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Sample records for cultural-historical activity theory

  1. Working With Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

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    Wolff-Michael Roth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the experiences of two researchers, Wolff-Michael ROTH and Luis RADFORD, using cultural-historical activity theory in mathematics education. The aim is to provide insights into the ways these researchers see and engage with activity theory, how they have come to adopt and expand it, and some of the challenges and concerns that they have had using it. These questions are not usually addressed within typical scientific papers. Yet, they are important for understanding both the dynamics of research and the practical use of cultural-historical activity theory. Since the format of research report papers is not necessarily well suited to convey personal experiences and thinking, the present article takes the form of a conversation, which provides an effective vehicle for exploring and articulating these matters. This provides a basis for understanding more deeply the underlying assumptions of this theory; its dynamics and how it is applied in research of mathematics practice, thinking, and learning; and insights into the manner in which experienced researchers grapple with the theoretical dimensions of their research. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1202232

  2. Community Service-Learning and Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

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    Taylor, Alison

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), to provide new insights into community service-learning (CSL) in higher education. While CSL literature acknowledges the influences of John Dewey and Paolo Freire, discussion of the potential contribution of cultural-historical activity theory, rooted in the work of…

  3. "Vygotsky's Neglected Legacy": Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

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    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lee, Yew-Jin

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe an evolving theoretical framework that has been called one of the best kept secrets of academia: cultural-historical activity theory, the result of proposals Lev Vygotsky first articulated but that his students and followers substantially developed to constitute much expanded forms in its second and third generations. Besides…

  4. "Vygotsky's Neglected Legacy": Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lee, Yew-Jin

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe an evolving theoretical framework that has been called one of the best kept secrets of academia: cultural-historical activity theory, the result of proposals Lev Vygotsky first articulated but that his students and followers substantially developed to constitute much expanded forms in its second and third generations. Besides…

  5. CULTURAL HISTORICAL ACTIVITY THEORY: EXPLORING PRINCIPALS’ INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP

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    Fulya Damla Kentli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instructional leadership activities are significant for school development. Although many researchers in this field consider leadership activities relating to the work of school principals, in effect, leadership is a network activity that includes all school staff. This study aims to show this interdependence network activity within Cultural Historical Activity Theory. The research question is “what are the activities of an instructional leader?” in order to understand instructional leadership activities in school from perspectives of Turkish graduate students and Cultural Historical Activity Theory. The answers are conceptualized within the framework of an Activity Theory. The students were asked to write about the activities of an instructional leader in the first and last course of the semester. Eighteen graduate students participated in this study.

  6. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory and Domain Analysis: Metatheoretical Implications for Information Science

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    Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cultural-historical activity theory is an important theory in modern psychology. In recent years, it has drawn more attention from related disciplines including information science. Argument: This paper argues that activity theory and domain analysis which uses the theory as one of its bases could bring about some important…

  7. Emotion at Work: A Contribution to Third-Generation Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

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    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    Second-generation cultural-historical activity theory, which drew its inspiration from Leont'ev's work, constituted an advance over Vygotsky's first-generation theory by explicitly articulating the dialectical relation between individual and collective. As part of an effort to develop third-generation-historical activity theory, I propose in this…

  8. An Overview of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) Use in Classroom Research 2000 to 2009

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    Nussbaumer, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Western educational researchers have eagerly accepted activity theory (AT) also known as cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) to collect and analyze data in rich description of complex situations. As this theory is applicable to a wide variety of disciplines, this review is limited to education and specifically to qualitative studies of…

  9. Understanding Synchronous Computer-Mediated Classroom Discussion through Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

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    Park, Yangjoo

    2015-01-01

    This study is about graduate students' discourse practices in classroom text-based synchronous computer mediated discussions (SCMD). Cultural historical activity theory (in short, Activity Theory) is the primary theoretical lens through which the data are analyzed. Engeström's (1987) Activity System model among the various theoretical positions or…

  10. Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory to Design and Evaluate an Educational Game in Science Education

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    Lazarou, D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a methodology for using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) at the initial stages of the design process of an educational game, by exploring how the theory can be used as a framework for producing not only usable but also useful computer tools. The research also aimed to investigate how the theory could…

  11. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory: Vygotsky's Forgotten and Suppressed Legacy and Its Implication for Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Cultural-historical activity theory--with historical roots in dialectical materialism and the social psychology to which it has given rise--has experienced exponential growth in its acceptance by scholars interested in understanding knowing and learning writ large. In education, this theory has constituted something like a well kept secret that is…

  12. Dialogue--Missing in Action Competence: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Approach in a Botswana School

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    Silo, Nthalivi

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth case study on children's participation in environmental management activities in a primary school in Botswana was undertaken, drawing on cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) and the action competence model. This research revealed that due to a lack of dialogue between teachers and children, teachers tended to view children's…

  13. Researching Contradictions: Cultural Historical Activity Theory Research (CHAT) in the English Classroom

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    Thompson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) is an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework for researchers in English interested in the social contexts of culture and its relationship with the formation of mind and activity in the English classroom. Two key concepts in Vygotsky's thought central to understanding…

  14. Researching Contradictions: Cultural Historical Activity Theory Research (CHAT) in the English Classroom

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    Thompson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) is an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework for researchers in English interested in the social contexts of culture and its relationship with the formation of mind and activity in the English classroom. Two key concepts in Vygotsky's thought central to understanding…

  15. Understanding and Dismantling Barriers for Partnerships for Inclusive Education: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Perspective

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    Waitoller, Federico R.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, universities and school districts share responsibility for teacher and student learning. Sharing responsibility demands that both institutions work to develop closer relationships through ongoing engagement, dialogue and negotiation. Drawing from Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), we examined one school/university…

  16. Methodologies in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory: The Example of School-Based Development

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    Postholm, May Britt

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Relatively little research has been conducted on methodology within Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT). CHAT is mainly used as a framework for developmental processes. The purpose of this article is to discuss both focuses for research and research questions within CHAT and to outline methodologies that can be used…

  17. Research in the Work of New Zealand Teacher Educators: A Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Perspective

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    Berg, David A. G.; Gunn, Alexandra C.; Hill, Mary F.; Haigh, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    In this article we use cultural-historical activity theory to explore the place of research in the work of New Zealand university-based teacher educators (TEs). We consider how aspirations for a research-informed initial teacher education are served by New Zealand universities' recruitment practices and TEs' actual work. We suggest that TEs value…

  18. Exploring Formative Assessment Using Cultural Historical Activity Theory

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    Asghar, Mandy

    2013-01-01

    Formative assessment is a pedagogic practice that has been the subject of much research and debate, as to how it can be used most effectively to deliver enhanced student learning in the higher education setting. Often described as a complex concept it embraces activities that range from facilitating students understanding of assessment standards,…

  19. Distributed communication: Implications of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) for communication disorders.

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    Hengst, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes distributed communication as a promising theoretical framework for building supportive environments for child language development. Distributed communication is grounded in an emerging intersection of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) and theories of communicative practices that argue for integrating accounts of language, cognition and culture. The article first defines and illustrates through selected research articles, three key principles of distributed communication: (a) language and all communicative resources are inextricably embedded in activity; (b) successful communication depends on common ground built up through short- and long-term histories of participation in activities; and (c) language cannot act alone, but is always orchestrated with other communicative resources. It then illustrates how these principles are fully integrated in everyday interactions by drawing from my research on Cindy Magic, a verbal make-believe game played by a father and his two daughters. Overall, the research presented here points to the remarkably complex communicative environments and sophisticated forms of distributed communication children routinely engage in as they interact with peer and adult communication partners in everyday settings. The article concludes by considering implications of these theories for, and examples of, distributed communication relevant to clinical intervention. Readers will learn about (1) distributed communication as a conceptual tool grounded in an emerging intersection of cultural-historical activity theory and theories of communicative practices and (2) how to apply distributed communication to the study of child language development and to interventions for children with communication disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cultural-historical activity theory: Vygotsky's forgotten and suppressed legacy and its implication for mathematics education

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    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-03-01

    Cultural-historical activity theory—with historical roots in dialectical materialism and the social psychology to which it has given rise—has experienced exponential growth in its acceptance by scholars interested in understanding knowing and learning writ large. In education, this theory has constituted something like a well kept secret that is only in the process of gaining larger levels of acceptance. Mathematics educators are only beginning to realise the tremendous advantages that the theory provides over other theories. In this review essay, I articulate the theory as it may relate to the issues that concern mathematics education and educators with a particular focus on the way in which it addresses logical contradictions in existing theories.

  1. From activity to learning: using cultural historical activity theory to model school library programmes and practices

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    E.M. Meyers

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. changes in educational policy and practice demand that we examine school library programmes from a new perspective. As a model that takes a developmental view of minds in context, Cultural Historical Activity Theory is particularly well suited to the study of school libraries and the learning that occurs therein. This paper focuses on the activity theoretic concepts of 'contradictions' and 'expansive learning' as they relate to the development of best practices. Method. Developmental Work Research was applied as a guiding methodology in an intervention study of six high school libraries in Washington State, USA. Library activity is illustrated from multiple perspectives using a triangulated, qualitative approach. Analysis. contradictions and tensions in the general school library activity system are identified, and an intervention was designed to facilitiate the development of expansive instruments. A case example illustrates a second level of analysis and specific points of intervention. Results. analysis reveals that the tensions and contradictions provide opportunities for expansive learning on the part of the teacher-Librarians. The research team can use practitioners' zones of proximal development to guide the alignment of library programme goals and practices. Conclusion. : some limitations and future promise of the framework and its application are discussed. The proposed activity theory toolkit suggest a new way of exploring the practices of teacher-librarians, incorporating research evidence, professional expertise, and reflective decision making.

  2. Working with Cultural-Historical Activity Theory and Critical Realism to Investigate and Expand Farmer Learning in Southern Africa

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    Mukute, Mutizwa; Lotz-Sisitka, Heila

    2012-01-01

    This article uses the theoretical and methodological tools of cultural historical activity theory and critical realism to examine three case studies of the introduction and expansion of sustainable agricultural practices in southern Africa. The article addresses relevant issues in the field of agricultural extension, which lacks a theoretical…

  3. Teachers' instructional goals for science practice: Identifying knowledge gaps using cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT)

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    Farrar, Cynthia Hamen

    In AP Biology, the course goal, with respect to scientific acts and reasoning, has recently shifted toward a reform goal of science practice, where the goal is for students to have a scientific perspective that views science as a practice of a community rather than a body of knowledge. Given this recent shift, this study is interested in the gaps that may exist between an individual teacher's instructional goal and the goals of the AP Biology course. A Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) methodology and perspective is used to analyze four teachers' knowledge, practice, and learning. Teachers have content knowledge for teaching, a form of knowledge that is unique for teaching called specialized content knowledge. This specialized content knowledge (SCK) defines their instructional goals, the student outcomes they ultimately aim to achieve with their students. The study employs a cultural-historical continuum of scientific acts and reasoning, which represents the development of the AP Biology goal over time, to study gaps in their instructional goal. The study also analyzes the contradictions within their teaching practice and how teachers address those contradictions to shift their instructional practice and learn. The findings suggest that teachers have different interpretations of the AP Biology goals of science practice, placing their instructional goal at different points along the continuum. Based on the location of their instructional goal, different micro-communities of teachers exist along the continuum, comprised of teachers with a shared goal, language, and culture of their AP Biology teaching. The in-depth study of one teacher's AP Biology teaching, using a CHAT perspective, provides a means for studying the mechanisms that connect SCK to classroom actions and ultimately to instructional practice. CHAT also reveals the nature and importance of contradictions or cognitive dissonance in teacher learning and the types of support teachers need to

  4. Using cultural-historical activity theory to analyze social service practices evolving from the Norwegian HUSK projects.

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    Foot, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The HUSK projects catalyzed innovation in the practices of providing social services that could yield useful insights both within and outside of Norway if analyzed in these two ways: (a) retrospective analysis of the development of individual HUSK projects in light of their cultural-historical contexts, and (b) comparative analysis of the efforts to advance multi-sector collaboration in some of the HUSK projects. Such analyses require a practice-based research approach that takes into account culture and history. In this article the author explains how cultural-historical activity theory provides such an approach, illustrated via several HUSK cases. The author suggests five questions for future analyses of the HUSK projects and argues that insights gleaned from such analyses could contribute significantly to research on-and the provision of-social services.

  5. Educational policies and activities for preschool children: Reflections from the cultural-historical approach and activity theory

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    Claudia Ximena González-Moreno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Educational activities employed with preschool children have significance in their development and preparation for school learning. For this reason, it is necessary to analyze the relationship established between educational policies and educational activities for the preschool population in the Colombian context. In this paper, these two aspects interact to contribute to its conclusion. The teacher’s task is to promote the integral development of children and ensure an optimal level of preparation for schooling. Considering current pedagogical practice, this task is not successfully carried out as required by the objectives of educational policy. However, monitoring this psychological and pedagogical approach based on cultural-historical theory highlights both theoretical foundations and methodological pathways for innovating with regard to the educational status of preschool.

  6. Understanding Preschool Emergent Science in a Cultural Historical Context through Activity Theory

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    Sundberg, Bodil; Areljung, Sofie; Due, Karin; Ekström, Kenneth; Ottander, Christina; Tellgren, Britt

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore how cultural factors interact with preschool teachers' shaping of activities with science content, and also how Activity Theory (AT) as a theoretical framework can be useful for examining interrelations within preschool systems. Qualitative data was collected from three preschools in the form of guided group…

  7. The Transformation of Learning: Advances in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

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    van Oers, Bert, Ed.; Wardekker, Wim, Ed.; Elbers, Ed, Ed.; van der Veer, Rene, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Learning is a changing phenomenon, depending on the advances in theory and research. This book presents a relatively new approach to learning, based on meaningful human activities in cultural practices and in collaboration with others. It draws extensively from the ideas of Lev Vygotsky and his recent followers. The book presents ideas that…

  8. A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Perspective to Understand Preservice Science Teachers' Reflections on and Tensions during a Microteaching Experience

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    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Tran, Minh-Dan; McDonald, Scott P.; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    This study draws from cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) to analyze preservice teachers' reflections on a microteaching activity. Microteaching activities involved preservice educators teaching middle school students from local schools. The study was conducted with 23 preservice teachers enrolled in a large university's teacher…

  9. Unknown Vygotsky: Cultural-Historical Theory in the Context of Pavlov’s Theory of Higher Nervous Activity and H. Werner’s Differential Development Theory

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    Chuprikova N.I.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The position about the internal connection between the cultural-historical theory of development of higher mental functions of L.S. Vygotsky and two prominent theories of the 20th century is substatianted. Firstly, this is the theory of conditioned reflex of I.P. Pavlov, including the idea of significant qualitative difference between human higher nervous activity and human behaviour and those of animals, due to the presence of the second signal system as a “grand speech signal” in humans. Second, this is the differential theory of development by H. Werner, which fits a number of key ideas of L.S. Vygotsky about the development of speech function and the role of the word in the psychological development of a child.

  10. A cultural historical activity theory perspective to understand preservice science teachers' reflections on and tensions during a microteaching experience

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    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Tran, Minh-Dan; McDonald, Scott P.; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-09-01

    This study draws from cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) to analyze preservice teachers' reflections on a microteaching activity. Microteaching activities involved preservice educators teaching middle school students from local schools. The study was conducted with 23 preservice teachers enrolled in a large university's teacher education program. During this secondary science teaching methods course, every pair of preservice teachers engaged in 20 minute microteaching activity with 3-5 middle school students. The microteaching was videotaped, and the teachers subsequently provided voice-over reflections on a second audio track. Transcriptions of the microteaching events were analyzed through the formation of event maps showing the phases of activity and the organizational sequence of actions. Event maps were used to investigate the focus of preservice teachers' reflections. The results showed that while learning from their microteaching, preservice teachers focused primarily on the mediating artifacts and gave least attention to the larger teaching community surrounding these activities. Use of CHAT helped to identify challenges in different elements of the microteaching activity. The study contributes to how reflective practice can be enhanced through attention to the social and cultural dimensions of the teaching.

  11. Re-Shaping the Faculty: Emergence and Development of "Permanent-Contingent" Roles through the Lens of Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

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    Tkachenko, Oleksandr; Louis, Karen Seashore

    2017-01-01

    This study retrospectively examines the emergence and development of a new class of full-time non-tenure track employees in a large land grant research university in the U.S., which created the employment category in 1980. We employ cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) to explore how this class of employees became institutionalized within…

  12. The Importance of the Cultural-Historical Theory for Education. Some Meditations on Learning, Development, Activity, and Creativity

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    Nikolai Veresov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available “What are the main items showing the importance of cultural-historical psychology for education?” It is much easier to put such a question than to give an appropriate answer. Different experts in this area definitely propose different answers to it. In this article I would try to present my answer from my perspective. It seems that our understanding of Vygotsky’s theory is so deep and complete that any question of missed links or hidden messages does not make any sense. What essentially new could be found in this area after more than 40 years of discovering of the cultural-historical theory by generations of researchers? However, I will try to show that there are missed links in our understanding of Vygotsky’s theoretical approach. Even more, I will try to show that there is a hidden message from Vygotsky which remains unclaimed. I will try to show then that both items (the missed link and the hidden message are connected with the idea of development in terms of drama.

  13. A Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Investigation of Contradictions in Open and Distance Higher Education among Alienated Adult Learners in Korea National Open University

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    K. P. Joo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Drawing upon cultural-historical activity theory, this research analyzed the structural contradictions existing in a variety of educational activities among a group of alienated adult students in Korea National Open University (KNOU. Despite KNOU’s quantitative development in student enrollment, the contradictions shed light on how the institution’s top-down, bureaucratic pedagogical system collided with individual expectations and needs. In particular, the participants’ critical viewpoints demonstrate the incompatible social roles that the open and distance higher education institution plays in Korean society. For example, while KNOU contributes to extending higher education opportunities for those who have unmet educational needs, the value of the KNOU degree has not been socially acknowledged since there is little, if any, competition in the entrance process. This study also documents how these contradictions were culturally and historically embedded in the participants’ distance higher education activities. Given the persistent contradictions, the research findings illuminate that KNOU’s efficiency-oriented model has not effectively facilitated the students’ learning as its distance higher education system is inevitably based on a compromise between a competitive, quality curriculum and the efficient extension of audiences.

  14. A conceptual perspective for investigating motive in cultural-historical theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief discussion of the other chapters in this edited volume, and then presents a brief introduction to the concept of motive within cultural-historical theory. This discussion includes a discussion of why the concept is needed, the ontological shift in the explanatory logic...... of the theory, the relation of the concept in the theory of activity. The main section of the chapter provides a methodological discussion of ways to research the motive concept. The chapter concludes with three open research problems in relation to the motive concept....

  15. Adopting a Grounded Theory Approach to Cultural-Historical Research: Conflicting Methodologies or Complementary Methods?

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    Jayson Seaman PhD

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Grounded theory has long been regarded as a valuable way to conduct social and educational research. However, recent constructivist and postmodern insights are challenging long-standing assumptions, most notably by suggesting that grounded theory can be flexibly integrated with existing theories. This move hinges on repositioning grounded theory from a methodology with positivist underpinnings to an approach that can be used within different theoretical frameworks. In this article the author reviews this recent transformation of grounded theory, engages in the project of repositioning it as an approach by using cultural historical activity theory as a test case, and outlines several practical methods implied by the joint use of grounded theory as an approach and activity theory as a methodology. One implication is the adoption of a dialectic, as opposed to a constructivist or objectivist, stance toward grounded theory inquiry, a stance that helps move past the problem of emergence versus forcing.

  16. From Social Motives to Spiritual Development: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Analysis of Communal Spiritual Development in a Korean American House Church

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    Park, SinWoong Simon

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on a unique culturally shaped church formation, a Korean house church in the U.S., and how the members of the Korean house church learn and develop their spirituality in their communal relations and activities. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest…

  17. From Social Motives to Spiritual Development: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Analysis of Communal Spiritual Development in a Korean American House Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SinWoong Simon

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on a unique culturally shaped church formation, a Korean house church in the U.S., and how the members of the Korean house church learn and develop their spirituality in their communal relations and activities. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest…

  18. The Models of Relationship between Training and Psyche development in Cultural-historical and Activity Approaches

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    Pogozhina I.N.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of referring of the psychological theories studying interrelation of training and mental development processes to this or that stage of scientific knowledge formation on the basis of studied objects types and corresponded determination systems as a basic criterion distinguishing the ideals of scientific rationality is justified. General characteristics of classical, non-classical and post-non-classical models, determination of the mechanisms of dissipative systems, requirements for learning and development model building in the context of post-non-classic science paradigm on the criterion of the system features of the object of cognition are described. Domestic psychological school models are compared with associanism, behaviorism, gestalt psychology and Piaget determination models on the number of options allocated to these determinants, types of causal chains and types of links between causal chains. It is shown that cultural-historical approach is situated intermediately between post-non-classical and non-classical models, while activity approach corresponds to post-non-classical understanding of the object of study as complicated self-developing "man-size" system. Determination relationships models developed by L.V.Vygotskii, S.L. Rubinstein, A.N. Leont’ev continue to play the heuristic role at the present stage of scientific development.

  19. Vygotsky in 21st Century Society: Advances in Cultural Historical Theory and Praxis with Non-Dominant Communities

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    Portes, Pedro R., Ed.; Salas, Spencer, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Vygotsky in Twenty-first Century Society" is an ensemble of novel perspectives about the legacy of Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria. The book illustrates how well the legacy of their work is being applied and continued in contemporary research, and how cultural historical theory has been constructed and re-constructed. Together, these collected…

  20. Vygotsky in 21st Century Society: Advances in Cultural Historical Theory and Praxis with Non-Dominant Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portes, Pedro R., Ed.; Salas, Spencer, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Vygotsky in Twenty-first Century Society" is an ensemble of novel perspectives about the legacy of Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria. The book illustrates how well the legacy of their work is being applied and continued in contemporary research, and how cultural historical theory has been constructed and re-constructed. Together, these collected…

  1. Perezhivanie and classroom discourse: a cultural-historical perspective on "Discourse of design based science classroom activities"

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    Adams, Megan; March, Sue

    2015-06-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser challenge the `argumentation focus of science lessons' and propose that through a `design-based approach' emergent conversations with the teacher offer possibilities for different types of discussions to enhance pedagogical discourse in science classrooms. This important paper offers a "preliminary contribution to a general theory" regarding the link between activity types and discourse practices. Azevedo, Martalock and Keser offer a general perspective with a sociocultural framing for analysis of classroom discourse. Interestingly the specific concepts drawn upon are from conversation analysis; there are few sociocultural concepts explored in detail. Therefore, in this article we focus on a cultural historical (Vygotsky in The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky. The history and development of higher mental functions, vol 4. Plenum Press, New York, 1987; The Vygotsky reader. Black, Cambridge, 1994) methodology to explore, analyse and explain how we would use a different theoretical lens. We argue that a cultural historical reading of argumentation in science lessons and design based activity will expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's proposed general theory of activity types and discourse practices. Specifically, we use Lev Vygotksy's idea of perezhivanie as the unit of analysis to reconceptualise this important paper. We focus on the holistic category of students' emotional experience through discourse while developing scientific awareness.

  2. CULTURAL-HISTORICAL THEORY AND EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE: SOME RADICAL-LOCAL CONSIDERATIONS

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    Seth David Chaiklin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: We emphasize that pedagogical practice was not just a way of validating and testing scientific findings but it has also, to generate new hypotheses and new challenges and research directions. This relationship between research, knowledge, and practice was recognised from the beginning days of the cultural-historical tradition, such as Vygotsky’s focus on practice for resolving the crisis in psychology. In a dialectical conception, pedagogical research should be developed as an interaction between theoretical conceptions in the cultural-historical tradition and the demands and needs of the societal practices. This article illustrates this idea concretely, using the idea of radical-local teaching and learning (HEDEGAARD; CHAIKLIN, 2005. The discussion starts with a brief comment about the dialectical tradition; than we illustrate one way to engage with the idea of full human development, viewing this in terms of personality development. We first explain the general idea of radical-local teaching and learning as a way to address the practical problem, and then show how it embodies the philosophical concerns of the dialectical tradition. The main idea is that core conceptual relations within subject-matter areas have to be related specifically to children’s life situation so that this academic knowledge can become integrated with local knowledge, thereby qualitatively transforming children’s everyday concepts and their possibility to use this knowledge in their local practice. We want to highlight the idea of how working with subject-matter content in a radical-local perspective can provide conditions for children to develop theoretical thinking and motive orientation, which is relevant to personality development, and which can be oriented to their full human development.RESUMO: Enfatizamos que práticas pedagógicas não são somente formas de validação de investigações científicas, mas são também formas de se gerar novas hip

  3. Cultural Historical Activity Theory, Expansive Learning and Agency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    productive relations between elements in a system while respecting and ... Grow as many diverse species as possible and use as many diverse ... This programme was considered as an appropriate case study of workplace learning ... a guiding principle for empirical research. ... summarising the causes, effects and model.

  4. Significance of Cultural-Historical Theory of Psychological Development of L.S. Vygotsky for the Development of Modern Models of Social Cognition and Psychotherapy

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    Kholmogorova A.B.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article acknowledges the situation of methodical crisis in modern research of social cognition related to the domination of reductive approaches that ignore the uniqueness of human psyche. Heuristicity of concepts of cultural-historical theory of psychological development of L.S. Vygotsky, which serves to overcome the apparent inconsistencies is substantiated. Models of social cognition based on the principles of cultural-historical psychology are described, those being the model of social cognition within phylogenesis of M. Tomasello, and the model of social cognition within ontogenesis of C. Fernyhough. Current situation in the area of mental health is reviewed from the standpoint of cultural-historical psychology, its specifics reflected in the increased burden on reflexive functions, that is, skills lying within the sphere of social cognition is substantiated. Modern psychotherapeutic apparatus directed to compensate social cognition deficits due to various psychiatric disorders is reviewed. The assumption that adolescense is sensitive period for the development of higher forms of social cognition is made, and a summary of researches supporting this assertion is presented. Main contradictions of modern-day maturing are enunciated. To conclude the presented theoretical analysis, a comprehensive multiple-factor model of social cognition is presented based on concepts of cultural-historical theory of L.S. Vygotsky.

  5. The Internalization Theory of Emotions: A Cultural Historical Approach to the Development of Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holodynski, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Starting with an overview of theoretical approaches to emotion from an activity-oriented stance, this article applies Vygotsky's three general principles of development, sign mediation, and internalization to the development of emotional expressions as a culturally evolved sign system. The possible twofold function of expression signs as a means…

  6. An activity theory approach to affordance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentsen, Klaus B.; Trettvik, J.

    2002-01-01

    the notion. Specifically we will suggest the inclusion of the ecological theory of perception in the paradigm of cultural historical psychology and activity theory developed in the former Soviet Union by most notably Lev Vygotsky, S. L. Rubinshtein, A. N. Leontjev and others. It will be suggested, that much...

  7. Southern Federal University in Relation to Teacher Education Modernization Project: Strategic Reflection of the Testing Results of Integrative Modules of the “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” Research Master’s Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernaya A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of a strategic reflection of the Southern Federal University participation in the project of modernization of teacher education. It analyses how theoretical, methodological and organizational-activity basis of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” research master’s program designed by Moscow State University of Psychology & Education relates to the strategic objectives of Southern Federal University. Priorities and forward-looking statements in the strategy for the training of specialists in education based on action-competence approach, integrative principle of educational modules construction, network forms of cooperation of educational institutions are shown. Basic methodological ideas of culturalhistorical psychology and activity theory and their applicability to the needs of modern education objectified in the draft are specially considered. The article presents the preliminary test results of integrative modules of research master’s program for Southern Federal University

  8. The Role of Educational Practice in the Learning of Basic Psychological Concepts (Based on Practical Training of 1st year Master Students Studying “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulanovskaya I. M.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes experience of the practical training for 1st year master students studying «cultural-historical psychology and activity approach in education» entitled “Study of the educational environment of the school”. The basis for training was provided by Moscow school #91 which systematically implemented in the elementary school the program of developing training, developed in the framework of Elkonin-Davydov theory of learning activity. There are examples of tools proposed and developed by teams of master students to evaluate certain characteristics of the educational environment and the results of their use to solve diagnostic problems. It is shown how techniques of deep studying, setting difficult practically significant substantive issues, independent work, group discussions, group projects development and defence, the master students applied, contribute to the formation of the bases of professional critical thinking, reflection and cognitive attitudes.

  9. Children's Development from a Cultural-Historical Approach: Children's Activity in Everyday Local Settings as Foundation for Their Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Mariane

    2009-01-01

    A central dilemma in developmental psychology has been to combine general concepts with research of the individual child in all her complexity in everyday life activities. Psychologists such as Riegel, Bronfenbrenner, Burman, Morss, Hedegaard, and Walkerdine have criticized research approaches that study child development from a functional view.…

  10. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Perspectives on Constructing ICT-Mediated Metaphors of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Song

    2012-01-01

    The identification of personal teaching metaphors is a potentially effective means of assisting pre-service teachers to become reflective teachers. However, although metaphors are often viewed as a way to facilitate self-reflection, teacher education programmes have shed little light on effective communication and collaboration that are essential…

  11. The Dialectical Potential of Cultural Historical Activity Theory for Researching Sustainable CSCL Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmis, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This article explores conceptual and methodological challenges in researching sustainable computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) within authentic educational settings. It argues that to investigate the sustainability of CSCL in such settings, we need to understand how new innovations become enculturated as part of educational communities…

  12. Examining English Language Arts Common Core State Standards Instruction through Cultural Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-Tatum, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The English Language Arts Common Core State Standards and corresponding assessments brought about many changes for educators, their literacy instruction, and the literacy learning of their students. This study examined the day-to-day literacy instruction of two primary grade teachers during their first year of full CCSS implementation. Engestr?m's…

  13. Diversifying Instruction and Shifting Authority: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) Analysis of Classroom Participant Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchen, Terri; Smithenry, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent calls asking science teachers to increase student authority by diversifying instruction appear stalled by a lack of empirical evidence supporting the actual implementation of any such shifts. To better support the practical integration of more student-directed inquiry into the science classroom, we consider one teacher's day-to-day…

  14. Rethinking Community-Based Indigenous Language Revitalization Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Man-Chiu Amay; Yudaw, Bowtung

    2013-01-01

    This article suggests a theoretical framework for re-examining the complex relationship of language, literacy, and cultural practices, across multiple generations in the context of community-based Indigenous language revitalization. In the scholarship of Indigenous language revitalization and education, researchers have shifted from viewing…

  15. Rethinking Community-Based Indigenous Language Revitalization Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Man-Chiu Amay; Yudaw, Bowtung

    2013-01-01

    This article suggests a theoretical framework for re-examining the complex relationship of language, literacy, and cultural practices, across multiple generations in the context of community-based Indigenous language revitalization. In the scholarship of Indigenous language revitalization and education, researchers have shifted from viewing…

  16. Deconstructing Dementia and Delirium Hospital Practice: Using Cultural Historical Activity Theory to Inform Education Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorczuk, Andrew; Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta; Corbett, Sally; Welfare, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Older patients with dementia and delirium receive suboptimal hospital care. Policy calls for more effective education to address this though there is little consensus on what this entails. The purpose of this clarification study is to explore how practice gaps are constructed in relation to managing the confused hospitalised older patient. The…

  17. The Cultural-Historical Basis of the "Golden Key" Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Genady G.; Kravtsova, Elena E.

    2011-01-01

    The "Golden Key" programme is a preschool education programme that is constructed on the basis of Vygotskij's cultural-historical theory. One of the most important aspects of this theory is not just the unity of intellect and affect, but the fact that the relationship between these two changes during the course of development. In infants, affect…

  18. The concept of writing according to the cultural-historical theory and literacy for children in the first Year of primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Bufrem,Leilah Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Study the concept of writing which can be inferred by Vygotsky´s and Leontyev´s theories. The authors did not elaborate a finished concept of writing. However, Vygotsky´s experiments for the study of writing development, his conceptions about the higher psychological functions and signs systems and tools, as well as Leontyev´s Activity Theory, contribute to formulate a writing and literacy conception. Introduce the etnographics observations in a literacy class, in order to investigate the rel...

  19. The concept of learning in cultural-historical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2015-01-01

    A cultural-historical perspective on learning is presented. The key idea is to conceptualise learning as self-mastery of action, using existing psychological functions. The main part of the chapter provides an overview of Vygotsky’s theory of higher psychological functions, and discusses their im......A cultural-historical perspective on learning is presented. The key idea is to conceptualise learning as self-mastery of action, using existing psychological functions. The main part of the chapter provides an overview of Vygotsky’s theory of higher psychological functions, and discusses...

  20. Narratives and Activity Theory as Reflective Tools in Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Kaz

    2012-01-01

    Narratives and activity theory are useful as socially constructed data collection tools that allow a researcher access to the social, cultural and historical meanings that research participants place on events in their lives. This case study shows how these tools were used to promote reflection within a cultural-historical activity theoretically…

  1. The Activity Theory Approach to Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Engeström

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author offers a practical view of the theory-grounded research on education action. She draws on studies carried out at the Center for Research on Activity, Development and Learning (CRADLE at the University of Helsinki in Finland. In its work, the Center draws on cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT and is well-known for the theory of Expansive Learning and its more practical application called Developmental Work Research (DWR. These approaches are widely used to understand professional learning and have served as a theoreticaland methodological foundation for studies examining change and professional development in various human activities.

  2. Early Learning and Development: Cultural-Historical Concepts in Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    "Early Learning and Development" provides a unique synthesis of cultural-historical theory from Vygotsky, Elkonin and Leontiev in the 20th century to the ground-breaking research of scholars such as Siraj-Blatchford, Kratsova and Hedegaard today. It demonstrates how development and learning are culturally embedded and institutionally defined, and…

  3. Aligning activity theory with community based participatory research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODuCTION. 1In the year 2000 about five ... 1Through the use of the language of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), in anticipation .... models for analysing information; (ii) new ideas and tools that the participants come up with; and ...

  4. Activity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschmann, Timothy; Roschelle, Jeremy; Nardi, Bonnie A.

    1998-01-01

    Includes three articles that discuss activity theory, based on "Context and Consciousness." Topics include human-computer interaction; computer interfaces; hierarchical structuring; mediation; contradictions and development; failure analysis; and designing educational technology. (LRW)

  5. Motives matter: a cultural historical approach to IT mediated subject matter teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenild, Kåre; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    2011-01-01

    The contributors to this collection employ the analytic resources of cultural-historical theory to examine the relationship between childhood and children's development under different societal conditions. In particular they attend to relationships between development, emotions, motives...

  6. Learning and Social Process of Aging among Korean Older Married Women: The Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyunmin

    2010-01-01

    The aging population has rapidly increased in South Korea. From an economic perspective, older people are too often seen in negative terms. Specifically, older women, who are traditionally at greater risk of poverty, are referred to as a social problem or as passive recipients, and the quality of life of older women in an aging society is often…

  7. Understanding Critical Reflection as Informal Learning: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Analysis of Factory Workers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Hwa

    2011-01-01

    This study started from the question "how does learning occur in human life". In particular, I am interested in learning that takes place continuously anywhere at any time rather than learning that is occurred by being taught by others. This study interpreted critical reflection as learning that continuously occur in anywhere at any time…

  8. The Use of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) within a Constructivist Learning Environment to Develop Core Competencies in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fire, Nancy; Casstevens, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving foundation-level practice behaviors to develop social work core competencies involves integrating learning across a curriculum. This article focuses on two phases of foundation-level course redevelopment aimed to support graduate students in accomplishing this outcome. The first phase involved restructuring the course to become a…

  9. The Use of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) within a Constructivist Learning Environment to Develop Core Competencies in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fire, Nancy; Casstevens, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving foundation-level practice behaviors to develop social work core competencies involves integrating learning across a curriculum. This article focuses on two phases of foundation-level course redevelopment aimed to support graduate students in accomplishing this outcome. The first phase involved restructuring the course to become a…

  10. Learning and Social Process of Aging among Korean Older Married Women: The Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyunmin

    2010-01-01

    The aging population has rapidly increased in South Korea. From an economic perspective, older people are too often seen in negative terms. Specifically, older women, who are traditionally at greater risk of poverty, are referred to as a social problem or as passive recipients, and the quality of life of older women in an aging society is often…

  11. Understanding Critical Reflection as Informal Learning: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Analysis of Factory Workers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Hwa

    2011-01-01

    This study started from the question "how does learning occur in human life". In particular, I am interested in learning that takes place continuously anywhere at any time rather than learning that is occurred by being taught by others. This study interpreted critical reflection as learning that continuously occur in anywhere at any time…

  12. THE CONCEPTION CULTURAL-HISTORICAL OF LITERACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meire dos Santos Dangió

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article on screen calls into question the cultural-historical conception of literacy in order to point out the relationship between it and the psychic development process of individuals, arguing - in accordance with the theoretical assumptions of historical-cultural psychology, that literacy takes place within a broader process of cultural development and, consequently, a developmental education from an early age. Thus, we defend the thesis that the teacher literacy needs to know the internal connections between literacy, oral language development and the abstractive leap required for its conversion into written language.

  13. Motives matter: a cultural historical approach to IT mediated subject matter teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenild, Kåre; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    2011-01-01

    The contributors to this collection employ the analytic resources of cultural-historical theory to examine the relationship between childhood and children's development under different societal conditions. In particular they attend to relationships between development, emotions, motives and ident......The contributors to this collection employ the analytic resources of cultural-historical theory to examine the relationship between childhood and children's development under different societal conditions. In particular they attend to relationships between development, emotions, motives...... and identities, and the social practices in which children and young people may be learners. These practices are knowledge-laden, imbued with cultural values and emotionally freighted by those who already act in them....

  14. Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Bødker, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    the young HCI research tradition. But HCI was already facing problems: lack of consideration for other aspects of human behavior, for interaction with other people, for culture. Cognitive science-based theories lacked means to address several issues that came out of the empirical projects....

  15. The Cultural Historical Complexity of Human Personality Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa E. Wynn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on implicit intelligence has conceptualized students’ beliefs about the nature of intelligence as either fixed or malleable. This research has largely not included African American adolescents, a group for whom beliefs about intelligence have a cultural historical complexity related to both scientific racism and master narratives of race and intelligence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of implicit theories of intelligence for 63 African American adolescents who are seventh and eighth graders in a public charter school. The two-way ANOVA revealed that these adolescents held a malleable view of intelligence, which did not vary by gender or grade. Exploratory correlation analysis showed some consistent relationships with achievement motivation variables found in other studies. These findings may be explained by African American cultural values and the personality characteristic adaptations that they make living within a racialized society.

  16. Using Activity Theory to Evaluate a Professional Learning and Development Initiative in the Use of Narrative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Roseanna; Mentis, Mandia; O'Neill, John

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the impact of professional learning and development (PLD) programmes for educators is complex. This article presents an analysis of a PLD initiative in which classroom teachers learned to use narrative assessment for students with "high" and "very high" learning needs. Using Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), the analysis…

  17. Activity Theory and Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peim, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to re-examine Yrio Engestrom's activity theory as a technology of knowledge designed to enable positive transformations of specific practices. The paper focuses on a key paper where Engestrom defines the nature and present state of activity theory. Beginning with a brief account of the relations between activity theory and…

  18. Reflections on Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhurst, David

    2009-01-01

    It is sometimes suggested that activity theory represents the most important legacy of Soviet philosophy and psychology. But what exactly "is" activity theory? The canonical account in the West is given by Engestrom, who identifies three stages in the theory's development: from Vygotsky's insights, through Leontiev's articulation of the…

  19. Reflections on Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhurst, David

    2009-01-01

    It is sometimes suggested that activity theory represents the most important legacy of Soviet philosophy and psychology. But what exactly "is" activity theory? The canonical account in the West is given by Engestrom, who identifies three stages in the theory's development: from Vygotsky's insights, through Leontiev's articulation of the…

  20. A cultural historical theoretical perspective of discourse and design in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan

    2015-06-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser have initiated an important conversation in science education as they use sociocultural theory to introduce design based scenarios into the science classroom. This response seeks to expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article The discourse of design- based science classroom activities by using a specific perspective within a sociocultural framework. Through using a cultural historical (Vygotsky in The history and development of higher mental functions, Plenum Press, New York, 1987) reading of design based activity and discourse in the science classroom, it is proposed that learning should be an integral part of these processes. Therefore, everyday and scientific concepts are explained and expanded in relation to Inventing Graphing and discourse presented in Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article. This response reports on the importance of teacher's being explicit in relation to connecting everyday and scientific concepts alongside design based activity and related science concepts when teaching students. It is argued that explicit teaching of concepts should be instigated prior to analysis of discourse in the science classroom as it is only with experience and understanding these processes that students have the resources to call upon to argue like practicing scientists.

  1. Critical Thinking as Cultural-Historical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panofsky, Carolyn P.

    1999-01-01

    Explores critical thinking as it has been constructed in schooling and in dominant traditions of psychological theory, presenting a dialectical view of critical thinking suggested in the social and philosophical writings of critical theorists (e.g., Theodor Adorno and Herbert Marcuse) and supported by the sociohistorical or cultural-historical…

  2. Historicizing affordance theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sofie; Bang, Jytte Susanne

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how mutually enriching points from both affordance theory and cultural-historical activity theory can promote theoretical ideas which may prove useful as analytical tools for the study of human life and human development. There are two issues that need to be ...

  3. A Cultural-Historical Interpretation of Resilience: the implications for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Edwards

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent attempts at preventing the social exclusion of vulnerable children in England have been driven by notions of resilience which centre primarily on changing children so that they may be better able to cope with adversity. Drawing on the concepts of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT, we suggest that the idea of resilience should be expanded to include developing a capacity to act on and reshape the social conditions of one’s development. We use evidence from two studies of practices in recent re-configurations of children’s services in England to examine whether practitioners are seeing resilience in these terms. We present examples of work which embody these views but suggest that they are not easily incorporated into practices where expertise is centred on care and clear communication. The care and communication model of practice reflects the emphases given to evolutionary notions of child development while a CHAT view of resilience reflects Vygotsky’s concerns with a dialectic between individuals and the social situations of their development.

  4. Constructing a Model of ESOL Content-Based Instruction with Native Language Support: Self-Reflective Action Research Grounded in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstein, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The study started as a critical response to a new sheltered science content course introduced by the school district where I teach ESOL students. Although the course was a bold and timely initiative, it was not supported by a well-built curriculum, realistic educational goals, and appropriate instructional materials. As I was unsatisfied with what…

  5. AN ACTIVITY THEORY APPROACH TO STUDY BARRIERS OF FACULTY REGARDING TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    2016-01-01

    Information and communication technologies are instruments for supporting new ways of teaching and learning. Nevertheless, its impact concerning scope has not reached the expected level. This strain between benefits and impact has been inquired from the perspective of barriers of teachers to use...... for a reconceptualization in the study of barriers arguing that the teaching process is a complex and dynamic activity that needs to be examined from a collective perspective. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory is the theoretical framework used in the study. It concludes with the necessity of overcoming the existing...

  6. Cultural-historical and cognitive approaches to understanding the origins of development of written speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Obukhova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of the emergence and development of written speech, its relationship to the oral speech, connections to the symbolic and modeling activities of preschool children – playing and drawing. While a child's drawing is traditionally interpreted in psychology either as a measure of intellectual development, or as a projective technique, or as a criterion for creative giftedness of the child, in this article, the artistic activity is analyzed as a prerequisite for development of written speech. The article substantiates the hypothesis that the mastery of “picture writing” – the ability to display the verbal content in a schematic picturesque plan – is connected to the success of writing speech at school age. Along with the classical works of L.S. Vygotsky, D.B. Elkonin, A.R. Luria, dedicated to finding the origins of writing, the article presents the current Russian and foreign frameworks of forming the preconditions of writing, based on the concepts of cultural-historical theory (“higher mental functions”, “zone of proximal development”, etc.. In Western psychology, a number of pilot studies used the developmental function of drawing for teaching the written skills to children of 5-7 years old. However, in cognitive psychology, relationship between drawing and writing is most often reduced mainly to the analysis of general motor circuits. Despite the recovery in research on writing and its origins in the last decade, either in domestic or in foreign psychology, the written speech is not a sufficiently studied problem.

  7. Project learn school community: An educational practice meets an educational activity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanovic-Shane Ana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Project Learn School community is a unique school coop in Philadelphia Founded 30 years ago, Project Learn was created as a cooperative between teachers, parents and students. The main philosophical principle, derived from J. Dewey’s educational theories is the principle of equality between the parties in the educative process. Other guiding philosophical principles are: the emphasis on the unique constellation of abilities of every student creating opportunities for meaningful personal involvement in the learning process, developing a sense of responsibility in students for themselves and for the larger world, and, finally, educating the whole person rather than just teaching academic skills. Although Cultural Historical Activity theory of L.S. Vygotsky was not very well known in the United States at the time of it’s founding, this school embodies several basic principles of Cultural Historical Activity theory. Among them is the principle of social mediation of the relationship between the subject and the object. The same principle is actualized through the rich use of cultural tools and symbols such as very developed programs in art, music and drama, as well as the frequent use of play and play like activities both to motivate and to create a collaborative learning atmosphere. Furthermore, the unique style of governance, where all families participate without delegation of their decision making powers, provides for a powerful model of human relationships, rules and norms believed to be the most beneficial for individual learning and the over all social development.

  8. Activity theory as a framework for analyzing and redesigning work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeström, Y

    2000-07-01

    Cultural-historical activity theory is a new framework aimed at transcending the dichotomies of micro- and macro-, mental and material, observation and intervention in analysis and redesign of work. The approach distinguishes between short-lived goal-directed actions and durable, object-oriented activity systems. A historically evolving collective activity system, seen in its network relations to other activity systems, is taken as the prime unit of analysis against which scripted strings of goal-directed actions and automatic operations are interpreted. Activity systems are driven by communal motives that are often difficult to articulate for individual participants. Activity systems are in constant movement and internally contradictory. Their systemic contradictions, manifested in disturbances and mundane innovations, offer possibilities for expansive developmental transformations. Such transformations proceed through stepwise cycles of expansive learning which begin with actions of questioning the existing standard practice, then proceed to actions of analyzing its contradictions and modelling a vision for its zone of proximal development, then to actions of examining and implementing the new model in practice. New forms of work organization increasingly require negotiated 'knotworking' across boundaries. Correspondingly, expansive learning increasingly involves horizontal widening of collective expertise by means of debating, negotiating and hybridizing different perspectives and conceptualizations. Findings from a longitudinal intervention study of children's medical care illuminate the theoretical arguments.

  9. Positive psychology and ideas of cultural-historical school of L.S. Vygotsky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilev V.K.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article was carried out a comparative analysis between two distinctive psychology schools: the cultural-historical psychology of L.V. Vygotsky and the positive psychological school. Distinct are a number of significant similarities between their basic ideas that are valuable both for the development of human knowledge and for public practice. The authors have outlined and systematized the leading personal and intellectual qualities of the famous psychologists who have created the most promising theories in the psychological science. The category is highlighted as well as a small group of visionary psychologists who have identified the most important problems of man and psychology and have offered the best quality solutions to these problems. These are W. James, S. Freud, L. Vygotsky, E. Eriksson and A. Maslow; We’ve noticed that Vygotsky alone meets all the criteria, as if the concept of insightful psychologists was modeled over his creative work and his personality.

  10. Critical Reflection on the Reception of Vygotsky’s Theory in the International Academic Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafermos M.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to analyze various types of the reception of Vygotsky’s theory in the international academic communities. The paper develops a critical analysis of three widespread theoretical frameworks of interpretation of Vygotsky’s theory: cognitivism, culturalism, cultural-historical activity theory. It is argues that fragmented readings of particular ideas of Vygotsky, without enough understanding of the theoretical programme in which these ideas have been included dominates in North-Atlantic research. The paper proposes the reconstruction of the theoretical programme of cultural-historical psychology in the social and scientific context of its formation.

  11. On Third Generation Activity Theory: Interview With Yrjö Engeström

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yrjö Engeström

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this interview Prof. Engeström discusses his professional trajectory and interest in cultural-historical activity theory with a focus on its insights into the fields of work and human development. He comments on recent transformations within this theoretical orientation, many of them promoted by his research into a variety of workplaces and organisations. Methodological aspects, and in particular formative intervention methods such as the Change Laboratory, are also considered. Prof. Engeström’s published work covers a multitude of real-life contexts and offers us a perfect example of how psychological research can be a powerful tool not only for understanding reality but actively shaping it.

  12. Nonclassical and Postnonclassical epistemology in Lev Vygotsky's cultural-historical approach to clinical psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zinchenko Yury P; Pervichko, Elena I

    2013-01-01

    .... Vygotsky's cultural-historical concept within the field of clinical psychology. We prove potency in application of contemporary philosophical concepts, which help distinguish between the types of scientific rationality...

  13. An Application of Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marken, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Activity Theory has often been used in workplace settings to gain new theoretical understandings about work and the humans who engage in work, but rarely has there been sufficient detail in the literature to allow HPT practitioners to do their own activity analysis. The detail presented in this case is sufficient for HPT practitioners to begin to…

  14. Analysing young children’s thinking about natural phenomena: A sociocultural/cultural historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JILL ROBBINS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vygotsky’s sociocultural/cultural historical theory emphasised the notion of semiotic mediation – or how thinking is transformed through signs (such as language and cultural tools (such as drawings from an intermental to an intramental plane. While the ideas of Vygotsky have become well-accepted within research in early childhood education in Australia, they are somewhat slower to be adopted within science education research. Yet they offer the potential for gaining new understandings of how young children’s thinking about the world develops. This article will demonstrate one way in which aspects of Vygotsky’s (1987-1999 work, particularly his ideas about semiotic mediation can inform analysis of children’s thinking about the world. Focusing on conversations with children about natural phenomena, and drawings they completed during those conversations, the analysis identifies a number of significant issues that are not normally revealed within the dominant forms of analysis which draw on constructivist perspectives. The findings, which reveal complex and dynamic aspects of children’s thinking, have implications for both teachers and researchers working with young children – especially within science education and science education research.

  15. Integrating IS and HCI Using Activity Theory as a Philosophical and Theoretical Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hasan

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The fields of Information Systems (IS and Human Computer Interaction (HCI are both multidisciplinary in nature and each is searching for an identity as a legitimate discipline in its own right, with a firm theoretical basis. Activity Theory offers a set of concepts, structures and terms which are eminently suited to both fields. It has its origins in the cultural historical psychology of Russia, and avoids the dichotomies between thought and action, and between individuals and society, that are prevalent in western thinking. This paper describes the basic principles of Activity Theory as they apply to IS and HCI, with particular emphasis on those systems which provide knowledge about the progress of their organisation to senior managers. Activity Theory principles will be used in a longitudinal case study to analyse an extensive project which attempted, with limited success, to produce management support systems in an organisation. The Activity Theory analysis indicates that an integrated IS and HCI approach would have improved the outcomes of this project.

  16. Preschool Children's Participation in Representational and Non-Representational Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, Gregory S.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined representational and non-representational activities in which children in a Head Start classroom participated. This was an investigation from the perspective of cultural-historical activity theory of how components (e.g. artifacts and division of labour) of classroom activities vary across and within types of activities.…

  17. Technology, Mathematics and Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This article describes 11 papers in which the authors report their research on technology as enhancement in the teaching and learning of mathematics, in the context of the application of activity theory for design and/or analysis. There is considerable diversity across the papers in how the authors have interpreted their task and in particular how…

  18. Concerning interpretations of activity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironenko, Irina A

    2013-09-01

    Activity theory (AT) is the most recognised part of Russian psychology outside Russia. However the general view of AT in international science is rather unilateral, lacking substantial aspects and areas necessary for proper understanding. This article is aimed at expanding the image of AT dominant in the mainstream which reduces the AT trend to A.N. Leontiev's theory. This reduction impoverishes the creative potentialities of the trend, and decreases the ability of AT to contribute to international science. We aim to reveal that AT is not limited to Leontiev's approach, to explain which ideas of the founders of AT, S.L. Rubinstein and L.S. Vygotsky, were pursued and which were rejected by A.N. Leontiev, and to assess another important contribution to the AT trend - the theory of B.G. Ananiev, where the ideas of AT's founders were developed which were not succeeded by A.N. Leontiev. Historical causes and consequences of the general reduction of the image of AT in the mainstream to Leontiev's theory are considered: why the discrepancies between views of Rubinstein, Vygotsky and Leontiev were hardly ever discussed in public and why other theories contemporary to Leontiev's theory were never given account appropriate to their value in Russia and remain almost unknown abroad.

  19. Exploring Child Play within the Framework of Cultural-Historical Psychology: Experience and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Elkoninova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper reconstructs the history of the problem of the development of mind on the example of child play. It reveals how researchers from the cultural-historical school of thought explored the developmental function of play, recorded quantitative leaps in its development and attempted to reconstruct it — from the works of L.S. Vygotsky and his followers (activity approach to role play: A.N. Leontiev, D.B. Elkonin, N.Ya. Mikhaylenko, N.A. Korotkova and others to the works of researchers who studied the very act of development in play (L.I. Elkoninova, T.V. Bazhanova, K.O. Yuryeva. It is argued that the concept of the cultural form of play that contains the Challenge (limited by possibilities of action, by risk and the Response to it serves as a foundation not only for role-playing games, but also for games with rules and computer games too. The Challenge is associated with action which transforms the situation of acting and is typical of all forms of play that are required to tie together everything that is separated in an everyday behavior of a child.

  20. Io. [theories concerning volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. V.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the continuing investigation of Io is presented. Gravitational resonance is discussed as the cause of Io's volcanism, and the volcanic activity is explained in terms of sulfur chemistry. Theories concerning the reasons for the two main types of volcanic eruptions on Io are advanced and correlated with geographical features of the satellite. The sulfur and silicate models of the calderas are presented, citing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Problems of the gravitational resonance theory of Io's heat source are then described. Finally, observations of Io planned for the Galileo mission are summarized.

  1. Professional Learning of K-6 Teachers in Science Through Collaborative Action Research: An Activity Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Primary/elementary teachers are uniquely positioned in terms of their need for ongoing, science-focused professional development. They are usually generalists, having limited preparation for teaching science, and often do not feel prepared or comfortable in teaching science. In this case study, CHAT or cultural-historical activity theory is used as a lens to examine primary/elementary teachers' activity system as they engaged in a teacher-driven professional development initiative. Teachers engaged in collaborative action research to change their practice, with the objective of making their science teaching more engaging and hands-on for students. A range of qualitative methods and sources such as teacher interviews and reflections, teacher-created artifacts, and researcher observational notes were adopted to gain insight into teacher learning. Outcomes report on how the teachers' activity system changed as they participated in two cycles of collaborative action research and how the contradictions that arose in their activity system became sources of professional growth. Furthermore, this research shows how the framework of activity theory may be used to garner insight into the activity and learning of teachers as both their professional activities and the context change over time.

  2. Toward a Political Economic Theory of Education: Use and Exchange Values of Enhanced Labor Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julian

    2011-01-01

    I explore theoretical conceptions of the use and exchange values of mathematics education within cultural-historical activity theory perspectives. The case of education in England is compared with that of health care (due to Engestrom). Then I draw on Lave and McDermott's study of estranged learning from the early Marx, and from Marx's later…

  3. A Cultural-Historical Model to Understand and Facilitate Children's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pui Ling

    2015-01-01

    Parents and educators strive to help their children to develop optimally. Given the diversity of values and practices among dynamic modern populations it is important to understand all the dimensions that affect the development of children in their communities. A cultural-historical lens facilitates such a holistic understanding. Taking this lens,…

  4. Generacion 1.5: A Cultural Historical Agenda for Research at the 2-Year College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Spencer; Portes, Pedro R.; D'Amico, Mark M.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we employ a cultural historical theoretical framework to extend understandings of how widespread 2-year college placement policies concerning English remediation potentially locate and retain U.S.-educated Latino adolescents at the margins of higher education through well-intentioned yet deficit-driven postsecondary cultural…

  5. Translation as the Cultural-Historical Problem (Domestic Discussions 1930-1950 and the Present)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shchedrina, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    The issue of the cultural-historical relativity of translation is considered in this article. The author analyses the positions of the participants of modern discussions on problems of translation in the context of the history of discussion of translation strategies in Russia (1930-1950-ies) and gro

  6. Genetic Research Methodology Meets Early Childhood Science Education Research: A Cultural-Historical Study of Child’s Scientific Thinking Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fragkiadaki G.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study reported in this paper aims to structure a cultural-historical understanding on how early childhood children experience science and how they develop scientific thinking as they interact with the social, cultural and material world. Moving beyond the cognitive dimensions of learning by interrelating different aspects of the process of children’s scientific thinking development constitutes a research prior- ity for the study. From a wide range of collected data, in the present article one qualitative empirical case study is presented. The detailed single example that is analyzed refers to a kindergarten female student, aged 5.2 years old, from an urban area of Greece. A developmental research methodology as specified from the requirements of cultural-historical theory framework is used. Following four of the main principles of the experimental genetic method, this study creates a fecund ground for a cultural-historical exploration and interpretation of the very processes of the child’s development. The collection of the data was achieved through expanded, open-type conversations conducted at three concrete phases between the case study child, two of her peers and the educator. Drawing upon the system of theoretical concepts of cultural- historical theory the analysis is mainly based on the concept of perezhivanie as analytical tool as well as the concept of the developmental trajectories. The concept of the conceptualization of a precursor model as a theoretical tool that derives from the field of Science Education is also used. The analysis gives insights into how a certain social situation between children and educators in kindergarten settings becomes the unique social situation of a child’s development. Using as a base the dialectic perspective that Vygotsky posed in the analysis of human psyche, the study in this paper offers a creative insight in order to elaborate on a broad and dynamic understanding of the child

  7. The main principles of formation of structure of cultural-historical landscapes of Central Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizovtsev, Vyacheslav; Natalia, Erman

    2014-05-01

    The forming and development of cultural-historical landscapes (CH) are obligate result of evolution of society and nature, as well as, man and landscapes during their coherent growth. CH landscapes are holistic historic-cultural and nature creations. They reflect the history of land use and spiritual development of ethnic community of concrete territory with determine homogeneous landscape characteristics. The majority of them appertain to the category of relict landscapes, which completed their evolution growth. That means that these are anthropogenic (AL) and cultural (CL) landscapes. They lost anthropogenic management and continue their growth obeying natural logic. These landscapes include elements of morphological structure and natural components, which have been transformed by men, and also artefacts, sociofacts and mental facts. These facts can be considered as peculiar "biographical chronicle" of activity of population in determinate landscape conditions in determinate historical period. These facts are evidences of material and spiritual cultural of society. The first AL begin to arise simultaneously with conversation of appropriating economy into generating economy. There was such conversation in Central Russia (Neolithic revolution) only in Bronze Age. Anthropogenic transformed landscape complexes and even man-made landscape complexes have been formed in Bronze Age. Some of these complexes exist now. Actual anthropogenic and cultural landscapes began to form only in Iron Age while permanent, long existed settlement and agriculture structure has organized. First, These are small settlement anthropogenic landscape complexes (selischa and gorodischa) with applied permanent miniature arable areas. These complexes located on the capes and on the areas between river banks and banks of streams. Second, these are pasture anthropogenic landscape complexes (on the level of podurochische and urochische), located in flood plain and valley-cavin position (pasture

  8. Developing the Ideas of the Scientific School of L.S. Vygotsky: Scientific Publications of the Journal “Cultural-Historical Psychology” (2005—2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvedovskaya A.A.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of the development of the ideas of L.S. Vygotsky’s school using the example of the publications in the international scientific journal “Cultural-Historical Psychology” (for the period 2005 through 2016. Over the period from 2005 to the end of 2016, 595 articles of 524 authors from 32 countries have been published in the journal “Cultural-Historical Psychology.” The study of the subjects of the articles published in the journal was held within the framework of the following criteria: scientometric publication indicators; group of authors; themes of the publications; relevance of the articles for their readers. The research uses the following sources: Russian Science Citation Index (RSCI; repository data of the psychological editions of PsyJournals.ru; report data on the activities of the journal “Cultural-Historical Psychology.” The citation frequency of the journal’s publications peaks in 2007, 2009 and 2006. Empirical findings comprise major part of the publications. The most developed areas are the studies of speech and thinking, personality, and communication.

  9. Activity as Object-Related: Resolving the Dichotomy of Individual and Collective Planes of Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetsenko, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This article suggests that the principle of object-relatedness, introduced by Vygotsky and expanded by A. N. Leontiev, can be used to conceptualize human subjectivity within a profoundly social view of human development. This is achieved by reformulating the premises of cultural-historical activity theory to include the notion that material…

  10. Active Inference: A Process Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl; FitzGerald, Thomas; Rigoli, Francesco; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a process theory based on active inference and belief propagation. Starting from the premise that all neuronal processing (and action selection) can be explained by maximizing Bayesian model evidence-or minimizing variational free energy-we ask whether neuronal responses can be described as a gradient descent on variational free energy. Using a standard (Markov decision process) generative model, we derive the neuronal dynamics implicit in this description and reproduce a remarkable range of well-characterized neuronal phenomena. These include repetition suppression, mismatch negativity, violation responses, place-cell activity, phase precession, theta sequences, theta-gamma coupling, evidence accumulation, race-to-bound dynamics, and transfer of dopamine responses. Furthermore, the (approximately Bayes' optimal) behavior prescribed by these dynamics has a degree of face validity, providing a formal explanation for reward seeking, context learning, and epistemic foraging. Technically, the fact that a gradient descent appears to be a valid description of neuronal activity means that variational free energy is a Lyapunov function for neuronal dynamics, which therefore conform to Hamilton's principle of least action.

  11. Nonclassical and Postnonclassical epistemology in Lev Vygotsky’s cultural-historical approach to clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Zinchenko Y.P.; Pervichko E.I.

    2013-01-01

    The work presents historiographic and theoretical methodological study of establishment of fundamental theses of L.S. Vygotsky’s cultural-historical concept within the field of clinical psychology.We prove potency in application of contemporary philosophical concepts, which help distinguish between the types of scientific rationality (classical, nonclassical, and postnonclassical), for scientific reflection over the development of psychology and designation of paradigmatic status of cultural-...

  12. The Influence of Linguistics upon the Formation of the Culture-Historical Approach in Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Kuzmanović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Through the critical research into the history of archaeology, the paper aims to explore the influence of linguistics and, more generally, the role of language in modern societies, upon the formation of the culture-historical approach in the discipline, focusing upon the situation in the Serbian archaeology. In doing so, the author follows the series of the similar critical historical accounts of the history of archaeology, pointing to the conceptual burden carried along with the culture-historical practice of attributing artefacts according to their cultural affiliation, automatically making inferences about the cultural/ ethnic identity of the people who used them. The need to analyse the relationship between linguistics and archaeology at the time of formation of the discipline originates from the standpoint that, even if we do not advocate the complete rejection of the culture-historical tradition (still impossible, however, it is nevertheless necessary to understand the ways in which certain meanings were formed, implicit to the archaeological concept of culture. In this way, it becomes possible to avoid the interpretive mistakes inherent to the conceptual burden of the discipline.

  13. Teaching Primary Science: Emotions, Identity and the Use of Practical Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripps Clark, John; Groves, Susie

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses cultural historical activity theory to examine the interactions between the choices primary teachers make in the use of practical activities in their teaching of science and the purposes they attribute to these; their emotions, background and beliefs; and the construction of their identities as teachers of science. It draws on four…

  14. Nonclassical and Postnonclassical epistemology in Lev Vygotsky’s cultural-historical approach to clinical psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinchenko Y.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents historiographic and theoretical methodological study of establishment of fundamental theses of L.S. Vygotsky’s cultural-historical concept within the field of clinical psychology.We prove potency in application of contemporary philosophical concepts, which help distinguish between the types of scientific rationality (classical, nonclassical, and postnonclassical, for scientific reflection over the development of psychology and designation of paradigmatic status of cultural-historic concept suggested by L.S. Vygotsky and Vygotsky-Luria syndrome approach at the contemporary stage of science.Present study of scientific works of L.S. Vygotsky and his followers demonstrated that fundamentals of cultural-historic conception suggested by L.S. Vygotsky and further developed in methodology of Vygotsky-Luria syndrome approach, these fundamentals presented the origins of not only non-classical, but as well post-nonclassical model of scientific rationality. They are characterized by post-nonclassical understanding of the object and method of psychological study and post-nonclassical mode of thinking of the scientists.As it was showed, in works of L.S. Vygotsky there formulated general methodological requirements to organization of mental studies, which, on the whole, go in tune with the requirements introduced for study of complex self-developing systems. There were produced arguments to prove that the concept of Vygotsky-Luria syndrome approach describes mental syndromes as dynamic structures, which display the features of self-organization, self-determination and adaptive rationality. Hence, they can be regarded as open self-developing systems.We assume and verify the hypothesis that the syndrome analysis, due to the features of post-nonclassic modeling of scientific rationality it reveals, may be regarded as theoretically productive methodological approach at the modern stage of science.

  15. The Effects of Music Composition as a Classroom Activity on Engagement in Music Education and Academic and Music Achievement: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenes, Michel; van Oers, Bert; Diekstra, René F. W.; Sklad, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to contribute to the understanding of the effects of music education, in particular music composition as a classroom activity for fifth- and sixth-graders. The intervention (experimental condition) focused on a three-step-model for music composition, based on the Cultural Historical Activity Theory of education, and has been…

  16. The Effects of Music Composition as a Classroom Activity on Engagement in Music Education and Academic and Music Achievement: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenes, Michel; van Oers, Bert; Diekstra, René F. W.; Sklad, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to contribute to the understanding of the effects of music education, in particular music composition as a classroom activity for fifth- and sixth-graders. The intervention (experimental condition) focused on a three-step-model for music composition, based on the Cultural Historical Activity Theory of education, and has been…

  17. Narrative as Cultural Mediator in Personality Development: Looking through the Lens of Cultural-Historical Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turusheva Y.B.,

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the features of the narrative approach as a new methodology for the study of personality and its development mechanisms. The article discusses the basic settings of social constructionism, in which most of the narrative research are carried out to date, and discloses the basic approaches and concepts of the narrative approach. The article also shows the ability of the narrative approach in the in the research process of socialization and the formation of human identity in the context of the cultural-historical approach, and analyzes some specific narrative function, such as the ability to structure the experience and give it meaning; create a basic system of values; build and rebuild our own identity and influence others; install time order and semantic links between the past, present and future; broadcast the cultural experience and influence in the community. All these functions — structuring, value-orienting, performative, temporal, translates — are invited to consider from the perspective of cultural-historical psychology, assuming a cul- tural narrative means, mediating personal development.

  18. Activity Theory in HCI Fundamentals and Reflections

    CERN Document Server

    Kaptelinin, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Activity theory -- a conceptual framework originally developed by Aleksei Leontiev -- has its roots in the socio-cultural tradition in Russian psychology. The foundational concept of the theory is human activity, which is understood as purposeful, mediated, and transformative interaction between human beings and the world. Since the early 1990s, activity theory has been a visible landmark in the theoretical landscape of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Along with some other frameworks, such as distributed cognition and phenomenology, it established itself as a leading post-cognitivist approac

  19. Double Stimulation in Strategic Concept Formation: An Activity-Theoretical Analysis of Business Planning in a Small Technology Firm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Jaakko; Ristimaki, Paivi

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we study the relationships between culturally existing general strategy concepts and a small information and communication technology firm's specific strategic challenge in its management team's search for a new strategy concept. We apply three theoretical ideas of cultural historical activity theory: (a) the idea of double…

  20. Double Stimulation in Strategic Concept Formation: An Activity-Theoretical Analysis of Business Planning in a Small Technology Firm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Jaakko; Ristimaki, Paivi

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we study the relationships between culturally existing general strategy concepts and a small information and communication technology firm's specific strategic challenge in its management team's search for a new strategy concept. We apply three theoretical ideas of cultural historical activity theory: (a) the idea of double…

  1. Nonisothermal activation: nonlinear transport theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1998-01-01

    We present the statistical mechanical foundation of nonisothermal stochastic processes, thereby generalizing Kramers' Fokker-Planck model for thermal activation and providing a microscopic context for Rolf Landauer's original ideas on state-dependent diffusion. By applying projection operator method

  2. Pattern activation/recognition theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Castel, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    In his 2012 book How to Create a Mind, Ray Kurzweil defines a "Pattern Recognition Theory of Mind" that states that the brain uses millions of pattern recognizers, plus modules to check, organize, and augment them. In this article, I further the theory to go beyond pattern recognition and include also pattern activation, thus encompassing both sensory and motor functions. In addition, I treat checking, organizing, and augmentation as patterns of patterns instead of separate modules, therefore handling them the same as patterns in general. Henceforth I put forward a unified theory I call "Pattern Activation/Recognition Theory of Mind." While the original theory was based on hierarchical hidden Markov models, this evolution is based on their precursor: stochastic grammars. I demonstrate that a class of self-describing stochastic grammars allows for unifying pattern activation, recognition, organization, consistency checking, metaphor, and learning, into a single theory that expresses patterns throughout. I have implemented the model as a probabilistic programming language specialized in activation/recognition grammatical and neural operations. I use this prototype to compute and present diagrams for each stochastic grammar and corresponding neural circuit. I then discuss the theory as it relates to artificial network developments, common coding, neural reuse, and unity of mind, concluding by proposing potential paths to validation.

  3. Pattern Activation/Recognition Theory of Mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand edu Castel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In his 2012 book How to Create a Mind, Ray Kurzweil defines a Pattern Recognition Theory of Mind that states that the brain uses millions of pattern recognizers, plus modules to check, organize, and augment them. In this article, I further the theory to go beyond pattern recognition and include also pattern activation, thus encompassing both sensory and motor functions. In addition, I treat checking, organizing, and augmentation as patterns of patterns instead of separate modules, therefore handling them the same as patterns in general. Henceforth I put forward a unified theory I call Pattern Activation/Recognition Theory of Mind. While the original theory was based on hierarchical hidden Markov models, this evolution is based on their precursor: stochastic grammars. I demonstrate that a class of self-describing stochastic grammars allows for unifying pattern activation, recognition, organization, consistency checking, metaphor, and learning, into a single theory that expresses patterns throughout. I have implemented the model as a probabilistic programming language specialized in activation/recognition grammatical and neural operations. I use this prototype to compute and present diagrams for each stochastic grammar and corresponding neural circuit. I then discuss the theory as it relates to artificial network developments, common coding, neural reuse, and unity of mind, concluding by proposing potential paths to validation.

  4. Themes of cultural-historical heritage and animation methods in art education present in teachers questionnaire statements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Pechová

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the animation of cultural historical heritage from educational perspective and its use in the school environment. Theoretical framework presents a contemporary perception of those two phenomena and is followed by interpretation of results of a questionnaire survey. The survey was conducted in Czech lower secondary schools in the Liberec region in 2011. The aim of the research was to investigate how the topics are present in art education and how they are perceived by teachers of art education. The research sample consisted of 81 teachers and provided answers to 9 questions. The analysis, classification and categorising of the results indicates a focus on artistic themes as preferred field of cultural historical heritage for teaching with the objectives of overall development of students personality. Due to the vague idea about the animation method, the cultural historical heritage theme presented by animation is almost not used.

  5. A Cultural Historical Theoretical Perspective of Discourse and Design in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser have initiated an important conversation in science education as they use sociocultural theory to introduce design based scenarios into the science classroom. This response seeks to expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article "The discourse of design-based science classroom activities" by…

  6. Transforming Teacher Education, An Activity Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholl, Jane; Blake, Allan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the work of teacher education in England and Scotland. It seeks to locate this work within conflicting sociocultural views of professional practice and academic work. Drawing on an activity theory framework that integrates the analysis of these seemingly contradictory discourses with a study of teacher educators' practical…

  7. Activity Theory and Language Teacher Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feryok, Anne

    2012-01-01

    This article takes a broadly sociocultural perspective on the development of an Armenian English as a foreign language (EFL) teacher. It focuses on how experiences and actions outside the professional development classroom influence language teacher agency. The paper is framed within activity theory and specifically draws on Galperin's orienting…

  8. Spinoza and the Theory of Active Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    2013-01-01

    of active tolerance that, for the most part, has been lost in contemporary democratic theory. Spinoza’s philosophy of immanence does so because it animates a sensorial orientation to politics, one that heightens our attention to the affective components of political life, enabling us to better theorize how......This paper considers the politics of tolerance through the lens of Spinoza’s philosophy of immanence. The contention is that Spinoza’s philosophy of immanence provides us with a better conceptualization of the relationship between tolerance and power, and that it in so doing reinvigorates a theory...

  9. Psychological problems of late adoption as observed in Brazil through a cultural-historical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anauate, Carla

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses certain cultural-historical concepts relating to late adoption. This term is used for the adoption of children over 2 years old. Unfortunately most people do not wish to adopt children over 2 years old. Generally they seek newborn babies, which are a rare population, probably because of birth control campaigns. The children who are available in orphanages are older children who are unwanted. This paper tries to deal with this issue emphasizing that relationships are built within a family, transforming those involved. It lays out principles for a successful adoption and illustrates this matter with a case study. Relationships should be provided so that people can interact. This interaction will lead to the transformation of all of those involved within the established relationship, which constitute the human being. We intend to demystify the difficult matter of late adoption, which is one of the key aspects concerning the return of the child to an orphanage. The adaptation of late adopted children is said to be more difficult, but when we believe that human beings can change and be modified through the relationships they establish, we see a promising possibility for late adoption. Late adoption can be successful when we view it from a relational point of view, stressing that relationships transform all the individuals involved within the group.

  10. Dynamo theory prediction of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamo theory technique to predict decadal time scale solar activity variations is introduced. The technique was developed following puzzling correlations involved with geomagnetic precursors of solar activity. Based upon this, a dynamo theory method was developed to predict solar activity. The method was used successfully in solar cycle 21 by Schatten, Scherrer, Svalgaard, and Wilcox, after testing with 8 prior solar cycles. Schatten and Sofia used the technique to predict an exceptionally large cycle, peaking early (in 1990) with a sunspot value near 170, likely the second largest on record. Sunspot numbers are increasing, suggesting that: (1) a large cycle is developing, and (2) that the cycle may even surpass the largest cycle (19). A Sporer Butterfly method shows that the cycle can now be expected to peak in the latter half of 1989, consistent with an amplitude comparable to the value predicted near the last solar minimum.

  11. Tying knots: an activity theory analysis of student learning goals in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Douglas P; Wesevich, Austin; Lichtenfeld, Jana; Artino, Antony R; Brydges, Ryan; Varpio, Lara

    2017-04-12

    Learning goal programmes are often created to help students develop self-regulated learning skills; however, these programmes do not necessarily consider the social contexts surrounding learning goals or how they fit into daily educational practice. We investigated a high-frequency learning goal programme in which students generated and shared weekly learning goals with their clinical teams in core Year 3 clerkships. Our study explores: (i) how learning goals were incorporated into the clinical work, and (ii) the factors that influenced the use of students' learning goals in work-based learning. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 14 students and 14 supervisors (attending physicians and residents) sampled from all participating core clerkships. Interviews were coded for emerging themes. Using cultural historical activity theory and knotworking as theoretical lenses, we developed a model of the factors that influenced students' learning goal usage in a work-based learning context. Students and supervisors often faced the challenge of reconciling contradictions that arose when the desired outcomes of student skill development, grading and patient care were not aligned. Learning goals could function as tools for developing new ways of acting that overcame those contradictions by facilitating collaborative effort between students and their supervisors. However, for new collaborations to take place, both students and supervisors had to engage with the goals, and the necessary patients needed to be present. When any one part of the system did not converge around the learning goals, the impact of the learning goals programme was limited. Learning goals are potentially powerful tools to mediate interactions between students, supervisors and patients, and to reconcile contradictions in work-based learning environments. Learning goals provide a means to develop not only learners, but also learning systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the

  12. Cognitive activation theory of stress (CATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursin, Holger; Eriksen, Hege R

    2010-05-01

    The cognitive activation theory of stress (CATS) is based on a long series of experiments on animals and on humans, in the laboratory, and in real life situations. From the common sense coping concept formulated by Seymour Levine; coping is when my "tommy" does not hurt, we have advanced to a systematic theory for what is behind the relaxed and happy coping rat (and cat). We also cover the translational leap to humans, starting with the now classic parachutist study. The bridge is based on formal and symbolic definitions, a theoretical short cut that Levine actually never really accepted. The essential pathophysiological concept is the potential pathological effects of sustained activation, which may occur in the absence of coping (positive response outcome expectancy). We review the current status of CATS in Behavioural Medicine by discussing its potential explanatory power in epidemiology, prevention and treatment of "subjective health complaints".

  13. Emotions, Development and Materiality at School: a Cultural-Historical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller Mirza, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    In the school context, feelings and emotions are generally perceived as obstacles to learning. Today, however, the introduction of complex real-world issues in lessons of Geography, History or civic education, such as international migration or cultural diversity, blurs the classic boundaries between emotions and cognition when they prompt students' personal opinions and experiences. In the frame of a research on teaching and learning practices in education for cultural diversity, this paper examines how students' personal emotions were elicited in the lessons, and how they were semiotized, transformed in the course of social interactions. We analyze empirical data gathered in 12 Primary and Junior school classrooms in Switzerland. 12 teachers and 232 students (from 11 to 16 years old) participated. We adopt a cultural-historical perspective inspired by Vygotsky and his followers and show the interactional processes by which the emotions undergo semiotization and influence the unfolding of the students' psychological processes. In the sequences we analyze, using the Valsiner's schema (Human Development, 44, 84-97, 2001), we identify three different modalities of semiotization: 1) the students' feelings are simply verbalized and linked to the speaker's affective world; 2) the verbalized emotions are reframed and interwoven with factual information; 3) the verbalized emotions are linked to information and reframed with collective emotional experiences. These processes are described, illustrated and discussed. We shed light on the central role of the verbal interventions of the teacher (who supports but also hinders the processes sometimes) and of materiality, here photographs, which mediated the teacher-student interactions.

  14. Active Learning: The Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky, and Constructivist Theory Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardjono Pardjono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Active Learning Approach has long been implemented in Indonesian schools, and until now the implementation of Active Learning Approach remains to be suggested to improve the quality of learning process in Indonesian classrooms. However, the constraint is still on the definition of active learning itself. This article discusses the nature of Active Learning from the perspectives of four theories: Dewey's theory of progressive education, Piaget's theory of assimilation and accommodation, Vygotsky's theory of social context and zone of proximal development, and theory of constructivism. The discussion involves the nature of knowledge, learning, and teaching including the roles of teachers in active learning based on the four theories

  15. Activity theory as a challenge to systems design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    1991-01-01

    This paper suggests an improvement of the theoretical foundation of information systems research of the 1990s. This foundation is found in human activity theory. The paper deals with how human activity theory can help systems design change, theoretically and practically. Applying activity theory...

  16. Exploring Virtual Enterprises Using Activity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Beckett

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available From joint Industry – University research into the key success factors that sustain Virtual Enterprises (VE’s, it has been observed that conditions for the establishment of a VE do not necessarily sustain it. Transactions that are valued by the participants, a balance between similarity and complementarity attributes of the participants and effective utilisation of time are seen as important sustaining factors. Different communication and ICT tools are utilised in different circumstances, and successful collaborations develop formal or informal “rules” underlying their operation. Considering such attributes helps us understand what happens within a successful VE, but not necessarily how. Two case studies describing long-standing collaborations – one relating to a manufacturing network, and the other to a professional virtual community are presented. A third case study relating to the development of ICT tools to be used in a VE is also presented. Activity Theory is used as a framework for discussion of the organisational attributes associated with these cases and how they operate. It is suggested that exploration of the nature of tools, communities etc is helpful in understanding VE operations, and applied at multiple levels, Activity Theory is also useful in understanding the evolution of those tools, communities etc.

  17. From ‘activity’ to ‘labour’: commodification, labourpower and contradiction in Engeström’s activity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Warmington

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Engeström’s (1987, 1999 innovations in cultural-historical activity theory emphasise the role of contradictions in analysing and transforming learning in practice. This paper considers some of the problems and possibilities contained in his analytical understanding of contradictions, in relation to activity and to what he terms ‘expansive learning’ (Engeström, 2001, 2004, 2007. In doing so, it builds upon Engeström’s stated concern with theorising activities ‘in capitalism’. Its goal is to problematise the underlying practical definition of contradictions and the claims made for his ‘contradiction-driven’ analysis of work practices as a platform for transformation. This paper suggests that the definition of contradictions that underpins Engeström’s notions of ‘expansive’ learning and his ‘developmental work research’ methodology is restrictive because it underplays the wider social contradictions and antagonisms inherent in the commodification of labour-power. As such, while Engeström’s take on activity theory offers a valuable approach to reforming configurations of labour within the bounds of capitalist efficiency, its engagement with capitalism’s internal contradictions is uneven and, therefore, its claims to produce transformative, expansive learning are heavily qualified. The framework of this argument is provided by Postone’s (1996 reading of Marx’s Capital and Grundrisse as social theories of labour within capitalism and the extensive analyses of the social reproduction of labourpower developed by Rikowski (1999, 2000a, 2000b, 2002a, 2002b, Allman et al. (2000 and Dinerstein and Neary (2002. The paper ends with a consideration of the practical research possibilities emanating from its call to ground activity theory and its concern with contradictions in a sophisticated understanding of labourpower theory. It draws upon the UK-based Learning in and for Interagency Working Project’s (2004‑2008

  18. Rethinking Distance Learning Activities: A Comparison of Transactional Distance Theory and Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haijun; Gyorke, Allan S.

    2008-01-01

    Despite its invaluable guidance to distance education development, transactional distance (TD) theory is not seamlessly synchronised with current field practice and lacks a social component. After it has provided over 30 years of guidance, there is now a need to re-appraise TD's propositions about distance learning activities. The social-cultural…

  19. Theory and modeling of active brazing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James Edward; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Givler, Richard C.

    2013-09-01

    Active brazes have been used for many years to produce bonds between metal and ceramic objects. By including a relatively small of a reactive additive to the braze one seeks to improve the wetting and spreading behavior of the braze. The additive modifies the substrate, either by a chemical surface reaction or possibly by alloying. By its nature, the joining process with active brazes is a complex nonequilibrium non-steady state process that couples chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion to the rheology and wetting behavior of the braze. Most of the these subprocesses are taking place in the interfacial region, most are difficult to access by experiment. To improve the control over the brazing process, one requires a better understanding of the melting of the active braze, rate of the chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion rates, nonequilibrium composition-dependent surface tension as well as the viscosity. This report identifies ways in which modeling and theory can assist in improving our understanding.

  20. Applying Activity Theory in Multiagency Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniels H.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I explore the extent to which two approaches to the social formation of mind are compatible and may be used to enrich and extend each other. These are: Activity Theory (AT as derived from the work of the early Russian psychologists, Vygotsky and Leontiev, and the work of the sociologist Basil Bernstein. The purpose is to show how Bernstein provides a language of description which allows Vygotsky’s account of social formation of mind to be extended and enhanced through an understanding of the sociological processes which form specific modalities of pedagogic practice and their specialized scientific concepts. The two approaches engage with a common theme namely the social shaping of consciousness, from different perspectives and yet as Bernstein acknowledges both develop many of their core assumptions from the work of Marx and the French school of early twentieth century sociology. The work of the Russian linguist is also be used to further nuance the argument applied in multiagency settings.

  1. An Activity Systems Theory Approach to Agent Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Peng; Bai, Guohua

    2005-01-01

    In the last decade, Activity Theory has been discussed a lot in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Activity Theory was used both theoretically as an analytical method and practically as a development framework for Information Systems. Meanwhile, there is a new trench from Artificial Intelligence. Artificial Intelligence researchers find that the fruit from Activity Theory study may contribute, especially to Agent Technology, with socio-psychologic...

  2. Activity Theory and Situated Learning Theory: Contrasting Views of Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnseth, Hans Christian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a critical discussion of the practice turn in contemporary educational research. In order to make the discussion specific, I use two influential theories, namely activity theory and situated learning theory. They both turn to the notion of practice in order to overcome the limitations of mentalist and…

  3. Protection motivation theory: is this a worthwhile theory for physical activity promotion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Trinh, Linda

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews the published studies in the physical activity domain, which include novel hypothesis from our laboratory, that have tested Rogers' Protection Motivation Theory. Across the various population groups, the theory's coping appraisal is generally supported; however, there is limited support for the theory's threat components. Implications of these findings are discussed from both theoretical and practical perspectives.

  4. Knowing, Assuming, and Theorizing: Activities To Teach about Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beins, Bernard C.

    The two-part activity outlined in this paper reveals to undergraduate students that assumptions made in theory building remain unquestioned until one steps outside the initial realm of expectations, and that theories adopted have a demonstrable impact on behaviors. Part I defines a theory, describes the roles of assumptions and knowledge in…

  5. On the classical theory of molecular optical activity

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2010-01-01

    The basic principles of classical and semi-classical theories of molecular optical activity are discussed. These theories are valid for dilute solutions of optically active organic molecules. It is shown that all phenomena known in the classical theory of molecular optical activity can be described with the use of one pseudo-scalar which is a uniform function of the incident light frequency $\\omega$. The relation between optical rotation and circular dichroism is derived from the basic Kramers-Kronig relations. In our discussion of the general theory of molecular optical activity we introduce the tensor of molecular optical activity. It is shown that to evaluate the optical rotation and circular dichroism at arbitrary frequencies one needs to know only nine (3 + 6) molecular tensors. The quantum (or semi-classical) theory of molecular optical activity is also briefly discussed. We also raise the possibility of measuring the optical rotation and circular dichroism at wavelengths which correspond to the vacuum ...

  6. Assessing migration and adaptation from two or more points of view: Cultural-historical theory and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro R. Portes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study validates a new tool for assessing differences in cultural adaptation for both majority and less dominant minority/immigrant adults in college in general. The Cultural Adaptation and Development Inventory (CADI is a self-report measure validated across multi-ethnic groups. The reliability and validity of a four factor model are adequate based several replication studies. Overall, the CADI provided evidence for a culturally valid measurement that shows both convergent and discriminant validity. Predicted ethnic group and gender differences were replicated with new groups of respondents for factors measuring Inter-Cultural Stress, Helplessness/Optimism, Positive Inter-cultural Adaptation and Inter-cultural Insensitivity. The study’s socio-cultural and usual types of validity is discussed in relation Berry’s (2003, Portes (1999 and Vygotski’s (1978 views regarding sociogenesis.

  7. Hiding in Plain Sight: The Stages of Mastery/Self-Regulation in Vygotsky's Cultural-Historical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredler, Margaret E.

    2009-01-01

    During the late 1970s and 1980s, as interest in Lev Vygotsky's work was growing rapidly, most of his writings were unavailable in English. Translations of Vygotsky's work that reflect the breadth and depth of his thinking became available in the mid-to late 1990s. However, this work has yet to become an integral part of educational psychology.…

  8. Hiding in Plain Sight: The Stages of Mastery/Self-Regulation in Vygotsky's Cultural-Historical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredler, Margaret E.

    2009-01-01

    During the late 1970s and 1980s, as interest in Lev Vygotsky's work was growing rapidly, most of his writings were unavailable in English. Translations of Vygotsky's work that reflect the breadth and depth of his thinking became available in the mid-to late 1990s. However, this work has yet to become an integral part of educational psychology.…

  9. Toward a Vygotskian theory of textbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plut Dijana L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an attempt to place the problem of textbook theory into a new frame of reference provided by cultural-historical theory of development, using the idea about cultural-historical mediation of individual development and concept of CST as a basic analytical concepts. The new frame of reference introduces a new language on textbooks, opening a range of new research problems, while dealing with the old ones in a new and more complex way. Textbook is shifted from the usual pedagogic-didactic setting and placed in a more basic and cultural context. The paper is an attempt to bring the concept of cultural tools to a completely operational level, as well as to test the actual power of that concept by identifying CST in textbooks. Furthermore, this paper is an attempt elaborate the forms of social assistance that constitute the zone of proximal development, seen as the characteristics of joint activities of the child and a more competent participant (which is "hidden”, i.e., indirectly present, in this case. Vygotsky never specified the forms of social assistance, but rather gave general prescriptions (Moll, 1990, thus presenting one of the central theoretical and practical tasks for the followers of his ideas.

  10. Rethinking Assessments: Creating a New Tool Using the Zone Of Proximal Development within a Cultural-Historical Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minson V.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a picture of the current theoretical positions and methods used to assess children’s development. A maturational understanding of development is seen to be predominately used to inform the assessment tools which track how children develop across the 0—5 age group. This paper proposes that with the movement towards a cultural-historical understanding of development, a tool following from this standpoint should be developed. It is envisaged that a new assessment tool will be developed from this analysis. A theoretical rationale is given to support why the Zone of Proximal Development can be used to identify the indicators of children’s actual and potential levels of development, moving away from age/level based testing. Developing an assessment tool aligned to the principles of the ZPD can offer alternative method to assess children’s development in a theoretically robust way, providing empirical evidence to rethink the methodologies of child development assessments.

  11. Critical Curriculum Theory and Slow Ecopedagogical Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Enacting a critical environmental education curriculum theory with 8- to 9-year-old children in 1978 is now "restoried" in a "history of the present/future" like "case study" for prosecuting five interrelated problems confronting progress in environmental education and its research. They are: the intense heat of the…

  12. Critical Curriculum Theory and Slow Ecopedagogical Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Enacting a critical environmental education curriculum theory with 8- to 9-year-old children in 1978 is now "restoried" in a "history of the present/future" like "case study" for prosecuting five interrelated problems confronting progress in environmental education and its research. They are: the intense heat of the…

  13. On activity theory in cognitive systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abolfazlian, Ali Reza Kian

    Theory' (Virksomhedsteori). Virksomhedsteori er den dominante teori i den sovjetiske tradition af social psykologi. Virksomhedsteori startede med Vygotskys arbejde og fortsatte sin vækst under vejledningen af forskere som Leontiev og Luria. Med sit erkendelsesteoretiske program baseret på interaktion med...

  14. Wundt, Vygotsky and Bandura: a cultural-historical science of consciousness in three acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel; Robinson, David K; Yasnitsky, Anton

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at three historical efforts to coordinate the scientific study of biological and cultural aspects of human consciousness into a single comprehensive theory of human development that includes the evolution of the human body, cultural evolution and personal development: specifically, the research programs of Wilhelm Wundt, Lev Vygotsky and Albert Bandura. The lack of historical relations between these similar efforts is striking, and suggests that the effort to promote cultural and personal sources of consciousness arises as a natural foil to an overemphasis on the biological basis of consciousness, sometimes associated with biological determinism.

  15. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  16. The Dialectic between Ideal and Real Forms of "Sharing": A Cultural-Historical Study of Story Acting through Imaginary Play at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yijun

    2017-01-01

    In a time when story-acting practices have gained increasing focus, little is known about the relations between family story acting and a child's interactions with the ideal models represented in stories. Drawing upon a cultural-historical perspective of play and development, this study is aimed at discovering how a child is able to interact with…

  17. Social Scientific Research and Societal Practice: Action Research and Cultural-Historical Research in Methodological Light from Kurt Lewin and Lev S. Vygotsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2011-01-01

    The main interest is the relationship between social scientific research and societal practice, with specific attention on action research and cultural-historical research. To provide a productive way to engage with these research traditions, a historically-grounded, superordinate perspective is formulated that places practice in the centre. This…

  18. Social Scientific Research and Societal Practice: Action Research and Cultural-Historical Research in Methodological Light from Kurt Lewin and Lev S. Vygotsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2011-01-01

    The main interest is the relationship between social scientific research and societal practice, with specific attention on action research and cultural-historical research. To provide a productive way to engage with these research traditions, a historically-grounded, superordinate perspective is formulated that places practice in the centre. This…

  19. On the Problem of Will and Self-Regulation in Cultural-Historical Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Smirnova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to differentiate between the concepts of 'will' and 'selfregulation'. Basing on literature research the author presumes that here we deal with two qualitatively different and specific processes: one of them centers around the awareness of an individual's actions, while at the core of the other lies the impulse to act, i.e. motivation. Thus the author sets forth a hypothesis that will and selfregulation have very different psychological content and different lines of development in ontogenesis. Following L.S. Vygotsky, the author considers selfregulation as the ability to control oneself (one's inner and outer activity with the help of culturally provided means of organizing behavior. Stages of selfregulation development are therefore shaped by the level of the individual's awareness of his/her activity and by the means employed for its organization. Will, as it has been interpreted over the course of history, is considered as the urge towards active actions, as the powerfulness and persistence of one's wishes and desires (volitions. From this perspective the development of will way be described as the formation of persistent motivation in a child, as the emergence of his/her own desires. The paper reveals the relationship between impulse and awareness in various forms of child activities suggesting that, however specific, will and selfregulation are one in their genesis. The final part discusses issues in modern childhood related to the development of will and selfregulation

  20. Using Activity Theory as a Base for Investigating Language Teacher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using Activity Theory as a Base for Investigating Language Teacher Education through ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... However, use of the platform is constrained by tensions and contradictions at system and individual levels.

  1. Discoordination of labor activity: theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Kozonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the literature review of current conception of development, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and management of discoordination in labor activity. Special attention is payed to the clinical course of the labor and its outcome and for morhpofunctional features of the myometrium in this category of patients.

  2. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how activity theory can be used in (cross-)cultural medical education research. We discuss activity theory's theoretical background and principles, and we show how these can be applied to the cultural research practice by discussing the steps involved in a cross-cultural study that we conducted, from formulating research questions to drawing conclusions. We describe how the activity system, the unit of analysis in activity theory, can serve as an organizing principle to grasp cultural complexity. We end with reflections on the theoretical and practical use of activity theory for cultural research and note that it is not a shortcut to capture cultural complexity: it is a challenge for researchers to determine the boundaries of their study and to analyze and interpret the dynamics of the activity system.

  3. Self-efficacy theory and the theory of planned behavior: teaching physically active physical education classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to examine determinants of teachers' intentions to teach physically active physical education classes (i.e., spend at least 50% of class time with the students engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity). Based on the theory of planned behavior, a model was examined hypothesizing that teachers' intentions were determined by subjective norm, attitude, and perceived behavioral control. Grounded in self-efficacy theory, it was hypothesized that program goal importance and hierarchical and barrier self-efficacy would also predict intention. Using a series of hierarchical regression analyses, the theory of planned behavior was supported by accounting for 59% of the variance in intention due to attitude, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norm. Self-efficacy theory based variables received minimal support.

  4. [Behavioral Activation for Depression: Theory and Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) has recently attracted marked attention. While cognitive therapy focuses on the cognitive distortion of patients with depression and asks them to change their behaviors as the process of altering the cognitive distortion, BA pays attention to behavior to avoid an unpleasant situation or social situation as a key symptom that leads to persistence of the depression. Avoidance behaviors are often seen during every process of depression, from onset to recurrence. Avoidance behaviors, a decrease in pleasant phenomena, or increase in unpleasant phenomena, result in reinforcing a depressive mood. If patients can set appropriate behavioral targets and achieve them, the beneficial behaviors will be further promoted with positive feed-back. The behavioral change, as-a consequence, will result in improvement of the mood, cognition, and depression itself. In this manuscript, the author presents two clinical cases, in which BA assisted the patients in recovering from their depression. The first case was a male in his thirties who repeatedly took sick leave from his work because of maladjustment, which resulted in persistent depression. The second case was a female in her thirties who suffered from OCD and then became maladjusted to her place of work, depressive, and emotionally unstable. In both cases, avoidant behaviors caused their conditions to persist. Appropriate activities formed by BA improved their moods, and their self-efficacies were gradually regained. It was suggested that BA is markedly effective, especially in patients whose avoidant behaviors mainly cause the persistence of their depressive symptoms.

  5. What propels sexual murderers: a proposed integrated theory of social learning and routine activities theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Heng Choon Oliver; Heide, Kathleen M; Beauregard, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Despite the great interest in the study of sexual homicide, little is known about the processes involved in an individual's becoming motivated to sexually kill, deciding to sexually kill, and acting on that desire, intention, and opportunity. To date, no comprehensive model of sexual murdering from the offending perspective has been proposed in the criminological literature. This article incorporates the works of Akers and Cohen and Felson regarding their social learning theory and routine activities theory, respectively, to construct an integrated conceptual offending framework in sexual homicide. This integrated model produces a stronger and more comprehensive explanation of sexual murder than any single theory currently available.

  6. Project-Based Language Learning: An Activity Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbes, Marina; Carson, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of project-based language learning (PBLL) in a university language programme. Learner reflections of project work were analysed through Activity Theory, where tool-mediated activity is understood as the central unit of analysis for human interaction. Data were categorised according to the components of human…

  7. Studying Doctoral Education: Using Activity Theory to Shape Methodological Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Catherine; Jazvac-Martek, Marian; McAlpine, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The study reported here, one part of a larger study on doctoral education, describes a pilot study that used Activity Theory to shape a methodological tool for better understanding the tensions inherent in the doctoral experience. As doctoral students may function within a range of activity systems, we designed data collection protocols based on…

  8. Transformation or Transformism: Engestrom's Version of Activity Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, James

    2009-01-01

    The paper examines Engestrom's version of activity theory. It seeks to locate this within the socio-economic and theoretical context in which notions of co-configuration and knotworking are set. Although this theoretical approach offers radical possibilities it is limited by its neglect of the wider social context in which activity systems are…

  9. Analysis of graphic representations of activity theory in international journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco André Mazzarotto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activity theory is a relevant framework for the Design field, and their graphic representations are cognitive artifacts that aid the understanding, use and communication of this theory. However, there is a lack of consistency around the graphics and labels used in these representations. Based on this, the aim of this study was to identify, analyze and evaluate these differences and propose a representation that aims to be more suitable for the theory. For this, uses as method a literature review based on Engeström (2001 and its three generations of visual models, combined with graphical analysis of representations collected in a hundred papers from international journals.

  10. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore recent developments in activity theoretical HCI with the purpose of preparing designers for action. The paper discusses two projects where students engaged in iterative design applying fundamental principles from Activity Theory. They had been introduced to these principles....... Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  11. Information Science Research and Steering Model Under the Perspective of Activity Theory%活动理论视角下的情报学研究及转向模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王知津; 韩正彪; 周鹏

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyzes the feasibility of information science research under the perspective of activity theory from existed application fields, discipline nature, their philosophy viewpoint based on carding the origin of activity theory and its basic viewpoints. Then, the authors emphatically analyze JnteractJve information retrieval, information seekJng behavior, competitive intelligence activi- ty and education of information literacy under the perspective of activity theory. Finally, information science steering model is put for- ward by authors under the perspective of activity theory which has six elements, including subject, object, community, tools, rule and division of labour, with the foundation of the thought that is cultural historical viewpoint.%在梳理活动理论的起源及其基本观点的基础上,从活动理论的已有应用领域、情报学学科性质、二者的哲学观三个维度对从活动理论视角分析情报学研究的可行性进行考察。继而重点分析了活动理论视角下的交互式信息检索、信息搜寻行为、竞争情报活动和信息素质教育。最后,以文化历史观为思想基础,以主体、客体、共同体、工具、规则、劳动分工为要素,构建了活动理论视角下的情报学转向模型。

  12. Using Theory Elaboration and Activity Theory for Building a Knowledge Management Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Edwin M.; Kazlauskas, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    Reports ongoing developmental research at the Department of Agriculture to build a high-performance knowledge base for four agencies within the Department. Describes data gathering for the information system; planning to support knowledge management practices; theory elaboration through qualitative case analysis; and use of an activity theory…

  13. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  14. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  15. Videogames, Tools for Change: A Study Based on Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Laura; Lacasa, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to provide a framework for analysis from which to interpret the transformations that take place, as perceived by the participants, when commercial video games are used in the classroom. We will show how Activity Theory (AT) is able to explain and interpret these changes. Method: Case studies are…

  16. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  17. Distributed Leadership through the Lens of Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Jeanne Ho Pau; Victor Chen, Der-Thanq; Ng, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Using Activity Theory as an interpretive lens to examine the distribution of leadership, this paper shares a case study on how leadership for an ICT project was distributed in a Singapore school. Method: The case study involved observations of 49 meetings and 34 interviews of leaders and the teachers who were involved in the ICT project.…

  18. Anthropological Approach and Activity Theory: Culture, Communities and Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to evaluate the contribution of the anthropological approach (AA) concurrently to Activity Theory (AT) in view of overarching questions about classroom use of technology for teaching and learning mathematics. I will do it first from a philosophical point of view, presenting the main notions of AA that have been used to…

  19. Activity Theory as a framework for understanding teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    of computer usage at a primary school level in South Africa ... technologically competent mathematicians and scientists while addressing the shortage of teacher capacity in the .... Whilat Activity Theory is best understood as a developing body of ... classroom, one needs to develop a picture of what the potential object.

  20. Videogames, Tools for Change: A Study Based on Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Laura; Lacasa, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to provide a framework for analysis from which to interpret the transformations that take place, as perceived by the participants, when commercial video games are used in the classroom. We will show how Activity Theory (AT) is able to explain and interpret these changes. Method: Case studies are…

  1. Engestrom's Version of Activity Theory: A Conservative Praxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, James

    2007-01-01

    This article examines Engestrom's version of activity theory, one rooted in Marxism. It is argued that whilst this approach holds progressive possibilities, its radicalism is undermined by a restricted conceptualisation of transformation and the marginalisation of a politicised notion of social antagonism. As a consequence, this approach to…

  2. Using Activity Theory to Model the Taiwan Atayal Students' Classroom Mathematical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Fou-Lai

    2013-01-01

    From the sociocultural perspective, this research utilized activity theory as the theoretical framework to analyze the influences of cultural factors for Taiwanese Atayal junior high school students' study in mathematics. The research methodology adopted grounded theory, theoretical and methodological approaches which are illustrated through…

  3. A Grounded Theory Approach to Physical Activity and Advanced Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya S. Lowe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity has demonstrated benefits in cancer-related fatigue and physical functioning in early-stage cancer patients, however the role of physical activity at the end stage of cancer has not been established. To challenge positivist–empiricist assumptions, I am seeking to develop a new theoretical framework that is grounded in the advanced cancer patient’s experience of activity. Aim: To gain an in-depth understanding of the experience of activity and quality of life in advanced cancer patients. Objectives: (1 To explore the meaning of activity for advanced cancer patients in the context of their day-to-day life, (2 to elicit advanced cancer patients’ perceptions of activity with respect to their quality of life, and (3 to elicit advanced cancer patients’ views of barriers and facilitators to activity in the context of their day-to-day life. Study Design: A two-phase, cross-sectional, qualitative study will be conducted through the postpositivist lens of subtle realism and informed by the principles of grounded theory methods. Study Methods: Advanced cancer patients will be recruited through the outpatient department of a tertiary cancer center. For Phase one, participants will wear an activPAL™ activity monitor and fill out a daily record sheet for seven days duration. For Phase two, the activity monitor output and daily record sheets will be used as qualitative probes for face-to-face, semistructured interviews. Concurrent coding, constant comparative analysis, and theoretical sampling will continue with the aim of achieving as close as possible to theoretical saturation. Ethics and Discussion: Ethical and scientific approval will be obtained by all local institutional review boards prior to study commencement. The findings will generate new mid-level theory about the experience of activity and quality of life in advanced cancer patients and aid in the development of a new theoretical framework for designing

  4. Pedagogical Distance: Explaining Misalignment in Student-Driven Online Learning Activities Using Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, Nicola; Franken, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an Activity Theory analysis of two online student-driven interactive learning activities to interrogate assumptions that such groups can effectively learn in the absence of the teacher. Such an analysis conceptualises learning tasks as constructed objects that drive pedagogical activity. The analysis shows a disconnect between…

  5. Elder Fraud and Financial Exploitation: Application of Routine Activity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLiema, Marguerite

    2017-03-10

    Elder financial exploitation, committed by individuals in positions of trust, and elder fraud, committed by predatory strangers, are two forms of financial victimization that target vulnerable older adults. This study analyzes differences between fraud and financial exploitation victims and tests routine activity theory as a contextual model for victimization. Routine activity theory predicts that criminal opportunities arise when a motivated offender and suitable target meet in the absence of capable guardians. Fifty-three financial exploitation and fraud cases were sampled from an elder abuse forensic center. Data include law enforcement and caseworker investigation reports, victim medical records, perpetrator demographic information, and forensic assessments of victim health and cognitive functioning. Fraud and financial exploitation victims performed poorly on tests of cognitive functioning and financial decision making administered by a forensic neuropsychologist following the allegations. Based on retrospective record review, there were few significant differences in physical health and cognitive functioning at the time victims' assets were taken, although their social contexts were different. Significantly more fraud victims were childless compared with financial exploitation victims. Fraud perpetrators took advantage of elders when they had no trustworthy friends or relatives to safeguard their assets. Findings support an adapted routine activity theory as a contextual model for financial victimization. Fraud most often occurred when a vulnerable elder was solicited by a financial predator in the absence of capable guardians. Prevention efforts should focus on reducing social isolation to enhance protection.

  6. El enfoque histórico cultural en el estudio del desarrollo humano: para una praxis humanista ( CULTURAL HISTORICAL PARADIGM IN STUDIES ABOUT HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: AN APPROACH TO PRAXIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariñas León Gloria

    2009-11-01

    in many cases they know very little about Vigotsky' s main ideas. Simplistic and linear interpretations about human dynamics (positivist approach, no longer occasion monolithic conformity. This paper deals, on the one hand, with a critical analysis of those misunderstandings, and on the other hand, with a discussion about humanistic and complex essence of the cultural historical paradigm, and even its illumination value. Positivism in human studies frequently keeps thinking away from grounded theory, practice that gives rise to central misunderstandings, I identify, in the present essay. Clarify vigotskyan logos about human development (based on a dialectical and complex standpoint, in opposition to positivistic philosophy is my immediate aim. Finally, I point up a research, considered as one of the best examples of cultural historical standpoint in education and human development. To finish I stress, two conclusions: First of all, understanding author's epistemology and axiology -in this case, vigotskyan- in human domains, is the reader's major task to deal with. Second, that reasoning provides the understanding about the grounds on which are constructed theoretical categories and principles. Both steps are intrinsically jointed. The reader must consider author's idiosyncrasy, its way of thinking and character, from the very beginning in reading.

  7. Mature students learning statistics: The activity theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sue

    1993-09-01

    The concept of approach "stresses relationships between intention, process and outcome within a specified context as described by an individual" (Schmeck, 1988, p. 10). This paper explores the approaches to learning of a group of mature students from the theoretical perspective of activity theory in order to gain an insight into some of the ways statistics is learned. In this framework, learning, regarded as goal-directed behaviour, is analysed by exploring the socio-historical factors relating to students' self regulation of their cognitive activities. The material is derived from questionnaires and interviews with five students, and focuses on the students' own interpretations of the contexts affecting their approaches.

  8. Active XML Document Rewriting Based on Tree Automata Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Haitao; HAO Zhongxiao; ZHU Yan

    2006-01-01

    The problem of document rewriting is a fundamental problem in active XML(AXML) data exchange and usually has a higher complexity.Prior work was focused on string automaton theory.This paper tries to solve it by using tree automaton.More precisely, the paper firstly defines a new tree automaton, active XML tree automaton (AXTA),which can efficiently represent the set of AXML documents produced by an AXML document or AXML document schema.And then, an algorithm for constructing AXTA automaton is also proposed.Finally, a polynomial time(PTIME) determining algorithm for AXML document rewriting is presented based on AXTA automaton.

  9. Comparing evaluation activities across multiple theories of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Lisa M

    2013-06-01

    This article compares and contrasts the evaluation activities described in Practical Participatory Evaluation (Cousins & Whitmore, 1998), Values-engaged Evaluation (Greene, 2005), and Emergent Realist Evaluation (Mark, Henry, & Julnes, 1998). Using the logic models developed to depict each of the three evaluation theories (Hansen, Alkin, & Wallace, 2013) as a starting point, both quantitative and qualitative analysis techniques are employed to discuss the similarities and differences across the practice prescriptions. The approaches are then described according to Miller's (2010) standards for empirical examinations of evaluation theory. Specifically, I offer speculation about their operational specificity and feasibility in practice. I argue that none of the models is completely specific, or wholly unique, and they all present challenges of adaptation into the field. However, the models each offer varying degrees of guidance and unique elements through their prescriptions.

  10. Three Key Concepts of the Theory of Objectification: Knowledge, Knowing, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Luis

    2013-01-01

    In this article I sketch three key concepts of a cultural-historical theory of mathematics teaching and learning--the theory of objectification. The concepts are: knowledge, knowing and learning. The philosophical underpinning of the theory revolves around the work of Georg W. F. Hegel and its further development in the philosophical works of K.…

  11. A stochastic model of gene-culture coevolution suggested by the "culture historical hypothesis" for the evolution of adult lactose absorption in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, K

    1986-05-01

    A stochastic model of gene-culture coevolution, suggested by the "culture historical hypothesis" of Simoons and McCracken, is presented. According to this hypothesis, adult lactose absorption, believed to be an autosomal dominant trait, attained a high frequency in some human populations due to the positive selection pressure induced by culturally determined milk use in those populations. Two-dimensional Kolmogorov backward equations with appropriate boundary conditions are derived for the ultimate fixation probability of milk users, of the gene for adult lactose absorption, and of both jointly, and for the average time until fixation of the gene. These boundary value problems are solved numerically by the Gauss-Seidel method. I define a theoretical measure of the correlation between gene and culture in terms of the three ultimate fixation probabilities. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to check and extend the numerical results and also to obtain the first arrival time at gene frequency 0.70, which is approximately the highest observed frequency in any population. Two results that pertain to the culture historical hypothesis are obtained. First, the incomplete correlation observed between adult lactose absorption and milk use does not necessarily constitute evidence against the hypothesis. Second, for the postulated genetic change to have occurred within the 6000-year period since the advent of dairying, either the effective population size was of the order of 100, or, if it was of larger order, the selection coefficient probably had to exceed 5%.

  12. Affordances in activity theory and cognitive systems engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, H.; Andersen, H.H.K.; Bødker, S.;

    2001-01-01

    is supplemented by careful analyses of other human modalities and activities than visual perception. Within HMI two well established perspectives on HMI,Activity Theory (AT) and Cognitive Systems Engineering (CSE), have discussed such analyses and design of action possibilities focusing on providing computer...... in HMI, notably those that have been putforward by Norman and Gaver, affordances are in the foreground, whereas the system or work area is in the background. AT and CSE share the view that the actors' perception of foreground and background shifts dynamically according to the actors'situational context...... in purposeful activity. AT and CSE follow the original notion by Gibson on the actor's dynamic shifting between foreground and background of the environment. Furthermore, their work- and actor-centred approach to analysis and designof information systems opens up to an extension of Gibson's original ideas...

  13. Analyzing Activities in the Course of Science Education, According to Activity Theory: The Case of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoraki, Xarikleia; Plakitsi, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we analyze activities on the topic of sound, which are performed in the science education laboratory lessons in the third-year students of the Department of Early Childhood Education at the University of Ioannina. The analysis of the activities is based on one of the most modern learning theories of CHAT (Cultural Historical…

  14. The Activation and Application of Schema Theory in Pre-listening Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程晓燕; 马媛

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the author will base on the important function of schema applied in teaching English listening, analyze the definition and classification of schema theory. Then, explain how important it is in pre-listening activities to activate students’schema.

  15. Stepping Theories of Active Logic with Two Kinds of Negation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail M. Vinkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper formulates a stepping theory formalism with two kinds of negation dealing with one of the areas of Active Logic, a new kind of logic aimed at performing practical tasks in real time knowledge-based AI systems. In addition to the standard logical negation, the proposed formalism uses the so-called subjective negation interpreted as inability to arrive at some conclusion through reasoning by a current time. The semantics of the proposed formalism is defined as an~argumentation structure.

  16. Quintan Wiktorowicz : Islamic Activism. A Social Movement Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bonnefoy

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available CEFAS, IEP Paris Quintan Wiktorowicz (dir. Islamic Activism. A Social Movement Theory Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 2004, 316 p. Si les sciences sociales, à la suite de la critique virulente de l'orientalisme formulée par le regretté Edward Saïd, ont pu progressivement s'imposer dans les études sur le Moyen-Orient ou le « monde musulman » en général, les travaux sur l'islamisme restent encore trop souvent réticents à employer les instruments théoriques de la sociologie ou de l...

  17. Quintan Wiktorowicz : Islamic Activism. A Social Movement Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent Bonnefoy

    2013-01-01

    CEFAS, IEP Paris Quintan Wiktorowicz (dir.) Islamic Activism. A Social Movement Theory Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 2004, 316 p. Si les sciences sociales, à la suite de la critique virulente de l'orientalisme formulée par le regretté Edward Saïd, ont pu progressivement s'imposer dans les études sur le Moyen-Orient ou le « monde musulman » en général, les travaux sur l'islamisme restent encore trop souvent réticents à employer les instruments théoriques de la sociologie ou ...

  18. Theory of Activated Relaxation in Nanoscale Confined Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    We extend the recently developed Elastically Cooperative Nonlinear Langevin Equation(ECNLE) theory of activated relaxation in supercooled liquids to treat the case of geometrically confined liquids. Generically, confinement of supercooled liquids leads to a speeding up of the dynamics(with a consequent depression of the glass transition temperature) extending on the order of tens of molecular diameters away from a free surface. At present, this behavior is not theoretically well understood. Our theory interprets the speed up in dynamics in terms of two coupled effects. First, a direct surface effect, extending two to three molecular diameters from a free surface, and related to a local rearrangement of molecules with a single cage. The second is a longer ranged ``confinement'' effect, extending tens of molecular diameters from a free surface and related to the long range elastic penalty necessary for a local rearrangement. The theory allows for the calculation of relaxation time and Tg profiles within a given geometry and first principles calculations of relevant length scales. Comparison to both dynamic and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements shows reasonable agreement to experiment with no adjustable parameters.

  19. A situation-specific theory of Midlife Women's Attitudes Toward Physical Activity (MAPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Stuifbergen, Alexa K; Walker, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a situation specific theory-the Midlife Women's Attitudes Toward Physical Activity (MAPA) theory-that explains how women's attitudes toward physical activity influence their participation in physical activity. Using the integrative approach of Im, the theory was developed based on the Attitude, Social Influence, and Self Efficacy Model; a review of the related literature; and a study of women's attitudes toward physical activity. As a situation-specific theory, the MAPA theory can be linked easily to nursing practice and research projects related to physical activity in midlife women, especially interventions aimed at increasing midlife women's participation in physical activity.

  20. Studying the learning of programming using grounded theory to support activity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Alsop

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Teaching programming to first year undergraduates in large numbers is challenging. Currently, online supported learning is becoming more dominant, even on face-to-face courses, and this trend will increase in the future. This paper uses activity theory (AT to analyse the use of tools to support learning. Data collection took place during 2008-2010 at Kingston University and involves over one hundred responses. This has been analysed into activity systems offering a detailed analysis of the use of a number of tools being used (in AT these include physical tools, such as technologies including books, and non-physical tools, such as conversation. When teaching programming to large numbers of students it is difficult to offer one-to-one attention and the reliance on such tools becomes more important. For example, in student responses a good integrated development environment (IDE is shown to make learning easier and more enjoyable, whereas a bad IDE makes the learning experience poor. Teaching materials, and access to these, were often mentioned positively. These included online communication, discussion boards and video lectures. Using AT offers sufficiently rich detail to identify key interventions and aids the redesign of the learning process. For example, the choice of an IDE for a specific language can have a larger impact than is initially apparent. This paper will report on the data collected to show where simple improvements to the use of tools may have a large impact on students' abilities to learn programming.

  1. A Case Study Analysis of a Constructionist Knowledge Building Community with Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Chee S.; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Wilson, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates how activity theory can help research a constructionist community. We present a constructionist activity model called CONstructionism Through ACtivity Theory (CONTACT) model and explain how it can be used to analyse the constructionist activity in knowledge building communities. We then illustrate the model through its…

  2. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  3. Theory and Applications of Ignition with Variable Activation Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.C.Wake; X.D.Chen; 等

    1992-01-01

    The determination of critical conditions for thermal ingition of combustible materials has been traditionally studied by the use of one overall reaction with bounded parameter values for the activation energy and other chemical constants.Significant errors can occur in the values of the threshold parameters for ignition when there are two(or more)simultaneous reactions present with distinct values of the chemical ocnstantsRecent work with simultaneous parallel reactions showed the thresholds for ignition could be lowered in this case.In this paper,motivated by experimental results for forest litter and cola,it is shown that for sequential reactions (different values of parameters in different temperature ranges)that the threshold conditions are changed(safer for lower ambient temperatures and less safe for higher ambient temperatures).The mathematical analysis is summarised and a detailed analysis is given for the forest litter and crushed coal applications,The experimental results show that variable activation energy dose occur and that this extension of the classical Frank-Kamenetskii theory is needed.Here the analysis is confined to the slab geometry only but the ideas developed can easily be extended to more general systems,including those involving mass transport,consumption and phase changes.

  4. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  5. Using activity-based costing and theory of constraints to guide continuous improvement in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybal, H; Baxendale, S J; Gupta, M

    1999-01-01

    Activity-based costing and the theory of constraints have been applied successfully in many manufacturing organizations. Recently, those concepts have been applied in service organizations. This article describes the application of activity-based costing and the theory of constraints in a managed care mental health and substance abuse organization. One of the unique aspects of this particular application was the integration of activity-based costing and the theory of constraints to guide process improvement efforts. This article describes the activity-based costing model and the application of the theory of constraint's focusing steps with an emphasis on unused capacities of activities in the organization.

  6. Understanding the cultural historical value of the Wadden Sea region : The co-evolution of environment and society in the Wadden Sea area in the Holocene up until early modern times (11,700 BC-1800 AD): An outline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazelmans, J.; Meier, D.; Nieuwhof, A.; Spek, T.; Vos, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Wadden region is a cultural landscape of exceptional cultural historical value. The present article describes in qualitative terms how the cultural landscape of the Wadden Sea region came about through the complex interaction of people and nature. Human impact on this region has occurred in stag

  7. Solar Activity Predictions Based on Solar Dynamo Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    2009-05-01

    We review solar activity prediction methods, statistical, precursor, and recently the Dikpati and the Choudhury groups’ use of numerical flux-dynamo methods. Outlining various methods, we compare precursor techniques with weather forecasting. Precursors involve events prior to a solar cycle. First started by the Russian geomagnetician Ohl, and then Brown and Williams; the Earth's field variations near solar minimum was used to predict the next solar cycle, with a correlation of 0.95. From the standpoint of causality, as well as energetically, these relationships were somewhat bizarre. One index used was the "number of anomalous quiet days,” an antiquated, subjective index. Scientific progress cannot be made without some suspension of disbelief; otherwise old paradigms become tautologies. So, with youthful naïveté, Svalgaard, Scherrer, Wilcox and I viewed the results through rose-colored glasses and pressed ahead searching for understanding. We eventually fumbled our way to explaining how the Sun could broadcast the state of its internal dynamo to Earth. We noted one key aspect of the Babcock-Leighton Flux Dynamo theory: the polar field at the end of a cycle serves as a seed for the next cycle's growth. Near solar minimum this field usually bathes the Earth, and thereby affects geomagnetic indices then. We found support by examining 8 previous solar cycles. Using our solar precursor technique we successfully predicted cycles 21, 22 and 23 using WSO and MWSO data. Pesnell and I improved the method using a SODA (SOlar Dynamo Amplitude) Index. In 2005, nearing cycle 23's minimum, Svalgaard and I noted an unusually weak polar field, and forecasted a small cycle 24. We discuss future advances: the flux-dynamo methods. As far as future solar activity, I shall let the Sun decide; it will do so anyhow.

  8. A Re-Examination of Information Seeking Behaviour in the Context of Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. D.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Activity theory, developed in the USSR as a Marxist alternative to Western psychology, has been applied widely in educational studies and increasingly in human-computer interaction research. Argument: The key elements of activity theory, Motivation, Goal, Activity, Tools, Object, Outcome, Rules, Community and Division of labour are…

  9. Activity Theory as a Framework for Project Work in Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David W. L.; Wong, Angela F. L.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes activity theory as a framework for student project work that is a form of open-ended contextual activity-based learning emphasizing problem solving as a collaborative effort. Topics include project work from a Vygotskian perspective of activity theory; and the design of a prototype for Web-based project work. (LRW)

  10. Activity Theory as a Framework for Designing the Model of College English Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Activity theory signifies that activities are at the centre of human behaviour and it has been used to study cognitive process in many fields. Nowadays, college English listening learning is time-consuming but less effective in China, so enhancing the performance of listening instruction is a very hot topic. Theoretically, activity theory is able…

  11. More than a Footnote to History in Cultural-Historical Theory: The Zalkind Summary, Experimental Study of Higher Behavioural Processes, and "Vygotsky's Blocks"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towsey, Paula M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents what is possibly the first English translation of a 1930 manuscript related to Vygotsky's work (probably written by Vygotsky himself). This manuscript, the Zalkind Summary, is a five-point summary of his presentation to the First All-Union Congress on the Study of Human Behaviour in Leningrad in January 1930. This article…

  12. More than a Footnote to History in Cultural-Historical Theory: The Zalkind Summary, Experimental Study of Higher Behavioural Processes, and "Vygotsky's Blocks"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towsey, Paula M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents what is possibly the first English translation of a 1930 manuscript related to Vygotsky's work (probably written by Vygotsky himself). This manuscript, the Zalkind Summary, is a five-point summary of his presentation to the First All-Union Congress on the Study of Human Behaviour in Leningrad in January 1930. This article…

  13. Sociological Understandings of Conduct for a Noncanonical Activity Theory: Exploring Intersections and Complementarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchuk, Peter H.; Stetsenko, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Following a discussion of activity theory as an approach to human development originally rooted in transformational change, we review the historical context and diverse conceptualizations of social conduct from the field of sociology. The discussion of social conduct is broken into theories of social action, theories of enactment, and contemporary…

  14. Theory, evidence and Intervention Mapping to improve behavior nutrition and physical activity interventions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Brug (Hans); A. Oenema (Anke); A. Ferreira (Isabel)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The present paper intends to contribute to the debate on the usefulness and barriers in applying theories in diet and physical activity behavior-change interventions. DISCUSSION: Since behavior theory is a reflection of the compiled evidence of behavior research, theory is th

  15. The Bourgeoisie Dream Factory: Teaching Marx's Theory of Alienation through an Experiential Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Elroi J.; Carroll, Alana M.

    2015-01-01

    Effectively teaching sociological theories to undergraduate students is challenging. Students often enroll in theory courses due to major requirements, not personal interest. Consequently, many students approach the study of theory with anxiety. This study examined the effectiveness of an experiential learning activity designed to teach Karl…

  16. Participation in Peer Response as Activity: An Examination of Peer Response Stances from an Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Mitchell, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports a case study that examined English as a Second Language students' peer response stances from an activity theory perspective. More specifically, the study was guided by the constructs of activity and motive/object in Leont'ev's theory. Multiple sources of data were collected from two native Spanish-speaking students enrolled in…

  17. Theory, evidence and Intervention Mapping to improve behavior nutrition and physical activity interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Isabel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present paper intends to contribute to the debate on the usefulness and barriers in applying theories in diet and physical activity behavior-change interventions. Discussion Since behavior theory is a reflection of the compiled evidence of behavior research, theory is the only foothold we have for the development of behavioral nutrition and physical activity interventions. Application of theory should improve the effectiveness of interventions. However, some of the theories we use lack a strong empirical foundation, and the available theories are not always used in the most effective way. Furthermore, many of the commonly-used theories provide at best information on what needs to be changed to promote healthy behavior, but not on how changes can be induced. Finally, many theories explain behavioral intentions or motivation rather well, but are less well-suited to explaining or predicting actual behavior or behavior change. For more effective interventions, behavior change theory needs to be further developed in stronger research designs and such change-theory should especially focus on how to promote action rather than mere motivation. Since voluntary behavior change requires motivation, ability as well as the opportunity to change, further development of behavior change theory should incorporate environmental change strategies. Conclusion Intervention Mapping may help to further improve the application of theories in nutrition and physical activity behavior change.

  18. Psychological peculiarities of icon perception during prayer through the lens of theological and literary texts in cultural-historical and christian context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena DANILOV

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychological peculiarities of icon perception during prayer through the lens of theological and literary texts in cultural-historical and christian context. This research is dedicated to the psychotherapeutic effect of prayer in front of a Christian icon and icon mediated perception, namely the perception through the spectrum period of theological and modern literature (in Christian space, a registered historical decline known as "separation from church" time. In was identified and defined the concepts, as well as the functional pictogram and Christian prayer. For this purpose, it was investigated the theological texts and artistic works of local authors. In these texts the human being according to Christian conception, represent the symbol of a "living icon". These identify the main aim of pictogram as a mediator between human being and Higher Spirituality. The icon perception are "speculation in paints", which helps the person in building a dialogue between him and God, as the higher absolute spiritual and moral value. This research generates a main conclusion, where icon social perception of is an indicator of spiritual potential of human light.

  19. Exploring Teaching Programming Online through Web Conferencing System: The Lens of Activity Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ünal Çakıroğlu; Mehmet Kokoç; Elvan Kol; Ebru Turan

    2016-01-01

    .... The findings were discussed through Mwanza’s Activity notations based on Activity Theory. The results indicated that, by using web conferencing tools, students could develop programming knowledge through the learning tasks by interacting each other...

  20. Divisions of Labour: Activity Theory, Multi-Professional Working and Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmington, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This article draws upon, but also critiques, activity theory by combining analysis of how an activity theory derived research intervention attempted to address both everyday work practices and organisational power relationships among children's services professionals. It offers two case studies of developmental work research (DWR) interventions in…

  1. Self-Conception and Life Satisfaction: Integrating Aged Subculture and Activity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Kent A.

    1982-01-01

    Integrates the traditional activity theory explanation of adjustment to aging with the aged subculture theory advanced by Rose. A path model to data from two subsamples of older adults. Self-conception is shown to be an important intervening variable between social activity and life satisfaction. (Author)

  2. Self-Conception and Life Satisfaction: Integrating Aged Subculture and Activity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Kent A.

    1982-01-01

    Integrates the traditional activity theory explanation of adjustment to aging with the aged subculture theory advanced by Rose. A path model to data from two subsamples of older adults. Self-conception is shown to be an important intervening variable between social activity and life satisfaction. (Author)

  3. TO THE QUESTION OF PRIVATE THEORIES IN OPERATIVE-INVESTIGATIVE SCIENCE: THEORY OF OPERATIVE AND INVESTIGATIVE ACTIVITIES AGAINST ETHNIC CRIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Pozdnyakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The questions related to the state and prospects of development of оперативно-разыскной science are examined in the article. About her becoming talks circumstance that within the framework of theory of operatively-search activity the row of private theories is already worked (set forth out : organization of operatively-search activity on a fight against the organized crime, theory of the personal searchand other. It contingently that in basis operatively-search sciences are stopped up components producting her development as her object and object presently many variantsand consist of row of are mutually constrained components. Private (special theories in operatively-search science are relatively independent scientific directions, that, leaning against the general theoretic base of this science, develop conceptual bases and strategy of fight against criminality in the separate spheres of social life with the use of forces, facilities and methods special. Grounds for the origin of new theories it is been under exploitation of normative legal framework and methodology of her application in practical activity of organs of internal affairs. Substantial worsening of situation in the field of fight against ethnic criminality - she came in an economy, the members of ethnic criminal structures all more often stay too long for crimes the extremist of orientation and terrorist character. Private theories are in criminology: ethnic criminology, ethnic psychology, worked out for the complex affecting reasons and factors, producting ethnic criminality. Development scopes of general theory of operatively-search activity of scientific methodologies on a fight against the crimes accomplished by the members of ethnic structures is a timely and exceptionally important tast. Such private to the theory can mark as "Operatively-search activity on a fight against ethnic criminality". In parallel it is necessary to develop methodologies, necessary

  4. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  5. [I. P. Pavlov's theory on higher nervous activity: the landmarks and trends in its development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, L I

    1999-01-01

    The theory of higher nervous activity created in Pavlovian time is compared with the present-day state of the theory developing due to appearance of new methods, techniques, facts, and concepts. Three principles of Pavlovian theory: determinism; analysis and synthesis; structural approach, as well s types of conditioned reflexes and techniques, types of higher nervous activity, and inhibition problems are discussed. The theory of higher nervous activity is schematically depicted as a tree, some branches of which are presented by facts and concepts obtained and introduced by I.P. Pavlov and his followers during his life, the others are formed by new facts and concepts advancing the theory. What is obsolete in the theory, what are the most prominent tendencies of its development and its new branches are discussed.

  6. Communication, activity and knowledge – governing unpredictability in post-industrial societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbeshausen, Hans; Ilgenayeva, Valentyna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose – The article mainly concentrates on the role of information and knowledge in transformation processes. The article examines and compares the concepts of information and knowledge in Social Communication Theory and Cultural-historical Activity Theory. This will be done in order...... to analyze the knowledge-power-relation essential for transformational and governmental processes in knowledge-societies. The dialectics between the rationalization of power and the politicization of knowledge are visible in the techniques used in social engineering and political administration. Social...... practice and individual activity and take up a distinct stance on historical change and societal transformation. In both cases, knowledge is conceived as individual knowing, as structuring process in social organizations and as a collective result of social activity. Research implications – Knowledge...

  7. Activity Theory applied to Global Software Engineering: Theoretical Foundations and Implications for Tool Builders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Paolo; Ali Babar, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Although a plethora of tools are available for Global Software Engineering (GSE) teams, it is being realized increasingly that the most prevalent desktop metaphor underpinning the majority of tools have several inherent limitations. We have proposed that Activity-Based Computing (ABC) can...... for applying activity theory to GSE. We analyze and explain the fundamental concepts of activity theory, and how they can be applied by using examples of software architecture design and evaluation processes. We describe the kind of data model and architectural support required for applying activity theory...

  8. INCORPORATING ROUTINE ACTIVITIES, ACTIVITY SPACES, AND SITUATIONAL DEFINITIONS INTO THE SOCIAL SCHEMATIC THEORY OF CRIME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Ronald L; Burt, Callie H; Barr, Ashley B; Lei, Man-Kit; Stewart, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Simons and Burt's (2011) social schematic theory (SST) of crime posits that adverse social factors are associated with offending because they promote a set of social schemas (i.e., a criminogenic knowledge structure) that elevates the probability of situational definitions favorable to crime. This study extends the SST model by incorporating the role of contexts for action. Furthermore, the study advances tests of the SST by incorporating a measure of criminogenic situational definitions to assess whether such definitions mediate the effects of schemas and contexts on crime. Structural equation models using 10 years of panel data from 582 African American youth provided strong support for the expanded theory. The results suggest that childhood and adolescent social adversity fosters a criminogenic knowledge structure as well as selection into criminogenic activity spaces and risky activities, all of which increase the likelihood of offending largely through situational definitions. Additionally, evidence shows that the criminogenic knowledge structure interacts with settings to amplify the likelihood of situational definitions favorable to crime.

  9. INCORPORATING ROUTINE ACTIVITIES, ACTIVITY SPACES, AND SITUATIONAL DEFINITIONS INTO THE SOCIAL SCHEMATIC THEORY OF CRIME*

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARR, ASHLEY B.; LEI, MAN-KIT; STEWART, ERIC

    2014-01-01

    Simons and Burt’s (2011) social schematic theory (SST) of crime posits that adverse social factors are associated with offending because they promote a set of social schemas (i.e., a criminogenic knowledge structure) that elevates the probability of situational definitions favorable to crime. This study extends the SST model by incorporating the role of contexts for action. Furthermore, the study advances tests of the SST by incorporating a measure of criminogenic situational definitions to assess whether such definitions mediate the effects of schemas and contexts on crime. Structural equation models using 10 years of panel data from 582 African American youth provided strong support for the expanded theory. The results suggest that childhood and adolescent social adversity fosters a criminogenic knowledge structure as well as selection into criminogenic activity spaces and risky activities, all of which increase the likelihood of offending largely through situational definitions. Additionally, evidence shows that the criminogenic knowledge structure interacts with settings to amplify the likelihood of situational definitions favorable to crime. PMID:26392633

  10. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    . Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  11. Do Differences in Brain Activation Challenge Universal Theories of Dyslexia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Johannes C.

    2006-01-01

    It has been commonly agreed that developmental dyslexia in different languages has a common biological origin: a dysfunction of left posterior temporal brain regions dealing with phonological processes. Siok, Perfetti, Jin, and Tan (2004, "Nature," 431, 71-76) challenge this biological unity theory of dyslexia: Chinese dyslexics show no deficits…

  12. Active Learning with Monty Hall in a Game Theory Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, Alan J.; Merz, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe a game that students can play on the first day of a game theory class. The game introduces the 4 essential elements of any game and is designed so that its sequel, also played on the first day of class, has students playing the well-known Monty Hall game, which raises the question: Should you switch doors? By implementing a…

  13. Integrating Vygotsky's theory of relational ontology into early childhood science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Susan A.

    2014-03-01

    In Science Education during Early Childhood: A Cultural- Historical Perspective, Wolff-Michael Roth, Maria Inês Mafra Goulart and Katerina Plakitsi explore the practical application of Vygotsky's relational ontological theory of human development to early childhood science teaching and teacher development. In this review, I interrogate how Roth et al. conceptualize "emergent curriculum" within the Eurocentric cultural-historical traditions of early childhood education that evolved primarily from the works of Vygotsky and Piaget and compare it to the conceptualizations from other prominent early childhood researchers and curriculum developers. I examine the implications of the authors' interpretation of emergence for early childhood science education and teacher preparation.

  14. A re-examination of information seeking behaviour in the context of activity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson T.D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Activity theory, developed in the USSR as a Marxist alternative to Western psychology, has been applied widely in educational studies and increasingly in human-computer interaction research. Argument. The key elements of activity theory, Motivation, Goal, Activity, Tools, Object, Outcome, Rules, Community and Division of labour are all directly applicable to the conduct of information behaviour research. An activity-theoretical approach to information behaviour research would provide a sound basis for the elaboration of contextual issues, for the discovering of organizational and other contradictions that affect information behaviour. It may be used to aid the design and analysis of investigations. Elaboration. The basic ideas of activity theory are outlined and an attempt is made to harmonize different perspectives. A contrast is made between an activity system perspective and an activity process perspective and a diagrammatic representation of the process perspective is offered. Conclusion. Activity theory is not a predictive theory but a conceptual framework within which different theoretical perspectives may be employed. Typically, it is suggested that several methods of data collection should be employed and that the time frame for investigation should be long enough for the full range of contextual issues to emerge. Activity theory offers not only a useful conceptual framework, but also a coherent terminology to be shared by researchers, and a rapidly developing body of literature in associated disciplines.

  15. Human-Computer Interaction and Operators' Performance Optimizing Work Design with Activity Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bedny, Gregory Z

    2010-01-01

    Directed to a broad and interdisciplinary audience, this book provides a complete account of what has been accomplished in applied and systemic-structural activity theory. It presents a new approach to applied psychology and the study of human work that has derived from activity theory. The selected articles demonstrate the basic principles of studying human work and particularly computer-based work in complex sociotechnical systems. The book includes examples of applied and systemic-structural activity theory to HCI and man-machine-systems, aviation, safety, design and optimization of human p

  16. Using behavioural activation in the treatment of depression: a control theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, P; Law, A; Bates, R; Hylton, K; Mansell, W

    2013-12-01

    Behavioural activation is an intervention that can be used to counteract the typical patterns of withdrawal, avoidance and inactivity that characterize depression. This paper examines the processes of change that may occur during behavioural activation from the perspective of control theory. Some of the key concepts that are associated with control theory are introduced and the process of change that may occur during behavioural activation is illustrated using two case studies. The case studies provide anecdotal evidence which supports the hypothesis that the effective implementation of behavioural activation may depend upon clients being able to retain or regain the sense of control that they value. The differences between a control-theory-based approach and more orthodox behavioural and cognitive approaches are highlighted and the implications of these differences are discussed. Flexible approaches that are informed by control theory, may offer a useful alternative to the more established behavioural and cognitive approaches towards behavioural activation.

  17. Job Search and Social Cognitive Theory: The Role of Career-Relevant Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikic, Jelena; Saks, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Social cognitive theory was used to explain the relationships between career-relevant activities (environmental and self career exploration, career resources, and training), self-regulatory variables (job search self-efficacy and job search clarity), variables from the Theory of Planned Behavior (job search attitude, subjective norm, job search…

  18. Job Search and Social Cognitive Theory: The Role of Career-Relevant Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikic, Jelena; Saks, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Social cognitive theory was used to explain the relationships between career-relevant activities (environmental and self career exploration, career resources, and training), self-regulatory variables (job search self-efficacy and job search clarity), variables from the Theory of Planned Behavior (job search attitude, subjective norm, job search…

  19. A Summary of Schema Theory Application in Reading——Readers analysis and schema activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琰

    2006-01-01

    This paper attempts to discuss some issues in the application of schema theory in reading instruction.It focuses on consideration of the difference of readers,knowledge preparation in the using schema theory in reading instruction and provides some examples of activating readers’schema.

  20. Changing Investment in Activities and Interests in Elders' Lives: Theory and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kathryn Betts

    2004-01-01

    Socioemotional selectivity and gerotranscendence, newer theories with roots in the disengagement theory of aging, provided the theoretical framework for a new measure of perceived change in investment in a variety of pursuits. The 30-item Change in Activity and Interest Index (CAII) was given to a sample of 327 outpatients aged 65-94. Items with…

  1. THE CONCEPTUAL APPROACHES FROM VIGOTSKIAN SCHOOL TO SOCIAL REPRESENTATIONS THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maylen Villamañan Alba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to develop a conceptual reading from the theoretical core of the cultural-historical school to the theory of social representations. The historic-cultural School, influenced by Marxism, far from implying the annulment of the subject, shows how the psychosocial content is expressed from the language-thought relationship to the categories of experience, zone of proximal development and social situation of development. For these authors, man is a social being and their personological singularities are expression of multiple gradations of the universal-contextual law. Also, the theory of social representations addresses the broad impact of a relational social context in shaping the notions of reality, and has a high impact on the social sciences. An approach from the cultural historical perspective would allow deepening and broadening the edges of the theory of social representations, which may contribute to the development of psychology. The analysis is beneficial to the areas of general and social field.

  2. Induced starburst and nuclear activity: Faith, facts, and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the origin of starburst and nuclear (nonstellar) activity in galaxies is reviewed. A physical understanding of the mechanism(s) that induce both types of activity requires one to address the following issues: (1) what is the source of fuel that powers starbursts and active galactic nuclei; and (2) how is it channeled towards the central regions of host galaxies? As a possible clue, the author examines the role of non-axisymmetric perturbations of galactic disks and analyzes their potential triggers. Global gravitational instabilities in the gas on scales approx. 100 pc appear to be crucial for fueling the active galactic nuclei.

  3. Digital Preservation Theory and Application: Transcontinental Persistent Archives Testbed Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Watry

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA and EU SHAMAN projects are working with multiple research institutions on tools and technologies that will supply a comprehensive, systematic, and dynamic means for preserving virtually any type of electronic record, free from dependence on any specific hardware or software. This paper describes the joint development work between the University of Liverpool and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC at the University of California, San Diego on the NARA and SHAMAN prototypes. The aim is to provide technologies in support of the required generic data management infrastructure. We describe a Theory of Preservation that quantifies how communication can be accomplished when future technologies are different from those available at present. This includes not only different hardware and software, but also different standards for encoding information. We describe the concept of a “digital ontology” to characterize preservation processes; this is an advance on the current OAIS Reference Model of providing representation information about records. To realize a comprehensive Theory of Preservation, we describe the ongoing integration of distributed shared collection management technologies, digital library browsing, and presentation technologies for the NARA and SHAMAN Persistent Archive Testbeds.

  4. Telling Active Learning Pedagogies Apart: From Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Kelsey Hood

    2017-01-01

    Designing learning environments to incorporate active learning pedagogies is difficult as definitions are often contested and intertwined. This article seeks to determine whether classification of active learning pedagogies (i.e., project-based, problem-based, inquiry-based, case-based, and discovery-based), through theoretical and practical…

  5. Korean immigrant women's physical activity experience: a situation-specific theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chang, Sun Ju; Nguyen, Giang; Stringer, Lynn; Chee, Wonshik; Chee, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    To develop successful physical activity promotion programs for midlife immigrant women, especially for Korean immigrant midlife women, concrete theoretical bases are needed. However, virtually no theoretical frameworks and/or theories exist that can explain the influences of immigration transition on the physical activity experience of midlife immigrant women in general or Korean immigrant midlife women in specific. The purpose of this article is to present a situation-specific theory on physical activity experience of Korean immigrant midlife women (SPAKIM) with its development process. An integrative approach was used to develop the theory based on the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity (MAPA) theory, the transitions theory, a review of the relevant literature, and two studies on midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity. The proposed theory includes nature of transitions, nonmodifiable and modifiable transition conditions, contexts of daily life, patterns of response, and nursing therapeutics as major concepts, and each major concept includes several related subconcepts. Because several concepts of the theory were developed mainly based on the literature review, the major concepts and related subconcepts need to be further developed and evaluated in future studies.

  6. Electrocatalytic Activity and Selectivity - a Density Functional Theory Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamad, Mohammadreza

    the isolated sites that are active for CO2 reduction and surrounded by inactive elements towards both hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and CO2 reduction to direct the selectivity towards favorable products. In the next step, using this concept we screen for suitable catalysts. Our screening includes viii both......-catalysts towards two appealing electrochemical reactions: 1)electroreduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons and alcohols, and 2) electrochemical production of hydrogen peroxide, i.e. H2O2, from its elements i.e. H2 and O2. The thesis is divided into three parts: In the first part, electro-catalytic activity of different...... site concept to tune the activity and selectivity for oxygen reduction towards H2O2 production. We screen for new catalysts that exhibit both high catalytic activity and selectivity by constructing activity volcano plots for ORR towards water and H2O2. Moreover, the stability of these catalysts...

  7. Active elastic thin shell theory for cellular deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoumieux, Hélène; Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Paluch, Ewa K.; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2014-06-01

    We derive the equations for a thin, axisymmetric elastic shell subjected to an internal active stress giving rise to active tension and moments within the shell. We discuss the stability of a cylindrical elastic shell and its response to a localized change in internal active stress. This description is relevant to describe the cellular actomyosin cortex, a thin shell at the cell surface behaving elastically at a short timescale and subjected to active internal forces arising from myosin molecular motor activity. We show that the recent observations of cell deformation following detachment of adherent cells (Maître J-L et al 2012 Science 338 253-6) are well accounted for by this mechanical description. The actin cortex elastic and bending moduli can be obtained from a quantitative analysis of cell shapes observed in these experiments. Our approach thus provides a non-invasive, imaging-based method for the extraction of cellular physical parameters.

  8. The Application of Schema Theory in the Prelistening Activities of IELTS Listening Tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭艳琴

    2014-01-01

    According to schema theory, the knowledge is stored in human brain by these units, and such units are the Schemata. Teachers can design prelistening tasks to build or activate the learners’ schemata in the IELTS listening teaching.

  9. An Activity Theory Approach to Analyze Barriers to a Virtual Management Information Systems (MIS) Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Suhair; Qablan, Ahmad; Barham, Areej

    2011-01-01

    This paper explains how the activity theory is used as a framework to analyze the barriers to a virtual Management Information Stream (MIS) Curriculum in Jordanian schools, from both the sociocultural and pedagogical perspectives. Taking the activity system as a unit of analysis, this study documents the processes by which activities shape and are…

  10. Active Classification: Theory and Application to Underwater Inspection

    CERN Document Server

    Hollinger, Geoffrey A; Sukhatme, Gaurav S

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the problem in which an autonomous vehicle must classify an object based on multiple views. We focus on the active classification setting, where the vehicle controls which views to select to best perform the classification. The problem is formulated as an extension to Bayesian active learning, and we show connections to recent theoretical guarantees in this area. We formally analyze the benefit of acting adaptively as new information becomes available. The analysis leads to a probabilistic algorithm for determining the best views to observe based on information theoretic costs. We validate our approach in two ways, both related to underwater inspection: 3D polyhedra recognition in synthetic depth maps and ship hull inspection with imaging sonar. These tasks encompass both the planning and recognition aspects of the active classification problem. The results demonstrate that actively planning for informative views can reduce the number of necessary views by up to 80% when compared to passive methods...

  11. Telling Active Learning Pedagogies Apart: from theory to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Hood Cattaneo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Designing learning environments to incorporate active learning pedagogies is difficult as definitions are often contested and intertwined. This article seeks to determine whether classification of active learning pedagogies (i.e., project-based, problem-based, inquiry-based, case-based, and discovery-based, through theoretical and practical lenses, could function as a useful tool for researchers and practitioners in comparing pedagogies. This article classified five active learning pedagogies based on six constructivist elements. The comparison was completed through a comparative analysis and a content analysis informed by a systematic literature review. The findings were that learner-centeredness is a primary goal of all pedagogies; however, there is a strong dissonance between each pedagogy’s theoretical underpinnings and implementation realities. This dissonance complicates differentiating active learning pedagogies and classification as a comparative tool has proved to have limited usefulness.

  12. 浅谈饶宗颐的文化历史观%A Brief Discussion of Jao Tsung-I’s Cultural-historical Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金英明[韩国

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses some views and assertions of Chinese culture by Jao Tsung-I, dubbed by many as“Dongzhou Hongru”(the erudite scholar of the East) and“Guoxue Dashi”(the master of Chinese culture), through the angles of“multicultural and historical perspective”and“time-spatial cultural-histori-cal perspective”respectively. Jao Tsung-I’s scholarship puts an emphasis on“Tri-fold Evidence Methodol-ogy”, namely field archaeology, historical records and oracle bone scripts. He on the one hand uses Chinese exegetics to trace the origin, applying philology to the study of culture and history, while on the other hand ac-quires a keen insight into a comprehensive view of the situation from bibliography. The attainment of being a great learned literate results in Jao’s time-spatial cultural-historical perspective with a convergence of the an-cient and the modernized. The academic achievements of Jao contribute to important inspiration and valuable cultural heritage for future scholars.%  从“多元文化历史观”和“时空兼顾的文化历史观”两方面来看“东洲鸿儒”、“国学大师”饶宗颐对中国文化的看法和主张,饶宗颐治学強调“三重证据法”即田野考古、文献记录和甲骨文三方面的资料,一方面用中国训诂学的方法去溯本追源,把语言文字学运用到文化史的研究中去,一方面从目录学上得到通观全局的眼力。这种“通儒”境界,造就了饶宗颐“博古通今,中西贯通”时空兼顾的文化历史观。饶宗颐的学术成果为以后的学者留下了重要的启示与宝贵的文化遗产。

  13. A geografia histórico-cultural da Escola de Berkeley: um precursor ao surgimento da História Ambiental The Berkeley School's cultural-historical Geography: a precursor to Environmental History's emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Mathewson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available No decorrer das últimas três décadas, a história ambiental se tornou um subcampo reconhecido com seus próprios clássicos, um grande número de monografias notáveis, um fluxo contínuo de artigos publicados e mais do que mil pesquisadores ativos em vários continentes, incluindo uma comunidade crescente na América Latina. Um olhar para além dos limites disciplinares da história mostra que há também outras tradições que se enquadram perfeitamente na temática. A geografia histórico-cultural da Escola de Berkeley sob a égide de Carl Sauer talvez seja uma dessas perspectivas alternativas conhecidas. Muitos estudos de Sauer, seus alunos e colaboradores podem ser considerados pesquisas em história ambiental; muitas delas se baseiam em matérias sobre a América Latina. Neste artigo, procuramos traçar o desenvolvimento dessa corrente alternativa para a história ambiental que se iniciou com a tese de doutoramento de Carl Sauer em 1915 e se consolidou nos anos 50, tendo sua continuidade no presente através dos trabalhos de diversos geógrafos.Over the past three decades environmental history has become a recognized subfield, with a cannon of classics, many dozens of distinguished monographs, a steady flow of published articles, and more than one thousand active practitioners on several continents, including a growing cohort in Latin America. If one looks beyond history's disciplinary bounds, one finds other traditions that equally fit perfectly into the array of environmental history. Perhaps the broadest and deepest current is represented by Carl Sauer's Berkeley School of cultural-historical geography. Much of the work of Sauer, his students, and his associates, can be considered environmental history. Moreover, much of it is based on Latin American materials. In this paper, we trace the development of an alternative current within environmental history - one that began with Carl Sauer's doctoral dissertation in 1915, became well

  14. H~ Estimation Approach to Active Noise Control: Theory, Algorithm and Real-Time Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Riyanto

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an H¥ estimation approach to active control of acoustic noise inside an enclosure. It is shown how H¥ filter theory and algorithm can be effectively applied to active noise control to provide important robustness property. Real-time implementation of the algorithm is performed on Digital Signal Processor. Experimental comparison to conventional FxLMS algorithm for active noise control is presented for both single channel and multichannel cases. While providing some new results, this paper also serves as a brief review on H¥ filter theory and on active noise control.

  15. The Effectiveness of WhatsApp Mobile Learning Activities Guided by Activity Theory on Students' Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoumi, Chokri

    2015-01-01

    This research paper explores the effectiveness of using mobile technologies to support a blended learning course titled Scientific Research Methods in Information Science. Specifically, it discusses the effects of WhatsApp mobile learning activities guided by activity theory on students' knowledge Management (KM). During the 2014 academic year,…

  16. How Work Positions Affect the Research Activity and Information Behaviour of Laboratory Scientists in the Research Lifecycle: Applying Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Nahyun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study was conducted to investigate the characteristics of research and information activities of laboratory scientists in different work positions throughout a research lifecycle. Activity theory was applied as the conceptual and analytical framework. Method: Taking a qualitative research approach, in-depth interviews and field…

  17. Trails, Hiking, The cultural trails layer represents various cultural/historical/senic trials within the City of Baltimore. Including Charles street, Falls road, Government center, Gwynns Falls trail, and others. The layer is restricted to the City of Baltimore, and ma, Published in 2007, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, City of Baltimore Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Trails, Hiking dataset current as of 2007. The cultural trails layer represents various cultural/historical/senic trials within the City of Baltimore. Including...

  18. Quantum Theory, Active Information and the Mind-Matter Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylkkänen, Paavo

    Bohm and Hiley suggest that a certain new type of active information plays a key objective role in quantum processes. This chapter discusses the implications of this suggestion to our understanding of the relation between the mental and the physical aspects of reality.

  19. A Conceptual Framework Based on Activity Theory for Mobile CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, Gustavo; Nussbaum, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for collaborative group activities that promote student social interaction in the classroom. Handheld computers interconnected by a wireless network allow people who work on a common task to interact face to face while maintaining the mediation afforded by a technology-based system. Wirelessly interconnected handhelds open up new…

  20. Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) as an Emergent System: A Dynamic Systems Theory Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi-Aghdam, Saeed

    2017-03-01

    This paper sets out to present a novel construal of one of the notions of Vygotskian cultural-historical theory viz., zone of proximal development (ZPD) drawing upon dynamic systems theory. The principal thesis maintains that ZDP is an emergent and dynamic system which is engendered by a dialectical concatenation of psychogenesic and sociogenesic facets of human development over time. It is reasoned that Vygotskian cultural-historical theory of human development, by invoking dialectical logic, has transcended Cartesian substance dualism and in turn has proffered a monistic and process-anchored ontology for emerging becoming of human consciousness. Likewise, it is contended that dynamic systems theory, having assumed fluent flux of reality with a capital R as its ontological axiom, entails a consilience of cognitive and contextual conceptual schemes to describe, explain, and optimize human development. The paper concludes by drawing some interpretive conclusions in regard to ZPD from dynamic systems theory perspective.

  1. Prediction of attendance at fitness center: a comparison between the theory of planned behavior, the social cognitive theory, and the physical activity maintenance theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekauc, Darko; Völkle, Manuel; Wagner, Matthias O; Mess, Filip; Reiner, Miriam; Renner, Britta

    2015-01-01

    In the processes of physical activity (PA) maintenance specific predictors are effective, which differ from other stages of PA development. Recently, Physical Activity Maintenance Theory (PAMT) was specifically developed for prediction of PA maintenance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the predictability of the future behavior by the PAMT and compare it with the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). Participation rate in a fitness center was observed for 101 college students (53 female) aged between 19 and 32 years (M = 23.6; SD = 2.9) over 20 weeks using a magnetic card. In order to predict the pattern of participation TPB, SCT and PAMT were used. A latent class zero-inflated Poisson growth curve analysis identified two participation patterns: regular attenders and intermittent exercisers. SCT showed the highest predictive power followed by PAMT and TPB. Impeding aspects as life stress and barriers were the strongest predictors suggesting that overcoming barriers might be an important aspect for working out on a regular basis. Self-efficacy, perceived behavioral control, and social support could also significantly differentiate between the participation patterns.

  2. Use of Theory in Behavior Change Interventions: An Analysis of Programs to Increase Physical Activity in Posttreatment Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluethmann, Shirley M.; Bartholomew, L. Kay; Murphy, Caitlin C.; Vernon, Sally W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Theory use may enhance effectiveness of behavioral interventions, yet critics question whether theory-based interventions have been sufficiently scrutinized. This study applied a framework to evaluate theory use in physical activity interventions for breast cancer survivors. The aims were to (1) evaluate theory application intensity and…

  3. Communication, activity and knowledge – governing unpredictability in post-industrial societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbeshausen, Hans; Ilgenayeva, Valentyna

    2016-01-01

    and its derivatives are paradigm-forming constructs of qualitatively new ideas about the world, its interactional structure, political culture, flows of information, and social relationships. In order to gain a holistic understanding of the importance of knowledge in post-industrial society, further......Abstract Purpose – The article mainly concentrates on the role of information and knowledge in transformation processes. The article examines and compares the concepts of information and knowledge in Social Communication Theory and Cultural-historical Activity Theory. This will be done in order...... to analyze the knowledge-power-relation essential for transformational and governmental processes in knowledge-societies. The dialectics between the rationalization of power and the politicization of knowledge are visible in the techniques used in social engineering and political administration. Social...

  4. Density functional theory investigations of radical scavenging activity of 3′-Methyl-quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah G. Al-Sehemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The possible eight rotamers of 3′-Methyl-quercetin have been optimized by using density functional theory (DFT at B3LYP/6-31G∗ level of theory. The molecular structure and molecular properties of the most stable rotamers have been investigated at the same level of theory. We have computed the descriptors; electronegativity (χ, hardness (η, electrophilicity (ω, softness (S and electrophilicity index (ωi by DFT approach. We have shed light on the structure–property relationship. The absorption spectrum has been computed by time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT at TD-B3LYP/6-31G∗ level of theory. Radical scavenging activity has been explained on the basis of bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE and the adiabatic ionization potential (IP. Two mechanisms have been explained for the radical scavenging processes, i.e., hydrogen atom transfer and one-electron transfer.

  5. Different View on PQ Theory Used in the Control Algorithm of Active Power Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Pavlanin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of power quality is a frequently discussed issue, which still requires a considerable research effort to be devoted to the study of the problem. The aim of this paper is to describe some problems related to the control of switching compensators, commonly known as active power filters. It also includes some shortcomings of pq theory regarded as three phase instantaneous power theory. The term “shortcomings” means that the pq theory does not provide a proper description of power properties. Moreover the control algorithm based on this theory only achieves satisfactory results for sinusoidal balanced voltage system. Nevertheless it can still be considered a helpful approach to the problem under study. The simulation results presented in this paper illustrate the weaknesses of the pq theory.

  6. Simulation and reliability analysis of shunt active power filter based on instantaneous reactive power theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Yu-long; LIU Hong; WANG Jing-qin; SUN Shu-guang

    2007-01-01

    This paper first discusses the operating principle ofinstantaneous reactive power theory. Then, the theory is introduced into shunt active power filter and its control scheme is studied. Finally, Matlab/Simulink power system toolbox is used to simulate the system. In the simulation model, as the most common harmonic source, 3-phase thyfistor bridge rectifier circuit is constructed.The simulation results before and after the shunt active filter was switched to the system corresponding to different firing angles of the thyristors are presented and analyzed, which demonstrate the practicability and reliability of the proposed shunt active filter scheme.

  7. Assessment of factors that predict physical activity among Oklahoma clergy: a theory of planned behavior approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwin, Shannon; Taylor, E Laurette; Branscum, Paul; Hofford, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of physical activity among clergy members in Oklahoma, using the theory of planned behavior. A 51-item valid and reliable instrument, measuring theory of planned behavior constructs and physical activity, was developed and administered to 141 clergy members. Results indicated that the majority of those surveyed were white (93%), college educated (97%), and overweight or obese (84%). Stepwise multiple regression analysis found that intentions accounted for 13.8% of the variance of physical activity whereas attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control accounted for 54.8% of the variance of intention. Implications for intervention development are discussed.

  8. A theory of working memory without consciousness or sustained activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trübutschek, Darinka; Marti, Sébastien; Ojeda, Andrés; King, Jean-Rémi; Mi, Yuanyuan; Tsodyks, Misha; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2017-07-18

    Working memory and conscious perception are thought to share similar brain mechanisms, yet recent reports of non-conscious working memory challenge this view. Combining visual masking with magnetoencephalography, we investigate the reality of non-conscious working memory and dissect its neural mechanisms. In a spatial delayed-response task, participants reported the location of a subjectively unseen target above chance-level after several seconds. Conscious perception and conscious working memory were characterized by similar signatures: a sustained desynchronization in the alpha/beta band over frontal cortex, and a decodable representation of target location in posterior sensors. During non-conscious working memory, such activity vanished. Our findings contradict models that identify working memory with sustained neural firing, but are compatible with recent proposals of 'activity-silent' working memory. We present a theoretical framework and simulations showing how slowly decaying synaptic changes allow cell assemblies to go dormant during the delay, yet be retrieved above chance-level after several seconds.

  9. The importance of behavior theory in control system modeling of physical activity sensor data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Martin, Cesar A; Rivera, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Among health behaviors, physical activity has the most extensive record of research using passive sensors. Control systems and other system dynamic approaches have long been considered applicable for understanding human behavior, but only recently has the technology provided the precise and intensive longitudinal data required for these analytic approaches. Although sensors provide intensive data on the patterns and variations of physical activity over time, the influences of these variations are often unmeasured. Health behavior theories provide an explanatory framework of the putative mediators of physical activity changes. Incorporating the intensive longitudinal measurement of these theoretical constructs is critical to improving the fit of control system model of physical activity and for advancing behavioral theory. Theory-based control models also provide guidance on the nature of the controllers which serve as the basis for just-in-time adaptive interventions based on these control system models.

  10. Brief Report: The Theory of Planned Behaviour Applied to Physical Activity in Young People Who Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Emma S.; Daley, Amanda J.; Ussher, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that physical activity may be useful as a smoking cessation intervention for young adults. In order to inform such interventions, this study evaluated the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) for understanding physical activity behaviour in young smokers. Regular smokers aged 16-19 years (N=124), self-reported physical…

  11. Contradictions between the Virtual and Physical High School Classroom: A Third-Generation Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Manzanares, Maria A. Rodriguez

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses a third-generation Activity Theory perspective to gain insight into the contradictions between the activity systems of the physical and virtual high school classroom from the perspective of teachers who had transitioned from one system to the other. Data collection relied on semi-structured interviews conducted with e-teachers as…

  12. Brief Report: The Theory of Planned Behaviour Applied to Physical Activity in Young People Who Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Emma S.; Daley, Amanda J.; Ussher, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that physical activity may be useful as a smoking cessation intervention for young adults. In order to inform such interventions, this study evaluated the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) for understanding physical activity behaviour in young smokers. Regular smokers aged 16-19 years (N=124), self-reported physical…

  13. Exploration of Tensions in a Mobile-Technology Supported Fieldtrip: An Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chen, Fei-Ching; Yang, Jie-Chi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze how mobile technologies were incorporated and implemented in an outdoor learning activity. Two classes of primary school students participated in the experiment. Using activity theory as an analytical framework, it is found that underlying tensions provided rich insights into system dynamics and that…

  14. Seismic Halos Around Active Regions: An MHD Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2007-01-01

    Comprehending the manner in which magnetic fields affect propagating waves is a first step toward the helioseismic construction of accurate models of active region sub-surface structure and dynamics. Here, we present a numerical method to compute the linear interaction of waves with magnetic fields embedded in a solar-like stratified background. The ideal Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) equations are solved in a 3-dimensional box that straddles the solar photosphere, extending from 35 Mm within to 1.2 Mm into the atmosphere. One of the challenges in performing these simulations involves generating a Magneto-Hydro-Static (MHS) state wherein the stratification assumes horizontal inhomogeneity in addition to the strong vertical stratification associated with the near-surface layers. Keeping in mind that the aim of this effort is to understand and characterize linear MHD interactions, we discuss a means of computing statically consistent background states. Results from a simulation of waves interacting with a flux tub...

  15. The role of nonautomatic processes in activity regulation: from Lipps to Galperin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arievitch, Igor M; van der Veer, René

    2004-05-01

    The authors present the historical analysis of one of the central questions in psychology: how and why the nonautomatic, psychological level of regulation (in contrast to automatic physiological processes) emerges both in evolution and in everyday context of activity. They discuss several approaches (by Lipps, Groos, Stern, James, Dewey, Claparède, Pavlov, and Leontiev) that culminated in the system of ideas developed by Galperin, one of the key figures in the cultural -historical activity theory. The authors analyze the relation of Galperin's ideas to Vygotsky's theoretical framework and then focus on Galperin's account of the origin and functions of mental activity. Galperin's contribution is highly relevant for understanding the role of psychological regulation and for contemporary research on cognition, consciousness, and conscious awareness.

  16. Implicit theories about willpower predict the activation of a rest goal following self-control exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Veronika; Bernecker, Katharina; Miketta, Stefanie; Friese, Malte

    2015-10-01

    Past research indicates that peoples' implicit theories about the nature of willpower moderate the ego-depletion effect. Only people who believe or were led to believe that willpower is a limited resource (limited-resource theory) showed lower self-control performance after an initial demanding task. As of yet, the underlying processes explaining this moderating effect by theories about willpower remain unknown. Here, we propose that the exertion of self-control activates the goal to preserve and replenish mental resources (rest goal) in people with a limited-resource theory. Five studies tested this hypothesis. In Study 1, individual differences in implicit theories about willpower predicted increased accessibility of a rest goal after self-control exertion. Furthermore, measured (Study 2) and manipulated (Study 3) willpower theories predicted an increased preference for rest-conducive objects. Finally, Studies 4 and 5 provide evidence that theories about willpower predict actual resting behavior: In Study 4, participants who held a limited-resource theory took a longer break following self-control exertion than participants with a nonlimited-resource theory. Longer resting time predicted decreased rest goal accessibility afterward. In Study 5, participants with an induced limited-resource theory sat longer on chairs in an ostensible product-testing task when they had engaged in a task requiring self-control beforehand. This research provides consistent support for a motivational shift toward rest after self-control exertion in people holding a limited-resource theory about willpower. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-30

    The main objective of this project is to systematically characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF, aiming to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating. The understanding gained will help us to optimize the composition and morphology of the catalyst layer and microstructure of the LSCF backbone for better performance. More specifically, the technical objectives include: (1) to characterize the surface composition, morphology, and electro-catalytic properties of catalysts coated on LSCF; (2) to characterize the microscopic details and stability of the LSCF-catalyst (e.g., LSM) interfaces; (3) to establish the scientific basis for rational design of high-performance cathodes by combining a porous backbone (such as LSCF) with a thin catalyst coating; and (4) to demonstrate that the performance and stability of porous LSCF cathodes can be enhanced by the application of a thin-film coating of LSM through a solution infiltration process in small homemade button cells and in commercially available cells of larger dimension. We have successfully developed dense, conformal LSM films with desired structure, composition, morphology, and thickness on the LSCF surfaces by two different infiltration processes: a non-aqueous and a water-based sol-gel process. It is demonstrated that the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes can be improved by the introduction of a thin-film LSM coating through an infiltration process. Surface and interface of the LSM-coated LSCF cathode were systematically characterized using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. TEM observation suggests that a layer of La and Sr oxide was formed on LSCF surfaces after annealing. With LSM infiltration, in contrast, we no longer observe such La/Sr oxide layer on the LSM-coated LSCF samples after annealing under similar

  18. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-02

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure.

  19. Analysis of the Effect of Water Activity on Ice Formation Using a New Theory of Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2013-01-01

    In this work a new theory of nucleation is developed and used to investigate the effect of water activity on the formation of ice within super-cooled droplets. The new theory is based on a novel concept where the interface is assumed to be made of liquid molecules trapped by the solid matrix. Using this concept new expressions are developed for the critical ice germ size and the nucleation work, with explicit dependencies on temperature and water activity. However unlike previous approaches, the new theory does not depend on the interfacial tension between liquid and ice. Comparison against experimental results shows that the new theory is able to reproduce the observed effect of water activity on nucleation rate and freezing temperature. It allows for the first time a theoretical derivation of the constant shift in water activity between melting and nucleation. The new theory offers a consistent thermodynamic view of ice nucleation, simple enough to be applied in atmospheric models of cloud formation.

  20. Chapter 2: Theoretical Models for Understanding Physical Activity Behavior among Children and Adolescents--Social Cognitive Theory and Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The study of physical activity behavior in youth generally lacks a sufficient theoretical foundation for examining variables that influence that behavior. This is a major limitation because theory guides the search for determinants of behavior and the subsequent interplay between research findings and application. Theory offers a systematically…

  1. Theory-based interventions in physical activity: a systematic review of literature in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Jalal; Eftekhar, Hassan; Estebsari, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Roya

    2014-11-30

    Lack of physical activity is ranked fourth among the causes of human death and chronic diseases. Using models and theories to design, implement, and evaluate the health education and health promotion interventions has many advantages. Using models and theories of physical activity, we decided to systematically study the educational and promotional interventions carried out in Iran from 2003 to 2013.Three information databases were used to systematically select papers using key words including Iranian Magazine Database (MAGIRAN), Iran Medical Library (MEDLIB), and Scientific Information Database (SID). Twenty papers were selected and studied .Having been applied in 9 studies, The Trans Theoretical Model (TTM) was the most widespread model in Iran (PENDER in 3 studies, BASNEF in 2, and the Theory of Planned Behavior in 2 studies). With regards to the educational methods, almost all studies used a combination of methods. The most widely used Integrative educational method was group discussion. Only one integrated study was done. Behavior maintenance was not addressed in 75% of the studies. Almost all studies used self-reporting instruments. The effectiveness of educational methods was assessed in none of the studies. Most of the included studies had several methodological weaknesses, which hinder the validity and applicability of their results. According to the findings, the necessity of need assessment in using models, epidemiology and methodology consultation, addressing maintenance of physical activity, using other theories and models such as social marketing and social-cognitive theory, and other educational methods like empirical and complementary are suggested.

  2. Brain activity and cognition: a connection from thermodynamics and information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collell, Guillem; Fauquet, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The connection between brain and mind is an important scientific and philosophical question that we are still far from completely understanding. A crucial point to our work is noticing that thermodynamics provides a convenient framework to model brain activity, whereas cognition can be modeled in information-theoretical terms. In fact, several models have been proposed so far from both approaches. A second critical remark is the existence of deep theoretical connections between thermodynamics and information theory. In fact, some well-known authors claim that the laws of thermodynamics are nothing but principles in information theory. Unlike in physics or chemistry, a formalization of the relationship between information and energy is currently lacking in neuroscience. In this paper we propose a framework to connect physical brain and cognitive models by means of the theoretical connections between information theory and thermodynamics. Ultimately, this article aims at providing further insight on the formal relationship between cognition and neural activity.

  3. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Generalized Active Space Self-Consistent-Field Wave Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongxia; Li Manni, Giovanni; Olsen, Jeppe; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-07-12

    A multireference second-order perturbation theory approach based on the generalized active space self-consistent-field (GASSCF) wave function is presented. Compared with the complete active space (CAS) and restricted active space (RAS) wave functions, GAS wave functions are more flexible and can employ larger active spaces and/or different truncations of the configuration interaction expansion. With GASSCF, one can explore chemical systems that are not affordable with either CASSCF or RASSCF. Perturbation theory to second order on top of GAS wave functions (GASPT2) has been implemented to recover the remaining electron correlation. The method has been benchmarked by computing the chromium dimer ground-state potential energy curve. These calculations show that GASPT2 gives results similar to CASPT2 even with a configuration interaction expansion much smaller than the corresponding CAS expansion.

  4. Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior to Physical Activity: The Moderating Role of Mental Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Thomas E; Moffitt, Robyn L; Neumann, David L; Thomas, Patrick R

    2015-10-01

    This study explored whether mental toughness, the capacity to maintain performance under pressure, moderated the relation between physical activity intentions and subsequent behavior. Participants (N = 117) completed the Mental Toughness Index and a theory of planned behavior questionnaire. Seven days later, physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control explained substantial variance (63.1%) in physical activity intentions. Intentions also significantly predicted physical activity behavior. The simple slopes analyses for the moderation effect revealed a nonsignificant intention-behavior relation at low levels of mental toughness. However, intentions were significantly and positively related to physical activity when mental toughness was moderate or high, suggesting that the development of a mentally tough mindset may reduce the gap between behavior and physical activity intention. Future research is needed to confirm these findings and apply them in the design of mental toughness interventions to facilitate physical activity engagement.

  5. Self-Identity as a Component of the Theory of Planned Behaviour in Predicting Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Francis; Hein, Vello; Pihu, Maret; Armenta, Jose Manuel Sevillano

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of self-identity, defined as salient and enduring aspects of one's self-perception (Sparks, 2000), in relation to adolescent physical activity (PA) intentions within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). School students aged 12 to 18 from two cultural groups (Estonia and Spain) completed measures of…

  6. Social Physique Anxiety and Intention to Be Physically Active: A Self-Determination Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia, Álvaro; Sáenz-Alvarez, Piedad; González-Cutre, David; Ferriz, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Based on self-determination theory, the purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between social physique anxiety and intention to be physically active, while taking into account the mediating effects of the basic psychological needs and behavioral regulations in exercise. Method: Having obtained parents' prior consent, 390…

  7. Activity Theory, Complexity and Sports Coaching: An Epistemology for a Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robyn L.; Edwards, Christian; Filho, I. A. Tuim Viotto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, it is to advance the case for activity theory (AT) as a credible and alternative lens to view and research sports coaching. Second, it is to position this assertion within the wider debate about the epistemology of coaching. Following a framing introduction, a more comprehensive review of the development…

  8. Exploring Students' Perceptions about Learning in School: An Activity Theory Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnov-Neeman, Yelena; Barak, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we used Activity Theory as the conceptual framework for exploring students' perceptions about how learning in school is affected by the following five elements: Object, Tools, Rules, Community and Division of Labor. Data were collected by administrating a semi-structured questionnaire among 70 junior high school students and…

  9. Science and Social Practice: Action Research and Activity Theory as Socio-Critical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemeyer, Ines

    2011-01-01

    Action research and activity theory are considered by a number of followers as socio-critical approaches, whereas others do not relate them to social-criticism and use them merely as methods to improve practice. This article searches for general insights in Kurt Lewin's and Lev S. Vygotsky's work into how one proceeds and acts critically. In their…

  10. Does One-to-One Technology Really Work: An Evaluation through the Lens of Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holen, Jodi Bergland; Hung, Woei; Gourneau, Bonni

    2017-01-01

    This program evaluation study examines an implementation of a one-to-one laptop initiative in a rural high school. Specifically, the researchers adopted a holistic view in evaluating the process and outcomes of this implementation by examining the interrelationships among the key participants using activity theory as a conceptual framework.…

  11. An Activity Theory Perspective on Student-Reported Contradictions in International Telecollaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharina, Olga K.

    2007-01-01

    This process-oriented study focuses on contradictions that emerged in a WebCT bulletin board collaboration among English learners from Japan, Mexico and Russia, and explains them from the perspective of activity theory (Leont'ev, 1978, 1981; Engestrom, 1987, 1999). The study identified a) two "intra-cultural" contradictions--to post or not to…

  12. Language-Learning Motivation during Short-Term Study Abroad: An Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Heather Willis

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the development of language-learning motivation during short-term study abroad (SA) for six intermediate-level students of French. Taking an activity theory perspective, findings demonstrated that one of two orientations motivated participants to study or continue studying French at the college level: linguistic motives or…

  13. Activity Theory as a Conceptual Framework for Understanding Teacher Approaches to Information and Communication Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasavvidis, Ilias

    2009-01-01

    While the issue of teachers' perspectives on the barriers to technology use has received considerable attention, teacher concerns have not been studied in a systematic and holistic way. The present paper examines teacher concerns regarding a proposed technology-based innovation using Activity Theory as a theoretical framework. Fifty-one teachers…

  14. Activity Theory in Spanish Mixed Classrooms: Exploring Corrective Feedback as an Artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín-Rivera, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This study draws upon activity theory to better understand the implications of corrective feedback (CF) as an artifact on (1) the coconstruction of knowledge and (2) the action-oriented decisions of 10 mixed pairs comprising a foreign language learner (FLL) and a heritage language learner (HLL) of Spanish. To this end, the dyads were divided into…

  15. Understanding Wikibook-Based Tensions in Higher Education: An Activity Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasavvidis, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    Research has indicated that the integration of wikis in higher education is very challenging. The present article focuses on the tensions emerging from the integration of a wikibook as a required assignment in an undergraduate course. Drawing on data from a case study, the article uses Activity Theory as a theoretical framework in order to…

  16. Investigating Learner Attitudes toward E-Books as Learning Tools: Based on the Activity Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of e-books as learning tools in terms of learner satisfaction, usefulness, behavioral intention, and learning effectiveness. Based on the activity theory approach, this research develops a research model to understand learner attitudes toward e-books in two physical sizes: 10? and 7?. Results suggest that screen…

  17. Investigating Learner Attitudes toward E-Books as Learning Tools: Based on the Activity Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of e-books as learning tools in terms of learner satisfaction, usefulness, behavioral intention, and learning effectiveness. Based on the activity theory approach, this research develops a research model to understand learner attitudes toward e-books in two physical sizes: 10? and 7?. Results suggest that screen…

  18. Using Social Cognitive Theory to Predict Physical Activity and Fitness in Underserved Middle School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J.; McCaughtry, Nate; Flory, Sara; Murphy, Anne; Wisdom, Kimberlydawn

    2011-01-01

    Few researchers have used social cognitive theory and environment-based constructs to predict physical activity (PA) and fitness in underserved middle-school children. Hence, we evaluated social cognitive variables and perceptions of the school environment to predict PA and fitness in middle school children (N = 506, ages 10-14 years). Using…

  19. Exploring Physical Activity by Ethnicity and Gender in College Students Using Social Cognitive Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehl, Eric J.; Blanchard, Chris M.; Kupperman, Janet; Sparling, Phillip; Rhodes, Ryan; Torabi, Mohammad R.; Courneya, Kerry S.

    2012-01-01

    Intervention;The psychological determinants of physical activity (PA) among college students may vary by ethnicity and gender, but few studies have considered these characteristics. This study tested constructs from Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) by ethnicity and gender to explain differences in PA. A total of 231 Blacks (70% female) and 218 White…

  20. Pavlov's Position on Old Age within the Framework of the Theory of Higher Nervous Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, George

    1995-01-01

    In later life, I. P. Pavlov incorporated his findings on aging into his theory of higher nervous activity. Some of the major findings showed that salivary conditioning and stimulus differentiation were difficult to establish in old dogs, but that conditioned reflexes established earlier in life persisted into old age. Pavlov hypothesized that…

  1. Preparing Students for Education, Work, and Community: Activity Theory in Task-Based Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chris; MacPherson, Seonaigh; Sawkins, Tanis

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes how sociocultural and activity theory were applied in the design of a publicly funded, Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB)-based English as a Second Language (ESL) credential program and curriculum for immigrant and international students in postsecondary institutions in British Columbia, Canada. The ESL Pathways Project…

  2. Activity Theory and Technology Mediated Interaction: Cognitive Scaffolding Using Question-Based Consultation on "Facebook"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambe, Patient

    2012-01-01

    Studies that employed activity theory as a theoretical lens for exploring computer-mediated interaction have not adopted social media as their object of study. However, social media provides lecturers with personalised learning environments for diagnostic and prognostic assessments of student mastery of content and deep learning. The integration…

  3. Investigating Acceptance toward Mobile Learning to Assist Individual Knowledge Management: Based on Activity Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Hatala, Marek; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Mobile devices could facilitate human interaction and access to knowledge resources anytime and anywhere. With respect to wide application possibilities of mobile learning, investigating learners' acceptance towards it is an essential issue. Based on activity theory approach, this research explores positive factors for the acceptance of m-learning…

  4. Pavlov's Position on Old Age within the Framework of the Theory of Higher Nervous Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, George

    1995-01-01

    In later life, I. P. Pavlov incorporated his findings on aging into his theory of higher nervous activity. Some of the major findings showed that salivary conditioning and stimulus differentiation were difficult to establish in old dogs, but that conditioned reflexes established earlier in life persisted into old age. Pavlov hypothesized that…

  5. Self-Identity as a Component of the Theory of Planned Behaviour in Predicting Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Francis; Hein, Vello; Pihu, Maret; Armenta, Jose Manuel Sevillano

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of self-identity, defined as salient and enduring aspects of one's self-perception (Sparks, 2000), in relation to adolescent physical activity (PA) intentions within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). School students aged 12 to 18 from two cultural groups (Estonia and Spain) completed measures of…

  6. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  7. Science and Social Practice: Action Research and Activity Theory as Socio-Critical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemeyer, Ines

    2011-01-01

    Action research and activity theory are considered by a number of followers as socio-critical approaches, whereas others do not relate them to social-criticism and use them merely as methods to improve practice. This article searches for general insights in Kurt Lewin's and Lev S. Vygotsky's work into how one proceeds and acts critically. In their…

  8. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  9. Middle-aged women's preferred theory-based features in mobile physical activity applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Diane K; Huberty, Jennifer L

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe which theory-based behavioral and technological features middle-aged women prefer to be included in a mobile application designed to help them adopt and maintain regular physical activity (PA). Women aged 30 to 64 years (N = 120) completed an online survey measuring their demographics and mobile PA application preferences. The survey was developed upon behavioral principles of Social Cognitive Theory, recent mobile app research, and technology adoption principles of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Frequencies were calculated and content analyses conducted to identify which features women most preferred. Behavioral features that help women self-regulate their PA (PA tracking, goal-setting, progress monitoring) were most preferred. Technological features that enhance perceived effort expectancy and playfulness were most preferred. Many women reported the desire to interact and compete with others through the application. Theory-based PA self-regulation features and theory-based design features that improve perceived effort expectancy and playfulness may be most beneficial in a mobile PA application for middle-aged women. Opportunities to interact with other people and the employment of social, game-like activities may also be attractive. Interdisciplinary engagement of experts in PA behavior change, technology adoption, and software development is needed.

  10. On the limits of Köhler activation theory: how do collision and coalescence affect the activation of aerosols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Fabian

    2017-07-01

    Activation is necessary to form a cloud droplet from an aerosol, and it is widely accepted that it occurs as soon as a wetted aerosol grows beyond its critical radius. Traditional Köhler theory assumes that this growth is driven by the diffusion of water vapor. However, if the wetted aerosols are large enough, the coalescence of two or more particles is an additional process for accumulating sufficient water for activation. This transition from diffusional to collectional growth marks the limit of traditional Köhler theory and it is studied using a Lagrangian cloud model in which aerosols and cloud droplets are represented by individually simulated particles within large-eddy simulations of shallow cumuli. It is shown that the activation of aerosols larger than 0. 1 µm in dry radius can be affected by collision and coalescence, and its contribution increases with a power-law relation toward larger radii and becomes the only process for the activation of aerosols larger than 0. 4-0. 8 µm depending on aerosol concentration. Due to the natural scarcity of the affected aerosols, the amount of aerosols that are activated by collection is small, with a maximum of 1 in 10 000 activations. The fraction increases as the aerosol concentration increases, but decreases again as the number of aerosols becomes too high and the particles too small to cause collections. Moreover, activation by collection is found to affect primarily aerosols that have been entrained above the cloud base.

  11. Pavlov's conceptualization of the dynamic stereotype in the theory of higher nervous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1996-01-01

    David Joravsky (1989) alleges that Ivan Petrovich Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity fails to explain "most forms of complex behavior" because establishment of second-order and third-order chains of conditional reflexes was not feasible. Yet, Pavlov (1951a), relying on experimental evidence, some of which is presented, held that the interaction of higher organisms with the external environment was based on the dynamic stereotype, that is, on the integration in the cortical hemispheres of neural traces coming from the external and internal environments. In its formulation in the 1930s, Pavlov's theory was dynamic, not associative. It postulated the synthesis of conditioned reflexes, not associative chains of conditioned reflexes.

  12. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of small ellipsoidal scatterers. [of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Kubacsi, M. C.; Kong, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied within the Rayleigh approximation to calculate the backscattering cross section of a layer of randomly positioned and oriented small ellipsoids. The orientation of the ellipsoids is characterized by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative approach to first order in albedo. In the half space limit the results are identical to those obtained via the approach of Foldy's and distorted Born approximation. Numerical results of the theory are illustrated using parameters encountered in active remote sensing of vegetation layers. A distinctive characteristic is the strong depolarization shown by vertically aligned leaves.

  13. Instantaneous Power Theory with Fourier and Optimal Predictive Controller Design for Shunt Active Power Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suksan Tiyarachakun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel harmonic identification algorithm of shunt active power filter for balanced and unbalanced three-phase systems based on the instantaneous power theory called instantaneous power theory with Fourier. Moreover, the optimal design of predictive current controller using an artificial intelligence technique called adaptive Tabu search is also proposed in the paper. These enhancements of the identification and current control parts are the aim of the good performance for shunt active power filter. The good results for harmonic mitigation using the proposed ideas in the paper are confirmed by the intensive simulation using SPS in SIMULINK. The simulation results show that the enhanced shunt active power filter can provide the minimum %THD (Total Harmonic Distortion of source currents and unity power factor after compensation. In addition, the %THD also follows the IEEE Std.519-1992.

  14. Active matter beyond mean-field: ring-kinetic theory for self-propelled particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yen-Liang; Ihle, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Recently, Hanke et al. [Phys. Rev. E 88, 052309 (2013)] showed that mean-field kinetic theory fails to describe collective motion in soft active colloids and that correlations must not be neglected. Correlation effects are also expected to be essential in systems of biofilaments driven by molecular motors and in swarms of midges. To obtain correlations in an active matter system from first principles, we derive a ring-kinetic theory for Vicsek-style models of self-propelled agents from the exact N-particle evolution equation in phase space. The theory goes beyond mean-field and does not rely on Boltzmann's approximation of molecular chaos. It can handle precollisional correlations and cluster formation, which are both important to understand the phase transition to collective motion. We propose a diagrammatic technique to perform a small-density expansion of the collision operator and derive the first two equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy. An algorithm is presented that numerically solves the evolution equation for the two-particle correlations on a lattice. Agent-based simulations are performed and informative quantities such as orientational and density correlation functions are compared with those obtained by ring-kinetic theory. Excellent quantitative agreement between simulations and theory is found at not-too-small noises and mean free paths. This shows that there are parameter ranges in Vicsek-like models where the correlated closure of the BBGKY hierarchy gives correct and nontrivial results. We calculate the dependence of the orientational correlations on distance in the disordered phase and find that it seems to be consistent with a power law with an exponent around -1.8, followed by an exponential decay. General limitations of the kinetic theory and its numerical solution are discussed.

  15. Building inhabitant feedback: Creating a reflective practice for environmental design using activity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Dara Suzanne

    The way buildings are designed now, there is little feedback from use involved in the design process. Attempts to correct this problem have been made in the form of Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) for 50-years but have largely failed. POEs are the accepted method for environmental designers to collect feedback about buildings in use. They are infrequently conducted, after the building is built, in a one-time only evaluation, and not funded as part of the build process. Other products receive feedback about the design in use from online critiques. Online critiques could provide a platform for feedback from actors engaged with buildings in use for environmental designers to utilize in developing reflective design rationale to avoid adverse consequences in future designs or correct consequences in past and current designs. Since buildings constitute such a large part of the human environment, it's important to research the effects of buildings on their inhabitants. In order for environmental designers to act on feedback from situated use, designers need to have access to that feedback and all actors interacting with the building design need to have an easy, inexpensive, and accessible method to submit feedback. These needs can be addressed by utilizing modern networked and mobile computing to collect and access building feedback. The analysis presented in this dissertation is informed by a thorough evaluation of the theory of reflective practice, activity theory, environmental design, and cognitive science research. From this analysis, I developed the following contributions. First, I expanded Schon's reflective practice by combining his theory with a modified version of activity theory, using activity theory to enrich reflective practice and create Reflective Activity Systems Theory (RAST), which provides a new framework to develop design rationale based on feedback from use and a focus on the activity. Second, I suggest the design of an activity information system

  16. Working in "teams" in an era of "liquid" healthcare: what is the use of theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Alan

    2013-01-01

    "Team" is used throughout the healthcare literature as if it had a transparent, single meaning, and in policy documents it has become a mantra. Yet, "team" is a contested and imprecise term, inviting theoretical sophistication. New forms of team working in healthcare contexts can be understood as a complex set of practices and a discourse--both performed, and written and talked about as a supplementary practice. In the context of fluid and unpredictable social conditions, teams are now theorized in terms of contradictory process as well as stable membership. Cultural-historical activity theory in particular provides a rich approach to understanding such process, in an era where the desire for stable networks--a will-to-stability--may be secondary to the need for a will-to-adaptability. A new vocabulary has emerged in theoretical accounts to describe activities of an emergent work order, in terms of a shift from stable "networking" to unstable "knotworking." However, this conceptual language can be overwrought and may alienate practitioners. Theory can be developed with practitioners themselves to avoid widening the gap between experience and the understanding and explanation of experience. Teams are not problems to be solved but activities to be expanded.

  17. Large-Scale Investigation of the Role of Trait Activation Theory for Understanding Assessment Center Convergent and Discriminant Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Filip; Chasteen, Christopher S.; Day, Eric Anthony; Christiansen, Neil D.

    2006-01-01

    This study used trait activation theory as a theoretical framework to conduct a large-scale test of the interactionist explanation of the convergent and discriminant validity findings obtained in assessment centers. Trait activation theory specifies the conditions in which cross-situationally consistent and inconsistent candidate performances are…

  18. Using Expectancy Value Theory as a Framework to Reduce Student Resistance to Active Learning: A Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katelyn M; Ashley, Michael; Brownell, Sara E

    2017-01-01

    There has been a national movement to transition college science courses from passive lectures to active learning environments. Active learning has been shown to be a more effective way for students to learn, yet there is concern that some students are resistant to active learning approaches. Although there is much discussion about student resistance to active learning, few studies have explored this topic. Furthermore, a limited number of studies have applied theoretical frameworks to student engagement in active learning. We propose using a theoretical lens of expectancy value theory to understand student resistance to active learning. In this study, we examined student perceptions of active learning after participating in 40 hours of active learning. We used the principal components of expectancy value theory to probe student experience in active learning: student perceived self-efficacy in active learning, value of active learning, and potential cost of participating in active learning. We found that students showed positive changes in the components of expectancy value theory and reported high levels of engagement in active learning, which provide proof of concept that expectancy value theory can be used to boost student perceptions of active learning and their engagement in active learning classrooms. From these findings, we have built a theoretical framework of expectancy value theory applied to active learning.

  19. Islamic Activism and Habermas' Theory of Strategic Action: a Case of Parade Tauhid in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Siddiq

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Capturing the case of Parade Tauhid in Indonesia, this paper aims to describe embodied relationship between religion (Islam and politics. As part of social action, Islamic activism provides variety of contention which is practiced in the name of “Islam”: ideologically, structurally, and purposely. Within his explanation of communicative action theory, Habermas acknowledges what so-called as “strategic action” which can be defined as every action oriented to success under the aspect of rational choice and assess the efficacy of influencing decisions or positions of rational opponent. In this context, Parade Tauhid is perceived to be conducted for reaching several political and theological purposes based on rational choices, although it is practiced by performing religious event. This paper attempts to describe definition of Islamic activism, explore the event of Parade Tauhid, and analyze the parade using Habermas’s theory of strategic action.

  20. Pavlov's conceptualization of paranoia within the theory of higher nervous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1996-03-01

    In 1934, I. P. Pavlov conceptualized paranoia within his theory of higher nervous activity. The conceptualization was based on the case study method used in the Psychiatric Clinic where Pavlov observed five cases diagnosed by psychiatrists as paranoid states. Furthermore, experiments with dogs as subjects produced behaviours that appeared analogous to paranoiac characteristics observed in the clinic. Pavlov's paranoia theory did not differ much from Ernst Kretschmer's 1927 explanation of the formation of paranoia. Hereditary predisposition and traumatic life experiences make, according to Pavlov, some centres in the brain more active than nearby areas, which results in preoccupation with certain ideas. Imbalance between neural excitation and inhibition creates a condition where weak external stimuli produce strong reactions, which explains paranoiac overreaction to the feeling of inferiority. Some suggestions as to Pavlov's interest in paranoia are offered.

  1. Scalar φ4 field theory for active-particle phase separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkowski, Raphael; Tiribocchi, Adriano; Stenhammar, Joakim; Allen, Rosalind J.; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2014-07-01

    Recent theories predict phase separation among orientationally disordered active particles whose propulsion speed decreases rapidly enough with density. Coarse-grained models of this process show time-reversal symmetry (detailed balance) to be restored for uniform states, but broken by gradient terms; hence, detailed-balance violation is strongly coupled to interfacial phenomena. To explore the subtle generic physics resulting from such coupling, we here introduce ‘Active Model B’. This is a scalar φ4 field theory (or phase-field model) that minimally violates detailed balance via a leading-order square-gradient term. We find that this additional term has modest effects on coarsening dynamics, but alters the static phase diagram by creating a jump in (thermodynamic) pressure across flat interfaces. Both results are surprising, since interfacial phenomena are always strongly implicated in coarsening dynamics but are, in detailed-balance systems, irrelevant for phase equilibria.

  2. Threads: theory of Vygotsky to learning processes and child development in early childhood education mediated by toy construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Tadeu Reina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article has the objectivity to point out some of the threads of the cultural historical theory of Vygotsky partner to the process of learning and development of children in early childhood education mediated by the construction of toys and games. In this direction, looking to approach the foundations of this theory in order to internalize the reader in his work in search of reflections and readings on the theme proposed here.

  3. Initial Free Recall Data Characterized and Explained By Activation Theory of Short Term Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Tarnow, Dr. Eugen

    2011-01-01

    The initial recall distribution in a free recall experiment is shown to be predictably different from the overall free recall distribution including an offset which can cause the least remembered items to be almost completely absent from the first recall. Using the overall free recall distribution as input and a single parameter describing the probability of simultaneous reactivated items per number of items in the presented list, activation theory not only qualitatively but quantitatively d...

  4. Activity theory, complexity and sports coaching: an epistemology for a discipline

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, it is to advance the case for activity theory (AT) as a credible and alternative lens to view and research sports coaching. Second, it is to position this assertion within the wider debate about the epistemology of coaching. Following a framing introduction, a more comprehensive review of the development and current conceptualisation of AT is given. Here, AT's evolution through three distinct phases and related theorists, namely Vygotsky, Leont'ev an...

  5. Elastically Cooperative Activated Barrier Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Fluids. II. Thermal Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirigian, Stephen [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Schweizer, Kenneth [University of Illinois

    2014-01-01

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in Paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singularities above zero Kelvin, and relaxation in the equilibrium low temperature limit is predicted to be of a roughly Arrhenius form. The two-barrier (local cage and long range collective elastic) description results in a rich dynamic behavior including apparent Arrhenius, narrow crossover, and deeply supercooled regimes, and multiple characteristic or crossover times and temperatures of clear physical meaning. Application of the theory to nonpolar molecules, alcohols, rare gases, and liquids metals is carried out. Overall, the agreement with experiment is quite good for the temperature dependence of the alpha time, plateau shear modulus, and Boson-like peak frequency for van der Waals liquids, though less so for hydrogen-bonding molecules. The theory predicts multiple growing length scales upon cooling, which reflect distinct aspects of the coupled local hopping and cooperative elastic physics. Calculations of the growth with cooling of an activation volume, which is strongly correlated with a measure of dynamic cooperativity, agree quantitatively with experiment. Comparisons with elastic, entropy crisis, dynamic facilitation, and other approaches are performed, and a fundamental basis for empirically extracted crossover temperatures is established. The present work sets the stage for addressing distinctive glassy phenomena in polymer melts, and diverse liquids under strong confinement.

  6. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. II. Thermal liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-05-01

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in Paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singularities above zero Kelvin, and relaxation in the equilibrium low temperature limit is predicted to be of a roughly Arrhenius form. The two-barrier (local cage and long range collective elastic) description results in a rich dynamic behavior including apparent Arrhenius, narrow crossover, and deeply supercooled regimes, and multiple characteristic or crossover times and temperatures of clear physical meaning. Application of the theory to nonpolar molecules, alcohols, rare gases, and liquids metals is carried out. Overall, the agreement with experiment is quite good for the temperature dependence of the alpha time, plateau shear modulus, and Boson-like peak frequency for van der Waals liquids, though less so for hydrogen-bonding molecules. The theory predicts multiple growing length scales upon cooling, which reflect distinct aspects of the coupled local hopping and cooperative elastic physics. Calculations of the growth with cooling of an activation volume, which is strongly correlated with a measure of dynamic cooperativity, agree quantitatively with experiment. Comparisons with elastic, entropy crisis, dynamic facilitation, and other approaches are performed, and a fundamental basis for empirically extracted crossover temperatures is established. The present work sets the stage for addressing distinctive glassy phenomena in polymer melts, and diverse liquids under strong confinement.

  7. On the Discrete Kinetic Theory for Active Particles. Modelling the Immune Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Brazzoli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of the mathematical kinetic theory for active particles, with discrete activity states, to the modelling of the immune competition between immune and cancer cells. The first part of the paper deals with the assessment of the mathematical framework suitable for the derivation of the models. Two specific models are derived in the second part, while some simulations visualize the applicability of the model to the description of biological events characterizing the immune competition. A final critical outlines some research perspectives.

  8. ENGLISH TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS ABOUT THEIR TEACHING: USING ACTIVITY THEORY TO IDENTIFY CONTRADICTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardi Marwan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper highlights the findings of a study which was undertaken at a vocational higher institution in Indonesia. The aim of the study was to explore English teachers’ perceptions about their English language teaching (ELT in this institution. Activity theory (AT was employed as the framework for guiding the study owing to the fact that its focus was on the identification of contradictions occurring in the activity system. From AT analysis, several contradictions could be located within the context of ELT in this institution. Recommendations for the improvement of ELT in this particular institution were also provided.

  9. [The theory of mechanical activity of lungs--a creation history, the present and development prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetenev, F F; Tetenev, K F

    2014-01-01

    In article the history of creation of the doctrine about respiratory movements of lungs, history of classical mechanics of breathing is stated. Supervision of the paradoxical facts which became a basis for hypothesis creation, then the theory of mechanical activity of lungs are presented. The facts proving mechanical activity of lungs on an inspiration and an expiration are given. Options of interaction of intra pulmonary and extra pulmonary sources of mechanical energy are considered. Theoretical justification for development of the new direction of studying of physiology of mechanical movements of the internal which does not have own skeleton is stated.

  10. Factors Involved in Iranian Women Heads of Household's Health Promotion Activities: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Forough; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Rezaei, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to explore and describe the factors involved in Iranian women heads of household's health promotion activities. Grounded theory was used as the method. Sixteen women heads of household were recruited. Data were generated by semi structured interviews. Our findings indicated that remainder of resources (money, time and energy) alongside perceived severity of health risk were two main factors whereas women's personal and socio-economic characteristics were two contextual factors involved in these women's health promotion activities. To help these women improve their health status, we recommended that the government, non-governmental organizations and health care professionals provide them with required resources and increase their knowledge by holding training sessions.

  11. Phishing for suitable targets in the Netherlands: routine activity theory and phishing victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukfeldt, E Rutger

    2014-08-01

    This article investigates phishing victims, especially the increased or decreased risk of victimization, using data from a cybercrime victim survey in the Netherlands (n=10,316). Routine activity theory provides the theoretical perspective. According to routine activity theory, several factors influence the risk of victimization. A multivariate analysis was conducted to assess which factors actually lead to increased risk of victimization. The model included background and financial data of victims, their Internet activities, and the degree to which they were "digitally accessible" to an offender. The analysis showed that personal background and financial characteristics play no role in phishing victimization. Among eight Internet activities, only "targeted browsing" led to increased risk. As for accessibility, using popular operating systems and web browsers does not lead to greater risk, while having up-to-date antivirus software as a technically capable guardian has no effect. The analysis showed no one, clearly defined group has an increased chance of becoming a victim. Target hardening may help, but opportunities for prevention campaigns aimed at a specific target group or dangerous online activities are limited. Therefore, situational crime prevention will have to come from a different angle. Banks could play the role of capable guardian.

  12. ADSORPTION OF ASSOCIATING FLUIDS AT ACTIVE SURFACES: A DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Tripathi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a density functional theory (DFT to describe adsorption in systems where molecules of associating fluids can bond (or associate with discrete, localized functional groups attached to the surfaces, in addition to other fluid molecules. For such systems as water adsorbing on activated carbon, silica, clay minerals etc. this is a realistic model to account for surface heterogeneity rather than using a continuous smeared surface-fluid potential employed in most of the theoretical works on adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces. Association is modelled within the framework of first order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1. The new theory accurately predicts the distribution of bonded and non-bonded species and adsorption behavior under various conditions of bulk pressure, surface-fluid and fluid-fluid association strengths. Competition between the surface-fluid and fluid-fluid association is analyzed for fluids with multiple association sites and its impact on adsorption is discussed. The theory, supported by simulations demonstrates that the extent and the nature of adsorption (e.g. monolayer vary with the number of association sites on the fluid molecules.

  13. Activity Theory: Quest for the Unattainable and Hope for the Future (Reply to Commentaries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironenko, Irina A

    2016-09-01

    In reference to commentaries on the paper (Mammen and Mironenko, Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science 49(4):681-713, 2015) some clarifications are introduced concerning the general landmarks and objectives in the development of psychological science, in respect to which activity theories (AT) can be assessed and evaluated. Contemporary psychological science is developing along the path of integration, as part of the emerging global world. AT has some special value and importance in this respect. It can contribute to the development of the emerging multi-paradigmatic system of the global psychological science because it combines two aspirations, which are rarely combined in psychological theories: a) consistent focus on scientific method, objectivity and conclusiveness; b) the pursuit of a holistic and complete, not simplified and not one-sided comprehension of the subject. The former provides good bases for dialogue with "objective" psychological approaches, close to natural sciences. The latter is suggesting dialogue with teleological humanitarian psychologies. Therefore, AT can engage in networking with a wide range of theories, facilitating the integration of psychological knowledge. It can contribute to resolve the much discussed collision of reductionist "scientific" theoretical models and loose "comprehensive" descriptions in contemporary psychological science. Developing dialogue and cooperation with other schools is of special importance for the RAT, which should return to the international science, where it was rooted, overcoming the language and conceptual barriers. Some new considerations are suggested regarding the theory of the two types of categories of Jens Mammen.

  14. Using the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence with a revised lattice structure for activity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jing; Bi, Yaxin; Nugent, Chris

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores a sensor fusion method applied within smart homes used for the purposes of monitoring human activities in addition to managing uncertainty in sensor-based readings. A three-layer lattice structure has been proposed, which can be used to combine the mass functions derived from sensors along with sensor context. The proposed model can be used to infer activities. Following evaluation of the proposed methodology it has been demonstrated that the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence can incorporate the uncertainty derived from the sensor errors and the sensor context and subsequently infer the activity using the proposed lattice structure. The results from this study show that this method can detect a toileting activity within a smart home environment with an accuracy of 88.2%.

  15. A Grounded Theory of Sexual Minority Women and Transgender Individuals' Social Justice Activism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Whitney B; Hoover, Stephanie M; Morrow, Susan L

    2017-08-21

    Psychosocial benefits of activism include increased empowerment, social connectedness, and resilience. Yet sexual minority women (SMW) and transgender individuals with multiple oppressed statuses and identities are especially prone to oppression-based experiences, even within minority activist communities. This study sought to develop an empirical model to explain the diverse meanings of social justice activism situated in SMW and transgender individuals' social identities, values, and experiences of oppression and privilege. Using a grounded theory design, 20 SMW and transgender individuals participated in initial, follow-up, and feedback interviews. The most frequent demographic identities were queer or bisexual, White, middle-class women with advanced degrees. The results indicated that social justice activism was intensely relational, replete with multiple benefits, yet rife with experiences of oppression from within and outside of activist communities. The empirically derived model shows the complexity of SMW and transgender individuals' experiences, meanings, and benefits of social justice activism.

  16. Protection motivation theory and physical activity in the general population: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Linh; Mullan, Barbara; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    An appropriate theoretical framework may be useful for guiding the development of physical activity interventions. This review investigates the effectiveness of the protection motivation theory (PMT), a model based on the cognitive mediation processes of behavioral change, in the prediction and promotion of physical activity participation. A literature search was conducted using the databases MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science, and a manual search was conducted on relevant reference lists. Studies were included if they tested or applied the PMT, measured physical activity, and sampled from healthy populations. A total of 20 studies were reviewed, grouped into four design categories: prediction, stage discrimination, experimental manipulation, and intervention. The results indicated that the PMT's coping appraisal construct of self-efficacy generally appears to be the most effective in predicting and promoting physical activity participation. In conclusion, the PMT shows some promise, however, there are still substantial gaps in the evidence.

  17. Checking the determinants of physical activity based on the theory of planned behavior in the housewives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Fatemeh; Shanazi, Hossein; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary life has been recognized as a serious problem in today's Iranian society. Promoting the lifestyle with increased physical activity and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is imperative. The purpose of this study was identifying the determinants of physical activity in the housewives of Nain city in 2012 based on the theory of planned behavior. In this cross-sectional study, 120 housewives were selected by simple random sampling method. Data collection tool was a questionnaire designed based on a standardized and fabricated questionnaire and consisted of four parts. The questionnaire included awareness variables, theory of structures, planned behavior, and physical activity. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS software version 18 and associated statistical tests. The 120 housewives under study had a mean age of 34.58 ± 6.86 years. The mean scores of awareness, attitude, motivation to perform, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control variables were 74.1 ± 18.5, 82.6 ± 12.1, 59.4 ± 21.7, 63.2 ± 21.2, and 48.1 ± 12.9 respectively. There was a significant relationship between the motivation for physical activity among women and knowledge (P = 0.02) attitude (P = 0.04) subjective norms (P = 0.002) perceived behavioral control (P = 0.001), and physical activity (P = 0.04). It seems that the housewives, despite being aware of and having a positive attitude on the benefits of physical activity, had a poor lifestyle. Perhaps further studies can help in finding the causes of this issue and the barriers to physical activity such as the conditions and plan for greater measures for improving physical activity, in order to promote women's health which has a significant role in family and community health.

  18. Checking the determinants of physical activity based on the theory of planned behavior in the housewives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Fatemeh; Shanazi, Hossein; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sedentary life has been recognized as a serious problem in today's Iranian society. Promoting the lifestyle with increased physical activity and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is imperative. The purpose of this study was identifying the determinants of physical activity in the housewives of Nain city in 2012 based on the theory of planned behavior. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 120 housewives were selected by simple random sampling method. Data collection tool was a questionnaire designed based on a standardized and fabricated questionnaire and consisted of four parts. The questionnaire included awareness variables, theory of structures, planned behavior, and physical activity. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS software version 18 and associated statistical tests. Findings: The 120 housewives under study had a mean age of 34.58 ± 6.86 years. The mean scores of awareness, attitude, motivation to perform, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control variables were 74.1 ± 18.5, 82.6 ± 12.1, 59.4 ± 21.7, 63.2 ± 21.2, and 48.1 ± 12.9 respectively. There was a significant relationship between the motivation for physical activity among women and knowledge (P = 0.02) attitude (P = 0.04) subjective norms (P = 0.002) perceived behavioral control (P = 0.001), and physical activity (P = 0.04). Conclusions: It seems that the housewives, despite being aware of and having a positive attitude on the benefits of physical activity, had a poor lifestyle. Perhaps further studies can help in finding the causes of this issue and the barriers to physical activity such as the conditions and plan for greater measures for improving physical activity, in order to promote women's health which has a significant role in family and community health. PMID:25250360

  19. Information Systems as Dialectic, Tool - Mediated Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hasan

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Information Systems (IS draws its significance from the uniqueness of computer-based information and communications tools and their place in shaping recent human history. Advances in the field come from a better understanding of how to develop and use these tools and what impact they have on the way we work, and live. As IS is still an evolving field of study, two views, the objective and the subjective, are in constant tension and, though these may be considered complementary, it is rare that they come together as a unified whole. A more balanced, and integrated, foundation for IS may be found in the subject-object dialectic arising out of the German philosophical tradition. An extension of this approach from the Cultural-Historical Activity Theory is presented in this paper. This theory views all human endeavour as a purposeful, dynamic, dialectic relationship between subject and object, mediated by tools, such as technology and information, and by the social environment or community. An adaptation of this holistic theory, to incorporate the best of other theoretical approaches used by IS researchers, could span and integrate the breadth of the field IS providing it with unity and identity.

  20. AN EXPLANATION OF THE CYBERCRIME VICTIMISATION: SELF-CONTROL AND LIFESTILE/ROUTINE ACTIVITY THEORY

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    Aleksandar Ilievski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current paper is to examine the causes of cybercrime victimisation, to highlight limitations of the existing cybercrime victimisation etiological studies and provide guidance for further research. The general findings are reported on the basis of a review of previous empirical studies. In addition to minor deficiencies, elements of self-control and lifestyle/routine activity theory together can be applied to the study of cybercrime victimisation. On the basis of the review of existing research, six main conclusions have been drawn. The limitation of the current research is that examines only the causes of cybercrime victimisation through the application of self-control and lifestyle/routine activity theory as the most useful for this purpose. Future research should take into account all the conclusions discussed in the paper and test new or other existing victimological theories for the purpose of better explaining cybercrime victimisation. This study contributes to improved etiological exploration of cybercrime victimisation and, consequently, to the creation of effective measures to prevent it.

  1. Minimizing the dysfunctional interplay between activity and recovery: A grounded theory on living with fibromyalgia

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    Lillemor R.-M. Hallberg

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory, based on interviews with women with fibromyalgia, explaining how they manage their main concerns in daily life. The study has an inductive approach in line with classic grounded theory (Glaser, 1992. Twenty-three women living in the southwest region of Sweden were interviewed in-depth about their daily living with fibromyalgia and problems related to this. Probing and follow-up questions were asked by the interviewers when relevant. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and consecutively analysed in line with guidelines for grounded theory. The results showed that the main concern for women with fibromyalgia was to reach a balance in daily life. This concern was resolved by them using different strategies aimed at minimizing the dysfunctional interplay between activity and recovery (core category. This imbalance includes that the women are forcing themselves to live a fast-paced life and thereby tax or exceed their physical and psychological abilities and limits. Generally, the fibromyalgia symptoms vary and are most often unpredictable to the women. Pain and fatigue are the most prominent symptoms. However, pain-free periods occur, often related to intense engagement in some activity, relaxation or joy, but mainly the “pain gaps” are unpredictable. To reach a balance in daily life and manage the dysfunctional interplay between activity and recovery the women use several strategies. They are avoiding unnecessary stress, utilizing good days, paying the price for allowing oneself too much activity, planning activities in advance, distracting oneself from the pain, engaging in alleviating physical activities, and ignoring pain sensations. Distracting from the pain seems to be an especially helpful strategy as it may lead to “pain gaps”. This strategy, meaning to divert attention from the pain, is possible to learn, or improve, in health promoting courses based on principles of

  2. Bernhard Sabel and 'Residual Vision Activation Theory': a History Spanning Three Decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Albamonte, Emilio; Ricci, Daniela; Fortini, Stefania; Amore, Filippo Maria

    2015-01-01

    This review has the purpose of retracing the work of Professor Bernard Sabel and his group over the last 2-3 decades, in order to understand how they achieved formulation of the 'Residual Vision Activation Theory'. The methodology proposed is described, from the first studies in 1995 with High Resolution Perimetry requiring a six-months training period, to the new technologies, such as repetitive transorbital Alternating Current Stimulation, that require ten days of training. Vision restoration therapy has shown improvement in visual responses irrespective of age at the training, lesion aetiology and site of lesion. The hypothesis that visual training may induce network plasticity, improving neuronal networks in cortical and subcortical areas of both hemispheres, appears to be confirmed by recent studies including observation of the cerebral activity by fMRI and EEG. However, the results are quite variable and the mechanisms that influence cerebral activity are still unclear. The residual vision activation theory has been much criticized, both for its methodology and analysis of the results, but it gave a new impulse to the research in this area, stimulating more studies on induced cerebral plasticity.

  3. Modeling & Analysis of Shunt Active Power Filter Using IRP Theory Fed to Induction Drive

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    PABBISETTY SAI SUJATHA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Utility distribution networks have sensitive industrial loads and critical commercial operations suffer from various types of outages and service interruptions which can cost significant financial losses. Because of sensitivity of consumers on power quality and advancement in power electronics. Active power filter technology is the most efficient way to compensate reactive power and cancel out low order harmonics generated by nonlinear loads. The shunt active power filter was considered to be the most basic configuration for the APF. This paper reviews the basic principle of shunt active power filter, along with the current tracking circuit based on the instantaneous reactive power theory and the main circuit performing as an inverter with PWM hysteresis control. The instantaneous active and reactive current component (id-iq method and instantaneous active and reactive power (p-q method are two control strategies which are extensively used in active filters. A shunt active filter based on the instantaneous active and reactive current component (id-iq method is proposed. This method aims to compensate harmonic and first harmonic unbalance. A Comprehensive control method is analyzed and a harmonic Compensation simulation is conducted, the result of which verifies The harmonic detection algorithm is well-proposed and the power Quality of the grid is overall-enhanced. The results are obtained using MATLAB/SIMULINK software.

  4. Autonomy Mediates the Relationship between Personality and Physical Activity: An Application of Self-Determination Theory

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    Meredith L. Ramsey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to examine tenets of Self-Determination Theory by testing a mediation model of physical activity and personality via autonomy. A total of 290 adults were recruited to complete a one-time online survey of exercise habits and individual characteristics. Surveys assessed personality, autonomy, and physical activity. A measurement model specifying direct effects between personality dimensions and physical activity and indirect effects operating through autonomy provided an excellent fit to the data (Χ2 = 0.66, df = 3, p = 0.88, RMSEA(90% CI = 0.00 (0.00–0.05, CFI = 0.99, SRMR = 0.01. Results indicated significant (p < 0.05 effects of Extroversion (β = 0.42, Conscientiousness (β = 0.96, and Emotional Stability (β = 0.60 on autonomy, which in turn, was significantly associated with physical activity (β = 0.55. No significant effects were observed for Agreeableness or Intellect. None of the personality constructs were found to be directly associated with physical activity. This model accounted for 27% of the variance in physical activity. The results of this study suggest that autonomy is significantly associated with physical activity. Therefore, attempts to improve autonomy in individuals may be a useful intervention strategy in improving physical activity levels.

  5. Physical activity adoption to adherence, lapse, and dropout: a self-determination theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnafick, Florence-Emilie; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Duda, Joan L

    2014-05-01

    Grounded in Self-Determination Theory, we aimed to explore and identify key motivational processes involved in the transition from a physically inactive to an active lifestyle, and the processes involved in lapse and dropout behavior within a walking program. We implemented a qualitative, longitudinal case study method, using semistructured interviews and theoretical thematic analyses. Fifteen women were interviewed over 10 months and three profiles were generated: (a) nonadherence, (b) lapse/readoption of physical activity, and (c) adherence. Internalization of walking behavior was key to adherence. Satisfaction of the needs for competence and relatedness were central for participation during exercise at the adoption stages, and autonomy was particularly pertinent in facilitating adherence. Those who lapsed and restarted physical activity experienced feelings of autonomy at the point of readoption. Sources of support were driving forces in the adoption and adherence phases.

  6. A RE-AIM evaluation of theory-based physical activity interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antikainen, Iina; Ellis, Rebecca

    2011-04-01

    Although physical activity interventions have been shown to effectively modify behavior, little research has examined the potential of these interventions for adoption in real-world settings. The purpose of this literature review was to evaluate the external validity of 57 theory-based physical activity interventions using the RE-AIM framework. The physical activity interventions included were more likely to report on issues of internal, rather than external validity and on individual, rather than organizational components of the RE-AIM framework, making the translation of many interventions into practice difficult. Furthermore, most studies included motivated, healthy participants, thus reducing the generalizability of the interventions to real-world settings that provide services to more diverse populations. To determine if a given intervention is feasible and effective in translational research, more information should be reported about the factors that affect external validity.

  7. Using Activity Theory to Problematize the Role of the Teacher During Mobile Learning

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    Pamela Cowan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Research to date in mobile (m-learning has focused mainly on the learners and the processes they utilize when learning using mobile technologies. This action research study considers the role of the teacher in (m-learning—the responsibilities, the pedagogies employed in teaching when using mobile devices, and also the changing levels of power and control in the m-learning context. Activity theory (AT is used as the lens through which the teacher’s role during m-learning is analyzed. The findings propose an enhanced AT model assuming a three-dimensional (3D representation that encapsulates the teacher at the heart of the activity system radiating power and control to maintain the balance between the components necessary for effective learning. In addition, the term “adaptive framing” is used to denote the changing power dynamic and level of control in activity systems using the proposed enhanced model.

  8. The theory of planned behavior: predicting physical activity in Mexican American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J; Oliver, Kimberly; McCaughtry, Nate

    2007-04-01

    Theoretically grounded research on the determinants of Mexican American children's physical activity and related psychosocial variables is scarce. Thus, the purpose of our investigation was to evaluate the ability of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to predict Mexican American children's self-reported moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Children (N = 475, ages 9-12) completed questionnaires assessing the TPB constructs and MVPA. Multiple regression analyses provided moderate support for the ability of the TPB variables to predict MVPA as we accounted for between 8-9% of the variance in MVPA. Attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control accounted for 45% of the variance in intention. Descriptive results were encouraging because mean values indicated that most children had positive attitudes, moderately strong intentions, felt in control, and perceived support from significant others (i.e., physical education teachers) for their physical activity engagement.

  9. Temporal self-regulation Theory: A neurobiologically informed model for physical activity behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eHall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dominant explanatory models for physical activity behavior are limited by the exclusion of several important components, including temporal dynamics, ecological forces, and neurobiological factors. The latter may be a critical omission, given the relevance of several aspects of cognitive function for the self-regulatory processes that are likely required for consistent implementation of physical activity behavior in everyday life. This narrative mini-review introduces temporal self-regulation theory (TST; Hall & Fong, 2007; 2013, as a new explanatory model for physical activity behavior. Important features of the model include consideration of the default status of the physical activity behavior, as well as the disproportionate influence of temporally proximal behavioral contingencies. Most importantly, the TST model proposes positive feedback loops linking executive function and the performance of physical activity behavior. Specifically, those with relatively stronger executive control (and optimized brain structures supporting it, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex are able to implement physical activity with more consistency than others, which in turn serves to strengthen the executive control network itself. The TST model has the potential to explain everyday variants of incidental physical activity, sport-related excellence via capacity for deliberate practise, and variability in the propensity to schedule and implement exercise routines.

  10. Temporal self-regulation theory: a neurobiologically informed model for physical activity behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Peter A; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2015-01-01

    Dominant explanatory models for physical activity behavior are limited by the exclusion of several important components, including temporal dynamics, ecological forces, and neurobiological factors. The latter may be a critical omission, given the relevance of several aspects of cognitive function for the self-regulatory processes that are likely required for consistent implementation of physical activity behavior in everyday life. This narrative review introduces temporal self-regulation theory (TST; Hall and Fong, 2007, 2013) as a new explanatory model for physical activity behavior. Important features of the model include consideration of the default status of the physical activity behavior, as well as the disproportionate influence of temporally proximal behavioral contingencies. Most importantly, the TST model proposes positive feedback loops linking executive function (EF) and the performance of physical activity behavior. Specifically, those with relatively stronger executive control (and optimized brain structures supporting it, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC)) are able to implement physical activity with more consistency than others, which in turn serves to strengthen the executive control network itself. The TST model has the potential to explain everyday variants of incidental physical activity, sport-related excellence via capacity for deliberate practice, and variability in the propensity to schedule and implement exercise routines.

  11. How Does an Activity Theory Model Help to Know Better about Teaching with Electronic-Exercise-Bases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud-Blanchard, Maha; Cazes, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The research presented in this paper relies on Activity Theory and particularly on Engestrom's model, to better understand the use of Electronic-Exercise-Bases (EEB) by mathematics teachers. This theory provides a holistic approach to illustrate the complexity of the EEB integration. The results highlight reasons and ways of using EEB and show…

  12. AN ACTIVITY THEORY-BASED ANALYTIC FRAMEWORK FOR THE STUDY OF DISCOURSE IN SCIENCE CLASSROOMS

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    Rodrigo Drumond Vieira

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a new framework and methodology to analyze science classroom discourse and apply it to a university physics education course. Two fields of inquiry were adapted to develop the framework: activity theory and linguistics. From activity theory we applied levels of analysis (activity, actions, and operations to organize and structure the discourse analysis. From the field of linguistics we used resources from sociolinguistics and textual linguistics to perform analysis at the action and operation levels. Sociolinguistics gave us criteria to introduce contextualization cues into analysis in order to consider ways that participants segmented their classroom conversations. Textual linguistics provided a basis for categories of language organization (e.g, argumentation, explanation, narration, description, injunction, and dialogue. From this analysis, we propose an examination of a teacher's discourse moves, which we labeled Discursive Didactic Procedures (DDPs. Thus, the framework provides a means to situate these DDPs in different types of language organization, examine the roles such DDPs play in events, and consider the relevant didactic goals accomplished. We applied this framework to analyze the emergence and development of an argumentative situation and investigate its specific DDPs and their roles. Finally, we explore possible contributions of the framework to science education research and consider some of its limitations.

  13. An information theory criteria based blind method for enumerating active users in DS-CDMA system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsami Khodadad, Farid; Abed Hodtani, Ghosheh

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a new and blind algorithm for active user enumeration in asynchronous direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) in multipath channel scenario is proposed. The proposed method is based on information theory criteria. There are two main categories of information criteria which are widely used in active user enumeration, Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and Minimum Description Length (MDL) information theory criteria. The main difference between these two criteria is their penalty functions. Due to this difference, MDL is a consistent enumerator which has better performance in higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) but AIC is preferred in lower SNRs. In sequel, we propose a SNR compliance method based on subspace and training genetic algorithm to have the performance of both of them. Moreover, our method uses only a single antenna, in difference to the previous methods which decrease hardware complexity. Simulation results show that the proposed method is capable of estimating the number of active users without any prior knowledge and the efficiency of the method.

  14. Theory of gelation, vitrification, and activated barrier hopping in mixtures of hard and sticky spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehman, Douglas C; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2008-02-28

    Naive mode coupling theory (NMCT) and the nonlinear stochastic Langevin equation theory of activated dynamics have been generalized to mixtures of spherical particles. Two types of ideal nonergodicity transitions are predicted corresponding to localization of both, or only one, species. The NMCT transition signals a dynamical crossover to activated barrier hopping dynamics. For binary mixtures of equal diameter hard and attractive spheres, a mixture composition sensitive "glass-melting" type of phenomenon is predicted at high total packing fractions and weak attractions. As the total packing fraction decreases, a transition to partial localization occurs corresponding to the coexistence of a tightly localized sticky species in a gel-like state with a fluid of hard spheres. Complex behavior of the localization lengths and shear moduli exist because of the competition between excluded volume caging forces and attraction-induced physical bond formation between sticky particles. Beyond the NMCT transition, a two-dimensional nonequilibrium free energy surface emerges, which quantifies cooperative activated motions. The barrier locations and heights are sensitive to the relative amplitude of the cooperative displacements of the different species.

  15. Addressing complex healthcare problems in diverse settings: insights from activity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Gail; Entwistle, Vikki A; Beech, Nic

    2012-02-01

    In the U.K., approaches to policy implementation, service improvement and quality assurance treat policy, management and clinical care as separate, hierarchical domains. They are often based on the central knowledge transfer (KT) theory idea that best practice solutions to complex problems can be identified and 'rolled out' across organisations. When the designated 'best practice' is not implemented, this is interpreted as local--particularly management--failure. Remedial actions include reiterating policy aims and tightening performance management of solution implementation, frequently to no avail. We propose activity theory (AT) as an alternative approach to identifying and understanding the challenges of addressing complex healthcare problems across diverse settings. AT challenges the KT conceptual separations between levels of policy, management and clinical care. It does not regard knowledge and practice as separable, and does not understand them in the commodified way that has typified some versions of KT theory. Instead, AT focuses on "objects of activity" which can be contested. It sees new practice as emerging from contradiction and understands knowledge and practice as fundamentally entwined, not separate. From an AT perspective, there can be no single best practice. The contributions of AT are that it enables us to understand the dynamics of knowledge-practice in activities rather than between levels. It shows how efforts to reduce variation from best practice may paradoxically remove a key source of practice improvement. After explaining the principles of AT we illustrate its explanatory potential through an ethnographic study of primary healthcare teams responding to a policy aim of reducing inappropriate hospital admissions of older people by the 'best practice' of rapid response teams.

  16. A Heuristic Model for the Active Galactic Nucleus Based on the Planck Vacuum Theory

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    Daywitt W. C.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The standard explanation for an active galactic nucleus (AGN is a "central engine" consisting of a hot accretion disk surrounding a supermassive black hole. Energy is generated by the gravitational infall of material which is heated to high temperatures in this dissipative accretion disk. What follows is an alternative model for the AGN based on the Planck vacuum (PV theory, where both the energy of the AGN and its variable luminosity are explained in terms of a variable photon flux emanating from the PV.

  17. Test and theory for piezoelectric actuator-active vibration control of rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, A. B.; Lin, R. R.; Alexander, R. M.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of piezoelectric actuators for active vibration control (AVC) of rotating machinery is examined. Theory is derived and the resulting predictions are shown to agree closely with results of tests performed on an air turbine driven-overhung rotor. The test results show significant reduction in unbalance, transient and sub-synchronous responses. Results from a 30-hour endurance test support the AVD system reliability. Various aspects of the electro-mechanical stability of the control system are also discussed and illustrated. Finally, application of the AVC system to an actual jet engine is discussed.

  18. Finite element formulation of active constraining layer damping plate using laminate theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓年春; 邹振祝; 黄文虎

    2004-01-01

    A new finite element modeling method has been developed using laminate theory in a virlual work principle for active constraining layer damping plate. The frequency dependent modulus of viscoelastic material is described by introducing a few dissipation coordinates, known as GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method, a standard linear system with constant coefficient. The effectiveness of this method is validated by experimental model. Compared with conventional methods, this method can reduce a number of degrees of freedom and improve accuracy, provides a good model for analogous configurations.

  19. Test and theory for piezoelectric actuator-active vibration control of rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, A. B.; Lin, R. R.; Alexander, R. M.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of piezoelectric actuators for active vibration control (AVC) of rotating machinery is examined. Theory is derived and the resulting predictions are shown to agree closely with results of tests performed on an air turbine driven-overhung rotor. The test results show significant reduction in unbalance, transient and sub-synchronous responses. Results from a 30-hour endurance test support the AVD system reliability. Various aspects of the electro-mechanical stability of the control system are also discussed and illustrated. Finally, application of the AVC system to an actual jet engine is discussed.

  20. Application of Learning Style Theory in an English-teaching Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jin

    2016-01-01

    Language teaching is demanding. The focus of language teachers nowadays has been extended to a broader area. In the TESOL context, the findings and research of learning style have raised the attention of language teachers, who have to take the responsibility to study how to improve the teaching results according to different learners. This essay attempts to demon-strate a language-teaching activity in a typical English class and discuss the application of learning style theory in it so as to im-prove the practical English teaching in China.

  1. Testing a longitudinal integrated self-efficacy and self-determination theory model for physical activity post-cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane N. Sweet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012 have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.’s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109 answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, P<0.001. The overall model retained good fit indices. In conclusion, results diverged from theoretical predictions of physical activity, but self-determination and self-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible.

  2. Physical activity prescription among Mexican physicians: a structural equation analysis of the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaviz, K I; Jauregui-Ulloa, E; Fabrigar, L R; Latimer-Cheung, A; Lopez y Taylor, J; Lévesque, L

    2015-03-01

    To describe the physical activity (PA) prescribing behaviour of Mexican primary care physicians and determine if the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) explains this behaviour. 633 physicians (56% male, mean age 38 years) from 305 primary care clinics in Jalisco, Mexico self-reported PA prescription behaviour, PA involvement, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control (PBC) and intention related to PA prescription behaviour. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was employed. 48% of physicians reported they always ask patients about their PA, 33% provide verbal prescriptions, 6% provide written prescriptions, 8% refer patients to PA resources and 4% assess patient fitness. SEM analysis showed that the fit of the TPB model was satisfactory (RMSEA = 0.05, CFI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.05). The model explained 79% of the variance on intention (r(2) = 0.79, p behaviour (r(2) = 0.14, p behavioural intention, while PBC (β = 0.38, p behaviour. The TPB provided useful insight into physician prescription behaviour, although not all the theory tenets were supported. More research testing the TPB and other theories is needed to better understand psychosocial predictors of this behaviour. Strategies aimed at improving physicians' perceived ability to prescribe PA and their own PA involvement seem worthwhile. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Mediation of Learning in the Zone of Proximal Development through a Co-Constructed Writing Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This article develops a theoretical understanding of the processes involved in the co-construction of a written text by a teacher and student from a Vygotskian perspective. Drawing on cultural-historical and sociocultural theories of writing and Vygotsky's concept of the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), this case study of a student and teacher…

  4. Predicting physical activity and outcome expectations in cancer survivors: an application of Self-Determination Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Philip M; Blanchard, Chris M; Nehl, Eric; Baker, Frank

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the contributions of autonomous and controlled motives drawn from Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Intrinsic Motivation and Self-determination in Human Behavior. Plenum Press: New York, 1985; Handbook of Self-determination Research. University of Rochester Press: New York, 2002) towards predicting physical activity behaviours and outcome expectations in adult cancer survivors. Participants were cancer-survivors (N=220) and a non-cancer comparison cohort (N=220) who completed an adapted version of the Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire modified for physical activity behaviour (TSRQ-PA), an assessment of the number of minutes engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) weekly, and the anticipated outcomes expected from regular physical activity (OE). Simultaneous multiple regression analyses indicated that autonomous motives was the dominant predictor of OEs across both cancer and non-cancer cohorts (R(2adj)=0.29-0.43), while MVPA was predicted by autonomous (beta's ranged from 0.21 to 0.34) and controlled (beta's ranged from -0.04 to -0.23) motives after controlling for demographic considerations. Cancer status (cancer versus no cancer) did not moderate the motivation-physical activity relationship. Collectively, these findings suggest that the distinction between autonomous and controlled motives is useful and compliments a growing body of evidence supporting SDT as a framework for understanding motivational processes in physical activity contexts with cancer survivors.

  5. Promoting physical activity: development and testing of self-determination theory-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Michelle S; Duda, Joan L; Guerin, Eva; Teixeira, Pedro J

    2012-03-02

    A growing number of studies have pulled from Deci and Ryan's Self-Determination Theory to design interventions targeting health behavior change. More recently, researchers have begun using SDT to promote the adoption and maintenance of an active lifestyle. In this review, we aim to highlight how researchers and practitioners can draw from the SDT framework to develop, implement, and evaluate intervention efforts centered on increasing physical activity levels in different contexts and different populations. In the present paper, the rationale for using SDT to foster physical activity engagement is briefly reviewed before particular attention is given to three recent randomized controlled trials, the Canadian Physical Activity Counseling (PAC) Trial, the Empower trial from the UK, and the Portuguese PESO (Promotion of Health and Exercise in Obesity) trial, each of which focused on promoting physical activity behavior. The SDT-based intervention components, procedures, and participants are highlighted, and the key findings that have emanated from these three trials are presented. Lastly, we outline some of the limitations of the work conducted to date in this area and we acknowledge the challenges that arise when attempting to design, deliver, and test SDT-grounded interventions in the context of physical activity promotion.

  6. Promoting physical activity: development and testing of self-determination theory-based interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortier Michelle S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A growing number of studies have pulled from Deci and Ryan's Self-Determination Theory to design interventions targeting health behavior change. More recently, researchers have begun using SDT to promote the adoption and maintenance of an active lifestyle. In this review, we aim to highlight how researchers and practitioners can draw from the SDT framework to develop, implement, and evaluate intervention efforts centered on increasing physical activity levels in different contexts and different populations. In the present paper, the rationale for using SDT to foster physical activity engagement is briefly reviewed before particular attention is given to three recent randomized controlled trials, the Canadian Physical Activity Counseling (PAC Trial, the Empower trial from the UK, and the Portuguese PESO (Promotion of Health and Exercise in Obesity trial, each of which focused on promoting physical activity behavior. The SDT-based intervention components, procedures, and participants are highlighted, and the key findings that have emanated from these three trials are presented. Lastly, we outline some of the limitations of the work conducted to date in this area and we acknowledge the challenges that arise when attempting to design, deliver, and test SDT-grounded interventions in the context of physical activity promotion.

  7. Psychometric Factors Affecting Female Employees Physical Activity Status: Applying Trans-Theoretical Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Shafieinia; A.R. Heidarnia; A. Kazemnejad; R. Rajabi

    2015-01-01

    ... .The purpose of this study was to investigate the effective psychometric factors on physical activity of female employees, according to the Trans-theoretical Model and theory of planned behavior. Materials & Methods...

  8. Psychosocial determinants of physical activity at school among Lebanese children: an application of the planned behavior theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tania Santina; Gaston Godin; Camille Gagné; Laurence Guillaumie

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Based on an extended version the theory of planned behavior, this survey, aimed to identify the psychosocial determinants of children's physical activity at school and intention to engage in it. Methods...

  9. Predicting Physical Activity of First-Year University Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Matthew Yiu Wing; Bray, Steven Russell; Ginis, Kathleen Anne Martin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to apply Ajzen's theory of planned behavior (TPB) and a measure of past physical activity behavior to predict first-year students' physical activity intentions and behavior. Participants and Methods: First-year university students (N = 212) completed measures of TPB variables and past physical activity at…

  10. Predicting Physical Activity of First-Year University Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Matthew Yiu Wing; Bray, Steven Russell; Ginis, Kathleen Anne Martin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to apply Ajzen's theory of planned behavior (TPB) and a measure of past physical activity behavior to predict first-year students' physical activity intentions and behavior. Participants and Methods: First-year university students (N = 212) completed measures of TPB variables and past physical activity at…

  11. Testing a self-determination theory model of children’s physical activity motivation: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Sebire, Simon J.; Jago, Russell; Fox, Kenneth R.; Edwards, Mark J.; Thompson, Janice L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding children’s physical activity motivation, its antecedents and associations with behavior is important and can be advanced by using self-determination theory. However, research among youth is largely restricted to adolescents and studies of motivation within certain contexts (e.g., physical education). There are no measures of self-determination theory constructs (physical activity motivation or psychological need satisfaction) for use among children and no previous stu...

  12. Application of Local Activity Theory of Cellular Neural Network with Two Ports to the Coupled Lorenz-Cell Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN LeQuan; YU Na

    2002-01-01

    Some criteria for the local activity theory in two-port cellular neural network cells with three local state variables are applied to a coupled Lorenz-cell model. The numerical simulation exhibited that emergence may exist if the selected cell parameters are nearby or on the edge of chaos domain. The local activity theory has provided a new tool of studying the complexity of high dimensional coupled nonlinear physical systems.

  13. THEORY OF ACTIVE HITTINGS IS IN PROCESSES OF ELECTRO-COAGULATION THE ADMIXTURES IN WATER TECHNOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.В. Березуцький

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available  In the article theoretical bases of electro-coagulation of admixtures are examined in a water technological environment with the use of theory of the active hittings, which are based on the results of the executed researches and analysis of scientific information. Application of theory of the active hittings is in coagulation, provides high efficiency of process of extraction of admixtures from water environments during minimization of energy consumption and expenses of materials.

  14. Testing a Longitudinal Integrated Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination Theory Model for Physical Activity Post-Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Shane N; Fortier, Michelle S; Strachan, Shaelyn M; Blanchard, Chris M; Boulay, Pierre

    2014-01-13

    Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012) have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.'s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109) answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, Pself-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible.

  15. A possible theory for the interaction between convective activities and vortical flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zhao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies usually attribute convections to the developments of instabilities such as the static or symmetric instabilities of the basic flows. However, the following three facts make the validities of these basic theories unconvincing. First, it seems that in most cases the basic flow with balance property cannot exist as the exact solution, so one cannot formulate appropriate problems of stability. Second, neither linear nor nonlinear theories of dynamical instability are able to describe a two-way interaction between convection and its background, because the basic state which must be an exact solution of the nonlinear equations of motion is prescribed in these issues. And third, the dynamical instability needs some extra initial disturbance to trigger it, which is usually another point of uncertainty. The present study suggests that convective activities can be recognized in the perspective of the interaction of convection with vortical flow. It is demonstrated that convective activities can be regarded as the superposition of free modes of convection and the response to the forcing induced by the imbalance of the unstably stratified vortical flow. An imbalanced vortical flow provides not only an initial condition from which unstable free modes of convection can develop but also a forcing on the convection. So, convection is more appropriately to be regarded as a spontaneous phenomenon rather than a disturbance-triggered phenomenon which is indicated by any theory of dynamical instability. Meanwhile, convection, particularly the forced part, has also a reaction on the basic flow by preventing the imbalance of the vortical flow from further increase and maintaining an approximately balanced flow.

  16. Kinematic matrix theory and universalities in self-propellers and active swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E.; Borhan, Ali; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2014-06-01

    We describe an efficient and parsimonious matrix-based theory for studying the ensemble behavior of self-propellers and active swimmers, such as nanomotors or motile bacteria, that are typically studied by differential-equation-based Langevin or Fokker-Planck formalisms. The kinematic effects for elementary processes of motion are incorporated into a matrix, called the "kinematrix," from which we immediately obtain correlators and the mean and variance of angular and position variables (and thus effective diffusivity) by simple matrix algebra. The kinematrix formalism enables us recast the behaviors of a diverse range of self-propellers into a unified form, revealing universalities in their ensemble behavior in terms of new emergent time scales. Active fluctuations and hydrodynamic interactions can be expressed as an additive composition of separate self-propellers.

  17. A theory of the transition to critical period plasticity: inhibition selectively suppresses spontaneous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoizumi, Taro; Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Yazaki-Sugiyama, Yoko; Atapour, Nafiseh; Hensch, Takao K; Miller, Kenneth D

    2013-10-02

    What causes critical periods (CPs) to open? For the best-studied case, ocular dominance plasticity in primary visual cortex in response to monocular deprivation (MD), the maturation of inhibition is necessary and sufficient. How does inhibition open the CP? We present a theory: the transition from pre-CP to CP plasticity arises because inhibition preferentially suppresses responses to spontaneous relative to visually driven input activity, switching learning cues from internal to external sources. This differs from previous proposals in (1) arguing that the CP can open without changes in plasticity mechanisms when activity patterns become more sensitive to sensory experience through circuit development, and (2) explaining not simply a transition from no plasticity to plasticity, but a change in outcome of MD-induced plasticity from pre-CP to CP. More broadly, hierarchical organization of sensory-motor pathways may develop through a cascade of CPs induced as circuit maturation progresses from "lower" to "higher" cortical areas.

  18. Kinematic matrix theory and universalities in self-propellers and active swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E; Borhan, Ali; Crespi, Vincent H

    2014-06-01

    We describe an efficient and parsimonious matrix-based theory for studying the ensemble behavior of self-propellers and active swimmers, such as nanomotors or motile bacteria, that are typically studied by differential-equation-based Langevin or Fokker-Planck formalisms. The kinematic effects for elementary processes of motion are incorporated into a matrix, called the "kinematrix," from which we immediately obtain correlators and the mean and variance of angular and position variables (and thus effective diffusivity) by simple matrix algebra. The kinematrix formalism enables us recast the behaviors of a diverse range of self-propellers into a unified form, revealing universalities in their ensemble behavior in terms of new emergent time scales. Active fluctuations and hydrodynamic interactions can be expressed as an additive composition of separate self-propellers.

  19. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme...... well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high...

  20. Communication and general concern criterion prior to activation of the rapid response team: a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martland, Jarrad; Chamberlain, Diane; Hutton, Alison; Smigielski, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Objective Patients commonly show signs and symptoms of deterioration for hours or days before cardiorespiratory arrest. Rapid response teams (RRT) were created to improve recognition and response to patient deterioration in these situations. Activation criteria include vital signs or 'general concern' by a clinician or family member. The general concern criterion for RRT activation accounts for nearly one-third of all RRT activity, and although it is well established that communication deficits between staff can contribute to poorer outcomes for patients, there is little evidence pertaining to communication and its effects on the general concern RRT activation. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a substantive grounded theory related to the communication process between clinicians that preceded the activation of an RRT when general concern criterion was used.Methods Qualitative grounded theory involved collection of three types of data details namely personal notes from participants in focus groups with white board notes from discussions and audio recordings of the focus groups sessions. Focus groups were conducted with participants exploring issues associated with clinician communication and how it related to the activation of an RRT using the general concern criterion.Results The three main phases of coding (i.e. open, axial and selective coding) analysis identified 322 separate open codes. The strongest theme contributed to a theory of ineffective communication and decreased psychological safety, namely that 'In the absence of effective communication there is a subsequent increase in anxiety, fear or concern that can be directly attributed to the activation of an RRT using the 'general concern' criterion'. The RRT filled cultural and process deficiencies in the compliance with an escalation protocol. Issues such as 'not for resuscitation documentation' and 'inability to establish communication with and between medical or nursing personnel' rated

  1. Understanding physical activity in adolescent cancer survivors: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Melanie R; Culos-Reed, S Nicole; Courneya, Kerry S; McBride, Mary

    2007-05-01

    Notwithstanding the remarkable achievements in survival, there is a growing recognition that pediatric cancer survivors are faced with a variety of chronic health problems that may be exacerbated by maladaptive health behaviors. The purpose of the present study was to examine the utility of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in understanding adolescent survivors' motivation to engage in physical activity. A group of adolescent cancer survivors recalled their beliefs, attitudes, norms, perceptions of control, intentions and post-treatment physical activity behaviors using a self-administered, mailed questionnaire in a retrospective design. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the TPB explained 29.1% of the variance in physical activity behavior, with the significant independent correlates being intention (beta=0.31,p=0.023) and self-efficacy (beta=0.42,p=0.04). For intention, 33.7% of the variance was explained by the TPB, with affective attitude (beta=0.32,p=0.016) and instrumental attitude (beta=0.31, p=0.037) making significant unique contributions. The present study has provided some of the first data toward understanding physical activity behavior in adolescent cancer survivors. Specifically, the results suggest that interventions designed to promote physical activity in this population should focus on the development of a positive attitude as well as fostering an enhanced sense of self-efficacy.

  2. Evidence, Theory and Context: Using intervention mapping to develop a worksite physical activity intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conner Mark

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The workplace is an ideal setting for health promotion. Helping employees to be more physically active can not only improve their physical and mental health, but can also have economic benefits such as reduced sickness absence. The current paper describes the development of a three month theory-based intervention that aims to increase levels of moderate intensity physical activity amongst employees in sedentary occupations. Methods The intervention was developed using an intervention mapping protocol. The intervention was also informed by previous literature, qualitative focus groups, an expert steering group, and feedback from key contacts within a range of organisations. Results The intervention was designed to target awareness (e.g. provision of information, motivation (e.g. goal setting, social support and environment (e.g. management support and to address behavioural (e.g. increasing moderate physical activity in work and interpersonal outcomes (e.g. encourage colleagues to be more physically active. The intervention can be implemented by local facilitators without the requirement for a large investment of resources. A facilitator manual was developed which listed step by step instructions on how to implement each component along with a suggested timetable. Conclusion Although time consuming, intervention mapping was found to be a useful tool for developing a theory based intervention. The length of this process has implications for the way in which funding bodies allow for the development of interventions as part of their funding policy. The intervention will be evaluated in a cluster randomised trial involving 1350 employees from 5 different organisations, results available September 2009.

  3. The concept of sign in the work of Vygotsky, Winnicott and Bakhtin: further integration of object relations theory and activity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiman, M

    1992-09-01

    In a recent paper Ryle introduced the idea of integrating object relations theory and activity theory, a conceptual tradition originated by Vygotsky and developed by a number of Soviet psychologists during the previous decades. A specific aspect of this integrative perspective will be examined, implied in Ryle's paper but not elaborated by him. It is the issue of sign mediation which was Vygotsky's primary contribution to the methodological problems of modern psychology. The aim is to show that object relations theory, especially the work of Winnicott, may bring fresh understanding into Vygotsky's early notions. It is further claimed that, by introducing the contribution of Mikhail Bakhtin and his circle to the notion of sign mediation, the profundity in Winnicott's understanding of the transitional object and of the potential space may be more fully appreciated. At the same time the ideas of Winnicott and Bakhtin will jointly clarify the limitations in Vygotsky's sign conception.

  4. Using complexity theory to develop a student-directed interprofessional learning activity for 1220 healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Christine; Nisbet, Gillian; Roberts, Chris; Gordon, Christopher; Gentilcore, Stacey; Chen, Timothy F

    2016-08-08

    More and better interprofessional practice is predicated to be necessary to deliver good care to the patients of the future. However, universities struggle to create authentic learning activities that enable students to experience the dynamic interprofessional interactions common in healthcare and that can accommodate large interprofessional student cohorts. We investigated a large-scale mandatory interprofessional learning (IPL) activity for health professional students designed to promote social learning. A mixed methods research approach determined feasibility, acceptability and the extent to which student IPL outcomes were met. We developed an IPL activity founded in complexity theory to prepare students for future practice by engaging them in a self-directed (self-organised) learning activity with a diverse team, whose assessable products would be emergent creations. Complicated but authentic clinical cases (n = 12) were developed to challenge student teams (n = 5 or 6). Assessment consisted of a written management plan (academically marked) and a five-minute video (peer marked) designed to assess creative collaboration as well as provide evidence of integrated collective knowledge; the cohesive patient-centred management plan. All students (including the disciplines of diagnostic radiology, exercise physiology, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy and speech pathology), completed all tasks successfully. Of the 26 % of students who completed the evaluation survey, 70 % agreed or strongly agreed that the IPL activity was worthwhile, and 87 % agreed or strongly agreed that their case study was relevant. Thematic analysis found overarching themes of engagement and collaboration-in-action suggesting that the IPL activity enabled students to achieve the intended learning objectives. Students recognised the contribution of others and described negotiation, collaboration and creation of new collective knowledge after working

  5. Evaluation of a school-based intervention programme to promote physical activity: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2005-12-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior provides a useful framework to study attitudes toward participation in physical activity. The objective of the study was to test the effectiveness of an intervention in manipulating the variables of the Theory of Planned Behavior and exercise habits with 366 high school students (M = 14.2 yr., SD = .7; 201 boys and 165 girls). The students were divided into intervention and control groups. A questionnaire to measure components of the theory, and the Baecke Questionnaire of Habitual Activity measuring exercise habits, were administered. The intervention lasted 12 wk. and included posters and lectures promoting participation in physical activity. Analyses showed the intervention was effective in improving attitudes towards physical activity, perceived behavioral control, intention, and self-reported actual behavior, but it was ineffective for improving attitude strength, subjective norms, and role identity. The results provide useful information for physical education teachers interested in promoting students' positive attitudes towards physical activity.

  6. The (kinetic) theory of active particles applied to learning dynamics. Comment on "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by D. Burini et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, J.

    2016-03-01

    The learning phenomena, their complexity, concepts, structure, suitable theories and models, have been extensively treated in the mathematical literature in the last century, and [4] contains a very good introduction to the literature describing the many approaches and lines of research developed about them. Two main schools have to be pointed out [5] in order to understand the two -not exclusive- kinds of existing models: the stimulus sampling models and the stochastic learning models. Also [6] should be mentioned as a survey where two methods of learning are pointed out, the cognitive and the social, and where the knowledge looks like a mathematical unknown. Finally, as the authors do, we refer to the works [9,10], where the concept of population thinking was introduced and which motivate the game theory rules as a tool (both included in [4] to develop their theory) and [7], where the ideas of developing a mathematical kinetic theory of perception and learning were proposed.

  7. Eigenmodes of brain activity: Neural field theory predictions and comparison with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P A; Zhao, X; Aquino, K M; Griffiths, J D; Sarkar, S; Mehta-Pandejee, Grishma

    2016-11-15

    Neural field theory of the corticothalamic system is applied to predict and analyze the activity eigenmodes of the bihemispheric brain, focusing particularly on their spatial structure. The eigenmodes of a single brain hemisphere are found to be close analogs of spherical harmonics, which are the natural modes of the sphere. Instead of multiple eigenvalues being equal, as in the spherical case, cortical folding splits them to have distinct values. Inclusion of interhemispheric connections between homologous regions via the corpus callosum leads to further splitting that depends on symmetry or antisymmetry of activity between brain hemispheres, and the strength and sign of the interhemispheric connections. Symmetry properties of the lowest observed eigenmodes strongly constrain the interhemispheric connectivity strengths and unihemispheric mode spectra, and it is predicted that most spontaneous brain activity will be symmetric between hemispheres, consistent with observations. Comparison with the eigenmodes of an experimental anatomical connectivity matrix confirms these results, permits the relative strengths of intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connectivities to be approximately inferred from their eigenvalues, and lays the foundation for further experimental tests. The results are consistent with brain activity being in corticothalamic eigenmodes, rather than discrete "networks" and open the way to new approaches to brain analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Activity theory and genre ecology: Conceptual tools for understanding technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winberg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a year-long project in an architectural technology department, which studied students’ oral language development in plenary discussions in a first year History and Appreciation of Architecture course. Data was obtained by videotaping classroom activities, and by interviewing the lecturer and students who were participants in the course. The data was analysed, using categories suggested by Activity Theory. The category of ‘rules’ was selected from the activity system for further analysis, using a Genre Ecology approach. The findings of the study show how technical communication is managed within a classroom based activity system comprising lecturer and students, and graphic and verbal texts, in a context of learning.  Learning, teaching, and expert discourses of the architectural review genre interact and are negotiated by participants. Through participation in plenary discussion, students from diverse backgrounds contribute to one another’s experience of architectural design, and by valuing and responding to students’ contributions, the lecturer facilitates students’ understanding of the ‘rules’ of architectural communication, and enables students to access an expanded repertoire of the genre of architectural review.

  9. Efficacy of theory-based interventions to promote physical activity. A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlan, M; Bernard, P; Bortolon, C; Romain, A J; Lareyre, O; Carayol, M; Ninot, G; Boiché, J

    2016-01-01

    Implementing theory-based interventions is an effective way to influence physical activity (PA) behaviour in the population. This meta-analysis aimed to (1) determine the global effect of theory-based randomised controlled trials dedicated to the promotion of PA among adults, (2) measure the actual efficacy of interventions against their theoretical objectives and (3) compare the efficacy of single- versus combined-theory interventions. A systematic search through databases and review articles was carried out. Our results show that theory-based interventions (k = 82) significantly impact the PA behaviour of participants (d = 0.31, 95% CI [0.24, 0.37]). While moderation analyses revealed no efficacy difference between theories, interventions based on a single theory (d = 0.35; 95% CI [0.26, 0.43]) reported a higher impact on PA behaviour than those based on a combination of theories (d = 0.21; 95% CI [0.11, 0.32]). In spite of the global positive effect of theory-based interventions on PA behaviour, further research is required to better identify the specificities, overlaps or complementarities of the components of interventions based on relevant theories.

  10. Adult active transportation: adding habit strength to the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Kremers, Stef P J; Singh, Amika; van den Putte, Bas; van Mechelen, Willem

    2009-03-01

    Many health behaviors have a history of repetition and, as a result, may become habitual. Because including a measure of habit strength may add depth to current theoretical models on health behavior, the present study explored the issue of habit strength within the context of the theory of planned behavior regarding adult bicycle use as a means of transportation. Cross-sectional data were gathered in a Dutch adult sample (n=317; mean age=42.09 years; 46.7% men) in 2006 using self-administered questionnaires. Variables for the theory of planned behavior were assessed regarding bicycle use as a means of transportation; habit strength regarding bicycle use as a means of transportation was assessed with the validated Self-Reported Habit Index. Hierarchical regression analyses and interaction analyses using simple slope analyses were conducted. After controlling for variables for the theory of planned behavior, habit strength was the strongest predictor of bicycle use. In addition, simple slope analyses based on a significant interaction term, intention x habit, showed that intention was a significant predictor of bicycle use among those at low levels of habit strength for bicycle use (beta=0.67, pstrength (beta=0.10, p=0.136). Habit strength is a moderator of the intention-behavior relationship regarding bicycle use, with intention becoming less relevant when bicycle use increases in habit strength. Future determinant and intervention studies on physical activity may benefit from including a measure of habit strength--for instance, by identifying the differential effects of informational and environmental interventions.

  11. Water adsorption constrained Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory: Montmorillonite and illite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C. D.; Greenaway, A.; Christie, M. J.; Baltrusaitis, J.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, fresh, unprocessed mineral aerosol has been found to contribute to the number of available cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets in the atmosphere due to the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. The work described here uses experimental water adsorption measurements on montmorillonite and illite clay to determine empirical adsorption parameters for a recently derived theoretical framework (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill Activation Theory, FHH-AT) used to calculate CCN activities of clay minerals. Upon fitting the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption model to experimental water adsorption measurements, we find FHH adsorption parameters, AFHH and BFHH, to be 98×22 and 1.79×0.11 for Na-montmorillonite and 75×17 and 1.77×0.11 for illite, respectively. The AFHH and BFHH values obtained for these clays are significantly different from FHH adsorption parameters derived from CCN activation measurements reported previously for similar clay minerals. Differences in FHH adsorption parameters were attributed to the different approaches used, the hydratable nature of the clays and the relative difficulty in measuring CCN activation of hydratable clays due to relatively long adsorption and desorption equilibration times. However, despite these differences, the calculated CCN activities of montmorillonite and illite are quite similar and are in excellent agreement with experimental CCN activation measurements reported previously for similar clays. The different FHH adsorption parameters, however, translate to lower sc-Ddry CCN activation curve exponents (xFHH = -0.61 and -0.64 for montmorillonite and illite, respectively) than have been reported previously. The lower exponent suggests that the CCN activity of hydratable clay aerosol is less sensitive to changes in dry particle diameter (Ddry) and the hygroscopicity parameter exhibits a broader variability with Ddry compared to more soluble aerosols. This study illustrates that FHH-AT using adsorption

  12. Can the theory of planned behaviour predict the physical activity behaviour of individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Nicola; Dixon, Diane; Johnston, Marie; Howie, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) can identify cognitions that predict differences in behaviour between individuals. However, it is not clear whether the TPB can predict the behaviour of an individual person. This study employs a series of n-of-1 studies and time series analyses to examine the ability of the TPB to predict physical activity (PA) behaviours of six individuals. Six n-of-1 studies were conducted, in which TPB cognitions and up to three PA behaviours (walking, gym workout and a personally defined PA) were measured twice daily for six weeks. Walking was measured by pedometer step count, gym attendance by self-report with objective validation of gym entry and the personally defined PA behaviour by self-report. Intra-individual variability in TPB cognitions and PA behaviour was observed in all participants. The TPB showed variable predictive utility within individuals and across behaviours. The TPB predicted at least one PA behaviour for five participants but had no predictive utility for one participant. Thus, n-of-1 designs and time series analyses can be used to test theory in an individual.

  13. Nuclear energy gradients for internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory: Multistate extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of the theory and computer program for analytical nuclear energy gradients for (extended) multi-state complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2) with full internal contraction. The vertical shifts are also considered in this work. This is an extension of the fully internally contracted CASPT2 nuclear gradient program, recently developed for a state-specific variant by us [MacLeod and Shiozaki, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 051103 (2015)]; in this extension, the so-called {\\lambda} equation is solved to account for the variation of the multi-state CASPT2 energies with respect to the change in the amplitudes obtained in the preceding state-specific CASPT2 calculations, and the Z-vector equations are modified accordingly. The program is parallelized using the MPI3 remote memory access protocol that allows us to perform efficient one-sided communication. The optimized geometries of the ground and excited states of a copper corrole and benzophenone are presented as numerical examples. The c...

  14. Nuclear Energy Gradients for Internally Contracted Complete Active Space Second-Order Perturbation Theory: Multistate Extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Shiozaki, Toru

    2016-08-09

    We report the development of the theory and computer program for analytical nuclear energy gradients for (extended) multistate complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2) with full internal contraction. The vertical shifts are also considered in this work. This is an extension of the fully internally contracted CASPT2 nuclear gradient program recently developed for a state-specific variant by us [MacLeod and Shiozaki, J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 051103]; in this extension, the so-called λ equation is solved to account for the variation of the multistate CASPT2 energies with respect to the change in the amplitudes obtained in the preceding state-specific CASPT2 calculations, and the Z vector equations are modified accordingly. The program is parallelized using the MPI3 remote memory access protocol that allows us to perform efficient one-sided communication. The optimized geometries of the ground and excited states of a copper corrole and benzophenone are presented as numerical examples. The code is publicly available under the GNU General Public License.

  15. Activity in right temporo-parietal junction is not selective for theory-of-mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason P

    2008-02-01

    Recent researchers have suggested that a region of right temporo-parietal junction (RTPJ) selectively subserves the attribution of beliefs to other people (Saxe R, Kanwisher N. 2003. People thinking about thinking people: fMRI investigations of theory of mind. NeuroImage. 19:1835-1842; Saxe R, Powell LJ. 2006. It's the thought that counts: specific brain regions for one component of theory of mind. Psychol Sci. 17:692-699; Saxe R, Wexler A. 2005. Making sense of another mind: the role of the right temporo-parietal junction. Neuropsychologia. 43:1391-1399). At the same time, a similar RTPJ region has been observed repeatedly in a variety of nonsocial tasks that require participants to redirect attention to task-relevant stimuli (e.g., Corbetta M, Shulman GL. 2002. Control of goal-directed and stimulus-driven attention in the brain. Nat Rev Neurosci. 3:201-215; Serences JT, Shomstein S, Leber AB, Golay X, Egeth HE, Yantis S. 2005. Coordination of voluntary and stimulus-driven attentional control in human cortex. Psychol Sci. 16:114-122). However, because these 2 sets of tasks have never been compared within the same participants, it remains unclear whether these observations refer to the exact same region of RTPJ or may instead involve neighboring regions with distinct functional profiles. To test the claim that there is a region of RTPJ selective for belief attribution, the current study used functional neuroimaging to examine the extent to which cortical loci identified by a "theory-of-mind localizer" also distinguish between trials on a target detection task that varied demands to reorient attention (i.e., a version of the "Posner cueing task"). Results were incompatible with claims of RTPJ selectivity for mental state attribution. Regardless of whether regions were defined from group analyses or were individually tailored for each participant, RTPJ activity was also modulated by the nonsocial attentional task. The overlap between theory-of-mind and attentional

  16. Activity Theory as a Framework for Investigating District-Classroom System Interactions and Their Influences on Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Anika Ball

    2012-01-01

    Technology implementation research indicates that teachers' beliefs and knowledge, as well as a host of institutional factors, can influence technology integration. Drawing on third-generation activity theory, this article conceptualizes technology implementation as a network of planning and integration activities carried out by technology…

  17. Testing Social-Cognitive Theory to Explain Physical Activity Change in Adolescent Girls from Low-Income Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Deborah L.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Morgan, Philip J.; Okely, Anthony D.; Costigan, Sarah A.; Lubans, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesized structural paths in Bandura's social-cognitive theory (SCT) model on adolescent girls' physical activity following a 12-month physical activity and dietary intervention to prevent obesity. Method: We conducted a 12-month follow-up study of 235 adolescent girls ("M[subscript…

  18. An activity theory analysis of boundary objects in cross-border information systems development for disaster management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharosa, N.; Lee, J.; Janssen, M.; Rao, H.R.

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges in cross-border disaster management is the development and use of information systems that cater the needs of heterogeneous relief agencies, policies, activities and cultures. Drawing upon activity theory, this paper examines cross-border information systems development fo

  19. Integrating Social Activity Theory and Critical Discourse Analysis: A Multilayered Methodological Model for Examining Knowledge Mediation in Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Ayelet; Orland-Barak, Lily

    2016-01-01

    This study suggests an integrative qualitative methodological framework for capturing complexity in mentoring activity. Specifically, the model examines how historical developments of a discipline direct mentors' mediation of professional knowledge through the language that they use. The model integrates social activity theory and a framework of…

  20. An activity theory analysis of boundary objects in cross-border information systems development for disaster management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharosa, N.; Lee, J.; Janssen, M.; Rao, H.R.

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges in cross-border disaster management is the development and use of information systems that cater the needs of heterogeneous relief agencies, policies, activities and cultures. Drawing upon activity theory, this paper examines cross-border information systems development

  1. Curriculum of broaden education and theory of teaching activity in school Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirléia Silvano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the conception of curriculum with broaden character in Physical Education and Davidov and Leontiev’s learning theory as possibility of focusing on human education in the omnilateral perspective. We endorse the necessity that the curriculum dynamics – dealing with knowledge, school systematization and standardization of school practices – becomes effective in a curriculum of broaden character. We consider that dealing with knowledge involves the necessity to create conditions that promote the transmission and assimilation of school knowledge. We refer therefore to a scientific direction of the teaching process, in other words, that the teacher leads the student to enter into study activity; from abstract knowledge rising to concrete theoretical knowledge, which is brought about by curriculum organization from a broaden conception.

  2. Using social cognitive theory to predict physical activity and fitness in underserved middle school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J; McCaughtry, Nate; Flory, Sara; Murphy, Anne; Wisdom, Kimberlydawn

    2011-06-01

    Few researchers have used social cognitive theory and environment-based constructs to predict physical activity (PA) and fitness in underserved middle-school children. Hence, we evaluated social cognitive variables and perceptions of the school environment to predict PA and fitness in middle school children (N = 506, ages 10-14 years). Using multiple regression analyses we accounted for 12% of the variance in PA and 13-21% of the variance in fitness. The best predictors of PA were barrier self-efficacy, classmate social support, and gender; whereas, only gender predicted fitness. The results affirmed the importance of barrier self-efficacy and gender differences. Our findings regarding classmate social support are some of the first to illuminate the importance of school-specific peers in promoting PA.

  3. What should be the roles of conscious states and brain states in theories of mental activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donelson E Dulany

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Answers to the title's question have been influenced by a history in which an early science of consciousness was rejected by behaviourists on the argument that this entails commitment to ontological dualism and "free will" in the sense of indeterminism. This is, however, a confusion of theoretical assertions with metaphysical assertions. Nevertheless, a legacy within computational and information-processing views of mind rejects or de-emphasises a role for consciousness. This paper sketches a mentalistic metatheory in which conscious states are the sole carriers of symbolic representations, and thus have a central role in the explanation of mental activity and action-while specifying determinism and materialism as useful working assumptions. A mentalistic theory of causal learning, experimentally examined with phenomenal reports, is followed by examination of these questions: Are there common roles for phenomenal reports and brain imaging? Is there defensible evidence for unconscious brain states carrying symbolic representations? Are there interesting dissociations within consciousness?

  4. CF₃I synthesis catalyzed by activated carbon: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingjie; Wu, Taiping; Liu, Weizhou; Zhang, Liyang; Pan, Renming

    2014-03-13

    A revised reaction mechanism of CF3I synthesis catalyzed by activated carbon is investigated with quantum chemistry methods using density functional theory (DFT). The adsorption configurations of possible intermediates are carefully examined. The reaction pathway and related transition states are also analyzed. According to our calculations, first, the dehydrofluorination of CHF3 is catalyzed by -COOH groups, which possesses the highest barrier and is accordingly identified as the rate-determining step. Second, the difluorocarbene disproportionation over graphite (001) surface proceeds instead of dimerization. The next reaction steps involving the association of fluoromethine and trifluoromethyl, the fluorine abstractions between intermediates and the iodine abstractions by the desorbed CF3 and CF2CF3 from molecular iodine are also feasible over graphite (001) surfaces. It is also found that the coke deposition in experiments is due to the fluorine abstraction from fluoromethine. This revised mechanism is in agreement with available experimental data and our theoretical computations.

  5. Activity Theories and the Ontology of Psychology: Learning from Danish and Russian Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Jens; Mironenko, Irina

    2015-12-01

    Psychology has permanent problems of theoretical coherence and practical, analytic and critical efficiency. It is claimed that Activity Theory (AT) with roots in a long European philosophical tradition and continued in Russian AT is a first step to remedy this. A Danish version of AT may have a key to exceed some, mostly implicit, ontological restrictions in traditional AT and free it from an embracement of functionalism and mechanicism, rooted in Renaissance Physics. The analysis goes back to Aristotle's understanding of the freely moving animal in its ecology and introduces some dualities in the encounter between subject and object which replace the dualistic dichotomies traditionally splitting Psychology in Naturwissenschaft vs. Geisteswissenshaft. This also implies a "Copernican turn" of Cartesian dualism. The perspectives are to give place for a phenomenology of meaning without cutting human psyche out of Nature and to open Psychology to its domain.

  6. Pavlov's conceptualization of voluntary movements within the framework of the theory of higher nervous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1998-01-01

    Pavlov became interested in the nature of voluntary movements after receiving Konorski and Miller's letter in 1928 describing their experiments on conditioning of motor movements in dogs. Their paradigmatic experiment involved presenting an indifferent stimulus, followed by passive raising of the dog's leg and then reinforcement. If the same stimulus was provided during a number of trials, the animal lifted its corresponding leg. In 1928 Pavlov asked his students to condition motor movements in his laboratory. Although their findings were equivocal, Pavlov incorporated the so-called voluntary movements into his theory of higher nervous activity. Voluntary movements were responses to external environmental contingencies. On the cortical level, the motor analyzer's cells had both afferent and efferent functions. In Pavlov's view, the motor analyzer's cells established connections with the afferent cells of other sensory analyzers. Pavlov held that motor movements, as responses to external and internal environments, give humans the illusion of voluntary behavior.

  7. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 3 - From theory to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of volume scattering and emission theory are discussed, taking into account a weakly scattering medium, the Born approximation, first-order renormalization, the radiative transfer method, and the matrix-doubling method. Other topics explored are related to scatterometers and probing systems, the passive microwave sensing of the atmosphere, the passive microwave sensing of the ocean, the passive microwave sensing of land, the active microwave sensing of land, and radar remote sensing applications. Attention is given to inversion techniques, atmospheric attenuation and emission, a temperature profile retrieval from ground-based observations, mapping rainfall rates, the apparent temperature of the sea, the emission behavior of bare soil surfaces, the emission behavior of vegetation canopies, the emission behavior of snow, wind-vector radar scatterometry, radar measurements of sea ice, and the back-scattering behavior of cultural vegetation canopies.

  8. Density functional theory studies of MTSL nitroxide side chain conformations attached to an activation loop

    CERN Document Server

    Concilio, Maria Grazia; Bayliss, Richard; Burgess, Selena G

    2016-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical (QM) method rooted on density functional theory (DFT) has been employed to determine conformations of the methane-thiosulfonate spin label (MTSL) attached to a fragment extracted from the activation loop of Aurora-A kinase. The features of the calculated energy surface revealed low energy barriers between isoenergetic minima and the system could be described in a population of 76 rotamers that can be also considered for other systems since it was found that the X3, X4 and X5 do not depend on the previous two dihedral angles. Conformational states obtained were seen to comparable to those obtained in the {\\alpha}-helix systems studied previously, indicating that the protein backbone does not affect the torsional profiles significantly and suggesting the possibility to use determined conformations for other protein systems for further modelling studies.

  9. Water adsorption constrained Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory: Montmorillonite and illite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Courtney D.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Christie, Matthew J.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    Fresh mineral aerosol has recently been found to be effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and contribute to the number of cloud droplets in the atmosphere due to the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. The work described here uses experimental water adsorption measurements on Na-montmorillonite and illite clay to determine empirical adsorption parameters that can be used in a recently derived theoretical framework (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill Activation Theory, FHH-AT) that accounts for the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. Upon fitting the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption model to water adsorption measurements, we find FHH adsorption parameters, AFHH and BFHH, to be 98 ± 22 and 1.79 ± 0.11 for montmorillonite and 75 ± 17 and 1.77 ± 0.11 for illite, respectively. The AFHH and BFHH values obtained from water adsorption measurements differ from values reported previously determined by applying FHH-AT to CCN activation measurements. Differences in FHH adsorption parameters were attributed to different methods used to obtain them and the hydratable nature of the clays. FHH adsorption parameters determined from water adsorption measurements were then used to calculate the critical super-saturation (sc) for CCN activation using FHH-AT. The relationship between sc and the dry particle diameter (Ddry) gave CCN activation curve exponents (xFHH) of -0.61 and -0.64 for montmorillonite and illite, respectively. The xFHH values were slightly lower than reported previously for mineral aerosol. The lower exponent suggests that the CCN activity of hydratable clays is less sensitive to changes in Ddry and the hygroscopicity parameter exhibits a broader variability with Ddry compared to more soluble aerosols. Despite the differences in AFHH, BFHH and xFHH, the FHH-AT derived CCN activities of montmorillonite and illite are quite similar to each other and in excellent agreement with experimental CCN measurements resulting from wet-generated clay aerosol

  10. The neurophysiological aspects of Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity: in honor of the 150th anniversary of Pavlov's birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, D L; Windholz, G

    2000-08-01

    Whereas Ivan P. Pavlov (1849-1936) is well-known for his work on classical conditioning, his contribution to neuroscience, particularly his interest in the function of neural centers in the central nervous system, is not as widely known. During the last three decades of his life, Pavlov explored cortical processes by salivary reflex conditioning, a method he used to develop his theory of higher nervous activity. This theory outlined the function of the brain in higher organisms in their interaction with the changing environmental contingencies. As early as 1908, Pavlov outlined a neurophysiological theory as the physiological basis of his theory of higher nervous activity. He maintained that the neural processes of excitation and inhibition irradiate and concentrate among the cortical neural centers. Most of all, he emphasized the plasticity of the cortex in higher organisms' in the Darwinian struggle for existence.

  11. Lost for emotion words: what motor and limbic brain activity reveals about autism and semantic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Rachel L; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are characterised by deficits in understanding and expressing emotions and are frequently accompanied by alexithymia, a difficulty in understanding and expressing emotion words. Words are differentially represented in the brain according to their semantic category and these difficulties in ASC predict reduced activation to emotion-related words in limbic structures crucial for affective processing. Semantic theories view 'emotion actions' as critical for learning the semantic relationship between a word and the emotion it describes, such that emotion words typically activate the cortical motor systems involved in expressing emotion actions such as facial expressions. As ASC are also characterised by motor deficits and atypical brain structure and function in these regions, motor structures would also be expected to show reduced activation during emotion-semantic processing. Here we used event-related fMRI to compare passive processing of emotion words in comparison to abstract verbs and animal names in typically-developing controls and individuals with ASC. Relatively reduced brain activation in ASC for emotion words, but not matched control words, was found in motor areas and cingulate cortex specifically. The degree of activation evoked by emotion words in the motor system was also associated with the extent of autistic traits as revealed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient. We suggest that hypoactivation of motor and limbic regions for emotion word processing may underlie difficulties in processing emotional language in ASC. The role that sensorimotor systems and their connections might play in the affective and social-communication difficulties in ASC is discussed.

  12. Testing Theory of Planned Behavior and Neo-Socioanalytic Theory models of trait activity, industriousness, exercise social cognitions, exercise intentions, and physical activity in a representative U.S. sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Phuong T.; Bogg, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Prior research identified assorted relations between trait and social cognition models of personality and engagement in physical activity. Using a representative U.S. sample (N = 957), the goal of the present study was to test two alternative structural models of the relationships among the extraversion-related facet of activity, the conscientiousness-related facet of industriousness, social cognitions from the Theory of Planned Behavior (perceived behavioral control, affective attitudes, subjective norms, intentions), Social Cognitive Theory (self-efficacy, outcome expectancies), and the Transtheoretical Model (behavioral processes of change), and engagement in physical activity. Path analyses with bootstrapping procedures were used to model direct and indirect effects of trait and social cognition constructs on physical activity through two distinct frameworks – the Theory of Planned Behavior and Neo-Socioanalytic Theory. While both models showed good internal fit, comparative model information criteria showed the Theory-of-Planned-Behavior-informed model provided a better fit. In the model, social cognitions fully mediated the relationships from the activity facet and industriousness to intentions for and engagement in physical activity, such that the relationships were primarily maintained by positive affective evaluations, positive expected outcomes, and confidence in overcoming barriers related to physical activity engagement. The resultant model – termed the Disposition-Belief-Motivation model– is proposed as a useful framework for organizing and integrating personality trait facets and social cognitions from various theoretical perspectives to investigate the expression of health-related behaviors, such as physical activity. Moreover, the results are discussed in terms of extending the application of the Disposition-Belief-Motivation model to longitudinal and intervention designs for physical activity engagement. PMID:26300811

  13. Testing Theory of Planned Behavior and Neo-Socioanalytic Theory models of trait activity, industriousness, exercise social cognitions, exercise intentions, and physical activity in a representative U.S. sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Phuong T; Bogg, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Prior research identified assorted relations between trait and social cognition models of personality and engagement in physical activity. Using a representative U.S. sample (N = 957), the goal of the present study was to test two alternative structural models of the relationships among the extraversion-related facet of activity, the conscientiousness-related facet of industriousness, social cognitions from the Theory of Planned Behavior (perceived behavioral control, affective attitudes, subjective norms, intentions), Social Cognitive Theory (self-efficacy, outcome expectancies), and the Transtheoretical Model (behavioral processes of change), and engagement in physical activity. Path analyses with bootstrapping procedures were used to model direct and indirect effects of trait and social cognition constructs on physical activity through two distinct frameworks - the Theory of Planned Behavior and Neo-Socioanalytic Theory. While both models showed good internal fit, comparative model information criteria showed the Theory-of-Planned-Behavior-informed model provided a better fit. In the model, social cognitions fully mediated the relationships from the activity facet and industriousness to intentions for and engagement in physical activity, such that the relationships were primarily maintained by positive affective evaluations, positive expected outcomes, and confidence in overcoming barriers related to physical activity engagement. The resultant model - termed the Disposition-Belief-Motivation model- is proposed as a useful framework for organizing and integrating personality trait facets and social cognitions from various theoretical perspectives to investigate the expression of health-related behaviors, such as physical activity. Moreover, the results are discussed in terms of extending the application of the Disposition-Belief-Motivation model to longitudinal and intervention designs for physical activity engagement.

  14. Testing Theory of Planned Behavior and Neo-Socioanalytic Theory models of trait activity, industriousness, exercise social cognitions, exercise intentions, and physical activity in a representative U.S. sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Thi Vo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prior research identified assorted relations between trait and social cognition models of personality and engagement in physical activity. Using a representative U.S. sample (N = 957, the goal of the present study was to test two alternative structural models of the relationships among the extraversion-related facet of activity, the conscientiousness-related facet of industriousness, social cognitions from the Theory of Planned Behavior (perceived behavioral control, affective attitudes, subjective norms, intentions, Social Cognitive Theory (self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and the Transtheoretical Model (behavioral processes of change, and engagement in physical activity. Path analyses with bootstrapping procedures were used to model direct and indirect effects of trait and social cognition constructs on physical activity through two distinct frameworks – the Theory of Planned Behavior and Neo-Socioanalytic Theory. While both models showed good internal fit, comparative model information criteria showed the Theory-of-Planned-Behavior-informed model provided a better fit. In the model, social cognitions fully mediated the relationships from the activity facet and industriousness to intentions for and engagement in physical activity, such that the relationships were primarily maintained by positive affective evaluations, positive expected outcomes, and confidence in overcoming barriers related to physical activity engagement. The resultant model – termed the Disposition-Belief-Motivation model – is proposed as a useful framework for organizing and integrating personality trait facets and social cognitions from various theoretical perspectives to investigate the expression of health-related behaviors, such as physical activity. Moreover, the results are discussed in terms of extending the application of the Disposition-Belief-Motivation model to longitudinal and intervention designs for physical activity engagement.

  15. The general practitioner's role in promoting physical activity to older adults: a review based on program theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Timo; Brach, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Positive influences of physical activity both on many chronic diseases and on preservation of mobility are well documented. But chronically ill or mobility restricted elderly living in their own homes are difficult to reach for interventions. The general practitioner's (GP) surgery offers one of the few opportunities to give advice for physical activity to those people. We used program theory to sound out knowledge on GP-centered physical activity counseling. The "conceptual theory" (evidence for training effects in old age) and the "implementation theory" (unique position of the GP) were reviewed narratively. The "action theory" (effects of GP counseling) was reviewed systematically. According to program theory, appropriate MeSH (Medical subject headings) concepts were Aged OR Aged, 80 and over (Target group), Physicians, Family OR Primary Health Care (Implementation/Setting), Counseling OR Patient Education as Topic OR Disease Management OR Health promotion (Intervention), Exercise OR Motor Activity OR Physical Fitness OR Sports (Determinants). The resulting six review papers (Pubmed, 2000-2009) were presented using the STARLITE mnemonic. Authors agree, that the GP plays a central role in the promotion of physical activity to elderly people, but there is conflicting evidence concerning counseling effectiveness. Utilizing behavioral change strategies and the collaboration between GPs and specialised professions are recommended and currently under research.

  16. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for bosonic many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, Camille; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2017-04-01

    We develop an ab initio time-dependent wavefunction based theory for the description of a many-body system of cold interacting bosons. Like the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (MCTDHB), the theory is based on a configurational interaction Ansatz for the many-body wavefunction with time-dependent self-consistent-field orbitals. The theory generalizes the MCTDHB method by incorporating restrictions on the active space of the orbital excitations. The restrictions are specified based on the physical situation at hand. The equations of motion of this time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory are derived. The similarity between the formal development of the theory for bosons and fermions is discussed. The restrictions on the active space allow the theory to be evaluated under conditions where other wavefunction based methods due to exponential scaling in the numerical effort cannot, and to clearly identify the excitations that are important for an accurate description, significantly beyond the mean-field approach. For ground state calculations we find it to be important to allow a few particles to have the freedom to move in many orbitals, an insight facilitated by the flexibility of the restricted-active-space Ansatz. Moreover, we find that a high accuracy can be obtained by including only even excitations in the many-body self-consistent-field wavefunction. Time-dependent simulations of harmonically trapped bosons subject to a quenching of their noncontact interaction, show failure of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approach within a fraction of a harmonic oscillation period. The TD-RASSCF theory remains accurate at much reduced computational cost compared to the MCTDHB method. Exploring the effect of changes of the restricted-active-space allows us to identify that even self-consistent-field excitations are mainly responsible for the accuracy of the method.

  17. Elastically Cooperative Activated Barrier Hopping Theory of Relaxation in Viscous Fluids. II. Thermal Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Building on the elastically collective nonlinear Langevin equation theory developed for hard spheres in the preceding paper I, we propose and implement a quasi-universal theory for the alpha relaxation of thermal liquids based on mapping them to an effective hard sphere fluid via the dimensionless compressibility. The result is a zero adjustable parameter theory that can quantitatively address in a unified manner the alpha relaxation time over 14 or more decades. The theory has no singulariti...

  18. 心理健康:维列鲁学派活动理论的诠释%The Definition of Mental Health by the Social-Cultural-Historical School's Action Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石文山; 陈家麟

    2004-01-01

    依据维列鲁学派活动理论的基本观点,揭示了心理健康的本质在于个体主导其生命活动的有效性,在于心理系统对个体生命活动系统的有效管理;强调健康心理学是关于人生的实践智慧的学问,它的核心在于促进个体对其生命活动的有效管理,使其能采取正确的生活方式,对自己的生命承担起责任.

  19. Postclassical Narratology. Cultural, Historical, and Cognitive Aspects of Narrative Theory [4. Wuppertaler Graduiertenforum Narratologie der ‚Arbeitsgruppe Erzählforschung‘, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, 23. bis 25.06.2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Gebauer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tagungsbericht zu / Conference report of:4. Wuppertaler Graduiertenforum Narratologie der „Arbeitsgruppe Erzählforschung“, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, 23. bis 25.06.2013

  20. Theory of activated penetrant diffusion in viscous fluids and colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2015-10-14

    We heuristically formulate a microscopic, force level, self-consistent nonlinear Langevin equation theory for activated barrier hopping and non-hydrodynamic diffusion of a hard sphere penetrant in very dense hard sphere fluid matrices. Penetrant dynamics is controlled by a rich competition between force relaxation due to penetrant self-motion and collective matrix structural (alpha) relaxation. In the absence of penetrant-matrix attraction, three activated dynamical regimes are predicted as a function of penetrant-matrix size ratio which are physically distinguished by penetrant jump distance and the nature of matrix motion required to facilitate its hopping. The penetrant diffusion constant decreases the fastest with size ratio for relatively small penetrants where the matrix effectively acts as a vibrating amorphous solid. Increasing penetrant-matrix attraction strength reduces penetrant diffusivity due to physical bonding. For size ratios approaching unity, a distinct dynamical regime emerges associated with strong slaving of penetrant hopping to matrix structural relaxation. A crossover regime at intermediate penetrant-matrix size ratio connects the two limiting behaviors for hard penetrants, but essentially disappears if there are strong attractions with the matrix. Activated penetrant diffusivity decreases strongly with matrix volume fraction in a manner that intensifies as the size ratio increases. We propose and implement a quasi-universal approach for activated diffusion of a rigid atomic/molecular penetrant in a supercooled liquid based on a mapping between the hard sphere system and thermal liquids. Calculations for specific systems agree reasonably well with experiments over a wide range of temperature, covering more than 10 orders of magnitude of variation of the penetrant diffusion constant.

  1. Theory of activated penetrant diffusion in viscous fluids and colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2015-10-01

    We heuristically formulate a microscopic, force level, self-consistent nonlinear Langevin equation theory for activated barrier hopping and non-hydrodynamic diffusion of a hard sphere penetrant in very dense hard sphere fluid matrices. Penetrant dynamics is controlled by a rich competition between force relaxation due to penetrant self-motion and collective matrix structural (alpha) relaxation. In the absence of penetrant-matrix attraction, three activated dynamical regimes are predicted as a function of penetrant-matrix size ratio which are physically distinguished by penetrant jump distance and the nature of matrix motion required to facilitate its hopping. The penetrant diffusion constant decreases the fastest with size ratio for relatively small penetrants where the matrix effectively acts as a vibrating amorphous solid. Increasing penetrant-matrix attraction strength reduces penetrant diffusivity due to physical bonding. For size ratios approaching unity, a distinct dynamical regime emerges associated with strong slaving of penetrant hopping to matrix structural relaxation. A crossover regime at intermediate penetrant-matrix size ratio connects the two limiting behaviors for hard penetrants, but essentially disappears if there are strong attractions with the matrix. Activated penetrant diffusivity decreases strongly with matrix volume fraction in a manner that intensifies as the size ratio increases. We propose and implement a quasi-universal approach for activated diffusion of a rigid atomic/molecular penetrant in a supercooled liquid based on a mapping between the hard sphere system and thermal liquids. Calculations for specific systems agree reasonably well with experiments over a wide range of temperature, covering more than 10 orders of magnitude of variation of the penetrant diffusion constant.

  2. Theory of activated penetrant diffusion in viscous fluids and colloidal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S., E-mail: kschweiz@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We heuristically formulate a microscopic, force level, self-consistent nonlinear Langevin equation theory for activated barrier hopping and non-hydrodynamic diffusion of a hard sphere penetrant in very dense hard sphere fluid matrices. Penetrant dynamics is controlled by a rich competition between force relaxation due to penetrant self-motion and collective matrix structural (alpha) relaxation. In the absence of penetrant-matrix attraction, three activated dynamical regimes are predicted as a function of penetrant-matrix size ratio which are physically distinguished by penetrant jump distance and the nature of matrix motion required to facilitate its hopping. The penetrant diffusion constant decreases the fastest with size ratio for relatively small penetrants where the matrix effectively acts as a vibrating amorphous solid. Increasing penetrant-matrix attraction strength reduces penetrant diffusivity due to physical bonding. For size ratios approaching unity, a distinct dynamical regime emerges associated with strong slaving of penetrant hopping to matrix structural relaxation. A crossover regime at intermediate penetrant-matrix size ratio connects the two limiting behaviors for hard penetrants, but essentially disappears if there are strong attractions with the matrix. Activated penetrant diffusivity decreases strongly with matrix volume fraction in a manner that intensifies as the size ratio increases. We propose and implement a quasi-universal approach for activated diffusion of a rigid atomic/molecular penetrant in a supercooled liquid based on a mapping between the hard sphere system and thermal liquids. Calculations for specific systems agree reasonably well with experiments over a wide range of temperature, covering more than 10 orders of magnitude of variation of the penetrant diffusion constant.

  3. Social Science Theories on Adolescent Risk-Taking: The Relevance of Behavioral Inhibition and Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Hans; T'Sjoen, Guy; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    The major social science theories on adolescent risk-taking--strain, social control, and differential association theories--have received substantial empirical support. The relationships between variables central to these theories and individual differences in temperament related to risk-taking, however, have not been adequately studied. In a…

  4. Social Science Theories on Adolescent Risk-Taking: The Relevance of Behavioral Inhibition and Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Hans; T'Sjoen, Guy; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    The major social science theories on adolescent risk-taking--strain, social control, and differential association theories--have received substantial empirical support. The relationships between variables central to these theories and individual differences in temperament related to risk-taking, however, have not been adequately studied. In a…

  5. Formative Evaluation of EFNEP Curriculum: Ensuring the Eating Smart • Being Active Curriculum Is Theory Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natker, Elana; Baker, Susan S.; Auld, Garry; McGirr, Kathryn; Sutherland, Barbara; Cason, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The project reported here served to assess a curriculum for EFNEP to ensure theory compliance and content validity. Adherence to Adult Learning Theory and Social Cognitive Theory tenets was determined. A curriculum assessment tool was developed and used by five reviewers to assess initial and revised versions of the curriculum. T-tests for…

  6. Formative Evaluation of EFNEP Curriculum: Ensuring the Eating Smart • Being Active Curriculum Is Theory Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natker, Elana; Baker, Susan S.; Auld, Garry; McGirr, Kathryn; Sutherland, Barbara; Cason, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The project reported here served to assess a curriculum for EFNEP to ensure theory compliance and content validity. Adherence to Adult Learning Theory and Social Cognitive Theory tenets was determined. A curriculum assessment tool was developed and used by five reviewers to assess initial and revised versions of the curriculum. T-tests for…

  7. Testing a self-determination theory model of children’s physical activity motivation: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding children’s physical activity motivation, its antecedents and associations with behavior is important and can be advanced by using self-determination theory. However, research among youth is largely restricted to adolescents and studies of motivation within certain contexts (e.g., physical education). There are no measures of self-determination theory constructs (physical activity motivation or psychological need satisfaction) for use among children and no previous studies have tested a self-determination theory-based model of children’s physical activity motivation. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of scores derived from scales adapted to measure self-determination theory constructs among children and test a motivational model predicting accelerometer-derived physical activity. Methods Cross-sectional data from 462 children aged 7 to 11 years from 20 primary schools in Bristol, UK were analysed. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of adapted behavioral regulation and psychological need satisfaction scales. Structural equation modelling was used to test cross-sectional associations between psychological need satisfaction, motivation types and physical activity assessed by accelerometer. Results The construct validity and reliability of the motivation and psychological need satisfaction measures were supported. Structural equation modelling provided evidence for a motivational model in which psychological need satisfaction was positively associated with intrinsic and identified motivation types and intrinsic motivation was positively associated with children’s minutes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions The study provides evidence for the psychometric properties of measures of motivation aligned with self-determination theory among children. Children’s motivation that is based on enjoyment and inherent satisfaction of physical activity is

  8. Testing a self-determination theory model of children's physical activity motivation: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebire, Simon J; Jago, Russell; Fox, Kenneth R; Edwards, Mark J; Thompson, Janice L

    2013-09-26

    Understanding children's physical activity motivation, its antecedents and associations with behavior is important and can be advanced by using self-determination theory. However, research among youth is largely restricted to adolescents and studies of motivation within certain contexts (e.g., physical education). There are no measures of self-determination theory constructs (physical activity motivation or psychological need satisfaction) for use among children and no previous studies have tested a self-determination theory-based model of children's physical activity motivation. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of scores derived from scales adapted to measure self-determination theory constructs among children and test a motivational model predicting accelerometer-derived physical activity. Cross-sectional data from 462 children aged 7 to 11 years from 20 primary schools in Bristol, UK were analysed. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of adapted behavioral regulation and psychological need satisfaction scales. Structural equation modelling was used to test cross-sectional associations between psychological need satisfaction, motivation types and physical activity assessed by accelerometer. The construct validity and reliability of the motivation and psychological need satisfaction measures were supported. Structural equation modelling provided evidence for a motivational model in which psychological need satisfaction was positively associated with intrinsic and identified motivation types and intrinsic motivation was positively associated with children's minutes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. The study provides evidence for the psychometric properties of measures of motivation aligned with self-determination theory among children. Children's motivation that is based on enjoyment and inherent satisfaction of physical activity is associated with their objectively-assessed physical

  9. Understanding physical activity intentions among French Canadians with type 2 diabetes: an extension of Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Godin Gaston; Boudreau François

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Regular physical activity is considered a cornerstone for managing type 2 diabetes. However, in Canada, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet national physical activity recommendations. When designing a theory-based intervention, one should first determine the key determinants of physical activity for this population. Unfortunately, there is a lack of information on this aspect among adults with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to f...

  10. Identity development in pre-service teachers who are explainers in a science center: Dialectically developing theory and praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Preeti

    This dissertation investigates how teaching in a hands-on science center contributes to re/shaping one's teaching identity. Situated at the New York Hall of Science (NYHS) in Queens, New York, my research approach is to conduct a critical ethnography where the focus is on improving the teaching and learning of science for all involved. In particular, Explainers, floor staff at NYHS, who are studying to be science teachers, are invited to become co-researchers with me. Written as a manuscript style, this dissertation consists of six chapters. Each chapter foregrounds certain events and phenomena, and theory and method are woven in to theorize identity construction. Grounded in cultural sociology, the frameworks of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), and the sociology of emotions, illuminate key understandings about the construction of teaching identity. Multiple data sources including field notes, transcribed audio and videotapes, and cogenerative dialogues are used. I employ a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to data analysis. This research has salient implications for museum-university partnerships, and training for museum floor staff and has the potential to inform policy-making for pre-service teaching clinical fieldwork experiences.

  11. Optimising physical activity engagement during youth sport: a self-determination theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Sally A M; Duda, Joan L; Barrett, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    Research suggests participation in youth sport does not guarantee physical activity (PA) guidelines are met. Studies indicate few children achieve recommended levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during their youth sport involvement, and habitual levels of MVPA are below the recommended 60 min per day. Informed by self-determination theory, this study examined whether the coach-created social environment and related player motivation predict variability in objectively measured MVPA within the youth sport setting. Seventy three male youth sport footballers (Mean age = 11.66 ± 1.62) completed a multisection questionnaire assessing their perceptions of the social environment created in youth sport (autonomy supportive and controlling) and motivation towards their football participation (autonomous and controlled). Intensity of PA during youth sport was measured using accelerometers (GT3X, ActiGraph). Results supported a model in which perceptions of autonomy support significantly and positively predicted autonomous motivation towards football, which in turn significantly and positively predicted youth sport MVPA (% time). A significant indirect effect was observed for perceptions of autonomy support on youth sport %MVPA via autonomous motivation. Results have implications for optimising MVPA engagement during youth sport and increasing daily MVPA towards recommended and health-enhancing levels on youth sport days.

  12. Activity-Based Design as a Way to Bridge Artifacts, Professions, and Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This paper will focus on the challenges in designing pervasive computing technology for children’s play, taking into account current trends in popular culture. In search of theoretical support for this work I have been exploring an activity-based approach called ‘habitats’ to describe the conditi......This paper will focus on the challenges in designing pervasive computing technology for children’s play, taking into account current trends in popular culture. In search of theoretical support for this work I have been exploring an activity-based approach called ‘habitats’ to describe...... the conditions around various design projects, and it seems to have some value. I will present my experiences from a playful pervasive gaming system for children and the problems I faced trying to find a solid theoretical paradigm. The paper argues that habitats with its three perspectives – physical......, informational, and pragmatic – together with the ability to describe their relations are a useful platform for practitioners and theorists who are forced to span a heterogeneous mash-up of technologies, theories, and professions....

  13. Understanding physical activity in individuals with prediabetes: an application of social cognitive theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lorian M; Raine, Kim D; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Vallance, Jeff K; Sharma, Arya M; Spence, John C

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented evidence implicating physical activity (PA) in the prevention of type 2 diabetes, the overwhelming majority of individuals with prediabetes are not physically active enough. The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of the social cognitive theory (SCT) in understanding PA behaviour in individuals with prediabetes. Individuals with prediabetes (N = 232) completed a mailed questionnaire assessing demographics, self-reported PA (MET.min/wk) and SCT constructs for PA MET.min/wk. For PA MET.min/wk, scheduling and task efficacy both had significant effects on PA (β = .30 and .22, respectively). Goal formation also had a direct effect on PA for scheduling, coping and task efficacy (β = .20, .34 and .30, respectively). Task, coping and scheduling efficacy explained a significant portion of the variance in PA behaviour. Overall, SCT appears to have merit as a model for understanding PA in individuals with prediabetes. Further evaluative inquiry is needed to establish support for the use of the SCT as a framework for developing, implementing and evaluating PA behaviour change interventions in this population.

  14. Theory of mind network activity is altered in subjects with familial liability for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnke, Sebastian; Erk, Susanne; Schnell, Knut; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Schmierer, Phöbe; Romund, Lydia; Garbusow, Maria; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Ripke, Stephan; Grimm, Oliver; Haller, Leila; Witt, Stephanie H.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Tost, Heike; Heinz, Andreas; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Walter, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    As evidenced by a multitude of studies, abnormalities in Theory of Mind (ToM) and its neural processing might constitute an intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. If so, neural alterations during ToM should be observable in unaffected relatives of patients as well, since they share a considerable amount of genetic risk. While behaviorally, impaired ToM function is confirmed meta-analytically in relatives, evidence on aberrant function of the neural ToM network is sparse and inconclusive. The present study therefore aimed to further explore the neural correlates of ToM in relatives of schizophrenia. About 297 controls and 63 unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia performed a ToM task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Consistent with the literature relatives exhibited decreased activity of the medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, increased recruitment of the right middle temporal gyrus and posterior cingulate cortex was found, which was related to subclinical paranoid symptoms in relatives. These results further support decreased medial prefrontal activation during ToM as an intermediate phenotype of genetic risk for schizophrenia. Enhanced recruitment of posterior ToM areas in relatives might indicate inefficiency mechanisms in the presence of genetic risk. PMID:26341902

  15. Theory of mind network activity is altered in subjects with familial liability for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnke, Sebastian; Erk, Susanne; Schnell, Knut; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Schmierer, Phöbe; Romund, Lydia; Garbusow, Maria; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Ripke, Stephan; Grimm, Oliver; Haller, Leila; Witt, Stephanie H; Degenhardt, Franziska; Tost, Heike; Heinz, Andreas; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Walter, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    As evidenced by a multitude of studies, abnormalities in Theory of Mind (ToM) and its neural processing might constitute an intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. If so, neural alterations during ToM should be observable in unaffected relatives of patients as well, since they share a considerable amount of genetic risk. While behaviorally, impaired ToM function is confirmed meta-analytically in relatives, evidence on aberrant function of the neural ToM network is sparse and inconclusive. The present study therefore aimed to further explore the neural correlates of ToM in relatives of schizophrenia. About 297 controls and 63 unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia performed a ToM task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Consistent with the literature relatives exhibited decreased activity of the medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, increased recruitment of the right middle temporal gyrus and posterior cingulate cortex was found, which was related to subclinical paranoid symptoms in relatives. These results further support decreased medial prefrontal activation during ToM as an intermediate phenotype of genetic risk for schizophrenia. Enhanced recruitment of posterior ToM areas in relatives might indicate inefficiency mechanisms in the presence of genetic risk. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Eliciting Metacognitive Experiences and Reflection in a Year 11 Chemistry Classroom: An Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gregory P.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

    2013-06-01

    Concerns regarding students' learning and reasoning in chemistry classrooms are well documented. Students' reasoning in chemistry should be characterized by conscious consideration of chemical phenomenon from laboratory work at macroscopic, molecular/sub-micro and symbolic levels. Further, students should develop metacognition in relation to such ways of reasoning about chemistry phenomena. Classroom change eliciting metacognitive experiences and metacognitive reflection is necessary to shift entrenched views of teaching and learning in students. In this study, Activity Theory is used as the framework for interpreting changes to the rules/customs and tools of the activity systems of two different classes of students taught by the same teacher, Frances, who was teaching chemical equilibrium to those classes in consecutive years. An interpretive methodology involving multiple data sources was employed. Frances explicitly changed her pedagogy in the second year to direct students attention to increasingly consider chemical phenomena at the molecular/sub-micro level. Additionally, she asked students not to use the textbook until toward the end of the equilibrium unit and sought to engage them in using their prior knowledge of chemistry to understand their observations from experiments. Frances' changed pedagogy elicited metacognitive experiences and reflection in students and challenged them to reconsider their metacognitive beliefs about learning chemistry and how it might be achieved. While teacher change is essential for science education reform, students are not passive players in change efforts and they need to be convinced of the viability of teacher pedagogical change in the context of their goals, intentions, and beliefs.

  17. Designing for Culturally Contextualized Learning Activity Planning: Matching Learning Theories and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Aparecido Fabiano Pinatti; Anacleto, Junia Coutinho; de Almeida Neris, Vania Paula

    Helping teachers in their activities has been an issue more and more explored in Computer Science. However, in order to support teachers effectively, it is necessary to understand their needs and to design tools that they can easily manage. One of those needs is undoubtedly to put in practice pedagogical principles. This paper presents the design of PACO-T, a tool for helping teachers in planning learning activities (LAs) supported by common sense knowledge, based on PACO, a seven-step textual framework for planning pedagogically suitable LAs. The design was based on the results of a case study carried out to investigate how teachers can plan LAs following PACO steps, using common sense knowledge from a common sense knowledge base collaboratively built through the web. Moreover, the interface design was ruled by a Web Design Pattern Language, attempting to improve the usability of the tool. PACO-T aims to help teachers to put in practice the recommendation for contextualizing LAs to the target group, found in several learning theories.

  18. T-cell activation: A queuing theory analysis at low agonist density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedagedera, J R; Burroughs, N J

    2006-09-01

    We analyze a simple linear triggering model of the T-cell receptor (TCR) within the framework of queuing theory, in which TCRs enter the queue upon full activation and exit by downregulation. We fit our model to four experimentally characterized threshold activation criteria and analyze their specificity and sensitivity: the initial calcium spike, cytotoxicity, immunological synapse formation, and cytokine secretion. Specificity characteristics improve as the time window for detection increases, saturating for time periods on the timescale of downregulation; thus, the calcium spike (30 s) has low specificity but a sensitivity to single-peptide MHC ligands, while the cytokine threshold (1 h) can distinguish ligands with a 30% variation in the complex lifetime. However, a robustness analysis shows that these properties are degraded when the queue parameters are subject to variation-for example, under stochasticity in the ligand number in the cell-cell interface and population variation in the cellular threshold. A time integration of the queue over a period of hours is shown to be able to control parameter noise efficiently for realistic parameter values when integrated over sufficiently long time periods (hours), the discrimination characteristics being determined by the TCR signal cascade kinetics (a kinetic proofreading scheme). Therefore, through a combination of thresholds and signal integration, a T cell can be responsive to low ligand density and specific to agonist quality. We suggest that multiple threshold mechanisms are employed to establish the conditions for efficient signal integration, i.e., coordinate the formation of a stable contact interface.

  19. Through an activity theory lens: Conceptualizing service learning as 'boundary work'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice McMillan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael Gibbons (2005 has spoken about the need to re-imagine the relationship between higher education and society and he calls for the emergence of a ‘new social contract’. In particular he highlights three elements of this new form of engagement: contextualization, boundary objects, and transaction spaces or boundary zones. It is here that my paper is located – in the conceptualization of the ‘boundary zone’ at the nexus of higher education and society, with a focus on service learning as practice. In the literature on higher education there appears to be little evidence describing ways of conceptualizing and understanding the boundary zone itself. Most of the service learning research literature for instance, looks either at the university side of the relationship or at the impact on the community (and even then only in very few cases. In order to better understand the ‘push and pull’ of service learning, we need to better understand better what happens in the transaction/boundary zone in the first instance. In order to do this, we need to develop conceptual tools to illuminate the complex practices that occur at this nexus. Drawing on situated learning, post Vygotskian theory and activity theory in particular, I develop a framework for service learning conceived as ‘boundary work’. This framework illuminates inherent contradictions in these trans-boundary practices, and the argument is therefore that unless we understand these practices better and in more nuanced ways, we are in no position to improve them and consequently our understandings of this form of educational practice remain unaltered. Finally, by raising a number of questions about boundary practices at the end of the paper, I provide some ways of taking this conceptualization project further.

  20. EL CONCEPTO DE CALIDAD EDUCATIVA: UNA MIRADA CRÍTICA DESDE EL ENFOQUE HISTÓRICOCULTURAL (THE CONCEPT OF QUALITY EDUCATION: A CRITICAL LOOK FORM THE CULTURAL HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Arocho Wanda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Este trabajo propone un examen crítico del concepto: “calidad educativa” desde la óptica históricocultural. A partir de la misma, se argumenta que la acepción técnica del concepto que domina el discurso educativo en la actualidad, según la cual la calidad se define a partir de parámetros derivados de una lógica empresarial, devela un origen asentado en el modelo neoliberal e impulsado por los procesos que caracterizan la globalización. Se plantea que tomar conciencia del origen sociocultural del concepto es una condición necesaria para construir significados alternos al término calidad y darle otros sentidos a su práctica. Se discute el rol que la pedagogía crítica puede desempeñar en la reflexión y la acción para el logro de esta meta.Abstract:This work presents a critical analysis of the concept of quality education from a cultural-historical perspective. It is argued that the technical reference of the concept that dominates current educational discourse, form which quality is defined in terms of parameters drawn form a commercial logical, unveils its origin grounded in the neoliberal model and propelled by the processes that characterize globalization. It is also argued that the development of consciousness regarding the sociocultural origins or the concept is a needed condition for the construction of alternative meanings and making new senses for its transformation into practices. The role of critical pedagogy in this endeavor is discussed.

  1. Social-cognitive theories for predicting physical activity behaviours of employed women with and without young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Leonor S; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Loucaides, Constantinos

    2009-03-01

    Chronic disease interventions for women have been understudied in the workplace domain. Understanding the role of cognitions in individual behaviour can help motivate change and suggest directions for achieving improvements in health. The purpose of this study was to identify psychosocial constructs and social-cognitive theories [e.g. Transtheoretical model (TTM), Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) and Social Cognitive Theory (SCT)] that are most salient for explaining physical activity behaviour among employed women (n = 1183). Demographic information, and social-cognitive measures related to physical activity, intention and behaviours (e.g. stage of change, energy expenditure) were assessed. A series of multiple regression analyses predicting intention, energy expenditure and stage of change were conducted separately for: (1) women with young children (n = 302), and (2) women without young children (n = 881) for each of the respective social-cognitive theories. Although taken as a whole the results were relatively similar between the two sub-groups of women for each of the socio-cognitive theories examined in this study, differences were observed in the relative contributions of the theoretical constructs between the two sub-groups. Results also indicate that self-efficacy and intention were the strongest predictors of behaviour among both women with and without young children. The explained variances (R(2)) for the theories examined in this study for different sub-groups ranged from 16 to 60%, generally reflecting what has been reported in other studies within the physical activity domain. The results of this study could be useful in guiding future research and in designing physical activity intervention programs for these specific population groups. Integrating approaches of individual lifestyle change while addressing issues related to creating supportive environments for women in various life stages is a suggested strategy

  2. What graph theory actually tells us about resting state interictal MEG epileptic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niso, Guiomar; Carrasco, Sira; Gudín, María; Maestú, Fernando; Del-Pozo, Francisco; Pereda, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory provides a useful framework to study functional brain networks from neuroimaging data. In epilepsy research, recent findings suggest that it offers unique insight into the fingerprints of this pathology on brain dynamics. Most studies hitherto have focused on seizure activity during focal epilepsy, but less is known about functional epileptic brain networks during interictal activity in frontal focal and generalized epilepsy. Besides, it is not clear yet which measures are most suitable to characterize these networks. To address these issues, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data using two orthogonal planar gradiometers from 45 subjects from three groups (15 healthy controls (7 males, 24 ± 6 years), 15 frontal focal (8 male, 32 ± 16 years) and 15 generalized epileptic (6 male, 27 ± 7 years) patients) during interictal resting state with closed eyes. Then, we estimated the total and relative spectral power of the largest principal component of the gradiometers, and the degree of phase synchronization between each sensor site in the frequency range [0.5-40 Hz]. We further calculated a comprehensive battery of 15 graph-theoretic measures and used the affinity propagation clustering algorithm to elucidate the minimum set of them that fully describe these functional brain networks. The results show that differences in spectral power between the control and the other two groups have a distinctive pattern: generalized epilepsy presents higher total power for all frequencies except the alpha band over a widespread set of sensors; frontal focal epilepsy shows higher relative power in the beta band bilaterally in the fronto-central sensors. Moreover, all network indices can be clustered into three groups, whose exemplars are the global network efficiency, the eccentricity and the synchronizability. Again, the patterns of differences were clear: the brain network of the generalized epilepsy patients presented greater efficiency and lower

  3. What graph theory actually tells us about resting state interictal MEG epileptic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiomar Niso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graph theory provides a useful framework to study functional brain networks from neuroimaging data. In epilepsy research, recent findings suggest that it offers unique insight into the fingerprints of this pathology on brain dynamics. Most studies hitherto have focused on seizure activity during focal epilepsy, but less is known about functional epileptic brain networks during interictal activity in frontal focal and generalized epilepsy. Besides, it is not clear yet which measures are most suitable to characterize these networks. To address these issues, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG data using two orthogonal planar gradiometers from 45 subjects from three groups (15 healthy controls (7 males, 24 ± 6 years, 15 frontal focal (8 male, 32 ± 16 years and 15 generalized epileptic (6 male, 27 ± 7 years patients during interictal resting state with closed eyes. Then, we estimated the total and relative spectral power of the largest principal component of the gradiometers, and the degree of phase synchronization between each sensor site in the frequency range [0.5–40 Hz]. We further calculated a comprehensive battery of 15 graph-theoretic measures and used the affinity propagation clustering algorithm to elucidate the minimum set of them that fully describe these functional brain networks. The results show that differences in spectral power between the control and the other two groups have a distinctive pattern: generalized epilepsy presents higher total power for all frequencies except the alpha band over a widespread set of sensors; frontal focal epilepsy shows higher relative power in the beta band bilaterally in the fronto-central sensors. Moreover, all network indices can be clustered into three groups, whose exemplars are the global network efficiency, the eccentricity and the synchronizability. Again, the patterns of differences were clear: the brain network of the generalized epilepsy patients presented greater

  4. Determinants of physical activity based on the theory of planned behavior in Iranian Military Staff's Wives: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamnia Shirvani, Zeinab; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Gharakhanlou, Reza; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2014-11-30

    Level of physical activity as a key determinant of healthy lifestyle less than is required in individuals particularly women. Applying theories of behavioral change about complex behaviors such as physical activity leads to identify effective factors and their relations. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of physical activity behavior based on the Theory of Planned Behavior in military staff's wives in Tehran. This cross-sectional study was performed in 180 military personnel's spouses residing in organizational houses, in Tehran, Iran in 2014. The participants were randomly selected with multi-stage cluster sampling. The validity and reliability of the theory based scale evaluated before conducting the path analysis. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS16 and LISREL8.8. The results indicated the model explained 77% and 17% of intention and behavior variance. Subjective norms (Beta=0.83) and intention (Beta=0.37) were the strongest predictors of intention and behavior, respectively. The instrumental and affective attitude had no significant path to intention and behavior. The direct relation of perceived behavioral control to behavior was non-significant. This research demonstrated relative importance and relationships of Theory of Planned Behavior constructs in physical activity behavior of military personnel's spouses in Tehran. It is essential to consider these determinants in designing of educational interventions for promoting and maintaining physical activity behavior in this target group.

  5. Influences of personality traits and continuation intentions on physical activity participation within the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Hagger, Martin S

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the theory of planned behaviour is insufficient in capturing all the antecedents of physical activity participation and that continuation intentions or personality traits may improve the predictive validity of the model. The present study examined the combined effects of continuation intentions and personality traits on health behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour. To examine these effects, 180 university students (N = 180, Male = 87, Female = 93, Age = 19.14 years, SD = 0.94) completed self-report measures of the theory of planned behaviour, personality traits and continuation intentions. After 5 weeks, perceived achievement of behavioural outcomes and actual participation in physical activities were assessed. Results supported discriminant validity between continuation intentions, conscientiousness and extroversion and indicated that perceived achievement of behavioural outcomes and continuation intentions of failure predicted physical activity participation after controlling for personality effects, past behaviour and other variables in the theory of planned behaviour. In addition, results indicated that conscientiousness moderated the effects of continuation intentions of failure on physical activity such that continuation intentions of failure predicted physical activity participation among conscientious and not among less conscientious individuals. These findings suggest that the effects of continuation intentions on health behaviour are contingent on personality characteristics.

  6. Generalized-active-space pair-density functional theory: an efficient method to study large, strongly correlated, conjugated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Predicting ground- and excited-state properties of open-shell organic molecules by electronic structure theory can be challenging because an accurate treatment has to correctly describe both static and dynamic electron correlation. Strongly correlated systems, i.e., systems with near-degeneracy correlation effects, are particularly troublesome. Multiconfigurational wave function methods based on an active space are adequate in principle, but it is impractical to capture most of the dynamic correlation in these methods for systems characterized by many active electrons. We recently developed a new method called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), that combines the advantages of wave function theory and density functional theory to provide a more practical treatment of strongly correlated systems. Here we present calculations of the singlet-triplet gaps in oligoacenes ranging from naphthalene to dodecacene. Calculations were performed for unprecedently large orbitally optimized active spaces of 50 electrons in 50 orbitals, and we test a range of active spaces and active space partitions, including four kinds of frontier orbital partitions. We show that MC-PDFT can predict the singlet-triplet splittings for oligoacenes consistent with the best available and much more expensive methods, and indeed MC-PDFT may constitute the benchmark against which those other models should be compared, given the absence of experimental data.

  7. Predictors of physical activity among rural and small town breast cancer survivors: an application of the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Jeff K; Lavallee, Celeste; Culos-Reed, Nicole S; Trudeau, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the utility of the two-component theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in understanding physical activity intentions and behaviour in rural and small town breast cancer survivors. The secondary objective was to elicit the most common behavioural, normative and control beliefs of rural and small town survivors regarding physical activity. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 524 rural and small town breast cancer survivors completed a mailed survey that assessed physical activity and TPB variables. Physical activity intention explained 12% of the variance in physical activity behaviour (p activity intention (p activity determinants among rural and small town breast cancer survivors. These data can be used in the development and establishment of physical activity behaviour interventions and health promotion materials designed to facilitate physical activity behaviour among rural and small town breast cancer survivors.

  8. Analysis of active closed cross-section slender beams based on asymptotically correct thin-wall beam theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouli, F.; Langlois, R. G.; Afagh, F. F.

    2007-02-01

    An asymptotically correct theory for multi-cell thin-wall anisotropic slender beams that includes the shell bending strain measures is extended to include embedded active fibre composites (AFCs). A closed-form solution of the asymptotically correct cross-sectional actuation force and moments is obtained. Active thin-wall beam theories found in the literature neglect the shell bending strains, which lead to incorrect predictions for certain cross-sections, while the theory presented is shown to overcome this shortcoming. The theory is implemented and verified against single-cell examples that were solved using the University of Michigan/Variational Beam Sectional Analysis (UM/VABS) software. The stiffness constants and the actuation vector are obtained for two-cell and three-cell active cross-sections. The theory is argued to be reliable for efficient initial design analysis and interdisciplinary parametric or optimization studies of thin-wall closed cross-section slender beams with no initial twist or obliqueness.

  9. Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burini, D.; De Lillo, S.; Gibelli, L.

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a systems approach to the theory of perception and learning in populations composed of many living entities. Starting from a phenomenological description of these processes, a mathematical structure is derived which is deemed to incorporate their complexity features. The modeling is based on a generalization of kinetic theory methods where interactions are described by theoretical tools of game theory. As an application, the proposed approach is used to model the learning processes that take place in a classroom.

  10. Activity theory as a tool to address the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary school chemical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalsvoort, Joke

    In a previous article, the problem of chemistry's lack of relevance in secondary chemical education was analysed using logical positivism as a tool. This article starts with the hypothesis that the problem can be addressed by means of activity theory, one of the important theories within the sociocultural school. The reason for this expectation is that, while logical positivism creates a divide between science and society, activity theory offers a model of society in which science and society are related. With the use of this model, a new course for grade nine has been constructed. This results in a confirmation of the hypothesis, at least at a theoretical level. A comparison with the Salters' approach is made in order to demonstrate the relative merits of a mediated way of dealing with the problem of the lack of relevance of chemistry in chemical education.

  11. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme...... well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high......-order harmonic generation spectra of a one-dimensional model of atomic beryllium interacting with a strong laser pulse, the TD-RASSCF method is reasonably accurate while largely reducing the computational complexity. The TD-RASSCF method has the potential to treat large atoms and molecules beyond the capability...

  12. Application of decision-making theory to the regulation of muscular work rate during self-paced competitive endurance activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfree, Andrew; Martin, Louise; Micklewright, Dominic; St Clair Gibson, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Successful participation in competitive endurance activities requires continual regulation of muscular work rate in order to maximise physiological performance capacities, meaning that individuals must make numerous decisions with regards to the muscular work rate selected at any point in time. Decisions relating to the setting of appropriate goals and the overall strategic approach to be utilised are made prior to the commencement of an event, whereas tactical decisions are made during the event itself. This review examines current theories of decision-making in an attempt to explain the manner in which regulation of muscular work is achieved during athletic activity. We describe rational and heuristic theories, and relate these to current models of regulatory processes during self-paced exercise in an attempt to explain observations made in both laboratory and competitive environments. Additionally, we use rational and heuristic theories in an attempt to explain the influence of the presence of direct competitors on the quality of the decisions made during these activities. We hypothesise that although both rational and heuristic models can plausibly explain many observed behaviours in competitive endurance activities, the complexity of the environment in which such activities occur would imply that effective rational decision-making is unlikely. However, at present, many proposed models of the regulatory process share similarities with rational models. We suggest enhanced understanding of the decision-making process during self-paced activities is crucial in order to improve the ability to understand regulation of performance and performance outcomes during athletic activity.

  13. The technique of project activity: A new approach in Russian preschool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veraksa N.E.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Project activity has a long history of implementation in education (Kilpatrick, 1918. This article describes the approach to project activity that became widespread in preschool education in Russia in the late 1990s. This approach is based on the cultural-historical theory of Vygotsky (1978, Venger’s (1988 understanding of intellectual giftedness, as well as an understanding of project activity proposed by Leontiev (2000. At the heart of project activity lies children’s exploration of the space of possibilities — that is, their search for action options that correspond to their personal motives and express their individuality. The main features of project activity are the problem situation to be presented to the child; the subjectivity of all its participants, including teachers; and its nature, which includes its social context. Three main types of project activity are presented: research, creative, and normative; each has its own structure and value for children’s development. Examples of their implementation in preschool settings are provided. The impact of project activity on all its participants in preschool — children, teachers, parents — is addressed. The article shows the effectiveness of project activity for educational work with both intellectually gifted and normally developing children.

  14. Relationships between self-determination theory and theory of planned behavior applied to physical activity and exercise behavior in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jessica M; Iwanaga, Kanako; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Cotton, Brandi Parker; Deiches, Jon; Morrison, Blaise; Moser, Erin; Chan, Fong

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the relationships between self-determination theory (SDT) and theory of planned behavior (TpB) applied to physical activity and exercise behavior (PA&E) in people with chronic pain. Two hundred and eleven adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain (28 males and 183 females, age range 18 to 82 years, mean age 43 years) were recruited from online support groups and clinic networks in the United States. Participants completed SDT measures relevant to PA&E on perceived autonomy support, autonomy, competence, and relatedness, as well as TpB measures relevant to PA&E on intention, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. Correlational techniques and canonical correlation analysis were performed to examine the relationships and variance within and between theoretical dimensions. Overall, the SDT set accounted for 37% of the TpB variance and the TpB set accounted for 32% of the SDT set variance. The results indicate there are statistical similarities and differences between concepts in SDT and TpB models for PA&E. Using both empirical guidance and clinical expertise, researchers and practitioners should attempt to select and integrate non-redundant and complementary components from SDT, TpB, and other related health behavior theories.

  15. AN ACTIVITY THEORY PERSPECTIVE ON STUDENT-REPORTED CONTRADICTIONS IN INTERNATIONAL TELECOLLABORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga K. Basharina

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This process-oriented study focuses on contradictions that emerged in a WebCT bulletin board collaboration among English learners from Japan, Mexico and Russia, and explains them from the perspective of activity theory (Leont’ev, 1978, 1981; Engeström, 1987, 1999. The study identified a two intra-cultural contradictions – to post or not to post, to sound formal or informal; b three inter-cultural contradictions – unequal contribution, genre clash/plagiarism, clash of topic choice; and c three technology-related contradictions – message overload as hindering community formation, bulletin board as too "slow" when compared to chat, and names and gender confusion. These contradictions were catalyzed by the clash of curricula versus interactive learning paradigms (Lemke, 1998: the outcomes of different cultures-of-use of computer technologies (Thorne, 2003, instructors’ mediation, and resources available to learners within their broader socio-cultural contexts. The study concludes with a discussion of whether the learning paradigms can be bridged and cultures-of-use of computer technologies aligned.

  16. Active control of the spatial MRI phase distribution with optimal control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Pauline M.; Van Reeth, Eric; Ratiney, Hélène; Beuf, Olivier; Brusseau, Elisabeth; Lambert, Simon A.; Glaser, Steffen J.; Sugny, Dominique; Grenier, Denis; Tse Ve Koon, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the use of Optimal Control (OC) theory to design Radio-Frequency (RF) pulses that actively control the spatial distribution of the MRI magnetization phase. The RF pulses are generated through the application of the Pontryagin Maximum Principle and optimized so that the resulting transverse magnetization reproduces various non-trivial and spatial phase patterns. Two different phase patterns are defined and the resulting optimal pulses are tested both numerically with the ODIN MRI simulator and experimentally with an agar gel phantom on a 4.7 T small-animal MR scanner. Phase images obtained in simulations and experiments are both consistent with the defined phase patterns. A practical application of phase control with OC-designed pulses is also presented, with the generation of RF pulses adapted for a Magnetic Resonance Elastography experiment. This study demonstrates the possibility to use OC-designed RF pulses to encode information in the magnetization phase and could have applications in MRI sequences using phase images.

  17. Carbon dioxide adsorption and activation on Ceria (110): A density functional theory study

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Zhuo; Lo, Cynthia S

    2012-01-01

    Ceria (CeO2) is a promising catalyst for the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to liquid fuels and commodity chemicals, in part because of its high oxygen storage capacity, yet the fundamentals of CO2 adsorption and initial activation on CeO2 surfaces remain largely unknown. We use density functional theory, corrected for onsite Coulombic interactions (DFT+U), to explore various adsorption sites and configurations for CO2 on stoichiometric and reduced CeO2 (110). Our model of reduced CeO2 (110) contains oxygen vacancies at the topmost atomic layer and undergoes surface reconstruction upon introduction of these vacancies. We find that CO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 (110) is thermodynamically favored over the corresponding adsorption on stoichiometric CeO2 (110). The most stable adsorption configuration consists of CO2 adsorbed parallel to the reduced CeO2 (110) surface, with the molecule situated near the site of the oxygen vacancy. Structural changes in the CO2 molecule are also observed upon adsorption, so t...

  18. Pregnant women's perceptions of weight gain, physical activity, and nutrition using Theory of Planned Behavior constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Kara M; Wilcox, Sara; Liu, Jihong; Blair, Steven N; Pate, Russell R

    2016-02-01

    A better understanding of women's perceptions of weight gain and related behaviors during pregnancy is necessary to inform behavioral interventions. We used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to examine pregnant women's perceptions and intentions toward weight gain, physical activity (PA), and nutrition using a mixed methods study design. Women between 20 and 30 weeks gestation (n = 189) were recruited to complete an Internet-based survey. Salient beliefs toward weight gain, PA, and nutrition were captured through open-ended responses and content analyzed into themes. TPB constructs (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, intentions) were examined using Pearson correlations and hierarchical linear regression models. Salient beliefs were consistent with the existing literature in non-pregnant populations, with the addition of many pregnancy-specific beliefs. TPB constructs accounted for 23-39 % of the variance in weight gain, PA, and nutrition intentions, and made varying contributions across outcomes. The TPB is a useful framework for examining women's weight-related intentions during pregnancy. Study implications for intervention development are discussed.

  19. Social cognitive theory and physical activity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M D; Plotnikoff, R C; Collins, C E; Callister, R; Morgan, P J

    2014-12-01

    This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to explain physical activity (PA)?; (ii) Is the effectiveness of SCT moderated by sample or methodological characteristics? and (iii) What is the frequency of significant associations between the core SCT constructs and PA? Ten electronic databases were searched with no date or sample restrictions. Forty-four studies were retrieved containing 55 SCT models of PA. Methodological quality was assessed using a standardized tool. A random-effects meta-analysis revealed that SCT accounted for 31% of the variance in PA. However, methodological quality was mostly poor for these models. Methodological quality and sample age moderated the PA effect size, with increases in both associated with greater variance explained. Although self-efficacy and goals were consistently associated with PA, outcome expectations and socio-structural factors were not. This review determined that SCT is a useful framework to explain PA behaviour. Higher quality models explained more PA variance, but overall methodological quality was poor. As such, high-quality studies examining the utility of SCT to explain PA are warranted.

  20. Theory of activated dynamics and glass transition of hard colloids in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Hui-shu; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2014-03-07

    The microscopic nonlinear Langevin equation theory is applied to study the localization and activated hopping of two-dimensional hard disks in the deeply supercooled and glass states. Quantitative comparisons of dynamic characteristic length scales, barrier, and their dependence on the reduced packing fraction are presented between hard-disk and hard-sphere suspensions. The dynamic barrier of hard disks emerges at higher absolute and reduced packing fractions and correspondingly, the crossover size of the dynamic cage which correlates to the Lindemann length for melting is smaller. The localization lengths of both hard disks and spheres decrease exponentially with packing fraction. Larger localization length of hard disks than that of hard spheres is found at the same reduced packing fraction. The relaxation time of hard disks rises dramatically above the reduced packing fraction of 0.88, which leads to lower reduced packing fraction at the kinetic glass transition than that of hard spheres. The present work provides a foundation for the subsequent study of the glass transition of binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard disks, normally adopted in experiments and simulations to avoid crystallization, and further, the rheology and mechanical response of the two-dimensional glassy colloidal systems.

  1. Adsorption Study of Methane on Activated Meso-carbon Microbeads by Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO, Xiao-Hong(邵晓红); HUANG, Shi-Ping(黄世萍); SHEN, Zhi-Gang(沈志刚); CHEN, Jian-Feng(陈建峰)

    2004-01-01

    A combined method of density functional theory (DFT) and statistics integral equation (SIE) for the determination of the pore size distribution (PSD) is developed based on the experimental adsorption data of nitrogen on activated mesocarbon microbead (AMCMB) at 77 K. The pores of AMCMB are described as slit-shaped with PSD. Based on the PSD, methane adsorption and phase behavior are studied by the DFT method. Both nitrogen and methane molecules are modeled as Lennard-Jones spherical molecules, and the well-known Steele's 10-4-3 potential is used to represent the interaction between the fluid molecule and the solid wall. In order to test the combined method and the PSD model, the Intelligent Gravimetric Analyzer (IGA-003) was used to measure the adsorption of methane on the AMCMB. The DFT results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Based on these facts, we predict the adsorption amount of methane, which can reach 32.3 w at 299 K and 4 MPa. The results indicate that the AMCMBs are a good candidate for adsorptive storage of methane and natural gas. In addition, the capillary condensation and hysteresis phenomenon of methane are also observed at 74.05 K.

  2. Schilder and Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity. A critique and apologia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, G

    1991-01-01

    In the late 1920s, the Viennese psychoanalyst Paul Schilder, after performing a conditioning experiment with human subjects, criticized I. P. Pavlov's concept of "experimental neurosis." Schilder maintained that subjective reports by conditioned human subjects were more informative than the objectively observed behavior of conditioned dogs. In 1932, Pavlov published a rejoinder to Schilder's critique in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Pavlov maintained that Schilder misunderstood the value and implications of the scientific, objective method in the study of experimental neurosis. In 1934, Schilder subjected Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity to an incisive critique in a 1935 article in Imago. Schilder objected to Pavlov's narrow, reductionist conceptualization of the conditional reflex. Schilder reiterated his view that the psychological, subjective explanation of the conditional reflex is preferable to the physiological, objective explanation, and that the inference of cortical phenomena from experimental findings might be improper. Neither Pavlov nor any of his disciples replied to Schilder. The author provides an apology for the Pavlovian position, suggesting that Schilder was unfamiliar with early and late writings of Pavlov.

  3. Chinese Tourists’ Perceptions of Climate Change and Mitigation Behavior: An Application of Norm Activation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiqiang Qiao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that tourism development is a prominent contributor to climate change, but is also a “victim” of climate change. Therefore, to mitigate climate change is of great importance for the sustainability of tourism. Yet extant studies regarding tourism and climate change tend to be dominated by a supply-side stance, albeit the core role of the tourist in the tourism industry. While researchers are increasingly adopting a tourist perspective, few seek to understand the linkage between climate change and tourists’ specific mitigation behaviors in a tourism context; this is especially so in China. This study investigates the impact of Chinese tourists’ perceptions of climate change on their mitigation behaviors based on norm activation theory. Drawing on 557 self-administrated questionnaires collected in China, it finds that tourists’ perceptions of climate change and perceived contribution of tourism to climate change both positively affect energy saving and carbon reduction behavior in tourism. Yet, compared with perceived contribution of tourism to climate change, tourists’ perceptions of climate change are found to be a much stronger predictor for energy saving and carbon reduction behavior. Therefore, it suggests that tourists’ perceptions of climate change in a general context is more strongly related to climate change mitigation behavior in tourism, calling for attention to go beyond the tourism context to alleviate the negative impacts of tourism on climate change.

  4. Exercise, physical activity, and self-determination theory: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Motivation is a critical factor in supporting sustained exercise, which in turn is associated with important health outcomes. Accordingly, research on exercise motivation from the perspective of self-determination theory (SDT) has grown considerably in recent years. Previous reviews have been mostly narrative and theoretical. Aiming at a more comprehensive review of empirical data, this article examines the empirical literature on the relations between key SDT-based constructs and exercise and physical activity behavioral outcomes. Methods This systematic review includes 66 empirical studies published up to June 2011, including experimental, cross-sectional, and prospective studies that have measured exercise causality orientations, autonomy/need support and need satisfaction, exercise motives (or goal contents), and exercise self-regulations and motivation. We also studied SDT-based interventions aimed at increasing exercise behavior. In all studies, actual or self-reported exercise/physical activity, including attendance, was analyzed as the dependent variable. Findings are summarized based on quantitative analysis of the evidence. Results The results show consistent support for a positive relation between more autonomous forms of motivation and exercise, with a trend towards identified regulation predicting initial/short-term adoption more strongly than intrinsic motivation, and intrinsic motivation being more predictive of long-term exercise adherence. The literature is also consistent in that competence satisfaction and more intrinsic motives positively predict exercise participation across a range of samples and settings. Mixed evidence was found concerning the role of other types of motives (e.g., health/fitness and body-related), and also the specific nature and consequences of introjected regulation. The majority of studies have employed descriptive (i.e., non-experimental) designs but similar results are found across cross

  5. Exercise, physical activity, and self-determination theory: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro J; Carraça, Eliana V; Markland, David; Silva, Marlene N; Ryan, Richard M

    2012-06-22

    Motivation is a critical factor in supporting sustained exercise, which in turn is associated with important health outcomes. Accordingly, research on exercise motivation from the perspective of self-determination theory (SDT) has grown considerably in recent years. Previous reviews have been mostly narrative and theoretical. Aiming at a more comprehensive review of empirical data, this article examines the empirical literature on the relations between key SDT-based constructs and exercise and physical activity behavioral outcomes. This systematic review includes 66 empirical studies published up to June 2011, including experimental, cross-sectional, and prospective studies that have measured exercise causality orientations, autonomy/need support and need satisfaction, exercise motives (or goal contents), and exercise self-regulations and motivation. We also studied SDT-based interventions aimed at increasing exercise behavior. In all studies, actual or self-reported exercise/physical activity, including attendance, was analyzed as the dependent variable. Findings are summarized based on quantitative analysis of the evidence. The results show consistent support for a positive relation between more autonomous forms of motivation and exercise, with a trend towards identified regulation predicting initial/short-term adoption more strongly than intrinsic motivation, and intrinsic motivation being more predictive of long-term exercise adherence. The literature is also consistent in that competence satisfaction and more intrinsic motives positively predict exercise participation across a range of samples and settings. Mixed evidence was found concerning the role of other types of motives (e.g., health/fitness and body-related), and also the specific nature and consequences of introjected regulation. The majority of studies have employed descriptive (i.e., non-experimental) designs but similar results are found across cross-sectional, prospective, and experimental designs

  6. Exercise, physical activity, and self-determination theory: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Pedro J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motivation is a critical factor in supporting sustained exercise, which in turn is associated with important health outcomes. Accordingly, research on exercise motivation from the perspective of self-determination theory (SDT has grown considerably in recent years. Previous reviews have been mostly narrative and theoretical. Aiming at a more comprehensive review of empirical data, this article examines the empirical literature on the relations between key SDT-based constructs and exercise and physical activity behavioral outcomes. Methods This systematic review includes 66 empirical studies published up to June 2011, including experimental, cross-sectional, and prospective studies that have measured exercise causality orientations, autonomy/need support and need satisfaction, exercise motives (or goal contents, and exercise self-regulations and motivation. We also studied SDT-based interventions aimed at increasing exercise behavior. In all studies, actual or self-reported exercise/physical activity, including attendance, was analyzed as the dependent variable. Findings are summarized based on quantitative analysis of the evidence. Results The results show consistent support for a positive relation between more autonomous forms of motivation and exercise, with a trend towards identified regulation predicting initial/short-term adoption more strongly than intrinsic motivation, and intrinsic motivation being more predictive of long-term exercise adherence. The literature is also consistent in that competence satisfaction and more intrinsic motives positively predict exercise participation across a range of samples and settings. Mixed evidence was found concerning the role of other types of motives (e.g., health/fitness and body-related, and also the specific nature and consequences of introjected regulation. The majority of studies have employed descriptive (i.e., non-experimental designs but similar results are found across

  7. Vision restoration after brain and retina damage: the "residual vision activation theory".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Bernhard A; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Fedorov, Anton; Gall, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Vision loss after retinal or cerebral visual injury (CVI) was long considered to be irreversible. However, there is considerable potential for vision restoration and recovery even in adulthood. Here, we propose the "residual vision activation theory" of how visual functions can be reactivated and restored. CVI is usually not complete, but some structures are typically spared by the damage. They include (i) areas of partial damage at the visual field border, (ii) "islands" of surviving tissue inside the blind field, (iii) extrastriate pathways unaffected by the damage, and (iv) downstream, higher-level neuronal networks. However, residual structures have a triple handicap to be fully functional: (i) fewer neurons, (ii) lack of sufficient attentional resources because of the dominant intact hemisphere caused by excitation/inhibition dysbalance, and (iii) disturbance in their temporal processing. Because of this resulting activation loss, residual structures are unable to contribute much to everyday vision, and their "non-use" further impairs synaptic strength. However, residual structures can be reactivated by engaging them in repetitive stimulation by different means: (i) visual experience, (ii) visual training, or (iii) noninvasive electrical brain current stimulation. These methods lead to strengthening of synaptic transmission and synchronization of partially damaged structures (within-systems plasticity) and downstream neuronal networks (network plasticity). Just as in normal perceptual learning, synaptic plasticity can improve vision and lead to vision restoration. This can be induced at any time after the lesion, at all ages and in all types of visual field impairments after retinal or brain damage (stroke, neurotrauma, glaucoma, amblyopia, age-related macular degeneration). If and to what extent vision restoration can be achieved is a function of the amount of residual tissue and its activation state. However, sustained improvements require repetitive

  8. Information sharing and organizational knowledge production in two Finnish firms: an exploration using activity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunilla Widén-Wulff

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this paper, we discuss the link between information sharing and organizational knowledge production in two very different organizations - a company that handles insurance claims and a small entrepreneurial hi-tech company. We suggest that this link has not been adequately addressed by studies of information behaviour, though a number of recent papers (e.g. Wilson, 2005; Bartlett and Toms, 2005 have proposed that human information behaviour research should appropriate methods from workplace studies and CSCW to provide a richer account of organizational information and knowledge work. Method. Two case studies of sharing practices in Finnish firms were carried out. Analysis. The version of activity theory that has been developed by Engeström (1999 and other Finnish researchers (Kuutti, 1996 was used to analyse the data. This has provided highly specific accounts of information sharing as a constituent of the varied processes that contribute to the development of organizational knowledge. Results. The overall analysis has allowed us to explain how and why organizational information sharing happens in terms that go beyond the cognitive and descriptive accounts (e.g. Widen-Wulff and Ginman, 2004; Widen-Wulff and Davenport, 2005; ; Widen-Wulff, 2006 of our earlier studies. Conclusion. . Information behaviour is a repertoire of actions and operations and judgements about timing and ethics that are brought into play across work cycles and routines. From this perspective, the duality of organizational knowledge becomes clear: it is both individual and collective judgements about how to behave, and the incremental outcome of these judgements, embedded in decisions that support the objects of activity systems.

  9. SIMULATION OF DRIVER’S LOCOMOTIVE-HANDLING ACTIVITY USING THE THEORY OF FUZZY GRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Butko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The efficiency and safety of locomotive control improving is important and relevant scientific and practical problem. Every driver during the trains-handling bases on his experience and knowledge, that is why the compilation and detection the most efficient ways to control the locomotive-handling is one of the stages of measures development to reduce transportation costs. The purpose of this paper is a formalization process description of locomotive-handling and quality parameters determination of this process. Methodology. In order to achieve this goal the theory of fuzzy probabilistic graphs was used. Vertices of the graph correspond to the events start and end operations at train-handling. The graph arcs describe operations on train-handling. Graph consists of thirteen peaks corresponding to the main control actions of the engine-driver. The weighting factors of transitions between vertices are assigned by fuzzy numbers. Their values were obtained by expert estimates. Fuzzy probabilities and transition time are presented as numbers with trapezoidal membership function. Findings. Using successive merging of parallel arcs, loops and vertices elimination, the equivalent fuzzy graph of train-handling and the corresponding L-matrix were obtained. Equivalent graph takes into account separately activity of the driver during normal operation and during emergency situations. Originality. The theoretical foundations of describing process formalization in driver’s locomotive-handling activity were developed using the fuzzy probabilistic graph. The parameters characterizing the decision-making process of engineer were obtained. Practical value. With the resulting model it is possible to estimate the available reserves for the quality improvement of locomotive-handling. Reduction in the time for decision-making will lead to the approximation the current mode of control to the rational one and decrease costs of hauling operations. And reduction

  10. How media campaigns influence children's physical activity: expanding the normative mechanisms of the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Hye-Jin; Oh, Hyun Jung; Hove, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study explicates mechanisms of media campaign effectiveness in the context of children's physical activity. The authors' model expands the theory of planned behavior by integrating injunctive and descriptive norms into its normative mechanism. Analysis of a 3-wave nationally representative evaluation survey among 1,623 tweens indicates that campaign exposure is significantly related, but only indirectly, to both physical activity intention and physical activity behavior. Instead, campaign exposure seems more strongly related to perceived behavioral control and attitudes toward physical activity. By contrast, perceived behavioral control and descriptive norms are strongly related to behavioral intention. The findings suggest that integrating normative mechanisms with the theory of planned behavior can improve efforts to predict and explain a health behavior.

  11. Applying an Activity Theory Lens to Designing Instruction for Learning about the Structure, Behavior, and Function of a Honeybee System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study in which activity theory was used to design, implement, and analyze a 10-week curriculum unit about how honeybees collect nectar with a particular focus on complex systems concepts. Students (n = 42) in a multi-year kindergarten and 1st-grade classroom participated in this study as part of their 10 regular classroom…

  12. Using Activity Theory to Understand Prospective Teachers' Attitudes to and Construction of Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate professional development, including that initial teacher training, is regarded as a cornerstone of the development of inclusive education. This research is concerned with prospective teachers' conceptualisations of terms such as "disability" and "special education". Activity theory is proposed as a lens through which to consider the…

  13. Understanding Physical Activity Behavior in African American and Caucasian College Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Chris; Fisher, Janet; Sparling, Phil; Nehl, Erich; Rhodes, Ryan; Courneya, Kerry; Baker, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Only 30% of college students meet the recommended amount of physical activity (PA) for health benefits, and this number is lower for African American students. Moreover, the correlates of PA may vary by ethnicity. Objective: In the present study, the authors tested the utility of the theory of planned behavior for explaining PA intentions and…

  14. Gender Differences in College Leisure Time Physical Activity: Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior and Integrated Behavioral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beville, Jill M.; Umstattd Meyer, M. Renée; Usdan, Stuart L.; Turner, Lori W.; Jackson, John C.; Lian, Brad E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: National data consistently report that males participate in leisure time physical activity (LTPA) at higher rates than females. This study expanded previous research to examine gender differences in LTPA of college students using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) by including 2 additional constructs, descriptive norm and…

  15. Gender Differences in College Leisure Time Physical Activity: Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior and Integrated Behavioral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beville, Jill M.; Umstattd Meyer, M. Renée; Usdan, Stuart L.; Turner, Lori W.; Jackson, John C.; Lian, Brad E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: National data consistently report that males participate in leisure time physical activity (LTPA) at higher rates than females. This study expanded previous research to examine gender differences in LTPA of college students using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) by including 2 additional constructs, descriptive norm and…

  16. Understanding Physical Activity Behavior in African American and Caucasian College Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Chris; Fisher, Janet; Sparling, Phil; Nehl, Erich; Rhodes, Ryan; Courneya, Kerry; Baker, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Only 30% of college students meet the recommended amount of physical activity (PA) for health benefits, and this number is lower for African American students. Moreover, the correlates of PA may vary by ethnicity. Objective: In the present study, the authors tested the utility of the theory of planned behavior for explaining PA intentions and…

  17. Sociocultural Dynamics of ESL Learning (De)Motivation: An Activity Theory Analysis of Two Adult Korean Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the longitudinal trajectories of two Korean ESL immigrants' L2 learning motivation from an Activity Theory perspective. Two highly skilled immigrants participated in monthly semistructured interviews over a period of 10 months. The research questions are as follows: (1) How does the relationship between ESL learners and their…

  18. Applied PhD Research in a Work-Based Environment: An Activity Theory-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, S. N.; Dochy, F.

    2016-01-01

    Activity theory is used to compare PhD undertaken at university, that is, academic PhD, with PhD performed in collaboration with industry, that is, semi-industrial PhD. The research is divided into a literature review and a case study. Semi-industrial and academic PhD are modelled as activity systems, and differences are highlighted in terms of…

  19. Insights from Skill Acquisition Theory for Grammar Activity Sequencing and Design in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a framework for the elaboration of Foreign Language Teaching (FLT) grammar materials for adults based on the application to SLA of Skill Acquisition Theory (SAT). This theory is argued to compensate for the major drawbacks of FLT settings in comparison with second language contexts (lack of classroom learning time and limited…

  20. Application of viability theory for road vehicle active safety during cornering manoeuvres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandanjon, P.-O.; Coiret, A.; Lorino, T.

    2014-02-01

    Viability theory proposes geometric metaphors in addition to classical ordinary differential equation analysis. In this paper, advantages of applying viability theory to road safety domain are presented. The exact issue is to determine if, from an initial state of a vehicle/road/driver system, a soft controls strategy is compatible with a safe driving sequence. The case of a car negotiating a curve is considered. The application of the viability theory to this issue offers the advantage to avoid classical full computing of the system. Instead of that, it consists on verifying that the states and the controls belong to a subset called the viability kernel. The construction and the use of the viability kernel for a vehicle system dynamic is proposed by using support vector machines algorithm. Then, the applicability of this theory is demonstrated through experimental tests. This innovative application of the viability theory to vehicle dynamics with road safety concerns could benefit to robust embedded warning systems.

  1. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent eld theory: Formulation and application to laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    We have developed a new theoretical framework for time-dependent many-electron problems named time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent field (TD-RASSCF) theory. The theory generalizes the multicongurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by truncating the expansion...

  2. Theory of activated-rate processes under shear with application to shear-induced aggregation of colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Gentili, Daniele; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Using an approximation scheme within the convective diffusion (two-body Smoluchowski) equation framework, we unveil the shear-driven aggregation mechanism at the origin of structure formation in sheared colloidal systems. The theory, verified against numerics and experiments, explains the induction time followed by explosive (irreversible) rise of viscosity observed in charge-stabilized colloidal and protein systems under steady shear. The Arrhenius-type equation with shear derived here, extending Kramers' theory in the presence of shear, clearly demonstrates the important role of shear drive in activated-rate processes as they are encountered in soft condensed matter.

  3. The effect of theory-based interventions on physical activity participation among overweight/obese individuals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger-Gravel, A; Godin, G; Vézina-Im, L-A; Amireault, S; Poirier, P

    2011-06-01

    Little attention has been paid to the evaluation of the long-term impact of theory-based interventions on physical activity participation among overweight/obese individuals after the interventions have ended. The primary aim of this systematic review was to investigate the long-term effectiveness of theory-based interventions increasing physical activity and identify the most effective techniques for behaviour change among overweight/obese individuals. The secondary aim was to investigate the effect of these interventions on theoretical variables. Eighteen studies were reviewed. Among these studies, three reported significant short-term and two long-term effects of interventions on physical activity participation. Most of the studies observed a significant short- or long-term effect of time on this behaviour. Theoretical frameworks most often applied included the Behavioural Model and the Social Learning/Cognitive Theory. However, few of the studies reported any impact on theoretical variables. The most prevalent techniques consisted of providing opportunities for social comparison and instruction as well as self-monitoring. Leading techniques differentiating the experimental group from the control group included prompting practice and intentions formation and barriers identification. Although the combination of these three techniques appears successful, the long-term impact of theory-based interventions remains ambiguous.

  4. The theory of active involvement: processes underlying interventions that engage adolescents in message planning and/or production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of increased risk taking, and recent intervention strategies have included adolescents planning or producing antirisk messages for their peers. Although these projects may generate enthusiasm, we know little about message planning or production as a strategy for changing adolescent decision-making and behavior. This article articulates the Theory of Active Involvement (TAI) to describe and explain the processes through which these active involvement interventions influence adolescents. TAI is based on social cognitive theory's notion of self-regulation and examines multiple perspective taking and activating the self-reflection processes. The theory specifically describes the process of cognitive changes experienced by participants in active involvement interventions. The sequence is conceptualized as starting when engagement with the intervention (arousal and involvement) produces skill and knowledge gains (immediate outcomes) that lead to reflection (perceived discrepancy) and then other cognitions (expectancies, norms, intentions), with the ultimate outcome being behavior change. Engaging the target audience in a process of self-reflection is conceptualized as the crucial ingredient for meaningful and sustainable change in cognitions and behavior. This article provides valuable insight into how active involvement strategies function and how to best design these interventions, particularly those targeting adolescents.

  5. A coupled theory for chemically active and deformable solids with mass diffusion and heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhong, Zheng

    2017-10-01

    To analyse the frequently encountered thermo-chemo-mechanical problems in chemically active material applications, we develop a thermodynamically-consistent continuum theory of coupled deformation, mass diffusion, heat conduction and chemical reaction. Basic balance equations of force, mass and energy are presented at first, and then fully coupled constitutive laws interpreting multi-field interactions and evolving equations governing irreversible fluxes are constructed according to the energy dissipation inequality and the chemical kinetics. To consider the essential distinction between mass diffusion and chemical reactions in affecting free energy and dissipations of a highly coupled system, we regard both the concentrations of diffusive species and the extent of reaction as independent state variables. This new formulation then distinguishes between the energy contribution from the diffusive species entering the solid and that from the subsequent chemical reactions occurring among these species and the host solid, which not only interact with stresses or strains in different manners and on different time scales, but also induce different variations of solid microstructures and material properties. Taking advantage of this new description, we further establish a specialized isothermal model to predict precisely the transient chemo-mechanical response of a swelling solid with a proposed volumetric constraint that accounts for material incompressibility. Coupled kinetics is incorporated to capture the volumetric swelling of the solid caused by imbibition of external species and the simultaneous dilation arised from chemical reactions between the diffusing species and the solid. The model is then exemplified with two numerical examples of transient swelling accompanied by chemical reaction. Various ratios of characteristic times of diffusion and chemical reaction are taken into account to shed light on the dependency on kinetic time scales of evolution patterns for

  6. A Lyapunov Stability Theory-Based Control Strategy for Three-Level Shunt Active Power Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijia Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-phase three-wire neutral-point-clamped shunt active power filter (NPC-SAPF, which most adopts classical closed-loop feedback control methods such as proportional-integral (PI, proportional-resonant (PR and repetitive control, can only output 1st–25th harmonic currents with 10–20 kHz switching frequency. The reason for this is that the controller design must make a compromise between system stability and harmonic current compensation ability under the condition of less than 20 kHz switching frequency. To broaden the bandwidth of the compensation current, a Lyapunov stability theory-based control strategy is presented in this paper for NPC-SAPF. The proposed control law is obtained by constructing the switching function on the basis of the mathematical model and the Lyapunov candidate function, which can avoid introducing closed-loop feedback control and keep the system globally asymptotically stable. By means of the proposed method, the NPC-SAPF has compensation ability for the 1st–50th harmonic currents, the total harmonic distortion (THD and each harmonic content of grid currents satisfy the requirements of IEEE Standard 519-2014. In order to verify the superiority of the proposed control strategy, stability conditions of the proposed strategy and the representative PR controllers are compared. The simulation results in MATLAB/Simulink (MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA and the experimental results obtained on a 6.6 kVA NPC-SAPF laboratory prototype validate the proposed control strategy.

  7. We are what we do: Examining learner-generated content in the anatomy laboratory through the lens of activity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Alison F; Wille, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Video and photography are often used for delivering content within the anatomical sciences. However, instructors typically produce these resources to provide instructional or procedural information. Although the benefits of learner-generated content have been explored within educational research, virtually no studies have investigated the use of learner-generated video and photograph content within anatomy dissection laboratories. This study outlines an activity involving learner-generated video diaries and learner-generated photograph assignments produced during anatomy laboratory sessions. The learner-generated photographs and videos provided instructors with a means of formative assessment and allowed instructors to identify evidence of collaborative behavior in the laboratory. Student questionnaires (n = 21) and interviews (n = 5), as well as in-class observations, were conducted to examine student perspectives on the laboratory activities. The quantitative and qualitative data were examined using the framework of activity theory to identify contradictions between student expectations of, and engagement with, the activity and the actual experiences of the students. Results indicate that learner-generated photograph and video content can act as a rich source of data on student learning processes and can be used for formative assessment, for observing collaborative behavior, and as a starting point for class discussions. This study stresses the idea that technology choice for activities must align with instructional goals. This research also highlights the utility of activity theory as a framework for assessing classroom and laboratory activities, demonstrating that this approach can guide the development of laboratory activities.

  8. Theory of planned behaviour cognitions do not predict self-reported or objective physical activity levels or change in the ProActive trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeman, Wendy; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Michie, Susan; Sutton, Stephen

    2011-02-01

    The objective was to test, in a trial cohort of sedentary adults at risk of Type 2 diabetes, whether theory of planned behaviour (TPB) cognitions about becoming more physically active predicted objective and self-reported activity levels and change. Participants of a randomized controlled trial underwent measurement at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Participants (N= 365, 30-50 years) were recruited via their parent or family history registers at 20 general practices in the UK. Energy expenditure was measured objectively at baseline and 1 year. Participants completed questionnaires assessing physical activity and beliefs about becoming more physically active over the next year at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Between baseline and 12 months, objective energy expenditure in the cohort increased by an average of 20 minutes of brisk walking per day. Based on the 252 participants who provided complete data, affective attitude and perceived behavioural control consistently predicted intention, but intention and perceived behavioural control failed to predict physical activity levels or change (p-values > .05). Failure of the theory to predict behaviour and behaviour change may be due to inapplicability of the theory to this at-risk population or to trial participation and intensive measurement facilitating behaviour change without affecting measured cognitions, or lack of correspondence between cognitive and behavioural measures. A wide range of potential personal and environmental mediators should be considered when designing physical activity interventions among at-risk groups. High-quality experimental tests of the theory are needed in clinical populations. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Short- and Long-Term Theory-Based Predictors of Physical Activity in Women Who Participated in a Weight-Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserkampf, A.; Silva, M. N.; Santos, I. C.; Carraça, E. V.; Meis, J. J. M.; Kremers, S. P. J.; Teixeira, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed psychosocial predictors of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and evaluated their associations with short- and long-term moderate plus vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and lifestyle physical activity (PA) outcomes in women who underwent a weight-management program. 221 participants (age…

  10. Short- and Long-Term Theory-Based Predictors of Physical Activity in Women Who Participated in a Weight-Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserkampf, A.; Silva, M. N.; Santos, I. C.; Carraça, E. V.; Meis, J. J. M.; Kremers, S. P. J.; Teixeira, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed psychosocial predictors of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and evaluated their associations with short- and long-term moderate plus vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and lifestyle physical activity (PA) outcomes in women who underwent a weight-management program. 221 participants (age…

  11. The Moderating Effect of Psychological Contract Violation on the Relationship between Narcissism and Outcomes: An Application of Trait Activation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Zagenczyk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We use trait activation and psychological contracts theories to build the argument that narcissism is a personality trait that will manifest itself in the form of exit and neglect when employees experience psychological contract violation. To test our hypotheses, we surveyed 262 employees from a wide array of industries working in different organizations at two points in time. Our results indicate that violation moderated the relationship between narcissism and exit such that narcissistic employees who experienced high levels of violation had higher levels of exit. However, we did not find support for our prediction regarding neglect. The findings suggest that the importance of narcissism at work may be contingent on the situation. Our study contributes to research on narcissism in the workplace, trait activation theory, and the role that individual differences play in shaping employee responses to psychological contract violation.

  12. The Moderating Effect of Psychological Contract Violation on the Relationship between Narcissism and Outcomes: An Application of Trait Activation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagenczyk, Thomas J.; Smallfield, Jarvis; Scott, Kristin L.; Galloway, Bret; Purvis, Russell L.

    2017-01-01

    We use trait activation and psychological contracts theories to build the argument that narcissism is a personality trait that will manifest itself in the form of exit and neglect when employees experience psychological contract violation. To test our hypotheses, we surveyed 262 employees from a wide array of industries working in different organizations at two points in time. Our results indicate that violation moderated the relationship between narcissism and exit such that narcissistic employees who experienced high levels of violation had higher levels of exit. However, we did not find support for our prediction regarding neglect. The findings suggest that the importance of narcissism at work may be contingent on the situation. Our study contributes to research on narcissism in the workplace, trait activation theory, and the role that individual differences play in shaping employee responses to psychological contract violation. PMID:28713315

  13. Activity Theory as a Theoretical Framework for Health Self-Quantification: A Systematic Review of Empirical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Manal; Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2016-05-27

    Self-quantification (SQ) is a way of working in which, by using tracking tools, people aim to collect, manage, and reflect on personal health data to gain a better understanding of their own body, health behavior, and interaction with the world around them. However, health SQ lacks a formal framework for describing the self-quantifiers' activities and their contextual components or constructs to pursue these health related goals. Establishing such framework is important because it is the first step to operationalize health SQ fully. This may in turn help to achieve the aims of health professionals and researchers who seek to make or study changes in the self-quantifiers' health systematically. The aim of this study was to review studies on health SQ in order to answer the following questions: What are the general features of the work and the particular activities that self-quantifiers perform to achieve their health objectives? What constructs of health SQ have been identified in the scientific literature? How have these studies described such constructs? How would it be possible to model these constructs theoretically to characterize the work of health SQ? A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature was conducted. A total of 26 empirical studies were included. The content of these studies was thematically analyzed using Activity Theory as an organizing framework. The literature provided varying descriptions of health SQ as data-driven and objective-oriented work mediated by SQ tools. From the literature, we identified two types of SQ work: work on data (ie, data management activities) and work with data (ie, health management activities). Using Activity Theory, these activities could be characterized into 6 constructs: users, tracking tools, health objectives, division of work, community or group setting, and SQ plan and rules. We could not find a reference to any single study that accounted for all these activities and constructs of health SQ activity. A

  14. Effects of an intervention based on self-determination theory on self-reported leisure-time physical activity participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Hagger, Martin S

    2009-01-01

    Based on self-determination theory, the present study developed and evaluated the utility a school-based intervention to change pupils' physical activity intentions and self-reported leisure-time physical activity behaviour. The study evaluated utility of the intervention to promote physical activity participation over a 5-week interval of time. A cluster randomised design targeting 215 pupils from 10 schools with schools as the unit of randomisation was adopted (Male = 106, Female = 109, Age = 14.84, SD = 0.48). Results indicated that pupils who were taught by autonomy-supportive teachers reported stronger intentions to exercise during leisure time and participated more frequently in leisure-time physical activities than pupils in the control condition. Autonomous motivation and intentions mediated the effects of the intervention on self-reported physical activity behaviour. It is concluded that self-determination theory provides a useful framework for the development of school-based interventions that ultimately affect leisure-time physical activity participation.

  15. Prospects for Research Training Activities in the Context of the Problems of the Modern Practice of Primary School.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruzhapov V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the current problems of research training activities in terms of the requirements of the Federal state educational standard of primary education. The initial methodological basis for the formulation of the problems is the theory of developmental education by Davydov and his followers. The article raises the question of the possibility of using the ideas of Dewey and Maslow to develop research training activities. There is the analysis of such subjects as formulating and performing learning tasks as a way of mastering theoretical knowledge in «from abstract to particular» microcycle; the content of theoretical generalizations formed before training activities (naive scientific concepts; forms of assimilation into the collective training activities; forms of cooperation in teaching and project activities; the content and form of requirements for training activities. Possible practical use of the study results are described. This area provides a lot of topics for Master’s thesis in the “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” research Master’s program

  16. Investigating Language Learning Activity Using a CALL Task in the Self-access Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Montoro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a small study of the language learning activity of individual learners using a CALL task in a self-access environment. The research focuses on the nature of the language learning activity, the most salient elements that make up its structure and major disturbances observed between and within some of those elements. It is set in the context of computer-assisted language learning (CALL and activity theory. A CALL task designed by the authors was made available online to be used as a research and learning tool. Empirical data was collected from two participants using ethnographic tools, such as participant observation and stimulated recall sessions. The analysis focuses on disturbances mainly involving the subject (i.e., the learner, mediating artefacts (e.g., the CALL task, the community (e.g., management and other self-access centre users and the object of the activity (i.e., learning English. It is recommended that future studies should look deeper into contradictions in the learning activity from a cultural-historical perspective.

  17. Teaching Theory X and Theory Y in Organizational Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Carey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the activity described here is to integrate McGregor's Theory X and Theory Y into a group application: design a syllabus that embodies either Theory X or Theory Y tenets. Students should be able to differentiate between Theory X and Theory Y, create a syllabus based on Theory X or Theory Y tenets, evaluate the different syllabi…

  18. Using Disability Studies Theory to Change Disability Services: A Case Study in Student Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Rebecca C.; White, Julia M.; Stuckey, Zosha

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, a group of student activists at Syracuse University started an organization called the Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee (BCCC). The BCCC activists used disability studies theory to engage the campus in conversations about disability and inform significant change in the way Syracuse administration think about disability. This paper…

  19. Adult active transportation: adding habit strength to the Theory of Planned Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, G.J.; Kremers, S.P.J.; Singh, A.; van den Putte, B.; van Mechelen, W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many health behaviors have a history of repetition and, as a result, may become habitual. Because including a measure of habit strength may add depth to current theoretical models on health behavior, the present study explored the issue of habit strength within the context of the theory

  20. Activity Theory as a Lens to Understand How Facebook Develops Knowledge Application Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagarukayo, Emily; Ssentamu, Proscovia; Mayisela, Tabisa; Brown, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Uganda's higher education system has generally been criticized for concentrating on theory leading to a mismatch between training received and practical skills required by employers. Studies have documented the inability of graduates from some programmes at Makerere University in applying knowledge in the work environment. This could partly be…