made the long-standing gap between research and practice in clinical psychology even more salient. He offered several strategies for bridging this gap: investigating mechanisms and moderators of therapeutic change, and qualitative research. We agree that qualitative…

  5. Cultural competence in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Janne; Jervelund, Signe Smith; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2017-01-01

    the survey, and 199 responded. The response rate is 14%. Data were analysed through descriptive calculations, and answers to open-ended questions were coded using content analysis. Results: Results showed that 82.4% of the informants agreed or strongly agreed that the medical education programme should...... in receiving training on cultural competence. Conclusions: Generally, there is interest in and acknowledgement of the importance of cultural competence in Danish medical education among teachers at the University of Copenhagen. This creates an opportunity to implement cultural competence in the medical...

  6. Working with Arab American Families: Culturally Competent Practice for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haboush, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    Individuals of Arab descent residing within the United States currently number between 1.2 million and 3.9 million. These families are characterized by considerable diversity depending upon their nationality, religion, and extent of acculturation to both Western and Arab cultures. More recently, Arab families have immigrated to the United States…

  7. Cultural competency in peer-run programs: results of a web survey and implications for future practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonikas, Jessica A; Kiosk, Stephen; Grey, Dennis D; Hamilton, Marie M; McNulty, James; Cook, Judith A

    2010-01-01

    The study explored perceptions of adults with psychiatric disabilities regarding cultural competency of peer-run mental health support groups and programs. Web survey respondents were recruited via mental health list-servs, web sites, newsletters, emails, and word of mouth. A total of 527 peers were surveyed about cultural competency barriers facing peer-run programs; common reasons for not using peer services; and strategies to engage diverse communities. Both multicultural and Caucasian respondents agreed that lack of funding and staff education about diversity were barriers to cultural competency in peer programs. Multicultural respondents were more likely than whites to feel that both the recognition of the need for and interest in attending cultural competency training is lacking in peer programs, as well as information about the diverse composition of peer program memberships. Among those who had never participated in peer support, people of color were more likely than whites to endorse feeling they would not belong and believing their languages would not be spoken in peer programs. Whites, on the other hand, were more likely to cite a preference for professional over peer support, while nearly half of both groups indicated that the main reason for non-attendance is a lack of knowledge about peer programs. Qualitative results highlighted successful outreach and engagement strategies. Study findings informed development of a cultural competency tool that was pilot-tested among peer-run programs. Given the importance of peer support in recovery, these findings suggest the need for additional research on cultural competency in peer programs.

  8. Increasing Cultural Competence through Needs Assessment and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Natasha L.; Bahr, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing cultural diversity of American students makes it imperative for school-based professionals to engage in culturally-competent practice, thereby ensuring high-quality mental health services. Although most cultural competence training occurs in university programs, research shows practicing mental health professionals would benefit…

  9. Social justice: a framework for culturally competent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingerman, Evelyn

    2011-10-01

    Nurse scholars with expertise in global health and culturally competent care recently proposed standards of practice for culturally competent nursing care that are founded on social justice as a broad framework. The purpose of this article is to respond to invited dialogue about the standards and to offer commentary on social justice and its relationship with context, advocacy, leadership, and culturally competent care. A model of culturally competent care for vulnerable groups informs this discussion. The context and culture that surround migrant and seasonal farmworkers illustrate how social justice illuminates their health inequities and necessitates their need for culturally competent care. The article concludes with recommendations for culturally competent education, practice, and research and offers suggestions for developing culturally competent interventions for migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

  10. The influence of the cultural climate of the training environment on physicians' self-perception of competence and preparedness for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muskiet Fred D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In current supervisory practice, the learning environment in which the training of specialist registrars (SpRs takes place is important. Examples of such learning environments are the hospital settings and/or geographical locations where training occurs. Our objective was to investigate whether the cultural climate of different learning environments influences physicians' perceived level of competence and preparedness for practice. Methods An electronic questionnaire was sent to an equal group of paediatricians who had trained in clinical settings located in Europe and the Caribbean. 30 items (Likert scale 1–4 = totally disagree-totally agree were used to measure the level of preparedness of the respondents in 7 physician competencies. Results 42 participants were included for analysis. The distribution of participants in both groups was comparable. The overall perception of preparedness in the Caribbean group was 2.93 (SD = 0.47 and 2.86 (SD = 0.72 in the European group. The European group felt less prepared in the competency as manager 1.81 (SD = 1.06 compared to their Caribbean counterparts 2.72 (SD = 0.66. The difference was significant (p = 0.006. Conclusion The training in the different environments was perceived as adequate and comparable in effect. The learning environment's cultural climate appeared to influence the physician's perception of their competencies and preparedness for clinical practice.

  11. Developing cultural competences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bachofer

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with a topic of intercultural management as a source of competitive advantages whose significance together with the development of the international trade becomes more important. Firms that expand into foreign markets must adapt themselves to different cultures to be able to communicate effectively with the local background and to achieve the best possible results. This entry is based on the methodology of action research and includes the analysis of the intercultural context of the company Skanska Property CZ

  12. Culture, Personality, Health, and Family Dynamics: Cultural Competence in the Selection of Culturally Sensitive Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Len

    2010-01-01

    Cultural sensitivity and cultural competence in the selection of culturally sensitive treatments is a requisite for effective counseling practice in working with diverse clients and their families, particularly when clients present with health issues or medical problems. Described here is a strategy for selecting culturally sensitive treatments…

  13. A constructivist theoretical proposition of cultural competence development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet Garneau, Amélie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-11-01

    Cultural competence development in healthcare professions is considered an essential condition to promote quality and equity in healthcare. Even if cultural competence has been recognized as continuous, evolutionary, dynamic, and developmental by most researchers, current models of cultural competence fail to present developmental levels of this competence. These models have also been criticized for their essentialist perspective of culture and their limited application to competency-based approach programs. To our knowledge, there have been no published studies, from a constructivist perspective, of the processes involved in the development of cultural competence among nurses and undergraduate student nurses. The purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical proposition of cultural competence development in nursing from a constructivist perspective. We used a grounded theory design to study cultural competence development among nurses and student nurses in a healthcare center located in a culturally diverse urban area. Data collection involved participant observation and semi-structured interviews with 24 participants (13 nurses and 11 students) working in three community health settings. The core category, 'learning to bring the different realities together to provide effective care in a culturally diverse context', was constructed using inductive qualitative data analysis. This core category encompasses three dimensions of cultural competence: 'building a relationship with the other', 'working outside the usual practice framework', and 'reinventing practice in action.' The resulting model describes the concurrent evolution of these three dimensions at three different levels of cultural competence development. This study reveals that clinical experience and interactions between students or nurses and their environment both contribute significantly to cultural competence development. The resulting theoretical proposition of cultural competence development

  14. The Limits of Cultural Competence: An Indigenous Studies Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Taking the Universities Australia report, "National best practice framework for Indigenous cultural competency in Australian universities" (2011) as the starting point for its discussion, this paper examines the applicability of cultural competence in the design and delivery of Australian Indigenous Studies. It argues that both the…

  15. Cultural competence knowledge and confidence after classroom activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muzumdar, Jagannath Mohan; Holiday-Goodman, Monica; Black, Curtis; Powers, Mary

    2010-01-01

    To determine change in cultural competency knowledge and perceived confidence of second-year pharmacy students to deliver culturally competent care after completing a required cultural competency curriculum...

  16. The Cultural Competence of Graduating Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repo, Hanna; Vahlberg, Tero; Salminen, Leena; Papadopoulos, Irena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Cultural competence is an essential component in nursing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of cultural competence of graduating nursing students, to identify associated background factors to cultural competence, and furthermore to establish whether teaching multicultural nursing was implemented in nursing education. A structured Cultural Competence Assessment Tool was used in a correlational design with a sample of 295 nursing students in southern Finland. The level of cultural competence was moderate, and the majority of students had studied multicultural nursing. Minority background (p = .001), frequency of interacting with different cultures (p = .002), linguistic skills (p = .002), and exchange studies (p = .024) were positively associated to higher cultural competence. To improve cultural competence in students, nursing education should provide continuous opportunities for students to interact with different cultures, develop linguistic skills, and provide possibilities for internationalization both at home and abroad. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Leading change in diversity and cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon Siantz, Mary Lou

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an expanded leadership role needed in schools of nursing as the nurse of the 21st century is prepared to assume expanded roles in a diverse society. With schools of nursing becoming more global, and the diverse population of the United States rapidly growing, a critical need exists for nurses who are ready to partner in the health care that multicultural communities need locally, nationally, and globally. Diversity and cultural competence have now become central issues in nursing education, research, practice, and health policy. Diversity leadership in a school of nursing can no longer concentrate only on issues of affirmative action, recruitment, and retention. The purpose of this article is to discuss how diversity leadership must increasingly focus on building a corporate environment in schools of nursing that integrates diversity and cultural competence with the strategic plan of the School's Chief Nursing Officer, across academic programs, research, practice, and public policy to eliminate health disparities in partnership with faculty, students, staff, the University infrastructure, and the community at large. The theoretical framework that guided the strategic planning is based on the model used by the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellowship Program. Examples of program initiatives designed to implement the strategic plan to strengthen the diversity and cultural competence of one school of nursing environment are described.

  18. A case study of organisational Cultural Competence in mental healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Jean; Warfa, Nasir; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2011-09-15

    Ensuring Cultural Competence (CC) in health care is a mechanism to deliver culturally appropriate care and optimise recovery. In policies that promote cultural competence, the training of mental health practitioners is a key component of a culturally competent organisation. This study examines staff perceptions of CC and the integration of CC principles in a mental healthcare organisation. The purpose is to show interactions between organisational and individual processes that help or hinder recovery orientated services. We carried out a case study of a large mental health provider using a cultural competence needs analysis. We used structured and semi-structured questionnaires to explore the perceptions of healthcare professionals located in one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse areas of England, its capital city London. There was some evidence that clinical staff were engaged in culturally competent activities. We found a growing awareness of cultural competence amongst staff in general, and many had attended training. However, strategic plans and procedures that promote cultural competence tended to not be well communicated to all frontline staff; whilst there was little understanding at corporate level of culturally competent clinical practices. The provider organisation had commenced a targeted recruitment campaign to recruit staff from under-represented ethnic groups and it developed collaborative working patterns with service users. There is evidence to show tentative steps towards building cultural competence in the organisation. However, further work is needed to embed cultural competence principles and practices at all levels of the organisation, for example, by introducing monitoring systems that enable organisations to benchmark their performance as a culturally capable organisation.

  19. A case study of organisational cultural competence in mental healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhui Kamaldeep

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ensuring Cultural Competence (CC in health care is a mechanism to deliver culturally appropriate care and optimise recovery. In policies that promote cultural competence, the training of mental health practitioners is a key component of a culturally competent organisation. This study examines staff perceptions of CC and the integration of CC principles in a mental healthcare organisation. The purpose is to show interactions between organisational and individual processes that help or hinder recovery orientated services. Methods We carried out a case study of a large mental health provider using a cultural competence needs analysis. We used structured and semi-structured questionnaires to explore the perceptions of healthcare professionals located in one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse areas of England, its capital city London. Results There was some evidence that clinical staff were engaged in culturally competent activities. We found a growing awareness of cultural competence amongst staff in general, and many had attended training. However, strategic plans and procedures that promote cultural competence tended to not be well communicated to all frontline staff; whilst there was little understanding at corporate level of culturally competent clinical practices. The provider organisation had commenced a targeted recruitment campaign to recruit staff from under-represented ethnic groups and it developed collaborative working patterns with service users. Conclusion There is evidence to show tentative steps towards building cultural competence in the organisation. However, further work is needed to embed cultural competence principles and practices at all levels of the organisation, for example, by introducing monitoring systems that enable organisations to benchmark their performance as a culturally capable organisation.

  20. Developing a cultural competence inventory for nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, D; Kunaviktikul, W; Klunklin, A; Sripusanapan, A; Avant, P K

    2017-06-01

    To develop and psychometrically test the Cultural Competence Inventory for Nurses in China. Cultural competence is expected worldwide from nurses due to the increasing cultural diversity of people in healthcare establishments. Yet, no cultural competence framework or instrument for nurses has been identified to guide nursing practice in China where the cultural diversity of the populations and the characteristics of the healthcare system are different from those of the West. A review of literature and individual interviews among nurse experts generated 74 items, which were evaluated by six experts in transcultural nursing. A stratified random sampling technique was used to recruit 520 Chinese nurses for the field test. Construct validity and internal consistency reliability of the instrument were estimated by exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha, respectively. The data were collected from May 2015 to January 2016. The final instrument consists of 29 items in five dimensions, namely 'cultural awareness, cultural respect, cultural knowledge, cultural understanding and cultural skills'. Cronbach's alpha for the instrument was 0.94, with a range of 0.79-0.92 for the individual dimensions. The evidence for contrast-group validity (P Cultural Competence Inventory for Nurses in China is reliable, valid and culturally sensitive for measuring nurses' cultural competence. The instrument development process facilitates the understanding of cultural competence globally. Cultural competence of nurses can be evaluated for self-development, workforce management and quality assurance. The instrument can also serve as the foundation to develop education curricula and nursing procedures or protocols to improve culturally competent nursing practice. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  1. Leadership and Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvrin, Marie; Lorant, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background International migration is a global phenomenon challenging healthcare professionals to provide culturally competent care. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of leaders on the cultural competence of healthcare professionals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to obtain data for a social network analysis in 19 inpatient services and five primary care services in Belgium. The Competences in Ethnicity and Health questionnaire was used. A total of 507 healthcare professionals, including 302 nurses, identified their social relationships with other healthcare professionals working in their service. Highest in-degree centrality was used to identify the leaders within each health service. Multiple regressions with the Huber sandwich estimator were used to link cultural competence of leaders with the cultural competence of the rest of the healthcare staff. Results Cultural competence of the healthcare staff was associated with the cultural competence of the leaders. This association remained significant for two specific domains of cultural competence—mediation and paradigm—after controlling for contextual and sociodemographic variables. Interaction analysis suggested that the leadership effect varied with the degree of cultural competence of the leaders. Discussion Cultural competence among healthcare professionals is acquired partly through leadership. Social relationships and leadership effects within health services should be considered when developing and implementing culturally competent strategies. This requires a cautious approach as the most central individuals are not always the same persons as the formal leaders. PMID:25871625

  2. Toward Defining, Measuring, and Evaluating LGBT Cultural Competence for Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Michael S.; Andres Bedoya, C.; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    A central part of providing evidence-based practice is appropriate cultural competence to facilitate psychological assessment and intervention with diverse clients. At a minimum, cultural competence with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people involves adequate scientific and supervised practical training, with increasing depth and complexity across training levels. In order to further this goal, we offer 28 recommendations of minimum standards moving toward ideal training for LGBT-specific cultural competence. We review and synthesize the relevant literature to achieve and assess competence across the various levels of training (doctoral, internship, post-doctoral, and beyond) in order to guide the field towards best practices. These recommendations are aligned with educational and practice guidelines set forth by the field and informed by other allied professions in order to provide a roadmap for programs, faculty, and trainees in improving the training of psychologists to work with LGBT individuals. PMID:26279609

  3. Cultural Competence and the Mississippi Educator: An Investigative Study into the Cultural Competence Levels of Mississippi Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson Stewart, Felicia L.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests a linkage between the academic success of culturally and linguistically diverse students and the cultural competence practice and behaviors of educators. Attention in the available research is given to urban school districts with a large population of culturally and linguistically diverse students and the relationships between…

  4. The Importance of Military Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eric G; Writer, Brian W; Brim, William

    2016-03-01

    Military cultural competence has recently gained national attention. Experts have posited that limited outcomes in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in the military may be related to limited familiarity with the military. National surveys have indicated low military cultural competence among providers and limited educational efforts on military culture or pertinent military pathology in medical schools and residency training programs. Military families, with their own unique military cultural identity, have been identified as a population with increased risks associated with deployment. In response to these findings, several curricula regarding military culture have been established and widely distributed. Assessments of military cultural competence have also been developed. The clinical impact of enhanced cultural competence in general has thus far been limited. The military, however, with its highly prescribed cultural identity, may be a model culture for further study.

  5. Influence of organizational culture on provider adherence to the diabetic clinical practice guideline: using the competing values framework in Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radwan M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mahmoud Radwan,1 Ali Akbari Sari,1 Arash Rashidian,1 Amirhossein Takian,1 Sanaa Abou-Dagga,2 Aymen Elsous1 1Department of Health Management and Economics, School of Public Health, International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Department of Research Affairs and Graduates Studies, Islamic University of Gaza, Gaza Strip, Palestine Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a serious chronic disease and an important public health issue. This study aimed to identify the predominant culture within the Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH and the Primary Healthcare Centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA by using the competing values framework (CVF and examining its influence on the adherence to the Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG for DM.Methods: A cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all the Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n=323 who work within 71 PHC clinic. A cross-cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version of the CVF questionnaire. Results: The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal (51.5%, p<0.001; 47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA. In the PHC-MoH, the clan/group culture was the most predominant (mean =41.13; standard deviation [SD] =8.92, followed by hierarchical (mean =33.14; SD=5.96, while in the PHC-UNRWA, hierarchical was the prevailing culture (mean =48.43; SD =12.51, followed by clan/group (mean =29.73; SD =8.37. Although a positively significant association between the adherence to CPG and the rational culture and a negatively significant association with the developmental archetype were detected in the PHC-MoH, no significant associations were found in the PHC-UNRWA. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that the organizational culture has a marginal influence on the adherence to the diabetic guideline. Future research

  6. Where Cultural Competency Begins: Changes in Undergraduate Students' Intercultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Elizabeth J.; Tupy, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher preparation programs and accreditation organizations have acknowledged need for educators to demonstrate intercultural knowledge, skills, and abilities. Teacher educators are responding to emphasis in higher education to assure that graduates achieve intercultural competence (NCATE, 2008). This study compared the cultural competency of…

  7. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics.

  8. Cultural Competence Integration in the Nursing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Boniface C.

    2013-01-01

    With an increasingly diverse population, it is important to ensure that graduates of nursing programs are able to deliver culturally competent care (Krainovich-Miller et al., 2008; Allen, 2010). This study was undertaken to address this call to include cultural competence integration into nursing curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  9. Cultural Competence Integration in the Nursing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Boniface C.

    2013-01-01

    With an increasingly diverse population, it is important to ensure that graduates of nursing programs are able to deliver culturally competent care (Krainovich-Miller et al., 2008; Allen, 2010). This study was undertaken to address this call to include cultural competence integration into nursing curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  10. Disability in Cultural Competency Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Justin J.; Okoro, Olihe; Kimberlin, Carole; Odedina, Folakemi T.

    2011-01-01

    Improving health care providers' knowledge and ability to provide culturally competent care can limit the health disparities experienced by disadvantaged populations. As racial and ethnic cultures dominate cultural competency topics in education, alternative cultures such as disability have consistently been underrepresented. This article will make the case that persons with disabilities have a unique cultural identity, and should be addressed as an important component of cultural competency education in pharmacy schools. Examples of efforts in pharmacy education to incorporate cultural competency components are highlighted, many of which contain little or no mention of disability issues. Based on initiatives from other health professions, suggestions and considerations for the development of disability education within pharmacy curricula also are proposed. PMID:21519416

  11. Critical perspectives on cultural competence as a strategic opportunity for achieving high performance in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelitz, Philippa; Watson, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    * Cultural proficiency is a critical component of diversity competence. Diversity competency attends to issues of cultural proficiency and links cultural competence to issues of diverse representation and organizational inclusivity. * Developing and applying cultural competencies in diagnostic and invasive imaging services provides strategic opportunities to experience better patient cooperation, increase patient satisfaction, reduce medical errors, reduce patient complaints, and improve service recovery. * New Jersey recently passed legislation that requires 16 hours of cultural competency education as a condition of licensure to practice medicine. Four other states have similar legislation pending. The state of Washington passed legislation requiring all state accredited programs to include cultural competency education.

  12. Cultural competence: a literature review and conceptual model for mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Mario; Nesman, Teresa; Mowery, Debra; Acevedo-Polakovich, Ignacio D; Callejas, Linda M

    2009-08-01

    This article presents a conceptual model of organizational cultural competence for use in mental health services that resulted from a comprehensive review of the research literature. The model identifies four factors associated with cultural competence in mental health services (community context, cultural characteristics of local populations, organizational infrastructure, and direct service support) and redefines cultural competence as the degree of compatibility among these factors. A strength of this model of organizational cultural competence is that it facilitates future research and practice in psychiatric services settings and links culturally competent practices to service parity.

  13. Improve Results of English Teaching Through Fostering Students' Cultural Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭秀梅

    2004-01-01

    This paper, based on recent overseas and home research findings and the author's teaching experiences,discusses the close relationship between culture background knowledge and English teaching, analyses the possible reasons for students' deficiency of culture background Knowledge, especially proposes several practical approaches of English teaching to help English teachers develop students' culture background knowledge so as to foster students' cultural competence and then improve the results of English teaching.

  14. Enhancing students' cultural competence using cross-cultural experiential learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Bertolo, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate community health students' perceptions of their cultural competence. Little is known about students' cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills after their experience working with diverse cultural groups and language barriers. A cross-cultural experiential learning exercise was used as an educational approach. Reflective writing was used to elicit students' attitudes of the other culture and their coping skills. Three themes emerged as cultural awareness and knowledge, observation and learning, and cross-cultural communication. Results underscore the need for student academic preparation using cross-cultural educational approaches to enhance cultural competence.

  15. Infusing Cultural Competence and Advocacy into Strength-Based Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothaus, Tim; McAuliffe, Garett; Craigen, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Strength-based counseling represents a welcome shift from prevailing deficit perspectives. However, the literature often treats enhancing strengths as an acultural concept, minimizing or ignoring the essential role of culture in forming and defining strengths. Integrating cultural competence and advocacy into strength-based practice is examined as…

  16. Educating for Cultural Competence in the Generalist Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers-Hoag, Karen M.; Sandau-Beckler, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    A skills-oriented model for educating culturally competent social workers focuses on integrating cultural content in courses covering human behavior in the social environment, methods for social work practice, social welfare policy, social work research, and field work. Includes objectives, discussion questions, and activities for each area. Case…

  17. Enhancing cultural competence in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Janne; Norredam, Marie; Dogra, Nisha

    2017-01-01

    A health system serving diverse populations requires health professionals who are competent in caring for patients and population groups who differ in e.g. age, gender, socio-economic status, migrant status, and ethnicity. Cultural competence (CC) among health professionals is viewed as one...... the project Culturally Competent in Medical Education involving 13 partners from 11 countries.4 The project aimed to support the implementation of CC in medical curricula. First, a Delphi Study involving 34 experts was conducted to develop a framework of core cultural competencies for medical school teachers...... The proposed guidelines were presented in September 2015 in Amsterdam at a workshop entitled: “How to integrate cultural competence in medical education”. A range of participants attended the workshop, including the project partners, deans and faculty members of Dutch medical schools, physicians, and students...

  18. Cultural Competence Knowledge and Confidence After Classroom Activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jagannath Mohan Muzumdar; Monica Holiday-Goodman; Curtis Black; Mary Powers

    2010-01-01

      To determine change in cultural competency knowledge and perceived confidence of second-year pharmacy students to deliver culturally competent care after completing a required cultural competency curriculum...

  19. Cultural competence in correctional mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Reena; Dike, Charles; Burns, Craig; Carvalho, Vinneth; Griffith, Ezra E H

    2013-01-01

    Cultural competence is an essential aspect of competence as a mental health professional. In this article, the framework of cultural competence developed in general psychiatry-acquiring knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand the interaction between culture and the individual-is applied to the prison setting. Race and ethnicity, extremes of age, gender, and religion are highlighted and examined as elements of the overall culture of prisons. The model of the cultural formulation from the DSM-IV is then adapted for use by clinicians in the correctional setting, with particular emphasis on the interaction between the inmate's culture of origin and the unique culture of the prison environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Competence: Conceptual Approach and Practice in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Deist, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to analyse the conceptual approaches to competence and practice in competence management in France. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive literature review, discussion with academic experts in the French competence network of AGRH and interviews concerning developments following the 2003 national agreement…

  1. Culturally Competent Counseling Psychology Students: Developmental Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Monique L.; Bronson, M. Kristine

    Four steps are critical in developing cultural competence in students: (1) a supportive training program; (2) a significant number or "critical mass" of culturally diverse students and allies; (3) opportunities to learn about diversity; and (4) development of racial identity. An appreciation of cultural diversity lies at the heart of any…

  2. Multicultural competence and evidence-based practice in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eric C; Kakkad, Dhruvi; Balzano, Julie

    2008-11-01

    The multicultural competence (MC) and evidence-based practice (EBP) initiatives have each generated healthy debates in the mental health field, with ample implications for clinical training and practice. Using two case illustrations, we highlight practical challenges and prospects in the intersection of MC and EBP. To facilitate complementary practice of MC and EBP, we offer strategies for the group therapist as a "local clinical scientist" to deliver culturally responsive treatments. We stress the importance of cultural adaptation of EBP models, namely, modifying evidence-based interventions that involve changes in service delivery, in the nature of the therapeutic relationship, or in components of the treatment itself to accommodate the cultural beliefs and behaviors of racial-cultural minority clients. Cultural adaptation of EBP in group therapy needs to be grounded in developmental contextualism and social justice. We discuss the two cases with an eye toward advancing multicultural competence in group therapy.

  3. Connecting and becoming culturally competent: a Lakota example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, K; Absalom, K; Beil, W; Schliessmann, L

    1999-03-01

    Addressing how nurses become culturally competent is essential for knowledge development beyond why sociocultural understandings are important. This article reports participatory research conducted during intercultural immersion learning experiences of non-native nurses on an Indian reservation. Emphasizing collaborative relationships within unfamiliar social, political, and economic circumstances, and using Diekelmann's "concernful practices" as an organizing scheme, prompted participants to explicate practices that promote intercultural connecting. Suggesting integral shifts in value orientations with changes in cultural competence, the findings argue for attending to associations between those dynamics and potential for developing co-responsibility (with consumer groups) for advocating improved health and health care.

  4. Cultural minority students' experiences with intercultural competency in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyerzapf, Hannah; Abma, Tineke

    2017-05-01

    Medical schools increasingly value and focus on teaching students intercultural competency within present-day multicultural society. Little is known about the experiences of cultural minority students in intercultural competence activities. This article discusses the intercultural competence activities of medical education in a Dutch university from the perspective of cultural minority students. We will formulate recommendations for how to stimulate intercultural competency in, as well as inclusiveness of, medical education. A qualitative evaluation was performed within a medical school in the Netherlands. Data were collected through interviews (n = 23), a focus group (six participants) and participant observations (20 hours). Thematic analysis was performed. Cultural minority students experienced a lack of respect and understanding by cultural majority students and teachers. Education activities intended to transfer intercultural knowledge, address personal prejudice and stimulate intercultural sensitivity were perceived as stigmatising and as creating an unsafe climate for cultural minority students. Cultural minority and majority students on campus seemed segregated and the intercultural awareness of minority students was not integrated in intercultural competence activities. As cultural minority students were confronted with microaggressions, the medical school did not succeed in creating a safe education environment for all students. Contrary to their aims and intentions, intercultural competence activities had limited effect and seemed to support the polarisation of cultural minority and majority students and teachers. This can be seen as pointing towards a hidden curriculum privileging majority over minority students. For structural integration of intercultural competency in medical education, the focus must penetrate beyond curricular activities towards the critical addressing of the culture and structure of medical school. Collective commitment to

  5. Assessing Cultural Competence among Florida's Allied Dental Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cyndi W; Su, Yu; Feng, Xiaoying; Catalanotto, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation requires that dental, dental hygiene and dental assisting schools offer educational experiences to ensure that prospective dental health care providers become culturally competent, socially responsible practitioners. To assert that these mandates are met requires that the faculty are knowledgeable and capable of providing this type of training. Currently, little is known about the cultural competence of the state of Florida allied dental faculty. The purpose of this study was to assess the cultural competence among the dental hygiene and dental assistant faculty in the state of Florida. One hundred ninety-three faculty were invited to take the Knowledge, Efficacy and Practices Instrument (KEPI), a validated measure of cultural competence. Respondents included 77 (74%) full-time and 27 (26%) part-time faculty. Data were analyzed descriptively and reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) were computed. Mean scores and internal estimates of reliability on the KEPI subscales were: knowledge of diversity 3.3 (ɑ=0.88), culture-centered practice 3.6 (ɑ=0.88) and efficacy of assessment 2.9 (ɑ=0.74). The participant's score of 3.6 on the culture-centered practice exceeds scores among dental students and faculty who participated in previous studies suggesting the allied dental faculty have a greater awareness of sociocultural and linguistically diverse dental patients' oral health needs. Participants' score on knowledge of diversity subscales suggests a need for moderate training, while their score on the efficacy of assessment subscale indicates a need for more intense training. Assessing faculty beliefs, knowledge and skills about cultural competency is critically important in ensuring that accreditation standards are being met and represents one step in the process of ensuring that faculty demonstrate the type of sensitivity and responsiveness, which characterizes behaviors associated with cultural competence. Copyright © 2016 The

  6. Patient-centered care: the key to cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epner, D E; Baile, W F

    2012-04-01

    Much of the early literature on 'cultural competence' focuses on the 'categorical' or 'multicultural' approach, in which providers learn relevant attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors of certain cultural groups. In essence, this involves learning key 'dos and don'ts' for each group. Literature and educational materials of this kind focus on broad ethnic, racial, religious, or national groups, such as 'African American', 'Hispanic', or 'Asian'. The problem with this categorical or 'list of traits' approach to clinical cultural competence is that culture is multidimensional and dynamic. Culture comprises multiple variables, affecting all aspects of experience. Cultural processes frequently differ within the same ethnic or social group because of differences in age cohort, gender, political association, class, religion, ethnicity, and even personality. Culture is therefore a very elusive and nebulous concept, like art. The multicultural approach to cultural competence results in stereotypical thinking rather than clinical competence. A newer, cross cultural approach to culturally competent clinical practice focuses on foundational communication skills, awareness of cross-cutting cultural and social issues, and health beliefs that are present in all cultures. We can think of these as universal human beliefs, needs, and traits. This patient centered approach relies on identifying and negotiating different styles of communication, decision-making preferences, roles of family, sexual and gender issues, and issues of mistrust, prejudice, and racism, among other factors. In the current paper, we describe 'cultural' challenges that arise in the care of four patients from disparate cultures, each of whom has advanced colon cancer that is no longer responding to chemotherapy. We then illustrate how to apply principles of patient centered care to these challenges.

  7. Towards the Development of a Cultural Competence Framework for Human Resource Development Professionals in International Business: A Study of Best Practice Learning and Diversity Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeyune, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In a global environment, growing business corporations have recognized the role diversity plays in business development. However, the human resource development (HRD) profession charged with the responsibility for developing any organization's human resources, has not defined what cultural competence is and its role in improving the…

  8. Towards the Development of a Cultural Competence Framework for Human Resource Development Professionals in International Business: A Study of Best Practice Learning and Diversity Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeyune, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In a global environment, growing business corporations have recognized the role diversity plays in business development. However, the human resource development (HRD) profession charged with the responsibility for developing any organization's human resources, has not defined what cultural competence is and its role in improving the…

  9. Leadership style and culturally competent care: Nurse leaders' views of their practice in the multicultural care settings of the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amouri, Souher; O'Neill, Shirley

    2014-06-20

    Abstract It is well recognised that nurse leader managers play an important role in facilitating the quality and nature of hospital care, the improvement of work performance and work satisfaction. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE) they face the additional challenge of working within a context of significant linguistic and cultural diversity where leadership in the provision of culturally competent care is a major requirement. With this goal at the fore, a sample of 153 nurse-leader-managers, including matrons, nursing directors, supervisors, nurses-in-charge and in-service education staff from four private and six government hospitals completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (Bass & Avolio, 2004). The survey also explored participants' perceptions of the characteristics of good leaders and what they needed to do in their particular work place to enhance culturally competent care. The results showed nurseleader-managers used both transformational and transactional leadership attributes but in different combinations across the two hospital types.

  10. Developing Culturally Competent Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Chiu, Calli; Sayman, Donna; Carrero, Kelly M.; Gibbon, Thomas; Zolkoski, Staci M.; Lusk, Mandy E.

    2017-01-01

    An unfortunate, yet persistent, truth in U.S. public schools is the large achievement gap existing between children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and their White, middle-class counterparts. The potential for cultural dissonance between contemporary teachers and their students necessitates that educators must persistently…

  11. Perceived Cultural Competence Levels in Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volberding, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: As the patient population continues to diversify, it is essential that athletic training students (ATSs) are educated to provide culturally competent care. This high-quality health care within the context of a patient's race, ethnicity, language, religious beliefs, or behaviors is a foundation of professional practice. Objective:…

  12. Picture this! Using photovoice to facilitate cultural competence in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    The use of digital images is a prevalent practice in today's society, especially in social media. Photovoice is a qualitative research methodology used to express the experiences of participants from a variety of populations. Photovoice can be utilized as a teaching and learning tool to facilitate cultural competence among undergraduate nursing students.

  13. Nine Constructs of Cultural Competence for Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookover, Cecile; Kennedy, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the self-administered Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire (CCCQ) and assess the perceived level of cultural competence of students in Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy to guide curriculum development within the 4-year academic program. Methods The CCCQ was administrated to each class of pharmacy students during spring 2009. Exploratory factor analysis with principal components and varimax rotation was conducted to build the constructs explaining the factors measuring students' self-assessment of cultural competence. Results Nine factors, including 46 items extracted from the CCCQ and explaining 79% of the total variance, were found as the best fit to measure students' self-assessment of cultural competence. Conclusions The CCCQ was found to be a practical, valid, and reliable self-assessment instrument to measure the perceived level of pharmacy students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and encounters in cross-cultural environments. The questionnaire allowed the identification of students' needs for training in cultural competence and the development of a curriculum tailored to satisfy those needs. PMID:21436922

  14. Cultural similarity, cultural competence, and nurse workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Sandra L; Brush, Barbara L; Moore, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Proponents of health workforce diversity argue that increasing the number of minority health care providers will enhance cultural similarity between patients and providers as well as the health system's capacity to provide culturally competent care. Measuring cultural similarity has been difficult, however, given that current benchmarks of workforce diversity categorize health workers by major racial/ethnic classifications rather than by cultural measures. This study examined the use of national racial/ethnic categories in both patient and registered nurse (RN) populations and found them to be a poor indicator of cultural similarity. Rather, we found that cultural similarity between RN and patient populations needs to be established at the level of local labor markets and broadened to include other cultural parameters such as country of origin, primary language, and self-identified ancestry. Only then can the relationship between cultural similarity and cultural competence be accurately determined and its outcomes measured.

  15. Overview of teaching strategies for cultural competence in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tracey B

    2012-01-01

    Multiple curricular approaches are being used to teach cultural competency to nursing students in the United States in accordance with accrediting board standards. As nurse educators are searching for evidence based teaching practices, this article reviews the most commonly current teaching methods being used. Although a variety of methods are being implemented, little empirical evidence exists to suggest any one methodology for teaching cultural competency for nursing students produces significantly better outcomes. The use of clinical experiences, standardized patients and immersion experiences have produced the most favorable results which increase student awareness, knowledge and confidence in working with ethnically diverse patients.

  16. Professional Competencies for Student Affairs Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Patty; Cortez, Lori

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to explore the integration of the ACPA/NASPA Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Practitioners (ACPA/NASPA, 2010) on community college campuses. The competencies provide specific skill sets for a broad range of student affairs practice areas that should be met by professionals throughout their careers.…

  17. A Framework for Enhancing and Assessing Cultural Competency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Désirée Lie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of medical practice using accepted evidence-based approaches is matched by a growing trend for shared curricula in medicine and other health professions across international boundaries. Interest in the common challenges of curricular design, delivery and assessment is expressed in conferences and dialogues focused on topics such as teaching of professionalism, humanism, integrative medicine, bioethics and cultural competence. The spirit of collaboration, sharing, acknowledgment and mutual respect is a guiding principle in cross-cultural teaching. This paper uses the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competency Training to explore methods for designing and implementing cultural competency curricula. The intent is to identify elements shared across institutional, national and cross-cultural borders and derive common principles for the assessment of learners and the curricula. Two examples of integrating new content into existing clerkships are provided to guide educators interested in an integrated and learner-centered approach to assimilate cultural competency teaching into existing required courses, clerkships and elective experiences. The paper follows an overarching principle that “every patient–doctor encounter is a cross-cultural encounter”, whether based on ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, sex, religious values, disability, sexual orientation or other differences; and whether the differences are explicit or implicit.

  18. A Journey, Not a Destination: Developing Cultural Competence in Secondary Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povenmire-Kirk, Tiana Cadye; Bethune, Lauren K.; Alverson, Charlotte Y.; Kahn, Laurie Gutmann

    2015-01-01

    "Cultural competence" is more than a buzzword; it is a best practice for transition educators who work with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students in special education. Developing cultural competence is easier said than done, and many educators don't know where to start. Knowing the history and definitions of cultural…

  19. Counselor Development in the Process of Mastering Cultural Competence: A Study of Professional Growth Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Marie A.

    2012-01-01

    Grounded theory methodology was employed to explore the experiences of counseling professionals as they work to develop a higher level of cultural competence. Three key findings support the core theme, navigating change toward cultural competent practices: (1) environmental awareness; (2) dispositions toward the development in cultural competency…

  20. Cultural competence and social relationships: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvrin, M; Lorant, V

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the role of social relationships in the sharing of cultural competence by testing two hypotheses: cultural competence is a socially shared behaviour; and central healthcare professionals are more culturally competent than non-central healthcare professionals. Sustaining cultural competence in healthcare services relies on the assumption that being culturally competent is a socially shared behaviour among health professionals. This assumption has never been tested. Organizational aspects surrounding cultural competence are poorly considered. This therefore leads to a heterogeneous implementation of cultural competence - especially in continental Europe. We carried out a social network analysis in 24 Belgian inpatient and outpatient health services. All healthcare professionals (ego) were requested to fill in a questionnaire (Survey on social relationships of health care professionals) on their level of cultural competence and to identify their professional relationships (alter). We fitted regression models to assess whether (1) at the dyadic level, ego cultural competence was associated with alter cultural competence, and (2) health professionals of greater centrality had greater cultural competence. At the dyadic level, no significant associations were found between ego cultural competence and alter cultural competence, with the exception of subjective exposure to intercultural situations. No significant associations were found between centrality and cultural competence, except for subjective exposure to intercultural situations. Being culturally competent is not a shared behaviour among health professionals. The most central healthcare professionals are not more culturally competent than less central health professionals. Culturally competent health care is not yet a norm in health services. Health care and training authorities should either make cultural competent health care a licensing criteria or reward culturally competent health care

  1. Assessment of cultural competence in Texas nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzilli, Collen

    2016-10-01

    Cultural competence [CC] is an essential component of nursing education and nursing practice yet there is a gap in the research evaluating CC in faculty and how to practically develop this skillset for faculty members. To explore CC in faculty as evaluated with the Nurses' Cultural Competence Scale [NCCS] and apply the findings to the Purnell Model of Cultural Competence [PMCC] to guide professional development opportunities for faculty members. This was a concurrent mixed-methods study. Faculty members teaching in Texas nursing programs were recruited for the study. Quantitative data was collected using an online survey tool and qualitative data was collected over the phone. 89 Texas faculty members completed the quantitative strand and a subset of 10 faculty members completed the qualitative strand. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the quantitative data and Strauss and Corbin's methodology guided the evaluation of the qualitative data. These two strands were used to support the results. Faculty in Texas are moderately culturally competent. The qualitative findings support the application of the PMCC to the areas identified by the NCCS. The PMCC may be applied to the application of culture and values in nursing professional education as supported by the NCCS. Recommendations are to include the PMCC as a structure for the creation of professional development opportunities for faculty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Leading Change through Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Peter Senge's message during the 2005 American Association of School Administrators (AASA) conference reminded people that they live not only in a school system, but also within a highly diverse, global community. Their individual and organizational policies, practices, and behaviors, can and do impact the learning experience for those they…

  3. Cultural consultation as a model for training multidisciplinary mental healthcare professionals in cultural competence skills: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owiti, J A; Ajaz, A; Ascoli, M; de Jongh, B; Palinski, A; Bhui, K S

    2014-01-01

    Lack of cultural competence in care contributes to poor experiences and outcomes from care for migrants and racial and ethnic minorities. As a result, health and social care organizations currently promote cultural competence of their workforce as a means of addressing persistent poor experiences and outcomes. At present, there are unsystematic and diverse ways of promoting cultural competence, and their impact on clinician skills and patient outcomes is unknown. We developed and implemented an innovative model, cultural consultation service (CCS), to promote cultural competence of clinicians and directly improve on patient experiences and outcomes from care. CCS model is an adaptation of the McGill model, which uses ethnographic methodology and medical anthropological knowledge. The method and approach not only contributes both to a broader conceptual and dynamic understanding of culture, but also to learning of cultural competence skills by healthcare professionals. The CCS model demonstrates that multidisciplinary workforce can acquire cultural competence skills better through the clinical encounter, as this promotes integration of learning into day-to-day practice. Results indicate that clinicians developed a broader and patient-centred understanding of culture, and gained skills in narrative-based assessment method, management of complexity of care, competing assumptions and expectations, and clinical cultural formulation. Cultural competence is defined as a set of skills, attitudes and practices that enable the healthcare professionals to deliver high-quality interventions to patients from diverse cultural backgrounds. Improving on the cultural competence skills of the workforce has been promoted as a way of reducing ethnic and racial inequalities in service outcomes. Currently, diverse models for training in cultural competence exist, mostly with no evidence of effect. We established an innovative narrative-based cultural consultation service in an inner

  4. Culturally Competent Qualitative Research with Latino Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Lizette; Flores, Lisa Y.; Meza, Rocio Rosales; Morales, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for conducting culturally competent qualitative research with Latino immigrants, a historically exploited group that represents more than half of all U.S. immigrants and is continuously growing. Limited research exists on Latino immigrants despite their large presence in the United States. The authors draw…

  5. Culturally Competent Qualitative Research with Latino Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Lizette; Flores, Lisa Y.; Meza, Rocio Rosales; Morales, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for conducting culturally competent qualitative research with Latino immigrants, a historically exploited group that represents more than half of all U.S. immigrants and is continuously growing. Limited research exists on Latino immigrants despite their large presence in the United States. The authors draw…

  6. Cultural Competence and Related Factors Among Taiwanese Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Nu; Mastel-Smith, Beth; Alfred, Danita; Lin, Yu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan is a multicultural and multiethnic society with a growing number of immigrants who have diverse ethnic, racial, and cultural needs. Although this diversity highlights the pressing need for culturally competent healthcare providers, cultural competence is a concept that is little understood and implemented only sporadically in Taiwan. This study investigates the cultural competence of Taiwanese nurses and the related factors of influence. An online self-report survey was used to collect data from 221 Taiwanese nurses from December 2012 through January 2013. Data from the demographic questionnaire, the Nurses' Cultural Competence Scale, and the Perceived Nurses' Cultural Competence Rating were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, independent sample t tests, and multiple regressions. The cultural competence of the participants was in the "low to moderate" range, with relatively higher mean scores for the subscales of cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity and relatively lower scores for the subscales of cultural knowledge and cultural skills. Participants generally perceived themselves as being "not culturally competent." Variables found to predict cultural competence included years of work experience, hours of continuing education related to cultural nursing care, and frequency of caring for clients from culturally and ethnically diverse backgrounds. Participating Taiwanese nurses rated their level of cultural competence as in the low-to-moderate range and self-perceived as being not culturally competent. These findings support the need to further expand and enhance cultural-competence-related continuing education and to address the topic of cultural care in the nursing curricula.

  7. Culturally-Sensitive Learning Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2010-01-01

    In today's global world, to provide meaningful education, teacher-librarians and their students need to become culturally competent: open to learning about other cultures and sharing one's own culture, able to change personal perspectives, and able to communicate effectively across cultures. Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions provides a…

  8. Creating a vision for the future: key competencies and strategies for culturally competent practice with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults in the health and human services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I; Hoy-Ellis, Charles P; Goldsen, Jayn; Emlet, Charles A; Hooyman, Nancy R

    2014-01-01

    Sexual orientation and gender identity are not commonly addressed in health and human service delivery, or in educational degree programs. Based on findings from Caring and Aging with Pride: The National Health, Aging and Sexuality Study (CAP), the first national federally-funded research project on LGBT health and aging, this article outlines 10 core competencies and aligns them with specific strategies to improve professional practice and service development to promote the well-being of LGBT older adults and their families. The articulation of key competencies is needed to provide a blueprint for action for addressing the growing needs of LGBT older adults, their families, and their communities.

  9. Creating a Vision for the Future: Key Competencies and Strategies for Culturally Competent Practice With Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Older Adults in the Health and Human Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREDRIKSEN-GOLDSEN, KAREN I.; HOY-ELLIS, CHARLES P.; GOLDSEN, JAYN; EMLET, CHARLES A.; HOOYMAN, NANCY R.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual orientation and gender identity are not commonly addressed in health and human service delivery, or in educational degree programs. Based on findings from Caring and Aging with Pride: The National Health, Aging and Sexuality Study (CAP), the first national federally-funded research project on LGBT health and aging, this article outlines 10 core competencies and aligns them with specific strategies to improve professional practice and service development to promote the well-being of LGBT older adults and their families. The articulation of key competencies is needed to provide a blueprint for action for addressing the growing needs of LGBT older adults, their families, and their communities. PMID:24571387

  10. Physician and Patient Perceptions of Cultural Competency and Medical Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohana, S.; Mash, R.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between the different perceptions of medical teams and their patients of the cultural competence of physicians, and the influence of this relationship on the conflict between them. Physicians' cultural competence (Noble A. Linguistic and cultural mediation of social services. Cultural competence of health care.…

  11. Culturally Competent School Leaders: The Individual and the System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansuvadha, Nat; Slater, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Cultural competence is the knowledge, behaviors, and dispositions necessary to effectively interact with other cultural groups. Two case studies are presented which illustrate the cultural competence of administrators in urban settings. Theories are reviewed to investigate the themes of cultural competence that emerged from the professional…

  12. Physician and Patient Perceptions of Cultural Competency and Medical Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohana, S.; Mash, R.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between the different perceptions of medical teams and their patients of the cultural competence of physicians, and the influence of this relationship on the conflict between them. Physicians' cultural competence (Noble A. Linguistic and cultural mediation of social services. Cultural competence of health care.…

  13. CREATIVE PRACTICES IN DEVELOPING INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila M. Andryukhina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article is concerned with the topical problem of extending intercultural communicative competence in the educational process. Materials and Methods: the authors made a theoretical and empirical analysis of domestic and foreign research and analytical reports prepared in the framework of international projects, the activity of non-governmental organisations, in particular the activities of Sverdlovsk regiona l public organisation “Friends of France”. Results: it is proven that intercultural competence cannot be fully developed by traditional forms of education, and even the existing current innovative experience in this area is insufficient. The integration of education becomes a crucial factor. The article describes the creative educational practices of such integration as the conditions for broadening intercultural communicative competence. The basic characteristics of creative practices are described. Сreative practices being integrated fo rm a creative platform. Discussion and Conclusions: the system of conditions and means for broadening intercultural communicative competence is in constant development. The authors propose to consider the communicative competence as a system of creative practices transformed in the course of elaboration into creative platforms, expanding in the process of intercultural dialogue. This is a promising way to achieve the comprehensive result – completeness of integrated multi-component structure of the intercultural co mmunicative competence.

  14. Cultural competence education in university rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteliano, Mary A; Stone, John H

    2014-01-01

    The Center of International Rehabilitation Research, Information, and Exchange (CIRRIE) has prepared curriculum guides for rehabilitation professionals in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech language pathology, and rehabilitation counseling. The objective is to provide a resource to faculty who wish to include or strengthen cultural competency education in their program and courses. CIRRIE assessed students'cultural needs, and solicited assistance from experts in the field to assist with the development of the guides. After the guides were published CIRRIE conducted surveys to assess their usefulness. Survey responses were highest among occupational therapy faculty. Among faculty who responded, most intended to use the cultural competence activities, case studies, and resources that the guides offer throughout their curriculum.

  15. Leadership Coaching: Coaching Competencies and Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Donald; Hammack, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Leadership coaching is now seen as a valuable tool to assist school leaders. Through a survey of school principals, this study identified specific coaching competencies used by leadership coaches that were perceived by principals to influence key best practices for schools. These best practices have in turn been correlated to increased student…

  16. The Influence of Cross-Cultural Experiences & Location on Teachers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange A.; Murphy, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing cultural and linguistic diversity in academic settings necessitates greater cultural competence on the part of teachers, and enhancing the cultural competence of teachers requires a greater understanding of both the level of cultural competence among teachers and the experiences that enhance cultural competence. Teacher educators…

  17. International WIL Placements: Their Influence on Student Professional Development, Personal Growth and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Nigel; Dender, Alma; Lawrence, Emma; Manning, Kirrily; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    In the increasingly global world, skills in cultural competence now form part of the minimum standards of practice required for allied health professionals. During an international work-integrated learning (WIL) placement, allied health students' cultural competence is expected to be enhanced. The present study scrutinized reflective journals of…

  18. The Benefits and Challenges of Becoming Cross-Culturally Competent Counseling Psychologists. Presidential Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, P. Paul

    2006-01-01

    The central thesis of this article is that focusing on cross-cultural competence will enhance both the science and the practice of counseling psychology. Developing cross-cultural competence is a lifelong journey, replete with many joys and challenges, that will (a) increase the sophistication of our research, (b) expand the utility and…

  19. The Benefits and Challenges of Becoming Cross-Culturally Competent Counseling Psychologists. Presidential Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, P. Paul

    2006-01-01

    The central thesis of this article is that focusing on cross-cultural competence will enhance both the science and the practice of counseling psychology. Developing cross-cultural competence is a lifelong journey, replete with many joys and challenges, that will (a) increase the sophistication of our research, (b) expand the utility and…

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF LANGUAGE COMPETENCE, WRITING COMPETENCE, AND CULTURAL COMPETENCE ON PRODUCING A SUCCESSFUL WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermanto Hermanto

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a skill derived from a long way of learning and exercises. Different from other language skills, writing is considered the difficult language skill to acquire since it involves many aspects of linguistics, social, and writing knowledge and conventions. There are at least three important elements of writing useful to produce a good piece of composition, language competence, writing competence and cultural competence. This paper shows the influence of these three elements in order to produce good, readable, communicative, and successful writing

  1. REM: A Collaborative Framework for Building Indigenous Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Tamara; Virdun, Claudia; Sherwood, Juanita; Parker, Nicola; Van Balen, Jane; Gray, Joanne; Jackson, Debra

    2016-09-01

    The well-documented health disparities between the Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous population mandates a comprehensive response from health professionals. This article outlines the approach taken by one faculty of health in a large urban Australian university to enhance cultural competence in students from a variety of fields. Here we outline a collaborative and deeply respectful process of Indigenous and non-Indigenous university staff collectively developing a model that has framed the embedding of a common faculty Indigenous graduate attribute across the curriculum. Through collaborative committee processes, the development of the principles of "Respect; Engagement and sharing; Moving forward" (REM) has provided both a framework and way of "being and doing" our work. By drawing together the recurring principles and qualities that characterize Indigenous cultural competence the result will be students and staff learning and bringing into their lives and practice, important Indigenous cultural understanding.

  2. Connecting care competencies and culture during disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabra Vivek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Connecting care Competencies and Culture are core fundamentals in responding to disasters. Thick coordination between professionals, communities and agencies in different geographical areas is crucial to the happening of appropriate preparedness and thus efficient response and mitigation of a disaster. In the next few articles, we present diverse examples related to the preparedness and recovery process to adverse disasters across the globe

  3. Intercultural palliative care: do we need cultural competence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratnam, Yasmin

    2007-10-01

    Recognition of the importance of 'cultural competence' is now central to health care policy and to nurse education and training across the international spectrum. Detailed engagement with models of cultural competence is comparatively recent in palliative care nursing. This article presents the findings from a development project on elders and carers from 'minority ethnic' groups, funded by the Department of Health, to increase awareness of palliative care and to improve understanding of the needs of these groups of service users. The article describes the experiences of nurses involved in the delivery of palliative care who were interviewed in focus groups as a part of the project. It draws attention to the complicated relationships between cultural knowledge and practice and to the non-rational and visceral dimensions of intercultural care. These aspects of nursing are marginalised in current approaches to cultural competence, which emphasise the rational acquisition and application of cultural knowledge and skills by practitioners. It is suggested that recognition of these marginalised experiences can contribute to the development of new approaches to intercultural nursing that are also more attuned to the ethos and values of palliative care.

  4. Weaving latino cultural concepts into Preparedness Core Competency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Jacome, Mary; Parker, Blanca Angelica Gonzalez; Waltz, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    The New York • New Jersey Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (NY•NJ PERLC) is one of 14 Centers funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designed to address the preparedness and response training and education needs of the public health workforce. One of the important niches, or focus areas for the Center, is training to improve the capacity of public health workers to respond with competence to the needs of vulnerable populations. During every phase of a disaster, racial and ethnic minorities, including Latinos, suffer worse outcomes than the general population. Communities with diverse cultural origins and limited English speakers often present more complex issues during public health emergencies. Training that incorporates cultural concepts into the Preparedness Core Competencies may improve the ability of public health workers to engage the Latino community in preparedness activities and ultimately improve outcomes during disasters. This article describes initiatives undertaken by the NY•NJ PERLC to improve the capacity of the public health workforce to respond competently to the needs of Latino populations. In 2012, the Center collaborated with national, state, and local partners to develop a nationwide broadcast founded on the Preparedness Core Competencies, Latinos During Emergencies: Cultural Considerations Impacting Disaster Preparedness. The widely viewed broadcast (497 sites in 47 states and 13 nations) highlighted the commonalities and differences within Latino culture that can impact emergency preparedness and response and outlined practical strategies to enhance participation. The success of the broadcast spurred a number of partner requests for training and technical assistance. Lessons learned from these experiences, including our "undercover" work at local Points of Dispensing, are incorporated into subsequent interactive trainings to improve the competency of public health workers. Participants recommended

  5. Physicians' cultural competency as perceived by African American patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulou, Georgia; Falzarano, Pamela; Arfken, Cynthia; Rosenberg, David

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the association between African American patients' perceptions of physician cultural competency and patient satisfaction with the visit, independent of other factors, including physician and patient race concordance. African American participants were surveyed at urban clinics. Cultural competency (Perceived Cultural Competency scale) was based on the 3-factor model that includes patients' perception of (1) physicians' cultural knowledge, (2) physicians' cultural awareness, and (3) physicians' cultural skill. The results confirmed that patients' perceptions of physician cultural competency are independently associated with satisfaction with the visit. These results further validate use of the Perceived Cultural Competency scale as a tool to measure patients' perceptions of physicians' cultural competency.

  6. Psychiatry Resident Training in Cultural Competence: An Educator's Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Irma; Johnson, Toni L; Shelton, Pheston G; Glass, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Resident physicians training in psychiatry in the U.S. are required to master a body of knowledge related to cultural psychiatry; are expected to adopt attitudes that endorse the principles of cultural competence; and finally are expected to acquire specific cultural competence skills that facilitate working effectively with diverse patients. This article first provides an overview of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies related to cultural competence, as well as the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's (AACAP) recommendations for the cultural competence training of child/adolescent fellows. Next, numerous print and electronic resources that can be used in cultural competence education in psychiatry are reviewed and discussed. Finally, we conclude by providing recommendations for psychiatry residency programs that we culled from model cultural competence curricula.

  7. Organizational cultural competence consultation to a mental health institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kenneth; Lo, Hung-Tat Ted; Srivastava, Rani; Andermann, Lisa

    2012-04-01

    Cultural competence is increasingly recognized as an essential component of effective mental health care delivery to address diversity and equity issues. Drawing from the literature and our experience in providing cultural competence consultation and training, the paper will discuss our perspective on the foundational concepts of cultural competence and how it applies to a health care organization, including its programs and services. Based on a recent consultation project, we present a methodology for assessing cultural competence in health care organizations, involving mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. Key findings and recommendations from the resulting cultural competence plan are discussed, including core principles, change strategies, and an Organizational Cultural Competence Framework, which may be applicable to other health care institutions seeking such changes. This framework, consisting of eight domains, can be used for organizational assessment and cultural competence planning, ultimately aiming at enhancing mental health care service to the diverse patients, families, and communities.

  8. Cultural Competence Among Italian Nurses: A Multicentric Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolini, Giancarlo; Della Pelle, Carlo; Comparcini, Dania; Tomietto, Marco; Cerratti, Francesca; Schim, Stephanie M; Di Giovanni, Pamela; Simonetti, Valentina

    2015-11-01

    To assess Italian nurses' cultural competence, as they are increasingly called upon to care for people of foreign origins. A cross-sectional, multicentric study. From September 2013 to May 2014, a survey was carried out among Italian nurses. Cultural competence was assessed by the Cultural Competence Assessment tool, translated and adapted to the Italian context. Nurses who completed the survey numbered 1,432; 70.6% were female; 42.6% ranged in age from 41 to 50 years; and 50.0% were bachelor's prepared. More than 50% had participated in some kind of cultural diversity training. Overall, cultural competence was moderate, showing a moderately high level of cultural awareness and sensitivity (mean = 5.41; SD = 0.66) and a moderate level of culturally competent behaviors (mean = 4.33; SD = 1.10). Although Italian nurses' cultural competence was acceptable, given the growing diversity of the patient population, nurses should be better prepared to face the changing health requests. Providing culturally competent care has been associated with improved provider-client communication, higher satisfaction with care, and health status improvement, as full comprehension of health status, adherence to medications and lifestyle recommendations, and appropriate utilization of the health system. Healthcare providers need to be adequately trained to provide culturally competent care. This research provides, for the first time, a report on Italian nurses' levels of cultural competence, and strengthens the current literature underlining the need for continuous education to enhance cultural competence among nurses. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. The Relationship between Teacher Cultural Competency and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Erin Nicole

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated teachers' cultural competency and their students' engagement within international high schools located in Hong Kong. Cultural competency is defined as a combination of knowledge about cultural groups as well as attitudes towards and skills for dealing with cultural diversity (Betancourt, 2003). The literature…

  10. Developing cultural competence in general practitioners: an integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Kelly; Abbott, Penny; Reath, Jenny

    2016-11-15

    Cultural competence is a broad concept with multiple theoretical underpinnings and conflicting opinions on how it should be materialized. While it is recognized that cultural competence should be an integral part of General Practice, literature in the context of General Practice is limited. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive summary of the current literature with respect to the following: the elements of cultural competency that need to be fostered and developed in GPs and GP registrars; how is cultural competence being developed in General Practice currently; and who facilitates the development of cultural competence in General Practice. We conducted an integrative review comprising a systematic literature search followed by a synthesis of the results using a narrative synthesis technique. Fifty articles were included in the final analysis. Cultural competence was conceptualized as requiring elements of knowledge, awareness/attitudes and skills/behaviours by most articles. The ways in which elements of cultural competence were developed in General Practice appeared to be highly varied and rigorous evaluation was generally lacking, particularly with respect to improvement in patient outcomes. Formal cultural competence training in General Practice appeared to be underdeveloped despite GP registrars generally desiring more training. The development of most aspects of cultural competence relied on informal learning and in-practice exposure but this required proper guidance and facilitation by supervisors and educators. Levels of critical and cultural self-reflection amongst General Practitioners and GP registrars varied and were potentially underdeveloped. Most standalone training workshops were led by trained medical educators however the value of cultural mentors was recognised by patients, educators and GP registrars across many studies. Cultural competency development of GP registrars should receive more focus, particularly training in non

  11. Global health language and culture competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadling, Charles; Maza, John; Nakano, Gregg; Mahmood, Maysaa; Jawad, Shakir; Al-Ameri, Ali; Zuerlein, Scott; Anderson, Warner

    2012-01-01

    This article presents findings from a survey conducted to examine the availability of foreign language and culture training to Civil Affairs health personnel and the relevance of that training to the tasks they perform. Civil Affairs forces recognize the value of cross-cultural communication competence because their missions involve a significant level of interaction with foreign governments? officials, military, and civilians. Members of the 95th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne) who had a health-related military occupational specialty code were invited to participate in the survey. More than 45% of those surveyed were foreign language qualified. Many also received predeployment language and culture training specific to the area of deployment. Significantly more respondents reported receiving cultural training and training on how to work effectively with interpreters than having received foreign language training. Respondents perceived interpreters as important assets and were generally satisfied with their performance. Findings from the survey highlight a need to identify standard requirements for predeployment language training that focuses on medical and health terminology and to determine the best delivery platform(s). Civil Affairs health personnel would benefit from additional cultural training that focuses on health and healthcare in the country or region of deployment. Investing in the development of distance learning capabilities as a platform for delivering health-specific language and culture training may help ease the time and resources constraints that limit the ability of Civil Affairs health personnel to access the training they need.

  12. Talking Culture: Intercultural Competence in a Corporate Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    Taking its starting point in two, currently predominant views on intercultural business communication and intercultural competence (e.g. Askehave & Norlyk 2006; Blasco 2004; Franklin 2007; Gudykunst & Kim 2002; Hofstede 2001; Holiday et al. 2004; Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner 1997), this paper......, the paper attempts to show that in practice members of staff may make sense of intercultural issues by means of various discourses that reflect very different ideas of what culture and intercultural competence is, potentially leading to differences in the handling and experience of intercultural encounters...... provides insight into the way practitioners in an international software company construct their experiences with culture and intercultural encounters in the workplace. On the basis of the discursive analysis of ten semi-structured interviews, the presentation details how practitioners make sense...

  13. Cultural competence education for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Lidia; Horey, Dell; Romios, Panayiota; Kis-Rigo, John

    2014-05-05

    Cultural competence education for health professionals aims to ensure all people receive equitable, effective health care, particularly those from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. It has emerged as a strategy in high-income English-speaking countries in response to evidence of health disparities, structural inequalities, and poorer quality health care and outcomes among people from minority CALD backgrounds. However there is a paucity of evidence to link cultural competence education with patient, professional and organisational outcomes. To assess efficacy, for this review we developed a four-dimensional conceptual framework comprising educational content, pedagogical approach, structure of the intervention, and participant characteristics to provide consistency in describing and assessing interventions. We use the term 'CALD participants' when referring to minority CALD populations as a whole. When referring to participants in included studies we describe them in terms used by study authors. To assess the effects of cultural competence education interventions for health professionals on patient-related outcomes, health professional outcomes, and healthcare organisation outcomes. We searched: MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1946 to June 2012); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library) (June 2012); EMBASE (OvidSP) (1988 to June 2012); CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1981 to June 2012); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1806 to June 2012); Proquest Dissertations and Theses database (1861 to October 2011); ERIC (CSA) (1966 to October 2011); LILACS (1982 to March 2012); and Current Contents (OvidSP) (1993 Week 27 to June 2012).Searches in MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, ERIC and Current Contents were updated in February 2014. Searches in CINAHL were updated in March 2014.There were no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs, and controlled clinical trials of

  14. Developing cultural competence in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Paula; Johnson, Mark R D

    2014-02-01

    Increasing ethnic or cultural diversity in the population served by health-care services requires improved competence and updated provision. Both individual staff and institutions need to reflect on and prepare to meet new challenges. Three key elements-reflective self-awareness, knowledge of others, and skills in managing difference-must be developed. Recognition of diversity and a database of appropriate information are essential for both workers and management of organisations. Above all, some preparedness for continual change and learning is essential. This article provides some suggestions and examples to assist with this.

  15. Celebrating ONS's 40th anniversary and its commitment 
to cultural competency, diversity, and inclusiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palos, Guadalupe R

    2015-04-01

    Today, we all have been taught that cultural competence is a valuable tool in providing patient-centered care. However, this concept was not considered a standard of oncology nursing practice when the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) began. It was not regarded as a critical component of patient safety, satisfaction, or quality care. In fact, in the 1970s, the importance of providing culturally competent care was virtually nonexistent in our nation's government policies, regulatory standards, academic curriculum, or professional practice. 
.

  16. COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT: BEST PRACTICES IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena VELCIU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current changing environment of work, the process of competence assessment is increasingly relevant as workers gain knowledge and practical skills through fulfilling different and new working tasks and through self-education. In this context, innovative tools for competence assessment and validation are very useful for encouraging movement of individuals between jobs and from unemployment or inactivity to employment and for increasing the capacity of companies to respond and adapt to changing and challenging environments. This article presents an overview of best practices for competence assessment and validation in order to identify and select methods that have been effective in various European countries including Romania. The article concludes with a set of „learned lessons” and short recommendations in order to improve the framework of competence assessment in Romanian context. Our findings are useful for the new human resources management that aims toward efficiently usage of the workforce, inside companies and in a global labour market, encouraging flexibility and adaptability.

  17. COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT: BEST PRACTICES IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena VELCIU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current changing environment of work, the process of competence assessment is increasingly relevant as workers gain knowledge and practical skills through fulfilling different and new working tasks and through self-education. In this context, innovative tools for competence assessment and validation are very useful for encouraging movement of individuals between jobs and from unemployment or inactivity to employment and for increasing the capacity of companies to respond and adapt to changing and challenging environments. This article presents an overview of best practices for competence assessment and validation in order to identify and select methods that have been effective in various European countries including Romania. The article concludes with a set of „learned lessons” and short recommendations in order to improve the framework of competence assessment in Romanian context. Our findings are useful for the new human resources management that aims toward efficiently usage of the workforce, inside companies and in a global labour market, encouraging flexibility and adaptability.

  18. Cultural competence knowledge and confidence after classroom activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Jagannath Mohan; Holiday-Goodman, Monica; Black, Curtis; Powers, Mary

    2010-10-11

    To determine change in cultural competency knowledge and perceived confidence of second-year pharmacy students to deliver culturally competent care after completing a required cultural competency curriculum. Cultural competence material was covered in the second-year PharmD curriculum through lectures, laboratories, and an experiential/out-of-class assignment. Eighty-five second-year (P2) pharmacy students completed a survey which assessed influence of classroom activities related to cultural competence. Mean values for knowledge and perceived confidence were significantly higher for posttest compared to pretest (p activities. Focus groups were used to solicit students' opinions on instructional effectiveness, relevance of activities, and areas for enhancement. The cultural competency curriculum increased pharmacy students' awareness of and confidence in addressing cultural diversity issues that affect pharmaceutical care delivery.

  19. Assessment of Military Cultural Competence: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eric G; Hall-Clark, Brittany N; Hamaoka, Derrick; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-08-01

    Cultural competence is widely considered a cornerstone of patient care. Efforts to improve military cultural competency have recently gained national attention. Assessment of cultural competence is a critical component to this effort, but no assessment of military cultural competence currently exists. An assessment of military cultural competence (AMCC) was created through broad input and consensus. Careful review of previous cultural competency assessment designs and analysis techniques was considered. The AMCC was organized into three sections: skills, attitudes, and knowledge. In addition to gathering data to determine absolute responses from groups with different exposure levels to the military (direct, indirect, and none), paired questions were utilized to assess relative competencies between military culture and culture in general. Piloting of the AMCC revealed significant differences between military exposure groups. Specifically, those with personal military exposure were more likely to be in absolute agreement that the military is a culture, were more likely to screen for military culture, and had increased knowledge of military culture compared to those with no military exposure. Relative differences were more informative. For example, all groups were less likely to agree that their personal culture could be at odds with military culture as compared to other cultures. Such perceptions could hinder asking difficult questions and thus undermine care. The AMCC is a model for the measurement of the skills, attitudes, and knowledge related to military cultural competence. With further validity testing, the AMCC will be helpful in the critical task of measuring outcomes in ongoing efforts to improve military cultural competence. The novel approach of assessing variance appears to reduce bias and may also be helpful in the design of other cultural competency assessments.

  20. Indicators to Evaluate Pre-Service Teachers' Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin; Zhang, Gang

    2009-01-01

    This study identifies and examines multiple indicators to evaluate cultural competence of pre-service teachers in teacher education institutions. National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education's concepts of culturally responsive teaching and theory discussions on cultural competence serve as the impetus for the study. The analysis applied…

  1. Latino Definitions of Success: A Cultural Model of Intercultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to examine Latino intercultural competence via two separate methodologies. Phase 1 entailed discovering and generating themes regarding the features of intercultural competence based on semistructured interviews of 15 Latino adults. Phase 2 included conducting a cultural consensus analysis from the quantitative responses of 46 Latino adults to determine the cultural model of intercultural competence. The major results indicated that the participants, despite variations in socioeconomic and generational statuses, shared a common knowledge base regarding the competencies needed for Latinos to successfully navigate different cultures. Overall, the cultural model of Latino intercultural competence includes a set of skills that integrates traditional cultural values along with attributes of self-efficacy. The findings are discussed within a competence-based conceptualization of cultural adaptation and potential advancements in acculturation research.

  2. Cultural competence course for nursing students in Taiwan: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Jung; Chang, Pei-rong; Wang, Ling-Hua; Huang, Mei-Chih

    2015-12-01

    Culturally competent care is an essential ability for nursing students. However, little is known about the effects of educational intervention on attitudes or behavior changes with regard to cultural competence in Taiwan. This study evaluates the effects of a cultural competence course for nursing students. Using a longitudinal study design, 105 participants were assigned to an experiment group (51 participants) and control group (54 participants) based on the school they attended. Students in the experiment group received a two-credit course on cultural competence care. Using the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument-Chinese Version (CCA-CV), data were collected between 2012 and 2013 at three points in time: before and after the course and again 6 to 8 months after the two groups (experiment and control) had completed the clinical practicum. The results of a generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis indicate that the cultural competence of all participants had improved at the posttest assessment, with the experiment group showing a significantly better improvement over the control group. However, the overall effectiveness of the training diminished with time. This study supports that taking a cultural competence course effectively enhances the cultural competence of nursing students for a limited period of time immediately following the course. These results support that the benefits of incorporating a cultural competence course in clinical practice should be considered in the future. Furthermore, healthcare institutions should be encouraged to provide greater support and consideration to cultural competence issues in the nursing workplace in order to reinforce and extend the benefits of cultural competence courses provided at nursing schools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational Curricula. Auto Body Repair. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Larry; Shin, Masako

    This document, one of eight in a multi-cultural competency-based vocational/technical curricula series, is on auto body repair. This program is designed to run 40 weeks and cover 7 instructional areas: use of basic repair tools; metal bumping (theory and practice); metal refinishing (theory and practice); panel replacement; glass work; spot…

  4. Promoting cultural competence through a health policy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Louise

    2010-01-01

    A healthcare system designed to support a culturally competent work force can contribute to the elimination of health disparities. Various courses were revised as part of a multicultural transformation of a college of nursing curricula. The author discusses a health policy course revised to promote development of cultural competencies. Examples of topics, teaching strategies, and assignments for integrating concepts and content related to cultural competencies as well as comments from students that reflect their learning experiences are provided.

  5. Impact of International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence among Occupational Therapy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Sood OTD, OTR/L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy (OT educators recognize a need to ensure that OT students are culturally competent. The researchers developed the International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence (ICPCC to help students understand the impact of cultural context on client care. Entry-level MOT students from a university in the US (N = 18 collaborated with BOT students (N = 4 and advanced MOT students (N = 9 from two universities in India using an online course management system WebCT. The study explored the impact of the ICPCC on OT students’ cultural competence and discusses students’ perceptions of culture on the OT process. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Health Care Professionals Revised© measured students’ cultural competence at baseline and immediately after participation in the ICPCC. Qualitative data was collected using a Self-Reflection Form. There was an increase in the cultural competence scores among all three groups of students after participating in the ICPCC at p value < .05. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data analysis: meaning of the term culture, impact of cultural on client- centered practice, and impact of cultural on OT outcomes. OT students recognized the role that cultural differences play in OT evaluation and intervention.

  6. Cultural Core Competencies: Perceptions of 4-H Youth Development Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Fox

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As society grows increasingly diverse, it is critical that youth development professionals are equipped with cultural core competencies. This descriptive study gauged the perceived level of cultural competence among 4-H Youth Development professionals from a Southern state in the United States. Based on the 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competency (PRKC Model (Stone & Rennekamp, 2004, youth development professionals rated their cultural competence (equity, access, and opportunity in eight core competency areas. Based on a five-point Likert scale ranging from 0 = No knowledge to 4 = Expert, youth development professionals evaluated their cultural competence ranging from 0.66 to 4.00. According to an interpretive scale, most youth development professionals rated their competence as intermediate. Participants reported the skills of active listening and an open attitude as areas in which they felt most competent. Areas of least competence were community outreach policies and procedures. No significant relationships existed between the demographic variables of gender, degree earned, and field of study when compared to perceived cultural competence. The findings will be used to detect deficiencies and create opportunities for professional training and development experiences in supporting the cultural competence and growth of youth professionals.

  7. Cultural competency and diversity among hospice palliative care volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Maja

    2012-05-01

    This case study examines the current state of cultural competence in hospice and palliative care in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Because of changing demographic trends and ethnic minorities underutilizing hospice palliative care services, this research examined the current state of culturally competent care in a hospice setting, and the challenges to providing culturally competent care in a hospice in the GTA. A case study was conducted with a hospice and included in-depth interviews with 14 hospice volunteers. The findings reveal that volunteers encountered cultural clashes when their level of cultural competency was weak. Second, volunteers revealed there was a lack of adequate cultural competency training with their hospice, and finally, there was a lack of ethnic, cultural, and linguistic diversity among the hospice volunteers.

  8. An Examination of Cultural Competence Training in US Medical Education Guided by the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Hearod, Jordan B; Tran, Kim; Norris, Keith C; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, medical students must demonstrate a standard level of "cultural competence," upon graduation. Cultural competence is most often defined as a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, organization, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. The Association of American Medical Colleges developed the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT) to assist schools in developing and evaluating cultural competence curricula to meet these requirements. This review uses the TACCT as a guideline to describe and assess pedagogical approaches to cultural competence training in US medical education and identify content gaps and opportunities for curriculum improvement. A total of 18 programs are assessed. Findings support previous research that cultural competence training can improve the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of medical trainees. However, wide variation in the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of cultural competence training programs exists, leading to differences in training quality and outcomes. More research is needed to establish optimal approaches to implementing and evaluating cultural competence training that incorporate cultural humility, the social determinants of health, and broader structural competency within the medical system.

  9. An Examination of Cultural Competence Training in US Medical Education Guided by the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Hearod, Jordan B.; Tran, Kim; Norris, Keith C.; Buchwald, Dedra

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, medical students must demonstrate a standard level of “cultural competence,” upon graduation. Cultural competence is most often defined as a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, organization, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. The Association of American Medical Colleges developed the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT) to assist schools in developing and evaluating cultural competence curricula to meet these requirements. This review uses the TACCT as a guideline to describe and assess pedagogical approaches to cultural competence training in US medical education and identify content gaps and opportunities for curriculum improvement. A total of 18 programs are assessed. Findings support previous research that cultural competence training can improve the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of medical trainees. However, wide variation in the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of cultural competence training programs exists, leading to differences in training quality and outcomes. More research is needed to establish optimal approaches to implementing and evaluating cultural competence training that incorporate cultural humility, the social determinants of health, and broader structural competency within the medical system. PMID:27818848

  10. Rethinking cultural competence: insights from indigenous community treatment settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Dennis C; Gone, Joseph P

    2012-04-01

    Multicultural professional psychologists routinely assert that psychotherapeutic interventions require culturally competent delivery for ethnoracial minority clients to protect the distinctive cultural orientations of these clients. Dominant disciplinary conceptualizations of cultural competence are "kind of person" models that emphasize specialized awareness, knowledge, and skills on the part of the practitioner. Even within psychology, this approach to cultural competence is controversial owing to professional misgivings concerning its culturally essentialist assumptions. Unfortunately, alternative "process-oriented" models of cultural competence emphasize such generic aspects of therapeutic interaction that they remain in danger of losing sight of culture altogether. Thus, for cultural competence to persist as a meaningful construct, an alternative approach that avoids both essentialism and generalism must be recovered. One means to capture this alternative is to shift focus away from culturally competent therapists toward culturally commensurate therapies. Indigenous communities in North America represent interesting sites for exploring this shift, owing to widespread political commitments to Aboriginal cultural reclamation in the context of postcoloniality. Two examples from indigenous communities illustrate a continuum of cultural commensurability that ranges from global psychotherapeutic approaches at one end to local healing traditions at the other. Location of culturally integrative efforts by indigenous communities along this continuum illustrates the possibility for local, agentic, and intentional deconstructions and reconstructions of mental health interventions in a culturally hybrid fashion.

  11. A Cultural Competence Organizational Review for Community Health Services: Insights From a Participatory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Mandy; Gibbs, Lisa; Pradel, Veronika; Morris, Michal; Gwatirisa, Pauline; Tadic, Maryanne; de Silva, Andrea; Hall, Martin; Young, Dana; Riggs, Elisha; Calache, Hanny; Gussy, Mark; Watt, Richard; Gondal, Iqbal; Waters, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    Cultural competence is an important aspect of health service access and delivery in health promotion and community health. Although a number of frameworks and tools are available to assist health service organizations improve their services to diverse communities, there are few published studies describing organizational cultural competence assessments and the extent to which these tools facilitate cultural competence. This article addresses this gap by describing the development of a cultural competence assessment, intervention, and evaluation tool called the Cultural Competence Organizational Review (CORe) and its implementation in three community sector organizations. Baseline and follow-up staff surveys and document audits were conducted at each participating organization. Process data and organizational documentation were used to evaluate and monitor the experience of CORe within the organizations. Results at follow-up indicated an overall positive trend in organizational cultural competence at each organization in terms of both policy and practice. Organizations that are able to embed actions to improve organizational cultural competence within broader organizational plans increase the likelihood of sustainable changes to policies, procedures, and practice within the organization. The benefits and lessons learned from the implementation of CORe are discussed.

  12. Development of secondary school student’s cultural competence during studies of History of Culture

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Development of secondary school student’s cultural competence during studies of History of Culture The purpose of the thesis is to analyze the impact of the subject History of Culture on the development of secondary school students’ cultural competence. In addition the thesis analyzes the implemented methodology of the subject History of Culture and defines research results as suggestions for the improvement of the cultural competence. The thesis consists of three parts, where the...

  13. Sorting It Out: Cultural Competency and Healthcare Literacy in the World Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnick, Paula M

    2016-04-01

    Healthcare literacy and cultural competence are necessary components in keeping patients informed. Nurses are the foundation of healthcare and pivotal in creating trusting relationships with patients by sharing information. Respect is key in developing a tailored approach to individuals' healthcare literacy and nurses' cultural competence. In practice, the consequence of understanding healthcare literacy and being culturally competent should not be understated. Whether on a mission trip to another country or working in a clinic in the United States, diverse cultures abound. While a person from a particular culture may have some of the same beliefs of others in a culture, the breadth of expression of culture, personal beliefs, and worldview may be vastly different. Humans express themselves in unique ways even within cultures. Seeking ways to understand one another is vital not only in healthcare but in all aspects of life.

  14. [Cultural competence in the healthcare relationship with migrant patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Marie-Jo; Bennegadi, Rachid; Paris, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    The nursing encounter in an intercultural context focuses on culture as a central element of the healthcare relationship. Learning cultural competence enables nurses to understand others without stigmatizing them.

  15. Medical education for a changing world: moving beyond cultural competence into transnational competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Peter H; Swick, Herbert M

    2006-06-01

    Given rapidly changing global demographic dynamics and the unimpressive evidence regarding health outcomes attributable to cultural competence (CC) education, it is time to consider a fresh and unencumbered approach to preparing physicians to reduce health disparities and care for ethnoculturally and socially diverse patients, including migrants. Transnational competence (TC) education offers a comprehensive set of core skills derived from international relations, cross-cultural psychology, and intercultural communication that are also applicable for medical education. The authors discuss five limitations (conceptual, vision, action, alliance, and pedagogical) of current CC approaches and explain how an educational model based on TC would address each problem area.The authors then identify and discuss the skill domains, core principles, and reinforcing pedagogy of TC education. The five skill domains of TC are analytic, emotional, creative, communicative, and functional; core principles include a comprehensive and consistent framework, patient-centered learning, and competency assessment. A central component of TC pedagogy is having students prepare a "miniethnography" for each patient that addresses not only issues related to physical and mental health, but also experiences related to dislocation and adaptation to unfamiliar settings. The TC approach promotes advances in preparing medical students to reduce health disparities among patients with multiple and diverse backgrounds, health conditions, and health care beliefs and practices. Perhaps most important, TC consistently directs attention to the policy and social factors, as well as the individual considerations, that can alleviate suffering and enhance health and well-being in a globalizing world.

  16. Enhancing Reflective Practice in Multicultural Counseling through Cultural Auditing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra; Arthur, Nancy; Wong-Wylie, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Counselors work in an increasingly complex cultural milieu where every encounter with a client must be considered multicultural in nature. Reflective practice is a central component of professional competence and necessarily involves attention to culture. The cultural auditing model provides an effective and flexible reflective process for…

  17. Evaluating the Impact of Two Globalization Projects on College Students' Cultural Competence and Cultural Intelligence (CQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange A.

    2013-01-01

    Cultural competence and CQ involve awareness of cultural similarities and differences, knowledge of differences in cultural values, and intercultural encounters. To assess college students' cultural competence and cultural intelligence gains, this experimental study evaluated the impact of two globalization projects on these two constructs. The…

  18. An investigation of culturally competent terminology in healthcare policy finds ambiguity and lack of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Julian; Parry, Yvonne; Guerin, Pauline

    2013-06-01

    This research explored how the concept of cultural competence was represented and expressed through health policies that were intended to improve the quality and efficacy of healthcare provided to families from culturally marginalised communities, particularly women and children with refugee backgrounds. A critical document analysis was conducted of policies that inform healthcare for families from culturally marginalised communities in two local government areas in South Australia. The analysis identified two major themes: lack of, or inconsistent, definitions of 'culture' and 'cultural competency' and related terms; and the paradoxical use of language to determine care. Cultural competence within health services has been identified as an important factor that can improve the health outcomes for families from marginalised communities. However, inconsistency in definitions, understanding and implementation of cultural competence in health practice makes it difficult to implement care using these frameworks. Clearly defined pathways are necessary from health policy to inform culturally competent service delivery. The capacity for policy directives to effectively circumvent the potential deleterious outcomes of culturally incompetent services is only possible when that policy provides clear definitions and instructions. Consultation and partnership are necessary to develop effective definitions and processes relating to cultural competence. © 2013 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2013 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. A snapshot of cultural competency education in US dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael L; Bean, Canise Y; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2006-09-01

    During the last decade, cultural competency has received a great deal of attention in health care and the literature of many fields, including education, social services, law, and health care. The dental education literature provides little information regarding status, strategies, or guiding principles of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. This study was an attempt to describe the status of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. A web-based thirty-question survey regarding cultural competency education coursework, teaching, course materials, and content was sent in 2005 to the assistant/associate deans for academic affairs at fifty-six U.S. dental schools, followed up by subsequent email messages. Thirty-four (61 percent) dental school officials responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (twenty-eight; 82 percent) did not have a specific stand-alone cultural competency course, but indicated it was integrated into the curriculum. Recognition of local and national community diversity needs prompted course creation in most schools. Respondents at almost two-thirds of schools indicated that their impression of students' acceptance was positive. Teachers of cultural competency were primarily white female dentists. Few schools required faculty to have similar cultural competency or diversity training. Thirty-three of the thirty-four U.S. dental schools responding to this survey offer some form of coursework in cultural competency with little standardization and a variety of methods and strategies to teach dental students.

  20. Emphasizing Cultural Competence in Evaluation: A Process-Oriented Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botcheva, Luba; Shih, Johanna; Huffman, Lynne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a process-oriented approach to culturally competent evaluation, focusing on a case study of an evaluation of an HIV/AIDS educational program in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. We suggest that cultural competency in evaluation is not a function of a static set of prescribed steps but is achieved via ongoing reflection, correction, and…

  1. School Nurse Cultural Competence Needs Assessment: Results and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza, Maria; Maughan, Erin; Barrows, Beth M

    2015-11-01

    NASN conducted a needs assessment to learn about the cultural competence skills needed by school nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the results of the needs assessment and describe actions taken to address cultural competency needs for the U.S. school nurse workforce.

  2. The Importance of Ethnic Cultural Competency in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cultural competency in physical education is unmistakable. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) has identified elements of cultural competency within both the National Standards for Physical Education and the National Standards and Guidelines for Physical Education Teacher Education. Although there…

  3. Creating competence: perspectives and practices in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Creating competence has become a major issue in organizations. Various authors contend that competency management has the potential of integrating organizational strategy, human-resource instruments, and human-resource development; that competency development can lead to performance improvement; and

  4. Creating competence: perspectives and practices in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Creating competence has become a major issue in organizations. Various authors contend that competency management has the potential of integrating organizational strategy, human-resource instruments, and human-resource development; that competency development can lead to performance improvement; and

  5. Breakout session: Diversity, cultural competence, and patient trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Nelson, Charles L

    2011-07-01

    The patient population served by orthopaedic surgeons is becoming increasingly more diverse, but this is not yet reflected in our workforce. As the cultural diversity of our patient population grows, we must be adept at communicating with patients of all backgrounds. WHERE ARE WE NOW?: Efforts to improve the diversity of our workforce have been successful in increasing the number of female residents, but there has been no improvement in the number of African American and Hispanic residents. There is currently no centralized effort to recruit minority and female students to the specialty of orthopaedic surgery. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has been leading workshops to train residents and practicing surgeons in communication skills and cultural competency. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: We must train the current generation of orthopaedic surgeons to become adept at interacting with patients of all backgrounds. While initiatives for crosscultural communication in orthopaedic surgery have been established, they have not yet been universally incorporated into residency training and Continuing Medical Education programs. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: We must continue to recruit the brightest students of all backgrounds, with a concerted effort to provide equal opportunities for early guidance to all trainees. Opportunities to improve diversity among orthopaedic surgeons exist at many stages in a future physician's career path, including "shadowing" in high school and college and continuing with mentorship in medical school. Additional resources should be dedicated to teaching residents about the immediate relevancy of cultural competency, and faculty should model these proficiencies during their patient interactions.

  6. A European Competence Framework for Industrial Pharmacy Practice in Biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey Atkinson; Pat Crowley; Kristien De Paepe; Brian Gennery; Andries Koster; Luigi Martini; Vivien Moffat; Jane Nicholson; Gunther Pauwels; Giuseppe Ronsisvalle; Vitor Sousa; Chris van Schravendijk; Keith Wilson

    2015-01-01

    The PHAR-IN (“Competences for industrial pharmacy practice in biotechnology”) looked at whether there is a difference in how industrial employees and academics rank competences for practice in the biotechnological industry. A small expert panel consisting of the authors of this paper produced a biotechnology competence framework by drawing up an initial list of competences then ranking them in importance using a three-stage Delphi process. The framework was next evaluated and validated by a l...

  7. Strategies to Promote Cultural Competence in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Megan; Kaspar, Rita W; Teall, Alice M

    2015-09-01

    Cultural competence is a mainstay in health care and nursing education. With the expansion in the number of distance-based nursing programs across the country, innovative teaching methods for distance learning faculty are required to instill cultural competence in students. Faculty must be deliberate when planning distance-based learning activities that incorporate cultural experiences. This article describes several such strategies including the creative use of blogging, recorded lectures, the online synchronous classroom, social media, and cultural immersion projects. These methods capitalize on existing information technologies and offer distance-based students the opportunity to connect with one another, as well as develop the awareness, sensitivity, and respect that is required when providing culturally competent care. These teaching methods are modifiable to meet the teaching and learning needs of the faculty and the students, thereby allowing educators to support the integration of cultural competence into patient care for distance students.

  8. Empowerment in Context: Lessons from Hip-Hop Culture for Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Raphael, Jr.; Deepak, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Hip-hop culture can be used as a conduit to enhanced cultural competence and practice skills through the individual and community empowerment framework. This framework is introduced as a tool for direct practice that allows social workers to understand the competing messages within hip-hop culture and how they may impact youths by promoting or…

  9. Core Competence Development : paradigm and practical implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Koay, Ze Wei; E.Markov, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The theory of core competence has drawn a large amount of attention in the academic field as well as of practitioners in the corporate world. Theory asserts that long-term value creation and competitiveness of the corporation relies on full-scale exploitation and timely development of company Core Competences; business strategies should be built around the core competencies of a firm. Identification and exploitation of Core Competences as well as essential elements comprising Core Competences...

  10. Congruence between Culturally Competent Treatment and Cultural Needs of Older Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Giuseppe; Malgady, Robert G.; Primavera, Louis H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated a new 2-factor construct, termed "cultural congruence", which is related to cultural competence in the delivery of mental health services to ethnic minority clients. Cultural congruence was defined as the distance between the cultural competence characteristics of the health care organization and the clients' perception of…

  11. Training on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview improves cultural competence in general psychiatry residents: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stacia; Xiao, Anna Q; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Lim, Russell; Lu, Francis G

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether a 1-hour didactic session on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) improves the cultural competence of general psychiatry residents. The main hypothesis was that teaching adult psychiatry residents a 1-hour session on the CFI would improve cultural competence. The exploratory hypothesis was that trainees with more experience in cultural diversity would have a greater increase in cultural competency scores. Psychiatry residents at a metropolitan, county hospital completed demographics and preintervention questionnaires, were exposed to a 1-hour session on the CFI, and were given a postintervention questionnaire. The questionnaire was an adapted version of the validated Cultural Competence Assessment Tool . Paired samples t tests compared pre- to posttest change. Hierarchical linear regression assessed whether pretraining characteristics predicted posttest scores. The mean change of total pre- and posttest scores was significant ( p = .002), as was the mean change in subscales Nonverbal Communications ( p < .001) and Cultural Knowledge ( p = .002). Demographic characteristics did not predict higher posttest scores (when covarying for pretest scores). Psychiatry residents' cultural competence scores improved irrespective of previous experience in cultural diversity. More research is needed to further explore the implications of the improved scores in clinical practice.

  12. A guide to developing a culturally competent organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Larry; Davidhizar, Ruth E; Giger, Joyce Newman; Strickland, Ora L; Fishman, Dorothy; Allison, Dale M

    2011-01-01

    The journey to organizational cultural competence for a health care organization, educational setting, freestanding clinic, or long-term-care organization is a process that requires the collaborative efforts from people at all levels in every department as well as external consumers such as public policy officials, students, and community leaders. Broadly speaking, four main but overlapping areas must be considered in institute activities and strategies to accomplish a comprehensive culturally competent organization. These four areas are (a) administration and governance, (b) orientation and education, (c) language, and (d) staff competencies. This article presents key content areas and activities to consider on the journey to cultural competence. Tables with suggested departmental responsibilities for implementation are included. In some cases, the journey may best be facilitated by a consultant who is well versed in cultural competence and organizational dynamics.

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation and reproducibility of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the modified FRESNO Test to evaluate the competence in evidence based practice by physical therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anderson M.; Costa, Lucíola C. M.; Comper, Maria L.; Padula, Rosimeire S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Modified Fresno Test was developed to assess knowledge and skills of both physical therapy (PT) professionals and students to use evidence-based practice (EBP). OBJECTIVES: To translate the Modified Fresno Test into Brazilian-Portuguese and to evaluate the test's reproducibility. METHOD: The first step consisted of adapting the instrument into the Brazilian-Portuguese language. Then, a total of 57 participants, including PT students, PT professors and PT practitioners, completed the translated instrument. The responses from the participants were used to evaluate reproducibility of the translated instrument. Internal consistency was calculated using the Cronbach's alpha. Reliability was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous variables, and the Kappa coefficient (K) for categorical variables. The agreement was assessed using the standard error of the measurement (SEM). RESULTS: The cross-cultural adaptation process was appropriate, providing an adequate Brazilian-Portuguese version of the instrument. The internal consistency was good (α=0.769). The reliability for inter- and intra-rater assessment were ICC=0.89 (95% CI 0.82 to 0.93); for evaluator 1 was ICC=0.85 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.93); and for evaluator 2 was ICC=0.98 (95% CI 0.97 to 0.99). The SEM was 13.04 points for inter-rater assessment, 12.57 points for rater 1 and 4.59 points for rater 2. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian-Portuguese language version of the Modified Fresno Test showed satisfactory results in terms of reproducibility. The Modified Fresno Test will allow physical therapy professionals and students to be evaluated on the use of understanding EBP. PMID:26786079

  14. Viewpoint: physician, know thyself: the professional culture of medicine as a framework for teaching cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin-Foster, Carla; Foster, Jordan C; Konopasek, Lyuba

    2008-01-01

    The need for physicians who are well equipped to treat patients of diverse social and cultural backgrounds is evident. To this end, cultural competence education programs in medical schools have proliferated. Although these programs differ in duration, setting, and content, their intentions are the same: to bolster knowledge, promote positive attitudes, and teach appropriate skills in cultural competence. However, to advance the current state of cultural competence curricula, a number of challenges have to be addressed. One challenge is overcoming learner resistance, a problem that is encountered when attempting to convey the importance of cultural competence to students who view it as a "soft science." There is also the challenge of avoiding the perpetuation of stereotypes and labeling groups as "others" in the process of teaching cultural competence. An additional challenge is that few cultural competence curricula are specifically designed to foster an awareness of the student's own cultural background. The authors propose the professional culture of medicine as a framework to cultural competence education that may help mitigate these challenges. Rather than focusing on patients as the "other" group, this framework explores the customs, languages, and beliefs systems that are shared by physicians, thus defining medicine as a culture. Focusing on the physician's culture may help to broaden students' concept of culture and may sensitize them to the importance of cultural competence. The authors conclude with suggestions on how students can explore the professional culture of medicine through the exploration of films, role-playing, and the use of written narratives.

  15. Development and Psychometric Assessment of the Healthcare Provider Cultural Competence Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L. Schwarz PhD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the measurement properties of 5 scales used in the Healthcare Provider Cultural Competence Instrument (HPCCI. The HPCCI measures a health care provider’s cultural competence along 5 primary dimensions: (1 awareness/sensitivity, (2 behaviors, (3 patient-centered communication, (4 practice orientation, and (5 self-assessment. Exploratory factor analysis demonstrated that the 5 scales were distinct, and within each scale items loaded as expected. Reliability statistics indicated a high level of internal consistency within each scale. The results indicate that the HPCCI effectively measures the cultural competence of health care providers and can provide useful professional feedback for practitioners and organizations seeking to increase a practitioner’s cultural competence.

  16. Identifying Student Competencies in Macro Practice: Articulating the Practice Wisdom of Field Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, Cheryl; Bogo, Marion; Donovan, Kirsten; Lim, April; Anstice, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Although a growing literature examines competencies in clinical practice, competencies of students in macro social work practice have received comparatively little attention. A grounded-theory methodology was used to elicit field instructor views of student competencies in community, organization, and policy contexts. Competencies described by…

  17. INCREASING CULTURALLY COMPETENT NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES FOR ETHNIC MINORITY POPULATIONS: A CALL TO ACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindt, Monica Rivera; Byrd, Desiree; Saez, Pedro; Manly, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    US demographic and sociopolitical shifts have resulted in a rapidly growing need for culturally competent neuropsychological services. However, clinical neuropsychology as a field has not kept pace with the needs of ethnic minority clients. In this discussion we review: historical precedents and the limits of universalism in neuropsychology; ethical/professional guidelines pertinent to neuropsychological practice with ethnic minority clients; critical cultural considerations in neuropsychology; current disparities germane to practice; and challenges to the provision of services to racial/ethnic minority clients. We provide a call to action for neuropsychologists and related organizations to advance multiculturalism and diversity within the field by increasing multicultural awareness and knowledge, multicultural education and training, multicultural neuropsychological research, and the provision of culturally competent neuropsychological services to racial/ethnic minority clients. Lastly, we discuss strategies for increasing the provision of culturally competent neuropsychological services, and offer several resources to meet these goals. PMID:20373222

  18. Creating Competence: Perspectives and Practices in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Martin

    Creating competence has become a major issue in organizations. Various authors contend that competency management has the potential of integrating organizational strategy, human-resource instruments, and human-resource development; that competency development can lead to performance improvement; and that it can help Human Resource Development…

  19. The Effectiveness of Cross-cultural Competence in Joint Ventures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Zheng; TONG Jing-wei

    2005-01-01

    The paper uses the theory of core competence based on knowledge capital to build up international joint venture's effective capability system of cross-culture. It involves in forming common mind of business, strategies of glocalization, complementary skills of cross-culture and cross-cultural training. It also presents the case of Lansheng Daewoo Corp to give a positive analysis.

  20. Cultural competence: a conceptual framework for teaching and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Seeleman; J. Suurmond; K. Stronks

    2009-01-01

    The need to address cultural and ethnic diversity issues in medical education as a means to improve the quality of care for all has been widely emphasised. Cultural competence has been suggested as an instrument with which to deal with diversity issues. However, the implementation of culturally comp

  1. Cultural competence in mental health care: a review of model evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenzie Kwame

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultural competency is now a core requirement for mental health professionals working with culturally diverse patient groups. Cultural competency training may improve the quality of mental health care for ethnic groups. Methods A systematic review that included evaluated models of professional education or service delivery. Results Of 109 potential papers, only 9 included an evaluation of the model to improve the cultural competency practice and service delivery. All 9 studies were located in North America. Cultural competency included modification of clinical practice and organizational performance. Few studies published their teaching and learning methods. Only three studies used quantitative outcomes. One of these showed a change in attitudes and skills of staff following training. The cultural consultation model showed evidence of significant satisfaction by clinicians using the service. No studies investigated service user experiences and outcomes. Conclusion There is limited evidence on the effectiveness of cultural competency training and service delivery. Further work is required to evaluate improvement in service users' experiences and outcomes.

  2. Cultural Competency Training Requirements in Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Adrian Jacques H.; Lin, Susan Y.; Chun, Maria B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency is an important skill that prepares physicians to care for patients from diverse backgrounds. Objective We reviewed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) program requirements and relevant documents from the ACGME website to evaluate competency requirements across specialties. Methods The program requirements for each specialty and its subspecialties were reviewed from December 2011 through February 2012. The review focused on the 3 competency domains relevant to culturally competent care: professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and patient care. Specialty and subspecialty requirements were assigned a score between 0 and 3 (from least specific to most specific). Given the lack of a standardized cultural competence rating system, the scoring was based on explicit mention of specific keywords. Results A majority of program requirements fell into the low- or no-specificity score (1 or 0). This included 21 core specialties (leading to primary board certification) program requirements (78%) and 101 subspecialty program requirements (79%). For all specialties, cultural competency elements did not gravitate toward any particular competency domain. Four of 5 primary care program requirements (pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, family medicine, and psychiatry) acquired the high-specificity score of 3, in comparison to only 1 of 22 specialty care program requirements (physical medicine and rehabilitation). Conclusions The degree of specificity, as judged by use of keywords in 3 competency domains, in ACGME requirements regarding cultural competency is highly variable across specialties and subspecialties. Greater specificity in requirements is expected to benefit the acquisition of cultural competency in residents, but this has not been empirically tested. PMID:24404264

  3. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE IN CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Zlomislić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the influence of education and additional factors influencing students’ awareness of intercultural differences. For the purposes of this research assessment was carried out with regard to their role in promoting cultural awareness and facing cross-cultural challenges posed by unfamiliar cross-cultural contexts. Cultural education is presumed to be a key factor for achieving a significant increase of cultural sensitivity and cultural awareness in order to ensure successful cross-cultural communication and increase mobility of students/working professionals. For this study, it was assumed that the cultural awareness of students increases due to the courses they take and their overall study experience. A special questionnaire was developed for the purposes of this research, and the obtained results were statistically analyzed with the help of descriptive statistics, the non-parametric chi-square test, and the Mann-Whitney test. The research has shown that intercultural competence has a statistically significant positive effect on the readiness of students to participate in study and work programs abroad. Thus, it is mandatory that foreign language competence as well as intercultural competence be a priority of the curriculum if we are to increase the number of highly educated experts who will be capable to compete successfully as students or professionals in all fields and all cultural areas. If we recognize that globalization has made the world a global village, we all need the intercultural competence to successfully live in it.

  4. Awareness of Cultural Differences and Cultivation of Intercultural Communicative Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖攀

    2014-01-01

    <正>Ⅰ.Introduction The aim of foreign language teaching is not only to make students get familiar with the knowledge of Western countries,but also to cultivate the students’competence in intercultural communication,this paper will list some cultural differences between China and Western counrties,then present some personal opinions on how to cultivate students’competence in

  5. Latino Definitions of Success: A Cultural Model of Intercultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to examine Latino intercultural competence via two separate methodologies. Phase 1 entailed discovering and generating themes regarding the features of intercultural competence based on semistructured interviews of 15 Latino adults. Phase 2 included conducting a cultural consensus analysis from the quantitative responses…

  6. Assessing Pharmacy Students’ Self-Perception of Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Margarita; Brookover, Cecile; Kennedy, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacists play an increasingly important role in medication therapy management, which requires communicating effectively with patients. Pharmacy students completed the Self-Assessment of Perceived Level of Cultural Competence (SAPLCC) questionnaire, and their results were used to identify patterns in self-assessment of cultural competence. In general, students rated their knowledge as less than their skills and attitudes. Important differences were found by race, comparing each group with its counterparts: African American students rated their perceived competencies regarding patient discrimination and barriers to health care at a significantly higher level; Asian American students rated their attitudes to engaging in self-reflection and their knowledge in multicultural issues at significantly lower level; and White students rated their awareness regarding racial dynamics at a significantly lower level. It is recommended to consider the students’ cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds before developing curriculum in cultural competence and, perhaps, to develop targeted educational interventions for specific groups. PMID:23395945

  7. Components of cultural competence in three mental health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Carole; Haugland, Gary; Reid-Rose, Lenora; Hopper, Kim

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify components of cultural competence in mental health programs developed for cultural groups by community and mental health professionals from these groups. Three programs were studied: a prevention program primarily serving African-American and Afro-Caribbean youth, a Latino adult acute inpatient unit, and a Chinese day treatment program in a community-based agency. Nine study-trained field researchers used a semistructured instrument that captures program genealogy, structure, processes, and cultural infusion. Program cultural elements were identified from field notes and from individual and group interviews of consumers and staff (N=104). A research-group consensus process with feedback from program staff was used to group elements by shared characteristics into the program components of cultural competence. Components included communication competencies (with use of colloquialisms and accepted forms of address); staff in culturally acceptable roles; culturally framed trust building (such as pairing youths with mentors), stigma reduction, friendly milieus (such as serving culturally familiar foods and playing music popular with the culture), and services; and peer, family, and community involvement (including use of peer counselors and mentors, hosting parent weekends, and linking clients with senior center and community services). Incorporating these components into any program in which underserved cultural populations are seen is recommended for improving cultural competence.

  8. Cultural Differences and Cultivation of Cross-Cultural Communicative Competence in Chinese FLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaobo

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve their abilities in cross-cultural communication, language learners should develop not only their language competence, but also communicative competence. This paper presents an understanding on the general cultural differences between the west and China by applying the cultural dimensions of Hofstede and Bond, and points out…

  9. An Overview of Undergraduate Training in Cultural Competency and Cross-Cultural Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Zaza; Laugharne, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Multiculturalism is a familiar concept in many developed countries. While cultural competency training is part of most medical curricula, training in cultural psychiatry at the undergraduate level is typically minimal. It is important that medical graduates are both culturally competent and able to respond to the mental health needs of patients…

  10. Cultural competence among nurse practitioners working with asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurmond, Jeanine; Seeleman, Conny; Rupp, Ines; Goosen, Simone; Stronks, Karien

    2010-11-01

    Asylum seekers often have complex medical needs. Little is known about the cultural competences health care providers should have in their contact with asylum seekers in order to meet their needs. Cultural competence is generally defined as a combination of knowledge about certain cultural groups, as well as attitudes towards and skills for dealing with cultural diversity. Given asylum seekers' specific care needs, it may be asked whether this set of general competences is adequate for the medical contact with asylum seekers. We explored the cultural competences that nurse practitioners working with asylum seekers thought were important. A purposive sample of 89 nurse practitioners in the Netherlands completed a questionnaire. In addition, six group interviews with nurse practitioners were also conducted. A framework analysis was used to analyse the data of the questionnaires and the interviews. From the analysis, several specific competences emerged, which were required for the medical contact with asylum seekers: knowledge of the political situation in the country of origin; knowledge with regard to diseases common in the country of origin; knowledge of the effects of refugeehood on health; awareness of the juridical context in the host country; ability to deal with asylum seekers' traumatic experiences; and skills to explain the host country's health care system. Apart from these cultural competences specific for the situation of asylum seekers, general cultural competences were also seen as important, such as the ability to use interpretation services. We conclude that insight into these cultural competences may help to develop related education and training for health care providers working with asylum seekers.

  11. A European Competence Framework for Industrial Pharmacy Practice in Biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; Crowley, Pat; De Paepe, Kristien; Gennery, Brian; Koster, Andries; Martini, Luigi; Moffat, Vivien; Nicholson, Jane; Pauwels, Gunther; Ronsisvalle, Giuseppe; Sousa, Vitor; van Schravendijk, Chris; Wilson, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The PHAR-IN (“Competences for industrial pharmacy practice in biotechnology”) looked at whether there is a difference in how industrial employees and academics rank competences for practice in the biotechnological industry. A small expert panel consisting of the authors of this paper produced a

  12. Cultural Practices, Oppression, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot

    1998-01-01

    Argues that contested meanings, multiple judgments, and conflicts are part of cultures and the individual's thoughts and actions. Contends that people make moral judgments that may affirm or contradict cultural norms and practices, and sometimes invoke concepts of welfare, justice, and rights. Notes that some key aspects of Baumrind's neo-Marxist…

  13. Cultural Practices, Oppression, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot

    1998-01-01

    Argues that contested meanings, multiple judgments, and conflicts are part of cultures and the individual's thoughts and actions. Contends that people make moral judgments that may affirm or contradict cultural norms and practices, and sometimes invoke concepts of welfare, justice, and rights. Notes that some key aspects of Baumrind's neo-Marxist…

  14. Games culture and media practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Alsina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this article is to explore the relationship between videogames and other practices related to audiovisual media in everyday life; we are specifically interested in examining how far videogames, as a cultural form that combines audiovisual narrative with the fun of a game, may be useful in understanding broader cultural transformations in relation to cultural production in the new media context opened up by information and communication technologies.

  15. Measures of Cultural Competence in Nurses: An Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collette Loftin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is limited literature available identifying and describing the instruments that measure cultural competence in nursing students and nursing professionals. Design. An integrative review was undertaken to identify the characteristics common to these instruments, examine their psychometric properties, and identify the concepts these instruments are designed to measure. Method. There were eleven instruments identified that measure cultural competence in nursing. Of these eleven instruments, four had been thoroughly tested in either initial development or in subsequent testing, with developers providing extensive details of the testing. Results. The current literature identifies that the instruments to assess cultural competence in nurses and nursing students are self-administered and based on individuals' perceptions. The instruments are commonly utilized to test the effectiveness of educational programs designed to increase cultural competence. Conclusions. The reviewed instruments measure nurses’ self-perceptions or self-reported level of cultural competence but offer no objective measure of culturally competent care from a patient’s perspective which can be problematic. Comparison of instruments reveals that they are based on a variety of conceptual frameworks and that multiple factors should be considered when deciding which instrument to use.

  16. Measures of Cultural Competence in Nurses: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is limited literature available identifying and describing the instruments that measure cultural competence in nursing students and nursing professionals. Design. An integrative review was undertaken to identify the characteristics common to these instruments, examine their psychometric properties, and identify the concepts these instruments are designed to measure. Method. There were eleven instruments identified that measure cultural competence in nursing. Of these eleven instruments, four had been thoroughly tested in either initial development or in subsequent testing, with developers providing extensive details of the testing. Results. The current literature identifies that the instruments to assess cultural competence in nurses and nursing students are self-administered and based on individuals' perceptions. The instruments are commonly utilized to test the effectiveness of educational programs designed to increase cultural competence. Conclusions. The reviewed instruments measure nurses' self-perceptions or self-reported level of cultural competence but offer no objective measure of culturally competent care from a patient's perspective which can be problematic. Comparison of instruments reveals that they are based on a variety of conceptual frameworks and that multiple factors should be considered when deciding which instrument to use. PMID:23818818

  17. Assessing medical student cultural competence: what really matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Windsor W; Mayo, Rachel M; Truong, Khoa D; Pribonic, Anne P; Schalkoff, Christine A

    2016-07-30

    The study aimed to explore medical students' attitudes and beliefs toward Latino patients, specifically: to assess students' levels of knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos; to determine students' exposure to and previous experience with Latinos; and to evaluate whether factors such as study abroad, living abroad, previous clinical experience with Latinos, and language proficiency predict Latino knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos. This study utilized a cross-sectional survey design. Participants were third and fourth year medical students at three medical schools in the Southeastern United States. Three composite measures: Latino knowledge, Cultural competence, and Comfort with Latino patients, were predicted in a multivariate regression model including individual sociodemographic characteristics and past clinical or social experience with Latinos. A total of 170 medical students completed the survey (43% response rate). Spanish language proficiency was a statistically significant predictor (t(131)=2.72, pcultural competence. Previous clinical experience with Latinos was not significantly associated with the three composite dependent variables, and comfort with Latino patients was not significantly predicted by any of the six Latino-related explanatory variables. Factors prior to medical school matriculation and during medical education may contribute to increased cultural competence and comfort with multicultural patients. Cultural patient-partner programs may be an effective way to increase cultural competence within the confines of medical school curricula.

  18. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings.

  19. Construct Validity of Almutairi's Critical Cultural Competence Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Adel F; Dahinten, V Susan

    2017-06-01

    Cultural diversity in health care settings can threaten the well-being of patients, their families, and health care providers. This psychometric study evaluated the construct validity of the recently developed four-factor, 43-item Critical Cultural Competence Scale (CCCS) which was designed to overcome the conceptual limitations of previously developed scales. The study was conducted in Canada with a random sample of 170 registered nurses. Comparisons with the Cultural Competence Assessment instrument, Scale of Ethnocultural Empathy, and Cultural Intelligence Scale provided mixed evidence of convergent validity. Modest correlations were found between the total scale scores suggesting that the CCCS is measuring a more comprehensive and conceptually distinct construct. Stronger correlations were found between the more conceptually similar subscales. Evidence for discriminant validity was also mixed. Results support use of the CCCS to measure health care providers' perceptions of their critical cultural competence though ongoing evaluation is warranted.

  20. In praise of cultural-competence training for mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsky, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Mental health practitioners in Israel encounter clients from a variety of ethnic groups and cultural backgrounds. Yet, culturally-informed practice standards have neither been defined nor promoted by the professional establishment. A model for cultural-competence training for mental health professionals is presented and evaluated based on self-reports of 51 trainees. An increase in the trainees' understanding of their clients' cultural experiences is elicited, as well as the expansion of their cultural self-awareness, empathy and respect for cultural diversity. this is a qualitative evaluation with a limited number of respondents and provides data only on short term effects of the training. the evaluation demonstrates positive training effects on the practice. Hopefully, this experience will encourage addressing cultural issues in the practice and training of mental health professionals in Israel.

  1. Nurse Leadership and Informatics Competencies: Shaping Transformation of Professional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Margaret Ann; Moen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Nurse leaders must demonstrate capacities and develop specific informatics competencies in order to provide meaningful leadership and support ongoing transformation of the healthcare system. Concurrently, staff informatics competencies must be planned and fostered to support critical principles of transformation and patient safety in practice, advance evidence-informed practice, and enable nursing to flourish in complex digital environments across the healthcare continuum. In addition to nurse leader competencies, two key aspects of leadership and informatics competencies will be addressed in this chapter - namely, the transformation of health care and preparation of the nursing workforce.

  2. Person-centered approach to enhancing cross-cultural competence of general physicians in the system of postgraduate education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тетяна Ярославівна Пилип

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the essence of the person-centered approach to enhancing cross-cultural competence of general physicians in the system of postgraduate education based on the conducted analysis of scientific pedagogical and psychological literature. The author has analysed the main tasks of the training process from person-centered perspective and its content; there were distinguished major practical concepts and tools of implementation of cross-cultural competence development of general physicians in teaching practice

  3. Reframing the Australian nurse teacher competencies: do they reflect the 'REAL' world of nurse teacher practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Jacqui; Taylor, Christine; Roden, Janet; Blundell, Jennifer; Tolhurst, Gerda

    2011-04-01

    The Australian nurse teacher competencies were introduced in 1996; however, the researchers perceived that changes to the health care system and a nursing workforce shortage may have affected nurse teacher roles over the past decade. This study aimed to explore perceptions of nurse teachers on the applicability of the current Australian nurse teacher competencies to practice, and modify the nurse teacher competencies to better reflect current practice. Methodology utilized mixed methods, and data collection was via focus groups, telephone interviews, and survey data. Results revealed that participants were mostly positive about the original competency statements, although there were some variations between items. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data were: changing trends in health care; preparation for teaching; understanding of the competencies, contextual influences on education role; nurse teachers as change agents, and resource management. Conclusions were that the Australian nurse teacher competencies (1996) were reflective of the current generic roles of nurse teachers however some of the competencies needed reframing to meet the current needs of nurse teachers. However, changes needed to be made in areas such as reducing complex language, inclusion of technology, and cultural competencies. Nurse teachers were supportive of the research because they valued the teacher competencies for reflection on their practice and the development of portfolios, job descriptions and performance appraisals.

  4. Development of an international interdisciplinary course: a strategy to promote cultural competence and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Eileen M; Tremethick, Mary Jane

    2013-03-01

    Now, more than ever, nurses are practicing in settings in which cultural competence and teamwork are essential to providing quality care. The expectation that nurses provide effective care across varied population groups highlights the need for attainment of cultural competency by baccalaureate nursing graduates. Nursing programs must develop strategies to address this educational need. In this article, the authors share their experiences in the development of an international interdisciplinary course that combined academic service learning with cultural immersion to promote the development of cultural competence and collaboration among students. By developing an interdisciplinary course that is of interest to a wide range of students, faculty can be successful in providing an opportunity for students with varied career paths to be better prepared to live and work in the world's global community.

  5. Assessing and changing medical practice culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Your medical practice has an existing culture that manifests itself daily in literally hundreds of ways. Some aspects of your culture likely support your practice's growth; others may be impeding your progress. This article describes the characteristics of medical practice culture and provides numerous examples of how culture influences behavior. It describes how culture is expressed in a medical practice through objects and artifacts, language, emotions, interactions, practice management systems, and daily work habits. It offers three techniques for assessing an existing medical practice culture and a checklist for conducting culture observations. This article also provides guidelines for identifying a desired medical practice culture and explores why changing culture is so difficult. It describes five reasons employees are likely to resist culture change and provides 12 fundamental changes that will enable a practice to improve its culture. Finally, this article explores how medical practice cultures are formed and perpetuated and provides more than a dozen questions to ask employees in a culture survey.

  6. Can One Undergraduate Course Increase Cross-Cultural Competence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Lois

    2015-01-01

    The majority of students who took this general education undergraduate course in developing cross-cultural understanding at a state college in the northeastern United States reported that their level of cross-cultural competence and global awareness increased by the end of the course. The primary course objective was to help students better…

  7. Utilizing the Project Method for Teaching Culture and Intercultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Sasha S.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a detailed methodological outline for teaching culture through project work. It is argued that because project work makes it possible to gain transferrable and applicable knowledge and insight, it is the ideal tool for teaching culture with the aim of achieving real intercultural communicative competence (ICC). Preceding the…

  8. The intersection between cultural competence and whiteness in libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Blackburn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The context for this article is Australian libraries and my experience there with cross-cultural provision. However, this article is not about providing library services for any specific group; it’s about cultural competence and whiteness. I begin with my background, so as to make clear how […

  9. How can a competency framework for advanced practice support care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Pamela Elizabeth

    2016-11-10

    Aim To explore whether perception of nurse practitioners in relation to whether a competency framework for advanced practice can support their work. Method A qualitative cross-sectional design was used, embedded in an interpretative paradigm of research. A non-probability sample of eight experienced nurse practitioners took part in focus groups and answered questionnaires. A mixture of phenomenological and grounded theory approaches were used to collect the data. Findings Four major themes were identified: competency frameworks can identify individual strengths and weaknesses, they can be used to set clear goals and targets, they can improve how practice is organised, and they have the potential to limit practice in terms of narrowing boundaries. The study also found competency frameworks could provide an structure to guide the development and evaluation of educational programmes. Conclusion Competency frameworks can be used so to target the development of new advanced nurse practitioners. They can address workforce development and governance by ensuring nurse practitioners have the competencies to provide safe, autonomous practice. Competency frameworks have been shown to ensure consistency in clinical practice skills underpinned with nurse practitioners' theoretical knowledge. They provide a clear development structure for career development and advanced practice. However, internationally, there is still a lack of definition of advanced practice and its core competencies.

  10. Cultural competence in medical education: A questionnaire study of Danish medical teachers' perceptions of and preparedness to teach cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Janne; Jervelund, Signe Smith; Norredam, Marie; Kristiansen, Maria; Krasnik, Allan

    2017-03-01

    The cultural competence training of healthcare professionals is a key element in ensuring the quality of both the access and delivery of healthcare to increasingly ethnically diverse populations. The aim of this study is to investigate Danish medical teachers' opinions about cultural competence, their willingness to receive training and preparedness to teach cultural competence topics. The survey was sent to medical teachers, clinical teachers and external lecturers who teach in the medical programme at the University of Copenhagen. A total of 1400 medical teachers received the survey, and 199 responded. The response rate is 14%. Data were analysed through descriptive calculations, and answers to open-ended questions were coded using content analysis. Results showed that 82.4% of the informants agreed or strongly agreed that the medical education programme should include training on cultural issues, and 60.3% agreed or strongly agreed that students should be assessed on their cultural competence skills. Regarding preparedness to teach a diverse classroom, 88.4% felt somewhat or very prepared to engage and motivate all students. About 70% were interested in receiving training on cultural competence. Generally, there is interest in and acknowledgement of the importance of cultural competence in Danish medical education among teachers at the University of Copenhagen. This creates an opportunity to implement cultural competence in the medical curriculum, training of teachers and strengthening the diversity sensitivity of the organisation. However, support for this programme by management and the allocation of an appropriate level of resources is a prerequisite to the success of the programme.

  11. Beyond cultural competency: Bourdieu, patients and clinical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ming-Cheng M; Stacey, Clare L

    2008-07-01

    In response to widely documented racial and ethnic disparities in health, clinicians and public health advocates have taken great strides to implement 'culturally competent' care. While laudable, this important policy and intellectual endeavour has suffered from a lack of conceptual clarity and rigour. This paper develops a more careful conceptual model for understanding the role of culture in the clinical encounter, paying particular attention to the relationship between culture, contexts and social structures. Linking Bourdieu's (1977) notion of 'habitus' and William Sewell's (1992) axioms of multiple and intersecting structures, we theorise patient culture in terms of 'hybrid habitus'. This conceptualisation of patient culture highlights three analytical dimensions: the multiplicity of schemas and resources available to patients, their specific patterns of integration and application in specific contexts, and the constitutive role of clinical encounters. The paper concludes with a discussion of directions for future research as well as reforms of cultural competency training courses.

  12. Development of Behavioral Indicators of Competences for Safety Culture of Nuclear Power Plants: A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Kwangsu; Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Shin, Youmin; Lee, Yong-Hee; Jang, Tong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    determine the method of measurement. Mainly used tools for behavior observations are Critical Behavior Checklist (CBC), Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS), Behavior Observation Scale (BOS), and Mixed Standard Scale (MSS). Each measure is used differently depending on the occurrence likelihood and dimension of behavior. Therefore, further study is needed in order to determine the most appropriate technique for effective and efficient measuring behavioral indicators in practice. In the future study, there are additional considerations to apply the suggested set of safety culture competences to any specific NPP. In general, five to seven core competences are recommended for efficient competence management, it is required to prioritize the importance of each competence among all competences through the field validation including actual behavior observation and discussion with incumbents. Moreover, it is better to select core competences across various types of jobs (operator, maintenance/repair, experiment and so on) because the priority of each competence may be different across job types. In addition, only the safety culture competence for field employees was proposed in this study.

  13. Mexican Managers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    2001-01-01

    Global managers in Mexico identified what their U.S. counterparts should know about Mexican culture to do business effectively. Suggested Mexican and U.S.cultures are exact opposites in many respects. Discussed differences in building business relationships, attitudes toward time, family and religious values, communication patterns, and…

  14. Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument: Initial Italian validation and proposed refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca; Dicembrino, Rita Bruna; Gionti, Luciano; Petre, Lucica; Ungurean, Liana

    2015-09-09

    Italy has become a target of immigration in the last three decades. Accordingly, the Italian population is progressively changing, becoming increasingly culturally different. Cultural competences are a fundamental requirement for many industries and, especially, for healthcare organizations. The aim of this paper is to propose an initial Italian validation of the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument (CCAI) and to propose a refinement of this scale in terms of measured constructs. The CCAI was translated into Italian through a team-based iterative approach and then administered to a sample of 289 nurses with symbolic and realistic threat scale and social dominance orientation scale. An on-line cross-sectional survey questionnaire was used. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the original two dimensions of the CCAI can be divided into two other sub-scales, thus leaving us with the following dimensions: cultural awareness, cultural sensitivity, seeking information and active behavior. These dimensions appeared to be sufficiently reliable and independent one from another. Moreover, they showed specific and different correlations with other measured constructs. The Italian version of the CCAI would seem to be a useful instrument for measuring both attitudes and behavioral intention of nurses with respect to intercultural care. Using four dimensions instead of two appears to increase the understanding of professionals' cultural competence and supply a deeper picture of dimensions which compose cultural competence in healthcare settings.

  15. Improving the Cultural Competency of Social Work Students with a Social Privilege Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Cynthia L.; Deck, Stacy M.; Miller, J. Jay; Borders, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the development and utilization of an instructional activity created by the authors for the purposes of preparing social work students for culturally competent practice with members of historically oppressed populations. Experiential activities in the classroom provide an alternative approach to traditional pedagogical…

  16. Perceived Levels of Cultural Competence for School Social Workers: A Follow-up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasley, Martell L.; Archuleta, Adrian; Miller, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on findings from a follow-up study that examined the relationship among social work education programs, postgraduate professional development, and school social workers' perceived levels of cultural competence in practice with urban minority youth. The initial study demonstrated that African Americans…

  17. Is Cultural Competence Enough? Deepening Social Justice Pedagogy in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Leah R.

    2015-01-01

    This viewpoint examines the limitations of cultural competency in art therapy education through personal reflection, calling for an immersive engagement with social justice practices of naming difference, asserting counter narratives, and following the leadership of people impacted by systemic violence. The author discusses the impact of…

  18. Reflecting on the Role of Competence and Culture in Consultation at the International Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    International educational consultation is challenging work that requires not only attention to best practices in consultation but also additional focus on cultural norms and regularities. In the three articles of this special issue, the consultation competencies of consultants play a critical role, as exemplified by entry issues, problem-solving…

  19. Is Cultural Competence Enough? Deepening Social Justice Pedagogy in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Leah R.

    2015-01-01

    This viewpoint examines the limitations of cultural competency in art therapy education through personal reflection, calling for an immersive engagement with social justice practices of naming difference, asserting counter narratives, and following the leadership of people impacted by systemic violence. The author discusses the impact of…

  20. Continuing Education Effects on Cultural Competence Knowledge and Skills Building among Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla B. Hall

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Racial and ethnic minority health data from a national perspective indicates there is much to learn in the public health workforce about the ongoing health disparities crisis. This suggests a level of urgency to assist our public health professionals in obtaining specific skills sets that will assist them in working better with vulnerable populations. The purpose of this research is to assess cultural competence knowledge and programmatic skill sets, utilizing an explorational case study, of individuals employed within an urban public health department. In order to effectively evaluate these constructs, a quantitative research approach was employed to examine participants’ knowledge and competencies of the subject matter. This data was further analyzed to determine if continuing education participation and training was correlated to the levels of culturally competent practice engagement and self-reported confidence. In addition, researchers obtained data on the availability of employer sponsored training opportunities. The data suggested when health professionals engage in cultural competence education, their level of awareness of unique characteristics between ethnic and racial minorities increased. Those who exhibited the healthiest behaviors, as it relates to effectively working with diverse populations, had a heightened sense of knowledge related to culture and healthcare services. Continuing education in cultural competence is an essential strategy for improving public health employees’ effectiveness in working with diverse clients and reducing racial and ethnic health disparities. As the finding illustrated, training programs must incorporate educational components which foster skill building to enable subsequent culturally appropriate clinical interactions.

  1. Multiracial competence in social work: recommendations for culturally attuned work with multiracial people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kelly E; Samuels, Gina M

    2011-07-01

    According to the 2010 U.S. census, approximately 9 million individuals report multiracial identities. By the year 2050, as many as one in five Americans could claim a multiracial background. Despite this population growth, a review of recent empirical and theoretical literature in social work suggests a disproportionate lack of attention to issues ofmultiraciality. Instead, social work practice models remain embedded in traditional societal discourses of race and culture that often exclude or marginalize the experiences of multiracial individuals and families.This article summarizes recommendations following the domains of awareness, knowledge, and skills in the NASW Standards for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice to support culturally attuned social work practice with multiracial people. The authors argue that a culturally attuned practice approach--one that is inclusive of multiraciality--is not only timely, but also consistent with the profession's ethical obligation to provide culturally relevant services to all consumers and clients.

  2. Production Machine Shop Employment Competencies. Part One: Practices and Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishart, Gus; Werner, Claire

    Competencies for production machine shop are provided for the first of four topic areas: principles and practice of machine shop. Each competency appears in a one-page format. It is presented as a goal statement followed by one or more "indicator" statements, which are performance objectives describing an ability that, upon attainment,…

  3. [Consensus on competencies for advanced nursing practice in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Fullana, Pedro; De Pedro-Gómez, Joan E; Bennasar-Veny, Miquel; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan C; Sesé-Abad, Albert J; Morales-Asencio, José M

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of international consensus on the exact definition and core competencies of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, a problem particularly acute in our national context due to the lack of APN role development, which has a significantly short history in our country. The main objective of this paper was the delineation of the competence framework for Advanced Practice Nurses in our national context based on expert consensus through the Delphi method Based on a preliminary literature review process, a conglomerate of 17 domains of competence (clusters of related competencies) were identified. This initial set was revised, refined and validated by a group of expert panellists on the subject (clinicians, researchers, managers, and teachers) through successive rounds in search of a suitable consensus on each of the various proposed items The results helped to establish a solid foundation in the form of a skills map that could identify those sets of more specific competencies for advanced practice roles, regardless of regulatory and professional practice context, identifying domains such as Research and Evidence Based Practice, Clinical and Professional Leadership, or Care Management This set of skills related to advanced practice roles in our environment can delineate competency standards common to this level of nursing practice, and serve as a reference for policy development, a review of roles, or the establishment of academic profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Incorporating Cultural Competence & Youth Program Volunteers: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Smith

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing diversity of youth in the United States necessitates a shift in the ways that youth services and programming are designed and implemented. This article examines existing scholarship on developing the cultural competency of volunteers in youth development programs in an effort to improve 4-H YDP protocol. Drawing from a diverse, interdisciplinary range of peer-reviewed, academic articles, this literature review plots out recent pedagogical trends, theoretical concepts, and empirical studies dealing with the cultural competence of service workers and mentors interacting with youth. Based on a synthesis of the findings, this paper presents guiding principles for increasing cultural competence of youth program design through both training and organizational changes.

  5. The Quad Council practice competencies for public health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swider, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce; Reyes, David; Cravetz, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the most recent efforts by the Quad Council of Public Health Nursing organizations to review and revise the competencies for PHN practice, and highlights the implications of these competencies for practice, education, and research. The Quad Council is a coalition of four nursing organizations with a focus on public health nursing and includes the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators; the Association of Public Health Nursing (known prior to July 1, 2012 as the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Nursing); the Public Health Nursing section of the American Public Health Association; and the Council on Economics and Practice of the American Nurses' Association. The Quad Council competencies are based on the Council on Linkages competencies for public health professionals and were designed to ensure that public health nursing fits in the domain of public health science and practice.

  6. Cultural competence in the baccalaureate degree nursing curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Angela

    Health care providers are members of a helping profession and need to provide quality care to all members of society. As a result of current and projected demographic changes within the United States (U.S.), health care professionals are faced with the challenges of providing culturally competent care and fulfilling the role as the "helping profession." In the past 10 years, minority populations have increased in the U.S. For example, the African American population experienced an approximate 12.3% increase, and the Hispanic population increased by 43%. Just as it is necessary for health care professionals to respond to the increase in the geriatric population as a result of the Baby Boomer generation, it is crucial to address the needs of an increasingly culturally diverse population in the U.S. Preparing to care for a culturally diverse population begins during the teaching and learning process in the nursing curriculum. This study intended to identify the methods in which nursing programs are integrating cultural concepts in their plan of study. Josepha Campinha-Bacote's model titled "The Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Health Care Services" was used as the theoretical framework to guide this study. Campinha-Bacote has studied transcultural nursing and has added to the current body of nursing knowledge with regard to incorporating cultural concepts in the nursing curriculum. This model requires health care professionals to see themselves as becoming culturally competent rather than being culturally competent and involves the integration of cultural awareness, cultural skill, cultural knowledge, cultural encounters, and cultural desire. An electronic survey was sent using Survey Monkey to 298 schools in the Northeast and Southern regions of the United States. The survey was sent on January 19, 2012 and remained open for 20 days. Once the survey closed, statistical analyses were conducted using frequencies and cross-tabluations, and the findings

  7. A Simulation-Based Approach to Training Operational Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Lewis

    2010-01-01

    Cultural knowledge and skills are critically important for military operations, emergency response, or any job that involves interaction with a culturally diverse population. However, it is not obvious what cultural knowledge and skills need to be trained, and how to integrate that training with the other training that trainees must undergo. Cultural training needs to be broad enough to encompass both regional (culture-specific) and cross-cultural (culture-general) competencies, yet be focused enough to result in targeted improvements in on-the-job performance. This paper describes a comprehensive instructional development methodology and training technology framework that focuses cultural training on operational needs. It supports knowledge acquisition, skill acquisition, and skill transfer. It supports both training and assessment, and integrates with other aspects of operational skills training. Two training systems will be used to illustrate this approach: the Virtual Cultural Awareness Trainer (VCAT) and the Tactical Dari language and culture training system. The paper also discusses new and emerging capabilities that are integrating cultural competence training more strongly with other aspects of training and mission rehearsal.

  8. Criteria, indicators and levels of formed professional functional competences of future teachers of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsutina N.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is shown the structural components of the functional competence of professional teachers of physical education: motivational, cognitive and action-practical. We used the following methods of scientific knowledge, as the analysis of psychological, educational and methodological literature, synthesis, comparison, generalization, specification, classification, ordering Criteria and levels of occupational functional competence of future teachers of physical education. It is determined that the high level of professional formation of the functional competence of future teachers of physical culture is characterized by the motivation to perform professional functions of a teacher of physical culture, fundamental knowledge required to perform professional functions of a teacher of physical culture, a high level of general physical fitness, pronounced specific motor abilities and skills.

  9. Performance measures of cultural competency in mental health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, C; Davis-Chambers, E; Haugland, G; Bank, R; Aponte, C; McCombs, H

    2000-11-01

    The authors utilized numerous documents created by advisory groups, expert panels and multicultural focus groups to develop performance measures for assessing the cultural competency of mental health systems. Competency was measured within three levels of organizational structure: administrative, provider network, and individual caregiver. Indicators, measures and data sources for needs assessment, information exchange, services, human resources, plans and policies, and outcomes were identified. Procedures for selection and implementation of the most critical measures are suggested. The products of this project are broadly applicable to the concerns of all cultural groups.

  10. Culturally competent substance abuse treatment with transgender persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttbrock, Larry A

    2012-01-01

    Transgender individuals are misunderstood and inadequately treated in many conventional substance abuse treatment programs. This article reviews current concepts regarding the definition and diversity of transgenderism and summarizes the existing literature on the prevalence and correlates of substance use in transgendered populations. Examples of culturally competent and gender-sensitive treatment in specialized settings are cited, with a call to extend these initiatives throughout the gamut of service venues that engage transgender individuals. Cultural competence combined with gender sensitivity should improve the effectiveness of substance abuse treatment for transgender individuals and will contribute to the goal of providing effective services in an increasingly diverse society.

  11. Evaluating competency to stand trial with evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Richard; Johansson-Love, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Evaluations for competency to stand trial are distinguished from other areas of forensic consultation by their long history of standardized assessment beginning in the 1970s. As part of a special issue of the Journal on evidence-based forensic practice, this article examines three published competency measures: the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Criminal Adjudication (MacCAT-CA), the Evaluation of Competency to Stand Trial-Revised (ECST-R), and the Competence Assessment for Standing Trial for Defendants with Mental Retardation (CAST-MR). Using the Daubert guidelines as a framework, we examined each competency measure regarding its relevance to the Dusky standard and its error and classification rates. The article acknowledges the past polarization of forensic practitioners on acceptance versus rejection of competency measures. It argues that no valuable information, be it clinical acumen or standardized data, should be systematically ignored. Consistent with the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law Practice Guideline, it recommends the integration of competency interview findings with other sources of data in rendering evidence-based competency determinations.

  12. CPD Aligned to Competency Standards to Support Quality Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Nash

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available As medication experts, pharmacists are key members of the patient’s healthcare team. Pharmacists must maintain their competence to practice to remain responsive to the increasingly complex healthcare sector. This paper seeks to determine how competence training for pharmacists may enhance quality in their professional development. Results of two separately administered surveys (2012 and 2013 were compared to examine the reported continued professional development (CPD practices of Australian pharmacists. Examination of results from both studies enabled a focus on how the competency standards inform CPD practice.In the survey administered in 2012, 91% (n = 253/278 pharmacists reported that they knew their current registration requirements. However, in the survey administered in 2013, only 43% (n = 46/107 reported utilization of the National Competency Standards Framework for Pharmacists in Australia (NCS to self-asses their practice as part of their annual re-registration requirements. Fewer, 23% (n = 25/107, used the NCS to plan their CPD. This may be symptomatic of poor familiarity with the NCS, uncertainty around undertaking self-directed learning as part of a structured learning plan and/or misunderstandings around what CPD should include. This is supported by thematic analysis of pharmacists’ social media comments. Initial and ongoing competence training to support meaningful CPD requires urgent attention in Australia. The competence (knowledge, skills and attributes required to engage in meaningful CPD practice should be introduced and developed prior to entry into practice; other countries may find they are in a similar position.

  13. Social Justice Competencies and Career Development Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra; Marshall, Catherine; McMahon, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The recent focus on social justice issues in career development is primarily conceptual in nature and few resources account for the challenges or successes experienced by career development practitioners. The purpose of this article is to report the results of a research study of career practitioners in Canada regarding the competencies they use…

  14. FORMATION OF STUDENTS’ FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCE IN THE INFORMATIONAL FIELD OF CROSS CULTURAL INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Vyacheslavovich Tomin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of foreign languages is becoming an integral feature of competitive persona-lity, ability to engage in cross-cultural communication and productive cross-cultural inte-raction, characterized by an adequate degree of tolerance and multi-ethnic competence, the ability for cross-cultural adaptation, critical thinking and creativity. However, the concept of foreign language competence has so far no clear, unambiguous definitions, thereby indicating the complexity and diversity of the phenomenon, which is an integrative, practice-oriented outcome of the wish and ability for intercultural communication. There have been mentioned a variety of requirements, conditions, principles, objectives, means and forms of foreign language competence forming, among which special attention is paid to non-traditional forms of practical training and information field in a cross-cultural interaction. There have been explained the feasibility of their application, which allows solving a complex of series of educational and teaching tasks more efficiently. There have been clarified the term «information field» in cross-cultural interaction, which is a cross-section of internally inherent in every individual «sections» of knowledge, skills, and experience, arising in certain given educational frameworks and forming a communication channel. The resultative indicators of the formation of foreign language competence and ways to improve its effectiveness are presented.

  15. Intercultural Competence and Cultural Learning through Telecollaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a six-week telecollaborative project between sixteen American students enrolled in a second-semester German class at an American university and sixteen German students enrolled in an advanced English course at a high school in Germany. Students discussed various cultural topics with their partner in two e-mails…

  16. Cultural competency and recovery within diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, D J

    2007-01-01

    Recovery for diverse populations with mental health problems includes communities of color, those with limited English proficiency and individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT). The process of healing and recovery must take into consideration the critical role of culture and language and look at the individual within the context of an environment that is influenced by racism, sexism, colonization, homophobia, and poverty as well as the stigma and shame associated with having a mental illness. Recovery must assess the impact of isolation brought about by cultural and language barriers and work towards reducing the negative influence it has on the emotional and physical well-being of the person. It is imperative that recovery occur at multiple levels and involves the person in recovery, the service provider, the larger community and the system that establishes policies that often work against those who do not fit the mold of what mainstream society considers being "the norm." Recovery must respect the cultural and language backgrounds of the individual.

  17. A Prescription for Cultural Competence in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kripalani, Sunil; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Katz, Marra G; Genao, Inginia

    2006-01-01

    Cultural competence programs have proliferated in U.S. medical schools in response to increasing national diversity, as well as mandates from accrediting bodies. Although such training programs share common goals of improving physician-patient communication and reducing health disparities, they often differ in their content, emphasis, setting, and duration. Moreover, training in cross-cultural medicine may be absent from students' clinical rotations, when it might be most relevant and memorab...

  18. Developing cultural competence and social responsibility in preclinical dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W

    2004-04-01

    Dental student development of cultural competence and social responsibility is recognized by educators as an important element in the overall shaping of minds and attitudes of modem dental practitioners. Yet training modalities to achieve these competencies are not clearly defined, and outcome measurements are elusive. This article shows an effective method to meet these desired outcomes. Sixty-one freshmen (class of 2005) participated in forty hours of nondental community service, and reflective journals were completed by the end of second year. Competency outcomes were measured by selecting key words and phrases found in the individual journals. Key phrases were related to compassion, righteousness, propriety, and wisdom. Also, phrases had to be accompanied by written indications of direct program causation. The combination of active-learning (based upon service learning models) in public health settings outside of the dental realm, accompanied by reflective journaling, enhanced cultural understanding and community spirit in the majority of students.

  19. The establishment of core competencies for canadian genetic counsellors: validation of practice based competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Raechel Ann; Connolly-Wilson, Mary; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer; Grewal, Sonya; Robb, Laura; Rutberg, Julie; Lilley, Margaret

    2013-12-01

    Numerous groups of health professionals have undertaken the task of defining core competencies for their profession. The goal of establishing core competencies is to have a defined standard for such professional needs as practice guidelines, training curricula, certification, continuing competency and re-entry to practice. In 2006, the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors (CAGC) recognized the need for uniform practice standards for the profession in Canada, given the rapid progress of genetic knowledge and technologies, the expanding practice of genetic counsellors and the increasing demand for services. We report here the process by which the CAGC Practice Based Competencies were developed and then validated via two survey cycles, the first within the CAGC membership, and the second with feedback from external stakeholders. These competencies were formally approved in 2012 and describe the integrated skills, attitudes and judgment that genetic counsellors in Canada require in order to perform the services and duties that fall within the practice of the profession responsibly, safely, effectively and ethically.

  20. Reflections on Service-Learning, Critical Thinking, and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lynette R.; Coufal, Kathy L.

    2009-01-01

    In today's increasingly multicultural society, students need to be prepared for the work world they will encounter. Well-developed critical thinking skills appear essential to needed cultural competence. With its focus on community involvement, deep reflection and civic engagement, the possibility that Service-Learning (SL) could improve students'…

  1. Identifying Dynamic Environments for Cross-Cultural Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Abbe (2010), contained 15 cross-cultural competencies grouped into affective (Willingness to Engage, iv Tolerance for Uncertainty, Emotional ...Regulation, Persistence, Self-efficacy, Openness, Emotional Empathy), behavioral (Flexibility, Rapport Building, Persuade/Influence), and cognitive...Phillips, Klein , & Cohn, 2005; Ross, Phillips, & Cohn, 2009) and was chosen as a starting point because it was developed in a military context for the

  2. Cultural Competence and School Counselor Training: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith A.; Bustamante, Rebecca; Sawyer, Cheryl; Sloan, Eva D.

    2015-01-01

    This collective case study investigated the experiences of bilingual counselors-in-training who assessed school-wide cultural competence in public schools. Analysis and interpretation of data resulted in the identification of 5 themes: eye-opening experiences, recognition of strengths, the role of school leaders, road maps for change, and…

  3. Cultural Competence: A Journey to an Elusive Goal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Jeanne A.; Haskins, Motier; Vasquez, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    To develop cultural competence, one must undertake an elusive journey that likely has no destination. Social workers have a responsibility to undertake this often rocky journey with few guideposts. As educators of future professionals, schools of social work must ensure that their students begin, or continue, this journey during this time of…

  4. Cultural Competence and the Recursive Nature of Conscientization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavan, Nancy P.; Webster-Smith, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The journey to cultural competence encompasses traveling an ever-expanding path increasing in size with the addition of each of five stages of development: conscientization, self-assessment, self-efficacy, agency, and, finally, critical consciousness as the unifying body within the educational enterprise. The increasing stages create a spiral…

  5. The Relationship between Cultural Competence and Teacher Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    JohnBull, Ranjini Mahinda

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine the nature of the relationship between cultural competence and teacher efficacy. According to 30 years of NAEP data, stagnant achievement among minority students persists; among factors related to student achievement, teacher efficacy represents the school-related variable that is most closely correlated and…

  6. Cultural Competence and Children's Mental Health Service Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancoske, Ronald J.; Lewis, Marva L.; Bowers-Stephens, Cheryll; Ford, Almarie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between clients' perception of cultural competency of mental health providers and service outcomes. A study was conducted of a public children's mental health program that used a community-based, systems of care approach. Data from a subsample (N = 111) of families with youths (average age 12.3) and primarily…

  7. Online cultural competency education for millennial dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lorraine; Hanes, Philip J

    2014-06-01

    Teaching cultural competence is now an educational requirement for U.S. dental curricula to meet 2013 accreditation standards. The question now is, given time restrictions, limited resources, and budget constraints faced by the majority of dental schools, how can they provide effective cultural competency education to prepare future dental professionals? An additional concern regarding instruction is the recent focus on techniques to engage Millennial learners since this generation is characterized as technologically savvy with a preference for multimedia and general dislike of traditional lectures. With these issues in mind, Georgia Regents University developed Healthy Perspectives, an online, interactive course in cultural competence designed to engage Millennial students. Both before and after the course, the students were asked to complete a modified version of the Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire. Of the eighty-eight students in the course (eighty-one first-year dental students and seven entering radiology students), seventy-one completed the questionnaire both before and after the course, for an 81 percent response rate. Seventy-five students also completed the course evaluation. The pre and post questionnaires showed statistically significant gains for students across the four primary areas of self-awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Student evaluations of the course were generally positive, particularly regarding content, but somewhat surprisingly their assessment of the interactive components (which were designed to meet generational expectations) was ambivalent.

  8. Global Migration: The Need for Culturally Competent School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Desireé; Lasser, Jon; Plotts, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Never before have more children lived away from their home countries. Given the unique social, emotional, and academic needs of children who have migrated, school psychologists must be well prepared to meet these growing demands. Consequently, school psychology training programs must invest in the preparation of culturally competent future school…

  9. Cultural Competence and School Counselor Training: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith A.; Bustamante, Rebecca; Sawyer, Cheryl; Sloan, Eva D.

    2015-01-01

    This collective case study investigated the experiences of bilingual counselors-in-training who assessed school-wide cultural competence in public schools. Analysis and interpretation of data resulted in the identification of 5 themes: eye-opening experiences, recognition of strengths, the role of school leaders, road maps for change, and…

  10. Exploring First-Year College Students' Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, D. Scott

    2017-01-01

    The development of college students' cultural competence is important in an increasingly diverse world. This exploratory, qualitative, action research study examined how 158 first-year students understood and applied core concepts after participating in a standardized diversity and social justice lesson plan designed using transformative education…

  11. Cultural Competence: A Journey to an Elusive Goal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Jeanne A.; Haskins, Motier; Vasquez, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    To develop cultural competence, one must undertake an elusive journey that likely has no destination. Social workers have a responsibility to undertake this often rocky journey with few guideposts. As educators of future professionals, schools of social work must ensure that their students begin, or continue, this journey during this time of…

  12. Study Abroad in Psychology: Increasing Cultural Competencies through Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, David R.; Rosenbusch, Katherine; Wallace-Williams, Devin; Keim, Alaina C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prominence of study abroad programs, few are offered in the field of psychology. The current study sought to investigate the impact of study abroad programs in psychology through a comparison of study abroad and domestic student cultural competencies. Participants included 104 undergraduate students enrolled in either a psychology…

  13. Study Abroad in Psychology: Increasing Cultural Competencies through Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, David R.; Rosenbusch, Katherine; Wallace-Williams, Devin; Keim, Alaina C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prominence of study abroad programs, few are offered in the field of psychology. The current study sought to investigate the impact of study abroad programs in psychology through a comparison of study abroad and domestic student cultural competencies. Participants included 104 undergraduate students enrolled in either a psychology…

  14. Understanding cultural competence in a multicultural nursing workforce: registered nurses' experience in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Adel F; McCarthy, Alexandra; Gardner, Glenn E

    2015-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the health system is mainly staffed by expatriate nurses from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Given the potential risks this situation poses for patient care, it is important to understand how cultural diversity can be effectively managed in this multicultural environment. The purpose of this study was to explore notions of cultural competence with non-Saudi Arabian nurses working in a major hospital in Saudi Arabia. Face-to-face, audio-recorded, semistructured interviews were conducted with 24 non-Saudi Arabian nurses. Deductive data collection and analysis were undertaken drawing on Campinha-Bacote's cultural competence model. The data that could not be explained by this model were coded and analyzed inductively. Nurses within this culturally diverse environment struggled with the notion of cultural competence in terms of each other's cultural expectations and those of the dominant Saudi culture. The study also addressed the limitations of Campinha-Bacote's model, which did not account for all of the nurses' experiences. Subsequent inductive analysis yielded important themes that more fully explained the nurses' experiences in this environment. The findings can inform policy, professional education, and practice in the multicultural Saudi setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Cultural Competence and Cultural Identity: Using Telementoring to Form Relationships of Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Audrey; Herrmann, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the following research question: How does telementoring urban high school students by English teacher candidates develop candidates' cultural competence and impact mentees' cultural identity development? Mentee-mentor exchanges were analyzed to uncover how mentees used writing to develop cultural identity, how mentors'…

  16. Cultural Competence and Cultural Identity: Using Telementoring to Form Relationships of Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Audrey; Herrmann, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the following research question: How does telementoring urban high school students by English teacher candidates develop candidates' cultural competence and impact mentees' cultural identity development? Mentee-mentor exchanges were analyzed to uncover how mentees used writing to develop cultural identity, how mentors'…

  17. Culturally Responsive School Psychology Practice: A Study of Practitioners' Self-Reported Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Ronda S.; Keller-Margulis, Milena A.; Burridge, Andrea Backscheider

    2017-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) recognizes cultural competence as a defining feature of psychological practice, education, training, and research (Sue et al. "American Psychologist," 49, 792-796, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the self-appraised cultural competence of school psychology practitioners…

  18. Teaching cultural competency through narrative medicine: intersections of classroom and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasGupta, Sayantani; Meyer, Dodi; Calero-Breckheimer, Ayxa; Costley, Alex W; Guillen, Sobeira

    2006-01-01

    Cultural competency and narrative medicine are perspectives that assist medical educators in teaching effective, empathetic communication and service delivery to a variety of patients. In this article, we describe a unique educational activity at the crossroads of these perspectives in which pediatric residents participated in a monthly reading and discussion group with staff members of an inner-city Dominican American community organization. By discussing a literary text rather than cases and facilitating discussions with particular attention to power, not only were historic conflicts between the groups circumvented, but an environment was created in which discussants drew heavily from personal and professional experiences. Qualitative evaluation of both groups revealed improved self-reported understanding of (a) issues of cultural diversity, (b) issues of medical culture, and (c) physicians' attitudes and behaviors in practice. Methodologies drawing from cultural competency and narrative medicine can be used to help physicians work in multidisciplinary, multicultural teams in and out of the medical institution.

  19. Training and Competency in Sedation Practice in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Ben; Buxbaum, James

    2016-07-01

    The practice of endoscopic sedation requires a thorough understanding of preprocedural assessment, sedation pharmacology, intraprocedure monitoring, adverse event management, and postprocedural care. The training process has become increasingly standardized and entails knowledge and practice-based components. The use of propofol in particular requires a higher level of structured training owing to its narrow therapeutic window. Simulation has increased opportunities for practice-based training in a controlled environment. After completion of training, the endoscopist must demonstrate competence in theoretical understanding and technical ability to administer sedation. Although individual institutions have certification processes, there is a lack of validated, standardized methods to confirm competence.

  20. Alignment of Human Resource Practices and Teacher Performance Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneman III, Herbert G.; Milanowski, Anthony T.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we argue that human resource (HR) management practices are important components of strategies for improving student achievement in an accountability environment. We present a framework illustrating the alignment of educational HR management practices to a teacher performance competency model, which in turn is aligned with student…

  1. Childhood Development Cross Culturally:Implications for Designing Childhood Obesity Interventions and Providing Culturally Competent Care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiying Ling; PhD.MS.RN.Vicki Hines-Martin; PhD.CNS.RN.FAAN Hong Ji; MSN

    2013-01-01

    United States is experiencing significant growth in its foreign -born population , especially Chinese American population comprising of 1.2% of the U.S.population.Many healthcare providers are challenged in their efforts to provide culturally competent healthcare to this population. To provide culturally competent healthcare ,healthcare providers should understand variations in cultural at-tributes that impact health. One group in which cultural variation holds great influence is that of children. Culture influences a child's be-havior,development and health. This article provides a cross -cultural,comparative examination of important cultural influences on child behaviors development and health in China and the U. S.Using the findings about these two populations ,interventions for childhood obesity cross culturally are addressed through the analysis of a U. S.based Children's Obesity Program. The author suggests that uniquely different approaches to childhood obesity intervention research are needed based upon the cultural differences identified within this paper.

  2. Cultural Collision: The Interference of First Language Cultural Identity on Pragmatic Competence of the Target Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Fen Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    This reflective study explores a different perspective of intercultural communicative competency (ICC) by focusing on the speech acts that nonnative speakers of Spanish from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds find difficult to perform competently in various contexts in Colombia. This article covers a qualitative case study using…

  3. Therapist Multicultural Competence, Asian American Participants' Cultural Values, and Counseling Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shihwe; Kim, Bryan S K

    2010-10-01

    Asian Americans drop out of mental health treatment at a high rate. This problem could be addressed by enhancing therapists' multicultural competence and by examining clients' cultural attitudes that may affect the counseling process. In the present study, we used a video analogue design with a sample of 113 Asian American college students to examine these possibilities. The result from a t test showed that the session containing therapist multicultural competencies received higher ratings than the session without therapist multicultural competence. In addition, correlational analyses showed that participant values acculturation was positively associated with participant ratings of counseling process, while the value of emotional self-control was negatively correlated. The results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis did not support any interaction effects among the independent variables on counseling process. All of these findings could contribute to the field of multicultural competence research and have implications for therapist practices and training.

  4. Interdisciplinary Service-Learning: Building Student Competencies through the Cross-Cultural Parent Groups Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Belliveau

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Changing demographics and an emphasis on competency-based social work education call for innovative approaches to the delivery of curricular content. In an effort to introduce BSW students to the socio-political issues facing the local Latino immigrant community, a service-learning project was developed in collaboration with the Spanish Language Department and a local middle school. An analysis of outcomes from social work student evaluations showed that students engaged with the community and issues in new and unexpected ways. Through their engagement in a cross-cultural group project, students developed greater cultural competency, honed their group practice skills in an unfamiliar context, provided a needed service to the community, and raised their awareness about the working conditions of new immigrants as part of a developing framework for social action. Details and implications of the project as a means to build student competencies are described.

  5. Preparing Globally Competent Teacher Candidates Through CrossCultural Experiential Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Kopish

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript presents findings and implications from a case study of one global educator's attempt to develop globally competent teacher candidates in an elective teacher preparation course. Global Citizenship Education served as the framing paradigm for the course and human experiences of immigrants and refugees served as the milieu for teacher candidates to learn critical inquiry. Teacher candidates also participated in several cross-cultural experiential learning opportunities designed to facilitate the development of global competencies (Longview, 2008 in teacher candidates. Students' reflective journals were analyzed to determine the personal significance of different learning experiences and the extent to which teacher candidates’ perceptions of immigrants and refugees changed as a result of the course content and activities. The findings demonstrate the potential of critical inquiry and cross-cultural experiential learning as transformative teaching practices to develop globally competent teachers.

  6. Exploring dental students' perceptions of cultural competence and social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W; Rustveld, Luis O; Weyant, Robert J; Close, John M

    2008-10-01

    The improvement of basic cultural competency skills and the creation of a greater community-minded spirit among dental students are important parts of dental education. The purpose of our study was to assess changes in dental students' attitudes and beliefs about community service and changes in cultural competencies after participation in a two-year program of non-dental community service (Student Community Outreach Program and Education, SCOPE). During 2003-07, two identical twenty-eight-item surveys were administered to SCOPE participants/completers. In the first, students reported on their attitudes after program completion. In the second, students reported retrospectively on their attitudes prior to starting the program. One hundred twenty-six post- and pre-intervention surveys were matched and assessed for changes in student attitudes after program participation. Based on factor analysis, four distinct scales were identified: 1) community service, 2) cultural competence, 3) communication, and 4) treatment perspective. Over time, statistically significant changes (pstudent attitudes and beliefs were found for scales 1 (p=.017), 2 (p=.001), and 3 (borderline significance, p=.057). Scale 4 showed no significant difference (p=.108). These scales indicate main focus areas to help guide future dentists in acquiring relevant sociocultural competencies and enabling community-minded attitudes. Overall, this study provides support for the addition of a non-dental community service-learning program into the preclinical curriculum.

  7. A European Competence Framework for Industrial Pharmacy Practice in Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; Crowley, Pat; De Paepe, Kristien; Gennery, Brian; Koster, Andries; Martini, Luigi; Moffat, Vivien; Nicholson, Jane; Pauwels, Gunther; Ronsisvalle, Giuseppe; Sousa, Vitor; van Schravendijk, Chris; Wilson, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The PHAR-IN (“Competences for industrial pharmacy practice in biotechnology”) looked at whether there is a difference in how industrial employees and academics rank competences for practice in the biotechnological industry. A small expert panel consisting of the authors of this paper produced a biotechnology competence framework by drawing up an initial list of competences then ranking them in importance using a three-stage Delphi process. The framework was next evaluated and validated by a large expert panel of academics (n = 37) and industrial employees (n = 154). Results show that priorities for industrial employees and academics were similar. The competences for biotechnology practice that received the highest scores were mainly in: “Research and Development”,‘“Upstream” and “Downstream” Processing’, “Product development and formulation”,“Aseptic processing”, “Analytical methodology”, “Product stability”, and “Regulation”. The main area of disagreement was in the category “Ethics and drug safety” where academics ranked competences higher than did industrial employees.

  8. A European Competence Framework for Industrial Pharmacy Practice in Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The PHAR-IN (“Competences for industrial pharmacy practice in biotechnology” looked at whether there is a difference in how industrial employees and academics rank competences for practice in the biotechnological industry. A small expert panel consisting of the authors of this paper produced a biotechnology competence framework by drawing up an initial list of competences then ranking them in importance using a three-stage Delphi process. The framework was next evaluated and validated by a large expert panel of academics (n = 37 and industrial employees (n = 154. Results show that priorities for industrial employees and academics were similar. The competences for biotechnology practice that received the highest scores were mainly in: “Research and Development”, ‘“Upstream” and “Downstream” Processing’, “Product development and formulation”, “Aseptic processing”, “Analytical methodology”, “Product stability”, and “Regulation”. The main area of disagreement was in the category “Ethics and drug safety” where academics ranked competences higher than did industrial employees.

  9. PLM-COMPETENCE FORMATION USING COMPUTATIONAL-GRAPHICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Zelentsov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The description of a new kind of learning activity “Computational - graphical practice” is presented. This practice aimed at consolidating the knowledge and skills acquired by students in the study of the basic engineering disciplines and bridge the gap in the training of students in the field of PLM-technology. The goals, objectives, program practices and competencies, which should have a student after passing the training practice, are listed 

  10. Information management competencies for practicing nurses and new graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Saratan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nursing informatics skills are required at all levels of nursing practice. Of those basic skills, management of information through the electronic health record (EHR is paramount. Previous research has explored computer literacy of nurses but has not investigated the competencies that relate specifically to information management. The purpose of this research study was to gather practicing nurses’ views of current information management competencies published by the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER initiative, as they pertain to new graduates. A convenience sample of members from the InspireNet online user group was surveyed. The results suggest that overall, nurses tend to agree with the information management competencies; however, informatics education is most needed for those who have been practicing nursing for longer, rather than for novice nurses.

  11. Participation in sports practice and motor competence in preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel da Rocha Queiroz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical model suggests that motor competence during early childhood is related to one's current and future health status and that practicing sports seems to be playing a special role in creating such competence. This study aimed to compare performance in gross motor skills among preschoolers participating in regular sports practice (SP and those not participating (NSP, including comparisons by gender. The study uses secondary data from a population-based study of performance regarding the locomotor and object control skills of preschoolers (3 to 5 years old. Preschoolers were assigned to groups SP or NSP, paired by age and sex according to skills: locomotor (n = 54; 30 boys or object control (n = 37; 17 boys. Analysis of variance showed that the SP group outperformed the NSP one, and there were gender differences only within SP group. Starting to practice sports during early childhood helps to build motor competence and benefits both genders.

  12. Moving toward cultural competency: DREAMWork online summer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Martina S; Purnell, Kathy; Fletcher, Audwin; Lindgren, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the origination and implementation of an online, interactive summer component of the Diversity Recruitment and Education to Advance Minorities in the Nursing Workforce Program (DREAMWork) at University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC). The summer course was designed as a strategy to help prepare baccalaureate nursing students to provide both culturally sensitive and competent care through online learning. Sixteen baccalaureate nursing students participated in the four week online summer program. Course objectives were framed using Campinha-Bacote's (2002) model of cultural competence (Figure 1). Analysis revealed at the end of the four week summer program, students were more comfortable discussing their own prejudices and biases and were left with a deeper appreciation of what it meant to provide culturally sensitive care. The results of this summer program suggest the need to expand the online course to allow DREAMWork pre-nursing students to address the issue of becoming culturally competent prior to admission into upper division nursing clinical courses. This project was supported by funds from the Division of Nursing (DN), Bureau of Health Professions (BHPr), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) under grant # D19HP08214.

  13. Analysis of Gender Equality Competence Present in Cultural Positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Mimbrero Mallado

    Full Text Available Abstract: Articulating the gender dimension in organizations is not easy because their members have to be trained to adopt positions that facilitate the implementation of solutions that help to combat inequalities. The aim of this article was to identify the gender equality competence present in the three types of cultural positions Castells proposed in members of a City CouncilinSevilla-Spain, who wanted to implement gender mainstreaming. The participants were 27 people (16 women and 11 men. The methodused was discourse analysis. The obtained results show that, while all competences were present in the projectposition,in the resistance position, there was none. In the legitimizers, we observed inconsistency in the discourse presented. This arouses considerations on the importance of knowing the gender equality competences in order to implement gender mainstreaming in organizations.

  14. Beyond competencies: using a capability framework in developing practice standards for advanced practice nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Jane; Gardner, Glenn; Coyer, Fiona

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the application of a capability framework for advanced practice nursing standards/competencies. There is acceptance that competencies are useful and necessary for definition and education of practice-based professions. Competencies have been described as appropriate for practice in stable environments with familiar problems. Increasingly competencies are being designed for use in the health sector for advanced practice such as the nurse practitioner role. Nurse practitioners work in environments and roles that are dynamic and unpredictable necessitating attributes and skills to practice at advanced and extended levels in both familiar and unfamiliar clinical situations. Capability has been described as the combination of skills, knowledge, values and self-esteem which enables individuals to manage change, be flexible and move beyond competency. A discussion paper exploring 'capability' as a framework for advanced nursing practice standards. Data were sourced from electronic databases as described in the background section. As advanced practice nursing becomes more established and formalized, novel ways of teaching and assessing the practice of experienced clinicians beyond competency are imperative for the changing context of health services. Leading researchers into capability in health care state that traditional education and training in health disciplines concentrates mainly on developing competence. To ensure that healthcare delivery keeps pace with increasing demand and a continuously changing context there is a need to embrace capability as a framework for advanced practice and education. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Culture, Diversity, and Language: What Is Culturally Competent Translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Antonio P.

    2009-01-01

    As the cultural and ethnic diversity of the student population rises within school districts across the nation, the matter of translating materials in a language that is understandable and meaningful to the target population becomes more pressing. There are multitude of problems inherent in translation of materials from one language to another. To…

  16. From Paternalistic to Patronizing: How Cultural Competence Can Be Ethically Problematic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muaygil, Ruaim A

    2017-08-28

    Cultural competence literature and training aim to equip healthcare workers to better understand patients of different cultures and value systems, in an effort to ensure effective and equitable healthcare services for diverse patient populations. However, without nuanced awareness and contextual knowledge, the values embedded within cultural competence practice may cripple rather than empower the very people they mean to respect. A narrow cultural view can lessen cultural understanding rather than grow it. In its first part, this paper argues that a hasty, unrestrained, and uneducated willingness to accept something as a cultural good, despite being well intentioned, can still cause significant harms-particularly when based on false, misinformed, and stereotypical conceptions-including the minimization of issues, the reinforcement of stereotypes, and the impediment of cultural change. The second part of this paper examines medical autonomy within the context of Saudi Arabian women. It pushes back on the common perception that Saudi women, by virtue of culture and religion, view dependency on and deference to male relatives as a cultural good. Through a historical examination and a presentation of the current women's movement in Saudi Arabia, it is argued that the continued assumption that personal agency is a value external to Saudi women is false, misguided, and ethically problematic. Lastly, this paper considers some approaches to help providers navigate the narrow grounds between paternalism and patronization when caring for patients.

  17. Reflexive photography: an alternative method for documenting the learning process of cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerson, Roxanne; Livingston, Wade G

    2014-04-01

    This qualitative descriptive study used reflexive photography to evaluate the learning process of cultural competence during an international service-learning project in Guatemala. Reflexive photography is an innovative qualitative research technique that examines participants' interactions with their environment through their personal reflections on images that they captured during their experience. A purposive sample of 10 baccalaureate nursing students traveled to Guatemala, where they conducted family and community assessments, engaged in home visits, and provided health education. Data collection involved over 100 photographs and a personal interview with each student. The themes developed from the photographs and interviews provided insight into the activities of an international experience that influence the cognitive, practical, and affective learning of cultural competence. Making home visits and teaching others from a different culture increased students' transcultural self-efficacy. Reflexive photography is a more robust method of self-reflection, especially for visual learners.

  18. Analysis of Gender Equality Competence Present in Cultural Positions

    OpenAIRE

    Concepción Mimbrero Mallado; Joilson Pereira da Silva; Leonor María Cantera Espinosa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Articulating the gender dimension in organizations is not easy because their members have to be trained to adopt positions that facilitate the implementation of solutions that help to combat inequalities. The aim of this article was to identify the gender equality competence present in the three types of cultural positions Castells proposed in members of a City CouncilinSevilla-Spain, who wanted to implement gender mainstreaming. The participants were 27 people (16 women and 11 men)...

  19. Adult third culture kids and their intercultural learning and competence

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Due to globalization, there are more and more families are bringing their children abroad due to different reasons (Cockburn 2002, 475-476). Third culture kids (TCKs) have gradually become well known to people and the society. The aim of this research is to discuss TCKs’ intercultural learning and competence during their significant years of development and what this experience means to them in terms of their educational and career choices. This is a qualitative research based on semi-st...

  20. Talking Culture: Intercultural Competence in a Corporate Context

    OpenAIRE

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    2010-01-01

    Taking its starting point in two, currently predominant views on intercultural business communication and intercultural competence (e.g. Askehave & Norlyk 2006; Blasco 2004; Franklin 2007; Gudykunst & Kim 2002; Hofstede 2001; Holiday et al. 2004; Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner 1997), this paper provides insight into the way practitioners in an international software company construct their experiences with culture and intercultural encounters in the workplace. On the basis of the di...

  1. Development and Validation of the Cultural Competence of Program Evaluators (CCPE) Self-Report Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, Krystall E.; Morrow, Jennifer A.; Porter, Bryan E.

    2012-01-01

    No self-report measure of cultural competence currently exists in program evaluation. Adapting items from cultural competence measures in fields such as counseling and nursing, the researchers developed the Cultural Competence of Program Evaluators (CCPE) self-report scale. The goals of this study were to validate the CCPE and to assess…

  2. How Do European Pharmacy Students Rank Competences for Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available European students (n = 370, academics (n = 241 and community pharmacists (n = 258 ranked 13 clusters of 68 personal and patient care competences for pharmacy practice. The results show that ranking profiles for all three groups as a rule were similar. This was especially true of the comparison between students and community pharmacists concerning patient care competences suggesting that students have a good idea of their future profession. A comparison of first and fifth (final year students shows more awareness of patient care competences in the final year students. Differences do exist, however, between students and community pharmacists. Students—like academics—ranked competences concerned with industrial pharmacy and the quality aspects of preparing drugs, as well as scientific fundamentals of pharmacy practice, well above the rankings of community pharmacists. There were no substantial differences amongst rankings of students from different countries although some countries have more “medicinal” courses than others. This is to our knowledge the first paper to look at how, within a healthcare sectoral profession such as pharmacy, the views on the relative importance of different competences for practice of those educating the future professionals and their students, are compared to the views of working professionals.

  3. Education Abroad and Domestic Cultural Immersion: A Comparative Study of Cultural Competence among Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare Landa, Melissa; Odòna-Holm, Jocelyn; Shi, Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    As the demographics of the United States continue to shift, American classrooms reflect the richness of cultural diversity and the vibrancy of immigrant populations. Education abroad programs provide opportunities for preservice teachers to develop their cultural competence, required for effectively teaching children from a range of cultural…

  4. The practices of competing discourses revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    will discuss also 2) the methodological implications which arise when turning the spotlight to analytical term ”accomplishment” (Goodwin, 2003). The data corpus includes video observations, interviews, an on-site conference and field notes as the main research documents. I shall discuss how a new analytical...... as practiced by the participants from the analysts interpretations? (Fleming, 1995) Goodwin, C. (2003). Conversational frameworks for the accomplishment of meaning in Aphasia. In: Goodwin, C. Conversation and brain damage. Oxford. Oxford University Press. 90-116. Fleming, D. (1995). The search...

  5. Developing Culture-Adaptive Competency Through Experiences with Expressive Avatars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverglate, Daniel S.; Sims, Edward M.; Glover, Gerald; Friedman, Harris

    2012-01-01

    Modern Warfighters often find themselves in a variety of non-combat roles such as negotiator, peacekeeper, reconstruction, and disaster relief. They are expected to perform these roles within a culture alien to their own. Each individual they encounter brings their own set of values to the interaction that must be understood and reconciled. To navigate the human terrain of these complex interactions, the Warfighter must not only consider the specifics of the target culture, but also identify the stakeholders, recognize the influencing cultural dimensions, and adapt to the situation to achieve the best possible outcome. Vcom3D is using game-based scenarios to develop culturally adaptive competency. The avatars that represent the stakeholders must be able to portray culturally accurate behavior, display complex emotion, and communicate through verbal and non-verbal cues. This paper will discuss the use of emerging game technologies to better simulate human behavior in cross-cultural dilemmas. Nomenclature: culture, adaptive, values, cultural values dimensions, dilemmas, virtual humans, non-verbal communications

  6. How Do European Pharmacy Students Rank Competences for Practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; De Paepe, Kristien; Sánchez Pozo, Antonio; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Volmer, Daisy; Hirvonen, Jouni; Bozic, Borut; Skowron, Agnieska; Mircioiu, Constantin; Marcincal, Annie; Koster, Andries; Wilson, Keith; van Schravendijk, Chris; Hočevar, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    European students (n = 370), academics (n = 241) and community pharmacists (n = 258) ranked 13 clusters of 68 personal and patient care competences for pharmacy practice. The results show that ranking profiles for all three groups as a rule were similar. This was especially true of the comparison

  7. Intercultural Communicative Competence: Exploring English Language Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tony Johnstone; Sachdev, Itesh

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the beliefs and practices of experienced teachers in the USA, UK and France relating to the application of a model of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) to English language programmes. Broadly, "intercultural" approaches to language learning and teaching are strongly advocated in both the…

  8. Best Practices for Competency Development and Assessment in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo Duarte, Sara; Learreta Ramos, Begoña; Ruiz Rosillo, María Auxiliadora; Alperstedt, Cristiane; Hazé, Emmanuël

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to present the results of a study aimed at determining, classifying and evaluating practices of interest for general competency development and assessment in undergraduate programmes. The study encompassed the following phases: (1) focus group in order to establish a starting point regarding competency…

  9. Competency-Based Blended Learning: Flipping Professional Practice Classes to Enhance Competence Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ragg

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, health and human service educational programs have transitioned to competence-based outcomes to enhance the quality of graduating professionals. While such outcomes are a critical step in ensuring professional quality, they require curricular and pedagogical adjustments that do not fit easily within university environments. Technology has eased many problems of fit through the development of hybrid and flipped courses that allow on-campus time to be better focused on developing professional skills. This study explored the question: Can flipped delivery improve competence-based outcomes in social work practice classes? The study assessed pedagogical adjustments that integrated competence-based learning principles with flipped classroom delivery. Principles of organizing the class to maximize competence development are explored and illustrated. Improved competence development and student satisfaction were demonstrated in three flipped practice courses with a combined sample size of 269 Bachelor of Social Work (BSW and Masters of Social Work (MSW students. Researchers concluded that using flipped-classroom methods enhanced the students’ capacity to apply concepts and develop skills. In particular, the ability to receive and process feedback on applied skills was improved.

  10. Challenges in providing culturally-competent care to patients with metastatic brain tumours and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Lianne; Slater, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a metastatic brain tumour can be devastating as it is characterized by very low cure rates, as well as significant morbidity and mortality. Given the poor life expectancy and progressive disability that ensues, patients and family members experience much turmoil, which includes losses that bring about changes to family roles, routines and relationships. Crisis and conflict are common during such major disruptions to a family system, as individual members attempt to make sense of the illness experience based on cultural and spiritual beliefs, past experiences and personal philosophies. It is imperative health care providers strive towards increased awareness and knowledge of how culture affects the overall experience of illness and death in order to help create a mutually satisfactory care plan. Providing culturally-competent care entails the use of proper communication skills to facilitate the exploration of patient and family perspectives and allows for mutual decision making. A case study will illustrate the challenges encountered in providing culturally-competent care to a woman with brain cancer and her family. As the patient's health declined, the family entered into a state of crisis where communication between family members and health care professionals was strained; leading to conflict and sub-optimal outcomes. This paper will address the ethical dilemma of providing culturally-competent care when a patient's safety is at risk, and the nursing implications of upholding best practices in the context of differing beliefs and priorities.

  11. Developing research competence to support evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lora E; Schlenk, Elizabeth A; Sereika, Susan M; Cohen, Susan M; Happ, Mary Beth; Dorman, Janice S

    2005-01-01

    This article describes one step in the process that was undertaken to prepare for the introduction of evidence-based practice (EBP) into the curriculum across the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing, and Doctor of Philosophy programs, as well as the programs that were under development, Clinical Nurse Leader and Doctor of Nursing Practice, at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. Expected research competencies were identified for each level or academic year within each program. Based on these competencies, recommendations on how to modify the curriculum into one that would support students' acquisition and development of the skills necessary to be successful in matriculating through an EBP curriculum were developed. Evaluation mechanisms for the achievement of these competencies vary across the academic programs and will include performance on capstone projects, comprehensive examinations, and program milestones for doctoral students. The establishment of evidence-based competencies provided a foundation for the development of new teaching approaches and the curricular revisions across the three academic programs. Thus, the University of Pittsburgh model of educating for EBP is based on a sequential layering of research competencies throughout the curriculum.

  12. COMPETENCIA CULTURAL E INTELIGENCIA CULTURAL. APORTES A LA MEDIACIÓN CULTURAL DOCENTE CULTURAL (COMPETENCE AND CULTURAL INTELLIGENCE. CONTRIBUTIONS TO CULTURAL MEDIATION FOR TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Antoni Maurizia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:El ensayo nace como parte de una investigación mayor que se publicará sobre la inserción profesional docente en la Universidad de Costa Rica. Su finalidad en la investigación en curso es la de explorar los aportes de los estudios sobre competencia cultural e inteligencia cultural, para identificar planteamientos teóricos que fortalezcan nuevos espacios para la mediación cultural docente en la Universidad. Se concluye que el concepto de competencia cultural representa un aporte importante, si se revisa la idea de cultura que subyace y se le transforma en “competencia intercultural”. Luego, se define mediación cultural, evidenciándose la importancia de la nueva figura profesional en el contexto actual, los ámbitos de acción donde se ha empleado y se manifiesta la necesidad de promover mediadores y mediadoras culturales en Costa Rica también.Abstract: The essay comes as part of a larger investigation to be published about teachers’ professional integration at the University of Costa Rica. His purpose in the ongoing investigation is to explore the contributions of studies on cultural competency and cultural understanding, to identify new theoretical approaches and strengthen new cultural spaces for teaching mediation at the University. We conclude that the concept of cultural competence represents an important contribution, if we review the underlying idea of culture and it is transformed into "intercultural competence". The definition of cultural mediation points to the importance of the new professional figure in the current context, evidencing the areas of action where it has been used and showing the need to promote cultural mediators in Costa Rica as well.

  13. The relationship between cultural competence and ethnocentrism of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capell, Jen; Dean, Elizabeth; Veenstra, Gerry

    2008-04-01

    The study examined the relationship between cultural competence and ethnocentrism among health care professionals. Physical therapists, occupational therapists, and nurses ( N = 71) from three hospitals in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, participated in the survey research project. The survey questionnaire incorporated the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professionals-Revised and the Generalized Ethnocentrism Scale. Cultural competence scores and ethnocentrism scores were inversely related (r = -.28, p = .017). Results suggest that cultural competence may not be entirely distinct from ethnocentrism. The construct of cultural competence warrants further study vis-à-vis its correlates and its impact on clinical outcomes.

  14. Miscommunication and Discourse Practices in Occupational Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlyk, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the contrasting discourse practices and occupational cultures of engineers and marketing representatives. The article argues that strong occupational cultures have different value systems and discourse practices. The article stresses the need for an interdisciplinary approach combining linguistic and cultural analyses to reduce…

  15. Development of an Evaluation Method for Team Safety Culture Competencies using Social Network Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Min; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, team safety culture competency of a team was estimated through SNA, as a team safety culture index. To overcome the limit of existing safety culture evaluation methods, the concept of competency and SNA were adopted. To estimate team safety culture competency, we defined the definition, range and goal of team safety culture competencies. Derivation of core team safety culture competencies is performed and its behavioral characteristics were derived for each safety culture competency, from the procedures used in NPPs and existing criteria to assess safety culture. Then observation was chosen as a method to provide the input data for the SNA matrix of team members versus insufficient team safety culture competencies. Then through matrix operation, the matrix was converted into the two meaningful values, which are density of team members and degree centralities of each team safety culture competency. Density of tem members and degree centrality of each team safety culture competency represent the team safety culture index and the priority of team safety culture competency to be improved.

  16. Beyond cultural competence: critical consciousness, social justice, and multicultural education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K; Lypson, Monica L

    2009-06-01

    In response to the Liaison Committee on Medical Education mandate that medical education must address both the needs of an increasingly diverse society and disparities in health care, medical schools have implemented a wide variety of programs in cultural competency. The authors critically analyze the concept of cultural competency and propose that multicultural education must go beyond the traditional notions of "competency" (i.e., knowledge, skills, and attitudes). It must involve the fostering of a critical awareness--a critical consciousness--of the self, others, and the world and a commitment to addressing issues of societal relevance in health care. They describe critical consciousness and posit that it is different from, albeit complementary to, critical thinking, and suggest that both are essential in the training of physicians. The authors also propose that the object of knowledge involved in critical consciousness and in learning about areas of medicine with social relevance--multicultural education, professionalism, medical ethics, etc.--is fundamentally different from that acquired in the biomedical sciences. They discuss how aspects of multicultural education are addressed at the University of Michigan Medical School. Central to the fostering of critical consciousness are engaging dialogue in a safe environment, a change in the traditional relationship between teachers and students, faculty development, and critical assessment of individual development and programmatic goals. Such an orientation will lead to the training of physicians equally skilled in the biomedical aspects of medicine and in the role medicine plays in ensuring social justice and meeting human needs.

  17. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  18. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  19. Cultural Competence: The Impact of Training on Rural Child Welfare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Tamikia S.

    2012-01-01

    Cultural competence among child welfare professionals is imperative given the rapidly changing American demographics. Current inadequacy in the delivery of culturally responsive social services is due to inadequate cultural competence training for child welfare professionals. This research study investigated the extent to which cultural competence…

  20. "WHERE SOULS ARE FORGOTTEN" : Cultural Competencies, Forensic Evaluations, and International Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perlin, Michael L.; McClain, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    Cultural competency is critical in criminal forensic evaluations. Cultural competency eschews reliance on stereotypes, precluding the mistake of assuming that cultural dictates apply with equal force to all who share a cultural background, thus allowing the forensic examiner to provide a comprehensi

  1. Interdisciplinary: Cultural competency and culturally congruent education for millennials in health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawala-Druy, Souzan; Hill, Mary H

    2012-10-01

    The increasingly diverse multicultural and multigenerational student population in the United States requires that educators at all levels develop cultural knowledge, awareness, and sensitivity to help diverse learners fulfill their potential and to avoid cultural misunderstandings that can become obstacles or barriers to learning. The purpose of this study was to design and implement eclectic, creative, evidence-based interdisciplinary educational activities, along with culturally congruent teaching strategies, within a semester-long university course that promoted positive and culturally competent learning outcomes for culturally diverse, largely millennial students. The interdisciplinary course would prepare health professional students with the requisite knowledge and skills, through transformative learning that produces change agents, to provide culturally congruent and quality team-based care to diverse populations. This was a qualitative and quantitative study, which measured students' level of cultural awareness, competence, and proficiency pre and post the educational intervention. Instruments used for data collection included the Inventory for Assessing The Process of Cultural Competence-Student Version (IAPCC-SV) by Campinha-Bacote, course evaluations, students' feedback, and portfolio reflections. The study was conducted at a private academic institution located in the Mid-Atlantic region and the sample population included inter-professional students (N=106) from various health professions including nursing, pharmacy, and allied health sciences. Results from the pre- and post-test IAPCC-SV survey revealed that mean scores increased significantly from pre-test (60.8) to post-test (70.6). Thus, students' levels of cultural competency (awareness, knowledge, skills, desire, encounter) improved post-educational intervention, indicating that the teaching methods used in the course might be applied on a larger scale across the university system to cater to the

  2. Leadership and cultural competence of healthcare professionals: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvrin, Marie; Lorant, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    International migration is a global phenomenon challenging healthcare professionals to provide culturally competent care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of leaders on the cultural competence of healthcare professionals. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to obtain data for a social network analysis in 19 inpatient services and five primary care services in Belgium. The Competences in Ethnicity and Health questionnaire was used. A total of 507 healthcare professionals, including 302 nurses, identified their social relationships with other healthcare professionals working in their service. Highest in-degree centrality was used to identify the leaders within each health service. Multiple regressions with the Huber sandwich estimator were used to link cultural competence of leaders with the cultural competence of the rest of the healthcare staff. Cultural competence of the healthcare staff was associated with the cultural competence of the leaders. This association remained significant for two specific domains of cultural competence-mediation and paradigm-after controlling for contextual and sociodemographic variables. Interaction analysis suggested that the leadership effect varied with the degree of cultural competence of the leaders. Cultural competence among healthcare professionals is acquired partly through leadership. Social relationships and leadership effects within health services should be considered when developing and implementing culturally competent strategies. This requires a cautious approach as the most central individuals are not always the same persons as the formal leaders.

  3. The Influence of Cultural Competence on the Interpretations of Territorial Identities in European Capitals of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lähdesmäki Tuuli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The EU’s cultural initiative ‘the European Capital of Culture’ (ECOC includes high identity political aims. It requires the designated cities to introduce and foster local, regional, and European cultural identities. In addition, the cities have used the designation as an opportunity to promote national cultural identity. Audiences of the ECOC events recognize and interpret different kinds of representations of territorial cultural identities from what the cities have to offer in culture. However, the contents of these interpretations vary drastically in the ECOCs. The article discusses whether the competence of interpreting the representations of territorial cultural identities is related to some social determinants of the audiences. Based on a questionnaire study conducted in recent ECOCs-Pécs (Hungary, Tallinn (Estonia, and Turku (Finland-the study indicates that, for example, education, source of livelihood, and active cultural participation impact the interpretations of the representations of territorial cultural identities.

  4. Advanced Practice Nursing Competency Assessment Instrument (APNCAI): clinimetric validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Fullana, Pedro; Morales-Asencio, Jose Miguel; Sesé-Abad, Albert; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan Carlos; De Pedro-Gómez, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and clinimetric validation of the Advanced Practice Nursing Competency Assessment Instrument (APNCAI) through several evidence sources about reliability and validity in the Spanish context. Design and setting APNCAI development was based on a multisequential and systematic process: literature review, instrument content consensus through qualitative Delphi method approach (a panel of 51 Advanced Practice in Nursing –APN– experts was selected) and the clinimetric validation process based on a sample of 600 nurses from the Balearic Islands public healthcare setting. Methods An initial step for tool's content development process based on Delphi method approach of expert consensus was implemented. A subsequent phase of tool validation started from the analysis of APN core competencies latent measurement model, including exploratory and confirmatory techniques. Reliability evidence for each latent factor was also obtained. Items' scores were submitted to descriptive analysis, plus univariate and multivariate normality tests. Results An eight-factor competency assessment latent model obtained adequate fit, and it was composed by ‘Research and Evidence-Based Practice’, ‘Clinical and Professional Leadership’, ‘Interprofessional Relationship and Mentoring’, ‘Professional Autonomy’, ‘Quality Management’, ‘Care Management’, ‘Professional Teaching and Education’ and ‘Health Promotion’. Conclusions Adequate empirical evidence of reliability and validity for APNCAI makes it useful for application in healthcare policy programmes for APN competency assessment in Spain. PMID:28235968

  5. From Cultural Knowledge to Intercultural Communicative Competence: Changing Perspectives on the Role of Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to the concept of culture and teaching cultural competence in a foreign language classroom have been changing over the last decades. The paper summarises, compares, contrasts and evaluates four major approaches to teaching cultural competence in foreign language teaching, that is, knowledge-based approach, contrastive approach,…

  6. From Cultural Knowledge to Intercultural Communicative Competence: Changing Perspectives on the Role of Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to the concept of culture and teaching cultural competence in a foreign language classroom have been changing over the last decades. The paper summarises, compares, contrasts and evaluates four major approaches to teaching cultural competence in foreign language teaching, that is, knowledge-based approach, contrastive approach,…

  7. Cultural self-awareness as a crucial component of military cross-cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappamihiel, Constantine J; Pappamihiel, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    The military forces in the United States represent a unique culture that includes many subcultures within their own military society. Acculturation into the military often deemphasizes the influence of personal narrative and thereby establishes the primacy of military culture over personal cultural influences. The authors make the argument that military personnel need to further develop an understanding and appreciation of personal cultural narrative as well as organizational culture. The increased integration of military personnel with interagency partners, along with cooperative efforts between relief organizations, and nongovernmental organizations in politically/economically unstable areas around the globe serves to make cross-cultural interaction unavoidable in the future. Military medical personnel are especially likely to interact with others who have culturally different values. These interactions can occur between organizations as easily as they can during patient care. They must be able to step outside of their military culture and develop cross-cultural competence that is grounded in cultural self-awareness. Without an appropriate level of cultural self-awareness, military and medical personnel run the risk of being unable to communicate across dissimilar cultures or worse, alienating key stakeholders in collaborative operations between military services, coalition partners, and nonmilitary organizations. It is the authors? contention that unless military personnel, especially those in the medical arena, are able to appropriately self-assess situations that are impacted by culture, both their own and the other personnel involved, the resulting cultural dissonance is more likely to derail any significant positive effect of such collaborations.

  8. Professional communication competences of nurses -- a review of current practice and educational problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włoszczak-Szubzda, Anna; Jarosz, Mirosław J

    2013-01-01

    A dissonance between high 'technical' professionalism of nurses and a relatively low level of patient satisfaction with received care is a phenomenon observed in many countries. Theoretical concept and review of current published studies. Most reviewed studies show that a low level of patient satisfaction occurs in the case of an inadequate interpersonal communication between nurses and patients. Most studies indicate poor effectiveness of shaping communication competences of nurses based on standard education in the area of general psychology and communication knowledge, because this knowledge does not convert itself 'spontaneously' into communication competences during occupational activity. It is necessary to supplement educational programmes for nurses with practical courses in professional interpersonal communication. International experience exchange concerning the shaping of nurses' communication competences may be limited due to cultural, organizational and systems factors.

  9. An anthropological approach to teaching health sciences students cultural competency in a field school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Frank T; Brown, Lori DiPrete; Poulsen, Keith P

    2014-02-01

    International immersion experiences do not, in themselves, provide students with the opportunity to develop cultural competence. However, using an anthropological lens to educate students allows them to learn how to negotiate cultural differences by removing their own cultural filters and seeing events through the eyes of those who are culturally different. Faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Global Health Institute believed that an embedded experience, in which students engaged with local communities, would encourage them to adopt this Cultural Competency 2.0 position. With this goal in mind, they started the Field School for the Study of Language, Culture, and Community Health in Ecuador in 2003 to teach cultural competency to medical, veterinary, pharmacy, and nursing students. The program was rooted in medical anthropology and embraced the One Health initiative, which is a collaborative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to obtain optimal health for people, animals, and the environment. In this article, the authors identify effective practices and challenges for using a biocultural approach to educating students. In a semester-long preparatory class, students study the Spanish language, region-specific topics, and community engagement principles. While in Ecuador for five weeks, students apply their knowledge during community visits that involve homestays and service learning projects, for which they partner with local communities to meet their health needs. This combination of language and anthropological course work and community-based service learning has led to positive outcomes for the local communities as well as professional development for students and faculty.

  10. Addressing Mental Health Disparities through Clinical Competence Not Just Cultural Competence: The Need for Assessment of Sociocultural Issues in the Delivery of Evidence-Based Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ann-Marie; Brekke, John S

    2008-01-01

    Recognition of ethnic/racial disparities in mental health services has not directly resulted in the development of culturally responsive psychosocial interventions. There remains a fundamental need for assessment of sociocultural issues that have been linked with the expectations, needs, and goals of culturally diverse consumers with severe and persistent mental illness. The authors posit that embedding the assessment of sociocultural issues into psychosocial rehabilitation practice is one step in designing culturally relevant empirically supported practices. It becomes a foundation on which practitioners can examine the relevance of their interventions to the diversity encountered in everyday practice. This paper provides an overview of the need for culturally and clinically relevant assessment practices and asserts that by improving the assessment of sociocultural issues the clinical competence of service providers is enhanced. The authors offer a conceptual framework for linking clinical assessment of sociocultural issues to consumer outcomes and introduce an assessment tool adapted to facilitate the process in psychosocial rehabilitation settings. Emphasizing competent clinical assessment skills will ultimately offer a strategy to address disparities in treatment outcomes for understudied populations of culturally diverse consumers with severe and persistent mental illness. PMID:18778881

  11. Cultural competence in end-of-life care: terms, definitions, and conceptual models from the British literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, N.; Meñaca, A.; Koffman, J.; Harding, R.; Higginson, I.J.; Pool, R.; Gysels, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cultural competency is increasingly recommended in policy and practice to improve end-of-life (EoL) care for minority ethnic groups in multicultural societies. It is imperative to critically analyze this approach to understand its underlying concepts. Aim: Our aim was to appraise cultura

  12. Physical culture as a phenomenon of the development of socio-cultural competence of future teachers of physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanii I.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to substantiate the phenomenon of formation of physical culture of the individual in terms of theoretical and methodological approaches to the development of socio-cultural competence of future teachers. Material : 22 literary sources analyzed on the issue of formation of physical culture of the individual. Used cultural studies, axiological and competence approach. Results : define the concept of socio-cultural competence of the teacher of physical education. Competence is considered as an integrative motivational tumor - activity sphere of the individual. It determines the focus of an expert on the formation of spiritual values and is the foundation for its further self-development. Disclosed structure sociocultural competence of the teacher in the unity components: cognitive, motivational-value, behavioral. For each component defined system of spiritual values. The system covers the socio- psychological, mental and cultural values of physical culture. Conclusions : the sociocultural competence of the teacher of physical education meaningful and functionally related to the values of the physical culture of the individual. Spiritual, value the personality of the teacher - is the foundation for all of the components of socio-cultural competence. This competence provides social and cultural development of the individual.

  13. Competency Revalidation Study of Specialty Practice in Sports Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill; Bartlett, Lynn; Woodall, William R.; Reinking, Mark F.; Wallmann, Harvey W.; Mulligan, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to revalidate the competencies that define the practice of sports physical therapy. Additionally, the study allowed for the comparison of responses of board certified specialists in sports physical therapy to respondents who were not specialists. Methods A survey instrument based the on American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties practice analysis template and The Guide to Physical Therapist Practice was developed by the Sports Specialty Council and a panel of subject matter experts in sports physical therapy. The instrument was sent to 630 physical therapists, 315 of whom were board certified specialists in sports physical therapy and 315 of whom were randomly selected members of the Sports Physical Therapy Section who were not board certified specialists in sports physical therapy. Two hundred and thirty seven subjects returned completed surveys for a 41% response rate. One hundred and fifty eight respondents were sports specialists Results The survey results were reviewed by the Sports Specialty Council and another panel of subject matter experts. Using a defined decision making process, the results were used to determine the competencies that define the specialty practice of sports physical therapy. Survey results were also used to develop the sports physical therapy specialty board examination blue print. A number of significant comparisons between the specialists and non-specialists were identified. Conclusion The competency revalidation process culminated in the publication of the Sports Physical Therapy Description of Specialty Practice. This document serves to guide the process related to the attainment and maintenance of the board certified clinical specialist in sports physical therapy. PMID:21509106

  14. The Impact of International Service-Learning on Nursing Students' Cultural Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlbry, Pamela Wolfe

    2016-05-01

    This article reports research findings on the effect of an international immersion service-learning project on the level and components of cultural competence of baccalaureate (BSN) nursing students. A triangulated methodology was used to determine changes in components and level of cultural competence pre- and postexperience. The theoretical model The Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services was used. It identifies five central constructs in the process of becoming culturally competent: cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural skill, cultural encounter, and cultural desire. The sample of 121 BSN nursing students was gathered from three southern California universities. Data were collected from 2009 to 2013. Using the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professionals-Student Version© and Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale, constructs of cultural competency were measured in pre- and posttest participants who participated in international service-learning immersion experiences. A demographic survey and open-ended qualitative questions were completed at the posttrip meeting. Mean, frequencies, and correlations with demographic data and survey data were calculated. Pre- and posttrip means were analyzed. Qualitative analysis from six open-ended questions completed at the posttest were coded and themes emerged. The research findings demonstrated the impact of the international service-learning project on building cultural competency in nursing students. Quantitative findings revealed statistically significant differences between pre- and posttest surveys for two of the five constructs of cultural competence. Qualitative analysis supported the quantitative findings in cultural competency constructs found in the model. The research findings support nursing education program use of international service-learning immersion experiences to foster cultural competence in nursing students. Findings from

  15. Attitudes of prejudice as a predictor of cultural competence among baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Pamela B; Kimble, Laura P; Gunby, Susan Sweat; Andrews, Margaret M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between attitudes of prejudice and cultural competence among nursing students. Using a mixed-methods design, a convenience sample of students (N = 129) currently enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program was recruited via Web networking. Data regarding attitudes of prejudice, cultural competence, prior cultural experience, and integration of cultural competence were obtained via a Web-based survey. Multiple linear regression was used to predict cultural knowledge, attitudes, and consciousness. Although all three regression models were statistically significant, the significant predictors varied within each model. Greater prejudice was a significant predictor of less culturally competent attitudes toward providing nursing care. Existing prejudice among nursing students needs to be addressed to help promote positive cultural attitudes and, ultimately, cultural competent nursing care.

  16. Critical Race Theory and the Cultural Competence Dilemma in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Laura S.; Moio, Jene A.

    2009-01-01

    Cultural competence is a fundamental tenet of social work education. Although cultural competence with diverse populations historically referred to individuals and groups from non-White racial origins, the term has evolved to encompass differences pertaining to sexuality, religion, ability, and others. Critics charge that the cultural competence…

  17. Normalizing the Fraughtness: How Emotion, Race, and School Context Complicate Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Jennifer; Ruggles Gere, Anne; Dallavis, Christian; Shaw Haviland, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Preservice teachers seeking to develop cultural competence can face a struggle fraught with multiple challenges, even when they are committed to culturally relevant pedagogy. This article closely analyzes one White beginning teacher's negotiations with cultural competence during a lesson in her student teaching semester, then traces how she made…

  18. Critical Race Theory and the Cultural Competence Dilemma in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Laura S.; Moio, Jene A.

    2009-01-01

    Cultural competence is a fundamental tenet of social work education. Although cultural competence with diverse populations historically referred to individuals and groups from non-White racial origins, the term has evolved to encompass differences pertaining to sexuality, religion, ability, and others. Critics charge that the cultural competence…

  19. Improving cultural competency among hospice and palliative care volunteers: recommendations for social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Maja

    2012-06-01

    This case study of 14 hospice and palliative care volunteers looked for recommendations and suggestions on how to increase cultural competency among hospice volunteers. In-depth interviews were conducted with a hospice in Toronto, Canada, and findings reveal that volunteers have very specific and diverse recommendations on how they prefer to be briefed and educated on cultural competency issues surrounding their patients. Findings also reveal hospice volunteers want more cultural competency training and acknowledge the importance of being culturally competent. This article concludes with a précis on recommendations for increasing cultural competency in hospice and palliative care for both volunteers and agencies and discusses the top 4 future trends in cultural competency for hospice care.

  20. Evaluation of the organizational cultural competence of a community health center: a multimethod approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherner, Rebecca; Olavarria, Marcela; Young, Marta; Aubry, Tim; Marchant, Christina

    2014-09-01

    Cultural competence is an important component of client-centered care in health promotion and community health services, especially considering the changing demographics of North America. Although a number of tools for evaluating cultural competence have been developed, few studies have reported on the results of organizational cultural competence evaluations in health care or social services settings. This article aims to fill this gap by providing a description of a cultural competence evaluation of a community health center serving a diverse population. Data collection included reviewing documents, and surveying staff, management, and the Board of Directors. The organization fully met 28 of 53 standards of cultural competence, partially met 21 standards, and did not meet 2 standards, and 2 standards could not be assessed due to missing information. The advantages and lessons learned from this organizational cultural competence evaluation are discussed. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  1. Refining the concept of cultural competence: building on decades of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackrah, Rosalie D; Thompson, Sandra C

    2013-07-08

    Cultural competence strategies aim to make health services more accessible for patients from diverse cultural backgrounds. Recently, such strategies have focused on specific groups, and particularly Indigenous Australians, where services have failed to address large disparities in health outcomes. Limitations of cultural competence largely fall into three categories: lack of clarity around how the concept of culture is used in medicine, inadequate recognition of the "culture of medicine" and the scarcity of outcomes-based research that provides evidence of efficacy of cultural competence strategies. Narrow concepts of culture often conflate culture with race and ethnicity, failing to capture diversity within groups and thus reducing the effectiveness of cultural competence strategies. This also hampers the search for evidence linking cultural competence to a reduction in health disparities. Attention to cultural complexity, structural determinants of inequality and power differentials within health care settings not only provide a more expansive notion of cultural competence and a nuanced understanding of the role of culture in the clinic, but may assist in determining the contribution that cultural competence strategies can make to a reduction in health disparities.

  2. [Evidence-based practice competence in undergraduate Nursing Degree students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Molina-Salas, Yolanda; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) learning has become a key issue for nurses. An EPB subject was included in the 4(th) year in the new syllabus of the Nursing Degree at University of Murcia (UM). To know the competence level in EBP of undergraduate nursing students at UM and compare the results between all four years. Observational descriptive study with a cross-sectional approach. undergraduate nursing students from all four years at Nursing Degree at the Faculty of Social and Healthcare Science at UM in the year 2013-14. EBP evaluation of competence of the nursing students consisted of attitude, skills and knowledge on EBP. A validated questionnaire, the EBP-COQ, was used. The scale range is 1 point «lowest level» to 5 points «higher level».The SPSS 21.0 program has been used to carry out descriptive and bivariate analyses. 144 students were included, 76.4% was female, and the median age was 23 years, 84.7% attended more than 75% class hours. The mean differences in the questionnaire between first and fourth years were 0.58 points in attitude, 0.60 in skills, 1.6 in knowledge and 0.83 in global competence in EBP. Significant differences in mean scores between the fourth and the remaining years in the global competence in EBP were observed, as well as in the three dimensions (p <0.05). The undergraduate-nursing students studied here have acquired an appropriate competence level in EBP, with a gradual increase by year. The biggest increase was in the fourth year students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards an Inclusive Pedagogical Culture: Experiences from University Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana María Fernández-Fernández

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with conceptual and methodological elements to develop the pedagogical inclusive competence of the professors of higher education in Ecuador. We analyze the current conceptions and the main drawbacks related to the inclusion process in the university environment nowadays. We support a theoretical procedural model, and from the practical standpoint, we implemented the methodological procedures structured in a map of processes to reach an inclusive formative process. The main results are given in the development of the pedagogical inclusive competence and the increase of the inclusion culture at the university, and revealed in the improvement of university curriculum from an inclusive approach, the betterment of the physical and technological infrastructure, the permanent upgrading of professors and putting into practice policies of affirmative action.

  4. The relationship between drivers and policy in the implementation of cultural competency training in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Nisha; Betancourt, Joseph R; Park, Elyse R; Sprague-Martinez, Linda

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, cultural competence has appeared on the agendas of the medical profession as well as other health care providers. Through semistructured interviews with staff at different types of health care institutions, we explored the motivation for and barriers against the implementation of cultural competence training. The findings show that while some progress has been made, there is still work to be done in making cultural competency an integral part of the organizational fabric of health care. National organizations need to consider their leadership role in helping health care organizations translate broad statements of cultural competence into meaningful action.

  5. Cultural Competency Education in Academic Dental Institutions in Australia and New Zealand: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Sheree L; Hayes, Melanie J; Taylor, Jane A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the status of cultural competency education in Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy programs. The study sought to explore the extent to which cultural competence is included in these programs' curricula, building on similar studies conducted in the United States and thus contributing to the international body of knowledge on this topic. A 12-item instrument was designed with questions in four areas (demographics, content of cultural competency education, organization of overall program curriculum, and educational methods used to teach cultural competence) and was sent to all Australian and New Zealand dental, dental hygiene, and oral health therapy educational programs. Of the total 24 programs, 15 responded for a response rate of 62.5%. The results showed that lectures were the most frequent teaching method used in cultural competency education; however, the variation in responses indicated inconsistencies across study participants, as discussions and self-directed learning also featured prominently in the responses. The majority of respondents reported that cultural competence was not taught as a specific course but rather integrated into their programs' existing curricula. The variations in methods may indicate the need for a standardized framework for cultural competency education in these countries. In addition, the notion of cultural competency education in academic dental institutions demands additional evaluation, and further research is required to develop a solid evidence base on which to develop cultural competency education, specifically regarding content, most effective pedagogies, and assessment of student preparedness.

  6. Cross-cultural Communicative Competence Training in Maritime Spoken English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鹿学军

    2010-01-01

    <正>As a means of communication,English has been internationalized.Communication in English always happens among the seafarers from different cultures.If crews couldn’t deal with the cultural differences well,successful communication and shipboard safety,which are just what STCW (Standards on Training,Certificate and Watch -keeping) calls upon,are difficult to be arrived at. Therefore cross -cultural communicative competence training,or how to teach maritime spoken English is the problem or the challenge that we,English teachers,are facing.To show how the teaching can be made more efficient and practical so as to narrow the gap between the training of the seaman in China and the requirements of STCW,through the teaching process,including the syllabus design and the materials selecting,we must consider the notion of language function as the key point.

  7. An interprofessional education Russian cultural competence course: Implementation and follow-up perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Health sciences educators are faced with creating meaningful, effective and satisfying experiences in interprofessional education (IPE) and cultural competence (CC) required of both students and professionals in practice. This study evaluated the experience and attitudes of the participants in a course combining IPE and CC. A novel, interprofessional course in the Russian language and culture was developed and delivered to a group of medical, nursing, and pharmacy students. One year after the completion of the course, an anonymous, online survey was sent to the participants. Attitudes, comfort, self-efficacy in working with other cultures/healthcare professionals, and comparison of the course to other IPE activities were assessed. The survey suggested that the course was a satisfying and effective combination of IPE and CC in a pre-professional health educational setting. Further work could be undertaken to evaluate the experiences of similar activities in the professional and continuing education arenas.

  8. Cultural competence dimensions and outcomes: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Somayeh; Chavan, Meena

    2016-11-01

    It has been widely suggested that cultural competence is an individual's core requirement for working effectively with culturally diverse people. However, there is no consensus regarding the definition or the components of this concept and there is a dearth of empirical proof indicating the benefits of cultural competence. Therefore, a systematic review was conducted to identify the most common cultural competence dimensions proposed in recent publications and to identify whether sufficient evidence exists regarding the efficacy of cultural competence in the healthcare context. A total of 1204 citations were identified through an electronic search of databases, of which 18 publications included cultural competence frameworks, and 13 studies contained empirical data on cultural competence outcomes. The overarching themes of the review were centred around the challenges faced by the healthcare sector in many countries due to growing cultural diversity, but lack of cultural competence, leading to predicaments that arise during intercultural interactions between patients and clinicians. This review will benefit researchers exploring cultural competence as one of the research variables impacting research outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Developing cultural competence through self-reflection in interprofessional education: Findings from an Australian university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Rebecca; Bidewell, John; Dune, Tinashe; Lessey, Nkosi

    2016-05-01

    Interprofessional education and cultural competence are both necessary for health professionals working in interprofessional teams serving diverse populations. Using a pre-post-survey case series design, this study evaluates a novel learning activity designed to encourage self-reflection and cultural competence in an Australian interprofessional education context. Undergraduate health professional students in a large subject viewed three 7-15 minute videos featuring interviews with persons of a minority cultural, linguistic, or sexual group who were living with a disability or managing a health condition. Immediately afterwards, students in interprofessional groups completed a structured activity designed to promote interprofessional and cultural reflection. A localised version of a validated scale measured cultural competence before and after the learning activity. Results suggest the value of video-based learning activities based on real-life examples for improving cultural competence. Despite initially rating themselves highly, 64% of students (n = 273) improved their overall cultural competence, though only by M = 0.13, SD = 0.08, of a 5-point rating-scale interval. A nuanced approach to interpreting results is warranted; even slight increases may indicate improved cultural competence. Suggestions for improving the effectiveness of video-based cultural competence learning activities, based on qualitative findings, are provided. Overall the findings attest to the merit of group discussion in cultural competence learning activities in interprofessional education settings. However, the inclusion of group discussions within such learning activities should hinge on group dynamics.

  10. Examining the Cultural Competence of Third- and Fourth-Year Nutrition Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Rebekah; Hekmat, Sharareh; Ahmadi, Latifeh

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary Canadian research assessing nutrition students' cultural competence and to identify areas for future education initiatives in dietetic education that could ultimately improve dietitians' cultural competence. A mixed-methods study was conducted using a 24-item questionnaire that was administered to students enrolled in third- and fourth-year undergraduate nutrition classes (n = 133). In total, 115 questionnaires were analyzed for quantitative data, and 109 were analyzed for qualitative data. The students scored an overall medium-high level of cultural competence. Out of the 5 areas examined (skills, attitudes, awareness, desires, knowledge), students' multicultural knowledge scores were the lowest. It was found that a lower number of barriers to learning about other cultures were significantly associated with a higher overall cultural competence score, and taking a course in cultural foods significantly increased the students' knowledge and overall cultural competence (P ≤ 0.05). The qualitative data found that students felt the cultural competence curriculum had gaps and identified several ideas for improvement. In conclusion, this research data provides novel insights into the cultural competence of Canadian dietetic students and additionally supports future research and curriculum development to enhance cultural competence.

  11. The Role of Cultural Competence in the Teaching of Hungarian as a Foreign Language and in Cultural Diplomacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Sólyom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, I aim to shed light on the importance of cultural competence from three perspectives. First, in my capacity as a sociolinguist, I will talk about how Hungarian culture is incorporated in the textbook "Colloquial Hungarian" (Rounds and Sólyom 2011, providing particular examples from various dialogues and cultural notes from the book. I believe that linguistic competence, communicative competence, and cultural competence are equally important parts of foreign language teaching and foreign language learning. Second, as a foreign language instructor at U.S. study abroad programs, I plan to discuss the importance of cultural norms of the speakers of the local language in the host country. Third, as a director of an American cultural and resource center in Budapest, I will talk about the importance of building bridges between two cultures, describing the goals and missions of the center as well as giving specific examples of the activities of the American Corner Budapest.

  12. Teacher Cultural Competency and Long-Term English Language Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jannis

    2015-01-01

    Students that have been designated English Language Learners for five or more years are Long-Term English Learners. The literature review addresses some typical characteristics and experiences of students that are Long- Term English Language Learners, and the need for culturally responsive practices to meet their needs. Teacher attitudes, perceptions about English Language Learners, positionality, and opportunities to learn are integrated into the review. The author discusses linguistic aware...

  13. Practical wisdom, understanding of coherence and competencies for everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Jette

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this article is the subject home economics education in the primary and lower secondary school in the 21st century. Practical wisdom, understanding of coherence and competencies for everyday life are suggested as aims of home economics education. It is argued that these elements should...... and experiencing the profession   [1] Bildung is the German word for education, but it is used as a pedagogical term in English literature as it has another and more specific meaning than the word education. The word in Danish is dannelse....

  14. INFLUENCE OF UNIVERSITY CORPORATE CULTURE ON «ADORNATION» OF GRADUATES’ COMPETENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Dremina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to identify the phenomenon and to describe the concept forming the competences of university graduates provided with signs of corporate identity.Methods. Methods of the system and comparative analysis, synthesis, generalisation, analogy are used in the presented paper.Results. The key role of corporate culture of high school in formation of actual competences providing future graduates success is proved on the basis of materials of the Russian and foreign researches. The social and pedagogical contradictions which are that the declared accounting of features of corporate culture in pedagogical process isn't provided with mechanisms of design of the competences provided with signs of corporate identity are revealed. Missions of modern leading high schools are analysed for the purpose of definition of these signs. The necessity of changing the model of corporate culture at the stage preceding the design of learning outcomes is justified.Scientific novelty. The concept of application of the model of HEI (Higher Education Institutions corporate culture as a key reference point for forming competences provided with signs of corporate identity is offered. The concept considers features of transition of the Russian HEI to work in conditions fulfilling requirements of the Bologna agreement. The concept is caused also by an indicator «Success of university graduates, achievements of HEI in the process of selection of elite at national and international levels» by criterion «brand» in the model of National Universities Ranking. The new concept «adornation» (derived from a verb “to adorn” in relation to process of forming the competences provided with signs of corporate identity is introduced. According to the offered concept, semantic filling of a mission and system of values allows adorning competences taking into account requirements of the social role of a graduate as a mission performer of HEI and helps the graduate

  15. Self-perceptions of cultural competence among dental students and recent graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Zed, Chris; Marino, Rodrigo

    2014-03-01

    This study assessed self-perceptions of cultural competence in dental students and recent graduates of the University of British Columbia. The sample consisted of 106 predoctoral students (response rate 98 percent) and thirty-three recent graduates (response rate 43 percent). The two cohorts completed similar questionnaires. Over 80 percent of responding predoctoral students reported encountering patients from culturally different groups, 50 percent of them admitted that their communication is not effective, two-thirds were not confident in caring for patients from diverse cultural groups, and over 60 percent perceived that sociocultural differences affect the provision of care. Some significant differences between the genders and study years were observed. Exploratory Factor Analyses validated multiple indicators in five domains: 1) encountering culturally diverse patients, 2) communication challenges in sociocultural situations, 3) cultural competence-related skills, 4) cultural competence related to diagnosis and patient treatment, and 5) training in cultural competence. Through qualitative assessments, important culturally relevant topics and interactive training methods preferred by students for developing cultural competence were identified. This study concluded that cultural competence was perceived as important by both dental students and recent graduates but also as partly deficient, particularly by predoctoral students. For teaching cultural competence, participants recommended various topics and interactive teaching modalities.

  16. Effects of a team-based assessment and intervention on patient safety culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, B; Müller, V; Rochon, J

    2014-01-01

    culture and decided on about 10 actions per practice to improve it. After 12 months, no significant differences were found between intervention and control groups in terms of error management (competing probability = 0.48, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.63, p = 0.823), 11 further patient safety culture indicators...

  17. Students’ Socio-cultural Competence Development, Using English and Russian Phraseological Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit I. Kopzhasarova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of socio-cultural competence development on the basis of using English and Russian phraseological units. The authors specify the essence of the socio-cultural competence, define socio-cultural component of foreign language teaching. The authors justify their viewpoint that phraseological units, being the most valuable source of cultural information, exposing background knowledge and culture specific vocabulary, are the effective means of socio-cultural competence development. The set of exercises on socio-cultural competence development on the material of English and Russian phraseological units, developed by authors, include language and speech tasks; tasks based on project and creative research activity methods, which are the basis of development of the main socio-cultural skills that are necessary in intercultural communication

  18. Cultural and communicative competence in the caring relationship with patients from another culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberg, Jessica Anne Viveka; Vilander, Susann

    2017-02-24

    The global and multicultural society of today creates challenges that require multicultural competence among individuals, especially within caring contexts. This study assumes an intercultural perspective, and the aim is to uncover a new understanding of the caring community between nurses and patients when these do not speak the same language. The research question is: What is the significance of communication in a caring community when nurses and patients do not speak the same language? This qualitative study uses a hermeneutical approach. The material was collected through questionnaires with eight nurses and two adults from another culture. The texts were analysed through latent content analysis. Study participation, data storage and handling for research purposes were approved by the participants when they provided their informed consent. Permission to conduct the study was granted by an ethical committee of a hospital organisation. Human love is the basis for a caring relationship since it reaches beyond the limits of cultural differences. Integrity is vital for cultural respect and especially for the consideration of spiritual needs in the caring relationship. An affirming presence is essential for communion. Creative courage is fundamental for communication, and continuous information is vital for establishing trust within the caring relationship. One limitation to this study might be the limited number of participants (ten). Caring for a patient from another culture requires that nurses are open-minded and have the courage to encounter new challenges. It is essential for nurses to respect the patient's integrity but also to acquire knowledge in order to improve their cultural competence. Further research within this area should focus on the role of next of kin in intercultural caring and on how leadership may contribute to improving cultural competence within health organisations. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Applying constructivism to nursing education in cultural competence: a course that bears repeating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    A graduate course on culture, diversity, and cultural competence was developed based on constructivist learning theory and Campinha-Bacote's constructs of cultural awareness, knowledge, skill, and encounters. The epistemology, structure, assignments, and activities used in both online and classroom courses were highly effective and well received by the students. Student course evaluations and outcome assessments of students' cultural competence levels, as compared to precourse levels, provided supportive evidence that the course design produced intended outcomes. Course resources are shared, making them available for use by others in cultural competence education.

  20. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  1. Best practices in cell culture: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baust, John M; Buehring, Gertrude Case; Campbell, Lia; Elmore, Eugene; Harbell, John W; Nims, Raymond W; Price, Paul; Reid, Yvonne A; Simione, Frank

    2017-08-14

    This overview describes a series of articles to provide an unmet need for information on best practices in animal cell culture. The target audience primarily consists of entry-level scientists with minimal experience in cell culture. It also include scientists, journalists, and educators with some experience in cell culture, but in need of a refresher in best practices. The articles will be published in this journal over a six-month period and will emphasize best practices in: (1) media selection; (2) use and evaluation of animal serum as a component of cell culture medium; (3) receipt of new cells into the laboratory; (4) naming cell lines; (5) authenticating cell line identity; (6) detecting and mitigating risk of cell culture contamination; (7) cryopreservation and thawing of cells; and (8) storing and shipping viable cells.

  2. Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice | Nkurunziza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice. ... In 2012, Human Resources for Health (HRH) Rwanda brought together international nursing ... providers in a globalized world and requires intellectual, attitudinal and behavioral flexibility.

  3. Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini J. Negi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of social justice educators is to engage students in a process of self-discovery, with the goal of helping them recognize their own biases, develop empathy, and become better prepared for culturally responsive practice. While social work educators are mandated with the important task of training future social workers in culturally responsive practice with diverse populations, practical strategies on how to do so are scant. This article introduces a teaching exercise, the Ethnic Roots Assignment, which has been shown qualitatively to aid students in developing self-awareness, a key component of culturally competent social work practice. Practical suggestions for classroom utilization, common challenges, and past student responses to participating in the exercise are provided. The dissemination of such a teaching exercise can increase the field’s resources for addressing the important goal of cultural competence training.

  4. PSYCHOLOGICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE MANAGERS IN THE SPHERE OF PHYSICAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Veniaminovna Suvorova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies of psychological competence of students. Psychological competence is a holistic integrative professional and personal education, the structure of which includes a system of components (cognitive, motivational and valuable and subsystems (psycho-pedagogical, communicative, autopsychological, socio-psychological, socio-perceptual. Ascertaining experiment showed the necessity of development of psychological competence of a future Manager in the field of physical culture as a meta-subject competence.

  5. Curricular Integration and Measurement of Cultural Competence Development in a Group of Physical Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombaro, Kerstin M.; Dole, Robin L.; Black, Jill D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Background: The link between cultural competence and effective physical therapy encounters is established. Physical therapist educational programs face the challenge of fostering the cultural competence of students in effective and meaningful ways within the curriculum. They also face the challenge of measuring the development of…

  6. Cultural Competence of Parenting Education Programs Used by Latino Families: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, Colleen K.; Ewaida, Marriam; Anderson, Elaine A.

    2014-01-01

    The cultural competence of 13 parenting education programs for Latino families with young children was examined in this study. Based on our analyses, we make several recommendations for improving the cultural competence and effectiveness of parenting education programs for Latino families with young children. Specifically, we recommend the…

  7. A survey of cultural competence of critical care nurses in KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nurses are primary caregivers and have a key role in providing care in a ... Nurses from non-English-speaking backgrounds scored significantly higher in cultural competence than English-speaking nurses. ... Cultural competence refers to the knowledge and skills nurses should .... they spoke a language other than English.

  8. Validating a Measure of Organizational Cultural Competence in Voluntary Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudrich, Wendy Zeitlin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This research examines the psychometric properties of two subscales of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) Multicultural Council's Organizational Cultural Competence Assessment, which together have been used to assess organizational cultural competence in child welfare agencies. Method: Confirmatory factor…

  9. Bridging the Gaps: Measuring Cultural Competence among Future School Library and Youth Services Library Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Renee Franklin; Kumasi, Kafi

    2011-01-01

    School library and youth services professionals must develop and display a strong sense of cultural competence to effectively serve their patrons. Cultural competence is defined here as one's ability to understand the needs of populations different from their own. This paper reports on the perceptions of school library and youth services students…

  10. The Impact of Service-Learning on Health Education Students' Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housman, Jeff; Meaney, Karen S.; Wilcox, Michelle; Cavazos, Arnoldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Development of cultural competence in future health educators is often mentioned as a goal of health education preparation programs; however research demonstrating evidence-based methods for development of cultural competence is limited. Purpose: To determine the impact of a service-learning project on development of cultural…

  11. Enhancing Cross-Cultural Competence in Multicultural Teacher Education: Transformation in Global Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeberg, Vilma; Minick, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    Teacher education needs to engage teacher candidates in developing cross-cultural competence so that they may be able to transmit global learning to their future students. This study theorizes cross-cultural competence (CCC) from the perspectives of multicultural and global education. During a four-year project at a mid-western US university,…

  12. Cultural Competence of Parenting Education Programs Used by Latino Families: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, Colleen K.; Ewaida, Marriam; Anderson, Elaine A.

    2014-01-01

    The cultural competence of 13 parenting education programs for Latino families with young children was examined in this study. Based on our analyses, we make several recommendations for improving the cultural competence and effectiveness of parenting education programs for Latino families with young children. Specifically, we recommend the…

  13. Validating a Measure of Organizational Cultural Competence in Voluntary Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudrich, Wendy Zeitlin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This research examines the psychometric properties of two subscales of the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) Multicultural Council's Organizational Cultural Competence Assessment, which together have been used to assess organizational cultural competence in child welfare agencies. Method: Confirmatory factor…

  14. Cultural competence among nursing students in Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J P; Alquwez, N; Cruz, C P; Felicilda-Reynaldo, R F D; Vitorino, L M; Islam, S M S

    2017-06-01

    This study assessed the cultural competence of nursing students in a Saudi University. With the current situation of immigration in Saudi Arabia, the cultural diversity in healthcare facilities is anticipated to grow. This presents a great challenge to the members of the healthcare team. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 272 nursing students in a Saudi university using a self-administered questionnaire consisting of two parts, namely the respondents' demographics and cultural background information sheet and the Cultural Capacity Scale Arabic version. The respondents showed the highest competence in their ability to demonstrate communication skills with culturally diverse patients and lowest in the familiarity with health- or illness-related cultural knowledge or theory. Gender, academic level, clinical exposure, prior diversity training, the experience of taking care of culturally diverse patients and patients belonging to special population groups were significant factors that could likely to influence cultural competence. The findings suggest that the Saudi nursing students possess the ability to provide culturally appropriate nursing care to patients with a diverse cultural background. Despite the good cultural competence reflected in this study, some aspects in ensuring a culturally competent care rendered by Saudi nursing students need to be improved. With the country's Saudization policy in health care (replacing foreign nurses with Saudi nurses), the findings can be used in designing training and interventions to meet the needs of Saudi nursing students regarding cultural competence development, which is integral in their preparation to assume their future roles as nurses. Policy guidelines, such as including cultural competency training and foreign languages training as mandatory continuing education for nurses, as well as integrating cultural competency and foreign languages in the prelicensure curriculum, should be developed and implemented in

  15. Review of: Legal practice and cultural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Niels Valdemar

    2010-01-01

    that arose after the speech by the Archbishop: whether or to what extent cultural difference should be recognized by legal systems. Legal practice and cultural diversity, edited by Ralph Grillo, Roger Ballard, Alessandro Ferrari, Andre´ J. Hoekema, Marcel Maussen, and Prakash Shah, Farnham, UK, Ashgate, 2009......This anthology comprises contributions from a conference on legal practice and cultural diversity held in London in July 2007, but the editors take their cue from the speech made in February 2008 by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams. The questions central to the book are the same...

  16. Impact of cultural contact on intercultural competency of occupational therapy students and international graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Sandra J; Miller, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    This study examined changes in cultural perceptions and communication of 47 occupational therapy students and 39 international graduate students following 5 peer teaching activities. The peer-teaching activities were designed on the premise that positive contact between people of equal status improves intercultural competency, and included social exchanges, interviews, feedback on practice teaching, and role-playing. Changes in intercultural competency were measured with pre- and post administration of the Cross Cultural Adaptability Inventory (CCAI), as well as questionnaires and journals. Significant positive change between pre- and post-test scores on the CCAI (p<.0002) was found for the 86 participants. When stratified into 3 subgroups (international students and occupational therapy students with and without international travel experience), changes were more pronounced. Occupational therapy students with international travel experience benefited the most from the peer-teaching activities (p<.002) and international graduate students benefited as well (p<.009). Occupational therapy students without international travel experienced no significant change. The findings indicate that peer teaching activities significantly impacted cross-cultural communication for students with prior international travel experience and confirm the importance of contextual learning.

  17. Culturally competent social work research: methodological considerations for research with language minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Banghwa Lee; Negi, Nalini Junko; Hong, Michin

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing number of language minorities, foreign-born individuals with limited English proficiency, this population has been largely left out of social work research, often due to methodological challenges involved in conducting research with this population. Whereas the professional standard calls for cultural competence, a discussion of how to implement strategies for culturally competent research with language minorities is regrettably limited in the social work literature. This article is, to the authors' knowledge, one of the first within the field of social work to tie together unique methodological issues that may arise throughout the research conceptualization, development, and implementation process with this population. Strategies for how to overcome such issues are provided by adapting and expanding on a conceptual framework by Meleis. The incorporation of such research practices with language minorities has the potential to enhance trust and, thus, improve the recruitment and retention of this hard-to-reach population. More important, studies that aim to include such culturally responsive criteria may produce results that have improved validity and, thus, contribute to the advancement of knowledge regarding this population.

  18. Evaluating Cultural Competence of Pediatric Oncology Nurses at a Teaching Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eche, Ijeoma Julie; Aronowitz, Teri

    2017-06-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated registered nurses' self-ratings of cultural competence on the hematology/oncology unit at a large Northeastern urban children's hospital. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence among Healthcare Professionals was used to measure 5 constructs of cultural competence. The study findings show that there were significant correlations between the knowledge and skill subscales (ρ = .57, P cultural desire (mean = 15.5), indicating that nurses were motivated to engage in the process of becoming culturally competent. The lowest mean among the 5 subscales was cultural knowledge (mean = 11.2), followed by cultural skill (mean = 11.8), indicating that nurses did not perceive themselves to be well informed in these areas. The findings from this pilot study suggest that nurses on this pediatric oncology unit are most likely to possess cultural desire and cultural awareness, but there is certainly opportunity to engage and educate the staff. Targeted interventions to improve cultural competence on this inpatient unit are being explored and a larger scale study is being planned to assess the cultural competence of nurses across the hospital.

  19. Cultural awareness in veterinary practice: student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jennifer N; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2011-01-01

    Australian veterinary classrooms are increasingly diverse and their growing internal diversity is a result of migration and large numbers of international students. Graduates interact with other students and increasingly with clients whose attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors differ from their own. An understanding and respect for these differences has an impact on client communication and health care outcomes. The present study explored how students understand and are likely to deal with issues of cultural diversity in veterinary professional practice as well as the educational needs that students feel should be met in regard to preparation to engage productively with diversity in professional practice. The present study also explored the extent to which the rich diversity of the undergraduate student population constitutes an educational resource. A class of final-year veterinary students was invited to participate in a workshop exploring intercultural confidence in veterinary consultation. Twelve groups of six to eight students discussed a fictitious scenario involving a challenging clinical encounter with a client from a different culture. Students were reticent to see the scenario in terms of cultural difference, although they generally recognized that awareness of cultural issues in veterinary practice was important. They also tended to not see their own ethnicity as relevant to their practice. While some felt that veterinary practice should be culture blind, most recognized a need to orient to cultural difference and to respond sensitively. Their suggestions for curricular improvements to address these issues are also included.

  20. Development of a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence for nursing and human service professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cora C; DoBroka, Cheryl Conrad; Mohammad, Saleem

    2009-09-01

    A multidisciplinary teaching model was used to develop a pilot course for students in the human service professions of nursing, education, and social work to gain additional knowledge and skills in providing diverse clients with culturally appropriate services during field and clinical experiences. This article focuses on the process of developing a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence that is consistent with a university mission to prepare students for leadership and service in an increasingly diverse society. Using the theoretical framework of Campinha-Bacote's process of cultural competence and the six developmental stages of intercultural competence in Bennett's developmental model of intercultural sensitivity, the course content covered the five components of cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural skills, cultural encounters, and cultural desire. Students' written reflections indicated growth in acquisition of cultural knowledge, skills, and desire. Faculty collaboration across disciplines included the benefits of an enriched knowledge base and shared scholarship.

  1. Social Competencies Identification for Realization of Successful Engineering Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Malinka

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to identify the main social competencies that future engineers need to become recognized professionals. In the paper the key competencies for contemporary engineers are examined and the focus is given on the importance of social competencies for professional development. A competency research model is developed…

  2. Common culture practices for cyprinids in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T

    1997-01-01

    Cyprinids are the largest group of cultured freshwater fish and thus the most important from the aspect of fish-borne parasitic zoonoses. The common practices employed in the culture of this group are described to provide background information which may be used in the formulation of strategies for the control of these zoonoses. Only the common carp is cultured in monoculture: all the rest of the carp species are usually cultured in polyculture systems incorporating several species. Polyculture of cyprinids may be carried out in ponds, cages or in free range culture in natural or man-made water bodies, Polyculture of cyprinids is often integrated with agriculture, such as livestock, poultry or crop farming, utilizing byproducts of the agriculture activity, especially manure, as a source of nutrient for the fish pond. If precautions are not taken, this practice may provide an avenue for the transmission of fish borne parasites to man.

  3. Predictors of cultural competence among nursing students in the Philippines: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Estacio, Joel C; Bagtang, Cristeta E; Colet, Paolo C

    2016-11-01

    With the continued emigration of Filipino nurses and increasing globalization, there is a need for globally competent nurses. Thus, the development of cultural competence among nursing students is critical in their preparation to assume their future responsibilities in the profession. This study investigated the predictors of cultural competence among nursing students in the Philippines. This is a descriptive, cross-section study. This study included 332 Bachelor of Science in nursing students in three nursing schools situated in the northern Philippines. The Cultural Capacity Scale was used to gather data from the respondents. The demographic characteristics and cultural background of the students were entered in a regression analysis to predict their cultural competence. The respondents manifested appreciably good cultural competence with a mean score of 68.98±11.73. The ability to understand the beliefs of various cultural groups received the highest mean of 3.65±0.86, while the ability to identify the care needs of patients with diverse cultural backgrounds received the lowest (mean, 3.31±0.74). Living in an environment with culturally diverse people, prior diversity training, being in the latter years of the nursing program, and with experience of caring for patients from diverse cultures and special population groups, were identified as predictors, accounting for 68.1% of the variance of cultural competence. Nursing education should devise strategies to ensure future culturally competent Filipino nurses. Considering the fact that most of the Filipino nurses will potentially work overseas, they should be well prepared to provide competent care that is culturally sensitive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Foreign Cultures: Research on Foreign Language Teachers and Intercultural Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo está basado en los resultados de un amplio estudio empírico que busca explorar la dimensión cultural del aprendizaje de lenguas extranjeras en términos de competencia comunicativa intercultural de maestros y alumnos. El estudio cuantitativo-comparativo consistió en una investigación por Internet presentada a maestros de escuelas secundarias de Bélgica, Bulgaria, Grecia, México, Polonia, España y Suecia. El propósito fundamental de la investigación fue intentar describir un comportamiento promedio en los maestros de lenguas extranjeras. Nos enfocamos en una de las áreas encontradas en la investigación: la familiaridad y los contactos que tenían los maestros con culturas extranjeras. Los resultados del estudio completo se pueden encontrar en Foreign Language Teachers and Intercultural Competence: An International Investigation (SerVu, 2005.

  5. Cultural Competence among Maternal Healthcare Providers in Bahir Dar City Administration, Northwest Ethiopia: Cross sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragaw, Amanu; Yigzaw, Tegbar; Tetemke, Desalegn; G/Amlak, Wubalem

    2015-09-24

    Cultural competency is now a core requirement for maternal health providers working in multicultural society. However, it has not yet received due attention in Ethiopia. This study aimed to determine the level of cultural competence and its associated factors among maternal health care providers in Bahir Dar City Administration, Northwest Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was carried out using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Maternal health care providers from all health facilities were our study participants. Structured Questionnaire with some modification of Campinha Bacote's tool was used to collect quantitative data from health workers and semi structured guide line was used for qualitative data among women. While quantitative data analysis was done using SPSS, qualitative data was analyzed using open code software. P-value of less than 0.05 was taken to determine statistical significance. Cronbach's alpha was used to test internal reliability and a factor loading of 0.3 or greater was the criterion used to retain items. Two hundred seventy four health workers and seven women were involved in the study. The overall competency level was 57.3 % thought vary in different subscales or stages. Of the cultural competent health workers near to three fourth (73.0 %) were in awareness stage which is the earliest stage of competence in which individuals were aware only their own culture but not the world view of their clients. The voices of mothers in the qualitative assessment also showed discordance in cultural competence with their healthcare providers. Female health workers almost six times [AOR,5.5; 2.71, 11.30] more competent than male providers and those who got in-service training related to maternal care provided services more culturally competent than their counter parts with [AOR,3.5; 1.4, 8.64]. Reliability Cronbach's α coefficient value of cultural competence subscales showed 0.672,0 .719, 0.658, 0.714, and 0.631 for cultural

  6. "It's Important for Them to Know Who They Are": Teachers' Efforts to Sustain Students' Cultural Competence in an Age of High-Stakes Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoch, Melody

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how four urban elementary teachers designed their literacy instruction in ways that sought to sustain students' cultural competence--maintaining their language and cultural practices while also gaining access to more dominant ones--amid expectations to prepare students for high-stakes testing. A large part of their teaching…

  7. Persuasive argumentation as a cultural practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Gałkowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article author traces relation between argumentation and cultural practice. The first part focuses on definition of argumentation in informal logic tradition. In particular, it discusses argument in terms of verbal and social activity involving the use of everyday language. Author claims that there is no argumentation beyond language. The second part explains persuasive argumentation as a form of cultural practice. The persuasive arguments found in “social practice” can be understood as a social activity, analysable within the context of a given cultural system. Author refers to an approach taking the argumentative expression as a certain type of communicative practice, directed towards respecting, recognising or accepting specific actions. The inclusion of persuasive argumentation in the “circuit of cultural activities” to be studied makes it possible to compare this type of argumentation with other social practices, and to posit a clear historical dimension in the study of argumentation. It also makes it possible to view persuasive argumentation as one of many cultural activities aimed at changing or perpetuating behaviours, attitudes, thinking, etc. The third part of the paper concerns the problem of humanistic interpretation of persuasive argumentation. Author attempts to develop this intuition, at the same time demonstrating the problems that arise from this approach. In conclusion, author tries to analyze argumentation in terms of culture theory and humanistic interpretation.

  8. Practical wisdom, understanding of coherence and competencies for everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Jette

    2009-01-01

    and interviews, followed by an action research approach, is reported. The work was further used for developing text books for home economics education in the primary and lower secondary school with the following titles: Home Economics in words and actions and Home Economics in thoughts, words and actions......The focus of this article is the subject home economics education in the primary and lower secondary school in the 21st century. Practical wisdom, understanding of coherence and competencies for everyday life are suggested as aims of home economics education. It is argued that these elements should...... be included as part of general education and ‘Bildung' [1] in late modern society. This article raises the following questions: what, how and why should these elements be included.   A literature research and developmental work within two home economics classes over two years commencing with observations...

  9. Cultural competency of health-care providers in a Swiss University Hospital: self-assessed cross-cultural skillfulness in a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As the diversity of the European population evolves, measuring providers’ skillfulness in cross-cultural care and understanding what contextual factors may influence this is increasingly necessary. Given limited information about differences in cultural competency by provider role, we compared cross-cultural skillfulness between physicians and nurses working at a Swiss university hospital. Methods A survey on cross-cultural care was mailed in November 2010 to front-line providers in Lausanne, Switzerland. This questionnaire included some questions from the previously validated Cross-Cultural Care Survey. We compared physicians’ and nurses’ mean composite scores and proportion of “3-good/4-very good” responses, for nine perceived skillfulness items (4-point Likert-scale) using the validated tool. We used linear regression to examine how provider role (physician vs. nurse) was associated with composite skillfulness scores, adjusting for demographics (gender, non-French dominant language), workplace (time at institution, work-unit “sensitized” to cultural-care), reported cultural-competence training, and cross-cultural care problem-awareness. Results Of 885 questionnaires, 368 (41.2%) returned the survey: 124 (33.6%) physicians and 244 (66.4%) nurses, reflecting institutional distribution of providers. Physicians had better mean composite scores for perceived skillfulness than nurses (2.7 vs. 2.5, p cultural training (β = 0.14, p = 0.01) and lack of practical experience caring for diverse populations (β = 0.11, p = 0.04). In stratified analyses among physicians alone, having French as a dominant language (β = −0.34, p cultural competency improvement among providers. These results support the need for cross-cultural skills training with an inter-professional focus on nurses, education that attunes provider awareness to the local issues in cross-cultural care, and increased diversity efforts in the work force

  10. Assessing capacity for providing culturally competent services to LGBT older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portz, Jennifer Dickman; Retrum, Jessica H; Wright, Leslie A; Boggs, Jennifer M; Wilkins, Shari; Grimm, Cathy; Gilchrist, Kay; Gozansky, Wendolyn S

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative, interview-based study assessed the cultural competence of health and social service providers to meet the needs of LGBT older adults in an urban neighborhood in Denver, Colorado, known to have a large LGBT community. Only 4 of the agencies were categorized as "high competency"; 12 were felt to be "seeking improvement" and 8 were considered "not aware." These results indicate significant gaps in cultural competency for the majority of service providers. Social workers are well-suited to lead efforts directed at improving service provision and care competencies for the older LGBT community.

  11. Incorporating organisational safety culture within ergonomics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim; Tappin, David

    2010-10-01

    This paper conceptualises organisational safety culture and considers its relevance to ergonomics practice. Issues discussed in the paper include the modest contribution that ergonomists and ergonomics as a discipline have made to this burgeoning field of study and the significance of safety culture to a systems approach. The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics work with regard to the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process, and implications for participatory ergonomics approaches, are also discussed. A potential user-friendly, qualitative approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented, based on a recently published conceptual framework that recognises the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of safety culture. The paper concludes by considering the use of such an approach, where an understanding of different aspects of safety culture within an organisation is seen as important to the success of ergonomics projects. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics practice is a key focus of this paper, including its relationship with the systems approach, participatory ergonomics and the ergonomics analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process. An approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented.

  12. Organizing Construction Practices in Different Cultural Contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Rasmussen, Christian K. S.

    2013-01-01

    participating in the construction management on site working for three different contractors in different cultural contexts: (1) Construir Futuro S.A. in Quito, Ecuador; (2) Anker Hansen & co. A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark; and (3) E. Pihl & Soen A/S in Stockholm, Sweden. Based on these explorative case studies......This paper presents in-depth case studies of construction practices with a specific focus on understanding the emergent and dynamic nature of construction management in different cultural contexts. The cases are based on actual working-experiences by the author as an assistant project manager...... a number of characteristics and challenges related to the cultural context have been identified highlighting a central issue in existing and future construction practices due to the globalization and thereby increasing importance of cultural understanding in project-based organizing. The empirical findings...

  13. Preceptor Understanding, Comfort, and Use Related to Evidence-Based Practice Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, W. David; Volberding, Jennifer L.; Timson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Context: The Fifth Edition of the National Athletic Trainers' Association Athletic Training Education Competencies includes the significant addition of competencies covering evidence-based practice (EBP). While the concept of EBP is not new, the terminology in the Competencies may be new to clinical practitioners who did not receive the same…

  14. Linking Cultural Competence to Functional Life Outcomes in Mental Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulou, Georgia; Falzarano, Pamela; Butkus, Michael; Zeman, Lori; Vershave, Judy; Arfken, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Minorities in the United States have well-documented health disparities. Cultural barriers and biases by health care providers may contribute to lower quality of services which may contribute to these disparities. However, evidence linking cultural competency and health outcomes is lacking. This study, part of an ongoing quality improvement effort, tested the mediation hypothesis that patients' perception of provider cultural competency indirectly influences patients' health outcomes through process of care. Data were from patient satisfaction surveys collected in seven mental health clinics (n=94 minority patients). Consistent with our hypothesis, patients' perception of clinicians' cultural competency was indirectly associated with patients' self-reported improvements in social interactions, improvements in performance at work or school, and improvements in managing life problems through the patients' experience of respect, trust, and communication with the clinician. These findings indicate that process of care characteristics during the clinical encounter influence patients' perceptions of clinicians' cultural competency and affect functional outcomes.

  15. ASYNCHRONICAL MEANS OF FORMING CROSS CULTURAL COMPETENCE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS (IN THE CASE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy G. Apalkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the key problems of forming cross cultural competence by means of asynchronic Internet-communication techniques. A concise overview of main studies in using e-mail group in forming cross cultural competence. An algorithm of forming cross cultural competence of high school students is described. 

  16. Forming of communicative competence as condition of professional preparation of future teachers of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsutina NM.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The modern state and necessity of realization of forming communicative competence of future teachers of physical culture is found out in the process of professional preparation. 294 students took part in an experiment. Rotined expedience of realization of forming of communicative competence of future teachers of physical culture. The questionnaire of students of higher educational establishments is conducted. The level of formed of communicative competence for students remains at low level. It needs strengthening of attention to perfection of process of professional preparation of future teachers of physical culture.

  17. Partnership for Diversity: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Nurturing Cultural Competence at an Emerging Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Stephanie M; Abuelroos, Dena; Dabaja, Emman; Jurva, Stephanie; Martin, Kimberly; McCarron, Joshua; Reed-Hendon, Caryn; Yeow, Raymond Y; Harriott, Melphine M

    2015-01-01

    Fostering cultural competence in higher education institutions is essential, particularly in training future health care workers to care for diverse populations. The opportunity to explore techniques to address diversity and cultural competence at a new medical school was undertaken by a multidisciplinary team of librarians, faculty, staff, and medical students. From 2011 to 2015, the team sponsored a voluntary programming series to promote cultural competence and raise awareness of health care disparities for the medical school. Thirteen events were hosted with 562 participants across all. This approach to diversity proved effective and could be adapted in any higher education setting.

  18. Relative importance of professional practice and engineering management competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    Problem: The professional practice of engineering always involves engineering management, but it is difficult to know what specifically to include in the undergraduate curriculum. Approach: The population of New Zealand practising engineers was surveyed to determine the importance they placed on specific professional practice and engineering management competencies. Findings: Results show that communication and project planning were the two most important topics, followed by others as identified. The context in which practitioners use communication skills was found to be primarily with project management, with secondary contexts identified. The necessity for engineers to develop the ability to use multiple soft skills in an integrative manner is strongly supported by the data. Originality: This paper is one of only a few large-scale surveys of practising engineers to have explored the soft skill attributes. It makes a didactic contribution of providing a ranked list of topics which can be used for designing the curriculum and prioritising teaching effort, which has not previously been achieved. It yields the new insight that combinations of topics are sometimes more important than individual topics.

  19. Perceptions of Norwegian physiotherapy students: cultural diversity in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougner, Marit; Horntvedt, And Tone

    2012-01-01

    At the Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College there is a growing recognition of the need for cultural competency training among students at the bachelor programmes. At the Mensendieck-physiotherapy bachelor programme the students are engaged in leading physical activity groups for Muslim women. This qualitative study describes ethnically Norwegian students experiencing cultural diversity in practice. Twenty-two female physiotherapy students participated in the interviews; 6 students were interviewed individually by telephone, and 16 students were interviewed in person in 8 pairs. The students' framework for dealing with diversity is based on preconceived notions about Muslim women and is reflected in two particular ways. One is how the values and norms of Norwegian "ideology of sameness" are pursued by the students. The other is how the students constructed images of the women as "the others." The interview responses indicate difficulties in uniting the reality of diversity and the "need" for integration. The curriculum requires additional attention on cultural competency for health care professionals in a multicultural society.

  20. Evaluation of a Cultural Competence Intervention with Implications for the Nurse-Patient Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Althea Betty

    A short-term intervention on participants' knowledge of cultural competence was provided to 38 students in a baccalaureate nursing program at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU). The study examined the effectiveness of this intervention. Although WSSU is a Historically Black University, the majority of students in this program were White. Six tools were used for data collection. The Cultural Competence Survey consisted of 19 Likert Scale items that also gave participants an opportunity to elaborate on each response. Four tools allowed participants to provide written answers to prompts related to cultural competence. The final tool made it possible for the investigator to record impressions and reflections regarding various aspects of the study. Results showed that the students are familiar with cultural competence and want to avoid stereotypical behavior in their nurse-patient encounters. The study suggests a need for education in cultural competence in three areas: 1) accepting that cultural competence is a lifelong endeavor, 2) understanding patients from a holistic perspective, and 3) recognizing that all people have biases; however, the competent nurse is self-aware and has been educated to recognize biased behavior.

  1. Exploring cultural tensions in cross-cultural social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Miu Chung

    2008-10-01

    Discussion of cultural tension in the social work literature is piecemeal. As part of a grounded theory study, this article reports some major findings on cultural tensions experienced by 30 frontline social workers. Cultural tensions caused by cultural similarities and differences among social workers, clients, organizations, and society are multifaceted. Social workers, however, are always at the center of the tensions. Findings indicate that the social work profession may need to consider the neutrality claim of the profession, the different experience of ethnic minority social workers, and the need of critical reflexivity for reflective practitioners. Implications for social work practice, social work education for ethnic minority social workers, and social work research are discussed.

  2. Cross-Cultural Competence: Leader Requirements for Intercultural Effectiveness in the Human Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    cultural experiences) as predictors of dynamic cross-cultural competencies (tolerance of ambiguity, cultural flexibility, and reduced ethnocentrism ...be discussed for now: Ethnocentrism is most interesting of the predominant KSAs from the research. Ethnocentrism is an individual’s nationalistic...strong predictor (Abbe 2008), but of the opposite desired outcome to intercultural encounters—lower is typically better. Ethnocentrism fits into the

  3. The effect of a cultural competence educational intervention for first-year nursing students in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Anita; Nuszen, Evelyn; Rom, Miriam; Noble, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention to increase general cultural competence of first-year nursing students. This was a quasi-experimental study that used a convenience sample with an experimental group and a control group and pre- and posttesting. The sample comprised 146 first-year nursing students enrolled in the Introduction to Nursing course divided into an intervention group (n = 58) of students from one school and a control group (n = 88) including students from two schools. The intervention group received a 2-hour faculty lecture on cultural competence, and students prepared and delivered a student group presentation about a cultural group in Israel, basing the presentation on Campinha-Bacote's five constructs. A demographic data instrument and Campinha-Bacote's Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professional-Revised© were used for pre- and posttesting. Students who received the educational intervention increased scores significantly (68 ± 6 to 73 ± 6, p = .000), students who did not receive the educational intervention had no significant increase (67 ± 6 to 66 ± 6). Introducing the topic of cultural competence for nursing students in the first-year Introduction to Nursing course as an integrative learning strategy revealed significant increases in cultural competence scores. Recommendations are to include evidence-based cultural competence teaching strategies into the nursing curriculum.

  4. Twelve Years Since Importance of Cross-Cultural Competency Recognized: Where Are We Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Remi A.; Coates, Wendy C.; Chanmugam, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to analyze the content and volume of literature that has been written on cultural competency in emergency medicine (EM) since its educational imperative was first described by the Institute of Medicine in 2002. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search through the PubMed portal in January 2015 to identify all articles and reviews that addressed cultural competency in EM. Articles were included in the review if cultural competency was described or if its impact on healthcare disparities or curriculum development was described. Two reviewers independently investigated all relevant articles. These articles were then summarized. Results Of the 73 abstracts identified in the initial search, only 10 met criteria for inclusion. A common theme found among these 10 articles is that cultural competency in EM is essential to reducing healthcare disparities and improving patient care. These articles were consistent in their support for cross-cultural educational advancements in the EM curriculum. Conclusion Despite the documented importance of cultural competency education in medicine, there appears to be only 10 articles over the past 12 years regarding its development and implementation in EM. This comprehensive literature review underscores the relative dearth of publications related to cultural competency in EM. The limited number of articles found is striking when compared to the growth of EM research over the same time period and can serve as a stimulus for further research in this significant area of EM education.

  5. Pond Fish Culture Practices in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Akankali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pond fish culture practices in Nigeria was reviewed to refresh the minds of fish and other interested stake holders on some basic principles involved in pond fish culture. Fish pond system is the commonest agricultural techniques in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Profit making, job creation, provision of raw materials for several industries and increase in foreign exchange earnings are some benefits. However, loss of land and introduction some water borne diseases are some disadvantages in pond fish culture. This articles reviews the fish pond management processes, stocking of ponds, feeding of fish, types of culture, fish farming combined with other branches of agriculture, rearing of fish for purposes other than food, other fish culture, types of fish used for fish culture in central east Africa, general biology of the species of value in fish culture and suitable combinations of fish for stocking to reawaken the minds of individuals, companies and government on the need to develop pond fish culture in Nigeria.

  6. School-Based Consultation: Training Challenges, Solutions and Building Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Janay B.; Hernández Finch, Maria E.; Pierson, Eric E.; Bishop, Jared A.; German, Rachel L.; Wilmoth, Claire E.

    2016-01-01

    This is a consensual qualitative research study of the perceptions of university faculty about methods and tools to teach students the professional competency area of school-based psychological consultation, with special attention to cultural competence. The participants (n = 7) included faculty of school psychology programs located in the…

  7. PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS FOR THE FORMATION OF SOCIAL COMPETENCES OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS DURING THEIR TEACHING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladlena Alekseevna ZAKHAREVICH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The author of the article considers the pedagogical con-ditions for the formation of social competences of under-graduate students in their teaching practice. The author highlights the concept of "competence", as well as pre-sents the methodology and conclusions of a study aimed at identifying the role of teaching practice in the for-mation of social competences of undergraduate stu-dents.

  8. The contribution of cultural competence to evidence-based care for ethnically diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Stanley J; Tilley, Jacqueline Lee; Jones, Eduardo O; Smith, Caitlin A

    2014-01-01

    Despite compelling arguments for the dissemination of evidence-based treatments (EBTs), questions regarding their relevance to ethnically diverse populations remain. This review summarizes what is known about psychotherapy effects with ethnic minorities, with a particular focus on the role of cultural competence when implementing EBTs. Specifically, we address three questions: (a) does psychotherapy work with ethnic minorities, (b) do psychotherapy effects differ by ethnicity, and (c) does cultural tailoring enhance treatment effects? The evidence suggests that psychotherapy is generally effective with ethnic minorities, and treatment effects are fairly robust across cultural groups and problem areas. However, evidence for cultural competence is mixed. Ethnic minority-focused treatments frequently incorporate culturally tailored strategies, and these tailored treatments are mostly efficacious; yet support for cultural competence as a useful supplement to standard treatment remains equivocal at best. We also discuss research limitations, areas for future research, and clinical implications.

  9. Identifying the essential components of cultural competence in a Chinese nursing context: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Duanying; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Klunklin, Areewan; Sripusanapan, Acharaporn; Avant, Patricia Kay

    2017-06-01

    This qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted to identify the essential components of cultural competence from the perspective of Chinese nurses. A purposive sample of 20 nurse experts, including senior clinical nurses, nurse administrators, and educators in transcultural nursing, was recruited. Using thematic analysis, four themes: awareness, attitudes, knowledge, and skills, with two subthemes for each, were identified. Notably, culture in China was understood in a broad way. The participants' responses focused upon demographic attributes, individuality, and efforts to facilitate quality care rather than on the cultural differences of ethnicity and race and developing the capacity to change discrimination or health disparities. A greater understanding of cultural competence in the Chinese nursing context, in which a dominant cultural group exists, is essential to facilitate the provision of culturally competent care to diverse populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Establishing a Framework on OER Practices for ICT Competence of Disabled Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay, Zehra; Ossiannilsson, Ebba; Kalaç, Mustafa Ozhan; Basari, Gülsün; Aktepebasi, Ali; Altinay, Fahriye

    2016-01-01

    The research encapsulates the framework on potential contributions of OER practices for supporting the ICT competence for disabled adult learners in building equal opportunities within the society. The study underlined the developing OER policy and framework to focus on digital citizenship competency for disabled adult learners. OER practices can…

  11. Continuing Education Effects on Cultural Competence Knowledge and Skills Building among Health Professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marla B. Hall; Jeffrey J. Guidry; E. Lisako J. McKyer; Corliss Outley; Danny Ballard

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research is to assess cultural competence knowledge and programmatic skill sets, utilizing an explorational case study, of individuals employed within an urban public health department...

  12. Predictors of self-perceived cultural competence among children's mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Victoria; Gamst, Glenn; Meyers, Lawrence S; Der-Karabetian, Aghop; Morrow, Gloria

    2014-07-01

    Based on empirical research and predictions from the Multicultural Assessment-Intervention Process model, the racial attitudes, ethnic identity, and acculturation of a national sample of 371 child mental health service providers were assessed as possible predictors of practitioner self-perceived cultural competence. It was hypothesized that ethnic identity and racial attitudes would each directly affect self-perceived cultural competence and that acculturation and racial attitudes would mediate the effect of ethnic identity. The results indicated that ethnic identity exerted a direct effect on self-perceived cultural competence and that this effect was partially mediated by respondents' racial attitudes; however, acculturation had no significant role as a mediator. The results are discussed within the context of the Multicultural Assessment-Intervention Process model and implications for providing culturally competent services to children.

  13. Reducing Disparities through Culturally Competent Health Care: An Analysis of the Business Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brach, Cindy; Fraser, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Finding ways to deliver high-quality health care to an increasingly diverse population is a major challenge for the American health care system. The persistence of racial and ethnic disparities in health care access, quality, and outcomes has prompted considerable interest in increasing the cultural competence of health care, both as an end in its own right and as a potential means to reduce disparities. This article reviews the potential role of cultural competence in reducing racial and ethnic health disparities, the strength of health care organizations’ current incentives to adopt cultural competence techniques, and the limitations inherent in these incentives that will need to be overcome if cultural competence techniques are to become widely adopted. PMID:12938253

  14. Communicative Competence Approach to Person-Oriented Teaching of the Russian Language and Culture of Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Orlova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the communicative competence approach in professional training of physicians on the undergraduate level. The main emphasis is on developing linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competences while teaching the Russian language and the culture of speech. The paper is aimed at analyzing the requirements of federal state educational standards of the 3rd generation concerning the competences in the humanities which should be developed by medical students in the course of the Russian language and the culture of speech; defining the contents of the «communicative competence» term based on consideration of general European competences in mastering the language and the analysis of lingua-didactic works of modern Russian scientists; identifying the component content of linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competences of the Russian language and the culture of speech course for medical schools. The research results regarding the analysis and component content of linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic competences of the Russian language and the culture of speech course have been applied while designing the Russian and the culture of speech curriculum, as well as electronic textbooks and manuals for medical students. 

  15. Can Hospital Cultural Competency Reduce Disparities in Patient Experiences with Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc N.; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Hall, Allyson; Hays, Ron D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency has been espoused as an organizational strategy to reduce health disparities in care. Objective To examine the relationship between hospital cultural competency and inpatient experiences with care. Research Design The first model predicted Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores from hospital random effects, plus fixed effects for hospital cultural competency, individual race/ethnicity/language, and case-mix variables. The second model tested if the association between a hospital’s cultural competency and HCAHPS scores differed for minority and non-Hispanic white patients. Subjects The National CAHPS® Benchmarking Database’s (NCBD) HCAHPS Surveys and the Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Surveys for California hospitals were merged, resulting in 66 hospitals and 19,583 HCAHPS respondents in 2006. Measures Dependent variables include ten HCAHPS measures: six composites (communication with doctors, communication with nurses, staff responsiveness, pain control, communication about medications, and discharge information), two individual items (cleanliness, and quietness of patient rooms), and two global items (overall hospital rating, and whether patient would recommend hospital). Results Hospitals with greater cultural competency have better HCAHPS scores for doctor communication, hospital rating, and hospital recommendation. Furthermore, HCAHPS scores for minorities were higher at hospitals with greater cultural competency on four other dimensions: nurse communication, staff responsiveness, quiet room, and pain control. Conclusions Greater hospital cultural competency may improve overall patient experiences, but may particularly benefit minorities in their interactions with nurses and hospital staff. Such effort may not only serve longstanding goals of reducing racial/ethnic disparities in inpatient experience, but may also contribute to general quality improvement

  16. Structural Equation Modeling of Cultural Competence of Nurses Caring for Foreign Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jung-Won

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to construct and test a hypothetical model including factors related to the cultural competence of nurses caring for foreign patients. The transcultural nursing immersion experience model and anxiety/uncertainty management theory were used to verify the paths between the variables. The exogenous variables were multicultural experience, ethnocentric attitude, and organizational cultural competence support. The endogenous variables were intercultural anxiety, intercultural uncertainty, coping strategy, and cultural competence. Participants were 275 nurses working in general hospitals in Seoul and Kyung-Gi Do, Korea. Each nurse in this study had experience of caring for over 10 foreign patients. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed with SPSS statistical software with the added AMOS module. The overall fitness indices of the hypothetical model were a good fit. Multicultural experience, ethnocentric attitude, organizational cultural competence support, and intercultural uncertainty were found to have a direct and indirect effect on the cultural competence of nurses while coping strategy only had a direct effect. Intercultural anxiety did not have a significant effect on cultural competence. This model explained 59.1% of the variance in the nurses' cultural competence when caring for foreign patients. Nurses' cultural competence can be developed by offering multicultural nursing education, increasing direct/indirect multicultural experience, and sharing problem-solving experience to promote the coping ability of nurses. Organizational support can be achieved by preparing relevant personnel and resources. Subsequently, the quality of nursing care for foreign patients' will be ultimately improved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Building competence through cross-cultural collaboration in the aftermath of a tsunami: experiences of Indonesian teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillund, Margrethe Valen; Rystedt, Ingrid; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Abubakar, Suwarni; Kvigne, Kari

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the reported experiences of Indonesian nursing teachers who participated in a two-year cross-cultural project designed to build pedagogical and professional competence after the tsunami in Aceh province in 2004. Eleven Indonesian teachers who had participated in the competence project answered an open-ended questionnaire in November 2007. The data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis, and the main theme "an empowered nursing teacher" emerged. The teachers expressed positive experiences, as having more self confidence, feeling inspired to develop one's potentiality and feeling strength and happiness in one's work. The theme constituted four categories: "encouraged by collaboration and teamwork", "more independent as a teacher", "encouraged by more active students" and, "inspired to develop further competence". The overall result showed that the teachers in the competence developing project reported mostly positive experiences by participating in the project. However, two years is a short time to develop both pedagogical and professional competence. They expressed a desire to continue building their competence, especially in direct clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Eliminating Barriers to Physical Activity: Using Cultural Negotiation and Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Physical and sport educators who incorporate cultural negotiation acknowledge that their teaching, routines, and plans for learning encompass a cultural act. In today's society, culture-free teaching or learning is nonexistent. Education is woven into the fabric of nearly every group; therefore, recognizing the impact of cultural norms on the…

  19. Assessing Capacity for Providing Culturally Competent Services to LGBT Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portz, Jennifer Dickman; Retrum, Jessica H.; Wright, Leslie A.; Boggs, Jennifer M.; Wilkins, Shari; Grimm, Cathy; Gilchrist, Kay; Gozansky, Wendolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative, interview-based study assessed the cultural competence of health and social service providers to meet the needs of LGBT older adults in an urban neighborhood in Denver, Colorado, known to have a large LGBT community. Only 4 of the agencies were categorized as “high competency” while 12 were felt to be “seeking improvement” and 8 were considered “not aware.” These results indicate significant gaps in cultural competency for the majority of service providers. Social workers are well-suited to lead efforts directed at improving service provision and care competencies for the older LGBT community. PMID:24798180

  20. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational Curricula. Food Service. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Larry; Shin, Masako

    This document, one of eight in a multi-cultural competency-based vocational/technical curricula series, is on food service. This program is designed to run 24 weeks and cover 15 instructional areas: orientation, sanitation, management/planning, preparing food for cooking, preparing beverages, cooking eggs, cooking meat, cooking vegetables,…

  1. Cross-Cultural Competence in the Department of Defense: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    education considerations. Synthesis of the literature review and workshop findings indicate that culture-general skills like non- ethnocentric attitudes...personnel to go beyond their own local cultures to understand deeper meanings in communication. He suggests that social conditioning and ethnocentrism can...Soldiers lower in cross-cultural competence were more ethnocentric and unwilling to understand other cultures, leading to lower mission success. Finally

  2. Multicultural Career Counseling: A National Survey of Competencies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespia, Kristin M.; Fitzpatrick, Mary E.; Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Chen, Yung-Lung

    2010-01-01

    Career counselors' multicultural competence has not been widely investigated. In this study, a national sample of 230 career counselors completed an online survey that included measures of career counseling self-efficacy and multicultural counseling competence. Beyond these self-report instruments, counselors responded to open-ended items that…

  3. Driving Performance Improvements by Integrating Competencies with Human Resource Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Gu; Park, Yongho; Yang, Gi Hun

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the issues in the development and application of a competency model and provides implications for more precise integration of competencies into human resource (HR) functions driving performance improvement. This research is based on a case study from a Korean consumer corporation. This study employed document reviews,…

  4. Driving Performance Improvements by Integrating Competencies with Human Resource Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Gu; Park, Yongho; Yang, Gi Hun

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the issues in the development and application of a competency model and provides implications for more precise integration of competencies into human resource (HR) functions driving performance improvement. This research is based on a case study from a Korean consumer corporation. This study employed document reviews,…

  5. Educational stratification in cultural participation: Cognitive competence or status motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Bol, Th.; Werfhorst, van de H.G.; Ganzeboom, H.B.G.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines educational stratification in highbrow cultural participation. Thereare two contrasting explanations of why cultural participation is stratified. The statushypothesis predicts that people come to appreciate particular forms of art because itexpresses their belonging to a certai

  6. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  7. Welcome to cultural competency: surgery's efforts to acknowledge diversity in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Catherine L; Chun, Maria B J

    2013-01-01

    Although cultural competency is not a new concept in healthcare, it has only recently been formally embraced as important in the field of surgery. All physicians, including and especially surgeons, must acknowledge the potential influence of culture in order to provide effective and equitable care for patients of all backgrounds. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recognizes cultural competency as a component of "patient care," "professionalism," and "interpersonal and communication skills." A systematic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. All publications focusing on surgical residents and the assessment of patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, or specifically cultural competency and/or were considered. This initial search resulted in 12 articles. To further refine the review, publications discussing curricula in residencies other than surgery, the assessment of technical, or clinical skills and/or without any explicit focus on cultural competency were excluded. Based on the specified inclusion and exclusion criteria, 5 articles were selected. These studies utilized various methods to improve surgical residents' cultural competency, including lectures, Objective Structural Clinical Examinations (OSCE), and written exercises and evaluations. A number of surgical residency programs have made promising strides in training culturally competent surgeons. Ultimately, in order to maximize our collective efforts to improve the quality of health care, the development of cultural competency curricula must be made a priority and such training should be a requirement for all trainees in surgical residency programs. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Challenges and Promises of Becoming a Culturally Competent Counselor in a Sociopolitical Era of Change and Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Patricia; Tovar-Blank, Zoila G.; Parham, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the historical and sociopolitical contexts of the multicultural competency movement and the challenges and promise of becoming a culturally competent counselor. Specific attention is directed to the promise and opportunity for those who commit to a culturally competent personal and professional way of life.

  9. Harvest managements and cultural practices in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Gustavo Quassi de Castro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of trash from the mechanical harvest of green cane on sugarcane plantations promotes changes in the agricultural management, for example, in the mechanical cultural practices of ratoon cane in-between the rows and nitrogen (N fertilization. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of sugarcane in different harvest systems, associated to the mechanical cultural practices in interrows and N rates. The study was carried out on a sugarcane plantation in Sales Oliveira, São Paulo, Brazil, with the sugarcane variety SP81-3250, on soil classified as Acrudox, in a randomized block design with split-split plots and four replications. The main treatments consisted of harvest systems (harvesting green cane or burnt cane, the secondary treatment consisted of the mechanical cultural practices in the interrows and the tertiary treatments were N rates (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 160 kg ha-1, using ammonium nitrate (33 % N as N source. The harvest systems did not differ in sugarcane yield (tons of cane per hectare - TCH, but in burnt cane, the pol percent and total sugar recovery (TSR were higher. This could be explained by the higher quantity of plant impurities in the harvested raw material in the system without burning, which reduces the processing quality. Mechanical cultural practices in the interrows after harvest had no effect on cane yield and sugar quality, indicating that this operation can be omitted in areas with mechanical harvesting. The application of N fertilizer at rates of 88 and 144 kg ha-1 N, respectively, increased stalk height and TCH quadratically to the highest values for these variables. For the sugar yield per hectare (in pol %, N fertilization induced a linear increase.

  10. Dermatoses Due to Indian Cultural Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Divya Gupta; Devinder Mohan Thappa

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ′Henna′ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ′Kumkum′ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ′bindis′ and ′alta′ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing ...

  11. Quality and safety in graduate nursing education: Cross-mapping QSEN graduate competencies with NONPF's NP core and practice doctorate competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Joanne M; Savrin, Carol; Fiandt, Kathryn; Beauchesne, Michelle; Drayton-Brooks, Shirlee; Scheibmeir, Monica; Brackley, Margaret; Werner, Kathryn E

    2009-01-01

    To ensure that nurse practitioners are prepared to deliver safe, high-quality health care, the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) publishes documents that outline the expected competencies for nurse practitioner (NP) practice (Domains and Core Competencies of Nurse Practitioner Practice and Practice Doctorate Nurse Practitioner Entry-Level Competencies). Having participated in the development of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies for graduate education, NONPF convened a task force to compare NONPF competencies with QSEN competencies for graduate education. This paper reports the first step of that cross-mapping process, comparing NONPF competencies with the QSEN knowledge objectives. Overall findings indicate close congruence across the 2 sets of competencies; however there are areas in which gaps are noted or for which clarification is required.

  12. GENDER GENEALOGY OF READING AS CULTURAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Kryvda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to the cultural aspect of texts using in European culture. The paper found out methodological basis of correctly interpreting the term "practice" in the philosophical and sociological discourses. In the first case the concept reveals human nature; appealing to the field of ethics and intersubjective interactions. In sociological approach the term practice is contrasted to institutional life. It seems to be an organic; vital relevance of actions for contrast to the mechanically regulated community life. Methodology. The paper considered the typology of human intellectual conditions according to Kant’s divided into pure and practical reason. The last one directs action-willed individual efforts so as to meet the universal relevance and ethical coherence. Gottlieb Fichte interpreted practice reason as the way to combine intellectual intentions and material conditions of human being. G. W. F. Hegel enriched the concept with terms of "objectification" and "alienation” of labour. Karl Marx formulated the main features of activity approach to the human nature exploring. In sociological discourse the term practice is opposed to mechanically done actions (according to institutional normativity. Given the philosophical and sociological methodological contexts the reading is studied as activity that aimed emotional and volitional contact with sense. Originality. The paper analysed the genealogy of reading practices. There were selected two types of text perception – rapid "masculine" and prudent "women's" reading. Women salon environment of the XVIII-th century capitalistic Europe was the main condition for the forming of literary-aware public. The authors analysed the process of reading of the text-as-satisfaction and text-as-pleasure (R. Barthes. The work presents the overview of classical studies of sociocultural field: Thorstein Veblen; Vladimir Toporov; Rolan Barthes and contemporary researchers such as T. Markova

  13. Use of Racial Identity Development Theory to Explore Cultural Competence among Early Childhood Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heejeong Sophia; West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Thomas, M. Shelley

    2011-01-01

    In order to explore early childhood educators' cultural competence through a lens of racial identity development theory, a case study was conducted with four White Kindergarten teachers. Participants were surveyed and interviewed to understand their racial identity development as well as perspectives of teaching culturally diverse early childhood…

  14. Cultural Competence in Alberta Schools: Perceptions of ESL Families in Four Major School Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hieu V.

    2012-01-01

    Complex linguistic, acculturative, and social needs of English-as-a-second-language (ESL) learners challenge the K-12 education system to develop cultural competence in working with culturally diverse families. This study surveyed 242 self-identified ESL students and their parents from four of Alberta's major school boards. Results of the survey…

  15. Behind Cultural Competence: The Role of Causal Attribution in Multicultural Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Montgomery, Diane

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to bridge the gap between achievement motivation and multicultural teacher education, this study explored the relationship between causal attribution of cultural awareness and cultural competence among preservice teachers. Participants were 793 preservice teachers from two large public universities who reported their causal…

  16. Cultural Competence in Medical Education: Aligning the Formal, Informal and Hidden Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, David; Ewen, Shaun C.; Jones, Rhys

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cultural competence has become reified by inclusion as an accreditation standard in the US and Canada, in New Zealand it is demanded through an Act of Parliament, and it pervades discussion in Australian medical education discourse. However, there is evidence that medical graduates feel poorly prepared to deliver cross-cultural care…

  17. Regionally Aligned Divisions: Enabling Cultural and Linguistic Competency in Regionally Aligned Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Regionally Aligned Divisions: Enabling Cultural & Linguistic Competency in... Regionally Aligned Forces A Monograph By MAJ Mikola J. King United States Army School of Advanced Military Studies United States Army Command...From - To) 01-05-2016 SAMS Monograph nJN 2015 - MAY 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Regionally Aligned Divisions: Enabling Cultural

  18. Cultural Competence in Medical Education: Aligning the Formal, Informal and Hidden Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, David; Ewen, Shaun C.; Jones, Rhys

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cultural competence has become reified by inclusion as an accreditation standard in the US and Canada, in New Zealand it is demanded through an Act of Parliament, and it pervades discussion in Australian medical education discourse. However, there is evidence that medical graduates feel poorly prepared to deliver cross-cultural care…

  19. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  20. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  1. Good cell culture practices &in vitro toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Chantra; Boström, Ann-Charlotte; Bowe, Gerhard; Coecke, Sandra; Hartung, Thomas; Hendriks, Giel; Pamies, David; Piton, Alain; Rovida, Costanza

    2017-04-25

    Good Cell Culture Practices (GCCP) is of high relevance to in vitro toxicology. The European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV), the Center for Alternatives for Animal Testing (CAAT) and the In Vitro Toxicology Industrial Platform (IVTIP) joined forces to address by means of an ESTIV 2016 pre-congress session the different aspects and applications of GCCP. The covered aspects comprised the current status of the OECD guidance document on Good In Vitro Method Practices, the importance of quality assurance for new technological advances in in vitro toxicology including stem cells, and the optimized implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices for regulatory testing purposes. General discussions raised the duality related to the difficulties in implementing GCCP in an academic innovative research framework on one hand, and on the other hand, the need for such GCCP principles in order to ensure reproducibility and robustness of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing. Indeed, if good cell culture principles are critical to take into consideration for all uses of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing, the level of application of such principles may depend on the stage of development of the test method as well as on the applications of the test methods, i.e., academic innovative research vs. regulatory standardized test method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Religious literacy in the system of cultural competencies in the training of law students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolsky Evgeny Vladimirovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a clear definition of general cultural competence of the future specialist, it is shown that they represent a social expectation of the fact that a graduate student entering into the social life, shares the values that prevail in this society: high moral characteristics and values of humanism, has a common language, legal culture. In this context, religious literacy is considered, in the presentation we prove that it is an organic part of the composition of the general cultural competences, complements and reveals their content. The article specifically states that religious education is a necessary and relevant part in the socialization of young people.

  3. Cultural competency in the physician assistant curriculum in the United States: a longitudinal study with two cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbra Beck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many Physician Assistant (PA programs have recently integrated cultural competency into their curricula. However, there is little evidence tracking the longitudinal effectiveness of curricula on culture competency. This study tested whether amount of exposure to a cultural competency curriculum affected self-assessments of cultural awareness among two cohorts of students. Method: Cohort 1 and Cohort 2 students completed a cultural awareness survey at the beginning of the program and retook the survey at three intervals during the first year. Results: Regression analyses confirmed significant linear relationships (two-tailed α < .05 between responses and interval number on all questions for each cohort, with exception of Question 8 for Cohort 2. Conclusion: Results from Cohort 2 replicated those from Cohort 1 suggesting that cultural awareness among PA students benefits from repeated exposure to lessons on cultural competency. Schools attempting to develop or expand cultural awareness among students should consider integrating cultural competency training throughout the PA curriculum.

  4. Training on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview Improves Cultural Competence in General Psychiatry Residents: A Multi-site Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stacia; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Xiao, Anna Q; Bourque, Marie Claire; Rojas, Sandra M Peynado; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Simpson, Annabelle K; Maye, Aleea; Lo, Pachida; Clark, Aaron; Lim, Russell; Lu, Francis G

    2016-10-01

    The authors assessed whether a 1-h didactic session on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) improves cultural competence of general psychiatry residents. Psychiatry residents at six residency programs completed demographics and pre-intervention questionnaires, were exposed to a 1-h session on the CFI, and completed a post-intervention questionnaire. Repeated measures ANCOVA compared pre- to post-intervention change. Linear regression assessed whether previous cultural experience predicted post-intervention scores. Mean scores on the questionnaire significantly changed from pre- to post-intervention (p cultural experience did not predict post-intervention scores. Psychiatry residents' cultural competence scores improved with a 1-h session on the CFI but with notable limitations.

  5. Educational stratification in cultural participation: Cognitive competence or status motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.; Bol, Th.; Werfhorst, van de H.G.; Ganzeboom, H.B.G.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines educational stratification in highbrow cultural participation. There are two contrasting explanations of why cultural participation is stratified. The status hypothesis predicts that people come to appreciate particular forms of art because it expresses their belonging to a cer

  6. Educational stratification in cultural participation: cognitive competence or status motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Notten; B. Lancee; H.G. van de Werfhorst; H.B.G. Ganzeboom

    2014-01-01

    This article examines educational stratification in highbrow cultural participation. There are two contrasting explanations of why cultural participation is stratified. The status hypothesis predicts that people come to appreciate particular forms of art because it expresses their belonging to a cer

  7. Culture,Textbooks and the Development of Intercultural Communicative Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN; Yuan

    2015-01-01

    <正>Byram(1993,p.13)argues that language and culture learning should be integrated with each other as language is a way of interacting with others.However,when the target language is English which is now the world’s lingua franca in the global village(Graddol,2006),the scope of target culture is becoming

  8. Cooperating or competing in three languages : Cultural accommodation or alienation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gargalianou, Vasiliki; Urbig, D.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of using foreign languages on cooperative behavior in a prisoner’s dilemma setting. The cultural accommodation hypothesis suggests that people are less cooperative in English, associated with the Anglophone cultural cluster, than in French, wh

  9. Cultural Competence and the Operational Level of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    2122.html. 85 J. Stewart Black and Mark Mendenhall , "Cross-Cultural Training Effectiveness: A Review and a Theoretical Framework for Future," The...Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2011. Black, J. Stewart, and Mark Mendenhall . "Cross-Cultural Training Effectiveness: A Review and a Theoretical

  10. [Application of the cultural competence model in the experience of care in nursing professionals Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Estevan, María Dolores; Solano Ruíz, María Del Carmen

    2017-06-10

    To know the experiences and perceptions of nurses in providing care and health promotion, women belonging to groups at risk of social vulnerability, applying the model of cultural competence Purnell. Phenomenological qualitative study. Department of Health Elda. A total of 22 primary care professional volunteers. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with recording and content analysis, according to the theory model of cultural competence. Socio-cultural factors influence the relationship between professionals and users of the system. The subtle racism and historical prejudices create uncomfortable situations and mistrust. The language barrier makes it difficult not only communication, but also the monitoring and control of the health-disease process. The physical appearance and stereotypes are determining factors for primary care professionals. Although perceived misuse of health services are also talking about changes. The spiritual aspects of religious beliefs alone are taken into account in the case of Muslim women, not being considered as important in the case of Gypsy women and Romanian women. To provide quality care, consistent and culturally competent, it is necessary to develop training programs for professionals in cultural competence, to know the culture of other, and work without preconceived ideas, and ethnocentric; since the greater the knowledge of the cultural group being served, the better the quality of care provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. A Quantitative Assessment of the Research Chefs Association Core Competencies for the Practicing Culinologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Rachel L.; Cheng, Michael S. H.; Brannan, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Professional organizations have linked core competency to professional success and competitive strategy. The Research Chefs Assn. (RCA) recently released 43 core competencies for practicing culinologists. Culinology[R] is a profession that links skills of culinary arts and food science and technology in the development of food products. An online…

  12. A Delphi Study of Effective Practices for Developing Competency-Based Learning Models in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre-Hite, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is an increase in competency-based education programs in higher education institutions in response to student and employer needs. However, research is lacking on effective practices for developing competencies, assessments, and learning resources for these programs. The purpose of this qualitative Delphi study was to gather expert…

  13. Professional communication competences of paramedics--practical and educational perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włoszczak-Szubzda, Anna; Jarosz, Mirosław J; Goniewicz, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    Dissonance between the high 'technical' competences of medical professionals, including paramedics or emergency medical technicians (EMT), and the relatively low level of patient satisfaction with care received, is a phenomenon observed in many countries. Many studies show that it occurs in the case of an inadequate interpersonal communication between medical professionals and patients. The primary goal of the presented research was evaluation of the level (study of the state) of communication competences of paramedics, and determination of the factors on which this level depends. An additional goal was analysis of the needs and educational possibilities within the existing models of education in the area of interpersonal communication provided by higher medical education institutions. The following three methods were used: 1) documentation analysis (standards, plans and educational programmes); 2) diagnostic survey concerning professional communication competences of paramedics; 3) self-reported communication skills in emergency medical services--adjective check list. The last two instruments were subject to standardization from the aspect of reliability and validity. The study group covered a total of 105 respondents in the following subgroups: 1) professional paramedics who, as a rule, were not trained in interpersonal communication (31 respondents); paramedic students covered by a standard educational programme (54 respondents); 3) paramedic students who, in addition to a standard educational programme, attended extra courses in professional interpersonal communications (20 respondents). The results of studies indicate poor efficacy of shaping communication competences of paramedics based on education in the area of general psychology and general interpersonal communication. Communication competences acquired by paramedics during undergraduate education are subject to regression during occupational activity. Methods of evaluating communication competences are

  14. CHIP: Facilitating Interprofessional and Culturally Competent Patient Care Through Experiential Learning in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Keli; Peck, Kirk; Jensen, Lou; Bracciano, Al; Carrico, Cathy; Feldhacker, Diana

    2016-12-01

    Health care professionals have advocated for educating culturally competent practitioners. Immersion in international experiences has an impact on student cultural competency and interprofessional development. The China Honors Interprofessional Program (CHIP) at a university in the Midwest is designed to increase students' cultural competency and interprofessional development. From 2009 to 2013, a total of 25 professional students including twelve occupational therapy students, ten physical therapy students and three nursing students were enrolled in the programme. Using a one group pre and posttest research design, this study evaluated the impact of CHIP on the participating students. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected in the study. Findings of the study revealed that CHIP has impact on students' cultural competency and professional development including gaining appreciation and understanding of the contributions of other healthcare professionals and knowledge and skills in team work. The findings of the study suggested that international immersion experience such as CHIP is an important way to increase students' cultural competency and interprofessional knowledge and skills. Limitations of the study included the small sample in the study, indirect outcome measures and the possible celling effect of the instruments of the study. Future research studies should include a larger and more representative sample, direct outcome measures such as behaviour observation and more rigorous design such as prospective experimental comparison group design. Future research should also examine the long-term effects of international experience on the professional development of occupational therapy students. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Should we rethink how we teach cultural competency in physician assistant education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia J

    2012-01-01

    Cultural competency training has traditionally been viewed as addressing race and ethnicity and its influence on health care disparity. There are many aspects of culture or diversity that have been overshadowed in physician assistant education but are equally as important. These cultural elements include socioeconomic status, religion, sexual orientation, and disability. This article will briefly discuss the importance of these elements and how each can affect the medical care of patients in these diverse populations.

  16. Self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies for doctor of nursing practice students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeungok; Zucker, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only 1 area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies.

  17. PERSONAL CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE IN BIOGRAPHICAL AND HAGIOGRAPHICAL LIFE AND ACTIVITIES OF SAINT ANTHIM THE IBERIAN (GEORGIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam VAKHTANG AKHALADZE

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze the biographical and hagiographical life and multifaceted activities of St. Anthim the Iberian in cross-cultural communicative dimension. Modern Post-Global world and its Weltanschauung need not onlytrans(cross-cultural, but also trans-historical contexts. We have designated the existence of trans-cultural polylogue (dialogue of many between all historical eras and ethnicities with their cultural codes and symbols. Our research enabled us to identify the following parameters of trans-cultural communicative competence: (i adequately assess the communicative situation; (ii possession of a certain body of knowledge about the native and other cultures; (iii to put into practice intercultural communicative intentions; (iv presence of not only the ability to understand other cultures, as well as members of their own culture, but also the ability to build new patterns of behavior, based on the values and norms of different cultures; (v strive to mix our own and others' cultural identity and as a result of the exchange of positive examples of actions and patterns of decision-making to go to a qualitatively new synthesis of action; (vi check the communication results with the help of feedback. We also identified the following aspects and facts of life and activity of Anthim the Iberian in the context of cross-cultural communicative competence: (a getting a wonderful upbringing (social intercultural communicative abilities and skills, and education (the possession of a certain body of knowledge about both native and other cultures, understanding and respect for diverse cultural values; (b the forced emigration of the native culture medium (communicative and behavioral adaptation to the behavior of other cultures; (c the experience of cruelty trafficking – the kidnapping and slavery sale (the religious-spiritual, social and cross-cultural communicative negative experience and its interpretation in a truly constructive manner that

  18. Teaching Pragmatic Competence: A Journey from Teaching Cultural Facts to Teaching Cultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenchuk, Iryna; Ahmed, Amer

    2013-01-01

    Pragmatic competence is one of the essential competences taught in the second language classroom. The Canadian Language Benchmarks (CCLB, 2012a), the standard document referred to in any federally funded program of ESL teaching in Canada, acknowledges the importance of this competence, yet at the same time notes the limited resources available to…

  19. Cultural Competence in Pediatrics: Health Care Provider Knowledge, Awareness, and Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Dabney

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a cultural competence training (CCT program on pediatric health care providers’ self-reported ability to provide culturally competent care to a diverse pediatric patient population. This quantitative, nested ecologic level study design used a repeated measure in the form of pre-test and post-test data to assess percent change in providers’ cultural awareness, experience working or learning about different cultures, and preparedness and skills in working with different cultures before and after CCT. The study was conducted between 2011 and 2012 in a pediatric hospital and associated outpatient offices. The sample consisted of pediatric health care providers from various departments, mainly physicians and nurses (n = 69. Participants completed a pre-intervention cultural competence assessment and then were subjected to a cultural competence-training program, after which they completed the assessment a second time. The baseline and post-intervention data were collected in the form of Likert scales and transformed into a quintile or quartile scale as appropriate. Data were assessed using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon’s signed-rank tests. Providers indicated a 13% increase in knowledge (53.9% vs. 66.7%, t = 3.4, p = 0.001, 8.7% increase in awareness (46.7% vs. 55.4%, t = 3.0, p = 0.002, and 8% statistically marginal increase in skills (66.4% vs. 74.5%, z = 1.8, p = 0.06. Culturally competent training in a pediatric environment significantly enhances knowledge, awareness and to some extent skills in providing care to culturally diverse patient population.

  20. Therapist Multicultural Competence, Asian American Participants’ Cultural Values, and Counseling Process

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shihwe; Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Asian Americans drop out of mental health treatment at a high rate. This problem could be addressed by enhancing therapists’ multicultural competence and by examining clients’ cultural attitudes that may affect the counseling process. In the present study, we used a video analogue design with a sample of 113 Asian American college students to examine these possibilities. The result from a t test showed that the session containing therapist multicultural competencies received higher ratings th...

  1. International survey of veterinarians to assess the importance of competencies in professional practice and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Harold G J; Teunissen, Pim W; Boerboom, Tobias B B; Rhind, Susan M; Baillie, Sarah; Tegzes, John; Annandale, Henry; Matthew, Susan; Torgersen, Anne; Hecker, Kent G; Härdi-Landerer, Christina M; Gomez-Lucia, Esperanza; Ahmad, Bashir; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; van Beukelen, Peter

    2014-10-15

    To determine the perceived importance of specific competencies in professional veterinary practice and education among veterinarians in several countries. Survey-based prospective study. 1,137 veterinarians in 10 countries. Veterinarians were invited via email to participate in the study. A framework of 18 competencies grouped into 7 domains (veterinary expertise, communication, collaboration, entrepreneurship, health and welfare, scholarship, and personal development) was used. Respondents rated the importance of each competency for veterinary professional practice and for veterinary education by use of a 9-point Likert scale in an online questionnaire. Quantitative statistical analyses were performed to assess the data. All described competencies were perceived as having importance (with overall mean ratings [all countries] ≥ 6.45/9) for professional practice and education. Competencies related to veterinary expertise had the highest ratings (overall mean, 8.33/9 for both professional practice and education). For the veterinary expertise, entrepreneurship, and scholarship domains, substantial differences (determined on the basis of statistical significance and effect size) were found in importance ratings among veterinarians in different countries. Results indicated a general consensus regarding the importance of specific types of competencies in veterinary professional practice and education. Further research into the definition of competencies essential for veterinary professionals is needed to help inform an international dialogue on the subject.

  2. International survey of veterinarians to assess the importance of competencies in professional practice and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, H.G.; Teunissen, P.W.; Boerboom, T.B.; Rhind, S.M.; Baillie, S.; Tegzes, J.; Annandale, H.; Matthew, S.; Torgersen, A.; Hecker, K.G.; Hardi-Landerer, C.M.; Gomez-Lucia, E.; Ahmad, B.; Muijtjens, A.M.; Jaarsma, D.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Beukelen, P. van

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the perceived importance of specific competencies in professional veterinary practice and education among veterinarians in several countries. DESIGN: Survey-based prospective study. SAMPLE: 1,137 veterinarians in 10 countries. PROCEDURES: Veterinarians were invited via email

  3. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Instrument to Assess Cross-Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals (CCCHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Gerda; Knibbe, Ronald A; von Wolff, Alessa; Dingoyan, Demet; Schulz, Holger; Mösko, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competence of healthcare professionals (HCPs) is recognized as a strategy to reduce cultural disparities in healthcare. However, standardised, valid and reliable instruments to assess HCPs' cultural competence are notably lacking. The present study aims to 1) identify the core components of cultural competence from a healthcare perspective, 2) to develop a self-report instrument to assess cultural competence of HCPs and 3) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the new instrument. The conceptual model and initial item pool, which were applied to the cross-cultural competence instrument for the healthcare profession (CCCHP), were derived from an expert survey (n = 23), interviews with HCPs (n = 12), and a broad narrative review on assessment instruments and conceptual models of cultural competence. The item pool was reduced systematically, which resulted in a 59-item instrument. A sample of 336 psychologists, in advanced psychotherapeutic training, and 409 medical students participated, in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of the CCCHP. Construct validity was supported by principal component analysis, which led to a 32-item six-component solution with 50% of the total variance explained. The different dimensions of HCPs' cultural competence are: Cross-Cultural Motivation/Curiosity, Cross-Cultural Attitudes, Cross-Cultural Skills, Cross-Cultural Knowledge/Awareness and Cross-Cultural Emotions/Empathy. For the total instrument, the internal consistency reliability was .87 and the dimension's Cronbach's α ranged from .54 to .84. The discriminating power of the CCCHP was indicated by statistically significant mean differences in CCCHP subscale scores between predefined groups. The 32-item CCCHP exhibits acceptable psychometric properties, particularly content and construct validity to examine HCPs' cultural competence. The CCCHP with its five dimensions offers a comprehensive assessment of HCPs' cultural competence, and has the

  4. Practice-based competencies for accreditation of and training in graduate programs in genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, B A; Baker, D L; Fiddler, M B

    1996-09-01

    In January 1996, the American Board of Genetic Counseling (ABGC) adopted 27 practice-based competencies as a standard for assessing the training of graduate students in genetic counseling. These competencies were identified and refined through a collective, narrative process that took place from January through November 1994, and included directors of graduate programs in genetic counseling, ABGC board members and expert consultants. These competencies now form the basis of the document "Requirements for Graduate Programs in Genetic Counseling Seeking Accreditation by the American Board of Genetic Counseling" (American Board of Genetic Counseling, 1996). The competencies are organized into four domains and are presented and discussed in this article.

  5. Integrating Theory, Content, and Method to Foster Critical Consciousness in Medical Students: A Comprehensive Model for Cultural Competence Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Diane K; Goss, Adeline L; Hoekzema, Andrew S; Kelly, Lauren A; Logan, Alexander A; Mehta, Sanjiv D; Sandesara, Utpal N; Munyikwa, Michelle R; DeLisser, Horace M

    2017-03-01

    Many efforts to design introductory "cultural competence" courses for medical students rely on an information delivery (competence) paradigm, which can exoticize patients while obscuring social context, medical culture, and power structures. Other approaches foster a general open-minded orientation, which can remain nebulous without clear grounding principles. Medical educators are increasingly recognizing the limitations of both approaches and calling for strategies that reenvision cultural competence training. Successfully realizing such alternative strategies requires the development of comprehensive models that specify and integrate theoretical frameworks, content, and teaching principles.In this article, the authors present one such model: Introduction to Medicine and Society (IMS), a required cultural competence course launched in 2013 for first-year medical students at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Building on critical pedagogy, IMS is centered on a novel specification of "critical consciousness" in clinical practice as an orientation to understanding and pragmatic action in three relational domains: internal, interpersonal, and structural. Instead of transmitting discrete "facts" about patient "types," IMS content provokes students to engage with complex questions bridging the three domains. Learning takes place in a small-group space specifically designed to spur transformation toward critical consciousness. After discussing the three key components of the course design and describing a representative session, the authors discuss the IMS model's implications, reception by students and faculty, and potential for expansion. Their early experience suggests the IMS model successfully engages students and prepares future physicians to critically examine experiences, manage interpersonal dynamics, and structurally contextualize patient encounters.

  6. INFORMATION AND NETWORKING AS THE MOST EFFECTIVE FACTOR IN THE OF ETHNO-CULTURAL COMPETENCE OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN IN PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Anatolievna AKULININA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the features of «information and networking» preschool with his family. Analysis was made of psychological and pedagogical literature on «information and networking», which showed that in or-der to achieve positive results in the formation of ethno-cultural competence of preschool teachers need practical interaction with parents means «computer communica-tions». It is concluded that the currently topical area of cooperation between preschool and his family is just information and networking, as the most effective factor in the formation of ethno-cultural competence of pre-school children.

  7. Professional communication competences of physiotherapists -- practice and educational perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włoszczak-Szubzda, Anna; Jarosz, Mirosław J

    2013-01-01

    Dissonance between the high 'technical' competences of medical professionals, including physiotherapists, and the relatively low level of patient satisfaction with care received is a phenomenon observed in many countries. Many studies show that it occurs in the case of an inadequate interpersonal communication between medical professionals and patients. The primary goal of the presented research was evaluation of the level (study of the state) of communication competences of physiotherapists, and determination of the factors on which this level depends. An additional goal was analysis of the needs and educational possibilities within the existing models of education in the area of interpersonal communication provided by higher medical education institutions. The self-designed questionnaire and adjective check list were subject to standardization from the aspect of reliability and validity. Information available on the websites of 20 educational facilities in Poland were compared. The study group covered a total number of 115 respondents in the following subgroups: 1) occupationally-active physiotherapists who, as a rule, were not trained in interpersonal communication (35 respondents); students of physiotherapy covered by a standard educational programme (60 respondents); 3) students of physiotherapy who, in addition to a standard educational programme, attended extra courses in professional interpersonal communications (20 respondents). The results of studies indicate poor efficacy of shaping communication competences of physiotherapists based on education in the area of general psychology and general interpersonal communication. Communication competences acquired during undergraduate physiotherapy education are subject to regression during occupational activity. Methods of evaluating communication competences are useful in constructing group and individual programmes focused on specific communication competences, rather than on general communication skills.

  8. Racial Dynamics and Cultural Competence Training in Medical and Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Margarita; Dise, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    Using the Self-Assessment of Perceived Level of Cultural Competence (SAPLCC) questionnaire, frequencies, means, and ANOVAS were determined to create medical and pharmacy student profiles of cultural competence. Profiles were used to identify needs for training and underscore critical issues that should be given priority in the curriculum. Significant differences were found in several domains of cultural competence (knowledge, skills, attitudes, and abilities); they may be explained by differences in the implementation of a pilot curriculum, the racial composition of students in both programs, and other characteristics. However, in the awareness domain, the main differences found may be explained only by respondents' attitudes and their personal experiences. Results confirm the importance of examining the racial dynamics factor and the need to address this sensitive topic early in the academic programs so students are prepared more fully to have sincere and meaningful encounters with their patients during the clinical years and as health care providers.

  9. Cultural Competence of Healthcare Providers: A Systematic Review of Assessment Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Jung; Lee, Chia-Kuei; Huang, Mei-Chih

    2017-06-01

    Few articles in the literature identify and describe the instruments that are regularly used by scholars to measure cultural competence in healthcare providers. This study reviews the psychometric properties of the several instruments that are used regularly to assess the cultural competence of healthcare providers. Researchers conducted a systematic review of the relevant articles that were published between 1983 and 2013 and listed on academic and government Web sites or on one or more of the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC, PsycINFO, Psyc ARTICLES, PubMed, Cochrane, Pro Quest, Google Scholar, CNKI (China), and the National Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (Taiwan). This study included 57 articles. Ten instruments from these articles were identified and analyzed. These instruments included five that were presented in English and five that were presented in Chinese. All were self-administered and based on respondent perceptions. Five of the 10 instruments were designed to measure cultural competence, two were designed to measure cultural sensitivity, two were designed to measure transcultural self-efficacy, and one was designed to measure cultural awareness. The six cultural dimensions addressed by these instruments were attitudes, knowledge, skills, behaviors, desires, and encounters. An expert panel validated the content of the 10 instruments. The subscales explained 33%-90% of the variance in scores for eight of the instruments. The reliability of the 10 instruments was estimated based on the internal consistency, which ranged from .57 to .97. This systematic review may assist researchers to choose appropriate instruments to assess the cultural competence of healthcare providers. The findings of this review indicate that no single instrument is adequate to evaluate cultural competence in all contexts.

  10. Minimum Requirements for Core Competency in Pediatric Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Elizabeth A; Burke, Margaret M; Johnson, Peter N; Klein, Kristin C; Miller, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    Colleges of pharmacy provide varying amounts of didactic and clinical hours in pediatrics resulting in variability in the knowledge, skills, and perceptions of new graduates toward pediatric pharmaceutical care. The Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the application of a minimum set of core competencies for all pharmacists involved in the care of hospitalized children.

  11. Competency-based medical education : theory to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, Jason R.; Snell, Linda S.; Ten Cate, Olle; Holmboe, Eric S.; Carraccio, Carol; Swing, Susan R.; Harris, Peter; Glasgow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Craig; Dath, Deepak; Harden, Ronald M.; Iobst, William; Long, Donlin M.; Mungroo, Rani; Richardson, Denyse L.; Sherbino, Jonathan; Silver, Ivan; Taber, Sarah; Talbot, Martin; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Although competency-based medical education (CBME) has attracted renewed interest in recent years among educators and policy-makers in the health care professions, there is little agreement on many aspects of this paradigm. We convened a unique partnership - the International CBME Collaborators - to

  12. [Training -- competency-based education -- learning theory and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Georg

    2013-11-01

    A lifelong learning process is necessarily the basis for the specialization and expertise in the field of anesthesiology. Thus competency as a physician is a complex, multidimensional construction of knowledge, skills and attitudes to be able to solve and persist the complex daily work challenges in a flexible and responsible way. Experts therefore showflexible and intuitive capabilities in pursuing their profession. Accordingly modern competency based learning objectives are very helpful. The DGAI Commission for “Further Education” already thought ahead in defining a competencybased curriculum for the specialization in the field of anesthesiology and could be integrated into the frameworks of the German Medical Association. In addition to the curricular framework elements of assessment are necessary. A single oral exam is consequently not representative for different levels of competencies. However, there is beside the responsibility of the learners for their learning processalso a high obligation of the clinical teachers to attend the learning process and to ensure a positive learning atmosphere with scope for feedback. Some competencies potentially could be better learned in a “sheltered” room based on simulation outside the OR, for example to train rare incidents or emergency procedures. In general there should be ongoing effort to enhance the process of expertise development, also in context of patient safety and quality management.

  13. Administrative Behaviors and Emotional and Social Competences of Higher Education Administrators: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Ferda BEYTEKİN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, higher education administrators, administrative behaviors; as educator, leader and manager, emotional competency; as self awareness and self management and social competency; as social awareness and social skills were compared according to two different cultures. The data was collected by inventories from 165 educators, and head of the departments Istanbul, and Helsinki Universities in 2008-2009 educational year. Elkins' administrative behaviors of higher education administrators inventory and Goleman's emotional and social competence inventory were conducted to test the differences. The manager behaviors of Istanbul University administrators are significantly higher than University of Helsinki administrators. The emotional competences of University of Helsinki administrators are significantly higher than the administrators of Istanbul University in the dimensions of self-awareness, self management, emotional selfcontrol, achievement orientation and positive outlook. The social competencies of University of Helsinki administrators are significantly higher than the administrators of Istanbul University in the dimensions of social awareness, empathy, and conflict management. On the other hand, the social competencies of Istanbul University administrators are significantly higher than the administrators of University of Helsinki in the dimensions of organizational awareness, coach and mentor, influence and teamwork. There is a significant positive relationship between the leadership behaviors and emotional and social competencies administrators in both Istanbul University and University of Helsinki. Significant differences are found between faculties and administrators about the administrative behaviors and emotional and social competences of administrators both at İstanbul University and University of Helsinki.

  14. A Cross-Cultural View of Strategic Competency: The Perspective of SME Entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Hazlina AHMAD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study attempts to understand the prevalence of strategic competency among entrepreneurs in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs in Australia and Malaysia. A sample of 20 SME entrepreneurs from Australia and Malaysia participated in this study. A series of interviews were conducted to probe into the behaviours that delineate strategic competency among these entrepreneurs. The results showed that SME entrepreneurs in both countries highlighted the importance of strategic competency in managing and running their ventures despite some minor variations in terms of the practices across country. This study provides entrepreneurs with knowledge about the way they should operate their business and encourages them to be conscious of the importance of strategic competency in managing their business and increasing the odds of success. The study also shows that entrepreneurs are capable of minimising the negative impact of business environment if they are willing to equip themselves with strategic competency.

  15. Multicultural Psychiatric Education: Using the DSM-IV-TR Outline for Cultural Formulation to Improve Resident Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Treniece Lewis; McQuery, Joy; Raab, Barbara; Elmore, Shekinah

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors present a 9-week multicultural competence course organized around the DSM-IV-TR Outline for Cultural Formulation. Method: The course alternated large group lectures with experiential small group discussions to acquire knowledge, develop skills, and explore attitudes. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of the course on…

  16. Practice to research: integrating evidence-based practices with culture and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisner, Thomas S; Hay, M Cameron

    2015-04-01

    There are ways to integrate culturally competent services (CCS) and evidence-based practices (EBP) which can improve the experiences of patients and their families and communities when faced with health problems, as well as the effectiveness and positive experiences of practitioners. CCS and EBP evidence should be jointly deployed for helping patients and clinicians. Partnership research models are useful for achieving the integration of CCS and EBP, since they involve close observation of and participation by clinicians and practitioners in the research process, and often use integrated qualitative and quantitative mixed methods. We illustrate this with 3 examples of work that can help integrate CCS and EBP: ongoing collection of information from patients, clinicians and staff, or "evidence farming"; close study and continuous improvement of activities and accommodations; and use of evidence of tacit, implicit cultural scripts and norms, such as being "productive," as well as explicit scripts. From a research practice point of view, collaborative partnerships will likely produce research with culture and context bracketed in, and will contribute stronger research models, methods, and units of analysis.

  17. Effect of an informatics for evidence-based practice curriculum on nursing informatics competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Karen S; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Jenkins, Melinda; Bakken, Suzanne

    2005-12-01

    Effective and appropriate use of information and communication technologies is an essential competency for all health care professionals. The purpose of this paper is to describe the effect of an evolving informatics for evidence-based practice (IEBP) curriculum on nursing informatics competencies in three student cohorts in the combined BS/MS program for non-nurses at the Columbia University School of Nursing. A repeated-measures, non-equivalent comparison group design was used to determine differences in self-rated informatics competencies pre- and post-IEBP and between cohorts at the end of the BS year of the combined BS/MS program. The types of Computer Skill competencies on which the students rated themselves as competent (> or =3) on admission were generic in nature and reflective of basic computer literacy. Informatics competencies increased significantly from admission to BS graduation in all areas for the class of 2002 and in all, but three areas, for the class of 2003. None of the three cohorts achieved competence in Computer Skills: Education despite curricular revisions. There were no significant differences between classes at the end of the BS year. Innovative educational approaches, such as the one described in this paper demonstrate promise as a method to achieve informatics competence. It is essential to integrate routine measurement of informatics competency into the curriculum so that approaches can be refined as needed to ensure informatics competent graduates.

  18. The Production of a Framework of Competences for Pharmacy Practice in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the PHAR-QA (quality assurance in European pharmacy education and training project is the production of a European framework for a quality assurance system based on competences for pharmacy practice. The PHAR-QA framework will be European, consultative and will encompass the various aspects of pharmacy practice. In this review, we describe the methodology to be used in the project and the first stage in the development of this framework. Using the proposals for competences produced by our previous PHARMINE (Pharmacy education in Europe project, together with those of other sources, three university professors of pharmacy (Authors 2 through 4 produced a list of three major competency domains that reflect the activities of practitioners: Patient Care Competences, Personal Competences and Management and Organizational Structure Competences. Each domain was subdivided into nine, nine and eight competencies, respectively, for a total of 27 major competencies that were further subdivided into an average of five supporting competences per major competence, giving a total of 140 proposals for competences for pharmacy practice. The 27 and 140 proposals were ranked by an expert panel of seven university professors of pharmacy (Authors 5 through 11. The panel also commented on the proposed competences. On the basis of the ranks and comments, a list of 68 proposals for competences was produced. This list was then examined by the expert panel and a new version based on their comments produced. The latter process was repeated twice based on Delphi methodology. This review presents this process and the 68 proposals. We invite the pharmacy community to participate in the second stage of the elaboration of the PHAR-QA competence framework for pharmacy practice by ranking the proposals and adding comments. It is anticipated that this survey will stimulate a productive discussion on pharmacy education and practice by the various stakeholders

  19. Assessing the efficacy of LGBT cultural competency training for aging services providers in California's central valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Valerie L; Breshears, Elizabeth M; Ringstad, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the outcomes of a cultural competency training for aging services providers regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Results indicate that participants significantly increased their knowledge, skills, and positive attitudes about working with LGBT older adults, with men and non-LGBT individuals reporting the most gain. Recommendations for future research include determining which factors influence the enduring effects of this type of training and developing a standardized instrument for measuring such success. Legislative and policy changes targeted at requiring this type of cultural competency training for all direct service providers are considered.

  20. Development of scales to assess patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rukhsana; Bates, Benjamin R

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the development of scales to measure patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions and thus contributes to promoting awareness of physician-patient intercultural interaction processes. Surveys were administrated to a total of 682 participants. Exploratory factor analyses were employed to assess emergent scales and subscales to develop reliable instruments. The first two phases were devoted to formative research and pilot study. The third phase was devoted to scale development, which resulted in a five-factor solution to measure patient perception of physicians' cultural competence for patient satisfaction.

  1. Health literacy practices and educational competencies for health professionals: a consensus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Clifford A; Hudson, Stan; Maine, Lucinda L

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals often lack adequate knowledge about health literacy and the skills needed to address low health literacy among patients and their caregivers. Many promising practices for mitigating the effects of low health literacy are not used consistently. Improving health literacy training for health care professionals has received increasing emphasis in recent years. The development and evaluation of curricula for health professionals has been limited by the lack of agreed-upon educational competencies in this area. This study aimed to identify a set of health literacy educational competencies and target behaviors, or practices, relevant to the training of all health care professionals. The authors conducted a thorough literature review to identify a comprehensive list of potential health literacy competencies and practices, which they categorized into 1 or more educational domains (i.e., knowledge, skills, attitudes) or a practice domain. The authors stated each item in operationalized language following Bloom's Taxonomy. The authors then used a modified Delphi method to identify consensus among a group of 23 health professions education experts representing 11 fields in the health professions. Participants rated their level of agreement as to whether a competency or practice was both appropriate and important for all health professions students. A predetermined threshold of 70% agreement was used to define consensus. After 4 rounds of ratings and modifications, consensus agreement was reached on 62 out of 64 potential educational competencies (24 knowledge items, 27 skill items, and 11 attitude items), and 32 out of 33 potential practices. This study is the first known attempt to develop consensus on a list of health literacy practices and to translate recommended health literacy practices into an agreed-upon set of measurable educational competencies for health professionals. Further work is needed to prioritize the competencies and practices in

  2. Perceived Safety, Quality and Cultural Competency of Maternity Care for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Women in Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Sarah; Miller, Yvette D

    2016-03-01

    Various policies, plans and initiatives have been implemented to provide safe, quality and culturally competent care to patients within Queensland's health care system. A series of models of maternity care are available in Queensland that range from standard public care to private midwifery care. The current study aimed to determine whether identifying as culturally or linguistically diverse (CALD) was associated with the perceived safety, quality and cultural competency of maternity care from a consumer perspective, and to identify specific needs and preferences of CALD maternity care consumers. Secondary analysis of data collected in the Having a Baby in Queensland Survey 2012 was used to compare the experiences of 655 CALD women to those of 4049 non-CALD women in Queensland, Australia, across three stages of maternity care: pregnancy, labour and birth, and after birth. After adjustment for model of maternity care received and socio-demographic characteristics, CALD women were significantly more likely than non-CALD women to experience suboptimal staff technical competence in pregnancy, overall perceived safety in pregnancy and labour/birth, and interpersonal sensitivity in pregnancy and labour/birth. Approximately 50 % of CALD women did not have the choice to use a translator or interpreter, or the gender of their care provider, during labour and birth. Thirteen themes of preferences and needs of CALD maternity care consumers based on ethnicity, cultural beliefs, or traditions were identified; however, these were rarely met. Findings imply that CALD women in Queensland experience disadvantageous maternity care with regards to perceived staff technical competence, safety, and interpersonal sensitivity, and receive care that lacks cultural competence. Improved access to support persons, continuity and choice of carer, and staff availability and training is recommended.

  3. Transferring Knowledge across Cultures: A Learning Competencies Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayes, Anna B.; Kayes, D. Christopher; Yamazaki, Yoshitaka

    2005-01-01

    At the heart of any successful cross-cultural knowledge transfer effort lies an individual or group of individuals with the skills to manage a complex, ambiguous and often stressful process. The ability to manage the knowledge transfer process depends as much on learning in real time as it does on rational planning. Yet, few approaches to…

  4. Got EQ?: Increasing Cultural and Clinical Competence through Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Shari A.

    2007-01-01

    Cultural intelligence has been described across three parameters of human behavior: cognitive intelligence, emotional intelligence (EQ), and physical intelligence. Each contributes a unique and important perspective to the ability of speech-language pathologists and audiologists to provide benefits to their clients regardless of cultural…

  5. Got EQ?: Increasing Cultural and Clinical Competence through Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Shari A.

    2007-01-01

    Cultural intelligence has been described across three parameters of human behavior: cognitive intelligence, emotional intelligence (EQ), and physical intelligence. Each contributes a unique and important perspective to the ability of speech-language pathologists and audiologists to provide benefits to their clients regardless of cultural…

  6. Culturally Competent Counseling for Religious and Spiritual African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Thomas, Cheryl; Day-Vines, Norma L.

    2008-01-01

    Religion and spirituality are deeply rooted in traditional African American culture. Data suggest that African American adolescents maintain higher baseline rates of religious activities and beliefs than their peers (Bachman, Johnston, & O'Malley, 2005; Smith, Faris, Denton, & Regnerus, 2003). Recognizing these data, this article examines…

  7. Culturally-Competent School Counseling with Asian American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Linda G.; Phoummarath, Marion J.

    2006-01-01

    Asian American adolescents are frequently overlooked as a population in need of counseling interventions. However, cultural issues such as refugee status or the pressure of high academic achievement can influence an Asian American student's mental health. As there is a dearth of school counseling literature written about what school counselors…

  8. Physician language ability and cultural competence. An exploratory study of communication with Spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alicia; Schillinger, Dean; Grumbach, Kevin; Rosenthal, Anne; Stewart, Anita L; Wang, Frances; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2004-02-01

    We studied physician-patient dyads to determine how physician self-rated Spanish-language ability and cultural competence affect Spanish-speaking patients' reports of interpersonal processes of care. Questionnaire study of 116 Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes and 48 primary care physicians (PCPs) at a public hospital with interpreter services. Primary care physicians rated their Spanish ability on a 5-point scale and cultural competence by rating: 1) their understanding of the health-related cultural beliefs of their Spanish-speaking patients; and 2) their effectiveness with Latino patients, each on a 4-point scale. We assessed patients' experiences using the interpersonal processes of care (IPC) in diverse populations instrument. Primary care physician responses were dichotomized, as were IPC scale scores (optimal vs nonoptimal). We analyzed the relationship between language and two cultural competence items and IPC, and a summary scale and IPC, using multivariate models to adjust for known confounders of communication. Greater language fluency was strongly associated with optimal IPC scores in the domain of elicitation of and responsiveness to patients, problems and concerns [Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR], 5.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.59 to 17.27]. Higher score on a language-culture summary scale was associated with three IPC domains - elicitation/responsiveness (AOR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.1 to 19.3), explanation of condition (AOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.0 to 7.34), and patient empowerment (AOR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.19)-and not associated with two more-technical communication domains. Physician self-rated language ability and cultural competence are independently associated with patients' reports of interpersonal process of care in patient-centered domains. Our study provides empiric support for the importance of language and cultural competence in the primary care of Spanish-speaking patients.

  9. Effectiveness of a developmental curricular design to graduate culturally competent health practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggis, Debra

    2012-01-01

    With the goal to facilitate cultural competency development of students enrolled in graduate-level health professional education, this study examined the effectiveness of a curricular program guided by the Intercultural Developmental Continuum (IDC) as measured by the Intercultural Developmental Inventory (IDI). The IDI was administered to 17 occupational therapy (OT) students and a control group of 25 non-OT health professional students upon matriculation into their respective programs of graduate study and again upon completion of 3 years of study. OT students participated in a cultural curricular design guided by the IDC, while the control group participated in cultural study not guided by the IDC. Though OT students did not show a significant change in overall developmental orientation mean scores from pre-test to post-test (t = 0.847, p = 0.41), the results indicate that the designed intercultural curriculum increased intercultural competence among those OT students who began their program with the monocultural mindset of polarization (an "us vs. them" evaluative viewpoint) and moved to the interculturally transitional mindset of minimization (recognizing cultural commonalities and elimination of the "us vs. them" mindset). The control group showed a significant decrease in developmental orientation mean scores at post-test (t = 6.1, p competency of OT students, appears to have mitigated a decrease in competence. Results suggest that the cultural challenges that students face appear to be considerable and, without targeted, integrated intercultural preparation, can overwhelm new health professionals' intercultural capability.

  10. Crosswalking public health and health education competencies: implications for professional preparation and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Lynn D; Auld, M Elaine; Miner, Kathleen; Alley, Kelly Bishop; Lysoby, Linda; Livingood, William C

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights similarities and differences between the public health competencies recently developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) and one public health specialty, health education (HE), which has used competencies in its quality assurance systems for more than 20 years. Based on a crosswalk methodology developed for this analysis, some 50 percent to 61 percent of the HE and ASPH competencies had similarities of varying degrees; 18 percent were deemed matches due to sameness in skill or content. Most similarities were found between the ASPH social and behavioral sciences competencies and the HE competencies. Significant domains of "no match" were found between the HE and ASPH competencies in the areas of Systems Thinking, Leadership, and Public Health Biology. The study results have implications for academic programs related to curricula review and revision, continuing education providers who are developing training agendas for the workforce, employers anticipating competencies in new job hires, and prospective students and practitioners who are considering a form of certification. Qualitative insights from the study related to professional culture, purpose, age, and consistency of the scope or depth of the two competency sets, as well as the crosswalk methodology itself, may be useful to those comparing other competency sets.

  11. Mental health learning needs assessment: competency-based instrument for best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Sylvia E

    2013-06-01

    A learning needs assessment focused on psychiatric/mental health nursing competency development is a central component of nursing education in specialty mental health nursing practice. The provision of education for mental health nursing relies on the underlying assumption that the learning needs of experienced mental health nurses have been assessed and educational programs implemented to address educational needs for competency in professional practice. Few professional learning needs assessments have been developed to identify learning needs in mental health nursing practice. The majority of available professional learning needs assessments focus on medical nursing practice applications rather than the psychosocial aspects of a mental health assessment. The mental health field addresses very different assessment criteria such as knowledge of suicide assessment and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this article is to present and describe the process of developing a learning needs assessment focused on competency development for the specialty practice of mental health nursing that addresses and resolves complex learning needs.

  12. Going Global: Toward Competency-Based Best Practices for Global Health in Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Shick, Elizabeth; Chaffee, Benjamin W; Benzian, Habib

    2017-06-01

    The Global Oral Health Interest Group of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (GOHIG-CUGH) published recommended competencies to support development of competency-based global health education in dental schools. However, there has been no comprehensive, systematically derived, or broadly accepted framework for creating and delivering competency-based global health education to dental students. This article describes the results of a collaborative workshop held at the 2016 American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Annual Session & Exhibition designed to build on the GOHIG-CUGH competencies and start to develop systematic approaches for their practical application. Workshop organizers developed a preliminary theoretical framework for guiding the development of global health in dental education, grounded in published research. Collectively, workshop participants developed detailed outcomes for the theoretical framework with a focus on three educational practices: didactic, experiential, and research learning and how each can meet the competencies. Participants discussed learning objectives, keys to implementation, ethical considerations, challenges, and examples of success. Outcomes demonstrated that no educational practice on its own meets all 33 recommended competencies for dental students; however, the three educational practices combined may potentially cover all 33. Participants emphasized the significance of sustainable approaches to student learning for both students and communities, with identified partners in the communities to collaborate on the development, implementation, evaluation, and long-term maintenance of any student global health activity. These findings may represent early steps toward professional consensus and best practices for global health in dental education in the United States.

  13. Organisational systems' approaches to improving cultural competence in healthcare: a systematic scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalman, Janya; Jongen, Crystal; Bainbridge, Roxanne

    2017-05-12

    Healthcare organisations serve clients from diverse Indigenous and other ethnic and racial groups on a daily basis, and require appropriate client-centred systems and services for provision of optimal healthcare. Despite advocacy for systems-level approaches to cultural competence, the primary focus in the literature remains on competency strategies aimed at health promotion initiatives, workforce development and student education. This paper aims to bridge the gap in available evidence about systems approaches to cultural competence by systematically mapping key concepts, types of evidence, and gaps in research. A literature search was completed as part of a larger systematic search of evaluations and measures of cultural competence interventions in health care in Canada, the United States, Australia and New Zealand. Seventeen peer-reviewed databases, 13 websites and clearinghouses, and 11 literature reviews were searched from 2002 to 2015. Overall, 109 studies were found, with 15 evaluating systems-level interventions or describing measurements. Thematic analysis was used to identify key implementation principles, intervention strategies and outcomes reported. Twelve intervention and three measurement studies met our inclusion criteria. Key principles for implementing systems approaches were: user engagement, organisational readiness, and delivery across multiple sites. Two key types of intervention strategies to embed cultural competence within health systems were: audit and quality improvement approaches and service-level policies or strategies. Outcomes were found for organisational systems, the client/practitioner encounter, health, and at national policy level. We could not determine the overall effectiveness of systems-level interventions to reform health systems because interventions were context-specific, there were too few comparative studies and studies did not use the same outcome measures. However, examined together, the intervention and measurement

  14. Dermatoses due to Indian cultural practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. 'Henna' use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. 'Kumkum' application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker 'bindis' and 'alta' induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with 'Holi' colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. 'Mudichood' represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device "kangri" is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause.

  15. Dermatoses Due to Indian Cultural Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ‘Henna’ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ‘Kumkum’ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ‘bindis’ and ‘alta’ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with ‘Holi’ colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. ‘Mudichood’ represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device “kangri” is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause. PMID:25657390

  16. Dermatoses due to indian cultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ′Henna′ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ′Kumkum′ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ′bindis′ and ′alta′ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with ′Holi′ colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. ′Mudichood′ represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device "kangri" is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause.

  17. How Effective is Cultural Competence Training of Healthcare Providers on Improving Patient Satisfaction of Minority Groups? A Systematic Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govere, Linda; Govere, Ephraim M

    2016-12-01

    With the rapid growth of minority populations in the United States, the need to train healthcare providers to give culturally competent care has never been greater. Extensive research on cultural competence of healthcare providers has been conducted, but no systematic review specifically focused on the effect of cultural competence training on patient satisfaction of clients from minority groups. To search and critically appraise published research articles that evaluated the effectiveness of cultural competence training of healthcare providers on improving patient satisfaction of clients from minority groups. Using MeSH entry terms: Competency, Cultural; Cultural Competencies; Cultural Competence; Competence, Cultural; Satisfaction, Patient; and non-MeSh text words: Cultural Awareness, Cultural Sensitivity, Cultural Competence Training, Cultural Sensitivity Training, and Cultural Awareness Training, a comprehensive literature search of peer-reviewed articles from 2002 to 2014 in CINAHL, Cochrane, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science databases was conducted. Original studies that reported cultural competence training and measured its impact on patient satisfaction were included. Quality of the reviewed studies was assessed on the basis of methodological limitations related to experimental design, sample size and sampling approaches, and ethnic spread of the participants. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Six studies revealed that cultural competence training intervention significantly increased the cultural competence level of healthcare providers. Five studies demonstrated that cultural competence training of healthcare providers was significantly associated with increased patient satisfaction. Cultural competence training is an effective intervention that enables healthcare providers to give culturally competent care that increases satisfaction of patients from minority groups. However, more research with better research designs, large sample sizes, and

  18. Impact of nurses' cross-cultural competence on nursing intellectual capital from a social cognitive theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    To understand the relationships among certain key factors such as organizational climate, self-efficacy and outcome expectation on registered nurses, with regard to the development of registered nurses' cross-cultural competence. The focus is specifically on the use of a social cognitive framework for nurses for providing intercultural nursing care to international patients. This study also aims to examine the relationship between nurses' cross-cultural competence and nursing intellectual capital. Given the influence of globalization on healthcare services, healthcare providers need to have enough cross-cultural competence to effectively care for patients from different cultures. Thus, the development of cross-cultural competence in nursing care has become an important issue. A quantitative method and a cross-sectional design were employed in this study. Data were collected from 309 RN working in 16 healthcare institutions in Taiwan from May to August 2013. Structural equation modelling, in combination with the smart partial least squares method, was used to measure the relationships in the research model. The results show that outcome expectation has a stronger impact on nurses' cross-cultural competence than self-efficacy. In addition, it was found that the cross-cultural competence of nurses has a positive impact on nursing intellectual capital. Nursing supervisors should promote a higher level of outcome expectation on nurses to enhance the improvement of their cross-cultural competence. Raising the cross-cultural competence of nurses will aid in the accumulation of nursing intellectual capital. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Problems of communicative competence in multi-cultural medical encounters in South African health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, T

    2006-11-01

    Research in health communication shows communicative competence to be an important aspect of successful health-care. Definitions of competence involve more than the participants, however; the position and status of these participants in terms of the medical hierarchy and accepted paradigm, the language of choice, educational levels and a host of other variables affect relationships and perceptions of competence. This article grapples with a number of issues that impact on communicative competence in the health-care professions, given the multi-lingual and -cultural society within South Africa as well as emerging shifts that foreground this debate. In particular, the thorny question around language use, the hegemonies of the past regarding a dominant lingua franca and subsequent issues involving translation and interpretation are discussed.

  20. Leading across cultures in the human age: an empirical investigation of intercultural competency among global leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Michael F; Bonial, Ron; Vanhove, Adam; Kedharnath, Uma

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a major, large-scale two-year empirical study to investigate intercultural competencies among global leaders and the relationship of these competencies to criteria of high performance global leadership. The study was designed to contribute to the emerging field of global leadership research by identifying and measuring proximal attributes and leadership criteria as suggested by Zaccaro's trait-based leadership model (American Psychologist 62: 6-16, 2007). Only global leaders were included in the study - CEO's, General Managers, Function Heads, or those with Profit and Loss responsibility for their businesses. These 1867 leaders of 13 nationalities were engaged in leading people across cultures - either on international assignment or working from their home base. A set of six intercultural competencies and three criteria of global leadership success were identified and compared across nationalities. The competencies were measured and used to predict success over time. Applications are discussed in terms of global leadership assessment and development.

  1. Caring for LGBTQ patients: Methods for improving physician cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Elizabeth W; Nakhai, Maliheh

    2016-05-01

    This article summarizes the components of a curriculum used to teach family medicine residents and faculty about LGBTQ patients' needs in a family medicine residency program in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. This curriculum was developed to provide primary care physicians and physicians-in-training with skills to provide better health care for LGBTQ-identified patients. The curriculum covers topics that range from implicit and explicit bias and appropriate terminology to techniques for crafting patient-centered treatment plans. Additionally, focus is placed on improving the understanding of specific and unique barriers to competent health care encountered by LGBTQ patients. Through facilitated discussion, learners explore the health disparities that disproportionately affect LGBTQ individuals and develop skills that will improve their ability to care for LGBTQ patients. The goal of the curriculum is to teach family medicine faculty and physicians in training how to more effectively communicate with and treat LGBTQ patients in a safe, non-judgmental, and welcoming primary care environment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. A Developmental Model of Cross-Cultural Competence at the Tactical Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Army. (2009). Army Culture and Foreign Language Strategy. Dunne, J. P. (2009). Maslow is non-deployable: Modifying Maslow’s hierarchy for contemporary...be destroyed when it is no longer needed . Please do not return it to the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. NOTE...efforts are addressing the need for general cross-cultural competence (3C). To support these efforts, this research aimed to identify the critical

  3. Facilitating reflective practice and self-assessment of competence through the use of narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy Lynn

    2007-03-01

    Reflective practice is a skill that is central to nursing students' professional development. Although there is an abundance of literature on the value of reflective practice there are few concrete methods that facilitate self-assessment of competence through the use of reflective practice. One such method is narrative reflection. A nursing narrative is a brief recount of an actual situation or episode in clinical practice that is significant because it resulted in new learning and/or new understanding. Narratives provide important opportunities for uncovering nursing practices that often go unnoticed and a new appreciation of the knowledge and skills of clinical practice. Nursing narratives reveal the richness of the clinical knowledge embedded in practice and provide a way for knowledge and practice to be linked together in meaningful dialogue, promoting interpretive analysis and reflection. A narrative approach contextualises knowledge and values and builds upon the clinical experiences of the student. Narratives afford opportunities for nursing students to: Learn from practice through reflection. Describe and critically analyse episodes of their clinical practice. Illuminate and assess their own level of competence by applying competency standards as a benchmark. Identify areas of strength and those requiring development. Develop practice-driven clinical learning objectives. Narratives have proven to be a successful means of developing students' ability to reflect upon and assess competence in a clinically relevant and motivating way. This paper will explore the possibilities that narratives hold for developing clinical acumen, promoting reflective practice, and assessing competence. It will provide an overview of narrative writing, and discuss some of the challenges encountered in the implementation of this clinical learning innovation at the author's university in Australia.

  4. African-Americans' perceptions of health care provider cultural competence that promote HIV medical self-care and antiretroviral medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Gina B

    2013-01-01

    Most studies of cultural competence in healthcare examine healthcare providers' definitions of cultural competence practices. This study is unique in that it examines the relationship between African-American patients' perceptions of the cultural competence of their HIV healthcare providers and the adherence of these patients to medical self-care and antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cross-sectional, exploratory, descriptive study was conducted at the Ruth Rothstein CORE Center in Chicago, Illinois. The sample consisted of 202 HIV-positive African-Americans who completed surveys during clinic visits. Multiple measures were used, including the Patient Assessments of Cultural Competency survey instrument developed by the Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Medical self-care was measured using the advice and instructions scale and the self-care symptom management for people living with HIV/AIDS categorical scale. ART adherence was measured using the Adherence Behaviors Self-Report and Adherence Self-Report scales. The data revealed many significant correlations between variables. The more patients believed that providers should integrate culture in HIV treatment; the better their reported health (F1,138=0.151, P=0.05) and the more they followed their provider's advice and instructions (medical self-care; F1,138=0.029, P=0.05). Participants who trusted their providers engaged in more medical self-care (F1,138=0.280, P=0.01). More shared treatment decisions were reported among participants who had higher levels of education (F1,127=0.337, P=0.05). Findings of this study indicate the need for increased attention to the role of cultural competence in HIV/AIDS care. Understanding patient perceptions of provider cultural competence has the potential to improve HIV treatment adherence and health outcomes.

  5. Investigación cualitativa en enfermería y competencia cultural Qualitative Nursing Research and Cultural Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Lillo Crespo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available La Competencia cultural como conocimiento aplicado a la Enfermería será uno de los temas de investigación mas significativos para las próximas décadas y el desarrollo de sus teorías y modelos representa el camino de progreso hacia la consecución de unos cuidados de calidad. El objetivo principal de este trabajo es mostrar las características del equipo de investigación en Enfermería a la hora de profundizar en el terreno de los cuidados, siempre desde la perspectiva de la Competencia cultural y obviamente mediante una metodología de investigación cualitativa. En el desarrollo del trabajo se define el área estudiada así como los componentes de la Competencia cultural aplicada a la investigación que son tres: el conocimiento cultural, la sensibilidad cultural y la colaboración cultural. Es a partir del desarrollo de estos tres puntos cuando podemos llegar a entender el papel del equipo investigador dentro de la metodología cualitativa aplicada a los cuidados de Enfermería, siempre teniendo como referencia la calidad en cuanto a la relación que se establezca entre el investigador y el individuo. Resulta necesario concluir afirmando que siempre que se de un relación de calidad habrá una posibilidad de llevar a cabo un investigación cualitativa de calidad que genere conocimiento enfermero.Cultural competence as a Nursing applied knowledge will be one of the most significant research areas for the next decades. Development of theories and models in Cultural competence shows a way of progress towards quality in cares. The aim of this article is to show the Nursing research team characteristics when going deepper into the Care research area from the view of Cultural competence and Qualitative research. This study gives a concept of Cultural competence as well as its three components such as: cultual knowledge, cultual sensitivity and cultural collaboration. These components help us to understand the role of the research team inside

  6. A meta-analysis of educational interventions designed to enhance cultural competence in professional nurses and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ruth W; Polanin, Joshua R

    2015-02-01

    Increasing professional nurses' and nursing students cultural competence has been identified as one way to decrease the disparity of care for vulnerable and minority groups, but effectiveness of training programs to increase competence remains equivocal. The purpose of this project is to synthesize educational interventions designed to increase cultural competence in professional nurses and nursing students. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to synthesize all existing studies on increasing cultural competence. A comprehensive search and screen procedures was conducted to locate all cultural competence interventions implemented with professional nurses and nursing students. Two independent researchers screened and coded the included studies. Effect sizes were calculated for each study and a random-effects meta-analysis was conducted. A total of 25 studies were included in the review. Two independent syntheses were conducted given the disparate nature of the effect size metrics. For the synthesis of treatment-control designed studies, the results revealed a non-statistically significant increase in cultural competence (g¯=.38, 95% CI: -.05, .79, p=.08). Moderator analyses indicated significant variation as a function of the measurements, participant types, and funding source. The pretest-posttest effect size synthesis revealed a significant increase in overall cultural competence (g¯=.45, 95% CI: .24, .66, pcultural competence have shown varied effectiveness. Greater research is required to improve these interventions and promote cultural competence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An examination of concordance and cultural competency in the diabetes care pathway: South Asians living in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, E; Randhawa, G

    2012-11-01

    The Care Pathway project used a multilevel and multimethod approach to explore access to the care pathway for diabetic renal disease. Taking what was known about the outcomes of ethnic minority patients with diabetic renal disease; the study sought to explore and further understand how and why South Asian patients' experiences may be different from the majority of population in relation to access. Through improved understanding of any observed inequalities, the study aimed to inform the development of culturally competent diabetes services. The design incorporated audits of patient indicators for diabetes and renal health at key points in the pathway: Diagnosis of diabetes and referral to specialist renal services in two years- 2004 and 2007, and qualitative individual interviews with patients and providers identified through the 2007 samples. This article describes the care provider perspective of access to diabetes care from a thematic analysis of 14 semistructured interviews conducted with professionals, at three study sites, with different roles in the diabetes pathway. National policy level initiatives to improve quality have been mirrored by quality improvements at the local practice level. These achievements, however, have been unable to address all aspects of care that service providers identified as important in facilitating access to all patient groups. Concordance emerged as a key process in improving access to care within the pathway system, and barriers to this exist at different levels and are greater for South Asian patients compared to White patients. A conceptual model of concordance as a process through which access to quality diabetes care is achieved and its relation to cultural competency is put forward. The effort required to achieve access and concordance among South Asian patients is inversely related to cultural competency at policy and practice levels. These processes are underpinned by communication.

  8. Students’ Socio-Cultural Competence Formation in Project Activity (Examplified by the Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Murayeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the model fostering the socio-cultural competence of the higher school students. The model in question is based on the integration of project activities and Web 2.0 information technologies, the methods facilitating its implementation being described along with the teaching means and forms, and socio-cultural competence formation levels. The author demonstrates the complex of problematic tasks which become more complicated depending on the acquired level of the above competence, and mastered skills and abilities. The tree types of socio-cultural projects are recommended according to the achieved levels: mini-project, web quest and web project. The suggested model fulfills the idea of pedagogic facilitation of the foreign language learning by using the meaning formation mechanism in socio- cultural educational environment. The author argues that its introduction into the higher school training process can promote the students’ interest to the different culture and mentality, and their readiness for the cross-cultural dialog over the internet. 

  9. Students’ Socio-Cultural Competence Formation in Project Activity (Examplified by the Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Murayeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the model fostering the socio-cultural competence of the higher school students. The model in question is based on the integration of project activities and Web 2.0 information technologies, the methods facilitating its implementation being described along with the teaching means and forms, and socio-cultural competence formation levels. The author demonstrates the complex of problematic tasks which become more complicated depending on the acquired level of the above competence, and mastered skills and abilities. The tree types of socio-cultural projects are recommended according to the achieved levels: mini-project, web quest and web project. The suggested model fulfills the idea of pedagogic facilitation of the foreign language learning by using the meaning formation mechanism in socio- cultural educational environment. The author argues that its introduction into the higher school training process can promote the students’ interest to the different culture and mentality, and their readiness for the cross-cultural dialog over the internet. 

  10. GLOBE Study Culture Clusters: Can They Be Found in Importance Ratings of Managerial Competencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jeremy Michael; Quast, Louis N.; Jang, Soebin; Wohkittel, Joseph; Center, Bruce; Edwards, Katherine; Bovornusvakool, Witsinee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore patterns of importance ratings of managerial competencies in 22 countries in different regions around the globe, to guide specificity in assessing and developing managers in multiple geographies. Additionally, this study examined the utility of clustering countries based on shared culture, as…

  11. The Arab American National Museum: Cultural Competency Training in Post-9/11 America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freij, Janice Ann

    2011-01-01

    In the aftermath of the tragic events of September 11th, 2001, Arab and Muslim Americans, already suffering from negative stereotyping, find themselves subject to greater hostility. The Arab American National Museum (AANM) has discovered that professional development and cultural competency training opportunities for law enforcement personnel,…

  12. Can Cultural Competence Be Taught? Evaluating the Impact of the SOAP Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin-Burque, Angie; Zugazaga, Carole B.; Davis-Maye, Denise

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the Self and Other Awareness Project (SOAP) cultural competence development model and presents the results of a study that evaluated its impact on the racial attitudes of 110 undergraduate students enrolled in an undergraduate interdisciplinary Minority Groups course at a mid-sized public university in the Southeastern…

  13. Developing Culturally Competent Marriage and Family Therapists: Guidelines for Working with Hispanic Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Roy A.; Perry, Benjamin J.; Bedell, Tina M.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a content analysis of the available treatment literature to generate guidelines for use in training and evaluating culturally competent therapists. Guidelines include: use family therapy; act as advocate for the family; assess immigration experience; assess acculturation; respect father; interview family subsystems separately; do not force…

  14. Considerations for Culturally Competent Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression with Hispanic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interian, Alejandro; Diaz-Martinez, Angelica M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline considerations for adapting cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to Hispanic patients who have recently immigrated, particularly those presenting with depressive symptoms. Culturally competent CBT is framed within a model originally proposed by Rogler and his colleagues (1987). The considerations outlined by…

  15. Culturally Competent Leadership through Empowering Relationships: A Case Study of Two Assistant Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Jennifer K.; Goodwin, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The student population in the United States is growing in diversity (Frankenburg & Lee, 2002; Orfield & Lee, 2004; Tefara, Frankenberg, Siegel-Hawley, & Chirichigno, 2011), challenging school leaders to develop or fine-tune their cultural competence in order to meet the needs of the changing student population (Bustamante, Nelson,…

  16. Delivering a Multicultural Curriculum on the Cultural Competence of Physician Assistant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Katie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect the integration of a multicultural curriculum has on the perceived level of cultural competence of physician assistant students. A convergent parallel mixed-methods approach was utilized to collect the necessary data. The physician assistant students participated in focus-group sessions and a…

  17. An Evaluation of Intergroup Dialogue Pedagogy: Addressing Segregation and Developing Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessel, Adrienne B.; Rodenborg, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    This article presents data from a study of an intergroup dialogue (IGD) course in an urban Midwest MSW program guided by Derald Wing Sue's multicultural education model. IGD was used as an innovative pedagogy to meet the Council on Social Work Education mandate for cultural competence and social justice education. Results showed significant gains…

  18. Evaluation of a Cultural Competence Intervention with Implications for the Nurse-Patient Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Althea Betty

    2012-01-01

    A short-term intervention on participants' knowledge of cultural competence was provided to 38 students in a baccalaureate nursing program at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU). The study examined the effectiveness of this intervention. Although WSSU is a Historically Black University, the majority of students in this program were White. Six…

  19. Teachers' Moral Values and Their Interpersonal Relationships with Students and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Natasa; Wubbels, Theo

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether and how teachers' beliefs about moral values are reflected in the student-teacher relationships (i.e. levels of control and affiliation in teachers' and students' perceptions of this relationship), and in teachers' cultural competence. A positive association was found between teachers' paternalist beliefs and their own…

  20. The Role of University Branches in the Formation of Common Cultural Competences of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, Marina Albertovna; Rimskaya, Tatyana Grigoryevna

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes the capabilities and potential of educational institutions in the formation of common cultural competences of students studying at regional municipalities of the Russian Far East. The study offers the directions and methods of interaction between government and local self-government authorities and training institutions…