WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural values influence

  1. Influencing agent group behavior by adjusting cultural trait values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Gaurav; Hexmoor, Henry

    2010-10-01

    Social reasoning and norms among individuals that share cultural traits are largely fashioned by those traits. We have explored predominant sociological and cultural traits. We offer a methodology for parametrically adjusting relevant traits. This exploratory study heralds a capability to deliberately tune cultural group traits in order to produce a desired group behavior. To validate our methodology, we implemented a prototypical-agent-based simulated test bed for demonstrating an exemplar from intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance scenario. A group of simulated agents traverses a hostile territory while a user adjusts their cultural group trait settings. Group and individual utilities are dynamically observed against parametric values for the selected traits. Uncertainty avoidance index and individualism are the cultural traits we examined in depth. Upon the user's training of the correspondence between cultural values and system utilities, users deliberately produce the desired system utilities by issuing changes to trait. Specific cultural traits are without meaning outside of their context. Efficacy and timely application of traits in a given context do yield desirable results. This paper heralds a path for the control of large systems via parametric cultural adjustments.

  2. What Cultural Values Influence American Public Relations Practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Gabriel M.; Taylor, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of culture as a key variable in public relations research and practice. Finds (1) American practitioners continue to practice one-way models of public relations; and (2) public relations practitioners who have collectivistic values tend to practice two-way models of public relations. Discusses implications for theory and…

  3. The Influence of Cultural Individualism-Collectivism, Self Construals, and Individual Values on Communication Styles across Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudykunst, William B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Shows that independent self-construals and individualistic values of college students mediate the influence of cultural individualism-collectivism on the use of low-context communication, and interdependent self-construals and collectivistic values mediate the influence of cultural individualism-collectivism on the use of high-context…

  4. Language Immersion and Cultural Identity: Conflicting Influences and Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Stephen J.; Caron-Caldas, Suzanne

    1999-01-01

    Examines developing cultural and linguistic identities of three French/English bilingual children reared in two linguistic cultures: American and Quebecois. Results indicate the adolescent boy, who speaks more English than French, identifies with his American peers, from whom he conceals his bilingualism. The twin girls, in a French-immersion…

  5. The Influence of Societal Values on Organizational Culture at Company Level –the Romanian Case

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai Ovidiu CERCEL

    2011-01-01

    The present study aims to analyze the influence of societal values in modelling the organizational culture at company level. Studies conducted by different researchers highlighted the differences of perception between peoples’ values in their society in relation with the values of their colleagues of different nationalities. Finally, these values influence the importance that people grants to work, leisure, family and social status. The purpose of this paper is to draw the highlights of a new...

  6. The Influence of Economic Literacyon Consumption Behaviour Mediated by Local Cultural Values and Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldila Septiana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the influence of economics literacy on the students’ consumption behavior through local cultural values and promotions. The mediation used is based on the theories, the empirical studies and the previous studies.Quantitative approach was used in this study. The population was the Pamekasan Senior High Schools students (Class XI IPS, academic year 2012/2013. Proportional random sampling was conducted to take the samples in the population. The data was collected by using the questionnaire and test. Path analysis was used to analyze the data.The findings showe that the economic literacy level influences directly and significantly on the local cultural values, while affected negatively significant on the promotion. Also the economic literacy level influences directly and negatively significant on the consumption behavior. Contrary, the local cultural values influence directly, positively and significantly on the consumption behavior similar to the promotion. Moreover, the economic literacy level influences indirectly and significantly on the consumption behavior through the local cultural values. Similar to the local cultural values, the promotion aspect had the same influence direction. Therefore, this research provided evidence that the economic literacy affected consumption behaviour which are moderated through the value of local culture and promotion aspects

  7. Influence of feedback characteristics on perceived learning value of feedback in clerkships : does culture matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Van Hell, Elisabeth A.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Emilia, Ova; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Various feedback characteristics have been suggested to positively influence student learning. It is not clear how these feedback characteristics contribute to students' perceived learning value of feedback in cultures classified low on the cultural dimension of individualism and high on

  8. Influence of feedback characteristics on perceived learning value of feedback in clerkships : does culture matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Van Hell, Elisabeth A; Kerdijk, Wouter; Emilia, Ova; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various feedback characteristics have been suggested to positively influence student learning. It is not clear how these feedback characteristics contribute to students' perceived learning value of feedback in cultures classified low on the cultural dimension of individualism and high on

  9. The Influence of Cultural Values on Classroom Behaviors of Adult Vietnamese Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Roberta S.

    A study examined the influence of cultural values on classroom behaviors of adult Vietnamese refugees. More specifically, the study was designed to determine the effect of culturally acquired attitudes and personality traits on the refugees' classroom behaviors, the relationship between these behaviors and the cognitive learning styles favored by…

  10. The influence of socio-cultural background and product value in usability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderegger, Andreas; Sauer, Juergen

    2013-05-01

    This article examines the influence of socio-cultural background and product value on different outcomes of usability tests. A study was conducted in two different socio-cultural regions, Switzerland and East Germany, which differed in a number of aspects (e.g. economic power, price sensitivity and culture). Product value (high vs. low) was varied by manipulating the price of the product. Sixty-four test participants were asked to carry out five typical user tasks in the context of coffee machine usage, measuring performance, perceived usability, and emotion. The results showed that in Switzerland, high-value products were rated higher in usability than low-value products whereas in East Germany, high-value products were evaluated lower in usability. A similar interaction effect of socio-cultural background and product value was observed for user emotion. Implications are that the outcomes of usability tests do not allow for a simple transfer across cultures and that the mediating influence of perceived product value needs to be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  11. The Influence of Principals Self Personality Values towards Their Work Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, Muhammad; Tahir, Lokman Bin Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the influence of principals' self personality values toward teachers' work culture in high schools. The sample consisted of 34 principals from SMAN, SMKN and MAN in the City of Makassar, South Sulawesi Indonesia. The sample of this study is population sample. The instrument used was a questionnaire. Data were analyzed…

  12. The influence of television on cultural values -- with special reference to Third World countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonasekera, A

    1987-01-01

    In focusing on the influence of television on cultural values, particularly in third world countries, the discussion covers the impact of the technology of communication on cultural values, the impact of existing, that is traditional, cultural values on television, and the impact of television programs on cultural values. It is not a problem to set up a television transmitting station in any third world country; the hardware is manufactured in developed countries and assembled in a third world country by technicians of the television manufacturing company. The key question is whether the third world country that has acquired this modern piece of technology can put it into operation run it. The operation of a modern television station calls for 3 types of professionals: engineers and technicians, television journalists and producers, and managers and administrators. Consequently, if the host country is to benefit from this transfer of technology it needs to have a community of modern professionals. Also, for a culture to successfully utilize television, it is helpful if the other media of communication are developed. In sum, at the time of the introduction of television in third world countries, such countries should possess an advanced sector of education and mass media which could form the basis for initiating the multiplier effect for which television has the potential. When introducing television to a third world country, one further needs to be aware of the impact that traditional values may have on the utilization of this medium. It can work to entrench traditional inequities in social relationships in the name of cultural uniqueness, and from the perspective of disadvantaged minority groups it could be a form of "cultural imperialism." Thus, when introducing television, the governments of these countries need to consider fostering a set of values and norms that could assist in the modernization of these countries. These should be values that promote human

  13. Typography And Local Culture How Local Values Influence Batik Label Design In Yogyakarta And Surakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Zainal Muttakin Raden

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Batik was incorporated into the Indonesian culture since the Majapahit era. At that time the royal families of Majapahit Kingdom wore batik clothes for activities such as religious event or kingdom event. Since then batik was seen as a symbol of nobility. The growth of batik industry especially in Yogyakarta and Surakarta region has produced a diverse motive and fabric quality of batik clothes. To help differentiate between these batik clothes the owner of batik industries created batik labels with intricate design. This study focused on analysing the intricate design and typography found within three batik labels each from Yogyakarta and Surakarta Region to better understand the role of local culture and values in creating the batik label design using vernacular typography and cultural approach. The result shows that the local culture and values symbolically enforced by each keraton kingdom-like body and social system in Yogyakarta and Surakarta influenced the batik label design. The high cultured values of Yogyakarta keraton resulted in a more formal and rigid typefaces used in the batik label giving off a classical feeling. Meanwhile the more grass rooted values of Surakarta urban culture resulted in a fluid and flowing typefaces giving off a trendy casual feeling.

  14. Influence of feedback characteristics on perceived learning value of feedback in clerkships: does culture matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Van Hell, Elisabeth A; Kerdijk, Wouter; Emilia, Ova; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-04-05

    Various feedback characteristics have been suggested to positively influence student learning. It is not clear how these feedback characteristics contribute to students' perceived learning value of feedback in cultures classified low on the cultural dimension of individualism and high on power distance. This study was conducted to validate the influence of five feedback characteristics on students' perceived learning value of feedback in an Indonesian clerkship context. We asked clerks in Neurology (n = 169) and Internal Medicine (n = 132) to assess on a 5-point Likert scale the learning value of the feedback they received. We asked them to record whether the feedback provider (1) informed the student what went well, (2) mentioned which aspects of performance needed improvement, (3) compared the student's performance to a standard, (4) further explained or demonstrated the correct performance, and (5) prepared an action plan with the student to improve performance. Data were analyzed using multilevel regression. A total of 250 students participated in this study, 131 from Internal Medicine (response rate 99%) and 119 from Neurology (response rate 70%). Of these participants, 225 respondents (44% males, 56% females) completed the form and reported 889 feedback moments. Students perceived feedback as more valuable when the feedback provider mentioned their weaknesses (β = 0.153, p learning value of feedback. No gender differences were found for perceived learning value. In Indonesia, we could validate four out of the five characteristics for effective feedback. We argue that our findings relate to culture, in particular to the levels of individualism and power distance. The recognized characteristics of what constitutes effective feedback should be validated across cultures.

  15. Religiosity and social welfare: competing influences of cultural conservatism and prosocial value orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Ariel; Soto, Christopher J; Cohen, Adam B; Miller, Dale T

    2011-08-01

    This research examines the hypothesis that religiosity has two competing psychological influences on the social welfare attitudes of contemporary Americans. On the one hand, religiosity promotes a culturally based conservative identity, which in turn promotes opposition to federal social welfare provision. On the other hand, religiosity promotes a prosocial value orientation, which in turn promotes support of federal social welfare provision. Across two national samples (Ns = 1,513 and 320) and one sample of business employees (N = 710), reliable support for this competing pathways model was obtained. We argue that research testing influences of nonpolitical individual differences on political preferences should consider the possibility of competing influences that are rooted in a combination of personality processes and contextual-discursive surroundings. © 2011 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Influence of Cultural Belief and Values on Secondary School Students' Understanding of Atmospheric Related Physics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Theodora Olufunke

    2015-01-01

    The study identified the different cultural concepts that secondary school students' believe in and determined the belief and idea of students about the cultural concepts. It also investigated students' source of information about the cultural concepts and determined the influence of these cultural believes on students' academic performance in…

  17. Influences of Caregivers' Cultural Norms, Values, Beliefs and Experiences on Caregiver Physical Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    The negative impact of physical violence against children is well established, but cultural norms surrounding appropriate acts of violence vary and aspects of one’s culture influence these behaviors. Given that the U.S. is multicultural, it is critical to examine which aspects of immigrants’ cultures are risky or protective for physical discipline. However, researchers who study the links between culture and physical punishment typically focus on one culture and the factors identified in one ...

  18. The influence of cross-cultural differences on consumer values: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostelijk, Erik Jan; Alsem, Karel Jan; Ali, Semra

    2017-01-01

    Values motivate consumer behaviour. The objective of this research is to show the impact of cultural differences on the consumer value system. The Netherlands and Chile were compared to identify to what extent differences between both cultures have an effect on what consumers value, and how this

  19. Culture and luxury value perception

    OpenAIRE

    Grange, Ségolène

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate how culture influences the way consumers perceive luxury. The model used in this paper combines previously developed frameworks concerning luxury value dimensions with the famous model of Hofstedes’ cultural dimensions. An online survey has been completed to collect data to compare responses of consumers from two different countries. Then an analysis of the data collected has been conducted in order to identify the cultural influence. ...

  20. Research on the Influencing Mechanism of Traditional Cultural Values on Citizens’ Behavior Regarding the Reuse of Recycled Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the influence mechanism of traditional Chinese culture values on urban residents’ acceptance of the reuse of recycled water, this paper selects interdependent self-constructional indicators representing the dependency relation between people as the representative of traditional culture values. In this paper, interdependent self-constructional indicators are introduced based on a technology acceptance model (TAM, in order to establish a hypothesis model. Following this, the writer conducts a study that shows the influence on the acceptance of recycled water through the formation of interdependent self-construction. Finally, the influence mechanism of traditional cultural values on citizens’ behavior regarding the reuse of recycled water is determined. To start with, the writer verifies the reliability and validity of data from 584 samples, and then tests the goodness-of-fit between the sample data and the hypothesis model by AMOS21.0 (software. On this basis, the writer analyzes the direct and indirect influence through the hypothesis model and finds that the interdependent self-constructional intensity will accelerate the acceptance process of recycled water technology by positively influencing a change in the residents’ attitudes to recycled water. The conclusion shows that traditional Chinese cultural values have a certain influence on urban residents’ acceptance of the reuse of recycled water. Meanwhile, the writer clarifies the influence’s mechanism.

  1. Cultural values and random breath tests as moderators of the social influence on drunk driving in 15 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestac, Julien; Kraïem, Sami; Assailly, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-01

    The social influence on drunk driving has been previously observed in several countries. It is noteworthy, however, that the prevalence of alcohol in road fatalities is not the same in all countries. The present study aimed to explore whether cultural values and the number of roadside breath tests moderate the link between the perceived drunk driving of one's peers and self-reported behavior. Based on the European survey SARTRE 4, the responses of 10,023 car drivers from 15 countries were analyzed. Two cultural values, "tradition" and "conformism," were identified as possibly being linked to social influence. Country scores for these values were taken from the European Social Survey. The number of random roadside breath tests per inhabitant was used as an indicator of drunk-driving enforcement in each country. A hierarchical multilevel modeling analysis confirmed the link between friends' drunk driving and one's own drunk driving in all countries, but the strength of the link was much stronger in some countries (e.g., Italy, Cyprus, and Israel) than in others (e.g., Finland, Estonia, and Sweden). Both the measured value of "tradition" and the number of alcohol breath tests were found to moderate the link between friends' and one's own drunk driving. European stakeholders should take into account cultural specificities of target countries when designing campaigns against drunk driving. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The impact of societal cultural values and individual social beliefs on the perceived effectiveness of managerial influence strategies: a meso approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, P.P.; Kennedy, J.C.; Tata, J.; Yukl, G.; Bond, M.H.; Peng, T.K.; Srinivas, E.S.; Howell, J.P.; Prieto, L.; Koopman, P.L.; Boonstra, J.J.; Pasa, S.; Lacassagne, M.F.; Higashide, H.; Cheosakul, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a 12-nation study designed to test empirically the relationships between societal cultural values, individual social beliefs, and the perceived effectiveness of different influence strategies. The relationships between three types of broad influence strategy

  3. Cultural War of Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cultural War of Values: The Proliferation of Moral Identities In the Danish Public Sphere Peter Hervik (Aalborg University) This chapter looks at the drastic shift in the construction of minority others that came with the emergence of neo-nationalism, neo-racism and radical right populism...... in the post-1989 world. Through an analysis of a political philosophy launched in Denmark in the 1990s called the “Cultural War of Values”, I show that the moral identities proliferating in the Danish public sphere are fundamentally anti-political correct, anti-multiculturalist, and anti......-Marxist as confrontation is also directed at political adversaries. Thus, the chapter’s key argument is that the social construction of thick minority identities can only be understood in relation to the cultural war of value strategy aimed at domestic political opponents....

  4. The Value of Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrede, Joar

    2014-01-01

    House has already been built. Parallel to this project, a decision has been made to relocate several old museums without any plans for the existing premises. Both projects have triggered years of debate in the media and the general public, and many of the decisions are highly disputed. From the official......, and that economic motives are given more attention than culture itself. This may be understood as a neoliberalisation of values where spheres of social and cultural life are subjected to the logic of the market....... documents and the public debate, it is evident that “culture” is vital in the urban development projects, but it is ambiguous what the value of “culture” consists of. Many citizens are questioning the disruption to historical continuity and they are confused about the political reasoning behind...

  5. Influence of spiritual and moral values of young people on the formation of the civic culture of the Russian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Alekseevna Tkacheva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a sociological analysis of the spiritual and moral orientations of young people and their influence on the formation of civic culture, which largely determines the form of the activity of individuals and social groups, the functioning of social institutions. Implementation of the objective function value consists in the achievement of a modern person in not only different kinds of material goods, but also, more importantly, in spiritual development. This, to a certain extent, will help to overcome the cultural gap between the elite of society and the main mass of citizens which can be considered as one of the important reasons for the failure of reform in Russia. Research of transformation processes have aroused great interest in the study of the social potential of youth as a subject of the reproduction of society. One of the factors in favor of subjectivity of youth is a civic culture, which is a key element of modernization. As a result of its formation, there is a change and activation of value orientations of young people, causing a qualitative transformation in all spheres of society. The empirical base of an article presents the results of original research conducted during 2016 among residents of five cities on the south of the Tyumen region, on the basis of which the authors point out the emerging shift from paternalistic expectations and passivity, the low value of the future to rationality, individualization, orientation on their own power. As one of the factors in the formation of civic culture the potential of the media were highlighted, which allowed the authors to justify the impact of the media on the formation of moral and spiritual values of the younger generation.

  6. Asian Indians in America: The influence of values and culture on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Rohit M; Arora, Lily; Mehta, Urvakhsh M; Asnaani, Anu; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv

    2016-08-01

    Asian Indians represent a significant portion of the largest growing race of Asians in the past decade in the United States. This selective review examines major cultural themes related to first- and second-generation Asian Indians living in the United States as they impact psychological and psychiatric dysfunction in this population. Specifically, we review the impact of Asian Indian culture on mental health, discuss the impact of acculturation and ethnic identity development on the mental health of Indian-Americans, and focus on typical mental health problems of Asian Indian adolescents, women and elderly in America. Finally, we provide a brief overview of empirically-supported treatment approaches and cultural considerations for additional treatments relevant to this population. This review is intended to provide an important foundation for more systematic empirically-driven investigation into better understanding how Asian Indian cultural themes impact mental health for Indian-Americans, and how to develop effective treatments for these issues in this cultural group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Igbo Cultural Values and the European Influence: A Way to Redirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The world is a mystery and very complex to finish its interpretation. As it continues to exist, numerous things and mysterious things manifest day by day. Human beings are made to live and control other things in the world. In different parts of the world, many cultures and belief systems exist. Because of the natural ...

  8. Constructive Cultural Blocks of Entrepreneurship in the Republic of Macedonia (The Influence of Culture’s Value on Entrepreneurship)

    OpenAIRE

    BILJANA ANGELOVA; VIOLETA TASHEVA

    2013-01-01

    Conditions in the economic, political, legal, social and cultural system of a country are not independent from each other; on the contrary they are in constant mutual interaction. This interaction shapes the beliefs, norms and values in the country as cultural characteristics that define its national culture. Each country has its own culture, as a specific cultural model accepted by the people, and it is passed from generation to generation. The evolution of all these factors has a direct imp...

  9. Creating a Culture: A Longitudinal Examination of the Influence of Management and Employee Values on Communication Rule Stability and Emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley-Zalabak, Pamela; Morley, Donald Dean

    1994-01-01

    Provides an examination of management and employee values as influential for organizational rule formation. Demonstrates that management values are directly related to employee values but indirectly influence the evolution of organization rules. Supports a view of rule emergence based on management and employee values. (HB)

  10. Forest ecosystem services: Cultural values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa M. Kreye; Damian C. Adams; Ramesh Ghimire; Wayde Morse; Taylor Stein; J. M. Bowker

    2017-01-01

    How we define “culture” and societal well-being related to culture depends heavily on who is looking at it, but culture can be generally described as “the customs and beliefs of a particular group of people that are used to express their collectively held values” (Soulbury Commission 2012). In the context of forests, culturally derived norms, beliefs, and values help...

  11. Cultural influences on personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandis, Harry C; Suh, Eunkook M

    2002-01-01

    Ecologies shape cultures; cultures influence the development of personalities. There are both universal and culture-specific aspects of variation in personality. Some culture-specific aspects correspond to cultural syndromes such as complexity, tightness, individualism, and collectivism. A large body of literature suggests that the Big Five personality factors emerge in various cultures. However, caution is required in arguing for such universality, because most studies have not included emic (culture-specific) traits and have not studied samples that are extremely different in culture from Western samples.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF CHINESE CORE CULTURAL VALUES ON THE COMMUNICATION BEHAVIOUR OF OVERSEAS CHINESE STUDENTS LEARNING ENGLISH

    OpenAIRE

    ABDUSALAM ABUBAKER

    2008-01-01

    This study is based on three dimensions of Hofstede’s framework, which are power distance, masculinity versus femininity, and uncertainty avoidance. Hofstede (1980) considers the Chinese culture to be characterized by high power distance, medium masculinity and weak uncertainty avoidance. For this reason, this study explores the impact of Chinese core cultural values on the communication behaviour of Chinese students learning English. A questionnaire was used as a technique to collect data ab...

  13. CREATING VALUE WITHIN CONSUMPTION CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Adrian Gârdan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of culture consumption is a particular concern within the modern marketing theory. Culture can be seen as representing a body of knowledge, beliefs, values, attitudes, symbols etc, developed in a certain period of time by a group of individuals, items transmitted with the help of a social learning process to other generations within the group. Thus, the consumption of culture will identify itself with the consumption of any product, service or a combination of them, directly resulted as manifestation of culture, expressions of artistic creativity specific for a certain cultural space. The present paper proposes the analysis of the phenomenon referring to the culture consumption in terms of specific characteristics. The paper reviews the features specific to the modern consumer of culture, the relationship that exists between the individuals’ level of education and the culture consumption and value creation process or augmentation of the intrinsic value of an artistic product as a result of the contribution that the culture consumer can bring himself. The authors highlight the fact that within extremely complex processes which are defining the culture consumption, consumers can assume an active role, becoming on their turn co-participants in the cultural goods and services value creation and transmission. The modern consumer benefits more than ever from the advantages offered by the information technology, being called to respond to major challenges of the postmodernism paradigm in terms of culture consumption. Globalization and other social economic and politic phenomena have profoundly changed the reports between individual and culture, between self and other members of the society, causing synthesis and essential transformations of culture consumption, of culture consumers typologies, and not least of the very forms of artistic expression related to cultural goods and services.

  14. Cultural values and international migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryam Rodríguez Monter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Immigration is one of the most controversial social issues debated nowadays. It is an undeniable fact that the phenomenon is lived in Europe with concern because of its consequences. People who live and coexist in Europe represent a huge cultural variety. Therefore, social and cultural gaps that can affect the basic values of the western societies seem to be inevitable due to the dimensions of the current migration phenomenon. The present studies are based on the European Social Survey Questionnaire (2002, and the Portrait Values Questionnaire (Schwartz, 1992, 2001 and focuses on the relevance of cultural values to explain the acceptance or rejection of the immigrant.. Finally, we emphasize the importance of cultural values -like Harmony or Egalitarianism- for any initiative or social policy which aimes at reducing the problems concerning inmigration in the European context.

  15. Racial/ethnic differences in the influence of cultural values, alcohol resistance self-efficacy, and alcohol expectancies on risk for alcohol initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Regina A; Miles, Jeremy N V; Tucker, Joan S; Zhou, Annie J; D'Amico, Elizabeth J

    2012-09-01

    Prior research has reported racial/ethnic differences in the early initiation of alcohol use, suggesting that cultural values that are central to specific racial/ethnic groups may be influencing these differences. This 1-year longitudinal study examines associations between two types of cultural values, parental respect (honor for one's parents) and familism (connectedness with family), both measured at baseline, and subsequent alcohol initiation in a sample of 6,054 (approximately 49% male, 57% Hispanic, 22% Asian, 18% non-Hispanic White, and 4% non-Hispanic Black) middle school students in Southern California. We tested whether the associations of cultural values with alcohol initiation could be explained by baseline measures of alcohol resistance self-efficacy (RSE) and alcohol expectancies. We also explored whether these pathways differed by race/ethnicity. In the full sample, adolescents with higher parental respect were less likely to initiate alcohol use, an association that was partially explained by higher RSE and fewer positive alcohol expectancies. Familism was not significantly related to alcohol initiation. Comparing racial/ethnic groups, higher parental respect was protective against alcohol initiation for Whites and Asians, but not Blacks or Hispanics. There were no racial/ethnic differences in the association between familism and alcohol initiation. Results suggest that cultural values are important factors in the decision to use alcohol and these values appear to operate in part, by influencing alcohol positive expectancies and RSE. Interventions that focus on maintaining strong cultural values and building strong bonds between adolescents and their families may help reduce the risk of alcohol initiation. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. School Values Across Three Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A new typology of school-level values is reported in three cultural contexts. School values were assessed by aggregating the scores of 862 students, (ages 15-19 in 32 Jewish and Arab Israeli schools (Study 1, and 1,541 students (ages 11-21 from 8 European schools and 163 teachers from 6 of these schools (Study 2, using Schwartz’s Portrait Values Questionnaire. Six school values emerged in both studies: achievement, autonomy, egalitarianism, harmony, compliance, and dominance. The importance of studying school-level values was demonstrated by relating the values of compliance and dominance to violence, and harmony values to student support measures (Study 1. Strong (minimal r = .64 school-level correlations between students of different ages and teachers supported the validity of the findings (Study 2.

  17. The Marketing of Cultural Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Enache

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current, fast and unpredictable changes required a rapid transformation of Marketing. Marketing 3.0 can be the solution. Marketing 3.0 is a cultural and social marketing, a marketing of high values: moral, legal, esthetic and a marketing of superior needs: peace, justice, spiritual accomplishments, all globally approached. The goal of Marketing 3.0 is to convince all commercial and cultural structures to get involved in creating the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs: eradicating poverty, access to education, promoting the equality of the sexes, reducing infantile mortality, improving maternal health, fighting diseases, ensuring environment sustainability.

  18. Congruence and functions of personal and cultural values: do my values reflect my culture's values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald

    2006-11-01

    Two studies are described examining the correlation between self- and culture-referenced values at a culture level (Study 1) and correlation between self- and culture-referenced values and self-reported behavior at an individual level (Study 2). It is found that values related to individual-group relationships (embeddedness) and expression and experience of affective feelings and emotions (affective autonomy) are significantly correlated at a culture level. In Study 2, culture-referenced values are shown to correlate with behaviors attached to social norms, whereas self-rated values are found to correlate with behaviors that are not norm-governed. Implications for measurement of cultural values and cultural and cross-cultural research designs are discussed.

  19. Influence of organizational culture on provider adherence to the diabetic clinical practice guideline: using the competing values framework in Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Mahmoud; Akbari Sari, Ali; Rashidian, Arash; Takian, Amirhossein; Abou-Dagga, Sanaa; Elsous, Aymen

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a serious chronic disease and an important public health issue. This study aimed to identify the predominant culture within the Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH) and the Primary Healthcare Centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA) by using the competing values framework (CVF) and examining its influence on the adherence to the Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) for DM. A cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all the Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n=323) who work within 71 PHC clinic. A cross-cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version of the CVF questionnaire. The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal (51.5%, p culture was the most predominant (mean =41.13; standard deviation [SD] =8.92), followed by hierarchical (mean =33.14; SD=5.96), while in the PHC-UNRWA, hierarchical was the prevailing culture (mean =48.43; SD =12.51), followed by clan/group (mean =29.73; SD =8.37). Although a positively significant association between the adherence to CPG and the rational culture and a negatively significant association with the developmental archetype were detected in the PHC-MoH, no significant associations were found in the PHC-UNRWA. Our study demonstrates that the organizational culture has a marginal influence on the adherence to the diabetic guideline. Future research should preferably mix quantitative and qualitative approaches and explore the use of more sensitive instruments to measure such a complex construct and its effects on guideline adherence in small-sized clinics.

  20. Free Speech as a Cultural Value in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Mauricio J.; Kemmelmeier, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Political orientation influences support for free speech, with liberals often reporting greater support for free speech than conservatives. We hypothesized that this effect should be moderated by cultural context: individualist cultures value individual self-expression and self-determination, and collectivist cultures value group harmony and conformity. These different foci should differently influence liberals and conservatives’ support for free speech within these cultures. Two studies eval...

  1. The Influence of Japanese Modern Culture Value Toward Purchase Decision Making Process on Youth Society in Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Ngurawan, Ahmad Maulana; Pangemanan, Sifrid S; Tielung, Maria V.J

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese trending of new way on the modern culture now affects many aspects all around the country. From the technology aspect, film industry, music and also in fashion with odd ways. In Indonesia we are getting support by everything by in daily life, for example, in transportation, there so many Japanese products in automotive. Also, the aspect of new modern culture also is happening in Indonesia like otaku, anime, manga, and cosplay. Many incoming events helds in Indonesia from local sc...

  2. Influence of organizational culture on provider adherence to the diabetic clinical practice guideline: using the competing values framework in Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radwan M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mahmoud Radwan,1 Ali Akbari Sari,1 Arash Rashidian,1 Amirhossein Takian,1 Sanaa Abou-Dagga,2 Aymen Elsous1 1Department of Health Management and Economics, School of Public Health, International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Department of Research Affairs and Graduates Studies, Islamic University of Gaza, Gaza Strip, Palestine Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a serious chronic disease and an important public health issue. This study aimed to identify the predominant culture within the Palestinian Primary Healthcare Centers of the Ministry of Health (PHC-MoH and the Primary Healthcare Centers of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (PHC-UNRWA by using the competing values framework (CVF and examining its influence on the adherence to the Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG for DM.Methods: A cross-sectional design was employed with a census sample of all the Palestinian family doctors and nurses (n=323 who work within 71 PHC clinic. A cross-cultural adaptation framework was followed to develop the Arabic version of the CVF questionnaire. Results: The overall adherence level to the diabetic guideline was disappointingly suboptimal (51.5%, p<0.001; 47.3% in the PHC-MoH and 55.5% in the PHC-UNRWA. In the PHC-MoH, the clan/group culture was the most predominant (mean =41.13; standard deviation [SD] =8.92, followed by hierarchical (mean =33.14; SD=5.96, while in the PHC-UNRWA, hierarchical was the prevailing culture (mean =48.43; SD =12.51, followed by clan/group (mean =29.73; SD =8.37. Although a positively significant association between the adherence to CPG and the rational culture and a negatively significant association with the developmental archetype were detected in the PHC-MoH, no significant associations were found in the PHC-UNRWA. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that the organizational culture has a marginal influence on the adherence to the diabetic guideline. Future research

  3. Cultural Values and Overall Fairness;

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Golparvar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This research conducted with the aim of investigating the relationships between overall fairness and cultural values with organizational justice, job satisfaction and turnover among the personnel of training and education administrations in Esfahan city. Statistical population were the personnel of education and training administrations regions, which 309 persons from them selected with using simple random sampling. Research instruments were overall fairness with 3 items, cultural values (in two fields including materialism and power distance with 8 items, distributive, procedural and interactional justice with 3,3,3 items respectively, job satisfaction with 3 items and turnover with 3 items. Data were analyzed with using Pearson’s correlation coefficient, structural equation modeling, moderated hierarchical regression and mediating regression analysis. Results showed that there are significant relations between overall fairness with distributive, procedural, interactional justice and turnover, job satisfaction and materialism (P0.05. The results of structural equation modeling and mediating regression analysis showed that overall fairness relatively mediate the relations between procedural justices with turnover. But there was not mediated role for overall fairness in relations between distributive and interactional fairness with turnover and job satisfaction. Moderated regression analysis showed that power distance likely have moderated role in relations between overall fairness with turnover likely.

  4. Pengaruh Mindset, Kepemimpinan, dan Nilai Keluarga terhadap Budaya Organisasi Perusahaan Keluarga [Influence of Mindset, Leadership, and Family Values on the Organizational Culture of Family Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bella

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to find out how significant the mindset, leadership, and family values influence the organizational culture of family firms. This research is a quantitative research which uses questionnaires as the data collection method. The population of this research is the students of University of Ciputra who attend the Family Business class in the odd semester of 2016 Entrepreneurship subject. There are 59 respondents’ data which fit as samples of this research and the data is processed by using the Partial Least Square (PLS analysis method. The result of this research shows that (1 mindset significantly affects leadership, (2 leadership does not significantly affect the organizational culture of family firms, (3 mindset significantly affects family values, (4 family values significantly affect the organizational culture of family firms, (5 family values do not significantly affect leadership, (6 mindset does not significantly affect the organizational culture of family firms, and (7 the organizational culture of family firms can be formed by the leader’s mindset which are reflected through the family values believed and applied within the companies. Bahasa Indonesia Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui seberapa signifikan mindset, kepemimpinan, dan nilai keluarga berpengaruh terhadap budaya organisasi perusahaan keluarga. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian kuantitatif yang menggunakan kuesioner sebagai metode pengumpulan data. Populasi pada penelitian ini adalah mahasiswa Universitas Ciputra yang tergabung dalam kelas Family Business pada mata kuliah Entrepreneurship semester ganjil 2016. Terdapat 59 data responden yang dinyatakan layak untuk digunakan sebagai sampel penelitian dan data diolah dengan menggunakan metode analisis Partial Least Square (PLS. Hasil dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa (1 mindset berpengaruh secara signifikan terhadap kepemimpinan, (2 kepemimpinan tidak berpengaruh secara signifikan

  5. Influence of Islamic culture on Scandinavian management in Malaysia - a glance at multinational management and Islamic values

    OpenAIRE

    Gjelsvik, Jorun Titlestad

    2001-01-01

    This study deals with differences ---especially related to the Islamic culture--- in business between Scandinavia and Malaysia. It is based on interviews with managers in 11 Scandinavian companies located in Malaysia. Globalisation is described as the intensification of worldwide social relations which link distant localities. Local happenings are shaped by events occurring many miles away. This is especially true for the multinational companies. Global firms have increased very much in numbe...

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF CULTURAL VALUES ON THE PARENT-CHILD INTERACTION PATTERNS OF FAMILIES FROM AN ASIAN BACKGROUND

    OpenAIRE

    NADINE AWDE

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to critically review previous studies of intervention programs that focus on parent-child interaction, in order to pinpoint deficiencies in this area of study and to recommend further research. Indeed, more interventionists and speech and language therapists must identify parent-child interaction patterns, especially when following a family-centred approach in the treatment of speech impairments or language delays. This review stresses that the cultural ...

  7. Cultural Repercussions: Extending Our Knowledge about How Values of Trust and Confidence Influence Tax Structures within Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Lierse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Within a unified Europe that is heading towards ever more harmonization,it is interesting to examine why there exists such diversity in tax regimesamong its countries. Is it possible that some of the decisions pertaining totaxation are based on latent cultural aspects? This study, set in a purelyEuropean context, seeks to analyze tax variations within Europe through thelens of cultural variations. Specifically, how trust, confidence and equalitymatter with regard to tax revenues and tax progressivity. Within this regard,we achieved strong results linking trust and confidence to higher tax revenuesand higher tax progressivity. That is, where trust among societal membersis low and confidence in public institutions is low, regimes opt for low taxrevenues and lenient tax rates. It is argued that where mistrust is high, theissue of income distribution between societal members is likely to stay withinthe private or individual sphere. Conversely, countries with high trust amongsocietal members exhibit higher levels of income distribution by delegatingmore responsibility to public institutions, reflected in higher tax revenues andmore progressive tax structures.

  8. Influence of lactic acid bacteria, probiotic cultures and pH value in fermented yoghurt drink to sensory quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Šulcerová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, we can see on market mainly fermented milk products with addition of probiotic microorganisms, especially strains of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. We can meet also other types of pro­bio­tic products. It is recommended to consume at least 100 grams of fermented milk products with mi­ni­mal concentration of 106 of probiotics in one gram or mililitr of product daily for reaching positive effect on men’s health. During fermentation of the carbohydrates, proteins and lipids are disunite and many of aromatic compounds ane compose. They give a typical sensory characteristic to fermented milk products. For quality and quantity level of probiotics, changes of pH value and sensory qua­li­ty of five kinds of fermented milk product Yoghurt Drink with different flavour were analyzed during the whole expiration period (28 days. Obtained results were statistically evaluated via the analysis of variance and the method of multiple comparison according to Tukey test (P < 0,010 and (P < 0,001. During the minimal endurance time lactic acid bacteria and Bifidobacterium sp. were evaluated and changes of descriptors and pH value were detected. Number of LAB was up to 107 CFU/ml in all samples during 28 days of analysis. Only at sample 2 the number of LAB was 106 CFU/ml. Bifidobacterium sp. grew about degree. The number of LAB and Bifidobacterium sp. of yoghurt drink correspond with public notice number 77/2003 Sb, LAB 107 nad Bifidobacterium sp. 106 KTJ / ml. During 28 days of storage the pH value decreased. The biggest pH drop was recorded between 21. and 28. days of sto­ra­ge in all samples. The beginning pH value was 4.03–4.07 and the final value was between 3.80–3.95.The results of sensory evaluation processed by analysis of dispersion according to type were statistically conlusive in descriptors thickness, texture, intensity of smell, pleasantness of taste and general impression. The results of sensory evaluation processed by

  9. Men as cultural ideals: Cultural values moderate gender stereotype content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Amy J C; Wolf, Elizabeth Baily; Glick, Peter; Crotty, Susan; Chong, Jihye; Norton, Michael I

    2015-10-01

    Four studies tested whether cultural values moderate the content of gender stereotypes, such that male stereotypes more closely align with core cultural values (specifically, individualism vs. collectivism) than do female stereotypes. In Studies 1 and 2, using different measures, Americans rated men as less collectivistic than women, whereas Koreans rated men as more collectivistic than women. In Study 3, bicultural Korean Americans who completed a survey in English about American targets rated men as less collectivistic than women, whereas those who completed the survey in Korean about Korean targets did not, demonstrating how cultural frames influence gender stereotype content. Study 4 established generalizability by reanalyzing Williams and Best's (1990) cross-national gender stereotype data across 26 nations. National individualism-collectivism scores predicted viewing collectivistic traits as more-and individualistic traits as less-stereotypically masculine. Taken together, these data offer support for the cultural moderation of gender stereotypes hypothesis, qualifying past conclusions about the universality of gender stereotype content. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Influence of personal values of the entrepreneur in organizational culture; Influencia de los valores personales de la emprendedora en la cultura organizativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, A.; Hormiga, E.; Valls, J.

    2012-11-01

    This study analyzes the case of the company Adiciona and its female founder under the perspective of personal values and their influence on corporate values. The case shows how her collectivist values, most notably its commitment to gender equality, have influenced the definition of competitive strategy. The interest of this case lies in the clear definition and defense of corporate values as a strategy for long-term success. (Author) 24 refs.

  11. Influence of culture and religion on HIV and sexuality education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of culture and religion on HIV and sexuality education among South African ... the prevailing religious and cultural tolerance sexuality education is receiving. ... was mainly driven by their own cultural and religious values and beliefs.

  12. Traditional Values, Socio-Cultural Factors and Human Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Values, Socio-Cultural Factors and Human Resource Management Practices in ... Ghanaian worker in general and the HR manager in particular is influenced ... face -to-face interview methods were used to obtain information for the study.

  13. Cross-Cultural Faculty Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Marybelle C.

    1992-01-01

    Compares the terminal values of 24 visiting scholars from the People's Republic of China based at a midwestern community college with resident faculty values. The Chinese scholars ranked freedom, equality, and self-respect highest, whereas U.S. schools gave highest rankings to salvation, family security, and self-respect. Contrasts findings with a…

  14. Integration of Latino/a cultural values into palliative health care: a culture centered model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adames, Hector Y; Chavez-Dueñas, Nayeli Y; Fuentes, Milton A; Salas, Silvia P; Perez-Chavez, Jessica G

    2014-04-01

    Culture helps us grapple with, understand, and navigate the dying process. Although often overlooked, cultural values play a critical and influential role in palliative care. The purpose of the present study was two-fold: one, to review whether Latino/a cultural values have been integrated into the palliative care literature for Latinos/as; two, identify publications that provide recommendations on how palliative care providers can integrate Latino/a cultural values into the end-of-life care. A comprehensive systematic review on the area of Latino/a cultural values in palliative care was conducted via an electronic literature search of publications between 1930-2013. Five articles were identified for reviewing, discussing, or mentioning Latino/a cultural values and palliative care. Only one article specifically addressed Latino/a cultural values in palliative care. The four remaining articles discuss or mention cultural values; however, the cultural values were not the main focus of each article's thesis. The results of the current study highlight the lack of literature specifically addressing the importance of integrating Latino/a cultural values into the delivery of palliative care. As a result, this article introduces the Culture-Centered Palliative Care Model (CCPC). The article defines five key traditional Latino/a cultural values (i.e., familismo, personalismo, respeto, confianza, and dignidad), discusses the influence of each value on palliative health care, and ends with practical recommendations for service providers. Special attention is given to the stages of acculturation and ethnic identity.

  15. Age differences in personal values: Universal or cultural specific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Helene H; Ho, Yuan Wan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Noels, Kimberly A; Tam, Kim-Pong

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies on value development across adulthood have generally shown that as people age, they espouse communal values more strongly and agentic values less strongly. Two studies investigated whether these age differences in personal values might differ according to cultural values. Study 1 examined whether these age differences in personal values, and their associations with subjective well-being, showed the same pattern across countries that differed in individualism-collectivism. Study 2 compared age differences in personal values in the Canadian culture that emphasized agentic values more and the Chinese culture that emphasized communal values more. Personal and cultural values of each individual were directly measured, and their congruence were calculated and compared across age and cultures. Findings revealed that across cultures, older people had lower endorsement of agentic personal values and higher endorsement of communal personal values than did younger people. These age differences, and their associations with subjective well-being, were generally not influenced by cultural values. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Human rights values or cultural values? Pursuing values to maintain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We argue that positive discipline in multicultural school environments needs to be based in part on human rights values that are neither solely universally interpreted nor particularistically interpreted. We report on the data generated at a research workshop held as the final dissemination process of a four-year international ...

  17. Associations between Cultural Stressors, Cultural Values, and Latina/o College Students' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Rosalie; Rodríguez, Vivian M; McDonald, Shelby E; Velazquez, Efren; Rodríguez, Adriana; Fuentes, Vanessa E

    2017-01-01

    Latina/o college students experience cultural stressors that negatively impact their mental health, which places them at risk for academic problems. We explored whether cultural values buffer the negative effect of cultural stressors on mental health symptoms in a sample of 198 Latina/o college students (70 % female; 43 % first generation college students). Bivariate results revealed significant positive associations between cultural stressors (i.e., acculturative stress, discrimination) and mental health symptoms (i.e., anxiety, depressive, psychological stress), and negative associations between cultural values of familismo, respeto, and religiosity and mental health symptoms. Several cultural values moderated the influence of cultural stressors on mental health symptoms. The findings highlight the importance of helping Latina/o college students remain connected to their families and cultural values as a way of promoting their mental health.

  18. Cultural values and health service quality in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsa, Pia; Fuxiang, Wei; Sääksjärvi, Maria; Shuyuan, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Several service quality studies show how cultural features may influence the way service quality is perceived. However, few studies specifically describe culture's influence on health service quality. Also, there are few studies that take into account patients' health service quality perceptions. This article seeks to present a first step to fill these gaps by examining patients' cultural values and their health service quality assessments. The study draws on published work and applies its ideas to Chinese healthcare settings. Data consist of hospital service perceptions in the People's Republic of China (PRC), a society that is socially, economically and culturally undergoing major changes. In total, 96 patients were surveyed. Data relationships were tested using partial least square (PLS) analysis. Findings show that Chinese patients' cultural values and their health service assessments are related and that the cultural values themselves seem to be changing. Additionally, further analyses provided interesting results pointing to which cultural values influenced service quality perceptions. The strongest service quality predictor was power distance. The sample is relatively small and collected from only one major hospital in China. Therefore, future research should extend the sample size and scope. Follow-up research could also include cross-cultural investigations of perceived health service quality to substantiate cultural influences on health service quality perceptions. In line with similar research in other contexts, the study confirms that power distance has a significant relationship with service quality perceptions. The study contributes to existing health service literature by offering patients' views on health service quality and by describing relationships between health service perceptions and cultural values--the study's main contribution.

  19. Values: the dynamic nexus between biology, ecology and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald; Boer, Diana

    2016-04-01

    Values are motivational goals that influence attitudes, behaviors and evaluations. Cross-cultural evidence suggests that values show a systematic structure. Personal and cultural variations in the value structure, value priorities and value links to attitudes, behavior and well-being reflect contextual constraints and affordances in the environment, suggesting that values function as broadly adaptive psychological structures. The internal structure of values (the descriptive value system) becomes more clearly differentiated in more economically developed contexts. Value priorities shift toward more autonomous, self-expressive and individualistic orientations with greater economic resources and less ecological stress. In addition to systematic changes in internal structure, value links to attitudes, behaviors and well-being are influenced by economic, ecological and institutional contexts. Values are more likely to be expressed in attitudes and behavior if individuals have greater access to economic resources, experience less institutional and ecological stress or when the values reinforce culturally normative behavior. Frontiers for further value research include a greater examination of the neural underpinnings of values in specific ecological contexts and across the lifespan; and an examination of how values are behaviorally instantiated in different environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Measuring values for cross-cultural research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maseland, R.K.J.; Hoorn, A.A.J. van

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the empirical relevance of the recent critique that values surveys, as they are, suffer from the problem of measuring marginal preferences rather than values. By surveying items from cross-cultural surveys by Hofstede, Inglehart and GLOBE, we show that the marginal

  1. The Role of Confucian Cultural Values and Politics in Planning Educational Programs for Adults in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kiung; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Program planning activities are not culturally neutral but are replete with various cultural values and affected by them. This qualitative study was conducted in Korea and examines how cultural values influence educational planning in Korea. Specifically, the study was to examine how Confucian cultural values play out in educational planning in…

  2. The cultural side of innovations: adding values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, D.

    2014-01-01

    In most discussions about the knowledge-based economy, innovation is associated or even equated with technology, while culture’s influence is ignored. Innovation is however embedded in cultural and social contexts, and neglecting these crucial contexts may impede an innovation’s diffusion—and

  3. Free Speech as a Cultural Value in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio J. Alvarez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Political orientation influences support for free speech, with liberals often reporting greater support for free speech than conservatives. We hypothesized that this effect should be moderated by cultural context: individualist cultures value individual self-expression and self-determination, and collectivist cultures value group harmony and conformity. These different foci should differently influence liberals and conservatives’ support for free speech within these cultures. Two studies evaluated the joint influence of political orientation and cultural context on support for free speech. Study 1, using a multilevel analysis of data from 37 U.S. states (n = 1,001, showed that conservatives report stronger support for free speech in collectivist states, whereas there were no differences between conservatives and liberals in support for free speech in individualist states. Study 2 (n = 90 confirmed this pattern by priming independent and interdependent self-construals in liberals and conservatives. Results demonstrate the importance of cultural context for free speech. Findings suggest that in the U.S. support for free speech might be embraced for different reasons: conservatives’ support for free speech appears to be motivated by a focus on collectively held values favoring free speech, while liberals’ support for free speech might be motivated by a focus on individualist self-expression.

  4. The cultural side of innovation adding values

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Dany

    2013-01-01

    In most discussions about the knowledge-based economy, innovation is associated or even equated with technology, while culture's influence is ignored. Innovation is however embedded in cultural and social contexts, and neglecting these crucial contexts may impede an innovation's diffusion-and eventual success. This book places culture at the center of discussions on innovation, beginning with a comprehensive introduction to innovation's various forms, including the history, sociology, and economics of innovation. Insights from marketing and psychology are integrated into a complexity theory framework, which are then utilized to evaluate case studies of organizations experiencing repeated innovation successes. The sometimes fraught relationship of firms to creativity is discussed, and a new model for to calculating the creativity of an economy is presented.

  5. A qualitative study of enablers and barriers influencing the incorporation of social accountability values into organisational culture: a perspective from two medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh-Hunt, Nicholas; Stroud, Laura; Murdoch Eaton, Deborah; Rudolf, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Definitions of social accountability describe the obligation of medical schools to direct education, research and service activities towards addressing the priority health concerns of the population they serve. While such statements give some direction as to how the goal might be reached, it does not identify what factors might facilitate or hinder its achievement. This study set out to identify and explore enablers and barriers influencing the incorporation of social accountability values into medical schools. Semi structured interviews of fourteen senior staff in Bar Ilan and Leeds medical schools were undertaken following a literature review. Participants were recruited by purposive sampling in order to identify factors perceived to play a part in the workings of each institution. Academic prestige was seen as a key barrier that was dependent on research priorities and student selection. The role of champions was considered to be vital to tackle staff perceptions and facilitate progress. Including practical community experience for students was felt to be a relevant way in which the curriculum could be designed through engagement with local partners. Successful adoption of social accountability values requires addressing concerns around potential negative impacts on academic prestige and standards. Identifying and supporting credible social accountability champions to disseminate the values throughout research and education departments in medical and other faculties is also necessary, including mapping onto existing work streams and research agendas. Demonstrating the contribution the institution can make to local health improvement and regional development by a consideration of its economic footprint may also be valuable.

  6. Cultural values and diversity management perspectives : Testing the impact of cultural values on the diversity management perspectives in Sierra Leone, Germany and Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cultural values impact the attitudes towards diversity management perspectives. Therefore they convey critical opportunities and challenges that a country encounters, and which need to be identified for the successful implementation of diversity management initiatives. This thesis discusses the different diversity management perspectives and their motivations and rationales to diversify and the process in which the national culture influences the organizational culture practices. The ...

  7. Re-interpreting cultural values: Tajikistani students abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazira Sodatsayrova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the mobility of Tajikistani students and how they negotiate their place in an increasing globalised world, where national boundaries are becoming more navigable. It explores how structural and cultural factors intersect and influence young people’s choices as they re-shape their connections to their homeland, and re-negotiate cultural meanings in the new geographical and cultural contexts they find themselves in. This inquiry uses the concept of translocality which frames the negotiation of cultural meanings in a distant geographical and (host cultural space by acknowledging the place of the “local connection” within international mobility. It does this by examining students’ perceptions of two cultural concepts: nomus or “keeping the family name high in the community” and kase shudan or “being the shaper of one’s own destiny.” Drawing on Stephen and Storey’s conceptualisation of culture (and the local notions of agency the article explores how continuity and contestation are juxtaposed and brought to bear on the new meaning-making by the students, against the national and international agendas that define student mobility choices. Using qualitative methodology, the researchers engaged with Tajikistani research participants in England and Japan, and looked at what those decisions about mobility mean for the individual students, locating them in a translocal (as opposed to a transnational space. The article finds that contrary to the usual expectations of immigrants adhering more closely to cultural values (for fear of diluting them in a new setting, while the local cultures keep evolving, these students re-interpreted traditional values to take account of their new settings and their exposure to new cultures and spaces and sought to expand meanings rather than constrain them in traditional moulds.

  8. Influence of Culture on the Process of Managing Decisions Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin-Lucian Isac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different cultural environment requires a corresponding managerial environment. The process of managing decisions adoption is influenced by the values, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of the employees.

  9. NETWORK CULTURE - INTEGRAL PART OF NEW VALUES OF CIVIL SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Vladimirovich Sukhanov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available New technologies not only improve working conditions or communication, they are also bringing new values to  the society. This article discusses the concept of «network culture», which is now perceived by society as an integral part of values that can only exist in a civil society. We can research ( find   this kind of society in modern time period in Russia. The article analyzes the meaning of communication, how to use it, development processes in network media.  Nowadays network culture and its influence on society are almost in all spheres of state and society, as well as changes in perception of information and content generation process. Development of the Internet and Internet technologies largely set the tone for  the development of popular culture and allows you to store or to influence the national culture. Internet press today is and example which shows us, how this kind of tool can be used to influence on citizens.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2014-3-6

  10. Avenues of Influence: Cross-Cultural Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    focused on comparisons between individualistic and collectivistic cultures . Furthermore, given the differential emphasis toward group factors in...either individualistic or collectivistic cultures , social influence tactics involving group social elements may be a good starting point for exploring...in Two Cultures : The Differential Influence of Social Proof and Commitment/Consistency on collectivists and Individualists . Personality and Social

  11. Cultural Values in Intergroup and Single-Group Social Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst; Carnevale; Triandis

    1999-03-01

    Do cultural values influence the manner in which people cooperate with one another? This study assessed cultural characteristics of individuals and then related these characteristics to cooperative behavior in social dilemmas. Participants were assessed for their degree of vertical and horizontal individualism and collectivism, cultural values identified by Triandis (1995). They made choices in either a single-group or an intergroup social dilemma. The single-group dilemma entailed a three-person dilemma; the intergroup dilemma was identical but added subgroup competition, i.e., an opposing three-person group. The results indicated an interaction between cultural characteristics and type of dilemma for cooperation. The single-group versus intergroup effect reported by Bornstein and Ben-Yossef (1994) was replicated, but only for vertical individualists. The vertical individualists were least cooperative in the single-group dilemma but were more cooperative in the intergroup dilemma-where cooperation with the group maximized personal outcomes. The vertical collectivists were most cooperative in the single-group dilemma but were less cooperative in the intergroup dilemma- where group defection resulted in maximum group outcomes. The horizontal individualists and collectivists exhibited an intermediate level of cooperation, with no differences in cooperation between the single-group and intergroup dilemmas. Taken together, the results suggest that the relationship between cultural values and cooperation, in particular with reference to vertical and horizontal components of individualism and collectivism, is more complex than has been suggested in past research. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Influences of culture on sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, R M

    1982-09-01

    Religion is a cultured phenomenon, a subculture within our larger cultural system. Different religions have different teachings about what constitutes sexual morality, while members within a specific religious denomination may also have different beliefs and practices. Religiosity, or acceptance of the teachings of a particular religion, is more important as a determinant of sexual behavior than a specific religion per se. Orthodox Judaism, traditional Catholicism and traditional Protestantism are alike in their condemnation of masturbation, abortion, homosexuality, and premarital and extramarital coitus. More liberal members of these religions may not tolerate these activities, but may espouse them as necessary means to maintain or attain health. Nurses assess the beliefs that clients hold in regard to sexual morality and also identify if the client is experiencing guilt about past sexual practices. Interventions are planned with the client within the framework of the client's religious and spiritual beliefs and practices. To do otherwise is to invite distrust and distress in the client. Nurses intervene with sensitivity, compassion, and respect for beliefs and values that may be different from their own.

  13. Cultural values predict coping using culture as an individual difference variable in multi-cultural samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Bardi, Anat; Guerra, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    Three studies establish the relations between cultural values and coping using multicultural samples of international students. Study 1 established the cross-cultural measurement invariance of subscales of the Cope inventory (Carver, Scheier, & Weintraub, 1989) used in the paper. The cultural value dimensions of embeddedness vs. autonomy and hierarchy vs. egalitarianism predicted how international students from 28 (Study 2) and 38 (Study 3) countries coped with adapting to living in a new cou...

  14. Pedagogy as influencing nursing students' essentialized understanding of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, David; Harrowing, Jean; Lee, Bonnie; Doolittle, Lisa; O'Sullivan, Patrick S

    2010-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we explored how students understood "culture." Participants defined culture and wrote narratives regarding specific cultural encounters. The sample comprised both nursing (n=14) and non-nursing (n=8) students to allow for comparison groups. Content analysis of the narratives revealed two broad paradigms of cultural understanding: essentialist and constructivist. Essentialist narratives comprised four themes: determinism (culture defied individual resistance); relativism (the possibility of making value judgments disappeared); Othering (culture was equated to exotica, and emphasized difference); and, reductionism (personhood was eclipsed by culture). In contrast, the constructivist narratives were characterized by influence (non-determinism), dynamism (culture was dynamic and evolutionary); and, relationship-building. The unintended negative consequences of essentialist notions of culture were revealed in the nursing students' narratives. Pedagogy is implicated in nursing students' essentialized understanding of culture.

  15. Economic and social impact of modernization on cultural values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Andreeva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the relevant theoretical economic approaches that allow us to understand the key elements of cultural values. The paper presents a model envisaged to estimate economic and social impact of modernization on cultural values in modern societies. We employ three indices of social and economic development for each level in Russian Federal districts of Moscow and St. Petersburg in order to reveal their impacts on modernization processes. Our data has been collected via the means of a questionnaire and an opinion poll with the purpose of revealing the value guidelines of society in terms of its modernization. Our results reveal the presence of four relevant levels of value orientations: family orientations, global, work, and personal orientations. Our results demonstrate how modernization is perceived in modern societies, in which spheres it is mostly expressed, and how it influences the society. Moreover, we show the determinants of values within four levels of value orientations. Our findings provide estimations of modern attitudes towards social consciousness in the processes of modernization and reveal basic moral principles that could become a background of new system of values used in modernizing modern societies.

  16. VALUES AS A CULTURAL STANDARD IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Považanová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals the issue of meaningfulness, significance, importance, and pragmaticallyspeaking, the usefulness of human life, in his private and family or the public, the workingenvironment. The topic today is an important topic of thinking, at least with respect toeconomic and financial crisis that devastates the global economic environment, both inconnection with the growing influence of global problems of mankind or by naturalimpending natural disasters around the world. Through axiological reflection reveals ourfundamental notions about quality of life. Naming the biased dissemination strategydrinking lifestyle, satisfaction and pseudo saturation mainly consumer needs. Theenvironment needs a new sense of permanent, other, innovative, naturally loses and dullsthe sense of genuine, real and substantial work and life values. Their commemoration,historical significance and generate real cultural values, reveals the essential foundations ofvalues and culture in general shows a tendency of a transformed form perceptions of thecultural dimension of social interaction a person at any level of social life, family andfriends and from work and career ending. The promotion of social, cultural maturity ofindividuals and groups which in the process of socialization creates must build on thetradition of values that forms the history of each culture.

  17. Cultural values associated with substance use among Hispanic adolescents in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Claradina; Unger, Jennifer B; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel W; Black, David Scott; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Cultural values can shape people's attitudes toward substance use and influence their risk of experimentation with drugs. This article examines the relationships between cultural values (familism, respeto, and machismo), fatalism (a culturally encouraged personality disposition), and substance use among Hispanic adolescents. In 2005, cross-sectional data were collected from 1,616 Hispanic ninth grade students in Los Angeles. Each cultural value was associated with lifetime substance use; however, these relationships depended on the type of substance and gender. Our findings suggest that it might be useful to incorporate the cultural values and address the personality trait of fatalism in prevention programs for Hispanic adolescents. The study's limitations are noted.

  18. Attitudes toward older adults: A matter of cultural values or personal values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Xing, Cai; Guan, Yanjun; Song, Xuan; Melloy, Robert; Wang, Fei; Jin, Xiaoyu

    2016-02-01

    The current research aimed to address the inconsistent findings regarding cultural differences in attitudes toward older adults by differentiating the effects of personal and cultural values. In Study 1, we used data from the sixth wave of the World Values Survey to examine attitudes toward older adults across cultures, and how different personal values (i.e., communal vs. agentic) and cultural values (i.e., individualism) predicted these attitudes. The results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that after controlling for potential covariates, personal communal values positively correlated with positive attitudes toward older adults; however, cultural individualistic values did not. To further examine the causal effects of personal values (vs. cultural values), we conducted an experimental study and confirmed that priming personal values rather than cultural values had significant effects on ageism attitudes. The present studies help to reconcile conflicting results on cultural differences in attitudes toward older adults. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Human rights values or cultural values? Pursuing values to maintain positive discipline in multicultural schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro du Preez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions on discipline in education often accentuate corporal punishment or measures to infuse moral fibre. In addition, many authors argue that inculcating a particular value system can promote discipline in schools. This could however be profoundly problematic in the light of the Constitution. We argue that positive discipline in multicultural school environments needs to be based in part on human rights values that are neither solely universally interpreted nor particularistically interpreted. We report on the data generated at a research workshop held as the final dissemination process of a four-year international research project entitled "Understanding human rights through different belief systems: intercultural and interreligious dialogue". Dialogue was chosen as a form of data gathering since it is more spontaneous than conventional questioning techniques and can thus generate more naturally occurring data to strengthen the outcomes of the project. It appears that some teachers believe discipline can only be maintained through the elevation of cultural values (particularism. We argue that schools should start negotiating, at the most basic level, the values, including emancipatory, human rights values, and cultural values, which could underpin positive discipline in multicultural schools. Drawing solely on cultural values is not only unlikely to solve the problem of discipline, but could also undermine the efforts to transform our diverse, democratic society.

  20. Teamwork orientation and personal learning: The role of individual cultural values and value congruence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: There is a growing body of research that indicates that personal factors such as collectivist value orientation play an important role in individuals’ preference for teamwork, and an individual’s propensity to work in a team is seen as a contributing factor in one’s personal learning. Research purpose: The purpose of this article is twofold. Firstly, the article aims to explore whether individual-level cultural values of power distance, uncertainty avoidance and masculinity–femininity interact with individual collectivist values to influence teamwork orientation. Secondly, the study aims to examine the influence of teamwork orientation on personal learning further exploring the role of perceived value congruence in this relationship. Motivation for the study: While an extensive amount of research has been conducted on teamwork orientation, the question of how individual cultural values influence formation of teamwork orientation is still largely unanswered. This lack is especially evident with regard to how the influence of collectivism on the development of positive attitudes towards teamwork is promoted or inhibited by other values such as power distance, uncertainty avoidance and masculinity–femininity. Moreover, the current evidence about the influence of teamwork orientation on personal learning and the role of personal and contextual factors in such a relationship is still scarce. Research design, approach and method: The study used a cross-sectional survey, with data collected from 120 business students engaged in project teams at a Norwegian university. All the hypothesised relationships were assessed using partial least square structural equation modelling technique. Main findings: The findings indicate that the link between collectivism–teamwork orientation is stronger for team members who scored high on uncertainty avoidance values and the relationship was weaker for team members who endorsed high

  1. The Influence of Culture on Teacher Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Razak, Nordin; Darmawan, I. Gusti Ngurah; Keeves, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Culture is believed to be an important factor that influences various aspects of human life, such as behaviour, thinking, perceptions and attitudes. This article examines the similarities and differences in the influence of culture on teacher commitment in three types of Malaysian primary schools. Since commitment to teaching has rarely been…

  2. Influencing organisational culture: a leadership challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muls, Ann; Dougherty, Lisa; Doyle, Natalie; Shaw, Clare; Soanes, Louise; Stevens, Anna-Marie

    In the wake of the Francis report, the need for NHS trusts and hospitals to adopt a culture of learning, safety and transparency has been highlighted. This article considers different aspects of culture in health care, and hones in on the link between culture and safety for patients in putting the patient first, embedding the 6Cs and considering the options to measure and influence organisational culture. The article reflects more deeply on how leadership across all levels can influence and inspire change in organisational culture, ensuring that the patient remains the focus of any changes in care delivery.

  3. The Value of Art and Culture in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Beth; Balling, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the earliest forms of mass media, the dichotomy of mass culture/popular arts and high culture/fine art has been a topic of debate. The discussion has focused on the value and use of different art forms and on different notions on and attitudes to the purpose of art. The concept...... of cultural democracy has developed as a way to acknowledge and support a variety of cultural activities. Despite attempts to develop a broader understanding of culture and to acknowledge different ways of participating in and experiencing and valuing art and culture, cultural policy still seems to reproduce...... the dichotomies between high and popular culture, and to value the first over the latter. Art and culture are rarely understood as an independent way to experiences, meaning creation and values in everyday life. In this article, we would argue for an expanded understanding of cultural democracy, which not only...

  4. Perceived cultural importance and actual self-importance of values in cultural identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ching; Chiu, Chi-yue; Tam, Kim-pong; Lee, Sau-lai; Lau, Ivy Yee-man; Peng, Siqing

    2007-02-01

    Cross-cultural psychologists assume that core cultural values define to a large extent what a culture is. Typically, core values are identified through an actual self-importance approach, in which core values are those that members of the culture as a group strongly endorse. In this article, the authors propose a perceived cultural importance approach to identifying core values, in which core values are values that members of the culture as a group generally believe to be important in the culture. In 5 studies, the authors examine the utility of the perceived cultural importance approach. Results consistently showed that, compared with values of high actual self-importance, values of high perceived cultural importance play a more important role in cultural identification. These findings have important implications for conceptualizing and measuring cultures. ((c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. How spatial context influences entrepreneurial value creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates how rural communities are enriched by entrepreneurial value-creating activities that go beyond job creation and growth. In addition, this study explores how spatial context influences these value-creating activities. This qualitative case-based study shows that rural......-being of the community. Thus, this study contributes to an in-depth understanding of how and why entrepreneurship can create multiple forms of value in rural areas as well as how value creation behaviours are motivated by the spatial context. In addition, it provides explanations why not all rural entrepreneurs...... entrepreneurs create 14 types of value for their communities, ranging from purely economic to socioeconomic and to social value. The reasons why rural entrepreneurs create value, not only for themselves, but value that benefits the community is partly explained by their desire to contribute positively...

  6. Beyond cultural values? Cultural leadership ideals and entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan, Ute; Pathak, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a fresh perspective on national culture and entrepreneurship research. It explores the role of Culturally-endorsed implicit Leadership Theories (CLTs) – i.e., the cultural expectations about outstanding, ideal leadership – on individual entrepreneurship. Developing arguments based on culture-entrepreneurship fit, we predict that charismatic and self-protective CLTs positively affect entrepreneurship. They provide a context that enables entrepreneurs to be co-operative in ord...

  7. Perception of Nonverbal Communication Influenced by Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蒙蒙

    2013-01-01

    The concept of perception influenced by culture is pretty important in the study of intercultural communication. The perceptions of language and nonverbal language formed under various cultures intimate with each other during communication. This paper aims to explore the relationship between perception and culture in nonverbal communication through the study of eye language and body odor, and promote the communication among people of different culture as well.

  8. Differences Between British and Americans’ Cultures in Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘巍巍; 戴立黎

    2008-01-01

    <正>Values are the most important issue in identifying one particular culture.Social values are the feelings people have about what is important,worthwhile,and just.In this paper,the differences between British and American values are discussed in two aspects which mainly lie respectively in the comparisons of values and characteristics in both cultures.

  9. The Relationship between Teachers' Views about Cultural Values and Critical Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Kursad; Altinkurt, Yahya; Ozciftci, Elif

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Known as basic elements directing individuals' lives, cultural values are hidden cultural elements that influence all evaluations and perceptions. Values, in that sense, are elements individuals are aware of and provide the answer to the "what should I do?" feeling (Schein, 1992). Critical pedagogy is a project based…

  10. Consumption patterns and cultural values in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemien van der Veen; Agnes Neulinger; Jacob Rosendahl; Tino Bech-Larsen

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 6 in Consumption culture in Europe. The chapter focuses on cultural differences in consumption across Europe and describes general attitudes towards consumption and brands, the significance of shopping, and how these are linked to the motives of consumption of alcoholic and non-alcoholic

  11. Cultural values: can they explain self-reported health?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roudijk, B.; Donders, R.; Stalmeier, P.F.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Self-reported health (SRH) is a measure widely used in health research and population studies. Differences in SRH have been observed between countries and cultural values have been hypothesized to partly explain such differences. Cultural values can be operationalized by two cultural

  12. Understanding Culture and Influencing Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    difference to significantly change the society from a collectivist to individualist culture .42 Pakistan scores fourteen which indicates a strongly...score lower than fifty indicating a more collectivist society. This helps the strategic leader to appreciate the importance class and culture play on...Pakistan which possess strong uncertainty avoidance scores (70) and low individualistic scores (14) - and are collectivists - rules and laws are

  13. The influence of attention on value integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunar, Melina A; Watson, Derrick G; Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Chater, Nick

    2017-08-01

    People often have to make decisions based on many pieces of information. Previous work has found that people are able to integrate values presented in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream to make informed judgements on the overall stream value (Tsetsos et al. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(24), 9659-9664, 2012). It is also well known that attentional mechanisms influence how people process information. However, it is unknown how attentional factors impact value judgements of integrated material. The current study is the first of its kind to investigate whether value judgements are influenced by attentional processes when assimilating information. Experiments 1-3 examined whether the attentional salience of an item within an RSVP stream affected judgements of overall stream value. The results showed that the presence of an irrelevant high or low value salient item biased people to judge the stream as having a higher or lower overall mean value, respectively. Experiments 4-7 directly tested Tsetsos et al.'s (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(24), 9659-9664, 2012) theory examining whether extreme values in an RSVP stream become over-weighted, thereby capturing attention more than other values in the stream. The results showed that the presence of both a high (Experiments 4, 6 and 7) and a low (Experiment 5) value outlier captures attention leading to less accurate report of subsequent items in the stream. Taken together, the results showed that valuations can be influenced by attentional processes, and can lead to less accurate subjective judgements.

  14. An assessment of organisational values, culture and performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of organisational values, culture and performance in Cape Town's ... confusion, control, manipulation, blame, power, results orientation, hierarchy, ... Conclusion: The organisational culture of the Metro District Health Services is ...

  15. The value of cultures to modern microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Since the late nineteenth century, pure cultures have been regarded as the cornerstone of bacteriology. However, not all bacteria will multiply sufficiently to produce visible colonies on solid media; some cells will produce micro-colonies that are invisible to the naked eye. Moreover, the proportion of culturable cells that produce visible growth will vary according to the species and the state of the cells-are they actively growing or comparatively inactive? The latter have a poorer rate of recovery in terms of cultivability. It is unclear whether or not an individual colony is always derived from a single cell; it is possible that organisms in close proximity to each other may multiply and come together to produce single colonies. Then, the resultant growth will most certainly be derived from more than one initial cell. Although it is generally assumed that streaking and re-streaking on fresh media will purify any culture, there is evidence for microbial consortia interacting to form what appear to be single pure cultures. As so-called pure cultures underpin traditional microbiology, it is relevant to understand that the culture does not necessarily contain clones of identical bacteria, but that there may be variation in the genetic potential of the component cells, i.e. the cells are not homogeneous. Certainly, many bacteria change rapidly upon culturing, with some becoming bigger and less active. It is difficult to be sure if these changes reflect a loss or change of DNA or whether standard culturing methods select faster growing cells that are effectively not representative of the environment from which they were derived. These concepts are reviewed with an emphasis on bacterial fish pathogens.

  16. Differences in cultural beliefs and values among African American and European American men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes Halbert, Chanita; Barg, Frances K; Weathers, Benita; Delmoor, Ernestine; Coyne, James; Wileyto, E Paul; Arocho, Justin; Mahler, Brandon; Malkowicz, S Bruce

    2007-07-01

    Although cultural values are increasingly being recognized as important determinants of psychological and behavioral outcomes following cancer diagnosis and treatment, empirical data are not available on cultural values among men. This study evaluated differences in cultural values related to religiosity, temporal orientation, and collectivism among African American and European American men. Participants were 119 African American and European American men who were newly diagnosed with early-stage and locally advanced prostate cancer. Cultural values were evaluated by self-report using standardized instruments during a structured telephone interview. After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, African American men reported significantly greater levels of religiosity (Beta = 24.44, P cultural values, clinical experiences with prostate cancer may also be important. This underscores the importance of evaluating the effects of both ethnicity and clinical factors in research on the influence of cultural values on cancer prevention and control.

  17. (14) Akinwole et al Influence of Culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adeyinka Odunsi

    Influence of Culture Water Draw-off on Growth of the African ... 1Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries Management, University of ... areas (Eyo et al., 2003). .... systems. Nigerian Journal of Rural. Extension and Development. 6: 38-. 42.

  18. SOCIO-CULTURAL INFLUENCES ON EFFECTIVE ENGLISH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    Consequently, challenges abound in the teaching and learning of ... English in tertiary institutions in contemporary Nigeria, the influence of socio-cultural factors ... The English Language has been a crucial issue in the Nigerian education.

  19. Influence of organisational culture on company performance

    OpenAIRE

    R.M. Yusuff; A. Busu; A. Rashid; N. Zulkifli

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The lack of organizational effort to assess cultural compatibility or fit prior to the engagement offirms has contributed to the failure of several mergers and acquisition. A Korean public listed company withmanufacturing plants in Malaysia and New Zealand found that the performances of the newly acquired plantswere significantly lower than the manufacturing plants in Korea.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, the influence of national culture on organizational culture andthe ...

  20. Does education engender cultural values that matter for economic growth?

    OpenAIRE

    Prosper F. Bangwayo-Skeete; Afaf H. Rahim; Precious Zikhali

    2009-01-01

    Empirical research has shown that cultural values matter for economic growth and has specifically identified the achievement motivation as an aspect of culture that engenders economic growth. If specific cultural values engender economic growth, how then can societies promote them? This paper attempts to answer this question using the 2005 wave of the World Values Survey data for 43 countries. We test the contention that education significantly impacts the relative importance an individual pl...

  1. Beyond individualism: professional culture and its influence on feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher; Driessen, Erik; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Vanstone, Meredith; Lingard, Lorelei

    2013-06-01

    Although feedback is widely considered essential to learning, its actual influence on learners is variable. Research on responsivity to feedback has tended to focus on individual rather than social or cultural influences on learning. In this study, we explored how feedback is handled within different professional cultures, and how the characteristics and values of a profession shape learners' responses to feedback. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we conducted 12 focus groups and nine individual interviews (with a total of 50 participants) across three cultures of professional training in, respectively, music, teacher training and medicine. Constant comparative analysis for recurring themes was conducted iteratively. Each of the three professional cultures created a distinct context for learning that influenced how feedback was handled. Despite these contextual differences, credibility and constructiveness emerged as critical constants, identified by learners across cultures as essential for feedback to be perceived as meaningful. However, the definitions of credibility and constructiveness were distinct to each professional culture and the cultures varied considerably in how effectively they supported the occurrence of feedback with these critical characteristics. Professions define credibility and constructiveness in culturally specific ways and create contexts for learning that may either facilitate or constrain the provision of meaningful feedback. Comparison with other professional cultures may offer strategies for creating a productive feedback culture within medical education. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cultural influences on Facebook photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Mao; Park, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Prior research in social psychology indicates that East Asians from collectivistic and interdependent sociocultural systems are more sensitive to contextual information than Westerners, whereas Westerners with individualistic and independent representation have a tendency to process focal and discrete attributes of the environment. Here we have demonstrated that such systematic cultural variations can also be observed in cyberspace, focusing on self-presentation of photographs on Facebook, the most popular worldwide online social network site. We examined cultural differences in face/frame ratios for Facebook profile photographs in two studies. For Study 1, 200 digital profile face photographs of active Facebook users were randomly selected from native and immigrant Taiwanese and Americans. For Study 2, 312 Facebook profiles of undergraduate students of six public universities in East Asia (Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan) and the United States (California and Texas) were randomly selected. Overall, the two studies clearly showed that East Asian Facebook users are more likely to deemphasize their faces compared to Americans. Specifically, East Asians living in Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan exhibited a predilection for context inclusiveness in their profile photographs, whereas Americans tended to prioritize their focal face at the expense of the background. Moreover, East Asian Facebook users had lower intensity of facial expression than Americans on their photographs. These results demonstrate marked cultural differences in context-inclusive styles versus object-focused styles between East Asian and American Facebook users. Our findings extend previous findings from the real world to cyberspace, and provide a novel approach to investigate cognition and behaviors across cultures by using Facebook as a data collection platform.

  3. Cultural influences on Facebook photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Mao; Park, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Prior research in social psychology indicates that East Asians from collectivistic and interdependent sociocultural systems are more sensitive to contextual information than Westerners, whereas Westerners with individualistic and independent representation have a tendency to process focal and discrete attributes of the environment. Here we have demonstrated that such systematic cultural variations can also be observed in cyberspace, focusing on self-presentation of photographs on Facebook, the most popular worldwide online social network site. We examined cultural differences in face/frame ratios for Facebook profile photographs in two studies. For Study 1, 200 digital profile face photographs of active Facebook users were randomly selected from native and immigrant Taiwanese and Americans. For Study 2, 312 Facebook profiles of undergraduate students of six public universities in East Asia (Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan) and the United States (California and Texas) were randomly selected. Overall, the two studies clearly showed that East Asian Facebook users are more likely to deemphasize their faces compared to Americans. Specifically, East Asians living in Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taiwan exhibited a predilection for context inclusiveness in their profile photographs, whereas Americans tended to prioritize their focal face at the expense of the background. Moreover, East Asian Facebook users had lower intensity of facial expression than Americans on their photographs. These results demonstrate marked cultural differences in context-inclusive styles versus object-focused styles between East Asian and American Facebook users. Our findings extend previous findings from the real world to cyberspace, and provide a novel approach to investigate cognition and behaviors across cultures by using Facebook as a data collection platform. PMID:22468606

  4. REGIONAL DISPARITIES – HISTORICAL CULTURAL INFLUENCES AND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA OŢIL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the issue of regional disparities has become a highly debated topic, knowledge regarding regional disparities being a matter of political priority as their persistence hinders the appropriate integration process. On the other hand, emphasis was put on integration through the process of EU enlargement, thus highlighting other issues related to the nature and size of disparities. Regional disparities regarding development and the living standards of the population have long been the concern of all Member States. In the case of Romania, recently admitted into the European structures, registering large backlogs to economically developed countries, the intense mobilization of internal and external factors of economic growth in order to reduce and eliminate disparities compared to other countries, represents a clear necessity. The "European Union" (EU project is of an unprecedented complexity and scale because it involves a plurality of states, which are culturally and economically heterogeneous. Moreover, these economic and cultural differences exist even within the states. Hence, there is also the central idea of the Union, regarding unity in diversity. In Romania the local, regional communities have a strong identity, but still evolving. Taking into account Romania's objective of successfully integrating into European structures, and the principles of democratic decision-making requires that regional development should aim at reducing economic and social disparities based on a notable involvement of the local, regional communities. Based on these facts, the paper aims to present the current regional (and intra-regional disparities in Romania with regard to a number of synthetic indicators of capital, of labor and of outcomes. The persistence in time of these economic disparities can be explained by considering the cultural legacies – represented by norms, values, institutions, that impact on how people interact, communicate

  5. Cultural/interpersonal values and smoking in an ethnically diverse sample of Southern California adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jennifer B; Shakib, Sohaila; Gallaher, Peggy; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Mouttapa, Michele; Palmer, Paula H; Johnson, C Anderson

    2006-01-01

    In ethnically diverse school contexts, values from multiple cultures might influence adolescents' attitudes and behaviors. This study developed scales to assess cultural values among Southern California 6'-grade adolescents (N=2281) and evaluated the associations between values and smoking. The scales assessed values salient in many Hispanic and Asian cultures: Respect for Adults (e.g., filial piety, respeto), Interpersonal Harmony (e.g., saving face, simpatia), and Differentiated Gender Roles (e.g., machismo). In cross-sectional and one-year longitudinal models, Respect for Adults and Interpersonal Harmony were associated with a lower risk of lifetime smoking. The associations were significant even after controlling for demographic characteristics, friends' smoking, and parents' smoking, indicating that values influence adolescents' behavior over and above the effects of modeling and peer influence. Increased understanding of adolescents' values could inform the creation of smoking prevention programs for ethnically diverse adolescents.

  6. Using Contemporary Art to Challenge Cultural Values, Beliefs, and Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Wanda B.

    2006-01-01

    Art educators, like many other educators born or socialized within the main-stream culture of a society, seldom have an opportunity to identify, question, and challenge their cultural values, beliefs, assumptions, and perspectives because school culture typically reinforces those they learn at home and in their communities (Bush & Simmons, 1990).…

  7. Cultural diversity in organizations : Enhancing identification by valuing differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijters, Kyra; van der Zee, Karen I.; Otten, Sabine

    The present research investigated the role of perceived similarity in cultural values (associated with diversity in cultural backgrounds) and an intercultural group climate in predicting identification with both the organization and the work team. The relevance of perceived similarity in cultural

  8. Understanding cultural influences on back pain and back pain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschke, Nicholas; Lorenz, Eva; Pokora, Roman; Michaleff, Zoe A; Quartey, Jonathan N A; Oliveira, Vinicius Cunha

    2016-12-01

    Low back pain is highly prevalent and places a considerable burden on individuals, their families and communities. This back pain burden is unequally distributed around the world and within populations. Clinicians and researchers addressing back pain should be aware of the cultural, social and political context of back pain patients and how this context can influence pain perception, disability and health care use. Culture, which influences the beliefs and behaviour of individuals within a social group, could be considered an important contributor to the unequal distribution of back pain. However, there is paucity of high-quality research exploring the influence of culture on the experience and management of back pain. Further development and testing of specific tools, assessment methods and communication strategies are needed to improve our understanding of how cultural practices, values and identifications affect those dealing with back pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of the factors with significant influence on safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcasiu, M.; Nitoi, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a qualitative and a quantitative evaluation of the factors with significant impact on safety culture were performed. These techniques were established and applied in accordance with IAEA standards. In order to show the applicability and opportunity of the methodology a specific case study was prepared: safety culture evaluation for INR Pitesti. The qualitative evaluation was performed using specific developed questionnaires. Through analysis of the completed questionnaires was established the development stage of safety culture at INR. The quantitative evaluation was performed using a guide to rate the influence factors. For each factor was identified the influence (negative or positive) and ranking score was estimated using scoring criteria. The results have emphasized safety culture stages. The paper demonstrates the fact that using both quantitative and qualitative assessment techniques, a practical value of the safety culture concept is given. (authors)

  10. Cultural values: can they explain self-reported health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudijk, Bram; Donders, Rogier; Stalmeier, Peep

    2017-06-01

    Self-reported health (SRH) is a measure widely used in health research and population studies. Differences in SRH have been observed between countries and cultural values have been hypothesized to partly explain such differences. Cultural values can be operationalized by two cultural dimensions using the World Values Survey (WVS), namely the traditional/rational-secular and the survival/self-expression dimension. We investigate whether there is an association between the WVS cultural dimensions and SRH, both within and between countries. Data from 51 countries in the WVS is used and combined with macroeconomic data from the Worldbank database. The association between SRH and the WVS cultural dimensions is tested within each of the 51 countries and multilevel mixed models are used to test differences between these countries. Socio-demographic and macroeconomic variables are used to correct for non-cultural variables related to SRH. Within countries, the survival/self-expression dimension was positively associated with SRH, while in most countries there was a negative association for the traditional/rational-secular dimension. Values range between 4 and 17% within countries. Further analyses show that the associations within countries and between countries are similar. Controlling for macroeconomic and socio-demographic factors did not change our results. The WVS cultural dimensions predict SRH within and between countries. Contrary to our expectations, traditional/rational-secular values were negatively associated with SRH. As SRH is associated with cultural values between countries, cultural values could be considered when interpreting SRH between countries.

  11. The Transmission of Cultural Values via EFL Textbooks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyi

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the cultural values conveyed via texts and illustrations in EFL (English as a foreign language) textbooks currently in use in China. The large number of cultural values represented include patriotism, respect, diligence, collectivism, and equitable gender roles. These show that the national curriculum has been implemented in…

  12. Cultural Value and Inequality: A Critical Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Oakley, K; O'Brien, D

    2015-01-01

    Inequality has become essential to understanding contemporary British society and is at the forefront of media, political and practice discussions of the future of the arts in the UK. Whilst there is a wealth of work on traditional areas of inequality, such as those associated with income or gender, the relationship between culture, specifically cultural value, and inequality is comparatively under-researched. The literature review considers inequality and cultural value from two points of vi...

  13. Cultural Values Predicting Acculturation Orientations: Operationalizing a Quantitative Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes that acculturation orientations are related to two sets of cultural values: utilitarianism (Ut) and traditionalism (Tr). While utilitarian values enhance assimilation, traditional values support language and identity maintenance. It is proposed that the propensity to either end of this value opposition can be measured by an…

  14. Cultural Value, Measurement and Policy Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dave

    2015-01-01

    No matter what the national context, the question of how to understand the impact of government programmes, particularly in terms of value for money, has emerged as a complex problem to be solved by social scientific management. This article engages with these trends in two ways. It focuses on the UK to understand how these tools and technologies…

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF ECONOMIC VALUE ADDED AND MARKET VALUE ADDED ON CORPORATE VALUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taslim F.A.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to determine the influence of economic value added and market value added on corporate value of manufacturing companies on sector consumer goods industry listed in Indonesia Stock Exchanges of 2011-2014. The sample of this research was 10 manufacturing companies on sector consumer goods industry listed in Indonesia Stock Exchanges. The method used was purposive sampling technique. This research used confirmatory factor analysis to form a combined proxy of corporate value comprised price earning ratio, price to book value and Tobin's Q.

  16. Dynamic cultural influences on neural representations of the self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Joan Y; Harada, Tokiko; Komeda, Hidetsugu; Li, Zhang; Mano, Yoko; Saito, Daisuke; Parrish, Todd B; Sadato, Norihiro; Iidaka, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    People living in multicultural environments often encounter situations which require them to acquire different cultural schemas and to switch between these cultural schemas depending on their immediate sociocultural context. Prior behavioral studies show that priming cultural schemas reliably impacts mental processes and behavior underlying self-concept. However, less well understood is whether or not cultural priming affects neurobiological mechanisms underlying the self. Here we examined whether priming cultural values of individualism and collectivism in bicultural individuals affects neural activity in cortical midline structures underlying self-relevant processes using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Biculturals primed with individualistic values showed increased activation within medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) during general relative to contextual self-judgments, whereas biculturals primed with collectivistic values showed increased response within MPFC and PCC during contextual relative to general self-judgments. Moreover, degree of cultural priming was positively correlated with degree of MPFC and PCC activity during culturally congruent self-judgments. These findings illustrate the dynamic influence of culture on neural representations underlying the self and, more broadly, suggest a neurobiological basis by which people acculturate to novel environments.

  17. Cultural beliefs and values in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, M

    2012-04-01

    In 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) released its World Cancer Report, which indicated that cancer accounts for approximately 12% of all-cause mortality worldwide. IARC estimated that globally 7.6 million people died from cancer and that 12.4 million new cases were diagnosed in 2008. The report went on to project that, due to increases in life expectancy, improvements in clinical diagnostics, and shifting trends in health behaviors (e.g. increases in smoking and sedentary lifestyles), in the absence of significant efforts to improve global cancer control, cancer mortality could increase to 12.9 million and cancer incidence to 20 million by the year 2030. Looking deeper into the data, it becomes clear that cancer-related stigma and myths about cancer are important problems that must be addressed, although different from a country to another. Stigmas about cancer present significant challenges to cancer control: stigma can have a silencing effect, whereby efforts to increase cancer awareness are negatively affected. The social, emotional, and financial devastation that all too often accompanies a diagnosis of cancer is, in large part, due to the cultural myths and taboos surrounding the disease. Combating stigma, myths, taboos, and overcoming silence will play important roles in changing this provisional trajectory. There are several reasons that cancer is stigmatized. Many people in our area perceived cancer to be a fatal disease. Cancer symptoms or body parts affected by the disease can cultivate stigma. Fears about treatment can also fuel stigma. There was evidence of myths associated with cancer, such as the belief that cancer is contagious, or cancer may be seen as a punishment. After reviewing these different examples of cultural myths and taboos met in cancer care, we can report these lessons learned: 1. Around the world, cancer continues to carry a significant amount of stigma, myths, and taboos; however, there are opportunities to

  18. Cultural values and cross-cultural video consumption on YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minsu; Park, Jaram; Baek, Young Min; Macy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Video-sharing social media like YouTube provide access to diverse cultural products from all over the world, making it possible to test theories that the Web facilitates global cultural convergence. Drawing on a daily listing of YouTube's most popular videos across 58 countries, we investigate the consumption of popular videos in countries that differ in cultural values, language, gross domestic product, and Internet penetration rate. Although online social media facilitate global access to cultural products, we find this technological capability does not result in universal cultural convergence. Instead, consumption of popular videos in culturally different countries appears to be constrained by cultural values. Cross-cultural convergence is more advanced in cosmopolitan countries with cultural values that favor individualism and power inequality.

  19. Cultural values and cross-cultural video consumption on YouTube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Video-sharing social media like YouTube provide access to diverse cultural products from all over the world, making it possible to test theories that the Web facilitates global cultural convergence. Drawing on a daily listing of YouTube’s most popular videos across 58 countries, we investigate the consumption of popular videos in countries that differ in cultural values, language, gross domestic product, and Internet penetration rate. Although online social media facilitate global access to cultural products, we find this technological capability does not result in universal cultural convergence. Instead, consumption of popular videos in culturally different countries appears to be constrained by cultural values. Cross-cultural convergence is more advanced in cosmopolitan countries with cultural values that favor individualism and power inequality. PMID:28531228

  20. Cultural values and cross-cultural video consumption on YouTube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsu Park

    Full Text Available Video-sharing social media like YouTube provide access to diverse cultural products from all over the world, making it possible to test theories that the Web facilitates global cultural convergence. Drawing on a daily listing of YouTube's most popular videos across 58 countries, we investigate the consumption of popular videos in countries that differ in cultural values, language, gross domestic product, and Internet penetration rate. Although online social media facilitate global access to cultural products, we find this technological capability does not result in universal cultural convergence. Instead, consumption of popular videos in culturally different countries appears to be constrained by cultural values. Cross-cultural convergence is more advanced in cosmopolitan countries with cultural values that favor individualism and power inequality.

  1. Cultural value orientations, internalized homophobia, and accommodation in romantic relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaines, S.O.; Henderson, M.C.; Kim, M.; Gilstrap, S.; Yi, J.; Rusbult, C.E.; Hardin, D.P.; Gaertner, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the impact of cultural value orientations (i.e., the personally oriented value of individualism, and the socially oriented values of collectivism, familism, romanticism, and spiritualism) on accommodation (i.e., voice and loyalty, rather than exit and neglect,

  2. Influence of organizational culture on quality healthcare delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify if aspects of organizational culture may indicate a new terrain in the cultural influences-quality healthcare relationship. This research stems from the author's belief that viewing the role of head of department or directorate as pivotal to health care management is critical to health care planning and quality healthcare delivery. Interviews were undertaken among 50 professional clinician and non-clinician managers working in the role of head of department, in acute care hospitals in Ireland. The sample was drawn from the total population of 850 managers, utilized in a previous survey study. Organizational culture is more complex than was previously thought. Several cultural influences such as excellence in care delivery, ethical values, involvement, professionalism, value-for-money, cost of care, commitment to quality and strategic thinking were found to be key cultural determinants in quality care delivery. Health care managers perceive that in order to deliver quality focused care they need to act in a professional, committed manner and to place excellence at the forefront of care delivery, whilst at the same time being capable of managing the tensions that exist between cost effectiveness and quality of care. These tensions require further research in order to determine if quality of care is affected in a negative manner by those tensions. Originality relates to the new cultural terrain presented in this paper that recognizes the potential of health service managers to influence the organizations' culture and through this influence to take a greater part in ensuring that quality health care is delivered to their patients. It also seems to be important that value-for-money is viewed as an ethical means of delivering healthcare, and not as a conflict between quality and cost.

  3. The Socialization of Culturally Related Values and Prosocial Tendencies among Mexican American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P.; Carlo, Gustavo; Mahrer, Nicole E.; Davis, Alexandra N.

    2016-01-01

    The socialization of cultural values, ethnic identity, and prosocial behaviors is examined in a sample of 749 Mexican American adolescents [age 9–12 at the 5th grade; M(SD) = 10.42(.55); 49% female], their mothers, and fathers at the 5th, 7th and 10th grades. Parents’ familism values positively predicted their ethnic socialization practices. Mothers’ ethnic socialization positively predicted adolescents’ ethnic identity, which positively predicted adolescents’ familism. Familism was associated with several types of prosocial tendencies. Adolescents’ material success and personal achievement values were negatively associated with altruistic helping and positively associated with public helping, but not their parents’ corresponding values. Findings support cultural socialization models, asserting that parents’ traditional cultural values influence their socialization practices, youth cultural values, and youth prosocial behaviors. PMID:28262940

  4. THE ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE VALUES IN PUBLIC SECTORS IN LATVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Ivanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is an important issue because of its` big influence on enterprises’ productivity and consequently on realization of their objectives and goals. The validation and harmonization of organizational values and employees’ values has an important role in increasing operational efficiency. It has long been established that enterprises and organizations, where creative and interested employees who support and understand the organizational values of the company work, operate more effectively. In this article elements of organizational culture are studied with a particular focus on the meaning of organizational culture values. This article also reveals an evaluation of the organizational culture in public sectors in Latvia (based on publicly available data and sources of information. In the research there is an indepth analysis of official public organizational culture values included. The analysis has been done in the context of rating different leaders’ organizational values. In this article we analyze the conclusions of various writers on the subject of organizational culture framework characterization. The research of values guidance as well as a view of cultural meaning and influence on both individual and organizational development is described here. The authors analyze the results of empirical research about official public values of companies and the results of a public leaders’ survey (as well as the personal values of employees which provide an opportunity to compare organizational employees’ values with the common results of organizations. Conclusions shows public characterization of values and values distribution in potentially limitative and positive values. The in-depth research of organizational values is based on A. Maslow’s (Maslow 2000 hierarchy of needs approach and developed on R. Barrett`s (Barrett 2006 sample of seven levels of consciousness.

  5. Language Study: Language and Socio-Cultural Values: An Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Language is an important tool in the human society. Apart from the fact that it makes communication and integration possible, it is an important aspect of the socio-cultural life of a people. To this extent, language is closely knit with culture as it embodies the society's value system and patterned way of life. This paper ...

  6. Culturally-Anchored Values and University Education Experience Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsis, Ann; Foley, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally-anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience. Design/methodology/approach: Culturally diverse business students (n 1/4 548) studying at an Australian university were surveyed using previously established scales.…

  7. Reasoning about the value of cultural awareness in international collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bernáld

    Full Text Available As international collaborations become a part of everyday life, cultural awareness becomes crucial for our ability to work with people from other countries. People see, evaluate, and interpret things differently depending on their cultural background and cultural awareness. This includes aspects such as appreciation of different communication patterns, the awareness of different value systems and, not least, to become aware of our own cultural values, beliefs and perceptions. This paper addresses the value of cultural awareness in general through describing how it was introduced in two computer science courses with a joint collaboration between students from the US and Sweden. The cultural seminars provided to the students are presented, as well as a discussion of the students\\' reflections and the teachers\\' experiences. The cultural awareness seminars provided students with a new understanding of cultural differences which greatly improved the international collaboration. Cultural awareness may be especially important for small countries like New Zealand and Sweden, since it could provide an essential edge in collaborations with representatives from more \\'powerful\\' countries.

  8. A quarter century of Culture's Consequences: a review of empirical research incorporating Hofstede's cultural values framework

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley L Kirkman; Kevin B Lowe; Cristina B Gibson

    2006-01-01

    Since Geert Hofstede's Culture's Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values (Sage, 1980) was published, researchers have utilized Hofstede's cultural values framework in a wide variety of empirical studies. We review 180 studies published in 40 business and psychology journals and two international annual volumes between 1980 and June 2002 to consolidate what is empirically verifiable about Hofstede's cultural values framework. We discuss limitations in the Hofstede-inspir...

  9. Safety culture and networks of influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Carlos Henrique V.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Vieira Neto, Antonio S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the social networks that influence the formation and maintenance of the safety culture within the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP). From the mapping and analysis of social networks, actors with a significant degree of influence were identified. Later using a questionnaire, the beliefs of the population sample were mapped. Thus, the importance of key actors in the network analysis could be confirmed statistically. Therefore, based on the mentioned methods we could demonstrate our hypothesis, that there are some social networks that are important in the formation of safety culture, as well as the fact that the influence of some distinguished actors plays an essential role in this amalgam. (author)

  10. Safety culture and networks of influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Carlos Henrique V.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Vieira Neto, Antonio S., E-mail: carloshvp@usp.br, E-mail: barroso@ipen.br, E-mail: asvneto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper analyzes the social networks that influence the formation and maintenance of the safety culture within the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP). From the mapping and analysis of social networks, actors with a significant degree of influence were identified. Later using a questionnaire, the beliefs of the population sample were mapped. Thus, the importance of key actors in the network analysis could be confirmed statistically. Therefore, based on the mentioned methods we could demonstrate our hypothesis, that there are some social networks that are important in the formation of safety culture, as well as the fact that the influence of some distinguished actors plays an essential role in this amalgam. (author)

  11. Climate change, values, and the cultural cognition thesis

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Johannes; Sahlin, Nils-Eric; Wallin, Annika

    2015-01-01

    Recently the importance of addressing values in discussions of risk perception and adaptation to climate change has become manifest. Values-based approaches to climate change adaptation and the cultural cognition thesis both illustrate this trend. We argue that in the wake of this development it is necessary to take the dynamic relationship between values and beliefs seriously, to acknowledge the possibility of bi-directional relationships between values and beliefs, and to address the variet...

  12. Avenues of Influence Cross-Cultural Implications (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    cultural , Social Influence, Communication modality, Emotional contagion, Individualistic , Collectivistic , Group orientation, Behavioral influences 16...appeals to take additional training – Culture groups: Individualistic and Collectivistic – Six persuasive appeals will be used in the stimuli: rational...between media type and emotional contagion Does culture influence the impact of social proof? H4: Collectivistic cultures will engage in

  13. From "Kickeando las malias" (kicking the withdrawals) to "Staying clean": The impact of cultural values on cessation of injection drug use in aging Mexican-American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, David V; Torres, Luis R; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Bordnick, Patrick S; Ren, Yi; Torres, Melissa I M; Deleon, Freddie; Pericot-Valverde, Irene; Lopez, Tenee

    2014-06-01

    Drug use among older adults is a growing concern, particularly for the burgeoning Hispanic population. Older adults seeking drug treatment will double over the next decade to almost 6 million. Cultural factors influence drug use, and more specifically, Hispanic cultural values influence heroin use. This study explored Mexican-American injection drug users' adherence to traditional Hispanic cultural values and their impact on cessation. Ethnographic interviews endorsed contextualized influences of values on heroin use. Cultural values functioned dichotomously, influencing both initiation and cessation. Understanding the impact of cultural values on substance abuse is critical given the changing demographics in American society.

  14. Exploring the Effects of Cultural Values and Beliefs on Cross-Cultural Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyin; Wang, Yingchun; Drewry, Anne Wang

    2006-01-01

    This article seeks to develop a framework for assessing the impacts of cultural values and beliefs on cross-cultural training (CCT). It argues that culture affects CCT processes including the use of training methods, trainers' selection, and trainees' learning style. The article also reasons that the congruence between parent and host cultures…

  15. Desired emotions across cultures: A value-based account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Maya; Schwartz, Shalom H; Cieciuch, Jan; Riediger, Michaela; Torres, Claudio; Scollon, Christie; Dzokoto, Vivian; Zhou, Xiaolu; Vishkin, Allon

    2016-07-01

    Values reflect how people want to experience the world; emotions reflect how people actually experience the world. Therefore, we propose that across cultures people desire emotions that are consistent with their values. Whereas prior research focused on the desirability of specific affective states or 1 or 2 target emotions, we offer a broader account of desired emotions. After reporting initial evidence for the potential causal effects of values on desired emotions in a preliminary study (N = 200), we tested the predictions of our proposed model in 8 samples (N = 2,328) from distinct world cultural regions. Across cultural samples, we found that people who endorsed values of self-transcendence (e.g., benevolence) wanted to feel more empathy and compassion, people who endorsed values of self-enhancement (e.g., power) wanted to feel more anger and pride, people who endorsed values of openness to change (e.g., self-direction) wanted to feel more interest and excitement, and people who endorsed values of conservation (e.g., tradition) wanted to feel more calmness and less fear. These patterns were independent of differences in emotional experience. We discuss the implications of our value-based account of desired emotions for understanding emotion regulation, culture, and other individual differences. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Imparting Cultural Values to Chinese Children through Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyi; Morrison, Johnetta W.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the occurrence of modernization and globalization in Chinese society over the last few decades, the content of 145 stories, published in the most popular Chinese children's story magazine from the 1980s to the present, were examined for the representation of cultural values. The presence of Chinese, Western and social-moral values in…

  17. Cultural Values and Happiness: An East-West Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luo; Gilmour, Robin; Kao, Shu-Fang

    2001-01-01

    Examines the relationships between cultural values and experiences of happiness in two samples focusing on university students in Taiwan (n=439) and the United Kingdom (n=344). Reports that the relationships between values and happiness were stronger in the Taiwanese sample. Includes references and an appendix. (CMK)

  18. Dissemination of Values and Culture through the E-Folklore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Normaliza Abd; Affendi, Nik Rafidah Nik Muhammad; Pawi, Awang Azman Awang

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the values and culture in the e-folklore. The objectives of the study were to identify and discuss the values in the song lyric "The Stork and the Mouse Deer." The song was taken from phone application in the compilation of the "Kingfisher stories" copyrighted by Dewan Bahasa and Pustaka. The e-folklore…

  19. Segmentation of culturally diverse visitors' values in forest recreation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Li; H.C. Zinn; G.E. Chick; J.D. Absher; A.R. Graefe; Y. Hsu

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential utility of HOFSTEDE’s measure of cultural values (1980) for group segmentation in an ethnically diverse population in a forest recreation context, and to validate the values segmentation, if any, via socio-demographic and service quality related variables. In 2002, the visitors to the Angeles National Forest (ANF)...

  20. Cultural values and immigrant entrepreneurship: the Chinese in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K B; Chiang, S N

    1994-01-01

    "It is the intent of this paper to examine the interrelationships between early socialisation into core Chinese cultural values, international migration and Chinese immigrant entrepreneurship.... It is through a developmental socialisation process by which [cultural] values are articulated in family and kin network dynamics that social organisations begin to develop and define what is popularly understood as the 'Chinese way of doing business'. We argue that among the overseas Chinese, this way of doing business must be viewed historically and developmentally, as it is intimately intertwined with transmigration experiences and their consequences in shaping values necessary for the emergence and development of entrepreneurship." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA) excerpt

  1. Cultural factors influencing Japanese nurses' assertive communication. Part 1: Collectivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Mieko; Stone, Teresa E; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2018-02-06

    Culture influences the way health-care professionals communicate with each other and their ability to relate to colleagues in an assertive manner. Cultural barriers can also make it difficult for nurses to speak up even when they have concerns about patient safety. An understanding of the potential impact of cultural factors is therefore needed when developing assertiveness communication training programs. This paper presents the findings from a study that explored Japanese nurses' perceptions of how culture and values impact assertive communication in health care. Semistructured interviews with 23 registered nurses were undertaken, and data were analyzed using directed content analysis. Two major themes were identified: collectivism and hierarchy/power. In the present study, we discuss the cultural values related to collectivism that included four categories of "wa" (harmony), "uchi to soto" (inside and outside), implicit communication/ambiguity, and "nemawashi" (groundwork). The findings highlight the impact of culture on nurses' assertive communication behaviors and can be used to inform the design of culturally-appropriate assertiveness communication training programs for Japanese nurses working both within their own country or internationally. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Cultivating character education through transforming school cultural values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the transformation of school cultural values in character education. This study aimed to outline the importance regarding the transformation of school cultural values in the management of: a curriculum and learning, b students, c teachers and school practitioners to realize the character education. This study was a qualitative study which employed a case study design. The participants of this study were the principals, teachers, practitioners, and students of Senior High School in Gorontalo Province of Indonesia. The results of the analysis revealed that the habituation of cultural values such as religious values, honesty, togetherness, modesty, and discipline which have formed a systematic and persistent integration with the management of curriculum, of students, of teachers and practitioners, can accomplish the goals of character education that is creating a generation that is emotionally, socially, and spiritually intelligent.

  3. Arab Cultural Influences on Intertemporal Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    Godfrey, Ph.D. Winset Group, LLC. Fairfax, VA Arab Cultural Influences 2 Introduction “The handling of time is revealing of how unconscious implicit...faint strains of this tendency in, for example, the works of William Shakespeare . Here, Western society has extracted, excerpted and restated...Subjective probability: A judgment of representativeness. Cognitive Psychology, 3, 430-454. Khaldûn, I. (1967). The Muqaddimah: An Introduction to

  4. Cultural values and performance appraisal: assessing the effects of rater self-construal on performance ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vipanchi; Roch, Sylvia G

    2013-01-01

    Much of the prior research investigating the influence of cultural values on performance ratings has focused either on conducting cross-national comparisons among raters or using cultural level individualism/collectivism scales to measure the effects of cultural values on performance ratings. Recent research has shown that there is considerable within country variation in cultural values, i.e. people in one country can be more individualistic or collectivistic in nature. Taking the latter perspective, the present study used Markus and Kitayama's (1991) conceptualization of independent and interdependent self-construals as measures of individual variations in cultural values to investigate within culture variations in performance ratings. Results suggest that rater self-construal has a significant influence on overall performance evaluations; specifically, raters with a highly interdependent self-construal tend to show a preference for interdependent ratees, whereas raters high on independent self-construal do not show a preference for specific type of ratees when making overall performance evaluations. Although rater self-construal significantly influenced overall performance evaluations, no such effects were observed for specific dimension ratings. Implications of these results for performance appraisal research and practice are discussed.

  5. THE ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE VALUES IN PUBLIC SECTORS IN LATVIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Maija; Kokina, Irēna

    2016-01-01

    Organizational culture is an important issue because of its` big influence on enterprises’ productivity and consequently on realization of their objectives and goals. The validation and harmonization of organizational values and employees’ values has an important role in increasing operational efficiency. It has long been established that enterprises and organizations, where creative and interested employees who support and understand the organizational values of the company wo...

  6. Cultural ecosystem services of mountain regions: Modelling the aesthetic value

    OpenAIRE

    Schirpke, Uta; Timmermann, Florian; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Tasser, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Mountain regions meet an increasing demand for pleasant landscapes, offering many cultural ecosystem services to both their residents and tourists. As a result of global change, land managers and policy makers are faced with changes to this landscape and need efficient evaluation techniques to assess cultural ecosystem services. This study provides a spatially explicit modelling approach to estimating aesthetic landscape values by relating spatial landscape patterns to human perceptions via a...

  7. The influence of organizational and national culture on new product performance

    OpenAIRE

    Eisend, Martin; Evanschitzky, Heiner; Gilliland, David I.

    2016-01-01

    The authors conduct a meta-analysis on the combined influence of organizational and national culture on new product performance. For this purpose, they refer to the effectiveness of value congruency and develop a conceptual model describing the fit between organizational culture types as suggested by the competing values framework and national culture, as described by Hofstede's cultural dimensions. The meta-analysis is based on 489 effect sizes taken from 123 manuscripts. The findings show t...

  8. The consumption values' influence on smartphone's ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrovcikova, Katarina; Sudzina, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to analyze impact of factors on adoption of smartphones using the Theory of Consumption Values framework. The Theory of Consumption Values provides a framework to categorize customer's motives for buying; it divides them into five groups: functional values, social values,...

  9. Cultural Characteristics and Values in Sorsogueños’ Poems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan F. Astillero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the Filipino way of life, it is imperative to study the literature of the Philippines specifically the poetry of Sorsogon for it serves as a receptacle and a showcase of cultural characteristics, values, and traditions of Sorsogueños. The contemporary times showcase Sorsogueños’ literature proliferating trilingually in English, Filipino and the vernacular. The desire for self- expression in any language seems to describe that literature is the most effective way to identify what comprises a meaningful human life. This study analyzed and extracted the cultural characteristics and values manifested in Sorsogueños poems. This is a descriptive qualitative study using documentary and content analysis of the works of Sorsogueños’ poets in terms of the cultural characteristics and values manifested in them. The researchers collected 22 published poems in the 16 municipalities of Sorsogon. Analysis of the poems showed the following cultural characteristics viz: Sorsogueños are very religious; they are very sentimental and emotional; very passionate and lovable; optimistic and have positive viewpoint in the future. They are also risk-takers; have regards on the welfare of others, nationalistic have sense of brotherhood/comradeship and full of hope despite hardships in life. Values embodied in the analyzed poems consist of the elements of hospitality, comradeship, nationalism, unselfish love, confidence, ingenuity, courtesy, hopes, aspirations, dreams, culture, and traditions of Sorsogueños.

  10. Safety culture : a significant influence on safety in transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    An organizations safety culture can influence safety outcomes. Research and experience show that when safety culture is strong, accidents are less frequent and less severe. As a result, building and maintaining strong safety cultures should be a t...

  11. An assessment of organisational values, culture and performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-13

    Sep 13, 2012 ... De Sa A, MBChB, MCFP, Family Physician, University of Cape Town. Schlemmer ... may influence the patient-healthcare worker relationship. For example ..... Barrett Value Centre [homepage on the Internet]. c2012. Available ...

  12. NETWORK CULTURE - INTEGRAL PART OF NEW VALUES OF CIVIL SOCIETY

    OpenAIRE

    Vyacheslav Vladimirovich Sukhanov

    2014-01-01

    New technologies not only improve working conditions or communication, they are also bringing new values to  the society. This article discusses the concept of «network culture», which is now perceived by society as an integral part of values that can only exist in a civil society. We can research ( find)   this kind of society in modern time period in Russia. The article analyzes the meaning of communication, how to use it, development processes in network media.  Nowadays network culture an...

  13. Searching for Symbolic Value of Cattle: Tropical Livestock Units, Market Price, and Cultural Value of Maasai Livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Quinlan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine metabolic, market, and symbolic values of livestock relative to cultural “positioning” by gender, marriage, and household production among Maasai people in Simanjiro, Tanzania to assess local “proximate currencies” relevant for “cultural success.” Data from mixed methods ethnographic research include qualitative interviews since 2012, observation of 85 livestock market sales in 2013 and 2015, and 37 short key informant interviews in 2015. We examine fit between market values, Tropical Livestock Units (TLU, weight-based species exchange ratio, and perceived value from interviews for moran (unmarried men, muruo (married men, and tɔmɔnɔ́k (married women. Hedonic regression using livestock species, sex, maturity, and size accounted for 90% of the local market price of livestock. We compared the market-based exchange ratio between cattle and smallstock (sheep and goats to TLU and perceived values situating symbolic value of cattle in terms of Maasai household production schema. One TLU model accurately predicted market exchange ratios, while another predicted hypothetical exchanges, suggesting need for improved livestock wealth estimation for pastoralists. Ritual context, subsistence work, and cultural position influenced perceived values: Moran overvalued cattle by 100% of the local market value. Tɔmɔnɔ́k accurately perceived the market exchange ratio despite never directly engaging in livestock market transactions. Muruo perceived exchange ratios intermediate between moran and tɔmɔnɔ́k. We argue that these perceptions of value reflect distinct labor responsibilities of moran, muruo, and tɔmɔnɔ́k in livestock management, differential value of bridewealth, and control of meat and milk.Attention to value of different livestock species in cultural models of production may prove useful for development efforts.

  14. Cultural estrangement: the role of personal and societal value discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Mark M; Gebauer, Jochen E; Maio, Gregory R

    2006-01-01

    Study 1 examined whether cultural estrangement arises from discrepancies between personal and societal values (e.g., freedom) rather than from discrepancies in attitudes toward political (e.g., censorship) or mundane (e.g., pizza) objects. The relations between different types of value discrepancies, estrangement, subjective well-being, and need for uniqueness also were examined. Results indicated that personal-societal discrepancies in values and political attitudes predicted estrangement, whereas mundane attitude discrepancies were not related to estrangement. As expected, value discrepancies were the most powerful predictor of estrangement. Value discrepancies were not related to subjective well-being but fulfilled a need for uniqueness. Study 2 replicated the relations between value discrepancies, subjective well-being, and need for uniqueness while showing that a self-report measure of participants' values and a peer-report measure of the participants' values yielded the same pattern of value discrepancies. Together, the studies reveal theoretical and empirical benefits of conceptualizing cultural estrangement in terms of value discrepancies.

  15. Does culture medium influence offspring birth weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Beatriz; Boada, Montserrat; Rodríguez, Ignacio; Coroleu, Buenaventura; Barri, Pedro N; Veiga, Anna

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether the type of medium used to culture human embryos in vitro influences neonatal birth weight after IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). A prospective study and a retrospective study. Private assisted reproduction center. The prospective study included 449 IVF/ICSI cycles from August to December 2008. The retrospective analysis was performed for 2,518 IVF/ICSI cycles from October 2006 to December 2010. In the prospective study, patients were randomized for embryo culture in Cook or Vitrolife medium. The retrospective study was performed with three different culture media (MediCult, Cook, and Vitrolife). Mean birth weight, adjusted for gestational age and gender (z score) of newborns. In the prospective study, the average z score was -0.19 ± 0.85 in Cook and 0.08 ± 1.40 in Vitrolife. In the retrospective study, the z scores obtained in each group were as follows: Cook, -0.14 ± 0.96; MediCult, 0.06 ± 1.13; and Vitrolife, 0.03 ± 1.05. No significant differences were observed regarding the birth weight of children born in the different groups in both studies. The results do not show any relationship between the medium used for in vitro culture and mean birth weight adjusted for gestational age and gender of singletons born after IVF/ICSI. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Do fair value adjustments influence dividend policy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goncharov, I.; van Triest, S.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of positive fair value adjustments on dividend policy. If fair value adjustments are transitory in nature and managers are able to assess their implications for future earnings, fair value adjustments in net income is expected to have no distribution consequences. However,

  17. Nigeria's Core Values and the Use of Social Media to Promote Cultural Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemah, Ezekiel S.; Ekhareafo, Daniel O.; Olaniran, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how Nigeria's core values are being redefined in the face of the new media and cultural globalisation era; it identifies Nigeria's core values to include age, greeting, dressing, among others. The questionnaire was used as an instrument to elicit data from the sampled population (Jos South Local Government Area of Plateau…

  18. The influence of national culture on organizational change and competitiveness in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Đorđe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalization of business has created a worldwide market where companies from around the world make interactions. National cultures have a significant influence on the way companies do business, as well as on company's market position. National culture influences the way managers interpret their environment, the types of organizational changes and employee motivation. Companies must perform more rigorous selection of workers, so as to employ a worker whose individual cultural values (that are formed under the influence of national culture correspond to organizational culture of a company, improving the competitiveness of companies in the process.

  19. Playing up and playing down cultural identity: Introducing cultural influence and cultural variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Gail M; Nguyen, Jacqueline; Iturbide, Maria I

    2017-01-01

    Cultural variability (CV) is introduced as an overlooked dimension of cultural identity development pertaining to emphasizing and de-emphasizing the influence of a single cultural identity (i.e., cultural influence [CI]) on daily interactions and behaviors. The Cultural IDentity Influence Measure (CIDIM) is introduced as a novel measure of CI and CV, and hypothesis-driven validation is conducted in two samples along with exploration of associations between CV and well-being. A multicultural sample of 242 emerging adults participated in a daily diary study (Mage = 19.95 years, SDage = 1.40) by completing up to eight daily online surveys containing the CIDIM, criterion measures (ethnic identity, other group orientation, ethnic identity salience and daily variability in salience, social desirability), and measures of personal and interpersonal well-being. A second validation sample (n = 245) completed a 1-time survey with the CIDIM and a subset of criterion measures. Results using both samples show evidence of CI and CV and demonstrate the validity, reliability, and domain-sensitivity of the CIDIM. Further, CV made unique and positive contributions to predicting interaction quality after accounting for ethnic salience and variability in ethnic salience. An analytic approach utilizing standard deviations produced near-identical results to multilevel modeling and is recommended for parsimony. Ethnic minority and majority individuals make daily adjustments to play up and play down the influence of cultural identity on their social interactions and behaviors, and these adjustments predict interpersonal well-being. Cultural influence and cultural variability contribute to our emerging understanding of cultural identity as dynamic and agentic. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Teaching about Respect and Tolerance with Presentations on Cultural Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Serin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Teaching students from diverse backgrounds requires more than sufficient. Very often battles occur among students due to not understanding each other’s values. This study presents experience of a teacher who teaches students from diverse religious, ethnic, and cultural groups. As disrespect, misunderstanding and intolerance were common in the class, it was difficult for the teacher to advance respect among the students for diversity. In order to encourage the students to embrace diversity, the teacher made them introduce their cultures through presentations in the classroom. Although at the beginning the students continued to tease each other by making fun of each other’s cultural values, after some time it was discovered that they were entering the classroom with a real respect and tolerance for diversity.

  1. The Relationship between Cultural Values and Learning Preference: The Impact of Acculturation Experiences upon East Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Szu-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Globalization and technology advancement are creating more biculturalism at workplaces and learning settings. However, little is known about acculturation experience and its influence on a person's cultural values and learning preference. The research reported in this study investigates the impact of acculturation experiences upon the relationship…

  2. Beyond Economy: Impact of National Cultural Values on Nationwide Broadband Internet Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how the non-conventional factors of national cultural values and government involvement affect the diffusion of broadband Internet technologies in various nations around the world. An innovative element of the study was the examination of the influence patterns at different stages of diffusion, which was measured by the number…

  3. Predictors of Cultural Values Conflict for Asian Indian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduvettoor-Davidson, Anju; Inman, Arpana G.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between the family environments and coping styles and the cultural values conflicts of 110 Asian Indian women. Results indicated that women perceiving supportive family environments had less sex role conflict. Additionally, avoidant and emotion-focused coping predicted high conflict regarding intimate relations…

  4. Ramogi Dance and Luo Cultural Values | Odwar | Humanities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specifically the study describes the dance performance with a view to analyze the dance vocabulary so as to provide an interpretation of how the dance movements enact the Luo cultural values. This study is based on personal interview with two Ramogi performers and my observation of the dance performance during ...

  5. Complementary Person-Culture Values Fit and Hierarchical Career Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtschlag, Claudia; Morales, Carlos E.; Masuda, Aline D.; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Although career success is an issue of global concern, few studies have examined the antecedents of career success across cultures. In this study we test whether the relationship between individuals' self-enhancement values (achievement and power) and hierarchical status differs across 29 countries and whether this variation depends on countries'…

  6. Organizational Culture, Values, and Routines in Iranian Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Zavareh, Davoud Khorasani; Masiello, Italo

    2009-01-01

    In Iran, restructuring of medical education and the health care delivery system in 1985 resulted in a rapid shift from elite to mass education, ultimately leading to an increase in the number of medical schools, faculties, and programs and as well as some complications. This study aimed to investigate views on academic culture, values, and…

  7. Species richness alone does not predict cultural ecosystem service value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose A. Graves; Scott M. Pearson; Monica G. Turner

    2017-01-01

    Sustaining biodiversity and ecosystem services are common conservation goals. However, understanding relationships between biodiversity and cultural ecosystem services (CES) and determining the best indicators to represent CES remain crucial challenges. We combined ecological and social data to compare CES value of wildflower communities based on observed...

  8. Mass Media and Cultural Memory: Idealization of Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljana Siljanovska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical approach in defining the means for mass communication expressed in functionalist theory, especially in John Riley’s model, determines mass media as a social subsystem which is functionally connected with other systems in society that arises from their mutual conditionality and their causative and consequential connection with politics, economy, education, socialization and culture. The functions of articulating opinion by themselves problematize the creation of creative-thinking public because the imposition of topics, representation of individuals, values and norms of a culture, a space, a time is mediated by the ideological and functional mechanism of an organized structuring and transfer of messages simultaneously to as big an audience as possible. The vastness of the audience simply cannot by itself be understood as democratization of the culture in its broadest sense or simply because it is not a high, elite culture intended solely for a certain number of users.  It is that exact media reality, which almost always and exclusively is created through the selection of facts and values in relation to the audience and the factor of time, which simultaneously problematizes individual and collective memory. In the era of postmodernism and globalization of societies, media shaped content, in different mass media, especially on TV and the Internet, stimulate cultural development and pluralism of ideas in intercultural communication. However at the same time the setting of the stage for a media product, imposed by market logic of supply and demand erases the borders of difference, restructures the modalities of cultural identifiers and relativizes the dimensions of cultural identity through the unification of values transformed in surpassed or modern collective memories and concepts, such as – Balkanization, Americanization, Europeanization, civil society.

  9. Cultural influences for college student language brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskirch, Robert S; Kim, Su Yeong; Zamboanga, Byron L; Schwartz, Seth J; Bersamin, Melina; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Children from immigrant families often translate communication for parents, a process known as language brokering (LB). LB begins in childhood, but may continue through emerging adulthood, even when individuals are in college. We surveyed 1,222 university students with two immigrant parents and compared non-language brokers, infrequent language brokers, and frequent language brokers on a variety of ethnic, cultural, and identity measures. Significant differences emerged for cultural heritage value orientation, ethnic identity, and dimensions of acculturation with frequent language brokers scoring highest, infrequent language brokers scoring in the middle, and non-language brokers scoring the lowest on these measures. There were no significant differences on acculturative stress among these three groups. These results suggest that LB experiences may contribute to the development of psychological assets for ethnic minority, emerging adults from immigrant families.

  10. THE EFFECT OF PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CULTURAL VALUES TOWARDS THE MARKETING ETHICS OF ACADEMICIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuah Chin Wei

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the personal cultural values and professional values of academicians in regards to marketing ethics. This research uses Singhapakdi and Vitell’s (1993 marketing norms scale and professional value scale together with Yoo and Donthu’s (2002 three dimensional measures of culture operation alised at the individual level. The findings showed that Uncertainty Avoidance and Professional Values influenced academicians’ marketing ethics. It is therefore suggested that managers should look into methods and ways of cultivating professionalism among academicians in order for them to possess good marketing ethics. The findings also showed that demographic factors such as age, gender, years of working experience, academic qualification do not have any influence on academicians’ marketing ethics. Other implications of the study were also discussed.

  11. The Study on the Preferences of Customer Personal Values with Chinese Culture Background in Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yue

    Customer personal values are the important factors which affect customer behaviors, and they guide and decide the customer's attitudes and behaviors on the products or the services. The paper thinks there are only several important customer personal values to guide customer's decisions, and these values will have -strong cultural differences. This study focuses on discussing the preferences of customer personal values with Chinese culture background when customers consume service and analyzes on the customer preferences of customer personal values with the deep interview method. After interviewing 16 responders with the semi-structured questionnaires, the study finds out some interesting results: (1) Some customers have recognized the existent of customer personal values, even though customer perceived values still have the strong influences on customer behaviors. (2) As they pursue to high quality lives, customers enjoy the lives in easy and pleasure way and care about the safe of the family. Quick response, simple and professional services contribute to enhance the experiences of easy and pleasure lives. (3) Non-rational consumers need the respect from the staff and the companies seriously. In comparison, the rational customers care less about the respect. (4) The sociable requirements have become a common consuming psychology of the customers. More and more customers try to gain the friends by consuming some services. (5) The preferences of customer personal values have a close relationship with the Chinese culture, such as collective values, family conception and "face" culture. The results benefit for service companies improving service brands and service quality.

  12. Cultural influences on parental bereavement in Chinese families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sio-Wa; Brotherson, Sean E

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the bereavement experiences of parents who had experienced the death of a child in Chinese families. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 bereaved parents in Macau, China. Narrative accounts of Chinese parents' experience in the loss of a child were explored to understand how their connection to the deceased child and their worldview were influenced by cultural beliefs and values. Study themes related to parental connections with the deceased child included the use of object linking, memorializing acts, and avoidance of traditional funeral processes, with clear patterns of Chinese cultural influence. Additionally, themes related to impacts on parental worldview included use of the concept of fate as a rationale for child loss and influences on religious orientation. The influence of cultural beliefs and background on Chinese parents as they deal with the issue of a child's death was apparent. Further research is needed and will benefit our understanding of parental bereavement in Chinese families.

  13. Culture, temporal focus, and values of the past and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tieyuan; Ji, Li-Jun; Spina, Roy; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2012-08-01

    This article examines cultural differences in how people value future and past events. Throughout four studies, the authors found that European Canadians attached more monetary value to an event in the future than to an identical event in the past, whereas Chinese and Chinese Canadians placed more monetary value to a past event than to an identical future event. The authors also showed that temporal focus-thinking about the past or future-explained cultural influences on the temporal value asymmetry effect. Specifically, when induced to think about and focus on the future, Chinese valued the future more than the past, just like Euro-Canadians; when induced to think about and focus on the past, Euro-Canadians valued the past more than the future, just like Chinese.

  14. Gender influencers on work values of black adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V G; Shields, L C

    1987-01-01

    Work values and key influencers of a sample of black male and female adolescents were examined. Results indicated that boys and girls valued both the intrinsic and extrinsic rewards of work; however, girls reported slighter stronger extrinsic values than did boys. In addition, the sexes reported differences in the importance of specific work values such as "making lots of money," and "doing important things." When naming a key influencer, respondents tended to cite a same-sex and race individual. Sex of one's key influencer was related to certain work values, with subjects reporting a male key influencer valuing "trying out one's own ideas" and "having a secure future" more than those reporting a female key influencer. The interaction of sex of subject and sex of key influencer was significant on one of the work value outcomes. Implications of these findings are considered.

  15. Reproduction of cultural values: a cross-cultural examination of stories people create and transmit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Toshie; Yussen, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Narratives are one of the oldest and universal forms of communication in human societies. In the present research, the authors hypothesized that narratives play an important role in the reproduction of cultural values. To test this idea, Study 1 examined the contents of stories created by American and Japanese participants for their reflection of individualistic and collectivistic values, and Study 2 examined whether information consistent with cultural values would be more likely to be retained and passed onto others. The studies found that American participants created stories that reflected individualistic values and retained more individualistic information than collectivistic information when they transmitted a story to others. In contrast, Japanese participants created stories that reflected collectivistic values and retained more collectivistic information than individualistic information when they transmitted a story to others. These findings support the idea that narrative communication is an important part of cultural reproduction mechanism.

  16. Cultural value orientations, internalized homophobia, and accommodation in romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Stanley O; Henderson, Michael C; Kim, Mary; Gilstrap, Samuel; Yi, Jennifer; Rusbult, Caryl E; Hardin, Deletha P; Gaertner, Lowell

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the impact of cultural value orientations (i.e., the personally oriented value of individualism, and the socially oriented values of collectivism, familism, romanticism, and spiritualism) on accommodation (i.e., voice and loyalty, rather than exit and neglect, responses to partners' anger or criticism) in heterosexual and gay relationships; and we examined the impact of internalized homophobia (i.e., attitudes toward self, other, and disclosure) on accommodation specifically in gay relationships. A total of 262 heterosexuals (102 men and 162 women) and 857 gays (474 men and 383 women) participated in the present study. Consistent with hypotheses, among heterosexuals and gays, socially oriented values were significantly and positively related to accommodation (whereas the personally oriented value of individualism was unrelated to accommodation); and among gays in particular, internalized homophobia was significantly and negatively related to accommodation. Implications for the study of heterosexual and gay relationships are discussed.

  17. Analysis on How does the Culture Conflicts Influence Business Negotiation and Foreign Investment in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔颖

    2007-01-01

    Culture is a distinguishing feature of a nation. Usually we divide culture into eastern and western categories. As the representative of eastern and western culture, China and America have a lot of incongruities in terms of cultural values which have deep influences on international business negotiation. This thesis aims to analyze the main cultural differences of the target countries on five processes of cross-cultural business negotiation. After a general view of these theories Ⅰ suggest some negotiating strategies and tactics to solve Sino-US cultural conflict appearing on the negotiating table. And with a real business invest case happened between US company of Intel and Dalian of China.

  18. The role of values-based leadership in sustaining a culture of caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    At the heart of healthcare are fundamental values like caring and compassion as well as the duty shared by healthcare organizations to address the care needs of those in their communities who are vulnerable, injured, or ill. A concern being raised by some political analysts in Canada is that fundamental values are being challenged by current economic and political influences that are reshaping the landscape of healthcare in this country. Influences from industry, technology, and business have significantly shifted healthcare from its moral foundations. A culture of caring is also challenged by the values and behaviours of individuals that negatively impact staff morale and inter-professional collaboration in many work settings. If a "culture of caring" is to survive the canons of cost containment, the impact of recurrent political wrangling, and other substantive influences, then healthcare must be guided by committed values-based leadership. Using case illustrations, this article attempts to explain the characteristics and role of values-based leaders in promoting those values that inspire a culture of caring.

  19. A Brief Talk on American Cultural Values: Reflected on the Movie the Pursuit of Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temmy Temmy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available America as one of world’s biggest developed countries has a very strong influence on global economy, politics, education, science, and military. America is also one of teaching Chinese as a foreign language destinations, therefore understanding American cultural values is very important. Article represents American cultural values based on a true story movie "The pursuit of Happiness". Research method applied was library research. It can be concluded that the characters, setting, and conflicts really presented the characteristics of American society.  

  20. Measuring cultural values at the individual-level: considering morality in cross-cultural value research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin-Melanie Vauclair

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Valores compartilhados são tipicamente vistos como um dos aspectos centrais da cultura. O procedimento comum para derivar valores culturais compartilhados é feito por meio da análise das prioridades dos valores individuais no nível cultural. Este artigo delineia os problemas conceituais e metodológicos associados com esse procedimento. Descobertas feitas por meio de estudos empíricos selecionados são apresentadas para corroborar essa crítica. Meios alternativos para medir valores culturais no nível individual são apresentados e classificados em uma taxonomia de valores. Nessa taxonomia, estudos anteriores têm até agora focalizado a medição de valores por meio da importância atribuída, refletindo o que os indivíduos ou grupos sociais desejam. Contudo, argumenta-se que, se valores culturais são supostamente compartilhados, eles deveriam refletir o que é desejável, isto é, o que o indivíduo deve valorizar ou empenhar-se para alcançar como um objetivo de vida em uma determinada sociedade. Isso constitui uma nova abordagem para a mensuração de valores culturais que propõe que sejam medidos no nível individual, utilizando-se perguntas que envolvam moralidade. Sugestões são feitas sobre como os valores culturais poderiam ser operacionalizados, referindo-se aos valores morais individuais ou àqueles de um grupo social. Os benefícios da utilização de taxionomia de valores para pesquisas futuras são eventualmente descritos.

  1. Not all cultural values are created equal: Cultural change in China reexamined through Google books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Weng, Liping

    2017-06-20

    Given its major transformations in recent decades, China has figured prominently in research on cultural change. Previous research converges in showing a general trend towards individualism in contemporary China while noting that rising individualism tends to coexist with enduring collectivism. To further understand this, we tested whether perceived traditional importance of cultural values would modulate the trajectory of cultural change reflected in word usage frequencies in published books. We re-analysed Google's Chinese corpus since 1980 based on a broad sample of words associated with individualism-collectivism. We replicated the pattern of rising individualism and declining collectivism among words of modest and low perceived traditional importance. Most important, however, collectivistic words of high perceived traditional importance increased in usage frequencies with time, thus departing from the general trend towards individualism. Overall, our research underscores the role of core culture in cultural maintenance during times of rapid cultural change. © 2017 International Union of Psychological Science.

  2. Spreadable media: Creating value and meaning in a networked culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moderated by Louisa Stein

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Online Roundtable on Spreadable Media, by Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green, with participants Paul Booth, Kristina Busse, Melissa Click, Sam Ford, Henry Jenkins, Xiaochang Li, and Sharon Ross. Section 1 first published as the article "Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture", by Louisa Stein, from Cinema Journal Volume 53 Issue 3, pp152-177. Copyright 2014 by The University of Texas Press. All rights reserved.

  3. Cultural influences on suicide in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Roxanne; Metraux, Daniel; Tohen, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Following the economic crash of the late 1990s, the suicide rate in Japan increased to a rate of over 30 000 people per year and has been one of the highest in the world. Cultural factors have influenced this high suicide rate, such as a tradition of honorable suicide as well as permissive attitudes towards suicide that remain in modern times. Additionally, the economic downturn, particularly the trend of unemployment in middle-aged men, also played a significant role in the high suicide rate. The suicide rate has started to decrease in recent years perhaps in part due to suicide prevention measures undertaken by the government. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  4. How intrinsic values influence wines prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gál Péter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hedonic price indices is quite common in the wine economics literature, yet they mainly include scores of organoleptic tests and some dummy variables representing varieties and quality signs as geographical indications. This study focuses on the relation between the composition and the price of wines on the example of Hungarian wines. In Hungary, the wine law renders chemical analysis compulsory for all wines released to the market. The study includes five main compounds: actual alcoholic strength, total sugars, total acidity, sugar free extract and pH value and is based on hedonic price indices calculated on a sample of 2,453 wines. Results of several regressions – using different model specifications – consistently show that actual alcoholic strength, sugar content, sugar free extract and pH value are related with the price. Some characteristics have an optimal level, while in other cases the relation is linear.

  5. Cultural Differences in Values as Self-Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Wing-Yee; Maio, Gregory R; Rees, Kerry J; Kamble, Shanmukh; Mane, Sangeetha

    2016-06-01

    Three studies tested whether individualism-collectivism moderates the extent to which values are endorsed as ideal self-guides and ought self-guides, and the consequences for regulatory focus and emotion. Across Studies 1 and 2, individualists endorsed values that are relatively central to the self as stronger ideals than oughts, whereas collectivists endorsed them as ideals and oughts to a similar degree. Study 2 found that individualists justified central values using reasons that were more promotion focused than prevention focused, whereas collectivists used similar amount of prevention-focused and promotion-focused reasons. In Study 3, individualists felt more dejected after violating a central (vs. peripheral) value and more agitated after violating a peripheral (vs. central) value. Collectivists felt a similar amount of dejection regardless of values centrality and more agitation after violating central (vs. peripheral) values. Overall, culture has important implications for how we regulate values that are central or peripheral to our self-concept. © 2016 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  6. National Culture Influence over the Organizational Culture in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Carataº Maria Alina; Spãtariu Elena Cerasela

    2012-01-01

    The present paper aims highlighting the characteristics of the organisational culture concept in Romania. In the first part of the paper, we have presented the importance of organizational culture theory through a literature review; we described the factors that have an impact on it. In the second part, we developed ideas about the national culture of Romania, the national frame and how this affects the organizational culture, and we presented its peculiarities.

  7. Cultural Values Represented in First Certificate Masterclass Taught in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alimorad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crucial role textbooks play in any educational system, an urgent need is felt to examine, evaluate, and choose the most suitable ones available. This study is an attempt to critically examine and uncover the hidden curriculum in First Certificate Masterclass (FCM that is taught at Navid institute in Iran. To this aim, FCM was deeply examined to identify any instances of Western cultural norms and preferences and their potential influences on Iranian EFL (English as a Foreign Language learners’ thoughts and ideologies. Peterson’s distinction between Big “C” culture and little “c” culture constituted the theoretical framework of the study. To collect the necessary data, all passages, texts, exercises, and even listening excerpts were closely studied and evaluated by the researcher. Results indicated that among the elements of little “c” culture introduced by Peterson, preferences or tastes, food, hobbies, popular music, and popular issues could mainly be observed in the book. Furthermore, the majority of the representations introduced and depicted in the book were incompatible with Iranian Muslim people’s ideologies and beliefs. Implications of these findings for Iranian material developers and textbook writers as well as English teachers are also discussed.

  8. Influence of organizational and project cultures on project success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdykulova G. M.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available the article is dedicated to studying the influence of organizational and project cultures on effective project management of the company by knowledge systematization and the comparative analysis of world companies’ practice that allowed to reveal the main factors and criteria of projects success and negative influence of organizational culture on the project; key aspects of corporate culture and cultural integration under the conditions of globalization.

  9. Values and the Scientific Culture of Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Maria R; Roche, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    As scientists and practitioners, behavior analysts must make frequent decisions that affect many lives. Scientific principles have been our guide as we work to promote effective action across a broad spectrum of cultural practices. Yet scientific principles alone may not be sufficient to guide our decision making in cases with potentially conflicting outcomes. In such cases, values function as guides to work through ethical conflicts. We will examine two ethical systems, radical behaviorism and functional contextualism, from which to consider the role of values in behavior analysis, and discuss potential concerns. Finally, we propose philosophical pragmatism, focusing on John Dewey's notions of community and dialogue, as a tradition that can help behavior analysts to integrate talk about values and scientific practices in ethical decision making. PMID:22478484

  10. Cultural value orientation and gender equity: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqi N.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, gender issues have grabbed substantial attention from social scientists, activists and academic fraternity. Right from family to workplace to society at large, attempts have been initiated to advocate equal rights for women in different spheres of life. Despite social activists and policy makers striving hard towards gender sensitization, gender discrimination still persists in various domains of life. Therefore, there is a strong need to identify the factors that potentially determine people’s attitude towards gender equity. With this very objective, the current study examines existing literature on gender discrimination and its association with Hofstede’s (1980 cultural values. Following the “Gender-Organization-System Approach”, the present study postulates that gender equality or inequality results from a complex interaction of individual, organizational and societal factors and that it cannot be explained in isolation from the broader socio-cultural milieu. Extensive review of literature indicates that cultural values are significant predictors of people’s attitude towards gender equity and that the extent to which people conform to existing gender roles determine how much people support the idea of gender equality. The study has significant practical implications since, by means of detecting such “causal factors”, more positive attitudinal changes can be brought about and gender egalitarian attitudes can be cultivated.

  11. Recognizing Deep Culture's Influence on Communicative Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to highlight and discuss the importance of culture and how it can affect our communication in intercultural contexts. We shall discuss the affect culture can have on communication in cross-cultural contexts using specific examples from Japanese and English speakers. Two culture models are presented for understanding and making sense of these cross-cultural events. The final purpose of this paper is to offer a way for readers and intercultural students to think about ...

  12. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Symptoms of Depression in Hispanic Youth: The Roles of Gender, Hispanic Cultural Values, and Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The risk for depression increases as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. society. This association is stronger for Hispanic girls than boys. To better understand the influence of culture and family on depressive symptoms, we tested a process-oriented model of acculturation, cultural values, and family functioning. The data came from Project RED,…

  13. An assessment of cultural values and resident-centered culture change in U.S. nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G; Lin, Michael; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2013-01-01

    Culture change initiatives propose to improve care by addressing the lack of managerial supports and prevalent stressful work environments in the industry; however, little is known about how culture change facilities differ from facilities in the industry that have not chosen to affiliate with the resident-centered care movements. The aim of this study was to evaluate representation of organizational culture values within a random sample of U.S. nursing home facilities using the competing values framework and to determine whether organizational values are related to membership in resident-centered culture change initiatives. We collected reports of cultural values using a well-established competing values framework instrument in a random survey of facility administrators and directors of nursing within all states. We received responses from 57% of the facilities that were mailed the survey. Directors of nursing and administrators did not differ significantly in their reports of culture and facility measures combined their responses. Nursing facilities favored market-focused cultural values on average, and developmental values, key to innovation, were the least common across all nursing homes. Approximately 17% of the facilities reported that all cultural values were strong within their facilities. Only high developmental cultural values were linked to participation in culture change initiatives. Culture change facilities were not different from non-culture change facilities in the promotion of employee focus as organizational culture, as emphasized in group culture values. Likewise, culture change facilities were also not more likely to have hierarchical or market foci than non-culture change facilities. Our results counter the argument that culture change facilities have a stronger internal employee focus than facilities more generally but do show that culture change facilities report stronger developmental cultures than non-culture change facilities, which

  14. Influence of customer value orientation, brand value, and business ethics level on organizational performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslier Maureen Valenzuela Fernández

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Customer value orientation, brand value and business ethics are critical variables to developing long-term relationships with customers and achieve sustainable sales growth over time. This research shows how the degree of orientation to customer value by the sales forces, brand value and business ethical standards could significantly influence organizational performance. Design/methodology/approach – The study contributes to an explanatory model through a structural equation model (SEM and empirical evidence of research applied to 327 executives – occupying medium and high positions in several companies in Chile – who manage their business globally. Findings – The results support the hypothesis that customer value orientation, brand value and business ethics influence organizational performance. Originality/value – This research shows how the degree of orientation to customer value by the sales forces, brand value and business ethical standards could significantly influence organizational performance in a country like Chile.

  15. Maternal cultural values and parenting practices: longitudinal associations with Chinese adolescents' aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michael M; Li, Yan; Shi, Junqi

    2012-04-01

    Interrelations among cultural values, parenting practices, and adolescent aggression were examined using longitudinal data collected from Chinese adolescents and their mothers. Adolescents' overt and relational aggression were assessed using peer nominations at Time 1 (7th grade) and Time 2 (9th grade). Mothers reported endorsement of cultural values (collectivism and social harmony) and parenting practices (psychological control and inductive reasoning) at Time 1. While controlling for Time 1 adolescent aggression, maternal collectivism and social harmony indirectly and longitudinally linked to adolescent aggression through maternal parenting practices. Specifically, maternal collectivism was positively related to inductive reasoning, which, in turn, negatively related to adolescent overt aggression at Time 2. Similarly, maternal social harmony negatively related to psychological control that positively predicted later adolescent relational aggression. Results of the present study shed light on mechanisms through which culture may indirectly influence adolescent aggression. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dissemination of Cultural Norms and Values: Agent-Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Andreevich Degterev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows how agent-based modeling allows us to explore the mechanisms of the dissemination of cultural norms and values both within one country and in the whole world. In recent years, this type of simulation is particularly prevalent in the analysis of international relations, becoming more popular than the system dynamics and discrete event simulation. The use of agent-based modeling in the analysis of international relations is connected with the agent-structure problem in international relations. Structure and agents act as interdependent and dynamically changing in the process of interaction between entities. Agent-structure interaction could be modeled by means of the theory of complex adaptive systems with the use of agent-based modeling techniques. One of the first examples of the use of agent-based modeling in political science is a model of racial segregation T. Shellinga. On the basis of this model, the author shows how the change in behavioral patterns at micro-level impacts on the macro-level. Patterns are changing due to the dynamics of cultural norms and values, formed by mass-media and other social institutes. The author shows the main areas of modern application of agent-based modeling in international studies including the analysis of ethnic conflicts, the formation of international coalitions. Particular attention is paid to Robert Axelrod approach based on the use of genetic algorithms to the spread of cultural norms and values. Agent-based modeling shows how to how to create such conditions that the norms that originally are not shared by a significant part of the population, eventually spread everywhere. Practical application of these algorithms is shown by the author of the article on the example of the situation in Ukraine in 2015-2016. The article also reveals the mechanisms of international spread of cultural norms and values. The main think-tanks using agent-based modeling in international studies are

  17. SYSTEM OF VALUES AS THE KERNEL OF CORPORATE CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Кузьменко, Наталія Ігорівна; Демченко, Олександр Олександрович

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the philosophical analysis of the university as a unique subject of social cognition. The article considers the features of cognitive interaction of the university with the society that is transforming, and the modern condition of oppressions of education of social sciences and humanities in higher educational institution. It investigates the change of the university mission in the public discussion, it is represented the influence of values of communicative university ...

  18. National cultural values and the evolution of process and outcome discrepancies in international strategic alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nti, Kofi O

    2004-01-01

    The article assesses the role played by national cultural values in shaping the evolution of international strategic alliances. The authors build on a systems dynamic model of alliance evolution in which the developmental path of an alliance depends on how the partners manage process and outcome...... discrepancies that may emerge during the course of an alliance. They argue that national culture affects alliance evolution by influencing partners sensitivity to discrepancy detection , shaping the nature of attributions they make, and by affecting the partners reactions to discrepancies. They focus...

  19. Parental Autonomy Granting and School Functioning among Chinese Adolescents: The Moderating Role of Adolescents’ Cultural Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cixin; Do, Kieu Anh; Bao, Leiping; Xia, Yan R.; Wu, Chaorong

    2017-01-01

    School adjustment and achievement are important indicators of adolescents’ well-being; however, few studies have examined the risk and protective factors predicting students’ school adjustment and achievement at the individual, familial, and cultural level. The present study examined the influences of individual and familial factors and cultural values on Chinese adolescents’ school functioning (e.g., school adjustment and grades). It also tested whether cultural values moderated the relationship between parenting and adolescents’ school functioning. Self-report data were collected from a stratified random sample of 2,864 adolescents (51.5% female, mean age = 15.52 years, grade 6th – 12th) from 55 classrooms, in 13 schools in Shanghai, China. Results showed that self-esteem (bse→adj = 0.05, SE = 0.01, p autonomy granting and adolescents’ grades (bindepxautom = 0.06, SE = 0.02, p cultural values may influence adolescents’ appraisal of parental autonomy granting, which then impacts their school functioning. PMID:29326622

  20. CULTURAL VALUES, MARKET INSTITUTIONS, AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP POTENTIAL: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES, TAIWAN, AND VIETNAM

    OpenAIRE

    THANG V. NGUYEN; SCOTT E. BRYANT; JERMAN ROSE; CHIUNG-HUI TSENG; SUPARA KAPASUWAN

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the impact of national cultural values and the development of market institutions on three aspects of entrepreneurship (desire, intention, and confidence in creating new ventures). We ask: What different kinds of effects do cultural and institutional factors have on different aspects of entrepreneurship? Our samples come from Vietnam, Taiwan, and the United States (US). The use of three countries allows us to distinguish the separate influences of culture and market instit...

  1. The Influence of Biblical Culture on American Spiritual Civilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李惠子

    2014-01-01

    Biblical culture is deeply rooted into current American society and culture,widely impacting every aspect of American people’s life.Through discussing about the historical accumulation of biblical culture reflected in America’s societal and spiritual civilization,this essay analyses the importance and function of biblical culture from the aspect of society inheritance,value,literature creation and customs etc.,helping us to further understand and study American society and culture.

  2. The Influence of Biblical Culture on American Spiritual Civilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李惠子

    2014-01-01

    Biblical culture is deeply rooted into current American society and culture, widely impacting every aspect of American people’s life. Through discussing about the historical accumulation of biblical culture reflected in America’s societal and spiritual civilization, this essay analyses the importance and function of biblical culture from the aspect of society inheritance, value, literature creation and customs etc., helping us to further understand and study American society and culture.

  3. Cultural values and population health : A quantitative analysis of variations in cultural values, health behaviours and health outcomes among 42 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractVariations in 'culture' are often invoked to explain cross-national variations in health, but formal analyses of this relation are scarce. We studied the relation between three sets of cultural values and a wide range of health behaviours and health outcomes in Europe. Cultural values

  4. Social Change and Cultural Values in a Small Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanmartín Arce, Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how social change has affected the cultural values in a small community of fishermen in the Albufera Lake of Valencia. Industrial development, tourism, new employment and jobs changed the ecology of the lake, the mutual dependency among neighbours and the efficiency of old cultural values to orient social interaction. Both the new role played by of women and the Spanish Constitution of 1978 lie at the basis of new conflicts which are at once a challenge and an opportunity for the emergence of new horizons.

    El artículo describe cómo ha afectado el cambio social a los valores culturales en una pequeña comunidad de pescadores en el lago de la Albufera de Valencia. El desarrollo industrial, el turismo y el nuevo empleo y trabajos cambiaron la ecología del lago, la mutua dependencia entre los vecinos y la eficiencia de los viejos valores culturales para orientar la interacción social. El nuevo rol de la mujer y la Constitución están en la base de nuevos conflictos como reto y como apertura de nuevos horizontes a la vez.

  5. The Influences of Western Food Culture on Contemporary Chinese Food Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张林

    2017-01-01

    Food, an essential prerequisite for existence, plays an irreplaceable role in the development of society and in the progress of human beings. Chinese food culture has a long and bril iant history, but under the huge impacts of the western civilization, it has been greatly influenced. From these study, the positive influences of the western food culture on the contemporary Chinese food culture can be clearly seen, which also have promoted the diverse developments of Chinese dietary culture.

  6. Species richness alone does not predict cultural ecosystem service value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Rose A.; Pearson, Scott M.; Turner, Monica G.

    2017-01-01

    Many biodiversity-ecosystem services studies omit cultural ecosystem services (CES) or use species richness as a proxy and assume that more species confer greater CES value. We studied wildflower viewing, a key biodiversity-based CES in amenity-based landscapes, in Southern Appalachian Mountain forests and asked (i) How do aesthetic preferences for wildflower communities vary with components of biodiversity, including species richness?; (ii) How do aesthetic preferences for wildflower communities vary across psychographic groups?; and (iii) How well does species richness perform as an indicator of CES value compared with revealed social preferences for wildflower communities? Public forest visitors (n = 293) were surveyed during the summer of 2015 and asked to choose among images of wildflower communities in which flower species richness, flower abundance, species evenness, color diversity, and presence of charismatic species had been digitally manipulated. Aesthetic preferences among images were unrelated to species richness but increased with more abundant flowers, greater species evenness, and greater color diversity. Aesthetic preferences were consistent across psychographic groups and unaffected by knowledge of local flora or value placed on wildflower viewing. When actual wildflower communities (n = 54) were ranked based on empirically measured flower species richness or wildflower viewing utility based on multinomial logit models of revealed preferences, rankings were broadly similar. However, designation of hotspots (CES values above the median) based on species richness alone missed 27% of wildflower viewing utility hotspots. Thus, conservation priorities for sustaining CES should incorporate social preferences and consider multiple dimensions of biodiversity that underpin CES supply. PMID:28320953

  7. Mate value and self-esteem: evidence from eight cultural groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robin; Marshall, Tara; Fülöp, Marta; Adonu, Joseph; Spiewak, Slawomir; Neto, Felix; Hernandez Plaza, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores self-perceived mate value (SPMV), and its association with self-esteem, in eight cultures. 1066 participants, from 8 cultural groups in 7 countries, rated themselves on 24 SPMVs and completed a measure of self-esteem. Consistent with evolutionary theory, women were more likely to emphasise their caring and passionate romantic nature. In line with previous cross-cultural research, characteristics indicating passion and romance and social attractiveness were stressed more by respondents from individualistic cultures, and those higher on self-expression (rather than survival) values; characteristics indicative of maturity and confidence were more likely to be mentioned by those from Traditional, rather than Secular, cultures. Contrary to gender role theory, societal equality had only limited interactions with sex and SPMV, with honesty of greater significance for male self-esteem in societies with unequal gender roles. These results point to the importance of cultural and environmental factors in influencing self-perceived mate qualities, and are discussed in relation to broader debates about the impact of gender role equality on sex differences in personality and mating strategies.

  8. Mate value and self-esteem: evidence from eight cultural groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Goodwin

    Full Text Available This paper explores self-perceived mate value (SPMV, and its association with self-esteem, in eight cultures. 1066 participants, from 8 cultural groups in 7 countries, rated themselves on 24 SPMVs and completed a measure of self-esteem. Consistent with evolutionary theory, women were more likely to emphasise their caring and passionate romantic nature. In line with previous cross-cultural research, characteristics indicating passion and romance and social attractiveness were stressed more by respondents from individualistic cultures, and those higher on self-expression (rather than survival values; characteristics indicative of maturity and confidence were more likely to be mentioned by those from Traditional, rather than Secular, cultures. Contrary to gender role theory, societal equality had only limited interactions with sex and SPMV, with honesty of greater significance for male self-esteem in societies with unequal gender roles. These results point to the importance of cultural and environmental factors in influencing self-perceived mate qualities, and are discussed in relation to broader debates about the impact of gender role equality on sex differences in personality and mating strategies.

  9. Cultural influences behind cholera transmission in the Far North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: in recent years, the Far North Region of Cameroon has experienced serious and recurrent cholera outbreaks. Yet, understanding of cultural influences on outbreaks and spread remain poorly understood. This qualitative study explored cultural influences on cholera exposure in this region. Methods: interviews ...

  10. Cultural Influences on the Assessment of Children’s Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Allen Finley

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture is commonly regarded as a factor in pain behaviour and experience, but the meaning of the term is often unclear. There is little evidence that pain perception is modified by cultural or ethnic factors, but pain expression by children and interpretation by caregivers may be affected by the culture of the patient or the caregiver. The present paper examines some of the research regarding cultural influences on children’s pain assessment, and addresses directions for future research. A focus on cultural influences should not distract clinicians from the need to be sensitive to individual beliefs and attitudes.

  11. Interpersonal Influence in Cross-Cultural Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Berry, J. W., Poortinga, Y. H., Segall, M. H., & Dasen, P. R. (2002). Cross - cultural psychology : Research and applications (Second Edition). Cambridge...Annual Review of Psychology , 51, 93–120. Matsumoto , D. (1996). Culture and psychology . Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole. Oyserman, D., Coon, H. M...interpreters. Infantry, Spring, 22–27. Shiraev, E., & Levy, D. (2004). Cross - cultural psychology : Critical thinking and contemporary applications. Boston

  12. Organisational culture and influence on developing athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Kristoffer; Storm, Louise Kamuk; Larsen, Carsten Hvid

    2018-01-01

    athlete development; (3) that such an organisational culture can, and must, be deliberately developed and maintained by the coach and management through cultural leadership; and (4) that a key task of the sport psychology practitioner is to make the coach conscious of his role as a culture leader and thus......In this chapter we will argue: (a) that a preoccupation with individual talented athletes should be supplemented with an understanding of the environment in which they develop; (b) that a strong and coherent organisational culture of a youth club or team is a, if not the, key factor in successful...

  13. Acculturation, cultural values, and Latino parental beliefs about the etiology of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Kathryn E; Gerdes, Alyson C; Haack, Lauren M; Schneider, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent mental health disorders of childhood. Despite the availability of several evidence-based interventions, Latino children are more likely than non-minority children to have an unmet need for services related to ADHD. Given that parental beliefs about the etiology of ADHD likely influence service utilization, research needs to focus on cultural factors that may influence parental beliefs about the etiology of child behavior problems. Thus, the goal of the current study was to investigate the role of acculturation and cultural values of familism, respect, spirituality, and traditional gender roles in explaining parental etiological beliefs about ADHD in a sample of Latino parents. Findings suggest that behavioral acculturation was not significantly correlated with biopsychosocial or sociological/spiritual etiological beliefs; however, the cultural values of familism and traditional gender roles were positively correlated with sociological/spiritual beliefs. Further, exploratory analyses suggested that after controlling for SES, familism and traditional gender roles accounted for 30.5 % of the total variance in sociological/spiritual beliefs about ADHD. Finally, post hoc analyses revealed that cultural values were associated with several individual belief categories within the sociological/spiritual domain, including beliefs about friends, spirituality, and nature disharmony. The current study supports the inclusion of etiological beliefs and cultural factors in research examining help-seeking and access to mental health services among Latino families and suggests that the incorporation of alternative etiological beliefs about child behavior may be an important factor in culturally-appropriate mental health services.

  14. The impact of spiritual and moral values of the youth on the Russian society civil culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N A Tkacheva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors conducted a sociological analysis of the spiritual and moral values of the youth and their impact on the civil culture, which largely determines the forms of individual and group social activity and the functioning of social institutions. The implementation of the key function of values, i.e. the achievement of material goods and the spiritual development, to a certain extent, will allow to overcome the cultural gap between elites and common citizens, which is considered one of the main reasons for the failure of reforms in Russia. The study of transformation processes determined great interest in the social potential of the youth as a subject of social reproduction, and the civil culture is a key factor and element of modernization for it changes and activates value orientations of the younger generations and leads to the qualitative transformations of all spheres of society. The article is based on the empirical data of a number of sociological surveys conducted in 2016 in five cities of the south of the Tyumen Region. The empirical data prove that there is an obvious emerging shift from paternalistic expectations, passivity and low estimates of the future to the rationality, individualization and self-reliance. The authors emphasize the influence of mass media as one of the factors of the civil culture formation, which is evident in the impact of media on the moral and spiritual values of the younger generations.

  15. Chapter 4. Radioactivity of waters and factors influencing its value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Harangozo, M.

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter of textbook of radioecology for university students. In this chapter authors deal with radioactivity of waters and factors influencing its value. Chapter consists of next parts: (1) Natural radioactivity of hydrosphere; (2) Radioactive contamination of hydrosphere

  16. The Resistance of national cultures to global marketing influence

    OpenAIRE

    Pikturnienė, Indrė

    2005-01-01

    Due to Increased regional integration, countries, which were previously closed to the world, became exposed to universal or partly adapted marketing mixes. A discussion whether global marketing campaigns can influence national cultures, and serve as a drive for emergence of global culture is developed in the article. The paper demonstrates that the conclusion, whether global marketing campaigns can generate globalisation of culture, depends on the definition of culture, which can overwhelm ei...

  17. The dynamics of democracy, development and cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaiser, Viktoria; Ranganathan, Shyam; Mann, Richard P; Sumpter, David J T

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades many countries have experienced rapid changes in their economies, their democratic institutions and the values of their citizens. Comprehensive data measuring these changes across very different countries has recently become openly available. Between country similarities suggest common underlying dynamics in how countries develop in terms of economy, democracy and cultural values. We apply a novel Bayesian dynamical systems approach to identify the model which best captures the complex, mainly non-linear dynamics that underlie these changes. We show that the level of Human Development Index (HDI) in a country drives first democracy and then higher emancipation of citizens. This change occurs once the countries pass a certain threshold in HDI. The data also suggests that there is a limit to the growth of wealth, set by higher emancipation. Having reached a high level of democracy and emancipation, societies tend towards equilibrium that does not support further economic growth. Our findings give strong empirical evidence against a popular political science theory, known as the Human Development Sequence. Contrary to this theory, we find that implementation of human-rights and democratisation precede increases in emancipative values.

  18. Can Cultural Worldviews Influence Network Composition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisey, Stephen; Lizardo, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Most sociological research assumes that social network composition shapes individual beliefs. Network theory and research has not adequately considered that internalized cultural worldviews might affect network composition. Drawing on a synthetic, dual-process theory of culture and two waves of nationally-representative panel data, this article…

  19. Culture and entrepreneurial processses: evidence of influence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Martin R.; Harms, Rainer; ten Ham, R.; Groen, Arend J.

    2012-01-01

    Processes that lead to the creation of new ventures are characterized by a combination of planned (causation) and emergent (effectuation) actions. Which one prevails is among others depending on contextual factors such as industry and national culture. Research on the impact of national culture on

  20. Canon, Value, and Cultural Heritage: New Processes of Assigning Value in the Postdigital Realm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Rodríguez-Ortega

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The range of modes through which the new conditions of the postdigital society is leading to a redefinition of the processes of assigning value, and the values themselves, which have hitherto prevailed in the comprehension of cultural heritage, are diverse and broad. Within this framework of critical inquiry, this paper discusses the mechanisms of canon-formation in the context of the web as the new laboratory of cultural production. It is argued that the main dynamics observed can be elucidated under the form of a triad: hypercanonization, socialdecanonization, and transcanonization. These three processes operate simultaneously interlaced and unfold in dialectical tension between the rise of the new (practices, actors, values, ideas, and the maintenance of the old (those structures that already exist. This paper delves into the paths through which such interlace dynamics and tension might reshape the principles by which canonicity develops, as well as poses open questions about the challenges facing us, which should be discussed in further studies and approaches to the problem.

  1. Influence of culture and community perceptions on birth and perinatal care of immigrant women: doulas' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative study examined the perceptions of doulas practicing in Washington State regarding the influence of cultural and community beliefs on immigrant women's birth and perinatal care, as well as their own cultural beliefs and values that may affect their ability to work interculturally. The findings suggest that doulas can greatly aid immigrant mothers in gaining access to effective care by acting as advocates, cultural brokers, and emotional and social support. Also, doulas share a consistent set of professional values, including empowerment, informed choice, cultural relativism, and scientific/evidence-based practice, but do not always recognize these values as culturally based. More emphasis on cultural self-awareness in doula training, expanding community doula programs, and more integration of doula services in health-care settings are recommended.

  2. Influence of Culture and Community Perceptions on Birth and Perinatal Care of Immigrant Women: Doulas’ Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative study examined the perceptions of doulas practicing in Washington State regarding the influence of cultural and community beliefs on immigrant women’s birth and perinatal care, as well as their own cultural beliefs and values that may affect their ability to work interculturally. The findings suggest that doulas can greatly aid immigrant mothers in gaining access to effective care by acting as advocates, cultural brokers, and emotional and social support. Also, doulas share a consistent set of professional values, including empowerment, informed choice, cultural relativism, and scientific/evidence-based practice, but do not always recognize these values as culturally based. More emphasis on cultural self-awareness in doula training, expanding community doula programs, and more integration of doula services in health-care settings are recommended. PMID:24453465

  3. Jesus and cultural values: Family life as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Osiek

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available 'Family values' is a set of traditional images that most cultures collect, images drawn mostly from an idealized picture of family life in the recent past. For Christians, the popular image of Jesus gets included: the Holy Family as a nuclear family unit, Jesus blessing children, Jesus as advocate of traditional family life. A closer reading of both contemporary family life and the Gospels reveals that things are not what they seem. Contemporary family life in Western societies is structured quite differently than the ideal. Jesus' family life was spent in a peasant village surrounded by relatives and neighbors, with little privacy and strong social pressure towards conformity. The gospel records indicate that he did not conform, and paid the price: rejection and misunderstanding by his extended family. The Synoptic Gospels consistently ponray not only an estrangement between Jesus and his family, but Jesus' encouragement of his disciples to break family ties in favor of the surrogate family of the circle of disciples. In a culture in which kinship loyalty was essential, this  message caused deep problems for early Christians which the authors of the household codes of Ephesians, Colossians, the  Pastoral Epistles, and 1 Peter tried to alleviate.

  4. Constructing Self Awareness Using Education Human Value In School Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wija Astawa Dewa Nyoman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The big number of poverty in Indonesia impact to the hope of having a free learning service, especially education for early age and elementary school students from the less fortunate families. Many people usually ask the quality of such kinds of free of charge schools. The low price makes a low standard for the students. Sathya Sai School in Denpasar has proven that the free learning service does not mean the standard quality of the school is low. This study will explain how the teachers and the members of the foundation build the awareness of the students and parents by socializing and internalizing the value that empower their collective awareness to help the school achievement. By using local cultural approach, the school builds a program that involves the parents especially the woman.

  5. The influence of Thai culture on diabetes perceptions and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowattanangoon, Napaporn; Kotchabhakdi, Naipinich; Petrie, Keith J

    2009-06-01

    To explore the way Thai patients perceive and manage their diabetes. Using a focused ethnographic approach, face-to-face interviews were conducted at two public hospitals in Bangkok. All interviews (n=27) were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the interview transcripts was completed thematically. The findings showed that Thai patients manage their diabetes according to their beliefs about diabetes. These beliefs are constructed using both modern and traditional knowledge. For example, some patients explained the cause of their illness as being due to biomedical factors such as genetics, and also cultural factors such as karma from either previous or current lifetimes. The analysis also revealed that some aspects of Thai life facilitate diabetes self-management while other aspects hamper good control of the illness. For example, Buddhist values of moderation contribute positively to dietary change, while, on the other hand, the importance of rice in the Thai diet can impede successful self-management strategies. The results of this research indicate that Thai culture influences diabetes perceptions and management. Culturally appropriate treatment guidelines should be established for diabetes management that give special consideration to the significance and meaning of food and to Buddhist beliefs.

  6. Influence of Antenatal Care on the Haematocrit Value of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Antenatal care is generally believed to influence the outcome of any pregnancy. Haematocrit values are important in the assessment of anaemia in pregnancy. A good antenatal care is expected to be associated with good haematocrit values, prevent anaemia in pregnancy, and result in an overall good pregnancy ...

  7. Understanding how culture influence emotions in consumer decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    is guided by anticipated emotions. Empirical results confirm that some emotions are preferred more than others and that studying discrete emotions may be important when trying to understand how other cultural dimensions than the traditionally studied influence emotions. It is confirmed that indeed also......The present research contributes to a limited researched area in consumer research. Little is known about how culture influence emotions in consumer decision-making. It is revealed that culture shapes how consumers ideally want to feel, and that this in turn influences preferences and choice, which...... Danes as other Western cultures prefer high arousal positive emotions over low arousal positive emotions, but it is also revealed that it could be crucial when studying the influence of culture on emotions in decision-making to distinguish between more than high and low arousal positive and negative...

  8. The Influence Of Organizational Culture On Management Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlis Dewi Kuraesin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to know the culture of the organization and management accounting information system based on existing theories. The management information system is a collection of sub-systems which are interconnected with each other to work together in harmony to achieve one goal of process data into information needed by management in decision making. An important factor influencing the use of information systems is Cultural Organization. Management Information system success is influenced by several factors one of which is the organizations culture. Organizational culture has a very strong influence on the overall organizational and individual behavior due to the information system is a major component of the organization are influenced substantially by organizational culture.

  9. Restoring local spiritual and cultural values in science education: The case of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Solomon Belay

    It has been repeatedly observed that home and local context matter in the education of children. A smooth transition between home and classroom prepares children for enjoyable and meaningful life-long learning. Knowledge building in children is influenced by previous experience, values, beliefs and sociocultural factors associated with community. Against this theoretical background, the thesis examined the integration of local spiritual and cultural values to improve science education in Ethiopia. This autoethnographic research used in-depth interviews, supplementary observations and focus group discussion and my biography to identify the perception and practice of common and unique spiritual and cultural values. The study examined whether these values were included and/or excluded in the school curriculum and explored the possibilities for incorporating values in science education and the anticipated tensions resulting from their inclusion. Students, science teachers, parents, employers, curriculum experts, policymakers, elders, and religious leaders participated in the research, conducted in a randomly selected secondary school in Addis Ababa. The sampling followed a kind of snowball method, with a total of twenty key informants participating in interviews, fifteen classroom observations, and one focus group discussion. The data collection aimed at generating stories, which underlie the auto-ethnography methodology. Findings indicated that belief in and fear of God animated and sustained the Ethiopian way of life. Although spiritual teachings derived from sacred writings were the initial foundation for Ethiopian cultural norms, the two merged together later, creating a mosaic pervading every aspect of life in Ethiopia. Education was sustained on this merger of spiritual and cultural norms and values. It was also shown that the now century-old system of formal education did not incorporate those local spiritual and cultural values. Current science education also

  10. Persuasion, Influence, and Value: Perspectives from Communication and Social Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily; Scholz, Christin

    2018-01-04

    Opportunities to persuade and be persuaded are ubiquitous. What determines whether influence spreads and takes hold? This review provides an overview of evidence for the central role of subjective valuation in persuasion and social influence for both propagators and receivers of influence. We first review evidence that decisions to communicate information are determined by the subjective value a communicator expects to gain from sharing. We next review evidence that the effects of social influence and persuasion on receivers, in turn, arise from changes in the receiver's subjective valuation of objects, ideas, and behaviors. We then review evidence that self-related and social considerations are two key inputs to the value calculation in both communicators and receivers. Finally, we highlight biological coupling between communicators and receivers as a mechanism through which perceptions of value can be transmitted.

  11. From “Kickeando las malias” (Kicking the Withdrawals) to “Staying clean”: The Impact of Cultural Values on Cessation of Injection Drug Use in Aging Mexican-American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, David V.; Torres, Luis R.; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Bordnick, Patrick S.; Ren, Yi; Torres, Melissa I. M.; DeLeon, Freddy; Pericot-Valverde, Irene; Lopez, Tenee

    2013-01-01

    Drug use among older adults is a growing concern, particularly for the burgeoning Hispanic population. Older adults seeking drug treatment will double over the next decade to almost 6 million. Cultural factors influence drug use, and more specifically, Hispanic cultural values influence heroin use. This study explored Mexican-American injection drug users' adherence to traditional Hispanic cultural values and their impact on cessation. Ethnographic interviews endorsed contextualized influences of values on heroin use. Cultural values functioned dichotomously, influencing both initiation and cessation. Understanding the impact of cultural values on substance abuse is critical given the changing demographics in American society. PMID:24779493

  12. Planning Smalltalk Behavior with Cultural Influences for Multiagent Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endrass, Birgit; Rehm, Matthias; André, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    There are several factors that influence communicative behavior, such as gender, personality or culture. As virtual agents interact in a more and more human-like manner, their behavior should be dependent on social factors as well. Culture is a phenomenon that affects one’s behavior without one...... realizing it. Behavior is thus sometimes perceived as inappropriate because there is no awareness of the cultural gap. Thus, we think cultural background should also influence the communication behavior of virtual agents. Behavioral differences are sometimes easy to recognize by humans but still hard...

  13. Influence of organizational culture on human error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlander, M.A.; Evans, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Much has been written in contemporary business literature during the last decade describing the role that corporate culture plays in virtually every aspect of a firm's success. In 1990 Kotter and Heskett wrote, open-quotes We found that firms with cultures that emphasized all of the key managerial constituencies (customers, stockholders, and employees) and leadership from managers at all levels out-performed firms that did not have those cultural traits by a huge margin. Over an eleven year period, the former increased revenues by an average of 682 percent versus 166 percent for the latter, expanded their workforce by 282 percent versus 36 percent, grew their stock prices by 901 percent versus 74 percent, and improved their net incomes by 756 percent versus 1 percent.close quotes Since the mid-1980s, several electric utilities have documented their efforts to undertake strategic culture change. In almost every case, these efforts have yielded dramatic improvements in the open-quotes bottom-lineclose quotes operational and financial results (e.g., Western Resources, Arizona Public Service, San Diego Gas ampersand Electric, and Electricity Trust of South Australia). Given the body of evidence that indicates a relationship between high-performing organizational culture and the financial and business success of a firm, Pennsylvania Power ampersand Light Company undertook a study to identify the relationship between organizational culture and the frequency, severity, and nature of human error at the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station. The underlying proposition for this asssessment is that organizational culture is an independent variable that transforms external events into organizational performance

  14. Understanding How Culture Influences Emotions in Consumer Decision Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    to understand how other cultural dimensions, than those traditionally studied (individualism vs. collectivism) in relation to consumers’ behavior, influence emotions. It is confirmed that indeed also Danes as other Western cultures prefer high arousal positive emotions over low arousal positive emotions......The present research contributes to a limited researched area in consumer research focusing on culture and emotion. Little is known about how culture influence emotions in consumer decision making but there is an emerging interest in deepening the understanding of this. Review of previous studies...... reveal that culture shapes how consumers ideally want to feel, and that this in turn influences preferences and choice, which is guided by anticipated emotions. Empirical results confirm that some emotions are preferred more than others and that studying discrete emotions may be important when trying...

  15. Social Cultural Factors Influencing Women's Participation in Sports ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social Cultural Factors Influencing Women's Participation in Sports as Perceived by Female Students of the University of Ilorin. ... sports competition while mass media should organize enlightenment programmes that will mitigate the ...

  16. Socio-Cultural Factors Influencing Consent For Research In Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-Cultural Factors Influencing Consent For Research In Nigeria: Lessons ... for Health Research Ethics in enforcing researchers' compliance with ethical standards in ... Genuine respect for human dignity requires deeper understanding of ...

  17. Found in Translation: The Value of Teaching Law as Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Kerstin Bree

    2013-01-01

    as culturally specific. Yet, as law practice becomes more globalized, such awareness is an increasingly necessary element of any practitioner’s toolkit. This Article explores three examples of cross-cultural blunders to demonstrate the necessity of being sensitive to law in cultural context.......Although the study of law within its larger culture is emerging, recognition of law as culture is still generally nascent within legal studies and preprofessional programs. In fact, the greater recognition of law’s social and political role may have impeded a consideration of law’s role...

  18. The Influence of Values on the Leadership Style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina Andra ROȘCA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of values has been an issue of interest for several subjects, such as philosophy, social sciences, ethics, axiology etc. Despite the fact that psychologists acknowledge the importance of values as orientation tools for every individual in their environment, generating attitudes which translate into behaviours, the empirical research on this topic has been rather scarce, given the complexity of the field, as well as the lack of a sensitive and valid tool able to allow the measurement of values. The academic research, however, cannot avoid an emphasis of (the values in the study of leadership. Based on the complete leadership model (Bass & Avolio, 1997, the empirical research we propose aims at studying the influence of values on the informal leadership style. The lot of respondents is made up of students, master degree candidates and prisoners from Târgsor, Prahova county prison - totalling 135 persons, divided in 15 groups with one informal leader for each group. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (Avolio & Bass, Schwartz Value Inventory and the socio-metric techniques for identifying the informal leaders have been applied to all of them. The proposed hypotheses approach the congruence between the leader's fundamental values and those of the group's members, the way the values influence the leadership in the educational environment (students, master degree candidates as opposed to the prison environment and, in perspective, the interactions of the members within and outside the group, determined by the degree of identification with the others' values.

  19. Culture's influence on consumers : exploratory behavior and risk taking

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Ana Maria; Farhangmehr, Minoo; Shoham, Aviv

    2003-01-01

    This theoretical paper addresses the influence of culture on risk taking and exploratory behavior. The cultural dimensions of long-term orientation, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism, and masculinity (Hofstede, 1984, 2001) are hypothesized to influence risk-taking behavior in general, and, through it, exploratory consumption behavior, risk taking, and risk attitudes and perception towards specific products. We also propose an empirical study to test the emergent model. Fu...

  20. Impact of Organizational Culture Values on Organizational Agility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M. Felipe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To remain competitive within the current, uncertain business scenario, it is vital for firms to develop capabilities that lead them to adapt and offer quick responses to market changes. Under the dynamic capabilities view of the firm, this paper proposes a model that presents an exhaustive analysis of two relevant research gaps: (i the underlying relationships that determine the impact exerted by each of the four organizational culture typologies, comprised in Cameron and Quinn’s Competing Values Framework on organizational agility and, (ii the contingency effect exerted by a key environmental factor, the industry’s technology intensity. An empirical study is performed to test the relationships proposed, using data collected from 172 Spain-based companies. To examine the contingency effect of technology intensity, the sample is divided into two subsamples, high and medium tech companies. This work uses partial least squares path-modeling, a variance-based structural equations modeling technique, in order to test and validate the research model and hypotheses posited. In addition, thorough analyses are carried out to assess the predictive performance of our model.

  1. A protocol for eliciting nonmaterial values through a cultural ecosystem services frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Rachelle K; Klain, Sarah C; Ardoin, Nicole M; Satterfield, Terre; Woodside, Ulalia; Hannahs, Neil; Daily, Gretchen C; Chan, Kai M

    2015-04-01

    Stakeholders' nonmaterial desires, needs, and values often critically influence the success of conservation projects. These considerations are challenging to articulate and characterize, resulting in their limited uptake in management and policy. We devised an interview protocol designed to enhance understanding of cultural ecosystem services (CES). The protocol begins with discussion of ecosystem-related activities (e.g., recreation, hunting) and management and then addresses CES, prompting for values encompassing concepts identified in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) and explored in other CES research. We piloted the protocol in Hawaii and British Columbia. In each location, we interviewed 30 individuals from diverse backgrounds. We analyzed results from the 2 locations to determine the effectiveness of the interview protocol in elucidating nonmaterial values. The qualitative and spatial components of the protocol helped characterize cultural, social, and ethical values associated with ecosystems in multiple ways. Maps and situational, or vignette-like, questions helped respondents articulate difficult-to-discuss values. Open-ended prompts allowed respondents to express a diversity of ecosystem-related values and proved sufficiently flexible for interviewees to communicate values for which the protocol did not explicitly probe. Finally, the results suggest that certain values, those mentioned frequently throughout the interview, are particularly salient for particular populations. The protocol can provide efficient, contextual, and place-based data on the importance of particular ecosystem attributes for human well-being. Qualitative data are complementary to quantitative and spatial assessments in the comprehensive representation of people's values pertaining to ecosystems, and this protocol may assist in incorporating values frequently overlooked in decision making processes. © 2014 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals

  2. Parental Autonomy Granting and School Functioning among Chinese Adolescents: The Moderating Role of Adolescents’ Cultural Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cixin Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available School adjustment and achievement are important indicators of adolescents’ well-being; however, few studies have examined the risk and protective factors predicting students’ school adjustment and achievement at the individual, familial, and cultural level. The present study examined the influences of individual and familial factors and cultural values on Chinese adolescents’ school functioning (e.g., school adjustment and grades. It also tested whether cultural values moderated the relationship between parenting and adolescents’ school functioning. Self-report data were collected from a stratified random sample of 2,864 adolescents (51.5% female, mean age = 15.52 years, grade 6th – 12th from 55 classrooms, in 13 schools in Shanghai, China. Results showed that self-esteem (bse→adj = 0.05, SE = 0.01, p < 0.001; bse→grades = 0.08, SE = 0.02, p < 0.001, parent–adolescent conflict (bconflict→adj = -0.03, SE = 0.00, p < 0.001; bconflict→grades = -0.04, SE = 0.01, p < 0.001, and conformity to parental expectations (bconform→adj = -0.03, SE = 0.02, p < 0.05; bconform→grades = 0.10, SE = 0.04, p < 0.05 all had significant effects on both school adjustment and grades, respectively. More importantly, results showed that independent self-construal moderated the relationship between parental autonomy granting and adolescents’ grades (bindepxautom = 0.06, SE = 0.02, p < 0.01. The findings suggest that cultural values may influence adolescents’ appraisal of parental autonomy granting, which then impacts their school functioning.

  3. Organizational Culture and Socio-Cultural Values: Perceptions of Managers and Employees in Five Economies in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseh, Maria; Ardichvili, Alexandre; Gasparishvili, Alexander; Krisztian, Bela; Nemeskeri, Zsolt

    2004-01-01

    This survey-based study compared socio-cultural values and perceptions of organizational culture characteristics held by more than 3,300 managers and employees in twelve business organizations in Hungary, Russia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, and the Kyrgyz Republic. Significant differences were found between the five countries on all socio-cultural and…

  4. A Cross-Cultural Perspective of Parental Influence on Female Adolescents' Achievement Beliefs and Behaviors in Sport and School Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Jennifer A.; Weiss, Maureen R.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about parental socialization processes for youth participants from different cultural backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to examine parental influence on self-perceptions, task values, and achievement behaviors among female adolescents from two cultures using Eccles' expectancy-value theory (Eccles et al., 1983). Twelve…

  5. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CULTURAL VALUES AND CONSUMER MOTIVATIONS FOR PURCHASING LUXURY BRANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa BEZZAOUIA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a global context, it is important for researchers and marketers alike to understand the behavior of consumers in general and their motivations in particular for purchasing luxury goods, while taking into account the cultural context of the buyers – an important aspect from the point of view of some marketing scholars. This research investigates if the differences between consumers from different parts of the world influence their motivation for purchasing luxury goods. Concerning motivations, we identified five categories: status, uniqueness, conformism, quality and hedonism, to which we added ostentation. With regard to cultural values, we relied on the framework provided by Hofstede and took into account the values for individualism-collectivism, power distance, masculinity-femininity, uncertainty avoidance. In this article we intend to develop a framework for analyzing the relationships between cultural values and motivations of purchase and consumption of luxury brands. For this purpose we conducted a literature review on this topic, we developed a conceptual model of research and we formulated the hypotheses of research. Conceptual model of research and the hypotheses will form the basis of a quantitative research that will take place in Tunisia and Romania on two samples of 100 respondents each. This will facilitate empirical research comparing purchasing behavior of luxury brands consumers on the two markets.

  6. Cultural values, U.S. neighborhood danger, and Mexican American parents' parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rebecca M B; Zeiders, Katharine H; Gonzales, Nancy A; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Roosa, Mark W

    2013-06-01

    To begin accounting for cultural and contextual factors related to child rearing among Mexican American parents we examined whether parents' Mexican American cultural values and perceptions of neighborhood danger influenced patterns of parenting behavior in two-parent Mexican-origin families living in the U.S. To avoid forcing Mexican American parents into a predefined model of parenting styles, we used latent profile analysis to identify unique patterns of responsiveness and demandingness among mothers and fathers. Analyses were conducted using parent self-reports on parenting and replicated with youth reports on mothers' and fathers' parenting. Across reporters, most mothers and fathers exhibited a pattern of responsiveness and demandingness consistent with authoritative parenting. A small portion of parents exhibited a pattern of less-involved parenting. None of the patterns were indicative of authoritarianism. There was a modicum of evidence for no nonsense parenting among fathers. Both neighborhood danger and parents' cultural values were associated with the likelihood of employing one style of parenting over another. The value of using person-centered analytical techniques to examine parenting among Mexican Americans is discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Cultural Values, U.S. Neighborhood Danger, and Mexican American Parents' Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rebecca M. B.; Zeiders, Katharine H.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Roosa, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    To begin accounting for cultural and contextual factors related to child rearing among Mexican American parents we examined whether parents' Mexican American cultural values and perceptions of neighborhood danger influenced patterns of parenting behavior in two-parent Mexican-origin families living in the U.S. To avoid forcing Mexican American parents into a predefined model of parenting styles, we used latent profile analysis to identify unique patterns of responsiveness and demandingness among mothers and fathers. Analyses were conducted using parent self-reports on parenting and replicated with youth reports on mothers' and fathers' parenting. Across reporters most mothers and fathers exhibited a pattern of responsiveness and demandingness consistent with authoritative parenting. A small portion of parents exhibited a pattern of less-involved parenting. None of the patterns were indicative of authoritarianism. There was a modicum of evidence for no nonsense parenting among fathers. Both neighborhood danger and parents' cultural values were associated with the likelihood of employing one style of parenting over another. The value of using person-centered analytical techniques to examine parenting among Mexican Americans is discussed. PMID:23750519

  8. Military NGO Interaction: The Value of Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    and culture specific. A culture general approach seeks to develop a strategic attribute, which will allow personnel to rapidly adapt to unfamiliar...understanding “the story behind the situation.”15 † Military leaders should not expect to become cultural chameleons that can blend seamlessly into another...and beliefs of the receiver, evaluate the receiver’s understanding of the message, and adapt as the situation and message continually evolve

  9. Naming patterns reveal cultural values: patronyms, matronyms, and the U.S. culture of honor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan P; Carvallo, Mauricio; Imura, Mikiko

    2014-02-01

    Four studies examined the hypothesis that honor norms would be associated with a pronounced use of patronyms, but not matronyms, for naming children. Study 1 shows that men who endorse honor values expressed a stronger desire to use patronyms (but not matronyms) for future children, an association that was mediated by patriarchal attitudes. Study 2 presents an indirect method for assessing state patronym and matronym levels. As expected, patronym scores were significantly higher in honor states and were associated with a wide range of variables linked previously to honor-related dynamics. Study 3a shows that following the terrorist attacks of 9/11, patronyms increased in honor states, but not in non-honor states. Likewise, priming men with a fictitious terrorist attack (Study 3b) increased the association between honor ideology and patronym preferences. Together, these studies reveal a subtle social signal that reflects the masculine values of an honor culture.

  10. Work as a cultural and personal value: attitudes towards work in Polish society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzyńska, Krystyna

    2002-01-01

    The meaning of work for Poles is analyzed here from 2 perspectives: macrosocial and individual. From the macrosocial perspective work attitudes are explained by 3 factors: traditional Polish Catholicism, cultural patterns (influence of noble class tradition), and experience of "real socialism." From an individual perspective some psychological and demographic predictors of an autonomous (intrinsic) work attitude are empirically tested. The autonomous attitude towards work is understood here as treating work as an important autonomous value versus only an instrumental means for earning money. The data was collected by means of standardized interviews run on a representative random sample of adult working Poles, N = 1340.

  11. Dataset on brand culture and perceived value of offerings to customers in the hospitality industry in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirisu, Joy; Worlu, Rowland; Osibanjo, Adewale; Borisade, Taiye; Olokundun, Maxwell; Atolagbe, Tolu; Obi, James

    2018-08-01

    This study critically examines the role of brand culture in influencing the perceived value of offerings to customers within the hospitality industry in Nigeria. In today's competitive market, the extent at which organizations disregard the importance of developing a strong brand culture before communicating their value to the outside world has become worrisome. Hence, this study filled in the gaps and a total of 434 customers drawn from six different hotels in Lagos state, Nigeria, were sampled. The data were analysed using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM). Management of these hotels were able to define their expectations in order to deliver a consistent brand experience to their customers. The result showed that brand culture has positive significant influence on the perceived value of offerings to customers. Important recommendations have also been made.

  12. "Cultural additivity" and how the values and norms of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism co-exist, interact, and influence Vietnamese society: A Bayesian analysis of long-standing folktales, using R and Stan

    OpenAIRE

    Vuong, Quan-Hoang; Ho, Manh-Tung; La, Viet-Phuong; Van Nhue, Dam; Khiem, Bui Quang; Cuong, Nghiem Phu Kien; Vuong, Thu-Trang; Ho, Manh-Toan; Nguyen, Hong-Kong T.; Nguyen, Viet-Ha; Pham, Hiep-Hung; Napier, Nancy K.

    2018-01-01

    Every year, the Vietnamese people reportedly burned about 50,000 tons of joss papers, which took the form of not only bank notes, but iPhones, cars, clothes, even housekeepers, in hope of pleasing the dead. The practice was mistakenly attributed to traditional Buddhist teachings but originated in fact from China, which most Vietnamese were not aware of. In other aspects of life, there were many similar examples of Vietnamese so ready and comfortable with adding new norms, values, and beliefs,...

  13. The market value of cultural heritage in urban areas: an application of spatial hedonic pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazrak, Faroek; Nijkamp, Peter; Rietveld, Piet; Rouwendal, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The current literature often values intangible goods like cultural heritage by applying stated preference methods. In recent years, however, the increasing availability of large databases on real estate transactions and listed prices has opened up new research possibilities and has reduced various existing barriers to applications of conventional (spatial) hedonic analysis to the real estate market. The present paper provides one of the first applications using a spatial autoregressive model to investigate the impact of cultural heritage—in particular, listed buildings and historic-cultural sites (or historic landmarks)—on the value of real estate in cities. In addition, this paper suggests a novel way of specifying the spatial weight matrix—only prices of sold houses influence current price—in identifying the spatial dependency effects between sold properties. The empirical application in the present study concerns the Dutch urban area of Zaanstad, a historic area for which over a long period of more than 20 years detailed information on individual dwellings, and their market prices are available in a GIS context. In this paper, the effect of cultural heritage is analysed in three complementary ways. First, we measure the effect of a listed building on its market price in the relevant area concerned. Secondly, we investigate the value that listed heritage has on nearby property. And finally, we estimate the effect of historic-cultural sites on real estate prices. We find that, to purchase a listed building, buyers are willing to pay an additional 26.9 %, while surrounding houses are worth an extra 0.28 % for each additional listed building within a 50-m radius. Houses sold within a conservation area appear to gain a premium of 26.4 % which confirms the existence of a `historic ensemble' effect.

  14. Beyond individualism: professional culture and its influence on feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watling, C.N.; Driessen, E.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Vanstone, M.; Lingard, L.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Although feedback is widely considered essential to learning, its actual influence on learners is variable. Research on responsivity to feedback has tended to focus on individual rather than social or cultural influences on learning. In this study, we explored how feedback is handled within

  15. Cultural dimensions, collective values and their importance for institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klasing, Mariko J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper critically assesses the role of culture in determining the quality of institutions. Employing various measures of cultural differences, I find that only differences related to the degree of individualism in society and the extent to which inequality in the distribution of power is

  16. Individuals in Relationships: Cultural Values, Children's Social Interactions, and the Development of an American Individualistic Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeff, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Explicates the theoretical position that independence and interdependence are inseparable dimensions of self-development in all cultures and that self-development occurs through social interactions shaped by cultural values. Individualism-collectivism classify two multidimensional cultural value systems that shape different routes and goals of…

  17. Environmental influences on childhood obesity: ethnic and cultural influences in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanyika, Shiriki K

    2008-04-22

    Ethnicity is associated with differences in food-related beliefs, preferences, and behaviors, and cultural influences may contribute to the higher than average risk of obesity among children and youth in U.S. ethnic minority populations. However, cultural attitudes and beliefs are not the only potential source of ethnic variation in childhood obesity prevalence and should not be studied in isolation. Demographic, socio-structural, and environmental variables must also be considered. Available evidence indicates ethnic differences along several pathways that may increase risks of obesity development during gestation, infancy, childhood and adolescence. These include above-average prevalence of obesity in adult females and of maternal diabetes during pregnancy, parental attitudes and practices that may lead to overfeeding children, above-average levels of consumption of certain high calorie foods and beverages, and inadequate physical activity. Environments with lower than average neighborhood availability of healthful foods and higher than average availability of fast food restaurants, along with exposure to ethnically targeted food marketing may contribute to reliance on high calorie foods and beverages, and these foods may be socially and culturally valued. Attitudes about and environmental contexts for physical activity are also relevant. Increasingly, it is acknowledged that individual behaviors and lifestyles, e.g. food choices or child feeding practices, are responsive to the ecological contexts in which they are practiced. Focusing attention on the fluid interactions of cultural influences with contextual factors, of recognized importance for the study of childhood undernutrition, can also lead to further understanding of how to address ethnic disparities in childhood obesity.

  18. Historical and contemporary cultural ecosystem service values in the rapidly urbanizing city state of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajah, Jharyathri; Wong, Shermaine K M; Richards, Daniel R; Friess, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    Cultural ecosystem services are a function of people and place, so may change as a location transitions from rural to urban. Singapore has undergone rapid urbanization after its independence in 1965, with a concomitant decline in natural habitat extent and accessibility. Using coastal mangrove forests as a case study habitat, changing cultural values were explored with a novel array of techniques, including qualitative archival analysis (photographs, oral histories), current sources (publically uploaded social media photographs), and surveys of (a) the general public and (b) visitors to publically accessible mangroves. Cultural value changed through time, with a significant transition from intrinsic, intrapersonal values (spiritual, cultural heritage) to instrumental, interpersonal values (recreation, education). Additionally, cultural value varied between different mangroves depending on their public accessibility, and the evolving degree of human interaction with the ecosystem as urban development occured. Cultural values change as development transitions, though mangroves still play an important cultural role in a heavily urbanized environment.

  19. On the Factors Influencing New Ventures’ Blended Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giones, Ferran; Ungerer, Christina; Baltes, Guido

    Mullen 2007). These so-called hybrid organizations try to be congruent with their blended values, despite being under external pressure in the process of maturing the new venture (Mcmullen & Warnick 2016). This research explores not only the initial motivations of the entrepreneur as potential influence...... on the ventures’ blended values, but also the source of finance. A dataset of 4,125 early-stage ventures (Entrepreneurship Database Program; Emory University) has been explored to gain insights into how entrepreneurs' motives and external financing sources could influence on the impact dimensions being addressed...... or environmental impact dimensions – thus they may have been willing to adapt their initial goals to match with different donors’ expectations. In the case of social impact ambitions, increasing profit margin targets and venture age have a negative effect on the prevalence of blended values. The research results...

  20. Diagnostic value of ADC in patients with prostate cancer: influence of the choice of b values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thörmer, Gregor; Otto, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Seiwerts, Matthias; Moche, Michael; Garnov, Nikita; Franz, Toni; Do, Minh; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Horn, Lars-Christian; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of the choice of b values on the diagnostic value of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for detection and grading of prostate cancer (PCa). Forty-one patients with biopsy-proven PCa underwent endorectal 3-T MRI before prostatectomy. Different combinations of b values (0-800 s/mm(2)) were used to calculate four representative ADC maps. Mean ADCs of tumours and non-malignant tissue were determined. Tumour appearance on different ADC maps was rated by three radiologists as good, fair or poor by assigning a visual score (VS) of 2, 1 or 0, respectively. Differences in the ADC values with the choice of b values were analysed using one-way ANOVA. Choice of b values had a highly (P < 0.001) significant influence on the absolute ADC in each tissue. Maps using b = [50, 800] and [0, 800] were rated best (VS= 1.6 ± 0.3) and second best (1.1 ± 0.3, P < 0.001), respectively. For low-grade carcinomas (Gleason score ≤ 6, 13/41 patients), only the former choice received scores better than fair (VS = 1.4 ± 0.3). Mean tumour ADCs showed significant negative correlation (Spearman's ρ -0.38 to -0.46, P < 0.05) with Gleason score. Absolute ADC values strongly depend on the choice of b values and therefore should be used with caution for diagnostic purposes. A minimum b value greater than zero is recommended for ADC calculation to improve the visual assessment of PCa in ADC maps. • Absolute ADC values are highly dependent on the choice of b values. • Absolute ADC thresholds should be used carefully to predict tumour aggressiveness. • Subjective ratings of ADC maps involving b = 0 s/mm ( 2 ) are poor to fair. • Minimum b value greater than 0 s/mm ( 2 ) is recommended for ADC calculation.

  1. The Influence of Employees’ Values on the Acquisition of Knowledge in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pivec Nataša

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on the importance and influence of employees’ values as an essential element of organizational culture in the acquisition of knowledge. Based on empirical research, we studied the influence of employees’ values in Slovenian organizations on the acquisition of knowledge, enabling us to identify the core values that exert the greatest effect on the acquisition of knowledge. The results of the analysis confirmed the positive impact of employees’ values on the acquisition of knowledge. We found that the more employees are dedicated to personal development and the more they feel connected and loyal to the organization, the more they are inclined to the development and acquisition of knowledge.

  2. The benefits of social influence in optimized cultural markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeliuk, Andrés; Berbeglia, Gerardo; Cebrian, Manuel; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Social influence has been shown to create significant unpredictability in cultural markets, providing one potential explanation why experts routinely fail at predicting commercial success of cultural products. As a result, social influence is often presented in a negative light. Here, we show the benefits of social influence for cultural markets. We present a policy that uses product quality, appeal, position bias and social influence to maximize expected profits in the market. Our computational experiments show that our profit-maximizing policy leverages social influence to produce significant performance benefits for the market, while our theoretical analysis proves that our policy outperforms in expectation any policy not displaying social signals. Our results contrast with earlier work which focused on showing the unpredictability and inequalities created by social influence. Not only do we show for the first time that, under our policy, dynamically showing consumers positive social signals increases the expected profit of the seller in cultural markets. We also show that, in reasonable settings, our profit-maximizing policy does not introduce significant unpredictability and identifies "blockbusters". Overall, these results shed new light on the nature of social influence and how it can be leveraged for the benefits of the market.

  3. The benefits of social influence in optimized cultural markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Abeliuk

    Full Text Available Social influence has been shown to create significant unpredictability in cultural markets, providing one potential explanation why experts routinely fail at predicting commercial success of cultural products. As a result, social influence is often presented in a negative light. Here, we show the benefits of social influence for cultural markets. We present a policy that uses product quality, appeal, position bias and social influence to maximize expected profits in the market. Our computational experiments show that our profit-maximizing policy leverages social influence to produce significant performance benefits for the market, while our theoretical analysis proves that our policy outperforms in expectation any policy not displaying social signals. Our results contrast with earlier work which focused on showing the unpredictability and inequalities created by social influence. Not only do we show for the first time that, under our policy, dynamically showing consumers positive social signals increases the expected profit of the seller in cultural markets. We also show that, in reasonable settings, our profit-maximizing policy does not introduce significant unpredictability and identifies "blockbusters". Overall, these results shed new light on the nature of social influence and how it can be leveraged for the benefits of the market.

  4. Canadian Cultural Materialism: Personal Values and Television Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surlin, Stuart H.; Squire, Larry A.

    A study examined the relationship between social and material values and attitudes toward television advertising. Using the Rokeach Value Survey Form E, 157 Canadian college students ranked the 18 terminal and 18 instrumental values in order of their importance as guiding principles for life. The values were classified as either material, social,…

  5. Searching for Symbolic Value of Cattle: Tropical Livestock Units, Market Price, and Cultural Value of Maasai Livestock

    OpenAIRE

    Robert J. Quinlan; Isaya Rumas; Godfrey Naiskye; Marsha Quinlan; Jonathan Yoder

    2016-01-01

    We examine metabolic, market, and symbolic values of livestock relative to cultural “positioning” by gender, marriage, and household production among Maasai people in Simanjiro, Tanzania to assess local “proximate currencies” relevant for “cultural success.” Data from mixed methods ethnographic research include qualitative interviews since 2012, observation of 85 livestock market sales in 2013 and 2015, and 37 short key informant interviews in 2015. We examine fit between market values, Tropi...

  6. Depression in the barrio: An analysis of the risk and protective nature of cultural values among Mexican American substance users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Yolanda R; Torres, Luis R; Stotts, Angela L; Ren, Yi; Sampson, Mcclain; Klawans, Michelle R; Bordnick, Patrick S

    2017-06-07

    Understanding the effect of cultural values on depression and how social networks influence these relationships may be important in the treatment of substance-using, Mexican American populations. Latino cultural values, familismo, personalismo, fatalismo, and machismo, may be associated with depression among Latinos. The current study identified the association of traditional Latino values on depressive symptomatology among a sample of Mexican American heroin injectors. A cross-sectional research design and field-intensive outreach methodology were utilized to recruit 227 Mexican American men. Participants were categorized into depressed and nondepressed groups. Relations among cultural values and depression were examined using logistic regression. Findings indicate that drug-using men with higher familismo and fatalismo scores are protected against depressive symptomatology. Relations between familismo and depression seem to be moderated by having a drug use network. In addition, findings reveal that age is inversely related to depressive symptomatology. Young Mexican American heroin users who do not ascribe to traditional Latino values may be highly associated with depression and therefore more vulnerable to riskier drug use behaviors. Moreover, drug-using social networks may affect the protective nature of certain cultural values. Further research is needed to identify whether culturally tailored treatments can cultivate these values while simultaneously undermining the effect of substance-using social networks in order to reduce depression symptoms among this group of high-risk substance users.

  7. Is the value of oral health related to culture and environment, or function and aesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassani, M Z; Kay, E J; Al-Nahhal, T I; Okşayan, R; Usumez, A; Mohammadi, T M

    2015-12-01

    To examine the disutility of tooth loss. It compared how people value their teeth in two countries which are culturally similar in order to explore the effect of culture on self-perceptions of oral health. Cross sectional study. Participants were recruited from subjects attending two hospitals in Turkey and in Iran. Nineteen descriptions of mouths with varying degrees and types of tooth loss were presented to the participants. They were shown mouth models of partially edentate dentitions and the teeth missing were explained in relation to the participants own mouth. The participants were specifically asked to consider the role their teeth played in function (chewing), communication (speech) and aesthetics (looks) along with "all the other things that make your mouth important". The participants were asked to indicate on a visual analogue scale how they would value the health of their mouth if they lost the tooth/teeth described and the resultant space was left unrestored. Overall 152 subjects participated, 78 in Turkey and 74 in Iran with 83 being female and 69 male. Their mean age was 29.5 years (SD 9.3), 62.5% had experienced tooth loss and 37.5% had complete (or completely restored) dentitions. Although there were no differences between the two countries in the degree of utility people attached to anterior teeth, Turkish participants attached significantly more disutility than Iranians to the loss of premolar and molar teeth (p health are influenced by prevalent cultural attitudes more than by function.

  8. Parental Autonomy Granting and School Functioning among Chinese Adolescents: The Moderating Role of Adolescents' Cultural Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cixin; Do, Kieu Anh; Bao, Leiping; Xia, Yan R; Wu, Chaorong

    2017-01-01

    School adjustment and achievement are important indicators of adolescents' well-being; however, few studies have examined the risk and protective factors predicting students' school adjustment and achievement at the individual, familial, and cultural level. The present study examined the influences of individual and familial factors and cultural values on Chinese adolescents' school functioning (e.g., school adjustment and grades). It also tested whether cultural values moderated the relationship between parenting and adolescents' school functioning. Self-report data were collected from a stratified random sample of 2,864 adolescents (51.5% female, mean age = 15.52 years, grade 6th - 12th) from 55 classrooms, in 13 schools in Shanghai, China. Results showed that self-esteem ( b se→adj = 0.05, SE = 0.01, p school adjustment and grades, respectively. More importantly, results showed that independent self-construal moderated the relationship between parental autonomy granting and adolescents' grades ( b indepxautom = 0.06, SE = 0.02, p autonomy granting, which then impacts their school functioning.

  9. Generational shifts in managerial values and the coming of a global business culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, A.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    In a globalizing world, cross-national differences in values and business culture and understanding these differences become increasingly central to a range of managerial issues. Studies of cultural (dis)similarities in the values of managers (so-called managerial values) and the development of a

  10. The Influence of culture on goal perception: Qatar versus Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina L.; Koppel, Jonathan; Johannessen, Kim Berg

    2016-01-01

    Expectations of control put forth by societal norms impose a constant influence on goal perception. To examine the influence of culture on perception of personal goals, 124 Middle Easterners and 128 Scandinavians rated their perceived locus of control, generated goals and evaluated goal...... characteristics. Findings show several cultural and gender differences, most notably in perceived locus of control, unhappiness despite goal achievement and adherence to cultural life script. Many differences were qualified by interactions, suggesting that Middle Eastern men deviate from Middle Eastern women...... and Scandinavians of both sexes. The Middle Eastern men demonstrated greater ambivalence regarding goal achievement, and contrary to previous findings from other cultural samples, they also showed a significant positive association between internal and external control. Furthermore , goals generated by Middle...

  11. A quiet migration: cultural influences impacting children adopted from the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, T

    2000-01-01

    When children immigrate to another culture, a variety of salient variables influence their adaptation. Among internationally adopted children, these variables include early history, changes in socioeconomic status, awareness of multiple issues impacting the child post-adoption, availability of social networks, and anti-immigration sentiments in the host culture. The change in socioeconomic status of children adopted from the former Soviet Union is a positive influence with the concomitant improvement in the child's nutrition and health care. Many internationally adopted children have spent time in institutional environments that constitute a culture in and of itself. The orphanages are microenvironments which may be closed to the influences of the larger culture. The environmental components of the orphanage transmit a collection of traits and values which, taken as a whole, constitute the orphanage culture. Adoptive parents must facilitate the children's adjustment to a new cultural milieu with different language, food, and customs. Further, children must adapt to the culture of the family, a culture that may have been previously unknown. Nurses can promote the adaptation of these families by increasing awareness of the multitude of issues that impact internationally adoptive families.

  12. Diagnostic value of ADC in patients with prostate cancer: influence of the choice of b values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoermer, Gregor; Otto, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Seiwerts, Matthias; Moche, Michael; Garnov, Nikita; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Franz, Toni; Do, Minh; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Urology, Leipzig (Germany); Horn, Lars-Christian [University of Leipzig, Institute of Pathology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    To evaluate the influence of the choice of b values on the diagnostic value of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for detection and grading of prostate cancer (PCa). Forty-one patients with biopsy-proven PCa underwent endorectal 3-T MRI before prostatectomy. Different combinations of b values (0-800 s/mm{sup 2}) were used to calculate four representative ADC maps. Mean ADCs of tumours and non-malignant tissue were determined. Tumour appearance on different ADC maps was rated by three radiologists as good, fair or poor by assigning a visual score (VS) of 2, 1 or 0, respectively. Differences in the ADC values with the choice of b values were analysed using one-way ANOVA. Choice of b values had a highly (P < 0.001) significant influence on the absolute ADC in each tissue. Maps using b = [50, 800] and [0, 800] were rated best (VS = 1.6 {+-} 0.3) and second best (1.1 {+-} 0.3, P < 0.001), respectively. For low-grade carcinomas (Gleason score {<=} 6, 13/41 patients), only the former choice received scores better than fair (VS = 1.4 {+-} 0.3). Mean tumour ADCs showed significant negative correlation (Spearman's {rho} -0.38 to -0.46, P < 0.05) with Gleason score. Absolute ADC values strongly depend on the choice of b values and therefore should be used with caution for diagnostic purposes. A minimum b value greater than zero is recommended for ADC calculation to improve the visual assessment of PCa in ADC maps. (orig.)

  13. Diagnostic value of ADC in patients with prostate cancer: influence of the choice of b values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoermer, Gregor; Otto, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Seiwerts, Matthias; Moche, Michael; Garnov, Nikita; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald; Franz, Toni; Do, Minh; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Horn, Lars-Christian

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of the choice of b values on the diagnostic value of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for detection and grading of prostate cancer (PCa). Forty-one patients with biopsy-proven PCa underwent endorectal 3-T MRI before prostatectomy. Different combinations of b values (0-800 s/mm 2 ) were used to calculate four representative ADC maps. Mean ADCs of tumours and non-malignant tissue were determined. Tumour appearance on different ADC maps was rated by three radiologists as good, fair or poor by assigning a visual score (VS) of 2, 1 or 0, respectively. Differences in the ADC values with the choice of b values were analysed using one-way ANOVA. Choice of b values had a highly (P < 0.001) significant influence on the absolute ADC in each tissue. Maps using b = [50, 800] and [0, 800] were rated best (VS = 1.6 ± 0.3) and second best (1.1 ± 0.3, P < 0.001), respectively. For low-grade carcinomas (Gleason score ≤ 6, 13/41 patients), only the former choice received scores better than fair (VS = 1.4 ± 0.3). Mean tumour ADCs showed significant negative correlation (Spearman's ρ -0.38 to -0.46, P < 0.05) with Gleason score. Absolute ADC values strongly depend on the choice of b values and therefore should be used with caution for diagnostic purposes. A minimum b value greater than zero is recommended for ADC calculation to improve the visual assessment of PCa in ADC maps. (orig.)

  14. The alignment of espoused values and organisational culture at a South African parastatal organisation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Comm. The primary purpose of the present study was to identify whether the organisational culture of the Transmission Division of Eskom is aligned to its stated values. In seeking to reach this objective, it was necessary to assess the gap between espoused and practised organisational values. The study also sought to identify the Transmission Division’s organisational culture. A correlation between the stated values and identified organisational culture was calculated and this was used t...

  15. Peer support: helping to influence cultural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Breastfeeding peer support schemes in Blackpool and Lancashire work closely with midwifery and other partners to offer additional support and encouragement to breastfeeding mothers. Employed and volunteer peer supporters deliver a systematic service in target areas delivering workshops to pregnant mothers, supporting new mothers in hospital, including in the neonatal units, in mothers' homes and in groups at children's centres. Working with health, children's centres, public health and councils, the peer supporters were instrumental in Fleetwood town agreeing to always welcome breastfeeding. They worked with teachers, public health and infant feeding coordinators to deliver a month-long breastfeeding campaign at a local college and, working with health visitors, have engaged with grandmothers to find out how they feel they can help support new mothers. Skilled supervision is essential to ensuring peer supporters work safely and continue to develop their skills and knowledge. Volunteer coordinators play a key role in valuing and organising volunteers.

  16. Do values of parents influence subjective perspective of children's rights?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Flerin

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we research the impact of the value orientation and parent's contentmentwith the fulfilment of the values on subjective experience of children's rights. The project is a part of the international children's rights research, being conducted by International School Psychologist Association (ISPA, which is also being conducted in Slovenia. 194 children from the fourth and the eighth class and one of their parents voluntarily took part in the research. The sample was homogeneous in regard to the demography variables. The following questionnaires were used: The international research of children's rights (questionnaire for children and parents, the Musek's scale of values and The scale of contentment with fulfilment of values (both just for parents. The following working hypothesis, which were partially verified, were placed: (1 There are differences in subjective experience of children's rights from the perspective of a child and the perspective of a parent in regard to different age period of a child. (2 There are differences in subjective experience of children's rights from the perspective of children in regard to the value orientation and parent's contentment with the fulfilment of the values. (3 There are differences in subjective experience of rights from the perspective of children in regard to the different demographic variables. The research showed that the children from the fourth and the eighth class differently experience children's rights. The differences are bigger in the evaluation of the importance of the rights than in the experience of the assertion of the rights. The differences in regard to the view of the children's rights among the children's parents are not significant. The evaluation of the importance of values and the evaluation of the parent's contentment with the fulfilment of the values (mainly of the apollonian type have an important influence on the evaluation of the importance and the adequacy of the

  17. The promotion of mental health through cultural values, institutions, and practices: a reflection on some aspects of botswana culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabone, Motshedisi B

    2009-12-01

    Botswana has seen rapid socioeconomic development since the 1970s that has contributed to the erosion of the values, institutions, and practices that are believed to be supportive of mental health. In this paper, the author argues that the aspects of culture that are supportive of mental health have been diluted by the process of urbanization and the interactions of Batswana (the indigenous people of Botswana) with other cultural groups, particularly those from the western hemisphere. The paper further highlights some of the values, institutions, and practices native to Botswana and describes how they promote mental health. Lastly, recommendations for reviving the cultural values, institutions, and practices of Botswana are discussed.

  18. Cultural Modes of Expressing Emotions Influence How Emotions Are Experienced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Damasio, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    The brain’s mapping of bodily responses during emotion contributes to emotional experiences, or feelings. Culture influences emotional expressiveness, i.e. the magnitude of individuals’ bodily responses during emotion. So, are cultural influences on behavioral expressiveness associated with differences in how individuals experience emotion? Chinese and American young adults reported how strongly admiration and compassion-inducing stories made them feel, first in a private interview and then during fMRI. As expected, Americans were more expressive in the interview. While expressiveness did not predict stronger reported feelings or neural responses during fMRI, in both cultural groups more expressive people showed tighter trial-by-trial correlations between their experienced strength of emotion and activations in visceral-somatosensory cortex, even after controlling for individuals’ overall strength of reactions (neural and felt). Moreover, expressiveness mediated a previously described cultural effect in which activations in visceral-somatosensory cortex correlated with feeling strength among Americans but not among Chinese. Post-hoc supplementary analyses revealed that more expressive individuals reached peak activation of visceral-somatosensory cortex later in the emotion process and took longer to decide how strongly they felt. The results together suggest that differences in expressiveness correspond to differences in how somatosensory mechanisms contribute to constructing conscious feelings. By influencing expressiveness, culture may therefore influence how individuals know how strongly they feel, what conscious feelings are based on, or possibly what strong versus weak emotions “feel like.” PMID:27270077

  19. Influence of cross-cultural leadership on organizational culture: Arcelormittal, Newcastle, a South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Feldman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the influence of cross cultural leadership on organisational culture. This is assessed by using the GLOBE project’s dimensions of culture which are an extension to Hofstede model of culture. These are; power distance, uncertainty avoidance, human orientation, individuality vs. collectivism, egalitarianism, assertiveness, long term orientation and performance orientation. As more organisations in South Africa become more culturally diverse, it is important to determine where the organisational culture stems from? This is essential in addressing cross cultural conflicts and in efforts to create a winning culture in the workplace. The case study involves Arcelormittal South Africa (AMSA, and will hopefully contribute positively in identifying salient cultural implications in managerial positions such as for example, high employee turnover and cultural clashes which hinder individual performance. A qualitative research design was used in this study to determine participants’ perspectives on organisational culture and leadership. Two instruments were used for primary data collection in this research. The first one was designed by the researcher to capture the demographics data for this particular study. The second instrument used was the GLOBE survey questionnaire which captured 8 dimensions of culture and was specifically designed to encompass questions relevant to the business environment. A convenience sampling methodology was used with a target population of 115 managers classified as middle management of AMSA. The research revealed that there is a general shift from a Eurocentric approach to leadership which is congruent with high individualism and low human orientation. The influence of cross cultural leadership is thus indicated by the preference for higher degree of human orientation and collectivism amongst managers, which is associated with the Afrocentric leadership style and the black ethnic

  20. The socio-cultural value of New Zealand wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry Wray

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand's wilderness resource has become iconic on both a national and international scale, and provides an important source of cultural identity for many Kiwis (a colloquial term for a New Zealander). Now, in the early 21st Century, however, social changes such as urbanization, globalization, increasing consumerism, and growing international tourism may be...

  1. Immigrant and Refugee Youth: Migration Journeys and Cultural Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Rowena

    2007-01-01

    Professionals working with immigrant and refugee youth in schools, mental health clinics, hospitals, and adolescent-serving organizations are better equipped to offer culturally appropriate interventions and prevention strategies if they understand their clients' migration journeys and legal status. Professionals who understand the cultural…

  2. Valuing Stuff: Materials Culture and Artifactual Literacies in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Régine; Mercurio, Mia Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Recent interest in materials culture and artifactual literacies has helped the authors of this article rethink how they teach preservice and inservice teachers and collaborate with K-12 teachers. Each discipline has its own stuff that can help students understand the products and practices of a field beyond what they might be able to glean from…

  3. Cultural values and international differences in business ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Dam, L.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze ethical policies of firms in industrialized countries and try to find out whether culture is a factor that plays a significant role in explaining country differences. We look into the firm's human rights policy, its governance of bribery and corruption, and the comprehensiveness,

  4. Consumption, indigeneous knowledge and cultural values of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the edible insects, lakeflies (Chaoborus and Chironomus sp) are least documented as items of human consumption. They are eaten by the Luo communities living within the Lake Victoria basin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the importance of lake flies as a source of food and its role in cultural practices.

  5. Culture and values - their relevance for marketing strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Rewerts, Astrid Lucie; Hanf, Jon Henrich

    2006-01-01

    Research on consumer behaviour has revealed that the prospect of reaching a personal value is the virtual buying motive. Bearing this in mind, the researcher, as well as the marketer, is not only able to observe whether one product is preferred to another, but also to understand why this product is preferred. Hence, identifying consumers' personal values contributes to explaining consumer preferences and buying motives, which is of great importance for marketing practice. Personal values that...

  6. The Effect of the Cultural Values on the Destination Image: A Search in Eskisehir 2013 Turkish World Capital of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Köroğlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As the destination images being dynamic and changeable, continuous researches should be conducted in order to measure and progress the images in the context of tourism marketing. The aim of this study is to analyze the tourists’ characters and behaviors who direct through the cultural destinations and to determine the relationship between the visitors’ perceptions of cultural values and destination image. Based on this purpose, a questionnaire was held on the foreign cullture tourist who visited Eskisehir, chosen as the 2013 Turkish World Capital of Culture. The data obtained were evaluated using analysis methods such as frequency, arithmetic mean, reliability, regression, independent samples t-test, one-way variance analysis (ANOVA. The results obtain from these analysis have shown that many of the participants have used internet as a source of information and travelled to explore new cultures. On the one hand the most affecting cultural values of the destination image was emotional values.

  7. Afrocentric cultural values and beliefs: movement beyond the race and ethnicity proxy to understand views of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollan-Koliopoulos, Melissa; Rapp, Kenneth J; Bleich, David

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the benefit of using a cultural characteristics scale to help diabetes educators understand how African Americans cope with diabetes. Illness representations are influenced by culture. Race and ethnicity as a proxy for culture provides an incomplete understanding of the mechanism by which cultural values influence representations of diabetes. A descriptive correlational design was employed by recruiting hospitalized adults with type 2 diabetes at 3 metropolitan northeast coast sites. The TRIOS Afrocentric cultural characteristics measure and the Illness perception Questionnaire were administered by paper-and-pencil to a diverse sample. Black race and African American ethnicity was used as a proxy for culture and compared to levels of agreement on an Afrocentric cultural scale to determine the relative ability to explain variance in illness representations of diabetes. The TRIOS measure adapted to diabetes care explained variance in illness representations of diabetes, while African American ethnicity/black race was not able to explain variance in illness representations. Clinicians would benefit from considering the degree to which a patient identifies with particular cultural characteristics when tailoring interventions to manipulate illness representations that are not concordant with biomedical representations.

  8. Influence of Organizational Culture on Service Provider Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Yılmaz, Mehmet; Yılmaz Börekçi, Dilek; Örnek, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Although Third Party Logistics Service Provider (3PL) selection literature mentions organizational culture’s role in the development as well as in the maintenance of 3PL arrangements, there is a paucity of attempts to underline the significance of organizational culture’s influence on the formation and management of 3PL relationships. In this study, the influence of different organizational cultural orientations in uncertainty avoidance, future orientation, performance orientation and paterna...

  9. Analyzing the socio-cultural values influencing the development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results from archival documents, e-mail correspondence and telephonic interviews revealed that passiveness of African learners to adults ideas, which is a traditional way of childrens respect for adults, filtered into the mathematics classrooms of the pre-service teachers. Such passiveness limited the full implementation ...

  10. LGB identity among young Chinese: the influence of traditional culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaowen; Wang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Based on the social construction perspective, this research aims to investigate how traditional cultural values may affect the way individuals interpret and negotiate with their minority sexual identity. Using an online survey questionnaire with a student sample of 149 Chinese lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals, 2 elements of traditional Chinese culture were found to be associated with negative LGB identity among Chinese LGB students-namely, perceived parental attitudes toward marriage and participants' endorsements of filial piety values. In addition, the endorsement of filial piety moderated the relation between perceived parental attitudes toward marriage and LGB identity, such that the effect of parental attitude on LGB identity was only present among LGBs of high filial piety. This study suggests the importance of cultural values in shaping the way LGB individuals perceive their sexual identities.

  11. Culture as common sense: perceived consensus versus personal beliefs as mechanisms of cultural influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xi; Tam, Kim-Pong; Morris, Michael W; Lee, Sau-Lai; Lau, Ivy Yee-Man; Chiu, Chi-Yue

    2009-10-01

    The authors propose that culture affects people through their perceptions of what is consensually believed. Whereas past research has examined whether cultural differences in social judgment are mediated by differences in individuals' personal values and beliefs, this article investigates whether they are mediated by differences in individuals' perceptions of the views of people around them. The authors propose that individuals who perceive that traditional views are culturally consensual (e.g., Chinese participants who believe that most of their fellows hold collectivistic values) will themselves behave and think in culturally typical ways. Four studies of previously well-established cultural differences found that cultural differences were mediated by participants' perceived consensus as much as by participants' personal views. This held true for cultural differences in the bases of compliance (Study 1), attributional foci (Study 2), and counterfactual thinking styles (Study 3). To tease apart the effect of consensus perception from other possibly associated individual differences, in Study 4, the authors experimentally manipulated which of 2 cultures was salient to bicultural participants and found that judgments were guided by participants' perception of the consensual view of the salient culture. 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. ETHICS, VALUES AND BELONGING. BUILDING AN ETHICAL CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    David King

    2013-01-01

    What is an ethical culture, and why should companies bother about it? An ethical company is a business that helps people know the right thing to do, understand their code of ethics and uphold the organisation’s principles. As a result, the organisation protects itself against the kind of ethical contraventions and scandals that have affected many sectors, putting businesses in the news for all the wrong reasons and undermining the trust of customers, employees and investors. How can companies...

  13. Nurture Hidden Talents: Transform School Culture into One That Values Teacher Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Diane P.

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the school culture where teacher expertise is often hidden and underused. While the media-rich culture places a high value on talent, the irony is that talent is underrated in most schools, and educators often remain silent about their hidden talents. Many school cultures are not conducive to dialogue that supports displays…

  14. San Luis Valley - Taos Plateau Landscape-Level Cultural Heritage Values and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wescott, Konstance L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Abplanalp, Jennifer M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brown, Jeff [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Cantwell, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dicks, Merrill [Bureau of Land Management, Taos, NM (United States); Fredericks, Brian [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Krall, Angie [US Forest Service, Creede, CO (United States); Rollins, Katherine E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sullivan, Robert [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Valdez, Arnie [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verhaaren, Bruce [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vieira, Joseph [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Walston, Lee [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zvolanek, Emily A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The San Luis Valley – Taos Plateau Landscape-Level Cultural Heritage Values and Risk Assessment (hereafter referred to as cultural assessment) is a BLM pilot project designed to see whether the Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) framework (already established and implemented throughout many ecoregions in the West) can be applied to the cultural environment.

  15. The Value Relevance Of Value Added And Stakeholder Compensation Across Business Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    John Darcy

    2011-01-01

    This research performed a partial test of the instrumental validity of the stakeholder model by examining the value relevance of value added relative to income and the incremental value relevance of two stakeholder compensation components of value added, wages and interest for Japan, Germany, United States, and United Kingdom.

  16. From Learning Cultures to Educational Cultures: Values and Judgements in Educational Research and Educational Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesta, Gert

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines a new approach to the study of learning and the improvement of education. The approach consists of two elements: a theory of learning cultures and a cultural theory of learning. Learning cultures are different from learning contexts or learning environments in that they are to be understood as the social practices through…

  17. Exploring definitions of financial abuse in elderly Korean immigrants: the contribution of traditional cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Lee, Sang E; Eaton, Charissa K

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the cultural definitions of financial abuse from the perspective of 124 elderly Korean immigrants and to examine the role of traditional cultural values in their definitions by using a mixed methods approach. The qualitative analysis generated four themes relevant to definition of financial abuse. A binary logistic regression indicated that those with stronger cultural adherence to traditional values had higher odds of providing culture-based definitions of financial abuse. Education is needed for health professionals, social service providers, and adult protective workers to increase their understanding of culture-specific experiences of financial abuse among ethnic minority elders.

  18. Cultural Influences on Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Seropositivity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the role of cultural influences, namely: circumcision, ear piercing and traditional scarification, on HbsAg seropositivity among primary school children in Nnewi. Subjects and Method: Two hundred and thirty seven randomly selected primary school children aged 5-12 years, were screened for HbsAg.

  19. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  20. Shifting to Value-Based Principles in Sickness Insurance: Challenges in Changing Roles and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Christian; Andersson, Frieda

    2018-02-12

    Purpose Management principles in insurance agencies influence how benefits are administered, and how return to work processes for clients are managed and supported. This study analyses a change in managerial principles within the Swedish Sickness Insurance Agency, and how this has influenced the role of insurance officials in relation to discretion and accountability, and their relationship to clients. Methods The study is based on a qualitative approach comprising 57 interviews with officials and managers in four insurance offices. Results The reforms have led to a change in how public and professional accountability is defined, where the focus is shifted from routines and performance measurements toward professional discretion and the quality of encounters. However, the results show how these changes are interpreted differently across different layers of the organization, where New Public Management principles prevail in how line managers give feedback on and reward the work of officials. Conclusions The study illustrates how the introduction of new principles to promote officials' discretion does not easily bypass longstanding management strategies, in this case managing accountability through top-down performance measures. The study points out the importance for public organizations to reconcile new organizational principles with the current organizational culture and how this is manifested through managerial styles, which may be resistant to change. Promoting client-oriented and value-driven approaches in client work hence needs to acknowledge the importance of organizational culture, and to secure that changes are reflected in organizational procedures and routines.

  1. Cultural Values, Counseling Stigma, and Intentions to Seek Counseling among Asian American College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miville, Marie L.; Constantine, Madonna G.

    2007-01-01

    The authors explored the extent to which Asian American college women's perceived stigma about counseling mediated the relationship between their adherence to Asian cultural values and intentions to seek counseling, Participants, 201 Asian American college women (age range = 18-24 years), completed measures of Asian cultural values, perceived…

  2. The Search for Better Ways of Speaking about Culture, Identity and Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to provide better metaphors for thinking and speaking about culture, identity and values. In terms of human behaviour, the words culture, identity and values are viewed as useful reifications which have allowed us to discuss human action in terms of nouns. However, the terms have been used over many years in various theoretical…

  3. Organisational Culture and Values and the Adaptation of Academic Units in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zilwa, Deanna

    2007-01-01

    This study explores connections between the organisational culture and values of academic units in Australian universities and their efforts to adapt to external environmental pressures. It integrates empirical findings from case studies with theories of organisational culture and values and adaptation. It identifies seven dimensions of academic…

  4. Using Cultures and Values to Support Flexible Coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhée, L.C.B.C.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis proposes a method for supporting flexible coordination in multi-agent systems (MASs). In other words, we aim at influencing societies of artificial agents such that they can handle complex and evolving environments and collective goals (emergency rescue robots capable of handling various

  5. CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN EMPLOYEE WORK VALUES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Matić, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Research has clearly established that culture affects the application of management theories and practices. Work values, in particular, are an important part of cross-cultural understanding in that they are themselves measures of cultural dimensions, and also have strong implications for many areas of management, from employee motivation to organizational communication. In order to successfully implement management practices originating in a different culture, it is necessary to first ide...

  6. Building a values-based culture in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetley, Josie; Dobson, Fiona; Jack, Kirsten; Pearson, Beryl; Walker, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Nurse education has found itself challenged to select and educate nurses who on completion of? of their programme? have: excellent technical skills, an ability to critically analyse care and work compassionately in ways that support the values of care that are important to service users. Recent reports of care suggest that nursing still needs to develop the values base of its student selection and education processes. Against this backdrop, this paper presents two examples from pre registration nurse education that illustrate how a values based approach is used as part of the selection process in one university and used to inform the development of a reflective poetry initiative in another university. Having presented the two examples the authors debate some of the wider benefits and challenges linked to these ways of working. For example, the importance of connecting nurses' personal beliefs, attitudes and assumptions to service user values in recruitment are discussed. The use of poetry as a way of thinking about practice that moves beyond traditional models of reflection in nursing are also considered. However, the authors recognise that if developments in nurse education are to have a real impact on nursing practice and patient care, there is the need for values based initiatives to be more directly connected to the delivery of healthcare. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence and adjustment goals: sources of cultural differences in ideal affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jeanne L; Miao, Felicity F; Seppala, Emma; Fung, Helene H; Yeung, Dannii Y

    2007-06-01

    Previous studies have found that in American culture high-arousal positive states (HAP) such as excitement are valued more and low-arousal positive states (LAP) such as calm are valued less than they are in Chinese culture. What specific factors account for these differences? The authors predicted that when people and cultures aimed to influence others (i.e., assert personal needs and change others' behaviors to meet those needs), they would value HAP more and LAP less than when they aimed to adjust to others (i.e., suppress personal needs and change their own behaviors to meet others' needs). They test these predictions in 1 survey and 3 experimental studies. The findings suggest that within and across American and Chinese contexts, differences in ideal affect are due to specific interpersonal goals. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Cultural influences on social feedback processing of character traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Christoph W; Fan, Yan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Chenbo; Han, Shihui; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2014-01-01

    Cultural differences are generally explained by how people see themselves in relation to social interaction partners. While Western culture emphasizes independence, East Asian culture emphasizes interdependence. Despite this focus on social interactions, it remains elusive how people from different cultures process feedback on their own (and on others') character traits. Here, participants of either German or Chinese origin engaged in a face-to-face interaction. Consequently, they updated their self- and other-ratings of 80 character traits (e.g., polite, pedantic) after receiving feedback from their interaction partners. To exclude potential confounds, we obtained data from German and Chinese participants in Berlin [functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)] and in Beijing (behavior). We tested cultural influences on social conformity, positivity biases, and self-related neural activity. First, Chinese conformed more to social feedback than Germans (i.e., Chinese updated their trait ratings more). Second, regardless of culture, participants processed self- and other-related feedback in a positively biased way (i.e., they updated more toward desirable than toward undesirable feedback). Third, changes in self-related medial prefrontal cortex activity were greater in Germans than in Chinese during feedback processing. By investigating conformity, positivity biases, and self-related activity in relation to feedback obtained in a real-life interaction, we provide an essential step toward a unifying framework for understanding the diversity of human culture.

  9. Perceived naturalness and evoked disgust influence acceptance of cultured meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, Michael; Sütterlin, Bernadette; Hartmann, Christina

    2018-05-01

    Cultured meat could be a more environment- and animal-friendly alternative to conventional meat. However, in addition to the technological challenges, the lack of consumer acceptance could be a major barrier to the introduction of cultured meat. Therefore, it seems wise to take into account consumer concerns at an early stage of product development. In this regard, we conducted two experiments that examined the impact of perceived naturalness and disgust on consumer acceptance of cultured meat. The results of Experiment 1 suggest the participants' low level of acceptance of cultured meat because it is perceived as unnatural. Moreover, informing participants about the production of cultured meat and its benefits has the paradoxical effect of increasing the acceptance of traditional meat. Experiment 2 shows that how cultured meat is described influences the participants' perception. Thus, it is important to explain cultured meat in a nontechnical way that emphasizes the final product, not the production method, to increase acceptance of this novel food. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cultural values and secondary prevention of breast cancer in african american women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Klassen, Ann C

    2008-01-01

    Improving mammography initiation and maintenance among African American women has been suggested as a strategy for reducing breast cancer mortality in this population. We examined cultural values in relation to self-reported breast cancer screening among 572 low-income, urban, African American women. Cultural values examined included time orientation, family authority, employment aspirations, value of past vs modern life, and reliance on medical professionals. Also, implications for continued development of culturally tailored health interventions and opportunities for the consideration of cultural values in health communication are discussed. Bivariate analyses showed that more traditional values were associated with worse screening histories and lower intentions for future screening. In multivariate analyses, two interactions were observed between cultural values and age: for younger women, more traditional values were associated with lower odds of having ever received a mammogram, and for older women, more traditional values were associated with lower odds of intentions to receive a mammogram in the next 2 years. This study adds to the evidence that cultural constructs, such as values, are associated with secondary prevention of breast cancer and supports the consideration of cultural constructs as important in increasing mammography and reducing breast cancer disparities for African American women.

  11. Nurturing the Growing Generation’s Values in the Process of Socio-Cultural Transformation of Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asbi Khaleb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arab minority in Israel is in the process of socio-cultural transformation, its force rising and splitting the society. Modernization, the Arab society undergoes, is influenced by the constant contacts with the Jew- ish nation representing in its majority the western culture, the other influenc- ing factors being technologies and mass media. Some changes affect the soci- ety in a positive way, whereas the global uncontrollable ones can bring about the system crisis and the full split of society. In order to retain the integrity it is necessary to control this process on the level of basic elements of cultural awareness by nurturing both cultural and moral values within the framework of educational system. One of the main functions of educational system is the man’s adapta- tion in society including its cultural aspect; and the upbringing process should be performed in the context of belonging to cultural and national val- ues. Well-balanced organic system of education combining cardinal, national and religious values can facilitate harmonious personal growth, and affect the society in a positive way. However, the Arab educational system in Israel faces some challenges in the course of implementing the value nurturing programs. They include the lack of political initiative and control over the educational system devel- opment performed by the Arabs; and the absence of the definite and steady value system that can be given to the growing generation by means of school education. To overcome the problem the author recommends developing and implementing a special training program focused on the value component de- velopment, as the students might have difficulty getting by in the real world without it. 

  12. Framing Social Values: An Experimental Study of Culture and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, John F.; Fender, Shanon

    2007-01-01

    How and why does a given social value come to shape the way an individual thinks, feels, and acts in a specific social situation? This study links ideas from Goffman's frame analysis to other lines of research, proposing that dramatic narratives of variable content, vividness, and language-in-use produce variation in the accessibility of…

  13. Integration of Character Values in School Culture at Elementary Schools in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arita - Marini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Character values can be integrated not only in the classroom, but also in the school culture. Some teachers are not familiar with the ways of integrating these values in the school culture. The purpose of this study was to find out about implementation of character values integration in school culture at elementary schools in Jakarta. This research was conducted in Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia. A quantitatively descriptive method was used for this study. Questionnaires related to integration of character values in school culture consists of religious, honesty, discipline, clean and healthy, tolerance, working ethos, and nationalism culture. A total of 63 principals from 63 elementary schools in Jakarta were involved in the study. The result showed that means of character values integration in religious, honesty, discipline, clean and healthy, tolerance, working ethos, and nationalism culture were achieved 13.40, 6.16, 17.71, 13.24, 11.81, 12.33, and 10.49 or 83.75 %, 68.44 %, 98.39 %, 88.27 %, 98.42 %, 94.85 %, and 95.36 % from theoretically maximum scores. This study concludes that character values has already been integrated effectively in religious, discipline, clean and healthy, tolerance, working ethos, and nationalism culture at 63 elementary schools in Jakarta.  On the other hand, integration of character values in honesty culture hasn’t been effective at 63 elementary schools in Jakarta.

  14. Cultural modes of expressing emotions influence how emotions are experienced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Damasio, Hanna

    2016-10-01

    The brain's mapping of bodily responses during emotion contributes to emotional experiences, or feelings. Culture influences emotional expressiveness, that is, the magnitude of individuals' bodily responses during emotion. So, are cultural influences on behavioral expressiveness associated with differences in how individuals experience emotion? Chinese and American young adults reported how strongly admiration- and compassion-inducing stories made them feel, first in a private interview and then during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As expected, Americans were more expressive in the interview. Although expressiveness did not predict stronger reported feelings or neural responses during fMRI, in both cultural groups more-expressive people showed tighter trial-by-trial correlations between their experienced strength of emotion and activations in visceral-somatosensory cortex, even after controlling for individuals' overall strength of reactions (neural and felt). Moreover, expressiveness mediated a previously described cultural effect in which activations in visceral-somatosensory cortex correlated with feeling strength among Americans but not among Chinese. Post hoc supplementary analyses revealed that more-expressive individuals reached peak activation of visceral-somatosensory cortex later in the emotion process and took longer to decide how strongly they felt. The results together suggest that differences in expressiveness correspond to differences in how somatosensory mechanisms contribute to constructing conscious feelings. By influencing expressiveness, culture may therefore influence how individuals know how strongly they feel, what conscious feelings are based on, or possibly what strong versus weak emotions "feel like." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Global Bioethics and Culture in a Pluralistic World: How does Culture influence Bioethics in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuneke, FN; Umeora, OUJ; Maduabuchi, JU; Egbunike, N

    2014-01-01

    Bioethics principles and practice can be influenced by different cultural background. This is because the four globally accepted bioethics principles are often based on basic ethical codes such as autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice. Beneficence/nonmaleficence requires us to maximize possible benefits, while minimizing possible harms and consequently secure the well-being of others by refraining from harming them. Autonomy gives individuals the right to self-actualization and decision-making, while justice is concerned with the fair selection and distribution of the burdens and benefits of research among participants. Applications of these principles in cultural settings vary more often from one cultural perspective to the other because of the different understanding and practices of “what is good.” The proponents of global ethics may argue that these principles should be universally generalizable and acceptable, but this is not possible because of the existing cultural diversities. In the African set-up, despite the existence of major common cultural practices, there are other norms and practices, which differ from one society to the other within the communities. Therefore, the word “global” bioethics may not be applicable generally in practice except if it can account for the structural dynamics and cultural differences within the complex societies in which we live in. However, the extent to which cultural diversity should be permitted to influence bioethical judgments in Africa, which at present is burdened with many diseases, should be of concern to researchers, ethicist and medical experts taking into considerations the constantly transforming global society. This topic examines the cultural influence on principles and practice of bioethics in Africa. PMID:25328772

  16. Cultural values and the prevalence of mental disorders in 25 countries: A secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Eva; Wegmann, Iris; Maercker, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    The prevalence of common mental disorders (CMDs, i.e., depression and anxiety) worldwide is substantial, and prevalence rates are higher in high-income than in low- and middle-income countries. This difference might reflect both underlying prevalence rates as well as the measurement model used in cross-national epidemiological studies. Schwartz' cultural values provide a meaningful taxonomy to describe 'culture' and to examine how culture affects both the aetiology and phenomenology of CMDs. The present study examines to what extent Schwartz' cultural values correlate with prevalence rates of CMDs at the country-level. Twenty-five countries were included in this study. Countries were included if data on cultural values and lifetime prevalence rates, from either the World Mental Health Surveys or the Global Burden of Disease Study, were available for at least one CMD. Spearman rank correlations were calculated between prevalence rates and cultural values, controlling for gross national income (GNI) per capita. Affective disorders correlated with cultural values, after controlling for GNI. For anxiety disorders, correlations were lower but still offered meaningful insights. Correlations followed the circular structure of values, meaning that the strength of relationship decreased and increased again when moving around the circle: the strongest positive correlations were found with egalitarianism, and the strongest negative correlations with hierarchy and mastery. The autonomy-embeddedness dimension correlated weakly with the prevalence of CMDs. Diverging prevalence rates between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries are associated with differences in cultural values. Values might not only relate to the aetiology of mental disorders, but most possibly affect the way in which psychological distress is expressed. As an example, in societies with a strong focus on embeddedness, the fear of stigma might be more pronounced. Cultural values offer a

  17. Islam and its Influence on the Kazakh Culture and language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina T. Yedgina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After The Republic of Kazakhstan has got its independence we can observe intensive revival of the national culture and traditional religion as well as increasing of religiousness level of the population. So, studying of the Islamic development in our country is necessary nowadays, because it may help to comprehend specific character of social, political, historical and cultural features. The Koran is unique, it is the first written literary monument of the rise of Islam period and a code of moral, religious, civil, political and legal regulations. At the beginning of 8-th century Islam became the prevailing religion in our region due to its monotheism ideas. Since that time we can notice the development and prosperity of the Moslem Arabic culture which has influenced the social, economic, political and cultural life in Central Asia and Southern Kazakhstan. After Islam had been declared a new state religion, the Arabic language, script and literature became an integral part of the culture, and it is no doubt that the culture of local population was enriched greatly after the Arabic invasion

  18. Examining the impact of Culture's consequences: a three-decade, multilevel, meta-analytic review of Hofstede's cultural value dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Vas; Kirkman, Bradley L; Steel, Piers

    2010-05-01

    Using data from 598 studies representing over 200,000 individuals, we meta-analyzed the relationship between G. Hofstede's (1980a) original 4 cultural value dimensions and a variety of organizationally relevant outcomes. First, values predict outcomes with similar strength (with an overall absolute weighted effect size of rho = 0.18) at the individual level of analysis. Second, the predictive power of the cultural values was significantly lower than that of personality traits and demographics for certain outcomes (e.g., job performance, absenteeism, turnover) but was significantly higher for others (e.g., organizational commitment, identification, citizenship behavior, team-related attitudes, feedback seeking). Third, cultural values were most strongly related to emotions, followed by attitudes, then behaviors, and finally job performance. Fourth, cultural values were more strongly related to outcomes for managers (rather than students) and for older, male, and more educated respondents. Fifth, findings were stronger for primary, rather than secondary, data. Finally, we provide support for M. Gelfand, L. H. Nishii, and J. L. Raver's (2006) conceptualization of societal tightness-looseness, finding significantly stronger effects in culturally tighter, rather than looser, countries. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. How do culture media influence in vitro perivascular cell behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra Juliane

    2015-12-01

    Perivascular cells are multilineage cells located around the vessel wall and important for wall stabilization. In this study, we evaluated a stem cell media and a perivascular cell-specific media for the culture of primary perivascular cells regarding their cell morphology, doubling time, stem cell properties, and expression of cell type-specific markers. When the two cell culture media were compared to each other, perivascular cells cultured in the stem cell medium had a more elongated morphology and a faster doubling rate and cells cultured in the pericyte medium had a more typical morphology, with several filopodia, and a slower doubling rate. To evaluate stem cell properties, perivascular cells, CD146(-) cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were differentiated into the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. It was seen that perivascular cells, as well as CD146(-) cells and MSCs, cultured in stem cell medium showed greater differentiation than cells cultured in pericyte-specific medium. The expression of pericyte-specific markers CD146, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), myosin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) could be found in both pericyte cultures, as well as to varying amounts in CD146(-) cells, MSCs, and endothelial cells. The here presented work shows that perivascular cells can adapt to their in vitro environment and cell culture conditions influence cell functionality, such as doubling rate or differentiation behavior. Pericyte-specific markers were shown to be expressed also from cells other than perivascular cells. We can further conclude that CD146(+) perivascular cells are inhomogeneous cell population probably containing stem cell subpopulations, which are located perivascular around capillaries. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  20. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Symptoms of Depression in Hispanic Youth: The Roles of Gender, Hispanic Cultural Values, and Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jennifer B.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The risk for depression increases as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. society. This association is stronger for Hispanic girls than boys. To better understand the influence of culture and family on depressive symptoms, we tested a process-oriented model of acculturation, cultural values, and family functioning. The data came from Project RED, which included 1,922 Hispanic students (53 % girls; 86 % were 14 years old; and 84 % were U.S. born) from Southern California. We used data from 9th to 11th grade to test the influence of acculturation-related experiences on depressive symptoms over time. Multi-group structural equation analysis suggested that both family conflict and cohesion were linked with depressive symptoms. Hispanic cultural values were associated with family cohesion and conflict but the strength and direction of these relationships varied across cultural values and gender. For girls and boys, familismo and respeto were associated with higher family cohesion and lower family conflict. Moreover, gender roles were linked with higher family cohesion in girls but not in boys. These results indicate that improving family functioning will be beneficial for boys’ and girls’ psychological well-being. This may be achieved by promoting familismo and respeto for boys and girls and by promoting traditional gender roles for girls. PMID:22627624

  1. Acculturation, enculturation, and symptoms of depression in Hispanic youth: the roles of gender, Hispanic cultural values, and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Unger, Jennifer B; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The risk for depression increases as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. society. This association is stronger for Hispanic girls than boys. To better understand the influence of culture and family on depressive symptoms, we tested a process-oriented model of acculturation, cultural values, and family functioning. The data came from Project RED, which included 1,922 Hispanic students (53 % girls; 86 % were 14 years old; and 84 % were U.S. born) from Southern California. We used data from 9th to 11th grade to test the influence of acculturation-related experiences on depressive symptoms over time. Multi-group structural equation analysis suggested that both family conflict and cohesion were linked with depressive symptoms. Hispanic cultural values were associated with family cohesion and conflict but the strength and direction of these relationships varied across cultural values and gender. For girls and boys, familismo and respeto were associated with higher family cohesion and lower family conflict. Moreover, gender roles were linked with higher family cohesion in girls but not in boys. These results indicate that improving family functioning will be beneficial for boys' and girls' psychological well-being. This may be achieved by promoting familismo and respeto for boys and girls and by promoting traditional gender roles for girls.

  2. Let's go outside: using photography to explore values and culture in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, K; de Goeas, S; Davies, S; Radcliffe, M; Christoforou, A

    2015-06-01

    Creative and imaginative approaches to mental healthcare education are known to help students explore emotions, empathy and others' experiences, as well as address ambivalence and ambiguity. Very few studies in mental health nursing education specifically utilise photography as a participatory pedagogic tool, with even fewer utilising photography to explore understandings of culture, values and diversity. Photography makes visible complex, collaborative forms of learning and previously unidentified, unarticulated ideas about culture and values. Photography as a critical pedagogic method helps develop critical, politicized understandings of culture and values. Increasing culturally diverse populations means complex and conflicting values have become a common feature in mental health nursing. In education the need to critically examine such topics necessitates creative and engaging pedagogy, and visual methods are readily acknowledged as such. Yet while many studies advocate and demonstrate the value of art-based methods in student learning, very few studies in mental health nursing specifically utilize photography as a participatory pedagogic tool, and fewer still use photography to explore understandings of culture, values and diversity. In this paper, we discuss a qualitative study where mental health nursing students used photography to create images in order to explore their own and often dominant culture and attendant values. Findings suggest that photography makes visible situated, relational and collaborative learning, and surfaces previously unidentified, unarticulated ideas about culture and values. These practices mimic important processes central to mental health nursing practice and contemporaneous understandings of diverse cultures. We argue that photography provides an important resource with which to unearth subjugated knowledge, promote critical understandings of culture and values, and thereby help address inequalities in mental health care. © 2015

  3. Organizational Culture and the Deployment of Agile Methods: The Competing Values Model View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iivari, Juhani; Iivari, Netta

    A number of researchers have identified organizational culture as a factor that potentially affects the deployment of agile systems development methods. Inspired by the study of Iivari and Huisman (2007), which focused on the deployment of traditional systems development methods, the present paper proposes a number of hypotheses about the influence of organizational culture on the deployment of agile methods.

  4. Looking Back to Look Forward: Maori Cultural Values and the Impact on Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lynette

    2011-01-01

    The career stories of 22 Maori in this study expressed the dynamic cultural contexts in which career processes have been enacted. A new typology of cultural career identities was developed focusing on diversity among Maori on issues pertaining to what being Maori means to them and the subsequent influence on participants' career stories. The three…

  5. The influence of culture: holistic versus analytic perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbett, Richard E; Miyamoto, Yuri

    2005-10-01

    There is recent evidence that perceptual processes are influenced by culture. Westerners tend to engage in context-independent and analytic perceptual processes by focusing on a salient object independently of its context, whereas Asians tend to engage in context-dependent and holistic perceptual processes by attending to the relationship between the object and the context in which the object is located. Recent research has explored mechanisms underlying such cultural differences, which indicate that participating in different social practices leads to both chronic as well as temporary shifts in perception. These findings establish a dynamic relationship between the cultural context and perceptual processes. We suggest that perception can no longer be regarded as consisting of processes that are universal across all people at all times.

  6. Social Reconstructionism: Reciprocal Influences of Culture and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kostyło

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The fact that culture has an impact, both in conceptual and practical sense, on education is undoubtable. But when we state that interaction between the two areas is mutual, namely, that also education has an influence on culture, then we express an original and controversial idea. Therefore, we acknowledge that education is a power which can change society. That idea was pushed forward for many years by Theodore Brameld, the founder of reconstructionst philosophy of education. In his view each educational theory and practice effectively affects culture, changes and reconstructs it. In this text I present the assumptions of Theodore Brameld’s social reconstructionism. The starting point for my considerations are three other philosophies of education indicated by by Brameld: perenialism, essentialism, and progressivism. In the conclusion I point out how each of the philosophies of education relates to social change. The terms “society” and “culture” are used interchangeably in this text.

  7. Quantifying social influence in an online cultural market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumme, Coco; Cebrian, Manuel; Pickard, Galen; Pentland, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    We revisit experimental data from an online cultural market in which 14,000 users interact to download songs, and develop a simple model that can explain seemingly complex outcomes. Our results suggest that individual behavior is characterized by a two-step process--the decision to sample and the decision to download a song. Contrary to conventional wisdom, social influence is material to the first step only. The model also identifies the role of placement in mediating social signals, and suggests that in this market with anonymous feedback cues, social influence serves an informational rather than normative role.

  8. Quantifying social influence in an online cultural market.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coco Krumme

    Full Text Available We revisit experimental data from an online cultural market in which 14,000 users interact to download songs, and develop a simple model that can explain seemingly complex outcomes. Our results suggest that individual behavior is characterized by a two-step process--the decision to sample and the decision to download a song. Contrary to conventional wisdom, social influence is material to the first step only. The model also identifies the role of placement in mediating social signals, and suggests that in this market with anonymous feedback cues, social influence serves an informational rather than normative role.

  9. Minding money: how understanding of value is culturally promoted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuya

    2011-03-01

    Adding to the issues of cognitive economics (Cortes and Londoño IPBS: Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science 43(2):178-184, 2009) and the social psychology of "shadow economics" (Salvatore et al. IPBS: Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science 43(2), 2009), the carrier of economic exchanges, money, plays a key role in children's socialization in different societies. Money given to children, 'pocket money,' is a negotiated settlement between children's social demands and those of their parents. I analyze such negotiations here on the basis of a concrete case of a Korean family in which the provision of pocket money given the child was inconsistent over time. The results indicate the social ecology of money use, in both children and their parents, sets the stage for value construction of the meaning of money.

  10. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mlyn?rikov?, Katar?na; Samek, Ota; Bernatov?, Silvie; R??i?ka, Filip; Je?ek, Jan; H?ronikov?, Andrea; ?iler, Martin; Zem?nek, Pavel; Hol?, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organis...

  11. Stars Influence on the Earth in Maya Culture: Stars and Planets in Maya Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel George Oprea

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Mesoamerican Culture of Maya’s was one of the ancient and advanced cultures of the American continent and they influenced other Amerindian peoples. The life of Maya people, of the Earth itself and of the Universe is set and constructed around Maya Calendar and has a cyclic character as a direct influence of the stars. Many centuries the Western civilization with the its linear Calendar had not accepted the ideas of the possible influence of the stars and planets to peoples lives. The end of the last century and the beginning of XXI’s had started to demonstrate the opposite. The present work tries to show the process of meeting and intersection of the ancient ideas of Maya civilization and some of new ideas from the modern sciences.

  12. Trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values among Mexican American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P; Basilio, Camille D; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A; Liu, Yu; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2014-12-01

    Mexican Americans are one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States, yet we have limited knowledge regarding changes (i.e., developmental trajectories) in cultural orientation based upon their exposure to the Mexican American and mainstream cultures. We examined the parallel trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values in a sample of 749 Mexican American adolescents (49 % female) across assessments during the fifth grade (approximately 11 years of age), the seventh grade (approximately 13 years of age) and the tenth grade (approximately 16 years of age). We expected that these values would change over this developmental period and this longitudinal approach is more appropriate than the often used median split classification to identify distinct types of acculturation. We found four distinct acculturation trajectory groups: two trajectory groups that were increasing slightly with age in the endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was relatively stable in Mexican American cultural values while the other was declining in their endorsement of these values; and two trajectory groups that were declining substantially with age in their endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was also declining in Mexican American cultural values and the other which was stable in these values. These four trajectory groups differed in expected ways on a number of theoretically related cultural variables, but were not highly consistent with the median split classifications. The findings highlight the need to utilize longitudinal data to examine the developmental changes of Mexican American individual's adaptation to the ethnic and mainstream culture in order to understand more fully the processes of acculturation and enculturation.

  13. Socio-economic factors, cultural values, national personality and antibiotics use: A cross-cultural study among European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaygısız, Ümmügülsüm; Lajunen, Timo; Gaygısız, Esma

    There are considerable cross-national differences in public attitudes towards antibiotics use, use of prescribed antibiotics, and self-medication with antibiotics even within Europe. This study was aimed at investigating the relationships between socio-economic factors, cultural values, national personality characteristics and the antibiotic use in Europe. Data included scores from 27 European countries (14 countries for personality analysis). Correlations between socio-economic variables (Gross National Income per capita, governance quality, life expectancy, mean years of schooling, number of physicians), Hofstede's cultural value dimensions (power distance, individualism, masculinity, uncertainty avoidance, long-term orientation, indulgence), national personality characteristic (extraversion, neuroticism, social desirability) and antibiotic use were calculated and three regression models were constructed. Governance quality (r=-.51), mean years of schooling (r=-.61), power distance (r=.59), masculinity (r=.53), and neuroticism (r=.73) correlated with antibiotic use. The highest amount of variance in antibiotic use was accounted by the cultural values (65%) followed by socio-economic factors (63%) and personality factors (55%). Results show that socio-economic factors, cultural values and national personality characteristics explain cross-national differences in antibiotic use in Europe. In particular, governance quality, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity and neuroticism were important factors explaining antibiotics use. The findings underline the importance of socio-economic and cultural context in health care and in planning public health interventions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Education: 6. The Influence of Cultural Diversity on Openearedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iușcă Dorina Geta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Open-earedness theory has repeatedly been confirmed on several populations including American, English, Dutch, German and Finnish people. Nonetheless the influence of cultural diversity on openness towards unfamiliar music has received little attention from researchers and this may create the possibility of adding essential modifications of Albert LeBlanc’s theory. Considering the contemporary context, people’s migration towards economic developed countries becomes a phenomenon with great implications related to the progress of social and cultural characteristics of any national context. Researching the openearedness of people which have been exposed not only to their native culture but also to the adopted one (due to financial necessities may reveal a series of useful aspects for the intercultural field (by disclosing new ways to promote the tolerance towards cultural diversity and also for the educational field (by describing new strategies of learning in a context of adaptation to an unfamiliar musical space. The present article analyses a series of previous experiments that monitored the way different social categories integrated in cultural communities different from their own assimilate or not the elements of the adopted country into their musical identity. The present analysis has educational implications related to the ways students may develop the preference for unfamiliar music.

  15. A review of cultural influence on maternal mortality in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Emily C

    2013-05-01

    identify research examining the effect of culture on maternal mortality rates. literature review of CINAHL, Cochrane, PsychInfo, OVID Medline and Web of Science databases. developing countries with typically higher rates of maternal mortality. women, birth attendants, family members, nurse midwives, health-care workers, and community members. reviews, qualitative and mixed-methods research have identified components of culture that have a direct impact on maternal mortality. Examples of culture are given in the text and categorised according to the way in which they impact maternal mortality. cultural customs, practices, beliefs and values profoundly influence women's behaviours during the perinatal period and in some cases increase the likelihood of maternal death in childbirth. The four ways in which culture may increase MMR are as follows: directly harmful acts, inaction, use of care and social status. understanding the specifics of how the culture surrounding childbirth contributes to maternal mortality can assist nurses, midwives and other health-care workers in providing culturally competent care and designing effective programs to help decrease MMR, especially in the developing world. Interventions designed without accounting for these cultural factors are likely to be less effective in reducing maternal mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Organizational culture in an academic health center: an exploratory study using a competing values framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Buchan, Alastair M

    2012-06-01

    Implementing cultural change and aligning organizational cultures could enhance innovation, quality, safety, and job satisfaction. The authors conducted this mixed-methods study to assess academic physician-scientists' perceptions of the current and preferred future organizational culture at a university medical school and its partner health system. In October 2010, the authors surveyed academic physicians and scientists jointly employed by the University of Oxford and its local, major partner health system. The survey included the U.S. Veterans Affairs Administration's 14-item Competing Values Framework instrument and two extra items prompting respondents to identify their substantive employer and to provide any additional open-ended comments. Of 436 academic physicians and scientists, 170 (39%) responded. Of these, 69 (41%) provided open-ended comments. Dominant hierarchical culture, moderate rational and team cultures, and underdeveloped entrepreneurial culture characterized the health system culture profile. The university profile was more balanced, with strong rational and entrepreneurial cultures, and moderate-to-strong hierarchical and team cultures. The preferred future culture (within five years) would emphasize team and entrepreneurial cultures and-to a lesser degree-rational culture, and would deemphasize hierarchical culture. Whereas the university and the health system currently have distinct organizational cultures, academic physicians and scientists would prefer the same type of culture across the two organizations so that both could more successfully pursue the shared mission of academic medicine. Further research should explore strengthening the validity and reliability of the organizational culture instrument for academic medicine and building an evidence base of effective culture change strategies and interventions.

  17. Training Culture: A New Conceptualization to Capture Values and Meanings of Training in Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Federica; Cervai, Sara; Kantola, Jussi

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to introduce and validate the concept of training culture defined as a subset of the main organizational culture that allows examining meanings and values attributed to the training within an organization by management and employees. Design/methodology/approach: This study, following the deductive scale…

  18. The Culture of Learning Continuum: Promoting Internal Values in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagy, Ornit; Kali, Yael; Tsaushu, Masha; Tal, Tali

    2018-01-01

    This study endeavors to identify ways to promote a productive learning culture in higher education. Specifically, we sought to encourage development of internal values in students' culture of learning and examine how this can promote their understanding of scientific content. Set in a high enrollment undergraduate biology course, we designed a…

  19. Unique cultural values of Madura cattle: is cross-breeding a threat?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tri Satya Mastuti Widi, Tri; Udo, H.M.J.; Oldenbroek, J.K.; Budisatria, I.G.S.; Baliarti, E.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2013-01-01

    In Indonesia, cross-breeding local cattle with European beef breeds is widely promoted to stimulate beef production. This cross-breeding is threatening local breeds that have often different functions, including cultural roles. This study analysed the cultural values of Madura cattle and the effects

  20. The cultural shaping of alexithymia: values and externally oriented thinking in a Chinese clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Jessica; Tang, Qiuping; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Cai, Lin; Yao, Shuqiao; Ryder, Andrew G

    2013-05-01

    Alexithymia is a multi-faceted personality construct characterized by difficulties in identifying and describing emotional states. Originally based on observations of American psychosomatic patients, the construct is now studied in a variety of cultural contexts. However, few studies have critically examined alexithymia from a cultural perspective. Dere et al. [1] recently found support for the hypothesis that one alexithymia component - externally oriented thinking (EOT) - is linked to cultural values, among Euro-Canadian and Chinese-Canadian students. The current study examines this association in a Chinese clinical sample. Outpatients presenting at three hospital-based psychology clinics in Hunan province, China (N=268) completed a structured clinical interview and self-report measures of alexithymia and cultural values. All participants endorsed clinically significant levels of depressed mood, anhedonia, and/or fatigue. As expected, EOT was negatively predicted by Modernization and Euro-American values. Two other alexithymia components, difficulty identifying feelings and difficulty describing feelings, were unrelated to cultural values. These findings suggest that cultural variations in the importance placed on emotional experience must be taken into account in cross-cultural alexithymia research. Such studies should also consider separately the specific components of alexithymia; failure to do so can lead to overestimation of alexithymia in groups where scores are driven by culturally-promoted EOT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Partner effects of Mexican cultural values: the couple and parenting relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Jin; Lucero-Liu, Ana A; Gamble, Wendy C; Taylor, Angela R; Christensen, Donna Hendrickson; Modry-Mandell, Kerri L

    2008-03-01

    In this investigation, the authors explored the impact of individuals' cultural values on their partners' relationship adjustment and perceptions of their parenting relationship. The authors examined Mexican cultural values of simpatía (i.e., harmonious interpersonal relationships) and respeto (i.e., respect for authority figures) using a sample of 50 Mexican-origin couples in southern Arizona. Congruent with their hypotheses, results supported the proposition that fathers' simpatía is positively associated with both relationship adjustment and the parenting relationship as reported by mothers, whereas fathers' respeto is negatively associated with both relationship adjustment and the parenting relationship as reported by mothers. However, the authors found little evidence of a contribution of mothers' cultural values to fathers' perceptions of either relationship adjustment or the parenting relationship. They interpret these findings to suggest that mothers' relationship adjustment and parenting relationship are more sensitive to and dependent on fathers' degree of traditional cultural values among Mexican-origin families.

  2. The relationship between individualistic, collectivistic, and transitional cultural value orientations and adolescents' autonomy and identity status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Ti; Beckert, Troy E; Goodrich, Thane R

    2010-08-01

    In an effort to validate the use of a Western model of adolescent development with Asian youth, 781 urban and rural Taiwanese high school students (56% female) completed questionnaires about their development. Adolescents were first divided into cultural value orientations (i.e. collectivistic, individualistic, or transitional) and compared geographically. There were statistically significant differences in cultural value orientations only for rural youth. Identity statuses and levels of cognitive autonomy were then compared according to cultural value orientations and gender. Adolescents who self-identified as collectivistic were significantly more likely to self-identify as achieved rather than diffused compared to transitional adolescents. Gender, more than cultural value identifications, significantly differentiated these youth in regard to issues of cognitive autonomy measured in this study (i.e. evaluative thinking, voicing opinions, making decisions, self-assessing, and comparative validation). Taken in whole, these findings support the use of a Western model of adolescent development for Taiwanese youth.

  3. The Impact of Value-Orientations on Cross-cultural Encounters and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    empirical studies aim to develop cross-cultural awareness and conflict management ... end states or behaviors (terminal and instrumental values), which transcend ... self-direction) or collectivistic goals (prosocial, conformity), which can.

  4. Clinical workplace learning : perceived learning value of individual and group feedback in a collectivistic culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Emilia, Ova; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Feedback is essential for workplace learning. Most papers in this field concern individual feedback. In collectivistic cultures, however, group feedback is common educational practice. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived learning value and characteristics of individual

  5. Cultural Values as Mediators between Parenting Styles and Bullying Behavior at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Stelios N.; Ioannou, Myria; Stavrinides, Panayiotis

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parenting styles, cultural values and bullying behavior at school. The main objective was to test the mediating role of cultural values in these relationships. The participants were 985 pre-adolescents, aged 10-12 years old (M = 10.95, SD = 0.75) from Cyprus and Greece who completed…

  6. Determination of DB10B values of single and mixed cultures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The survi-ving fraction of isolates decreased with increased irradiation doses. DB10B values of E. coli, S. aureus and S. parat-hyphi B were respectively 0.27, 0.33 and 0.44 kGy when inoculated as single cultures, and 0.24, 0.28 and 0.32 kGy respectively when inoculated as mixed cultures. DB10B values were lower for ...

  7. Organisational values and organisational commitment: do nurses' ethno-cultural differences matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendel, Tova; Kagan, Ilya

    2014-05-01

    To examine the association between perceived organisational values and organisational commitment among Israeli nurses in relation to their ethno-cultural background. Differences and the discrepancy between individuals' organisational values and those of their organisational culture are a potential source of adjustment difficulties. Organisational values are considered to be the bond of the individual to their organisation. In multicultural societies, such as Israel, the differences in perception of organisational values and organisational commitment may be reflected within workgroups. Data were collected using a questionnaire among 106 hospital nurses. About 59.8% of the sample were Israeli-born. A positive correlation was found between organisational values and organisational commitment. Significant differences were found in organisational values and organisational commitment between Israeli-born-, USSR-born- and Ethiopian-born nurses. The socio-demographic profile modified the effect of organisational values on organisational commitment: when the nurse was male, Muslim, religiously orthodox and without academic education, the effect of organisational values on organisational commitment was higher. Findings confirm the role of culture and ethnicity in the perception of organisational values and the level of organisational commitment among nurses. Assessing ethno-cultural differences in organisational values and organisational commitment provides a fuller understanding of nurses' ability to adjust to their work environment and helps nurse managers devise means to increase nurses' commitment. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Influence of School Managers' Ethical Leadership Behaviors on Organizational Culture: Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toytok, Esef Hakan; Kapusuzoglu, Saduman

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Frequently researched, organizational effectiveness is influenced by leadership, organizational culture and climate, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction; additionally, for effective, sustainable management, ethical leadership, which also influences organizational culture, is emphasized. To our knowledge, no previous…

  9. Competing Values Framework: A useful tool to define the predominant culture in a maternity setting in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine; Dawson, Angela; Foureur, Maralyn

    2017-04-01

    To identify the predominant culture of an organisation which could then assess readiness for change. An exploratory design using the Competing Values Framework (CVF) as a self-administered survey tool. The Maternity Unit in one Australian metropolitan tertiary referral hospital. All 120 clinicians (100 midwives and 20 obstetricians) employed in the maternity service were invited to participate; 26% responded. The identification of the predominant culture of an organisation to assess readiness for change prior to the implementation of a new policy. The predominant culture of this maternity unit, as described by those who responded to the survey, was one of hierarchy with a focus on rules and regulations and less focus on innovation, flexibility and teamwork. These results suggest that this unit did not have readiness to change. There is value in undertaking preparatory work to gain a better understanding of the characteristics of an organisation prior to designing and implementing change. This understanding can influence additional preliminary work that may be required to increase the readiness for change and therefore increase the opportunity for successful change. The CVF is a useful tool to identify the predominant culture and characteristics of an organisation that could influence the success of change. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. All rights reserved.

  10. Agricultural Leaders' Influence on the Safety Culture of Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Frank A

    2017-01-01

    Most US farmers are small, independent owner-operators, many of whom are exempt from safety regulation and enforcement, as well as age restrictions relative to family members performing hazardous tasks. These smaller farms account for a disproportionate share of the total fatality and injury statistics from farming incidents, contributing to an agriculture-industry death rate that is seven times greater than all occupations combined. In contrast, large agricultural enterprises that employ larger numbers of non-family workers are more regulated and more highly incentivized by economic, supply chain, and societal factors to implement cultures of safety, and are more readily influenced by agricultural opinion leaders, agribusinesses, farm organizations, and agricultural media. These agricultural influencer institutions must find ways to play more significant roles in changing the culture on operations that use only family labor. They will find willing partners in safety organizations such as the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America (ASHCA), Agricultural Extension, and other health and safety advocates, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-funded agricultural research centers. The overall workplace injury statistics for agriculture remain alarming; however, with leadership from the larger farm operations, and help from ASHCA, academia, the healthcare community, and others, the current culture of workplace safety and health in agriculture can be impacted in positive ways.

  11. The Aesthetic Value of Socio-Cultural Identities and the Cultural Dimension of the Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaros Elias Mavromatidis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes an individual theoretical study on how the landscape could be shaped by economic globalization and political restructuring. Providing a socio-cultural approach to the landscape notion I am trying to discover through the international literature the subjective dimension on landscape definition, in order to understand its ‘cultural dimension’. In this paper, the notion of ‘virtual landscape’ is introduced in order to investigate the incoherence that exists in the nowadays megacities regarding their social reality and their iconic existence through architecture and urban planning. In addition, it is also explored in theory how an ideological turn is re-inforced through political orientation focusing on ‘virtual landscape’ images in order to obtain a favorable publicity in a contemporary context of ‘globalised cities’ consisting in the elimination of the ‘cultural landscape’. Therefore, this contribution has as main objective to define, negotiate and start the debate on radical socio-cultural approaches of landscape notion in the nowadays ‘megacities’, inside a strict capitalistic context.

  12. How does traditional Confucian culture influence adolescents' sexual behavior in three Asian cities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ersheng; Zuo, Xiayun; Wang, Li; Lou, Chaohua; Cheng, Yan; Zabin, Laurie S

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether and how the presence of Confucian cultural norms influences the sexual behaviors of adolescents and young adults in three Asian cities experiencing different levels of economic development. Data for this article were drawn from the international cross-sectional survey on sexual and reproductive health of adolescents and young adults aged 15-24 years in three Asian cities (Hanoi, Shanghai, and Taipei), conducted in 2006. The original sample consisted of a representative group of 17,016 adolescents; while in this study, 16,554 never-married adolescents were included in the analysis. Both face-to-face interview and computer-assisted self-interview approaches were adopted in the survey. Exposure to family concepts, self-cultivation values, gender role concepts, and sexual values were the main measures of traditional Confucian cultural influence. Sexual and intimate behaviors were the main outcome measures, and multi-Cox regression models were used to assess the association between traditional cultural concepts and values and sexual behavior after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. Data were analyzed with SAS software 9.1. The traditional Confucian cultural norms were not weakening evenly, with more entrenchment in Hanoi than in Shanghai and Taipei. Prevalence of sexual coitus among adolescent and young adults was lowest in Hanoi and highest in Taipei, while similar profiles of other intimate behaviors were displayed in the three cities. Associations between respondents' sexual behavior and their cultural concepts and values differed by city. In Hanoi, for all four cultural measures, respondents with more traditional views were less likely to engage in sexual activity. This was also true in Shanghai and Taipei with respect to traditional sexual values and self-cultivation values. However, there was an inverse relationship between sexual behavior and traditional family concepts and gender roles in Shanghai and Taipei; those with more

  13. Influence of corporate culture on innovative activity of employees of the enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Nikiforovich Belkin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the ways of influence of corporate culture on innovative activity of staff of enterprises are considered. The authors understand the corporate culture of the enterprise as the system of cultural, moral, esthetic and other wealth, which is used and introduced in labor life of employees by employers and CEO. On the basis of this system, the enterprise norms and rules of the relations of workers, customs, traditions etc. are developed. The corporate culture of the enterprise is connected with the general culture of the people of the country, it reflects on this or that form, to some extent, but it can contradict it. In this case, the conflict of cultural values of the enterprise and workers is possible. In the article, much attention is paid to influence of corporate culture of Japanese corporations on innovative activity of their workers. It is shown that high innovative activity of the personnel is provided not with separate systems of material and moral incentive, but with all system of the labor relations built on the basis of corporate culture. In the center of corporate culture, there is a person, instead of goods and services. It can be found in such systems of work with staff as “lifelong hiring”, account system in a salary of “vital peaks” of employees, staff turnover, training at the workplace etc. The corporate culture of Toyota corporation is based on the business philosophy, according to which, the main socio-economic purpose is the ensuring the welfare of its employees and improvement of life of the population of the whole world. In the article is shown that in the conditions of transition of the Russian Federation to the market economy, there were basic changes in corporate culture of the enterprises. Market business-culture according to which the main thing for the enterprise is profit, and workers are only one of means of production, was included in a contradiction with a mentality of the Russian

  14. An Exploration of Cultural Factors and Their Influence on Saudi Arabian University Deans’ Leadership Perceptions and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Abu Alsuood

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports an investigation into societal and organizational cultural influences on academic leadership in Saudi Arabian higher education, a previously underexplored area. In Saudi Arabia, it is currently unclear how university deans are negotiating the balance between organizational cultural values and contemporary influences, and how the values they embrace may influence their leadership practices and effectiveness. The study has been conducted in eight main governmental universities under the Ministry of Education. Qualitative data has been collected, involving interviews with fifteen university deans, with data scrutinized by an interpretive thematic analysis. The deans’ responses indicated dissatisfaction with the broad societal culture around them and the negative influence this had on leadership practices. Tensions were apparent between traditional values and change, and the influence of family and tribal backgrounds. Five organizational cultural themes were identified as influences on deans’ leadership—a centralized environment, strict regulations, the authority of top management, selection and promotion issues, and reputational factors. The study’s outcomes contribute to the understanding of leadership perceptions and practices within a particular cultural context.

  15. How does organizational culture influence organizational learning in a shipping company?

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Jorge Mario Garzon

    2016-01-01

    This project targets on organizational culture and organizational learning, aiming to reveal how organizational culture influences on organizational learning within the shipping industry. The main research question is: How does organizational culture influence organizational learning within a shipping company? The two research sub-questions are: 1) Which components of organizational culture are especially important for organizational learning? 2) How is organizational structure...

  16. Cultural values and population health: a quantitative analysis of variations in cultural values, health behaviours and health outcomes among 42 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenbach, Johan P

    2014-07-01

    Variations in 'culture' are often invoked to explain cross-national variations in health, but formal analyses of this relation are scarce. We studied the relation between three sets of cultural values and a wide range of health behaviours and health outcomes in Europe. Cultural values were measured according to Inglehart׳s two, Hofstede׳s six, and Schwartz׳s seven dimensions. Data on individual and collective health behaviours (30 indicators of fertility-related behaviours, adult lifestyles, use of preventive services, prevention policies, health care policies, and environmental policies) and health outcomes (35 indicators of general health and of specific health problems relating to fertility, adult lifestyles, prevention, health care, and violence) in 42 European countries around the year 2010 were extracted from harmonized international data sources. Multivariate regression analysis was used to relate health behaviours to value orientations, controlling for socioeconomic confounders. In univariate analyses, all scales are related to health behaviours and most scales are related to health outcomes, but in multivariate analyses Inglehart׳s 'self-expression' (versus 'survival') scale has by far the largest number of statistically significant associations. Countries with higher scores on 'self-expression' have better outcomes on 16 out of 30 health behaviours and on 19 out of 35 health indicators, and variations on this scale explain up to 26% of the variance in these outcomes in Europe. In mediation analyses the associations between cultural values and health outcomes are partly explained by differences in health behaviours. Variations in cultural values also appear to account for some of the striking variations in health behaviours between neighbouring countries in Europe (Sweden and Denmark, the Netherlands and Belgium, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and Estonia and Latvia). This study is the first to provide systematic and coherent empirical evidence that

  17. Consumer Culture, Sustainability and Business Practice: How Companies can Promote the Symbolic Value of Sustainability in Consumption Activities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Macário de Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Discussions on sustainability began recently to focus on the consumption patterns of contemporary society as a major causative factors of social and environmental problems. Thus, the aim of this paper is to discuss some opportunities that companies have to influence these changes consumption patterns towards sustainability, taking as a basis the view discussed in studies of Rindova and Ravasi (2008 who consider firms as producers of culture. To this end, we performed a theoretical essay. The results show that companies can influence the formation of specific cultures with the symbolic construction of sustainable practices, contributing to the formation of a culture of sustainable consumption. This occurs from innovation in their ways of working, considering that evoke meanings that products appear to be influenced by strategic choices of producers, such as the concepts and philosophies of design (Ravasi; Rindova, 2008, which includes the development new technologies and practices (Michaelis, 2003 based on the principles of eco-efficiency (Barber, 2008; Clark, 2008, as well as changes in values and discourses that shape the cultures of business, government, media and civil society (Michaelis, 2003, also aligned with the ethical principles and shared environmental responsibility (Tukkeret al, 2008.

  18. Are International Students’ Preferred Pedagogy Influenced by Their Educational Culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Winch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of international students is studying at British universities. This study investigates multicultural students’ preferences on teaching and learning which was conducted at a university in the South of England during 2009/2010 academic year. In the literature review, the framework used in this study is explained. The study sample was 34 students who were studying Japanese as a non-credit module. Quantitative and qualitative data was collected using questionnaires. The results showed that some students’ preferred pedagogy appeared to be altered and influenced by British educational culture regardless of students’ previous educational culture. In addition, the sample participants’ preferred pedagogy are identified into given categories based on the framework of the study. Those who are in the teaching profession are encouraged to take into consideration of the educational cultures and teaching and learning practices from non-Anglophone countries. Keywords: culture, globalisation, higher education, Japanese language teaching, multicultural, power distance index (PDI, uncertainty avoidance index (UAI

  19. Microbiology of liver abscesses and the predictive value of abscess gram stain and associated blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemaly, Roy F; Hall, Gerri S; Keys, Thomas F; Procop, Gary W

    2003-08-01

    Although rare, pyogenic liver abscesses are potentially fatal. We evaluated the predictive value of Gram stain of liver abscess aspirates and temporally associated blood cultures. Gram stains detected bacteria in 79% of the liver abscesses tested. The sensitivity and specificity of Gram stain of the liver abscesses were 90% and 100% for Gram-positive cocci (GPC) and 52% and 94% for Gram-negative bacilli (GNB). The sensitivities of the blood cultures for any GPC and GNB present in the liver abscess were 30% and 39%, respectively. Although, Gram stains and blood cultures offer incomplete detection of the microbial contents of pyogenic liver abscesses, both tests should always accompany liver abscess cultures.

  20. A protocol for eliciting nonmaterial values through a cultural ecosystem services frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Rachelle K; Klain, Sarah C; Ardoin, Nicole M; Satterfield, Terre; Woodside, Ulalia; Hannahs, Neil; Daily, Gretchen C; Chan, Kai M

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders’ nonmaterial desires, needs, and values often critically influence the success of conservation projects. These considerations are challenging to articulate and characterize, resulting in their limited uptake in management and policy. We devised an interview protocol designed to enhance understanding of cultural ecosystem services (CES). The protocol begins with discussion of ecosystem-related activities (e.g., recreation, hunting) and management and then addresses CES, prompting for values encompassing concepts identified in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) and explored in other CES research. We piloted the protocol in Hawaii and British Columbia. In each location, we interviewed 30 individuals from diverse backgrounds. We analyzed results from the 2 locations to determine the effectiveness of the interview protocol in elucidating nonmaterial values. The qualitative and spatial components of the protocol helped characterize cultural, social, and ethical values associated with ecosystems in multiple ways. Maps and situational, or vignette-like, questions helped respondents articulate difficult-to-discuss values. Open-ended prompts allowed respondents to express a diversity of ecosystem-related values and proved sufficiently flexible for interviewees to communicate values for which the protocol did not explicitly probe. Finally, the results suggest that certain values, those mentioned frequently throughout the interview, are particularly salient for particular populations. The protocol can provide efficient, contextual, and place-based data on the importance of particular ecosystem attributes for human well-being. Qualitative data are complementary to quantitative and spatial assessments in the comprehensive representation of people's values pertaining to ecosystems, and this protocol may assist in incorporating values frequently overlooked in decision making processes. Un Protocolo para Obtener Valores No Materiales por medio de un Marco de

  1. Cultural factors influencing Japanese nurses' assertive communication: Part 2 - hierarchy and power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Mieko; Stone, Teresa E; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2018-03-23

    Hierarchy and power characterize health-care relationships around the world, constituting a barrier to assertive communication and a risk to patient safety. This issue is more problematic and complex in countries such as Japan, where deep-seated cultural values related to hierarchy and power persist. The current paper is the second of two that present the findings from a study exploring Japanese nurses' views and experiences of how cultural values impact assertive communication for health-care professionals. We conducted semistructured interviews with 23 registered nurses, following which data were analyzed using directed content analysis. Two overarching themes emerged from the analysis: hierarchy/power and collectivism. In the present study, we focus on cultural values related to hierarchy and power, including differences in professional status, gender imbalance, seniority/generation gap, bullying, and humility/modesty. The findings from our research provide meaningful insights into how Japanese cultural values influence and constrain nurses' communication and speaking up behaviors, and can be used to inform educational programs designed to teach assertiveness skills. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. INFLUENCE OF CULTURE AND WORKING ENVIRONMENT AGAINST GROUP DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORU CÎRNU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over time, during the existence of a company, there are inevitable changes in its organizational structure, normal changes caused by the increase or decrease of its activity volume, changes brought about by the adaptation to the new needs of the market. Concretely, the company can move from organizational systems such as entrepreneurship to bureaucratic or matrix organization systems, depending on the type of activity they perform and the degree of development attained at one point. In this context, it is obvious that a strong organization also has a strong organizational culture, a culture that exists and is carried out within the general framework defined by all the market players. What is imperative for organizations is the continuous supervision of power and the way it is distributed between formal and informal leaders in order to be able to intervene on time through the levers analyzed by us in order to influence their organizational behavior.

  3. Cultural factors influencing dietary and fluid restriction behaviour: perceptions of older Chinese patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Xiaoshan; Peng, Youqing; Yu, Hai-Ping; Li, Dan

    2017-03-01

    To explore the cultural factors related to dietary and fluid restriction behaviours among older Chinese patients. Excess dietary sodium and fluid intake are risk factors contributing to the worsening and rehospitalisation for heart failure in older patients. Managing the complex fluid and diet requirements of heart failure patients is challenging and is made more complicated by cultural variations in self-management behaviours in response to a health threat. Qualitative study using semi-structured in interviews and framework analysis. The design of this study is qualitative descriptive. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 heart failure patients. Data were analysed through content analysis. Seven cultural themes emerged from the qualitative data: the values placed on health and illness, customary way of life, preference for folk care and the Chinese healthcare system, and factors related to kinship and social ties, religion, economics and education. Dietary change and management in response to illness, including heart failure, is closely related to individuals' cultural background. Healthcare providers should have a good understanding of cultural aspects that can influence patients' conformity to medical recommendations. Heart failure patients need support that considers their cultural needs. Healthcare providers must have a good understanding of the experiences of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Validation of the Cultural Influence on Helping Scale among Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ben M. F.; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of culture on adolescent prosocial behavior is a neglected aspect in existing studies. Objectives: This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Cultural Influence on Helping Scale (CIHS) among Chinese adolescents. CIHS is an instrument that assesses Chinese cultural influence on helping other people. Method: The CIHS was…

  5. Cultural monuments from exceptional importance in Serbia as anthropogenic tourist values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirković Sanja

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural monuments mark historical past. They are included in anthropogenic tourist values. They present rare copies of creativity and they have exceptional artistic and esthetic values. The most numerous group are sacral objects. The largest attention deserve objects assigned in World cultural inheritance - monastery Studenica and monastery Sopoćani with old town Ras. It is necessary to build caterer capacities, parking lots and sanitary devices in encirclement. Manifestations and presentations on domestic and foreign market contribute to cultural affirmation. Tourist valorization is impeded with that there are no evidence about number of visitors. In separating priorities we must consider uniqueness, rarity and fame. That’s the reason why Čele kula has tourist importance. Cultural monuments increase stay and serve as complementary tourist values. That’s why is necessary synthesis access in their learn and tourist presentation.

  6. The Importance of Cultural Values and Trust for Innovation - A European Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Bing; Habisch, André; Thøgersen, John

    2018-01-01

    covering 27 European countries, we find that innovation at the country level is positively correlated with the level of societal trust and with three cultural value dimensions: “Autonomy vs. Embeddedness”, “Egalitarianism vs. Hierarchy”, and “Harmony vs. Mastery”. A multivariate SEM analysis reveals...... that when “Autonomy vs. Embeddedness” is controlled, the two other cultural value dimensions are no longer significant. Further, a SEM path analysis confirms that the relationship between cultural values and innovation performances is completely mediated through the level of trust in a society. Overall...... settings (i.e., policy makers) are discussed. It is suggested that for successful innovation to blossom, the actors on both levels should aim at strengthening the cultural emphasis on individual autonomy, institutional integrity and mutual trust....

  7. Axelrod Model of Social Influence with Cultural Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radillo-Díaz, Alejandro; Pérez, Luis A.; Del Castillo-Mussot, Marcelo

    2012-10-01

    Since cultural interactions between a pair of social agents involve changes in both individuals, we present simulations of a new model based on Axelrod's homogenization mechanism that includes hybridization or mixture of the agents' features. In this new hybridization model, once a cultural feature of a pair of agents has been chosen for the interaction, the average of the values for this feature is reassigned as the new value for both agents after interaction. Moreover, a parameter representing social tolerance is implemented in order to quantify whether agents are similar enough to engage in interaction, as well as to determine whether they belong to the same cluster of similar agents after the system has reached the frozen state. The transitions from a homogeneous state to a fragmented one decrease in abruptness as tolerance is increased. Additionally, the entropy associated to the system presents a maximum within the transition, the width of which increases as tolerance does. Moreover, a plateau was found inside the transition for a low-tolerance system of agents with only two cultural features.

  8. Influencing factors analysis of anammox bacteria cultured by mixing denitrifying-anammox

    OpenAIRE

    Sihui WANG; Yuanyuan SONG; Yunman LIU; Yankai GUO; Jing LIAN; Jianbo GUO

    2017-01-01

    In order to get the optimal growth conditions of anammox bacteria, the mature-cultured anammox granule sludge is used to investigate the influencing factors. The effects of temperature, pH value, COD and influent substrate (NO-2-N and NH+4-N) on anammox bacteria activity are investigated. The results demonstrate that the optimal temperature is 40 ℃ and the optimal pH value is between 7.0~8.0 for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacteria activity is not inhibited severely when COD concentration i...

  9. Social and cultural influences among Mexican border entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Bretones, Francisco; Cappello, Héctor M; Garcia, Pedro A

    2009-06-01

    Social and cultural conditions (including U.S. border and inland influence, role models within the family, and educational background) which affect locus of control and achievement motivation among Mexican entrepreneurs were explored among 64 selected entrepreneurs in two Mexican towns, one on the Mexico-U.S. border, the other located inland. Analyses showed that the border subsample scored higher on External locus of control; however, in both subsamples the father was an important element in the locus of control variable and the entrepreneur status. No statistically significant mean difference was noted for achievement motivation. Practical applications and limitations are discussed.

  10. Value dimensions of corporate culture of state-owned enterprise employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Požega Željko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines value dimensions of the organizational culture of employees in Hrvatska elektroprivreda d.d., a joint stock company wholly owned by the government of the Republic of Croatia, with the aim of identifying the corporate culture and value differences within the company in relation to employee gender, age and type of workplace. Hofstede’s research on organizational culture value dimensions forms the theoretical framework of this paper. Descriptive statistical methods, i.e., frequencies, comparison of means and ranking were used in the analysis. The results show a difference in values between older and younger employees, as well as between employees working in an office and those working in the field which leads to the conclusion that in this company there are different sub-cultural elements within a single corporate culture. Moreover, the results show that value dimensions of employees in Hrvatska elektroprivreda d.d. are somewhat different from earlier findings of Hofstede’s research into value dimensions of employees in the Republic of Croatia in that the power distance is lower; uncertainty avoidance remains relatively high; individualism of employees has risen considerably, the culture is still impregnated with feminine values and there is a high degree of long-term orientation of employees. The analysis of respondents’ answers indicates that personal time and family time are highly valued. In addition, physical working conditions, good working relations with immediate supervisors and good cooperation with colleagues were also rated high on the scale of importance. It was also found that the most important work objective was job security, and that personal steadiness, stability and persistence were most valued personal traits.

  11. Embedding the organizational culture profile into Schwartz’s theory of universals in values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Borg (Ingwer); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); K.A. Jehn (Karen); W. Bilsky (Wolfgang); S.H. Schwartz (Shalom)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Person-organization fit (P-O fit) is often measured by the congruence of a person’s values and the values that he or she ascribes to the organization. A popular instrument used in this context is the Organizational Culture Profile (O’Reilly, Chatman, & Caldwell, 1991). The OCP

  12. The Value of Risk: Noah's Ark at the Skirball Cultural Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Sheri; Gittleman, Marni

    2010-01-01

    In this article Bernstein and Gittleman address the role of risk in creating an exhibition that is of value to the public and is aligned with their cultural institution's core values. Through an examination of the development process, the authors present lessons that can assist others who are interested in undertaking an exhibition with similar…

  13. Intergenerational Patterns of Values and Autonomy Expectations in Cultures of Relatedness and Separatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sunita Mahtani; Bond, Michael Harris; Deeds, Osvelia; Chung, Siu Fung

    1999-01-01

    Investigated value priorities and autonomy expectations in 59 pairs of Caucasian and 66 pairs of Asian teenagers and their mothers in Hong Kong. Findings support models that predict persistent family interdependence despite adoption of many individualist values in modernizing collectivist cultures. (SLD)

  14. Crisis of cultural values and teacher’s attitudes to discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Peiró i Gregòri, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Questions that guide this work refer to: social and cultural critical situations of students causing school indiscipline; appropriate teacher’s models of behaviour to reduce lack of discipline; how teachers could create a suitable climate for a peaceful coexistence; best valued teaching style; and values that define o teacher’s behaviour style on critical situations. ECER

  15. Relationship Marketing: A Quantitative Study of Individual Cultural Values as Predictors of Satisfaction Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Tracy Simone

    2017-01-01

    The economic value of international students to higher education had become important and global competition to attract and retain these lucrative students was fierce. In British Columbia, educational goals were set to ensure that all students receive quality learning experiences and provide maximum economic benefit. Cultural values affect…

  16. The effects of cultural values on mental health among the Taiwanese people: mediating of attitudes toward emotional expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Li-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Empirical evidence has demonstrated that an individual's cultural values can influence his or her mental health. This study extends previous research by proposing and testing a model that examines mediating processes underlying the relationship between individuals' cultural values and their mental health. This 2-stage study used data collected from 208 (at time 1) and 159 (at time 2) full-time staff employed by private enterprises in Taiwan. The author tested hypotheses through the use of hierarchical multiple regression. The results showed that under horizontal individualism and vertical collectivism, the predictors of negative mental health (ie, somatic symptoms, anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction and/or severe depression) were partially and almost completely achieved through the mediating effect of the negative attitudes toward emotional expression. © 2012 APJPH.

  17. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Broers, Nick J; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2015-07-01

    National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on successful curriculum change in medical schools internationally. The authors tested a literature-based conceptual model using multilevel structural equation modeling. For the operationalization of national and organizational culture, the authors used Hofstede's dimensions of culture and Quinn and Spreitzer's competing values framework, respectively. To operationalize successful curriculum change, the authors used two derivates: medical schools' organizational readiness for curriculum change developed by Jippes and colleagues, and change-related behavior developed by Herscovitch and Meyer. The authors administered a questionnaire in 2012 measuring the described operationalizations to medical schools in the process of changing their curriculum. Nine hundred ninety-one of 1,073 invited staff members from 131 of 345 medical schools in 56 of 80 countries completed the questionnaire. An initial poor fit of the model improved to a reasonable fit by two suggested modifications which seemed theoretically plausible. In sum, characteristics of national culture and organizational culture, such as a certain level of risk taking, flexible policies and procedures, and strong leadership, affected successful curriculum change. National and organizational culture influence readiness for change in medical schools. Therefore, medical schools considering curriculum reform should anticipate the potential impact of national and organizational culture.

  18. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, Filip; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, Andrea; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2015-11-24

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar) and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar.

  19. Health workers' perceptions of private-not-for-profit health facilities' organizational culture and its influence on retention in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumba, Constance Sibongile; Kielmann, Karina; Witter, Sophie

    2017-12-06

    An in-depth understanding of how organizational culture is experienced by health workers (HWs), and influences their decisions to leave their jobs is a fundamental, yet under-examined, basis for forming effective retention strategies. This research examined HWs' working experiences and perceptions of organisational culture within private-not-for-profit, largely mission-based hospitals, and how this influenced retention. Thirty-two HWs, including managers, in 19 health facilities in Uganda were interviewed using a semi-structured topic guide. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic content analysis. Interviews showed that the organizational culture was predominantly hierarchical, with non-participative management styles which emphasized control and efficiency. HWs and managers held different perceptions of the organizational culture. While the managers valued results and performance, HWs valued team work, recognition and participative management. The findings of this study indicate that organizational culture influences retention of HWs in health facilities and provide a useful context to inform health care managers in the PNFP sub-sector in Uganda and similar contexts. To improve retention of HWs, a gradual shift in organizational culture will be necessary, focussing on the values, beliefs and perceptions which have the greatest influence on observable behaviour.

  20. Transformation of values and design in the new socio-cultural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasimova Elfana Nasimi gyzy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays people often see the contradictions in understanding values that define human and cultural measuring of the events of the social reality happening in almost all areas of modern life. In addition, we are witnessing the controversial events of the transformation that characterize the processes of reconsideration of the values. These contradictions, of course, show up in the area of social cultural values that define the work of the designer. In this regard the study of transformation of social and cultural values of the national culturological thought is of great importance. The author comes to a conclusion that perfection, harmony, a sense of proportion, taste, an image of the world order, and a sense of beauty are aesthetic categories based on the aesthetic ideal and determine the possibility of its implementation.

  1. A New Measure of Traditional Values Across Cultures: China and Russia Compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Taormina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new measure of adherence to traditional values was created with the objective of facilitating research within and across cultures and nations. The measure was tested in China (N = 321 and Russia (N = 314 and factor analysis of the data revealed two subscales named Personal Traditional Values (10 items and Public Traditional Values (6 items. Empirical psychometric testing of the overall 16-item measure and the two subscales strongly supported the validity and reliability of all three measures. Means comparisons conducted to assess how well the measures could be used for cross-cultural comparisons revealed the Russians somewhat more than the Chinese living by traditional values overall, both nations about equal on living according to traditional values in their personal lives, and the Russians significantly more inclined to abide by traditional values in public. Also tested were several social and psychological variables as theoretical predictors of living by traditional values, and Life Satisfaction was tested as a possible correlate of living according to traditional values. Regression analyses on the combined data confirmed that Family Emotional Support, Conscientiousness, Collectivism, and Age were all significant positive predictors of living by traditional values. Additional regressions also found some unique predictors for each nation. These findings and the results of the parametric tests support the use of the new scales for measuring traditional values both within and across cultures.

  2. To Understand the “Brazilian Way” of School Management: How National Culture Influences the Organizational Culture and School Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria de Albuquerque Moreira

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify characteristics of national culture in the culture of Brazilian school management and leadership. Considering the broad literature that deals with the peculiarities of Brazilian culture and its influence on Brazilian management, it is assumed that as an institution belonging to a particular society, the school offers internal dynamics that are organized under influences of historical and cultural determinants of this society. This work is an exploratory study that uses secondary data found in studies on the profiles of principals, leadership, climate, and organizational culture in schools and primary data from research applied in public secondary schools located in the Federal District, Brazil. The results demonstrate that the initial premise—national culture influences the organizational culture and school leadership—has been confirmed and aspects that merit further analysis are identified.

  3. INFLUENCE OF SEXUAL VALUES ON PERCEIVED RISK OF INTERFAITH MARRIAGE AMONG UNMARRIED URBAN STUDENTS IN JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juneman Juneman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of interfaith marriage has been analyzed with the approach of theology, sociology, law, politics, and public policy. The original contribution of this study is its effort and aim to approach this phenomenon with psychological perspective. This study placed the level of one’s identification towards sexual values as predictors for his/her perceived risk of interfaith marriage, of which the values cannot be separated from metropolitan culture. This research is a quantitative research by employing predictive correlational design. The samples were 271 students (99 men, 172 women; Mage = 20.59 years, SDage = 1.67 years from five campuses in and around Jakarta. Research data analyses, by using multiple linear regression, show results which indicate that there is interaction between the gender with sexual values in influencing the risk perception. There are differences between men and women in terms of correlation between the two variables. In men, sexual values are not able to predict the perceived risk. In the Moslem women, two sexual values, i.e. absolutism and hedonism, are able to predict it. The results provide new insights regarding the relationship between sexuality with religion and marriage, particularly in urban areas in Indonesia.

  4. Individualism and the field viewpoint: cultural influences on memory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maryanne; Jones, Gregory V

    2012-09-01

    Two perspectives from which memories can be retrieved have been distinguished: field resembles the view from the first-person vantage point of original experience, whereas observer resembles the view from the third-person vantage point of a spectator. There is evidence that the incidences of the two types of perspective differ between at least two different cultural groups. It is hypothesised here that this is a special case of a more general relation between memory perspective and cultural individualism, such that field and observer perspectives are more prevalent among people from, respectively, relatively individualist and relatively collectivist societies. Memory perspectives adopted by participants from a range of different countries were recorded, and were found to vary in the predicted manner. Regression analysis showed that the potential effects of three other cultural variables - uncertainty avoidance, masculinity and, to a lesser extent, power distance - were eclipsed by the influence of individualism, and the implications are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding middle managers' influence in implementing patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutberg, Jennifer; Berta, Whitney

    2017-08-22

    The past fifteen years have been marked by large-scale change efforts undertaken by healthcare organizations to improve patient safety and patient-centered care. Despite substantial investment of effort and resources, many of these large-scale or "radical change" initiatives, like those in other industries, have enjoyed limited success - with practice and behavioural changes neither fully adopted nor ultimately sustained - which has in large part been ascribed to inadequate implementation efforts. Culture change to "patient safety culture" (PSC) is among these radical change initiatives, where results to date have been mixed at best. This paper responds to calls for research that focus on explicating factors that affect efforts to implement radical change in healthcare contexts, and focuses on PSC as the radical change implementation. Specifically, this paper offers a novel conceptual model based on Organizational Learning Theory to explain the ability of middle managers in healthcare organizations to influence patient safety culture change. We propose that middle managers can capitalize on their unique position between upper and lower levels in the organization and engage in 'ambidextrous' learning that is critical to implementing and sustaining radical change. This organizational learning perspective offers an innovative way of framing the mid-level managers' role, through both explorative and exploitative activities, which further considers the necessary organizational context in which they operate.

  6. Set size and culture influence children's attention to number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Lisa; Kuwabara, Megumi; Smith, Linda B

    2015-03-01

    Much research evidences a system in adults and young children for approximately representing quantity. Here we provide evidence that the bias to attend to discrete quantity versus other dimensions may be mediated by set size and culture. Preschool-age English-speaking children in the United States and Japanese-speaking children in Japan were tested in a match-to-sample task where number was pitted against cumulative surface area in both large and small numerical set comparisons. Results showed that children from both cultures were biased to attend to the number of items for small sets. Large set responses also showed a general attention to number when ratio difficulty was easy. However, relative to the responses for small sets, attention to number decreased for both groups; moreover, both U.S. and Japanese children showed a significant bias to attend to total amount for difficult numerical ratio distances, although Japanese children shifted attention to total area at relatively smaller set sizes than U.S. children. These results add to our growing understanding of how quantity is represented and how such representation is influenced by context--both cultural and perceptual. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF THE CULTURE IN THE STYLE OF LEADERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Gheta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The level of development of a country is defined based on indicators such as population size, GDP and contry area. Although it’s easy to identify countries like the USA, France and Spain that are part of developed countries and countries such as Senegal, Gabon Greece or China ranked as emerging countries, there is no universally accepted definition of developing contries. The “emerging contries” are often listed in terms of their differentiation from the developed contries; A comun problem is that some organizations dont’t take into consideration all the variables, a country located on a higher position in terms of GDP is possible to not have the same position at the social development or quality of life.   For the last 25 years China has known continuous economic expansion, it’s forecasted that in the next 20 years it will become one of the world’s superpower. China encountered a relatively fast development after the deployment of the “cultural revolution”. In China, the long standing cultural tradition influences till today the economic area, more than other countries encounter from this category. The youth’s mentality is to learn and to work very well with the solely interest to serve the country completely. This desire of the Chinese people is positively influenced by the state - the Chinese Communist Party encourages the state of raising the development of education and the level of life.

  8. Determination of D10 values of single and mixed cultures of bacteria after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu-Gyamfi, A.; Nketsia-Tabiri, J.; Boatin, R.

    2009-01-01

    The D 10 value of bacteria represents the absorbed radiation dose required to inactivate 90 % of a viable population or reduce the population by a factor of 10. D 10 values of 3 bacterial isolates (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella parathyphi B) were determined using single and mixed cultures to assess the effect of microbial competition on radiosensitivity. The isolates were inoculated into wakye substrate and exposed to γ-radiation doses of 0, 100, 300, 450, 600, 750, 850 Gy from a 6O Co source at a dose rate of 2.20 kGy/h in air. Enumeration of survivors of the isolates was carried out using serial dilution and pour plate methods. The surviving fraction of isolates decreased with increased irradiation doses. D 10 values of E. coli, S. aureus and S. parathyphi B were respectively 0.27, 0.33 and 0.44 kGy when inoculated as single cultures, and 0.24, 0.28 and 0.32 kGy respectively when inoculated as mixed cultures. D 10 values were lower for mixed cultures compared to single cultures, which might indicate reduced resistance to γ-radiation as a result of competition among the isolates. Microbiological challenge tests based on the D 10 values may result in delivery of higher irradiation doses, but the extra dose could serve as safety margin to enhance the food preservative capacity of radiation processing. (au)

  9. A latent profile analysis of Asian American men's and women's adherence to cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y Joel; Nguyen, Chi P; Wang, Shu-Yi; Chen, Weilin; Steinfeldt, Jesse A; Kim, Bryan S K

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to identify diverse profiles of Asian American women's and men's adherence to values that are salient in Asian cultures (i.e., conformity to norms, family recognition through achievement, emotional self-control, collectivism, and humility). To this end, the authors conducted a latent profile analysis using the 5 subscales of the Asian American Values Scale-Multidimensional in a sample of 214 Asian Americans. The analysis uncovered a four-cluster solution. In general, Clusters 1 and 2 were characterized by relatively low and moderate levels of adherence to the 5 dimensions of cultural values, respectively. Cluster 3 was characterized by the highest level of adherence to the cultural value of family recognition through achievement, whereas Cluster 4 was typified by the highest levels of adherence to collectivism, emotional self-control, and humility. Clusters 3 and 4 were associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms than Cluster 1. Furthermore, Asian American women and Asian American men had lower odds of being in Cluster 4 and Cluster 3, respectively. These findings attest to the importance of identifying specific patterns of adherence to cultural values when examining the relationship between Asian Americans' cultural orientation and mental health status.

  10. Clusters of cultures: diversity in meaning of family value and gender role items across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vlimmeren, Eva; Moors, Guy B D; Gelissen, John P T M

    2017-01-01

    Survey data are often used to map cultural diversity by aggregating scores of attitude and value items across countries. However, this procedure only makes sense if the same concept is measured in all countries. In this study we argue that when (co)variances among sets of items are similar across countries, these countries share a common way of assigning meaning to the items. Clusters of cultures can then be observed by doing a cluster analysis on the (co)variance matrices of sets of related items. This study focuses on family values and gender role attitudes. We find four clusters of cultures that assign a distinct meaning to these items, especially in the case of gender roles. Some of these differences reflect response style behavior in the form of acquiescence. Adjusting for this style effect impacts on country comparisons hence demonstrating the usefulness of investigating the patterns of meaning given to sets of items prior to aggregating scores into cultural characteristics.

  11. The influence of culture of honor and emotional intelligence in the acculturation of Moroccan immigrant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Zafra, Esther; El Ghoudani, Karima

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a normal process of people seeking new opportunities, work, or leisure in societies. The way people adapt to a new country (acculturation) is a complex process in which immigrants' evaluations about the culture of origin and their perceptions of the host country interact. The combination of these two factors produces four types of acculturation: separation, assimilation, integration, and marginalization. Several variables, such as personality, attitudes, and emotional intelligence, have been studied to help explain this process. However, the impact of a culture of honor and its interaction with other variables remains an open question that may help to explain how migrants can better adjust to their host culture. In this study, we examine the influence of the culture of honor (social) and emotional intelligence (individual) on acculturation. In a sample of 129 Moroccan women (mean age = 29, SD = 9.40) immigrants in Spain (mean time in Spain = 6 years, SD = 3.60), we investigated the relations among the variables of interest. Our results show that no significant differences emerged in the scores given for culture of honor (CH) and the acculturation strategies of the Moroccan immigrant women F(3, 99) = .233; p = .87. However women who preferred the integration strategy scored highest on emotional intelligence (EI), whereas the assimilated immigrants showed the lowest scores for EI F(3, 92) = 4.63; p = .005. Additionally, only in the case of integration does EI mediate between CH and the value given to the immigrant's own and host cultures (p <.001).

  12. Cultural influences on causal beliefs about depression among Latino immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Susan; Escobar, Javier; Paris, Manuel; Alvidrez, Jennifer; Dixon, Jane K; Desai, Mayur M; Scahill, Lawrence D; Whittemore, Robin

    2013-01-01

    This study describes causal beliefs about depression among Dominican, Colombian, and Ecuadorian immigrants. The authors describe participants' narratives about how particular supernatural or religious beliefs may contribute to or alleviate depression. Latino primary care patients (n = 177) were interviewed with the Beliefs About Causes of Depression Scale, a list of 35 items rated from not at all important to extremely important. Participants had the option of expanding on responses using an informal conversational approach. Underlying themes of these explanatory comments were derived from narrative and content analysis. Major themes that emerged were Psychosocial and Religious and Supernatural causal beliefs. A third theme emerged that represented the integration of these categories in the context of the immigrant experience. This article adds to the understanding of cross-cultural beliefs about depression. Psychosocial stressors related to the immigrant experience and adverse life events were highly endorsed, but the meaning of these stressors was construed in terms of religious and cultural values. To provide culturally appropriate services, nurses should be aware of and discuss the patient's belief systems, illness interpretations, and expectations of treatment.

  13. "Cultural fit": individual and societal discrepancies in values, beliefs, and subjective well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luo

    2006-04-01

    The author examined the relationship between cultural values, beliefs, and subjective well-being (SWB) in the context of the "cultural fit" proposition with 3 diverse Chinese samples from Taiwan and Mainland China (N = 581). The author found that beliefs regarding the independent self, the interdependent self, active control, and relationship harmony as forming individual-level culture were consistently related to SWB. Furthermore, the author found that the magnitude of cultural fit was associated with SWB for certain groups of the Chinese people. It is most interesting that the direction of cultural fit regarding independent self was also important for SWB. Specifically, people who endorsed higher independent self but expected lower societal endorsement of such views were better off in SWB than those of the opposite combination.

  14. The role of cultural values and religion on views of body size and eating practices among adolescents from Fiji, Tonga, and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Waqa, Gade; Dev, Anjileena; Cama, Tilema; Swinburn, Boyd A

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated cultural values related to body image and eating practices in Western and non-Western societies. In total, 628 Fijian, 463 Indo-Fijian, 598 Tongan, and 534 Australian adolescents completed measures of cultural values and religious influences in relation to the ideal body and eating practices. Fijian and Tongan adolescents were more likely to value a large body. Religious influences were most strongly associated with eating practices for Fijians, Indo-Fijians, and Tongans. The findings support the role of religion in transmitting cultural values regarding eating practices in Pacific Island communities. What is already known on this subject? Previous research has demonstrated that sociocultural factors shape body image and eating behaviours. Most of this research has been conducted in Western countries. What does this study add? The current study identifies the role of cultural values and religious influences on body image and eating behaviours in a number of different cultural groups. This is the first study to use the same methodology to explore these relationships across Western and Pacific Island communities. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  15. The role of utility value in achievement behavior: the importance of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Olga G; Durik, Amanda M; Miyamoto, Yuri; Harackiewicz, Judith M

    2011-03-01

    Two studies tested how participants' responses to utility value interventions and subsequent interest in a math technique vary by culture (Westerners vs. East Asians) and levels of initial math interest. Participants in Study 1 were provided with information about the utility value of the technique or not. The manipulation was particularly effective for East Asian learners with initially lower math interest, who showed more interest in the technique relative to low-interest Westerners. Study 2 compared the effects of two types of utility value (proximal or distal) and examined the effects on interest, effort, performance, and process variables. Whereas East Asian participants reaped the most motivational benefits from a distal value manipulation, Westerners benefited the most from a proximal value manipulation. These findings have implications for how to promote motivation for learners with different cultural backgrounds and interests.

  16. Incorporating the cultural value of respeto into a framework of Latino parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Esther J; Fernandez, Yenny; Cortes, Dharma E

    2010-01-01

    Latino families face multiple stressors associated with adjusting to United States mainstream culture that, along with poverty and residence in inner-city communities, may further predispose their children to risk for negative developmental outcomes. Evidence-based mental health treatments may require culturally informed modifications to best address the unique needs of the Latino population, yet few empirical studies have assessed these cultural elements. The current study examined cultural values of 48 Dominican and Mexican mothers of preschoolers through focus groups in which they described their core values as related to their parenting role. Results showed that respeto, family and religion were the most important values that mothers sought to transmit to their children. Respeto is manifested in several domains, including obedience to authority, deference, decorum, and public behavior. The authors describe the socialization messages that Latina mothers use to teach their children respeto and present a culturally derived framework of how these messages may relate to child development. The authors discuss how findings may inform the cultural adaptation of evidence-based mental health treatments such as parent training programs. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Native Language as a Core Value which creates the Cross-Cultural Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JERZY NIKITOROWICZ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Th e thesis which is undertaken in this article applies to a native language (the language of the family and home as the leading (primary value of creating a crosscultural identity. To justify this argument, the author refers to his own research and literature in this area. Th ere are many references to the theory of cultural relativism by Sapir-Whorf and the theory of core values by Jerzy Smolicz. Th e author demonstrates, notices, and highlights that the personal and group identity, analysed in terms of evolutionary (processual, based on the values which are recognised and respected in the family, are shaping and developing cross-cultural identity. Th e more we recognize, respect and accept your native (family and home identity, the more we are likely to make an eff ort to get to know the Other and his culture.

  18. Influence of cultural mechanisms on horizontal inter-firm collaborations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Vilana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of organizations that work in multinational environments has considerably altered their production strategies. One of the consequences has been the appearance of Horizontal Inter-firm Collaborations (HICs, which include all kinds of enterprises and production centres and establish a new type of horizontal collaborations and relations between independent companies or even competitors who establish occasional collaborations on projects they could not take on individually. HICs are dynamically changing organizations formed by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs, Contract Manufacturers (CMs, turn-key and component suppliers, R+D centres and distributors. The dynamic relations that exist within the HICs allow them a very permeable organization easy to connect and disconnect from one to each other as well as to choose a set of partners with specific attributes. The result is a highly flexible system characterized by low barriers to entry and exit, geographic flexibility, low costs, rapid technological diffusion, high diversification through contract manufacturers and exceptional economies of scale. This study of organizational culture at the network level includes aspects such as cultural similarity among its actors, social embeddedness, tacit knowledge transfer or the importance of trust atinter-firm collaborations. The presence, under a systemic perspective, of homogeneous cultural values and practices in which collaboration actors can be identified may strengthen the group membership or establish a social network that underlies the own HIC and facilitates interactions among its members. The feasibility of this approach would facilitate the formation of new HICsby establishing, ex ante, a cultural prescriptive model at the network level. Finally, to validate the proposed model, the case methodology have been applied to an example within the aeronautical industry that has been one of the most successful relationships within HICs, the

  19. Cultural value orientation and authoritarian parenting as parameters of bullying and victimization at school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Stelios N; Fousiani, Kyriaki; Michaelides, Michalis; Stavrinides, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the existing association between cultural value orientation, authoritarian parenting, and bullying and victimization at school. The participants (N = 231) were early adolescents, randomly selected from 11 different schools in urban and rural areas of Cyprus. Participants completed self reports measuring cultural value orientation, authoritarian parenting, bullying, and victimization. These instruments were the following: the cultural value scale (CVS), the parental authority questionnaire (PAQ), and the revised bullying and victimization questionnaire (BVQ-R). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine mediation effects. It was found that vertical individualism acted as a mediator between authoritarian parenting and bullying. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between authoritarian parenting and the vertical dimensions of both cultural value orientations (individualism and collectivism), but not with the horizontal dimensions of either cultural orientation. Further, authoritarian parenting was also positively associated with bullying and victimization at school. The main contribution of the present study is the finding that vertical individualism significantly mediates the relationship between authoritarian parental style and bullying propensity.

  20. Students' inclusion to the value of physical culture during the process of athletic training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sychov S.O.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Means and methods of students' inclusion to the value of physical culture, during the process of athletic training on the classes of physical education are opened in this article. 52 students took part in research. It is developed the recommendation for the application of pedagogical conditions of use in the expressway strength and strength training, ability to determine dosing load for students with different level of physical background, methods of power properties development both for boys and for girls. It is shown that using of athletic training at the classes of physical education is contributing of students' inclusion to the value of physical culture.

  1. Tolerance as a factor of value system formation within process of cross-cultural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Hanas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cross­cultural communication relates to particular phenomenon in two or more cultures and has an additional value for communicative competence comparison of different cultures representatives. The realization of communicative competence capacity is culturally conditioned, in addition, it also caused by unique individual experience of person. Intercultural communication became one of the most urgent issues of humanity in modern society. Study of intercultural communication becomes increasingly important in recent years due to globalization. Features of intercultural communication are studied within the sciences such as philosophy, linguistics, cultural studies, psychology, sociology, anthropology, ethnology, cybernetics, and an interdisciplinary process. Intercultural communication as a social phenomenon was called to the practical needs of the postwar world, reinforced by ideological interest, which of the early twentieth century was formed in academia and in the public mind for the different cultures and languages. The study of intercultural communication is a result of rapid economic development of many countries and regions, revolutionary changes in technology associated with this globalization of economic activity. On the level of historical evolutionary approach to the development of complex systems tolerance phenomenon could not be reduced to everyday perspective of tolerance. Tolerance is works as cultural norm and as a civilization principle. A key feature of tolerance as long as multiculturalism is support of complex systems diversity. Tolerance also provides a right of each individual to be a different personality. The concept of tolerance is understood as a norm that provides a balance opposing sides and the possibility of dialogue of various world views, religions and cultures. Initial thesis that each person is a unique individual and unlike the others, is characterized by different manifestations of their own individuality, is the

  2. How fair-value accounting can influence firm hedging

    OpenAIRE

    Beisland, Leif Atle; Frestad, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Published version of an article in the journal: Review of Derivatives Research. Also available from the publisher at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11147-012-9084-y The potential influence of accounting regulations on hedging strategies and the use of financial derivatives is a research topic that has attracted little attention in both the finance and the accounting literature. However, recent surveys suggest that company hedging can be substantially influenced by the accounting for financial...

  3. The Cultural Value of Older People's Experiences of Theater-making: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Miriam; Rickett, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    Although a number of existing reviews document the health and social benefits of arts participation by older people, there are none which focus specifically on theater and drama. This article presents the findings of a study conducted as part of the UK's Arts and Humanities Research Council "Cultural Value Project." The 2-year (2013-2015) "Cultural Value Project" sought to make a major contribution to how we think about the value of arts and culture to individuals and to society. It made 72 awards: 19 critical reviews of existing bodies of research, 46 research development awards to carry out new research, and 7 expert workshop awards to facilitate discussions among academics and practitioners. Together, these awards explored the components of cultural value and the ways in which cultural value is evidenced and evaluated. Following an extensive search of academic databases and E-mail requests via relevant organizations and networks, 77 publications formed the basis for our own critical review. Our findings highlight the benefits and value of older people's theater and drama participation on health and well-being, group relationships, learning and creativity, and draw attention to the importance of the esthetic value and quality of older people's drama. Despite the recent surge of interest in this field (a third of the reviewed literature was published between 2010 and 2014), we suggest that there are multiple areas for further research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Examining Convergence in the Cultural Value Orientations of Norwegians in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Jennifer

    There is much debate in Norway as to whether Norwegian cultural values are being diluted by the increasing influx of international organizations. Little empirical work has been done to assess the effect of employment by international organizations on the cultural values of Norwegians. The aim of this study was to determine if individuals retain cultural values closest to their own nationality or the nationality of their employing organization. This objective was accomplished by comparing cultural value dimensions of Norwegians employed in organizations headquartered in one of five countries. Recruitment emails were sent to 612 possible participants and 160 individuals completed the survey completely, resulting in a sample size of N=160, a response rate of 26%. From the completed surveys, cultural dimension scores were calculated for each individual and group in the areas of power distance, individualism, masculinity, and uncertainty avoidance. Using those cultural dimension scores, three groups of one-way ANOVA tests were run in accordance with the parameters of each of three research questions. Comparing Norwegians employed in local government or a Norwegian oil and gas company, a significant difference existed only for uncertainty avoidance (p=.0074). Comparing cultural dimension scores of Norwegians employed in local government with those employed by one of four internationally-headquartered oil companies resulted in significant differences in scores for power distance (p=.0007), individualism (p=.0000), and uncertainty avoidance (p=.0000); however, there was not a statistically significant difference in masculinity scores between the two groups (p=.0792). Comparing cultural dimension scores of Norwegians employed in a Norwegian oil and gas company with those employed by one of four internationally-headquartered oil and gas companies also resulted in statistically significant differences in scores for power distance (p=.0015), individualism (p=.0000), and

  5. CULTURAL IMPACT OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL VALUES IN THE ADOPTION OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza-Aguilera, Dora A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Project management is a knowledge area that counts with the definition of best practices and methodologies, around the world. However, the use of these practices, is affected by social norms within an organization (Alavi, Kayworth & Leidner, 2005 and by the interpretation made by individuals, about the usefulness of these practices (Stare, 2012. This work seeks to establish the cultural effect of the values in the extent to which people adopt the project management practices in organizations. From the literature review, honesty, formalization, responsibility and justice were identified as values associated to behaviors that include the use of project management practices. A questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 55 companies located in Bogotá, Colombia, from various sectors of industry. Positive relationships between cultural values and the adoption of project management practices was evidenced. It was found that the extent, to which these practices are adopted, is a function of formalization. The theoretical contribution of this research is to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between cultural values and project management practices, since there are no studies about this relation. Its utility is to provide guidance to organizations on the need to promote the formalization as cultural value, to increase the use of project management practices. This integration lead to greater effectiveness (Rosenthal & Masarech, 2003.

  6. The value-congruence model of memory for emotional experiences: an explanation for cultural differences in emotional self-reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Schimmack, Ulrich; Diener, Ed; Kim-Prieto, Chu; Scollon, Christie Napa; Choi, Dong-Won

    2007-11-01

    In 3 studies, the authors found support for the value-congruence model that accounts for cultural variations in memory for emotional experiences. In Study 1, the authors found that in the made-in-the-U.S. scenario condition, European Americans were more accurate than were Asian Americans in their retrospective frequency judgments of emotions. However, in the made-in-Japan scenario condition, European Americans were less accurate than were Asian Americans. In Study 2, the authors demonstrated that value orientation mediates the CulturexType of Event congruence effect. In Study 3 (a daily event sampling study), the authors showed that the congruence effect was explained by the importance of parental approval. In sum, emotional events congruent with personal values remain in memory longer and influence retrospective frequency judgments of emotion more than do incongruent events. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Community Attitudes towards Culture-Influenced Mental Illness: Scrupulosity vs. Nonreligious OCD among Orthodox Jews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirutinsky, Steven; Rosmarin, David H.; Pargament, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Culture may particularly influence community attitudes towards mental illness, when the illness itself is shaped by a cultural context. To explore the influence of culture-specific, religious symptoms on Orthodox Jewish community attitudes, the authors compared the attitudes of 169 Orthodox Jews, who randomly viewed one of two vignettes describing…

  8. A Case Study on the Influence of Organizational Culture on Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihui

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to probe the influence of the organizational culture on language classroom at a newly-established local college. It firstly reviews the knowledge of the organizational culture and finds out its features, and then discusses how the organizational culture was greatly influenced by the host educational environment. On the basis of…

  9. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  10. Factors that influence the reinforcing value of foods and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Jennifer L

    2014-09-01

    Behavioral economic principles state that as the cost of a product increases, purchasing or consumption of that product will decrease. To understand the impact of behavioral economics on ingestive behavior, our laboratory utilizes an operant behavior paradigm to measure how much work an individual will engage in to get access to foods and beverages. This task provides an objective measure of the reinforcing value. We have shown that consumption of the same high fat snack food every day for two weeks reduces its reinforcing value in lean individuals, but increases its reinforcing value in a subset of obese individuals. This increase in the reinforcing value of food predicts future weight gain. Similarly, we have shown that repeated intake of caffeinated soda increases its reinforcing value in boys, but not in girls. This increase in reinforcing value is not related to usual caffeine consumption, but may be associated with positive, subjective effects of caffeine that are more likely to be reported by boys than by girls. Because food and beverage reinforcement relates to real-world consumption, it is important to determine factors that increase or decrease the reinforcing value and determine the consequences of these responses. We are especially interested in determining ways to shift the behavioral economic curve in order to develop novel strategies to decrease the reinforcing value of less healthy snack foods and beverages, such as soda, potato chips and candy and to increase the reinforcing value of healthier foods and beverages, such as water, fruits, and vegetables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceived Maternal Parenting Styles, Cultural Values, and Prosocial Tendencies Among Mexican American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alexandra N; Carlo, Gustavo; Knight, George P

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to extend research on parenting and positive development of Latino youth. Participants were 207 Mexican American adolescents (M age = 10.9 years, SD = 0.83 years; 50% girls) who completed measures of their parents' supportive and firm parenting, their own endorsement of respect and traditional gender role values, and their tendency to engage in six forms of prosocial behaviors. Maternal nativity was also considered as an initial predictor of parenting, adolescents' cultural values, and adolescents' prosocial behaviors. Overall, the results demonstrated that maternal nativity was associated with traditional gender roles and specific forms of prosocial behaviors. Parenting dimensions were differentially associated with respect and traditional gender role values and prosocial behaviors. Cultural values, in turn, were associated with multiple forms of prosocial behaviors. Gender differences in the processes were also explored.

  12. Cultural influence on directional tendencies in children's drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portex, Marine; Foulin, Jean-Noël; Troadec, Bertrand

    2017-09-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating how print experience as a cultural factor influences directional tendencies in children's drawing in the interplay with biomechanical (hand), syntactic (shape orientation) and semantic (shape meaning) factors. Eighty-eight right-handed children from three literacy/age groups (preliterate, first graders and third graders) had to copy a geometrical shape adapted from the Rey-Osterrieth complex figure. The shape was presented alternatively leftward and rightward, while using both dominant (right) and non-dominant (left) hands. Directional tendencies were assessed regarding directionality of drawing movements at global, intermediate and local levels and deviation error in centre line bisection. Results show a global improvement of drawing quality and strategies across groups and an advantage for the dominant right hand from 6 years onward. Regarding directional tendencies, a reinforcement of a congruency effect between conditions and writing direction was found from preliterates to third graders. These results are discussed as a cultural embodiment process and have implications for psychological testing.

  13. The Value(s) of Civil Leaders : A Study into the Influence of Governance Context on Public Value Orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The main research question of the dissertation is: What values motivate and direct civil leaders and to what extent are the values shaped by the institutional context in which these leaders operate? This central question was divided into three research questions. 1. Do civil leaders have a common

  14. Repercussions of Isinai Lyric Poetry on Culture-Based Values Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girlie F. Salas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available - Lyric poetry is an important manifestation of the people’s psychology, character, and individuality. Belonging to one of the ethnolinguistic groups of Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines which embraces a rich lyric poetry are the Isinais who inhabit Dupax del Sur, particularly the barangays of Domang, Dopaj, and Balzain, as well as those found in Barangays Buag and Banggot in Bambang. This qualitative study focused on the folksongs as a literary form evolved by the Isinais in the foregoing setting and how these pieces could contribute to a more meaningful culture-based values education among college students of the Nueva Vizcaya State University-Bambang Campus strategically located at the heart of southern Nueva Vizcaya populated primarily by Igorots, Ifugaos, Ilocanos and Isinais. Key informants divulged published and unpublished Isinai folksongs, whose features as to origin, musical structure, cultural and social traits, and implications to values education, were thoroughly investigated in this study. Problems were identified as an attempt to initially help derive a mechanism which can preserve and promote the Isinai lyric poetry. The findings incited better standpoints on preparing prospective teachers of the university by encouraging them to integrate culture in values education; participation of school administrators and local officials in preserving the Isinai culture; involvement of music and literature teachers and researchers of the university in exploring and promoting the Isinai culture; and supporting the program of the provincial government in preserving Isinai dialect, songs and dances.

  15. Hierarchical cultural values predict success and mortality in high-stakes teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anicich, Eric M.; Swaab, Roderick I.; Galinsky, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Functional accounts of hierarchy propose that hierarchy increases group coordination and reduces conflict. In contrast, dysfunctional accounts claim that hierarchy impairs performance by preventing low-ranking team members from voicing their potentially valuable perspectives and insights. The current research presents evidence for both the functional and dysfunctional accounts of hierarchy within the same dataset. Specifically, we offer empirical evidence that hierarchical cultural values affect the outcomes of teams in high-stakes environments through group processes. Experimental data from a sample of expert mountain climbers from 27 countries confirmed that climbers expect that a hierarchical culture leads to improved team coordination among climbing teams, but impaired psychological safety and information sharing compared with an egalitarian culture. An archival analysis of 30,625 Himalayan mountain climbers from 56 countries on 5,104 expeditions found that hierarchy both elevated and killed in the Himalayas: Expeditions from more hierarchical countries had more climbers reach the summit, but also more climbers die along the way. Importantly, we established the role of group processes by showing that these effects occurred only for group, but not solo, expeditions. These findings were robust to controlling for environmental factors, risk preferences, expedition-level characteristics, country-level characteristics, and other cultural values. Overall, this research demonstrates that endorsing cultural values related to hierarchy can simultaneously improve and undermine group performance. PMID:25605883

  16. Influence Strategies in South African Wine Value Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Ewert

    2015-11-01

    Drawing on a number of detailed case studies, in this paper we investigate this conclusion in more depth. By doing so, we try to explain which paths South African producer cellars have or have not chosen, and why. As global value chain theory posits that the governance structure of value chains are of crucial importance, we will pay particular interest to the design of the chains as a success factor.

  17. The Value of Value Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sløk-Madsen, Stefan Kirkegaard; Christensen, Jesper

    The world over classrooms in business schools are being taught that corporate values can impact performance. The argument is typically that culture matter more than strategy plans and culture can be influenced and indeed changed by a shared corporate value set. While the claim seems intuitively a...... a unique contribution to the effects of investment in shared company values, and to whether agent rationality can be fundamentally changed by committed organizational efforts....

  18. The influence of sociocultural factors on the eating attitudes of Lebanese and Cypriot students: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeni, N; Gharibeh, N; Katsounari, I

    2013-07-01

    The present comparative cross-cultural study aimed to explore the relationship between eating behaviour and sociocultural influences with respect to appearance and body image in female university students from two cultural contexts, namely Cyprus and Lebanon. The Dutch Eating Behavior questionnaire (DEBQ) and the Perceived Sociocultural Influences on Body Image and Body Change Questionnaire were used to assess sociocultural influences and body image, respectively, in 200 students from each country. The results indicated that the Lebanese students were more likely to engage in emotional and external eating and their body image was impacted to a larger extent by sociocultural agents, including media influences, compared to the Cypriot students. Also, a positive relationship was found between emotional and external eating in both cultures. Finally, sociocultural influences correlated positively with external eating only in the Cypriot sample. Culture-specific factors, such as the societal values and norms, as well as the Westernisation history of each country, are discussed as underpinnings for the differences found. These findings are significant for understanding the rise of eating pathology in these two cultures and provide evidence for a need to consider cultural environment when designing public health policies addressing the negative aspects of nutrition transition. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. Core ethical values of radiological protection applied to Fukushima case: reflecting common morality and cultural diversities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Chieko; Cho, Kunwoo; Toohey, Richard E

    2016-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has established Task Group 94 (TG94) to develop a publication to clarify the ethical foundations of the radiological protection system it recommends. This TG identified four core ethical values which structure the system: beneficence and non-maleficence, prudence, justice, and dignity. Since the ICRP is an international organization, its recommendations and guidance should be globally applicable and acceptable. Therefore, first this paper presents the basic principles of the ICRP radiological protection system and its core ethical values, along with a reflection on the variation of these values in Western and Eastern cultural traditions. Secondly, this paper reflects upon how these values can be applied in difficult ethical dilemmas as in the case of the emergency and post-accident phases of a nuclear power plant accident, using the Fukushima case to illustrate the challenges at stake. We found that the core ethical values underlying the ICRP system of radiological protection seem to be quite common throughout the world, although there are some variations among various cultural contexts. Especially we found that 'prudence' would call for somewhat different implementation in each cultural context, balancing and integrating sometime conflicting values, but always with objectives to achieve the well-being of people, which is itself the ultimate aim of the radiological protection system.

  20. Family Traditions, Cultural Values, and the Clinician's Countertransference: Therapeutic Assessment of a Young Sicilian Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in models and instruments to understand the role of a client's cultural background, clinical psychologists are not immune to implicit cultural biases that are potentially damaging to the therapeutic alliance. In this article, I present a Therapeutic Assessment with a young Sicilian woman conducted in a university-based student clinic in Italy. During the assessment, I assumed that because we were both Italians, my client shared my perspective (northern Italian) about family and individual values, which resulted in a therapeutic impasse when I responded on the basis of my individual and culturally shaped view of interpersonal and family relationships without appreciating important differences between my own and my client's microcultures. To overcome the impasse, I had to openly acknowledge such differences and reorient myself to my client's goals. I discuss the core processes involved in such a repair in the context of a cross-cultural psychological assessment.

  1. The influence of sex on the haematological values of apparently ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were collected from fifty apparently healthy adult Sahel goats, twenty five each of male and female in Maiduguri to assess the influence of sex on their haematology. The red blood cell (RBC) counts, white blood cell (WBC) counts, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration, packed cell volume (PCV), platelet counts, ...

  2. The Relationship between Individualistic, Collectivistic, and Transitional Cultural Value Orientations and Adolescents' Autonomy and Identity Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Ti; Beckert, Troy E.; Goodrich, Thane R.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to validate the use of a Western model of adolescent development with Asian youth, 781 urban and rural Taiwanese high school students (56% female) completed questionnaires about their development. Adolescents were first divided into cultural value orientations (i.e. collectivistic, individualistic, or transitional) and compared…

  3. Welfare values of sustained urban water flows for recreational and cultural amenities under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikouei, A.; Brouwer, R.

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to estimate the welfare values related to sustained water flows in the Zayandeh-Rud River for recreational and cultural amenities in the urban park of Isfahan City in Iran. As is elsewhere the case in arid regions, the drying up of the river due to growing water

  4. The Familial Socialization of Culturally Related Values in Mexican American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P.; Berkel, Cady; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Ettekal, Idean; Jaconis, Maryanne; Boyd, Brenna M.

    2011-01-01

    Research has documented a relation between parents' ethnic socialization and youth's ethnic identity, yet there has been little research examining the transmission of cultural values from parents to their children through ethnic socialization and ethnic identity. This study examines a prospective model in which mothers' and fathers' Mexican…

  5. Africentric Cultural Values: Their Relation to Positive Mental Health in African American Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Madonna G.; Alleyne, Vanessa L.; Wallace, Barbara C.; Franklin-Jackson, Deidre C.

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to test a path model exploring the relationships among Africentric cultural values, self-esteem, perceived social support satisfaction, and life satisfaction in a sample of 147 African American adolescent girls. This investigation also examined the possible mediating effects of self-esteem and perceived social…

  6. Maternal Cultural Values and Parenting Practices: Longitudinal Associations with Chinese Adolescents' Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michael M.; Li, Yan; Shi, Junqi

    2012-01-01

    Interrelations among cultural values, parenting practices, and adolescent aggression were examined using longitudinal data collected from Chinese adolescents and their mothers. Adolescents' overt and relational aggression were assessed using peer nominations at Time 1 (7th grade) and Time 2 (9th grade). Mothers reported endorsement of cultural…

  7. Information and Communication Technology and Cultural Change How ICT Changes Self-Construal and Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Nina; Postmes, Tom; van der Vinne, Nikita; van Thiel, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies whether and how information and communication technology (ICT) changes self-construal and cultural values in a developing country. Ethiopian children were given laptops in the context of an ICT for development scheme. We compared children who used laptops (n = 69) with a control

  8. Indian Adolescents' Cyber Aggression Involvement and Cultural Values: The Moderation of Peer Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michelle F.; Kamble, Shanmukh V.; Soudi, Shruti P.

    2015-01-01

    Although research on cyberbullying and cyber aggression is growing, little attention has been given to examinations of these behaviors among adolescents in Asian countries, particularly in India. The present study examined the relationships among cyber aggression involvement and cultural values (i.e. individualism, collectivism), along with peer…

  9. The Impact of Iranian Teachers Cultural Values on Computer Technology Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Karim; Saribagloo, Javad Amani; Aghdam, Samad Hanifepour; Mahmoudi, Hojjat

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of testing the technology acceptance model and the impact of Hofstede cultural values (masculinity/femininity, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism, and power distance) on computer technology acceptance among teachers at Urmia city (Iran) using the structural equation modeling approach. From among…

  10. Teachers' Moral Values and Their Interpersonal Relationships with Students and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Natasa; Wubbels, Theo

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether and how teachers' beliefs about moral values are reflected in the student-teacher relationships (i.e. levels of control and affiliation in teachers' and students' perceptions of this relationship), and in teachers' cultural competence. A positive association was found between teachers' paternalist beliefs and their own…

  11. The Construction of Cultural Values and Beliefs in Chinese Language Textbooks: A Critical Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongbing

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the discourses of cultural values and beliefs constructed in Chinese language textbooks currently used for primary school students nationwide in China. By applying story grammar analysis in the framework of critical discourse analysis, the article critically investigates how the discourses are constructed and what ideological…

  12. Ethnicity and cultural values as predictors of the occurrence and impact of experienced workplace incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbourne, Jennifer L; Gangadharan, Ashwini; Sariol, Ana M

    2015-04-01

    Workplace incivility is a subtle type of deviant work behavior that is low in intensity and violates workplace norms of respect. Past research demonstrates the harmful impact of incivility on work attitudes and employee wellbeing; however, little is known about how incivility is experienced by individuals of different ethnicities and cultural orientations. In the current study, we compared the amount and impact of workplace incivility that was experienced by Hispanic and white, non-Hispanic employees. Further, we examined whether cultural dimensions of vertical and horizontal individualism and collectivism moderated the relationships between workplace incivility and work and health outcomes. A sample of 262 university employees (50% Hispanic; 63% female) provided self-reports of experienced incivility, burnout, job satisfaction, and cultural values. Although male Hispanic employees experienced more incivility, female Hispanic employees experienced less incivility than non-Hispanic employees of the same gender. Hispanic employees displayed greater resilience against the impact of incivility on job satisfaction and burnout, compared with non-Hispanic employees. Additionally, employees with strong horizontal collectivism values (emphasizing sociability) were more resilient against the impact of incivility on burnout, whereas employees with strong horizontal individualism values (emphasizing self-reliance) were more susceptible to burnout and dissatisfaction when faced with incivility. These findings suggest that employees' ethnicity and cultural values may increase or decrease their vulnerability to the impact of incivility at work. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Cultural Values and Communication Online: Chinese and Southeast Asian Students in a Taiwan International MBA Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Clyde A.; Chen, Judy F.; Caskey, D'Arcy

    2005-01-01

    Whereas many researchers have examined differences in values and behavior between Westerners and Asians, fewer have investigated differences within Asian cultural groups. A recent government initiative in Taiwan to encourage international education has led to the development of an international MBA program at the National Cheng Kung University in…

  14. Shared Values and Socio-Cultural Norms: E-Learning Technologies from a Social Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Patti; Velan, Gary M.; Shulruf, Boaz

    2017-01-01

    From a perspective of social practice, learning is a socially constituted practice that is imbued with socio-culturally significant meanings and shaped by the values and norms shared within a community of learners. This focus group study examines the role of e-learning technologies in mediating the social practice of learning among coursework…

  15. International Christian Schoolteachers' Traits, Characteristics, and Qualities Valued by Third Culture Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Dale B.

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative grounded theory study, 24 participants, referred to as "third culture kids" (or TCKs), ages 18-30 years, who had previously attended international Christian schools were interviewed to determine the dispositions they valued in their teachers. Incorporating principles of grounded theory, a series of rigorous steps were…

  16. Links between Adolescents' Relationships with Peers, Parents, and Their Values in Three Cultural Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Anni; Kasearu, Kairi; Tulviste, Tiia; Trommsdorff, Gisela

    2018-01-01

    The study examined associations among adolescents' perceived mother-child and father-child relationship quality (intimacy, conflict, and admiration), perceived peer acceptance, and their values (individualism and collectivism) in a sample of 795 Estonian, German, and Russian 15-year-olds. Adolescents from the three cultural contexts differed in…

  17. Development of a decision aid for energy resource management for the Navajo Nation incorporating environmental cultural values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necefer, Len Edward

    Decision-making surrounding pathways of future energy resource management are complexity and requires balancing tradeoffs of multiple environmental, social, economic, and technical outcomes. Technical decision aid can provide a framework for informed decision making, allowing individuals to better understand the tradeoff between resources, technology, energy services, and prices. While technical decision aid have made significant advances in evaluating these quantitative aspects of energy planning and performance, they have not been designed to incorporate human factors, such as preferences and behavior that are informed by cultural values. Incorporating cultural values into decision tools can provide not only an improved decision framework for the Navajo Nation, but also generate new insights on how these perspective can improve decision making on energy resources. Ensuring these aids are a cultural fit for each context has the potential to increase trust and promote understanding of the tradeoffs involved in energy resource management. In this dissertation I present the development of a technical tool that explicitly addresses cultural and spiritual values and experimentally assesses their influence on the preferences and decision making of Navajo citizens. Chapter 2 describes the results of a public elicitation effort to gather information about stakeholder views and concerns related to energy development in the Navajo Nation in order to develop a larger sample survey and a decision-support tool that links techno-economic energy models with sociocultural attributes. Chapter 3 details the methods of developing the energy decision aid and its underlying assumptions for alternative energy projects and their impacts. This tool also provides an alternative to economic valuation of cultural impacts based upon an ordinal index tied to environmental impacts. Chapter 4 details the the influence of various cultural, environmental, and economic outcome information provided

  18. Transmission of Cultural Values among Mexican American Parents and their Adolescent and Emerging Adult Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Brena, Norma J.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of the U.S. and Mexican culture is an important process associated with Mexican-origin youths’ adjustment and family dynamics. The current study examined the reciprocal associations in parents’ and two offspring’s cultural values (i.e., familism and respect) in 246 Mexican-origin families. Overall, mothers’ values were associated with increases in youths’ values five years later. In contrast, youths’ familism values were associated with increases in fathers’ familism values five years later. In addition, developmental differences emerged where parent-to-offspring effects were more consistent for youth transitioning from early to late adolescence than for youth transitioning from middle adolescence to emerging adulthood. Finally, moderation by immigrant-status revealed a youth-to-parent effect for mother-youth immigrant dyads, but not for dyads where youth were U.S.-raised. Our findings highlight the reciprocal nature of parent-youth value socialization and provide a nuanced understanding of these processes through the consideration of familism and respect values. As Mexican-origin youth represent a large and rapidly growing segment of the U.S. population, research that advances our understanding of how these youth develop values that foster family cohesion and support are crucial. PMID:25470657

  19. Transmission of cultural values among Mexican-origin parents and their adolescent and emerging adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Brena, Norma J; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2015-06-01

    The integration of the U.S. and Mexican culture is an important process associated with Mexican-origin youths' adjustment and family dynamics. The current study examined the reciprocal associations in parents' and two offspring's cultural values (i.e., familism and respect) in 246 Mexican-origin families. Overall, mothers' values were associated with increases in youths' values 5 years later. In contrast, youths' familism values were associated with increases in fathers' familism values 5 years later. In addition, developmental differences emerged where parent-to-offspring effects were more consistent for youth transitioning from early to late adolescence than for youth transitioning from middle adolescence to emerging adulthood. Finally, moderation by immigrant status revealed a youth-to-parent effect for mother-youth immigrant dyads, but not for dyads where youth were U.S.-raised. Our findings highlight the reciprocal nature of parent-youth value socialization and provide a nuanced understanding of these processes through the consideration of familism and respect values. As Mexican-origin youth represent a large and rapidly growing segment of the U.S. population, research that advances our understanding of how these youth develop values that foster family cohesion and support is crucial. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  20. Effect of national cultural values on safety climate, and safety management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, T.H.; Memon, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the critical role played by the national culture in influencing how workers safely or otherwise behave (mainly in risky situations) on construction sites, and how site managers implement safety management processes and practices. The paper presents the findings of an empirical research study based on a questionnaire survey, administered in Pakistan, targeting construction site managers and workers to gauge the effect national culture has on managers preferences for and perceptions of safety management systems (policies and practices) and than linking this effect to predict workers attitudes and intentional behaviors. (author)

  1. Parents’ Traditional Cultural Values and Mexican-Origin Young Adults’ Routine Health and Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; McHale, Susan M.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Wheeler, Lorey A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prospective associations between Mexican-origin mothers’ and fathers’ traditional cultural values and young adults’ health and dental care utilization and to test the moderating role of youth gender. Methods Mexican-origin parents and youth (N = 246 families) participated in home interviews and provided self-reports of parents’ cultural values (time 1) and young adults’ health status and routine health and dental care (time 2; 5 years later). Logistic regressions tested parents’ traditional cultural values as predictors of routine health and dental care, accounting for parent nativity, parent acculturation, family socioeconomic status, youth gender, youth age, and youth physical health status. We also tested whether youth gender moderated the associations between parents’ cultural values and young adults’ routine care. Results Young adults whose mothers endorsed strong familism values when they were in mid-to-late adolescence were more likely to report at least one routine physician visit in the past year as young adults (odds ratio [OR] = 3.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23–9.83, p = .019). Furthermore, for females only, mothers’ more traditional gender role attitudes predicted reduced odds of receiving routine health (OR = .22; 95% CI: .08–.64, p = .005) and dental care (OR = .26; 95% CI: .09–.75, p = .012) in young adulthood. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of examining intragroup variability in culturally specific mechanisms to identify targets for addressing ethnic/racial disparities in health care utilization among Mexican-origin young adults, during a period of increased risk for health-compromising behaviors and reduced access to care. PMID:27988108

  2. Parents' Traditional Cultural Values and Mexican-Origin Young Adults' Routine Health and Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegraff, Kimberly A; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; McHale, Susan M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Wheeler, Lorey A

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prospective associations between Mexican-origin mothers' and fathers' traditional cultural values and young adults' health and dental care utilization and to test the moderating role of youth gender. Mexican-origin parents and youth (N = 246 families) participated in home interviews and provided self-reports of parents' cultural values (time 1) and young adults' health status and routine health and dental care (time 2; 5 years later). Logistic regressions tested parents' traditional cultural values as predictors of routine health and dental care, accounting for parent nativity, parent acculturation, family socioeconomic status, youth gender, youth age, and youth physical health status. We also tested whether youth gender moderated the associations between parents' cultural values and young adults' routine care. Young adults whose mothers endorsed strong familism values when they were in mid-to-late adolescence were more likely to report at least one routine physician visit in the past year as young adults (odds ratio [OR] = 3.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-9.83, p = .019). Furthermore, for females only, mothers' more traditional gender role attitudes predicted reduced odds of receiving routine health (OR = .22; 95% CI: .08-.64, p = .005) and dental care (OR = .26; 95% CI: .09-.75, p culturally specific mechanisms to identify targets for addressing ethnic/racial disparities in health care utilization among Mexican-origin young adults, during a period of increased risk for health-compromising behaviors and reduced access to care. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Culture as an Influencing Factor in Adolescent Grief and Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    Culture is a complex and important consideration in the process of helping others. In clinical practice, we must view the individual within the context of their culture in order for assessment or treatment to be effective. Further, to overlook or negate culture, a practitioner may possibly operate from faulty cultural assumptions or…

  4. Project value creation: The case of a European Capital of Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Markus

    – the European Capital of Culture (ECoC) in Aarhus, Denmark taking place in 2017. Based on engaged scholarship research we explore how value is conceptualized as a subjective construct and how it is created by a wide range of actors and captured by other actors, and we present a model of actor interactions over......In recent years value creation has been reinforced as an important concept in project management research, and in this paper the service-dominant logic is applied to reinforce the shift from a focus on products to value in projects. The setting for the research is a public sector project...

  5. Model Recommended Values of Corporate Culture for Industrial Companies in Slovak Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanovičová, Petra; Mikulášková, Justína; Čambál, Miloš

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of the paper is to describe the recommended values model of corporate culture and supporting business performance for industrial companies operating in the Slovak Republic. This model was developed on the basis of research results within the STU Project to support young researchers entitled "Changing the potential of the companýs success using the principles of spiral management and its impact on corporate culture". The current paper is a part of submitted VEGA project No.1/0348/17 "The impact of the coexistence of different generations of employees on the sustainable performance of organisations". This model will be the basis for defining corporate values and developing or changing corporate culture for the companies operating on or coming (from abroad) to the Slovak market. The characteristic features of the value model are simplicity, complexity and applicability. This model takes into account the current situation on the Slovak market. The values of this model have a different level of significance given and each value is defined by the specified principles.

  6. The influence of cultural differences between China and Western countries on cross-cultural communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    次仁德吉

    2017-01-01

    Cross-cultural communication refers to the communication between peoples of different cultural backgrounds. To solve and avoid the cultural conflicts and blocks, it is high time to enhance the actual skills of cross-cultural communication. This paper gives a comparative analysis of the concrete representations of differences between Chinese and western culture in cross-cultural communication. And it gives some communication principles on the cross-cultural communication.

  7. The Influence of Number in Chinese and Western Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shujun

    2015-01-01

    Numeral not only has the numerical symbol, but also is the important constituent of language, and it also expresses the rich cultural connotation besides the literal meaning.This article emphatically will carry on the analysis to the mystique and the metaphor between Chinese and Western numeral culture in order to help the people to understand some special numeral culture phenomenon thoroughly in the Trans-Culture exchange process which will make the cultural exchange smoother.

  8. The Manipulation of Social, Cultural and Religious Values in Socially Mediated Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Smith

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of how the Islamic State/Da’esh and Hizb ut-Tahrir Indonesia manipulate conflicting social, cultural and religious values as part of their socially mediated terrorism. It focusses on three case studies: (1 the attacks in Paris, France on 13 November 2015; (2 the destruction of cultural heritage sites in Iraq and Syria; and (3 the struggle between nationalist values and extreme Islamic values in Indonesia. The case studies were chosen as a basis for identifying global commonalities as well as regional differences in socially mediated terrorism. They are located in Asia, the Middle East and Europe. The integrated analysis of these case studies identifies significant trends and suggests actions that could lessen the impact of strategies deployed by extremist groups such as Da’esh, al-Qaeda and Hizb ut-Tahrir. We discuss the broader implications for understanding various aspects of socially mediated terrorism.

  9. Responsibility and Social Solidarity as Values of Organizational Culture in Venezuelan Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pasek De Pinto

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The controversial and even hostile climate of coexistence of many schools formed a culture where prevailing values contrary to the stated vision and mission. Therefore, the objective of the study was to describe the responsibility and social solidarity as values of organizational culture in Venezuelan schools. Methodologically, it was a descriptive research with field design. The population was 200 subjects and sample of 74 members of staff managerial, teaching, administrative and environmental support of three schools. To gather information about the variables responsibility and social solidarity a valid and reliable questionnaire was applied (79.7%, alpha of Cronbach. As result it was found empirical evidence that 69% of the staff is responsible and 40% is solidarity. In conclusion, the practice of organizational values is not ideal or generalized because only some of its aspects are practiced in addition that not all the staff practice them. Low solidarity makes it difficult the coexistence, for the success and excellence of institutions.

  10. The Influence of Organizational Culture on School-Based Obesity Prevention Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Kayla N; Solari Williams, Kayce D; Warren, Judith; McKyer, E Lisako Jones; Ory, Marcia G

    2018-06-01

    Although the influence of organizational culture has been examined on a variety of student outcomes, few studies consider the influence that culture may have on school-based obesity prevention interventions. We present a systematic review of the literature to examine how elements of organizational culture may affect the adoption, implementation, and sustainability of school-based obesity prevention interventions. Fourteen studies examining the impact of organizational-level characteristics on school-based obesity prevention interventions were identified through the online databases EBSCO (CINAHL, ERIC, Agricola), Web of Science, Medline (PubMed), and Scopus. Five themes were identified as elements of organizational culture that influence the adoption, implementation, and sustainability of school-based obesity prevention interventions: organizational response to limited resources, value placed on staff training and professional development, internal support, organizational values, and school climate. Organizational culture can greatly influence the success of school-based obesity interventions. The collection of data related to organizational-level factors may be used to identify strategies for creating and sustaining a supportive environment for obesity prevention interventions in the school setting. © 2018, American School Health Association.

  11. Latino cultural values as protective factors against sexual risks among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mindy; Malcolm, Lydia R; Diaz-Albertini, Kristine; Klinoff, Vera A; Leeder, Elisa; Barrientos, Sohani; Kibler, Jeffrey L

    2014-12-01

    The study objective was to examine the associations between cultural values and sexual risk factors among Latino youth. A sample of 226 Latino adolescents ages 13-16 completed a survey on cultural and sexual variables. Results indicate higher levels of Latino cultural orientation were related to greater sexual self-efficacy and fewer sexual partners for female adolescents and greater condom use self-efficacy for both males and females. Greater endorsement of simpatia (belief in interpersonal relationship harmony) was associated with sexual abstinence and greater sexual self-efficacy for all adolescents, and with being older at sexual debut for females. Stronger endorsement of respeto (respect towards parents and other authority figures) was correlated with a lower intention to have sex during secondary school and greater condom use self-efficacy. American cultural orientation was associated with less condom use. Our findings indicate Latino cultural values may serve as protective factors against sexual risk behaviors among Latino youth. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Economic value analysis of the return from the Korean astronaut program and the science culture diffusion activity in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Soyeon; Jang, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Hyo Suk; Yu, Jong-Phil; Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Joohee; Hur, Hee-Young

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we analyze the economic effects from the Korean Astronaut Program (KAP) and the subsequent Science Culture Diffusion Activity (SCDA). Korea has had a huge practical effect on the development of science and technology and has increased international awareness of Korea by producing Korea's first astronaut. There has also been a large, ripple effect on space related industries. In addition, the KAP has exercised a far-reaching influence on Korean society and culture by boosting all science and engineering and inspiring national pride. After the KAP, astronauts' outreach activities, such as lectures for the general public; interviews on television, newspapers and magazines; participating in children's science camps; and distributing publications and DVDs about astronaut program for general public, were instituted for diffusing science culture. Thus, positive effects such as the promotion of Korea's level of technology, student interest in science and engineering fields, and the expansion of the industrial base were reinforced after the KAP. This study is aimed at evaluating the economic significance and the value of return through analyzing the effects of the KAP and the subsequent Science Culture Diffusion Activity.

  13. Dynamics of Russian business culture values in the reflection of mass media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Sverdlikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses practices of “Traditions and values of Russian business culture” course teaching at Lomonosov Moscow State University’s Faculty of Sociology. The experience allows drawing methodological and theoretical conclusions on the values of business culture which underlie models of the modern business behavior. The first part of the publication concerns analysis of tradition of studying Russian culture values, in the paradigm of which the Russian business culture exists. According to the findings, traditions are enrooted in the Orthodoxy and are determined by patrimonial memories and contradictions of the Russian people’s character, ideals and spiritual framework. A system of Russian business values is developed based on the traditions as well as literary heritage, biographies of famous Russian and Soviet economists and set of rules of ethics code of the pre-revolutionary Russian business class. The main elements of the system include the following values: faith, family, commitment to business, patriotism, natural ingenuity, ability to set and solve atask of extra complexity, original forms of labor organization, and prevalence of moral motivation forms over material ones. The second part of the article deals with succession of the above-mentioned values in the modern Russian business environment. The content analysis is applied to examine the continuity. The object of the research is the text corpus of the Russian business press. The findings of the research show dynamics of the Russian mass media attention to the business culture values for the period from 2010 to 2014. The mass media interest to the issue coverage has been on the constant rise: from 37,2% of the aggregate amount of information on the Russian business in 2012 to 39,8% in 2014. There have also been examined dynamics of mass media attention to certain business culture values. The mass media assignedtop priority in 2012, 2013 and 2014 to the following values

  14. The Influence of Personal Values on Attitudes and Loyalty Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz Henrique

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although loyalty has been extensively investigated in the marketing discipline, there is a lack of attention to the relationship between personal values, loyalty and attitudes. Based on that, the objective of this study was to test the moderating role of personal values in the relationship between attitudes and loyalty tages from Oliver (1999. Data from a survey with 910 bank customers support the hypothesis that attitudes predicts loyalty, despite the structural model does not reveal statistically significant differences among customer clusters (self-promotional and selftranscending Hedonic. However, when comparing Loyalty means among segments, it can be noted that (i the self-promotional and self-transcendent clusters were different at the cognitive and affective stages, and (ii the self-promotional differed from the hedonic in the action stage. Finally we discuss the theoretical and managerial implications and provide suggestions for future research in the area.

  15. Cultural values associated with substance use among Hispanic emerging adults in Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Patricia; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Unger, Jennifer B

    2018-02-01

    Hispanic emerging adults are a priority population for substance use prevention, yet few studies have examined whether traditional Hispanic cultural values serve as risk or protective factors for substance use among emerging adults. This study examined the relationship between familism, respeto, fatalism, and substance use among Hispanic emerging adults. Participants (ages 18 to 25) completed surveys indicating identification with familism, respeto, and fatalism, past month use of tobacco, marijuana, hard drugs and binge drinking. Separate logistic regression models examined the association between cultural values and each substance use outcome, controlling for acculturation, age and gender. Among participants (n=1445, mean age=23, 60% female), 21% reported past month cigarette use, 18% reported past month alternative tobacco product (ATP) use, 25% reported past month marijuana use, 44% reported past month binge drinking, and 7% reported past month hard drug use. Higher fatalism scores were associated with increased ATP use. Higher familism scores were associated with binge drinking, while higher respeto scores were associated with decreased binge drinking, marijuana, and hard drug use. These findings suggest that substance use prevention and intervention programs should emphasize how substance use interferes with caring and honoring parents (respeto) and family cohesion and functioning (familism). Programs that highlight these cultural values and beliefs may be beneficial for Hispanic emerging adults and members of other collectivistic cultures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Evaluation of Company's Intangible Assets' influence for Business Value

    OpenAIRE

    Savickaitė, Živilė

    2014-01-01

    Mismeasurement of intangible assets in a company may result in high costs and loss of its competitiveness and position in the market. Conventional evaluation methods are not able to identify reliably intangible intensive business value because of such assets specificity. Therefore, the business assessment process adjustment, making it comprehensive and including the intangible asset valuation methods is a critical process that allows to evaluate companies better and increases business managem...

  17. Factors influencing the reinforcing value of fruit and unhealthy snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, L; Clauwaert, A; Vandeweghe, L; Vangeel, J; Van Lippevelde, W; Goossens, L; Huybregts, L; Lachat, C; Eggermont, S; Beullens, K; Braet, C; De Cock, N

    2017-12-01

    The present study investigated the reinforcing value of healthy and unhealthy snack food in adolescents (n = 108, aged 14-16 years). Moderation by access to different foods, sex and the personality trait reward sensitivity is tested. In a computerized Food Reinforcement Task, adolescents could earn portions of a healthy and an unhealthy snack following an identical progressive reinforcement schedule for both food types. Reinforcing value of food was indexed by the number of button presses for each food type. Participants were allocated randomly to two-order condition: fruit-snack versus snack-fruit. Reward sensitivity was assessed with the Dutch age-downward version of Carver and White's BIS/BAS scale. Results showed that the reinforcing value of an unhealthy snack is higher than that of fruit, with participants making more button presses for unhealthy snacks, M = 1280.40, SD = 1203.53, than for fruit, M = 488.04, SD = 401.45, F(1,48) = 25.37, p present in the snack-fruit condition, not in the fruit-snack condition, indicating that access to food moderates the effect of food type. There is no evidence for moderation by reward sensitivity. Results point to the importance of simultaneously increasing barriers to obtain unhealthy food and promoting access to healthy food in order to facilitate healthy food choices.

  18. On the influence of Vatin and Verbicioara cultures in the finds of the Gamzigrad cultural group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapuran Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Timočka Krajina region has not been sufficiently investigated archaeologically, which coupled with the fact that a very small number of metal finds and remains have been discovered, makes the reconstruction of the start and end of the Bronze Age that much more difficult. Identification work in the area around Romuliana on two occasions in 2001 and 2008 led to the discovery of another 10 predominantly multi-layered sites dating back to the Bronze Age, of which 7 are highland settlements while 3 are lowland settlements located in the immediate vicinity of the Timok river or its tributaries. The discovered sites 1. Varsari, 2. Đokin Vis, 3. Kravarnik, 4. Mustafa, 5. Nikolov Savat, 6. Njiva Zore Brzanović, 7. Petronj, 8. Potes-Petronj, 9. Strenjak and 10. Zvezdan; bare the characteristics of the material culture of the »Gamzigrad group« of the Middle Iron Age. Besides known ceramic forms and characteristic ornamentation of this culture, there is a visibly strong influence of the Vatin (Crvenka-Cornesþi and Verbicioara elements to a greater extent, and Paraćin cultural elements to a lesser extent. Given that this material was collected during identification work, we are now aware of the stratigraphic relations between these elements, and have devoted more attention to common characteristics and interconnections from which certain conclusions can be drawn. Based on the finds from archaeological sites that have been excavated it can be concluded that the distribution of sites with Gamzigrad cultural characteristics is limited to a very small area, i.e. only to the vicinity of the Crni Timok river. Nearly at all sites, both highland and lowland, Vatin and Verbicioara elements are strongly visible on the ceramic materials. The geographic position of the Crni Timok, which is located in the area where the Paraćin, Vatin and Verbichoar cultures connected and overlapped, could contribute to shedding light on the origin and characteristics of this

  19. The Influence of Cross-Cultural Experiences & Location on Teachers' Perceptions of Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange A.; Murphy, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing cultural and linguistic diversity in academic settings necessitates greater cultural competence on the part of teachers, and enhancing the cultural competence of teachers requires a greater understanding of both the level of cultural competence among teachers and the experiences that enhance cultural competence. Teacher educators…

  20. Investigating the Effect of Cultural Values on National Identity; (Case Study of Kerman’s Citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nassaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available National identity is the most comprehensive and important level of identity in all social systems, which is influential in all domains of culture, society and politics. Considering the significance of national identity as the most component of social order and integrity, the present study investigates the indices of national identity. Accordingly, the effect of cultural values on citizens’ attitudes towards national identity is to be studied. The present study is a survey research and the required data were collected via a researcher-made questionnaire. The population included the youth aged 16 to 40 years old in Kerman City, among whom 270 participants were selected as the sample size. The results of the research indicate that the degree of values of pluralism, patriarchy, power distance and avoidance of uncertainty are at relatively high levels. Furthermore, citizens’ national identity is at the moderate level. In addition, the findings indicate that the effect of variables of pluralism and power distance has significant effects on citizens’ national identity, and the coefficient and direction of the effect of this two variables on national identity is positive. In other words, participants who enjoy pluralist cultural values have more degree of national identity than those who have individualist characteristics and the first group are more likely to be located at higher classes of national identity than the second group. Also, the results indicate that participants who have cultural values with high power distance have more degree of national identity than those who have cultural characteristics with low degree of power distance. The findings indicate that variables of risk-taking and patriarchy have no significant effect on the degree of citizens’ national identity.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF CORPORATE CULTURE ON THE MANAGEMENT OF PERSONNEL OF THE ENTERPRISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolha H.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The essence of corporate culture and its influence on personnel management of the enterprise are considered in the article. In particular, the essence of corporate culture in the personnel management system of the enterprise is determined by: universal values, the interaction of interests of staff with corporate interests; real market requirements for enterprise management and requirements for personnel, etc. It has been established that such a culture makes it possible to distinguish an organization, creates an atmosphere of identity for its members, strengthens social stability and is a controlling mechanism that directs and shapes the relations and behavior of employees. Purpose. The purpose of the article is to generalize theoretical and methodical principles and to develop scientific and practical recommendations on the impact of corporate culture on the personnel management of the enterprise. Results. It is proved that in order to achieve the goal in the process of personnel management, the company needs to solve the following tasks: the development of a sense of belonging of the personnel to the company; encouraging the involvement of staff in joint activities for the benefit of the enterprise; strengthening the stability of the system of social relations; support of individual initiative of employees; assisting the staff in achieving personal success; creation of an atmosphere of unity of managers and personnel in the enterprise; delegation of responsibility; strengthening the corporate family, etc. Conclusions. Conducted studies have shown that corporate culture: regulates the behavior of employees; is social, because the process of its formation is influenced by the employees of the enterprise; is multifaceted; is the result of the actions and opinions of the staff; able to change; consciously or unknowingly perceived by all employees; masses of traditions, because of a certain historical development process; and is in

  2. Values and beliefs of psychedelic drug users: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Michael; Lyvers, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Psychedelic drugs such as LSD and psilocybin are often claimed to be capable of inducing life-changing experiences described as mystical or transcendental, especially if high doses are taken. The present study examined possible enduring effects of such experiences by comparing users of psychedelic drugs (n = 88), users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs (e.g., marijuana, amphetamines) (n = 29) and non illicit drug-using social drinkers (n = 66) on questionnaire measures of values, beliefs and emotional empathy. Samples were obtained from Israel (n = 110) and Australia (n = 73) in a cross-cultural comparison to see if values associated with psychedelic drug use transcended culture of origin. Psychedelic users scored significantly higher on mystical beliefs (e.g., oneness with God and the universe) and life values of spirituality and concern for others than the other groups, and lower on the value of financial prosperity, irrespective of culture of origin. Users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs scored significantly lower on a measure of coping ability than both psychedelic users and non illicit drug users. Both groups of illegal drug users scored significantly higher on empathy than non illicit drug users. Results are discussed in the context of earlier findings from Pahnke (1966) and Doblin (1991) of the transformative effect of psychedelic experiences, although the possibility remains that present findings reflect predrug characteristics of those who chose to take psychedelic drugs rather than effects of the drugs themselves.

  3. Values Education and Student Satisfaction: German Business Students' Perceptions of Universities' Value Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmayer, Dirk C.; Siems, Florian U.

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the past decade's financial crises, the focus on students' values as an output of higher management education has increased. Simultaneously, marketing theory has become prevalent in the management of higher education institutions, such that student satisfaction represents a key output variable for their service provision. This study…

  4. The imperative of culture: a quantitative analysis of the impact of culture on workforce engagement, patient experience, physician engagement, value-based purchasing, and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Katie; Eggers, Jim; Keller, Stephanie; McDonald, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Current uncertainty for the future of the health care landscape is placing an increasing amount of pressure on leadership teams to be prepared to steer their organization forward in a number of potential directions. It is commonly recognized among health care leaders that culture will either enable or disable organizational success. However, very few studies empirically link culture to health care-specific performance outcomes. Nearly every health care organization in the US specifies its cultural aspirations through mission and vision statements and values. Ambitions of patient-centeredness, care for the community, workplace of choice, and world-class quality are frequently cited; yet, little definitive research exists to quantify the importance of building high-performing cultures. Our study examined the impact of cultural attributes defined by a culture index (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88) on corresponding performance with key health care measures. We mapped results of the culture index across data sets, compared results, and evaluated variations in performance among key indicators for leaders. Organizations that perform in the top quartile for our culture index statistically significantly outperformed those in the bottom quartile on all but one key performance indicator tested. The culture top quartile organizations outperformed every domain for employee engagement, physician engagement, patient experience, and overall value-based purchasing performance with statistical significance. Culture index top quartile performers also had a 3.4% lower turnover rate than the bottom quartile performers. Finally, culture index top quartile performers earned an additional 1% on value-based purchasing. Our findings demonstrate a meaningful connection between performance in the culture index and organizational performance. To best impact these key performance outcomes, health care leaders should pay attention to culture and actively steer workforce engagement in attributes that

  5. Influence of Cultural Cognition, Social Aspect of Culture, and Personality on Trust. Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    world through a different lens). BIV-2_Leroux, J. (1994). Cognition. In D. Matsumoto (Ed.), People: Psychology from a Cultural Perspective...interactions. A-2 Human behavior in global perspective: An introduction to cross- cultural psychology . A-3 The analysis of subjective culture A-4...Hofstede – Culturally questionable? A-5 Through an Arab cultural lens. A-6 Bringing culture to basic psychological theory–beyond individualism

  6. The Evaluation of Company's Intangible Assets' influence for Business Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živilė Savickaitė

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mismeasurement of intangible assets in a company may result in high costs and loss of its competitiveness and position in the market. Conventional evaluation methods are not able to identify reliably intangible intensive business value because of such assets specificity. Therefore, the business assessment process adjustment, making it comprehensive and including the intangible asset valuation methods is a critical process that allows to evaluate companies better and increases business management efficiency and quality. The article states the importance of further scientific research in the areas of the intangible value resources, creation of business valuation, intangible assets valuation methods and models - the creation of intangible assets on the firm level and how they meet changing needs of the company's owners, capital markets investors, politicians and other interest-groups needs in the intangible intensive economy should be analysed as well as how economic systems based on intangible assets operates. Also special attention is be given to the strenghtening of the cooperation of scientific research and business. It's important to avoid a repeat of guidelines, methods, models and systems of intangible assets' measurement and business valuation methods and to eliminate its disadvantages in order to create and establish universal system for effective intangible intensive business valuation.

  7. Influence of Organisational Culture on Total Quality Management Implementation and Firm Performance: Evidence from the Vietnamese Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panuwatwanich Kriengsak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organisational culture (OC and Total Quality Management (TQM, and the influence of TQM implementation on organisational performance improvement within the context of the Vietnamese construction industry. A survey was conducted with 104 respondents from Vietnamese construction firms, using validated survey instruments developed in past research. Analysis techniques include cluster analysis and Structural Equation Modelling. Findings showed that Vietnamese construction firms are dominated by clan and hierarchy cultures rather than adhocracy and market cultures according to Competing Value Framework (CVF of OC classification. Furthermore, it was found that organisations dominated by either clan or adhocracy cultures could provide a favourable environment for successful TQM implementation, whereas this is not the case for those dominated by both market and hierarchy cultures. This study also confirmed the significant and positive relationship between TQM implementation and organisational performance improvement.

  8. "Who can you tell?" Features of Arab culture that influence conceptualization and treatment of childhood sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haboush, Karen L; Alyan, Hala

    2013-01-01

    The literature on child sexual abuse reflects growing recognition of the manner in which culture impacts the conceptualization, experience, and treatment of such cases. Despite heightened visibility of Arab Americans within the United States, population due to recent media attention, little empirical research exists on the occurrence of child sexual abuse within this population. Arab culture is often characterized by an emphasis on collectivism and familial obligations, and such features may prove to either facilitate or impede assessment and treatment of child sexual abuse, depending on how they are manifested. In terms of reporting child sexual abuse, cultural values pertaining to shame and honor as well as the stigma attached to mental health problems may influence the response to abuse. As such, enhancing the cultural competence of the therapist is key to facilitating effective cultural practice. Empirical research is required to investigate and substantiate these concepts as they relate to child sexual abuse in Arab-American populations.

  9. Kultura jako wartośc i jako system wartości (CULTURE AS A VALUE AND AS THE SYSTEM OF VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Skurjat

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crisis of natural and mathematical science as well as positivistic philosophy the second half of the nineteenth century saw an increasing search for differences between natural and humanistic cognition. The problems such as what is important, what cultural substances and values shape individual and social consciousness, as well as what is the world of culture as a objective reality also require philosophical explanation. In the face of contemporary culture philosophy basically aims at answering the questions: can cultural transformations be measured by ethical criteria, what can we say about a human being as a subject of culture - creative activities, are there any tests, stating what is culture value and the direction in which cultural transformations should proceed. There exist many variations of culture philosophy just as there are many trends of philosophy itself and many culture labels of varied meaning. The article presents an outlook on culture rising from the tradition of humanistic philosophy by F. Znaniecki and from the spirit of phenomenology. Both these trends understand philosophy as a knowledge of universally significant values.

  10. Does culture influence what and how we think? Effects of priming individualism and collectivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyserman, Daphna; Lee, Spike W S

    2008-03-01

    Do differences in individualism and collectivism influence values, self-concept content, relational assumptions, and cognitive style? On the one hand, the cross-national literature provides an impressively consistent picture of the predicted systematic differences; on the other hand, the nature of the evidence is inconclusive. Cross-national evidence is insufficient to argue for a causal process, and comparative data cannot specify if effects are due to both individualism and collectivism, only individualism, only collectivism, or other factors (including other aspects of culture). To address these issues, the authors conducted a meta-analysis of the individualism and collectivism priming literature, with follow-up moderator analyses. Effect sizes were moderate for relationality and cognition, small for self-concept and values, robust across priming methods and dependent variables, and consistent in direction and size with cross-national effects. Results lend support to a situated model of culture in which cross-national differences are not static but dynamically consistent due to the chronic and moment-to-moment salience of individualism and collectivism. Examination of the unique effects of individualism and collectivism versus other cultural factors (e.g., honor, power) awaits the availability of research that primes these factors. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. "Does organizational culture influence the ethical behavior in the pharmaceutical industry?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashekhara, Molugulu; Agil, Syed Omar Syed

    2011-12-01

    Study of ethical behavior among medical representatives in the profession is an under-portrayed component that deserves further perusal in the pharmaceutical industry. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of organizational culture on ethical behavior of medical representatives. Medical representatives working for both domestic and multinational companies constitutes the sample (n=300). Data is collected using a simple random and cluster sampling through a structured questionnaire. The research design is hypothesis testing. It is a cross-sectional and correlational study, conducted under non-contrived settings. Chi-square tests were shows that there is an association between the organizational culture and ethical behavior of medical representatives. In addition, the strength of the association is measured which report to Cramer's V of 63.1% and Phi Value of 2.749. Results indicate that multinational company medical reps are more ethical compared to domestic company medical representatives vast difference in both variance and in t test results. Through better organizational culture, pharmaceutical companies can create the most desirable behavior among their employees. Authors conclude that apart from organizational culture, the study of additional organizational, individual and external factors are imperative for better understanding of ethical behavior of medical representatives in the pharmaceutical industry in India.

  12. INFLUENCE OF OPERABILITY CRITERIA LIMITING VALUES ON SHIP SPEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Prpić-Oršić

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available When the ship is caught in heavy seas, there are two manoeuvres that the shipmaster can undertake to avoid excessive ship motion and hull damage: changing course or voluntary speed reduction. This paper presents a study of the effect of the various voluntary speed reduction criteria to attainable speed of ship on seaway. The speed loss is calculated by taking into account wind and wave effect on ship speed, the engine and propeller performance in actual seas as well as the mass inertia of the ship. The attainable ship speed for ship in head, following and beam waves by accounting for voluntary speed reduction is estimated for various significant wave height. The criteria of slamming, deck wetness, propeller emergence, excessive accelerations and roll are taken into account. The impact of variations of the limiting values of certain criteria due to which the captain intentionally reduces the ship speed is analysed and discussed.

  13. Influence of the Dimensions of Corporate Cultural Practices on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Culture is described as a common identity among people based on shared social relationships, beliefs and technology. People are different in not only gender, qualifications or skills but also in their cultural characteristics. Cultural differences in languages, custom, traditions and norms often follow organisational lines and in ...

  14. An exploration study to find important factors influencing on multi-dimensional organizational culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to find important factors influencing multi-dimensional organizational culture. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale consists of 21 questions, distributes it among 300 people who worked for different business units and collects 283 filled ones. Cronbach alpha is calculated as 0.799. In addition, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy and Approx. Chi-Square are 0.821 and 1395.74, respectively. The study has implemented principal component analysis and the results have indicated that there were four factors influencing organizational culture including, diversity in culture, connection based culture, integrated culture and structure of culture. In terms of diversity in culture, sensitivity to quality data and cultural flexibility are the most influential sub-factors while connection based marketing and relational satisfaction are two important sub-factors associated with diversity in culture. The study discusses other issues.

  15. Nutritional value and influence of the thermal processing on a traditional Portuguese fermented sausage (alheira).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Sílvia D; Alves, Rita C; Mendes, Eulália; Costa, Anabela S G; Casal, Susana; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P

    2013-04-01

    Alheiras are a traditional, smoked, fermented meat sausage, produced in Portugal, with an undeniable cultural and gastronomic legacy. In this study, we assessed the nutritional value of this product, as well as the influence of different types of thermal processing. Alheiras from Mirandela were submitted to six different procedures: microwave, skillet, oven, charcoal grill, electric fryer and electric grill. Protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, NaCl, and cholesterol contents, as well as fatty acid profile were evaluated. The results show that alheiras are not hypercaloric but an unbalanced foodstuff (high levels of proteins and lipids) and the type of processing has a major impact on their nutritional value. Charcoal grill is the healthiest option: less fat (12.5 g/100 g) and cholesterol (29.3 mg/100 g), corresponding to a lower caloric intake (231.8 kcal, less 13% than the raw ones). Inversely, fried alheiras presented the worst nutritional profile, with the highest levels of fat (18.1 g/100 g) and cholesterol (76.0 g/100 g). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical workplace learning: perceived learning value of individual and group feedback in a collectivistic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Emilia, Ova; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2018-04-19

    Feedback is essential for workplace learning. Most papers in this field concern individual feedback. In collectivistic cultures, however, group feedback is common educational practice. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived learning value and characteristics of individual and group feedback in a collectivistic culture. During two weeks, on a daily basis, clerkship students (n = 215) from 12 clinical departments at Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, recorded individual and group feedback moments by using a structured form: the providers, focus and perceived learning value of feedback. Data were analysed with logistic regression and multilevel techniques. Students reported 2687 group and 1535 individual feedback moments. Group feedback more often focused on history taking, clinical judgment, patient management, patient counselling, and professional behaviour (OR ranging from 1.232, p cultures, group feedback may add to the array of educational measures that optimize student learning. Congruence between culture and type of feedback may be important for the effectiveness of feedback.

  17. Re-Organizing Cultural Values: Vers le Sud by Laurent Cantet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Michelmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cantet's movie “Vers le sud/ Heading South“ (2005 explores cultural stereotypes and values without being moralizing in a common sense. His drama deals with female sex tourism, political and social violence, power and money in such a way that people are tempted to judge the protagonists: Their desire for young black men is called “embarrassing“, they are seen as corrupting and as actors in a new kind of imperialism. In fact the images in the film organize characters in a certain kind of dualism which leads easily to these argumentations. But having a look at the cultural values that produce the disgust, we see that they are all open to question.

  18. Improving the energy performance of historic buildings with architectural and cultural values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2017-01-01

    The thermal performance of solid walls of historic buildings can be improved by external or internal insulation. External insulation is preferred from a technical perspective, but is often disregarded as many such buildings have architectural or cultural values leaving internal insulation.......g. improvement of thermal indoor climate. The paper discusses different motivating factors for improving the thermal performance of solid walls in historic buildings with architectural and cultural values. It is argued that internal insulation, provided that it can be done without resulting in critical moisture...... as the only possible solution. As internal insulation is considered a risky way of improving the thermal performance from a moisture perspective, technically feasible solutions are needed. Further, other arguments than energy saving could convince a building owner to carry out internal insulation, e...

  19. Cultural Collision and Collusion: Reflections on Hip-Hop Culture, Values, and Schools. Educational Psychology: Critical Pedagogical Perspectives. Volume 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachum, Floyd D.; McCray, Carlos R.

    2011-01-01

    "Cultural Collision and Collusion" addresses the complexity of problems that surround youth culture and school culture. By broadening the scholarly dialogue and examining and disseminating relevant research to practitioners, the book seeks to provide insight into youth culture and some manifestations of popular culture (e.g., hip-hop). In…

  20. Teachers' moral values and their interpersonal relationships with students and cultural competence

    OpenAIRE

    Pantic, Natasa; Wubbels, T.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether and how teachers' beliefs about moral values are reflected in the student-teacher relationships (i.e. levels of control and affiliation in teachers' and students' perceptions of this relationship), and in teachers' cultural competence. A positive association was found between teachers' paternalist beliefs and their own perceptions of control. A negative association was found between teachers' liberal beliefs and students' perceptions of affiliation. Positive associ...

  1. Report on Societal-cultural Norms and Values and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nie, Peng; Gwozdz, Wencke; Reisch, Lucia A.

    is the European Social Survey (ESS). The report extends the work presented in D7.1.2 in which we have demonstrated that peer effects between the children/ teenagers in the schools exist and that they are systematically linked to collectivist and individualistic values in the different I.Family countries.......This report is part of Task 7.3.1. As outlined in the Description of Work, we aim to identify health related social norms and values on a national level and compare them cross-culturally, using publicly available, cross-national data sources. In our case, the best available public source...

  2. Scope insensitivity in helping decisions: Is it a matter of culture and values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Tehila; Slovic, Paul; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The singularity effect of identifiable victims refers to people's greater willingness to help a single concrete victim compared with a group of victims experiencing the same need. We present 3 studies exploring values and cultural sources of this effect. In the first study, the singularity effect was found only among Western Israelis and not among Bedouin participants (a more collectivist group). In Study 2, individuals with higher collectivist values were more likely to contribute to a group of victims. Finally, the third study demonstrates a more causal relationship between collectivist values and the singularity effect by showing that enhancing people's collectivist values using a priming manipulation produces similar donations to single victims and groups. Moreover, participants' collectivist preferences mediated the interaction between the priming conditions and singularity of the recipient. Implications for several areas of psychology and ways to enhance caring for groups in need are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Axelrod models of social influence with cultural repulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radillo-Díaz, Alejandro; Pérez, Luis A.; Del Castillo-Mussot, Marcelo

    2009-12-01

    Since both attractive and repulsive effects among agents are important in social systems, we present simulations of two models based on Axelrod’s homogenization mechanism that includes repulsion. These models are the repulsive model, where all individuals can repel, and the partially repulsive model where only a fraction of repelling agents are considered. In these two models, attractive dynamics is implemented for agents with the ability to repel each other only if the number of features shared by them is greater than a threshold parameter. Otherwise, repelling dynamics is used. In the repulsive model, the transition from a monocultural state to a fragmented one often occurs abruptly from one cultural-variability value to the next one and a second transition emerges. For the partially repulsive model, there are also two different transitions present: the initial one being as abrupt as the one found for the repulsive model, whereas the second one follows a less abrupt behavior and resembles that of the original Axelrod model. However, the second transition for this model occurrs from a partially fragmented state and not from a monocultural one.

  4. Model Recommended Values of Corporate Culture for Industrial Companies in Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbanovičová Petra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the paper is to describe the recommended values model of corporate culture and supporting business performance for industrial companies operating in the Slovak Republic. This model was developed on the basis of research results within the STU Project to support young researchers entitled “Changing the potential of the company´s success using the principles of spiral management and its impact on corporate culture”. The current paper is a part of submitted VEGA project No.1/0348/17 “The impact of the coexistence of different generations of employees on the sustainable performance of organisations”. This model will be the basis for defining corporate values and developing or changing corporate culture for the companies operating on or coming (from abroad to the Slovak market. The characteristic features of the value model are simplicity, complexity and applicability. This model takes into account the current situation on the Slovak market. The values of this model have a different level of significance given and each value is defined by the specified principles.

  5. Couples' cultural values, shared parenting, and family emotional climate within Mexican American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor-Peterson, Marcela; Figueredo, Aurelio J; Christensen, Donna H; Taylor, Angela R

    2012-06-01

    This study tested a model of shared parenting as its centerpiece that incorporates cultural values as predictors and family emotional climate as the outcome variable of interest. We aimed to assess the predictive power of the Mexican cultural values of familismo and simpatia over couples' shared parenting practices. We anticipated that higher levels of shared parenting would predict family emotional climate. The participants were 61 Mexican American, low income couples, with at least one child between 3 and 4 years of age, recruited from a home-based Head Start program. The predictive model demonstrated excellent goodness of fit, supporting the hypothesis that a positive emotional climate within the family is fostered when Mexican American couples practice a sufficient level of shared parenting. Empirical evidence was previously scarce on this proposition. The findings also provide evidence for the role of cultural values, highlighting the importance of family solidarity and avoidance of confrontation as a pathway to shared parenting within Mexican American couples. © FPI, Inc.

  6. The Impact of Training and Culture on Leadership Values and Perceptions at the United States Army Engineer School

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Ted

    1998-01-01

    .... The EOBC students are training to assume leadership positions which the EOAC students were in. A random sample of business leaders values were then compared to the Army engineers values to draw cultural leadership...

  7. The relationship between Mexican American cultural values and resilience among Mexican American college students: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L; Llamas, Jasmin D

    2013-10-01

    The current study investigated the role of cultural values in the resilience of Mexican American college students. Utilizing mixed methodology, 124 self-identified Mexican American college students were asked to complete an online survey, including a demographic questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, Mexican American Cultural Values Scale, and 2 open-ended questions concerning overcoming adversity and cultural values. As hypothesized, Mexican American traditional cultural values (Familismo, Respeto, Religiosidad, and Traditional Gender Roles) predicted resilience, with Familismo accounting for the majority of the variance. Consensual qualitative research (Hill, Thompson, & Nutt Williams, 1997) was used to identify emergent domains and themes within the open-ended question responses. Traditional Mexican American Value themes included Familismo, Ethnic Identity, Religiosidad, Perseverance, and Respeto. Results highlight the important role that certain Mexican American cultural values play in providing strength for overcoming adversities.

  8. Response to Marie Paz Morales' ``Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-12-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript.

  9. Cultural factors influencing safety need to be addressed in design and operation of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkati, N

    1996-10-01

    Cultural factors which influence aviation safety in aircraft design, air traffic control, and human factors training are examined. Analysis of the Avianca Flight 052 crash in New York in January, 1990, demonstrates the catastrosphic effects cultural factors can play. Cultural factors include attitude toward work and technology, organizational hierarchy, religion, and population stereotyping.

  10. The Influence of Culture on Anxiety in Latino Youth: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, R. Enrique; Hensley-Maloney, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on how culture influences anxiety in Latino youth. First, a review of cross-cultural variations in prevalence and measurement is presented. Then, the article focuses on how culture impacts the meaning and expression of anxiety. Specifically, we discuss the meaning and expression of anxiety, the impact of culture…

  11. Psychosocial and Cultural Factors Influencing Expectations of Menarche: A Study on Chinese Premenarcheal Teenage Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Dannii Y. L.; Tang, Catherine So-kum; Lee, Antoinette

    2005-01-01

    This study explored how psychosocial and cultural factors influenced expectations of menarche among 476 Chinese premenarcheal teenage girls. Results showed that participants' expectations of menarche were largely negative and heavily influenced by cultural beliefs about menstruation. Findings of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that…

  12. The Influence of National Culture on Educational Videos: The Case of MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayeck, Rebecca Yvonne; Choi, Jinhee

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of cultural dimensions on Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) introductory videos. The study examined the introductory videos produced by three universities on Coursera platforms using communication theory and Hofstede's cultural dimensions. The results show that introductory videos in MOOCs are influenced by the…

  13. Factors Influencing Suicide Behaviours in Immigrant and Ethno-Cultural Minority Groups: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel W L; Li, Lun; Daoust, Gabrielle D

    2017-06-01

    This paper reviews recent literature on factors influencing suicide behaviours, including thoughts, plans, and attempts, in immigrant and ethno-cultural minority groups, to inform a more comprehensive understanding of suicide behaviours in increasingly culturally diverse populations. Thirty-three studies published between 2002 and 2013 were identified through digital databases searches and included in this review. Analysis of study findings focused on impacts of ethno-cultural identity and acculturation, other cultural and immigration influences, and family and community supports on suicide behaviours. Policy, practice, and research recommendations are identified, to inform relevant suicide prevention efforts and enhance mental health supports for immigrant and ethno-cultural minority populations.

  14. AUI&GIV: Recommendation with Asymmetric User Influence and Global Importance Value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Lin Zhao

    Full Text Available The user-based collaborative filtering (CF algorithm is one of the most popular approaches for making recommendation. Despite its success, the traditional user-based CF algorithm suffers one serious problem that it only measures the influence between two users based on their symmetric similarities calculated by their consumption histories. It means that, for a pair of users, the influences on each other are the same, which however may not be true. Intuitively, an expert may have an impact on a novice user but a novice user may not affect an expert at all. Besides, each user may possess a global importance factor that affects his/her influence to the remaining users. To this end, in this paper, we propose an asymmetric user influence model to measure the directed influence between two users and adopt the PageRank algorithm to calculate the global importance value of each user. And then the directed influence values and the global importance values are integrated to deduce the final influence values between two users. Finally, we use the final influence values to improve the performance of the traditional user-based CF algorithm. Extensive experiments have been conducted, the results of which have confirmed that both the asymmetric user influence model and global importance value play key roles in improving recommendation accuracy, and hence the proposed method significantly outperforms the existing recommendation algorithms, in particular the user-based CF algorithm on the datasets of high rating density.

  15. Methodology for determining influence of organizational culture to business performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Skoumalová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Content this article is to propose the possible methodology for quantitative measuring the organizational culture using the set of statistical methods. In view of aim we elected procedure consisting of two major sections. The first is classification of organizational culture and role of quantitative measurement on organizational culture. This part includes definition and several methods used to classify organizational culture: Hofstede, Peters and Waterman, Deal and Kennedy, Edgar Schein, Kotter and Heskett, Lukášová and opinions why a measurement perspective is worthwhile. The second major section contains methodology for measuring the organizational culture and its impact on organizational performance. We suggest using structural equation modeling for quantitative assessment of organizational culture.

  16. Arab management accounting systems under the influence of their culture

    OpenAIRE

    Dik, Roula

    2011-01-01

    Due to globalization, business opportunities can be established in new countries more than ever before. The Arab countries are gaining more attention as emerging markets in global business. Applying managerial accounting on a global basis requires an understanding of the cultural aspects of the countries. Arabic culture has a long history on the one hand and contradicts the Western cultures sharply on the other hand. Research on comparative management accounting (CMA) emerged in the early ...

  17. Cross-cultural differences in social desirability scales: Influence of cognitive ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aletta Odendaal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The use of personality tests for selection and screening has been consistently criticised resulting from the risk of socially desirable responding amongst job applicants. Research purpose: This study examined the magnitude of culture and language group meanscore differences amongst job applicants and the moderating effect of race on the relationship between social desirability and cognitive ability. Motivation for the study: The influence of cognitive ability and potential race and ethnic group differences in social desirability scale scores, which can lead to disproportional selection ratios, has not been extensively researched in South Africa. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative, cross-sectional research design, based on secondary datasets obtained from the test publisher, was employed. The dataset consisted of 1640 job applicants across industry sectors. Main findings: Moderated multiple regression analyses revealed that the relationship between social desirability and general reasoning was moderated by culture and language, with group differences in social desirability being more pronounced at the low general reasoning level. This suggests that social desirability scales may be an ambiguous indicator of faking as the scales may indicate tendency to fake, but not the ability to fake, that is likely to be connected to the level of cognitive ability of the respondent. Practical/managerial implications: Individual differences in social desirability are not fully explained by cognitive ability as cultural differences also played a role. Responding in a certain manner, reflects a level of psychological sophistication that is informed by the level of education and socio-economic status. In relation to selection practice, this study provided evidence of the potentially adverse consequences of using social desirability scales to detect response distortion. Contribution/value-add: The exploration of cross-cultural

  18. Legal Culture as the Determinant of Value Orientations in Youth in the Society of the Transition Period (Philosophical Analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulzhanova, Zhuldizay T.; Kulzhanova, Gulbaram T.

    2016-01-01

    This research is devoted to the philosophical analysis of legal culture as a determinant of value orientations in the transition period society. The purpose of the study is to discover the essence and specificity of legal culture as a determinant of value orientations in a transition society from the philosophical perspective. In accordance with…

  19. Verbal Communication Culture and Local Wisdom: The Value Civilization of Indonesia Nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Kartika

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is a nation with cultural diversity and area. This caused a lot of the uniqueness of culture in everyday life. This uniqueness was generally a positive value to maintain the harmony of human beings and nature. The discussion of this article was the verbal communication, the study of the wisdom of the nation speech-language Indonesia, and local wisdom in civilization. The words expressed in the local wisdom among others are fearless (need fear only God Almighty, self-sacrificing or spirit of nationalism (patriotism, orderly, loyal, affectionate, hardworking, consensus, mutual help, and creative. Positive values here needed to be crystallized in people’s lives; it would be the identifier of the Indonesian people. This research was conducted in five districts of Pagaralam, South Sumatra. The method used was qualitative. Data collection techniques included participant observer/observation, observation without participation, in-depth interviews, and documentation. This article finds that if local wisdom actually exists in everyday life, the nation of Indonesia has carved beauty behave in civilization itself. The local wisdom of the nation begins values, the rule in the family, and then developed in the community. A positive value of local wisdom is the identifier of civilized society and the need to preserve Indonesia. 

  20. A cross-cultural analysis of work values and moral reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hugo

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The principal aim of this study was to explore the cultural differences with regard to work values and moral reasoning in the context of the management of diversity. A secondary aim was to determine whether individuals in the various stages of moral reasoning, differ with regard to the work values espoused. The sample group (N=182 consisted of black and white students at under-graduate and post-graduate levels. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences between cultural groups with regard to work values and moral reasoning, but indicated no difference in stages of moral reasoning with regard to work values. The implications of the findings for work organisations and tertiary institutions are discussed. Opsomming Die hoofdoel van die studie was om vanuit 'n bestuur-van-diversiteit konteks vas te stel of daar interkulturele verskille bestaan ten opsigte van werkwaardes en morele redenering. 'n Sekondere doelwit was om te bepaal of individue in verskillende fases van morele redenering verskil ten opsigte van werkwaardes. Die steekproef (N=182 is saamgestel uit swart en wit studente op voor- en nagraadse vlak. Statisties-beduidende verskille tussen kultuurgroepe ten opsigte van werkwaardes en morele redenering het na vore gekom, maar geen verskille tussen fases van morele redenering ten opsigte van werkwaardes is gevind nie. Die implikasies van die bevindinge soos dit werkorganisasies en tersiere instellings raak, word bespreek.