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Sample records for cultural values counselor

  1. An analogue study of the effects of asian cultural values and counselor multicultural competence on counseling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lisa C; Kim, Bryan S K; O'Brien, Karen M

    2007-03-01

    One-hundred-and-sixteen Asian American college students viewed analogue videotapes in which an actress portraying a European American female "counselor" expressed cultural values that were either consistent or inconsistent with Asian culture to an actress portraying an Asian American female "client." In addition, the counselor either acknowledged racial differences or did not acknowledge racial differences with the client. The results showed that when the counselor expressed values that were inconsistent with Asian culture, the counselor who acknowledged racial differences was perceived to be more cross-culturally competent than the counselor who did not acknowledge racial differences. Also, the results showed that observer-participants' adherence to the value of conformity to norms was positively associated with their ratings of counselor credibility and crosscultural counseling competence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Counselor Values and the Pregnant Adolescent Client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Bebe C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews options counselors can suggest to pregnant adolescents, including abortion, adoption, marriage, and single parenthood. Discusses the need for counselors to be aware of their own values and help the client explore her values. (JAC)

  3. Value Orientations of Vietnamese Culture. Cultural Monograph No. 3. Bilingual Multicultural Education Training Project for School Psychologists and Guidance Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Clemens L.; And Others

    This teacher training monograph deals with value orientations of cultures in general with specific reference to Vietnamese culture. The first two sections discuss the conceptual issues of value orientation and give axiological definitions of the six clusters used to describe cultural orientation. The third section introduces the section on…

  4. Life and Work Values of Counselor Trainees: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Louis A.; Beebe, Ronald S.; Toman, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    This national web-based study used the Schwartz Value Survey (Schwartz, 1994) and Super's Work Values Inventory-Revised (Zytowski, n.d.) to identify general life and work value orientations of 674 female and male entry-level counselor trainees residing in 27 states. In general, trainees emphasized benevolence, self-direction, and achievement and…

  5. Understanding Military Culture: A Guide for Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Rebekah F.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors must be knowledgeable about military culture in order to help military students and their families in a culturally competent manner. This article explores the nature of this unique culture, which is often unfamiliar to educators, including its language, hierarchy, sense of rules and regulations, self-expectations and…

  6. Counseling Latino alcohol and other substance users/abusers. Cultural considerations for counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, A M; Peregoy, J J

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a sociocultural alcohol/drug counseling model for counselors working with Latino users/abusers. Intended to supplement different treatment models, this model addresses pre-treatment issues of Latino users/abusers. A demographic overview of Latinos and a discussion of selected Latino cultural values and issues as they relate to substance use/abuse are included. These cultural values include Simpatía, Personalismo, Familismo, Gender Roles (Machismo and Hembrismo/Marianisimo), Vergüenza, and Espiritismo. Along with identifying misperceptions and issues that may occur within the counseling session, specific recommendations and interventions for counselors are provided.

  7. Cultural Competence and School Counselor Training: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith A.; Bustamante, Rebecca; Sawyer, Cheryl; Sloan, Eva D.

    2015-01-01

    This collective case study investigated the experiences of bilingual counselors-in-training who assessed school-wide cultural competence in public schools. Analysis and interpretation of data resulted in the identification of 5 themes: eye-opening experiences, recognition of strengths, the role of school leaders, road maps for change, and…

  8. Cultural Competence and School Counselor Training: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith A.; Bustamante, Rebecca; Sawyer, Cheryl; Sloan, Eva D.

    2015-01-01

    This collective case study investigated the experiences of bilingual counselors-in-training who assessed school-wide cultural competence in public schools. Analysis and interpretation of data resulted in the identification of 5 themes: eye-opening experiences, recognition of strengths, the role of school leaders, road maps for change, and…

  9. A national survey of genetic counselors' personal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzadeh, Sara M; McCarthy Veach, Patricia; Bartels, Dianne M; Kao, Juihsien; Leroy, Bonnie S

    2007-12-01

    Personal values are motivational sources for an individual's actions [Hitlin and Piliavin (Annual Review of Sociology 30:359-393, 2004)]. Genetic counselors' values may influence their behaviors in clinical practice, but a profile of their personal values has not been identified empirically. In this study, 292 genetic counselors completed the Schwartz Universal Values Questionnaire (SUVQ; Schwartz, S. H. (1992). Universals in the content and structure of values: Theoretical advances and empirical tests in 20 countries. In M. Zanna (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (pp. 1-65). Boston, MA: Academic.), a widely used measure of value types, and provided information about their demographic characteristics. Results indicate that respondents highly valued benevolence, self-direction, achievement, and universalism indicating a strong pattern of concern for the welfare of others. They placed considerably less value on stimulation, tradition, and power, which reflect personal interests. Respondents who reported practicing a religion scored significantly lower on stimulation and hedonism and higher on tradition and spirituality than those not practicing; married respondents and parents scored significantly lower on stimulation and achievement; and males scored higher on power than females. The value types are described, and training and research recommendations are provided.

  10. Work Values of Malaysian School Counselors: It’s Implication on School Counseling

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    A. R. Bakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Work values have been widely studied in management areas, among students and nurses. One can easily obtain literatures on these populations. One may face some difficulties when searching for literature on work values of counselors. Approach: The current study intends to explore the work values of Malaysian school counselors, specifically and to determine if their work values differ based on gender, level of education and experience as counselors, school location and size of school population. Results: Their work values were measured using a 60 items work value instrument. The overall mean of counselor’s work value was 3.71 (SD = 0.43. There was a significant difference of work values between male and female counselors. Conclusion: Work values were found to be associated with age, experience and academic qualification. No correlation was found between work values and location of school and size of school.

  11. On value and culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Value stands for the significance of things,and concepts of value are ideas,opinions and attitudes about what kind of things are significant.Studies on the concept of value cannot be separated from culture.Every society has its own distinct culture and concept of value shared by its people.The relationship between concept of value and culture shows that the building of the concept of value must be based on culture.Developing culture,providing excellent products of culture and better humanitarian environment are the premise for people's possession of the correct concept of value.

  12. The Value of Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klamer, Arjo

    1997-01-01

    Culture manifests itself in everything human, including the ordinary business of everyday life. Culture and art have their own value, but economic values are also constrained. Art sponsorships and subsidies suggest a value that exceeds market price. So what is the real value of culture? Unlike the u

  13. Contribution of Professional School Counselors' Values and Leadership Practices to Their Programmatic Service Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingford, M. Ann; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2010-01-01

    School counselors are called to be leaders to support the development of all students. The study in this article investigated the contributions of the values (Schwartz, 1992) and leadership practices (Posner & Kouzes, 1988) of 163 school counselors to their programmatic service delivery (Scarborough, 2005). Leadership practices made…

  14. Reconciling Spiritual Values Conflicts for Counselors and Lesbian and Gay Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Kathleen M.; Dobmeier, Robert A.; Reiner, Summer M.; Casquarelli, Elaine J.; Giglia, Lauren A.; Goodwin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Counselors and lesbian and gay clients experience parallel values conflicts between religious beliefs/spirituality and sexual orientation. This article uses critical thinking to assist counselors to integrate religious/spiritual beliefs with professional ethical codes. Clients are assisted to integrate religious/spiritual beliefs with sexual…

  15. Cultural War of Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cultural War of Values: The Proliferation of Moral Identities In the Danish Public Sphere Peter Hervik (Aalborg University) This chapter looks at the drastic shift in the construction of minority others that came with the emergence of neo-nationalism, neo-racism and radical right populism...... in the post-1989 world. Through an analysis of a political philosophy launched in Denmark in the 1990s called the “Cultural War of Values”, I show that the moral identities proliferating in the Danish public sphere are fundamentally anti-political correct, anti-multiculturalist, and anti......-Marxist as confrontation is also directed at political adversaries. Thus, the chapter’s key argument is that the social construction of thick minority identities can only be understood in relation to the cultural war of value strategy aimed at domestic political opponents....

  16. Motivating and hindering factors during the reemployment process: the added value of employment counselors' assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Edwin A J

    2014-01-01

    Because unemployment negatively affects people's well-being, it is of crucial importance that unemployed individuals move back to work. The process of getting reemployed, however, is difficult and complex. Therefore, many unemployed job seekers are assisted by employment counselors. The present study focuses on motivating and hindering factors in the reemployment process, examining the added value of the counselors' assessment of job seekers' attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors. The results of a 3-wave study with job seeker self-ratings and counselor-ratings indicated that perceived health problems is the most consistent predictor of job search and reemployment status. The findings further provide some convergent validity evidence for self- and counselor-rated situational-level motivators (i.e., attitude, social pressure, self-efficacy) and job search intensity. Although method effects did not seem to threaten the validity of the prediction of job search intensity and procrastination, employment counselors' assessments of job seekers' job search intensity and procrastination were significantly more strongly related to reemployment success than job seekers' self-ratings. Future research should therefore include other-reports, in addition to job seeker self-reports, to get a more complete view of people's job search behavior. Also reemployment counseling firms may want to use the expert knowledge of their employment counselors more systematically. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Promoting Research as a Core Value in Master's-Level Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Charles H.; Savage, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    Theory, practice, and research are all espoused to be core values within counselor education. The authors assert that research needs to become directly associated with theory and practice for it to be a concurrent core value. "Action research" is most simply defined as a form of research that is practitioner based. The authors propose infusing…

  18. Cultural Values and Alexithymia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Lo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexithymia refers to difficulty with reflecting on and articulating emotional states. Previous research has found that Asian groups may tend toward greater alexithymia and that cultural values may mediate this difference, although the content of Asian values that form these pathways is unclear. This study examined the relationship between Confucian values, ethnicity, and alexithymia. A sample of 216 undergraduate students completed the Chinese Value Survey and the Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Asian Canadians scored more highly on alexithymia than non-Asian Canadians. Individuals who valued trustworthiness, patience, and kindness were found to be less alexithymic. The ability to be a source of kindness and security to others may be tied to the development of reflective awareness. Individuals who valued purity from desire and respect for social order were found to be more alexithymic. Such individuals may tend not to reflect on impure or socially disruptive thoughts and feelings. Values associated with purity and order mediated the difference between Asians and non-Asians on alexithymia. Asian Canadians may therefore score more highly on alexithymia because they prefer not to reflect on emotions associated with impurity or social disorder.

  19. The Value of Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrede, Joar

    2014-01-01

    In Oslo, the capital of Norway, several urban development projects are in the making. One such project is the Fjord City project, which involves freeing up waterfront areas for housing, commerce, culture and recreation. It has been decided to relocate The Munch Museum to the area, and a new Opera...... documents and the public debate, it is evident that “culture” is vital in the urban development projects, but it is ambiguous what the value of “culture” consists of. Many citizens are questioning the disruption to historical continuity and they are confused about the political reasoning behind...... the decisions to abandon the old museum buildings. On the other hand, the relocation of the cultural institutions is intended to increase the city’s attractiveness and make it more interesting to investors, tourists and visitors. Against this backdrop, this thesis is devoted to the task of analysing – from...

  20. URGENCY CULTURAL AWARENESS SKILLS OF COUNSELORS IN IMPLEMENTING THE SERVICE GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING FOR DEALING ASEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY (AEC

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    Galang Surya Gumilang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Humans live in this world depends on culture. Culture greatly affect every aspect of human life that occurred as a whole according to the demands and needs. Human activity ranging from waking to sleep again did not escape the influence of culture. Culture is indeed long life for each event experienced by humans is closely related to culture. For example, as socialize with other people very concerned with culture because every human being has their cultural awareness. Just as a counselor when faced counselee when giving guidance and counseling services. The counselor must have the cultural awareness in the face of the counselee for bringing the essence of each culture. In providing guidance and counseling services, counselors need to pay attention to cultural awareness of being able to bring counselees to understand the psychological characteristics such as intelligence (intelligence, emotional, and spiritual, aptitude, attitude, motivation, and others. Counselors in Indonesia are still not paying attention because of cultural awareness in the provision of guidance and counseling services helped form a new behavior and to determine the success of the counseling process. Keywords: cultural counselor, guidance and counseling services, the ASEAN economic community

  1. Computer Applications in Counselor Education: Developing Cultural Competencies through Online Collaboration of Future School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, Vessela; Erguner-Tekinalp, Bengu

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the applications of computer-mediated student collaboration in a graduate multicultural counseling course. The course work included a reflective cultural competency building assignment that utilized online communication and collaboration using a wiki to extend and improve students' multicultural counseling and social justice…

  2. Measurement Invariance of the Counselor Burnout Inventory across Cultures: A Comparison of U.S. and Korean Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrola, Paul A.; Yu, Kumlan; Sass, Daniel A.; Lee, Sang Min

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed scores from the Counselor Burnout Inventory for factorial validity, convergent and discriminant validity, internal consistency reliability, and measurement invariance across U.S. and Korean counselors. Although evidence existed for factorial validity across both groups, mixed results emerged for the other forms of validity and…

  3. CREATING VALUE WITHIN CONSUMPTION CULTURE

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    Daniel Adrian Gârdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of culture consumption is a particular concern within the modern marketing theory. Culture can be seen as representing a body of knowledge, beliefs, values, attitudes, symbols etc, developed in a certain period of time by a group of individuals, items transmitted with the help of a social learning process to other generations within the group. Thus, the consumption of culture will identify itself with the consumption of any product, service or a combination of them, directly resulted as manifestation of culture, expressions of artistic creativity specific for a certain cultural space. The present paper proposes the analysis of the phenomenon referring to the culture consumption in terms of specific characteristics. The paper reviews the features specific to the modern consumer of culture, the relationship that exists between the individuals’ level of education and the culture consumption and value creation process or augmentation of the intrinsic value of an artistic product as a result of the contribution that the culture consumer can bring himself. The authors highlight the fact that within extremely complex processes which are defining the culture consumption, consumers can assume an active role, becoming on their turn co-participants in the cultural goods and services value creation and transmission. The modern consumer benefits more than ever from the advantages offered by the information technology, being called to respond to major challenges of the postmodernism paradigm in terms of culture consumption. Globalization and other social economic and politic phenomena have profoundly changed the reports between individual and culture, between self and other members of the society, causing synthesis and essential transformations of culture consumption, of culture consumers typologies, and not least of the very forms of artistic expression related to cultural goods and services.

  4. Cultural values and international migration

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    Miryam Rodríguez Monter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Immigration is one of the most controversial social issues debated nowadays. It is an undeniable fact that the phenomenon is lived in Europe with concern because of its consequences. People who live and coexist in Europe represent a huge cultural variety. Therefore, social and cultural gaps that can affect the basic values of the western societies seem to be inevitable due to the dimensions of the current migration phenomenon. The present studies are based on the European Social Survey Questionnaire (2002, and the Portrait Values Questionnaire (Schwartz, 1992, 2001 and focuses on the relevance of cultural values to explain the acceptance or rejection of the immigrant.. Finally, we emphasize the importance of cultural values -like Harmony or Egalitarianism- for any initiative or social policy which aimes at reducing the problems concerning inmigration in the European context.

  5. Cultural Legacies: Operationalizing Chicano Cultural Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Maricela; Anda, Diane de

    1996-01-01

    Survey of 41 Chicanos and 39 whites ages 18-80 found that despite effects of acculturation, Chicanos held educational and developmental values and beliefs consistent with ancient Nahuatl (Aztec) society, an indigenous Mexican culture. Suggests a need to examine social service delivery systems to determine whether assumptions and procedures are…

  6. Cultural Legacies: Operationalizing Chicano Cultural Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Maricela; Anda, Diane de

    1996-01-01

    Survey of 41 Chicanos and 39 whites ages 18-80 found that despite effects of acculturation, Chicanos held educational and developmental values and beliefs consistent with ancient Nahuatl (Aztec) society, an indigenous Mexican culture. Suggests a need to examine social service delivery systems to determine whether assumptions and procedures are…

  7. The Marketing of Cultural Values

    OpenAIRE

    Ionel Enache

    2015-01-01

    The current, fast and unpredictable changes required a rapid transformation of Marketing. Marketing 3.0 can be the solution. Marketing 3.0 is a cultural and social marketing, a marketing of high values: moral, legal, esthetic and a marketing of superior needs: peace, justice, spiritual accomplishments, all globally approached. The goal of Marketing 3.0 is to convince all commercial and cultural structures to get involved in creating the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs): eradicating poverty...

  8. Challenges and Promises of Becoming a Culturally Competent Counselor in a Sociopolitical Era of Change and Empowerment

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    Arredondo, Patricia; Tovar-Blank, Zoila G.; Parham, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the historical and sociopolitical contexts of the multicultural competency movement and the challenges and promise of becoming a culturally competent counselor. Specific attention is directed to the promise and opportunity for those who commit to a culturally competent personal and professional way of life.

  9. Baseball and American Cultural Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan exploring social values and historical periods as it is reflected in the sport of baseball. Suggests that teachers start with an overview of the game's history and rules in the nineteenth century. Includes four sets of quotes relating to baseball and race, capitalism, community, and cultural context. (DK)

  10. The Marketing of Cultural Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Enache

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current, fast and unpredictable changes required a rapid transformation of Marketing. Marketing 3.0 can be the solution. Marketing 3.0 is a cultural and social marketing, a marketing of high values: moral, legal, esthetic and a marketing of superior needs: peace, justice, spiritual accomplishments, all globally approached. The goal of Marketing 3.0 is to convince all commercial and cultural structures to get involved in creating the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs: eradicating poverty, access to education, promoting the equality of the sexes, reducing infantile mortality, improving maternal health, fighting diseases, ensuring environment sustainability.

  11. Congruence and functions of personal and cultural values: do my values reflect my culture's values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald

    2006-11-01

    Two studies are described examining the correlation between self- and culture-referenced values at a culture level (Study 1) and correlation between self- and culture-referenced values and self-reported behavior at an individual level (Study 2). It is found that values related to individual-group relationships (embeddedness) and expression and experience of affective feelings and emotions (affective autonomy) are significantly correlated at a culture level. In Study 2, culture-referenced values are shown to correlate with behaviors attached to social norms, whereas self-rated values are found to correlate with behaviors that are not norm-governed. Implications for measurement of cultural values and cultural and cross-cultural research designs are discussed.

  12. Rehabilitation Counselors' Perceptions of Ethical Workplace Culture and the Influence on Ethical Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Frank J.; Shaw, Linda R.; Young, Mary Ellen; Bourgeois, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the environment in which a counselor works influences his or her ethical behavior, but there is little empirical examination of this idea within the rehabilitation counseling professional literature. A survey was conducted with a national sample of practicing certified rehabilitation counselors that elicited…

  13. Motivating and hindering factors during the reemployment process: the added value of employment counselors' assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooft, E.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Because unemployment negatively affects people’s well-being, it is of crucial importance that unemployed individuals move back to work. The process of getting reemployed, however, is difficult and complex. Therefore, many unemployed job seekers are assisted by employment counselors. The present

  14. Value and Strategy of Emotional Intelligence of College Counselors%大学辅导员情绪智力的价值与策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹

    2016-01-01

    University Counselors emotional intelligence has the important value of on University Counselors' mental health. it is also an important content of university counselors, and to develop students' emotional intelligence. Therefore, it is necessary to strengthen theoretical research of emotional intelligence of college counselors, but also t he need to strengthen the College Counselor's self-cultivation.at the same time, also need emotional intelligence test of university counselors, more need to build a university counselor heart assist system (EPA).%大学辅导员情绪智力对大学辅导员的心理健康具有重要价值,也是大学辅导员专业化的重要内容,还有利于大学生情绪智力的养成。为此,需要加强大学辅导员情绪智力的理论研究,还需要加强大学辅导员的自我修养,同时,也需要对大学辅导员进行情绪智力的测验,更需要构建大学对辅导员心理辅助系统(EPA)。

  15. Construction on the Broadcasting of Cultural Value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Xu

    2011-01-01

    Broadcast host responsible transmission of information, expression of emotion and preserving culture. Construction of broadcasting cultural value will raise the cultural character of the electronic medium itself, provide spiritual power of the people's needs, enhancing the cultural influence of broadcasting on audiences.

  16. Values of The Cultural Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Examines Chinese press editorials and testimonials from members of the People's Liberation Army in an attempt to determine the meaning of Mao Tse Tung's vision of a new socialist man and the societal value transformation process. (MH)

  17. Meeting the Holistic Needs of Students: A Proposal for Spiritual and Religious Competencies for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbel, Tyler M.; Schellenberg, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Authors discuss the importance of school counselors addressing spiritual and religious issues in ethically meeting the developmental and cultural needs of K-12 students. Domains of spiritual and religious competence for professional counselors, published by the Association for Spiritual, Ethical, and Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC, 2009),…

  18. Induced Abortion: An Ethical Conundrum for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner, Vaughn S.; Hanks, Robert B.

    2002-01-01

    Induced abortion is one of the most controversial moral issues in American culture, but counselor value struggles regarding abortion are seldom addressed in counseling literature. This article considers the conflictual nature of the ethical principles of autonomy, fidelity, justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence as they can occur within the…

  19. Teachers' and School Counselors' Perceptions of Their Cultural Competence in Working with Newly Arrived Latino Immigrant Students: A Mixed Methods Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola Castillo, Irma V.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teachers' and school counselors' perceptions of their cultural competence in working with newly arrived Latino immigrant students by using a mixed instrument with closed-ended and open-ended items. Multicultural Counseling Competencies (MCC) served as the theoretical framework for this study (Sue,…

  20. Men as cultural ideals: Cultural values moderate gender stereotype content.

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    Cuddy, Amy J C; Wolf, Elizabeth Baily; Glick, Peter; Crotty, Susan; Chong, Jihye; Norton, Michael I

    2015-10-01

    Four studies tested whether cultural values moderate the content of gender stereotypes, such that male stereotypes more closely align with core cultural values (specifically, individualism vs. collectivism) than do female stereotypes. In Studies 1 and 2, using different measures, Americans rated men as less collectivistic than women, whereas Koreans rated men as more collectivistic than women. In Study 3, bicultural Korean Americans who completed a survey in English about American targets rated men as less collectivistic than women, whereas those who completed the survey in Korean about Korean targets did not, demonstrating how cultural frames influence gender stereotype content. Study 4 established generalizability by reanalyzing Williams and Best's (1990) cross-national gender stereotype data across 26 nations. National individualism-collectivism scores predicted viewing collectivistic traits as more-and individualistic traits as less-stereotypically masculine. Taken together, these data offer support for the cultural moderation of gender stereotypes hypothesis, qualifying past conclusions about the universality of gender stereotype content.

  1. Literary Translation: Cultural Value, Time and Intertextuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimer Luarsabishvili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present article we evaluate the literary translation as the phenomena with three peculiarities: as the creator of the cultural values, as the possessor of the intertextual peculiarities and as the mediator between the epoch of creations and translation of the literary text.

  2. Couples Work in Cultural Context: Te Ao Māori and Poststucturalist Practices Informing Counselor Training in Aotearoa New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Helene; Gremillion, Helen; Meima, Yolanda

    2016-06-01

    This article outlines key themes that appear in the teaching of poststructuralist ideas and practices for couples counseling within the Postgraduate Diploma in Counseling Program at Unitec Institute of Technology in Auckland, New Zealand, and it explores the congruence of this pedagogical approach with Māori (indigenous) understandings of relationality, collaboration, and partnership. The diploma program's curriculum includes narrative therapy and relational language-making. Themes explored in this article include: understanding (heterosexual) couple relationships as contextualized entities, deconstructing dominant discourses of coupledom, and the positioning of counselors/teachers as nonexpert. Taking each theme in turn, the authors, one of them Māori and two Pākehā (European), articulate points of alignment with Māori cultural concepts and practices. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  3. International Cultural Immersion: Assessing the Influence of a Group Intervention on Intercultural Sensitivity for Counselor Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Sejal M.; Shannonhouse, Laura; Mobley, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Scholars (e.g., Bemak & Chung, 2004) underscore the need for group workers to be culturally sensitive. One group training strategy, cultural immersion, is often employed to develop cultural sensitivity. However, no studies have utilized quasi-experimental methodologies to assess differences in cultural sensitivity between trainees that immerse…

  4. Counselor Development in the Process of Mastering Cultural Competence: A Study of Professional Growth Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Marie A.

    2012-01-01

    Grounded theory methodology was employed to explore the experiences of counseling professionals as they work to develop a higher level of cultural competence. Three key findings support the core theme, navigating change toward cultural competent practices: (1) environmental awareness; (2) dispositions toward the development in cultural competency…

  5. Cultural values predict coping using culture as an individual difference variable in multi-cultural samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Bardi, Anat; Guerra, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    Three studies establish the relations between cultural values and coping using multicultural samples of international students. Study 1 established the cross-cultural measurement invariance of subscales of the Cope inventory (Carver, Scheier, & Weintraub, 1989) used in the paper. The cultural value dimensions of embeddedness vs. autonomy and hierarchy vs. egalitarianism predicted how international students from 28 (Study 2) and 38 (Study 3) countries coped with adapting to living in a new cou...

  6. Arab Americans with Disabilities and Their Families: A Culturally Appropriate Approach for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khateeb, Jamal M.; Al Hadidi, Muna S.; Al Khatib, Amal J.

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a brief introduction to Americans of Arab descent and a brief overview of Arab culture. Then, culturally appropriate counseling considerations related to family, attitudes toward disability, religion, communication, acculturation, help-seeking behaviors, and stereotypes are highlighted. In the last section, the authors provide…

  7. Assessing and Promoting Cultural Relativism in Students of Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcauliffe, Garrett John; Grothaus, Tim; Jensen, Margaret; Michel, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Multicultural counseling is often promoted as a core element in counselor development. As such, educational efforts aim to increase counselors' cultural relativism, or their ability to recognize their own enculturation and to appreciate the value of other cultural norms. This mixed qualitative-quantitative study explored the relationship between…

  8. Human rights values or cultural values? Pursuing values to maintain positive discipline in multicultural schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro du Preez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions on discipline in education often accentuate corporal punishment or measures to infuse moral fibre. In addition, many authors argue that inculcating a particular value system can promote discipline in schools. This could however be profoundly problematic in the light of the Constitution. We argue that positive discipline in multicultural school environments needs to be based in part on human rights values that are neither solely universally interpreted nor particularistically interpreted. We report on the data generated at a research workshop held as the final dissemination process of a four-year international research project entitled "Understanding human rights through different belief systems: intercultural and interreligious dialogue". Dialogue was chosen as a form of data gathering since it is more spontaneous than conventional questioning techniques and can thus generate more naturally occurring data to strengthen the outcomes of the project. It appears that some teachers believe discipline can only be maintained through the elevation of cultural values (particularism. We argue that schools should start negotiating, at the most basic level, the values, including emancipatory, human rights values, and cultural values, which could underpin positive discipline in multicultural schools. Drawing solely on cultural values is not only unlikely to solve the problem of discipline, but could also undermine the efforts to transform our diverse, democratic society.

  9. Attitudes toward older adults: A matter of cultural values or personal values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Xing, Cai; Guan, Yanjun; Song, Xuan; Melloy, Robert; Wang, Fei; Jin, Xiaoyu

    2016-02-01

    The current research aimed to address the inconsistent findings regarding cultural differences in attitudes toward older adults by differentiating the effects of personal and cultural values. In Study 1, we used data from the sixth wave of the World Values Survey to examine attitudes toward older adults across cultures, and how different personal values (i.e., communal vs. agentic) and cultural values (i.e., individualism) predicted these attitudes. The results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that after controlling for potential covariates, personal communal values positively correlated with positive attitudes toward older adults; however, cultural individualistic values did not. To further examine the causal effects of personal values (vs. cultural values), we conducted an experimental study and confirmed that priming personal values rather than cultural values had significant effects on ageism attitudes. The present studies help to reconcile conflicting results on cultural differences in attitudes toward older adults.

  10. The Value of Art and Culture in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Beth; Balling, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the earliest forms of mass media, the dichotomy of mass culture/popular arts and high culture/fine art has been a topic of debate. The discussion has focused on the value and use of different art forms and on different notions on and attitudes to the purpose of art. The concept...... of cultural democracy has developed as a way to acknowledge and support a variety of cultural activities. Despite attempts to develop a broader understanding of culture and to acknowledge different ways of participating in and experiencing and valuing art and culture, cultural policy still seems to reproduce...... the dichotomies between high and popular culture, and to value the first over the latter. Art and culture are rarely understood as an independent way to experiences, meaning creation and values in everyday life. In this article, we would argue for an expanded understanding of cultural democracy, which not only...

  11. Differences Between British and Americans’ Cultures in Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘巍巍; 戴立黎

    2008-01-01

    <正>Values are the most important issue in identifying one particular culture.Social values are the feelings people have about what is important,worthwhile,and just.In this paper,the differences between British and American values are discussed in two aspects which mainly lie respectively in the comparisons of values and characteristics in both cultures.

  12. Values of counselors and psychotherapists and its effect on their ethical decision-making%心理咨询师与治疗师的价值观及对伦理事件决策的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李扬; 钱铭怡

    2011-01-01

    be divided into three factors of principle, instrumental and maintained professional competence values, but the scores of each values factor could not predict their ethical decision-making very well (predicting rates from 32. 4% to 47. 8%). In Study 2, the relationship between the values of counselors and psychotherapists and their ethical decision-making got further examination. The results showed that there was not linear relationship between the two variables. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the values of counselors and psychotherapists can not predict their ethical decision-making correctly. The findings imply that the values and ethical decision-making of counselors and psychotherapists are influenced by Chinese culture strongly, and it is important to consider the cultural factors when establishing the Chinese clinical ethics.

  13. Cultural Values as an Explanatory Variable

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These Chinese companies are equipped with superior technology and .... Studies have shown that the importance of culture is not new, but empirical work, ..... and low on uncertainty avoidance (thus high on risk taking), whereas China and ...

  14. Cultural values in international migration and remittances

    OpenAIRE

    Inna Čábelková

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of cultural determinants on the migration flows across countries and the financial flows back to the country of origin of the migrants in the form of remittances. We present econometric models for migration and remittances and test the relations between migration and remittances on one hand and cultural dimensions on the other hand. We find that collectivist countries produce more migrants per one inhabitant. This finding corresponds to social reason for mig...

  15. Age differences in personal values: Universal or cultural specific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Helene H; Ho, Yuan Wan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Noels, Kimberly A; Tam, Kim-Pong

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies on value development across adulthood have generally shown that as people age, they espouse communal values more strongly and agentic values less strongly. Two studies investigated whether these age differences in personal values might differ according to cultural values. Study 1 examined whether these age differences in personal values, and their associations with subjective well-being, showed the same pattern across countries that differed in individualism-collectivism. Study 2 compared age differences in personal values in the Canadian culture that emphasized agentic values more and the Chinese culture that emphasized communal values more. Personal and cultural values of each individual were directly measured, and their congruence were calculated and compared across age and cultures. Findings revealed that across cultures, older people had lower endorsement of agentic personal values and higher endorsement of communal personal values than did younger people. These age differences, and their associations with subjective well-being, were generally not influenced by cultural values. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Interracial and Cross-cultural Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Reagan H.; Goldstein, Helen Haft

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the need to improve interracial and cross-cultural relationships within therapeutic settings. Suggests strategies counselors can use to communicate more successfully with clients from different racial or ethnic backgrounds who have different values and personal characteristics. (MK)

  17. Cultural Value And Travel Motivation Of European Tourists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acheraporn Plangmarn; Bahaudin G Mujtaba; Mohamed Pirani

    2012-01-01

      The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among demographic characteristic, cultural values, and travel motivations in regards to understanding the context of tourist's motivation...

  18. Culture And Universal Professional Values In Global Organizations: Is There A Divergence Or Convergence Of Cultural Values?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nieves

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and discusses the theory of universal human values, the universal human values of people across cultures, and how culture and values impact organizations. This article reviews the history and research into human values, culture, and behavior, followed by reviews of Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions and Schwartz and Bilky’s Theory of Universal Human Values.A strong connection exists between these theories and their related empirical research, not only chronologically, but also theologically and methodologically. The subjects are presented in a temporal sequence. Thus, the work of Professor Gert Hofstede is presented first; the work of Schwartz, Bilsky, is more recent, but strongly linked to prior research by Hofstede on values and culture. The objective is to improve ones understanding of work-related values, culture, and the impact that values may have on individuals in different cultural environments that are found in international organizations. This study tests to see if there is a difference in individualism scores of Mexican and American engineers when compared to Hofstede’s original study in 1980. This study also looks at the Mexican and American engineer samples to see if their scores on Hofstede’s cultural dimensions show a correlation with the scores on Schwartz’s culture-level dimensions. The study attempts to determine if there is a divergence or convergence of cultural values. Findings of the study are reported.

  19. Population change and socio-cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    The developing countries of the world in general, and those of Asia and the Pacific in particular, recognize that unplanned population growth is a stumbling block to socioeconomic development. Discussion here focuses on population growth and social, economic, and institutional forces, which are referred to as sociocultural values. Generally, sociocultural values change sluggishly over time. The rate at which a country's sociocultural values change depends on several factors such as the stage of economic development and modernization and whether a country has an open or closed door policy. "The Value of Children Study: A Crossnational Study" by Fred Arnold et al. shows that there are positive and negative values attributed to children in the Asian countries. These are: positive general values--emotional benefits, economic benefits and security, self enrichment and development, identification with children, and family cohesiveness and continuity; negative general values--emotional costs, economic costs, restrictions on opportunity costs, physical demands, and family costs; large family values--sibling relationships, sex preferences, child survival; and small family values--maternal health and societal costs. Possibly the most formidable obstacle to the success of antinatalist population policies is that of religious values. It appears that the Muslim world is divided on the issue of fertility control. Conflicting views regarding fertility control is perhaps aggravated by the fact that there is no central international religious official hierarchy that issues out edicts. Despite the presence of a centralized religious hierarchy and a network of churches from the Vatican to the village levels among the Catholics, and a clearer elucidation of the Humanae Vitae, a liberal attitude to population regulation and family planning has emerged, largely because of the declining quality of life of the people resulting from unplanned births. Economic benefits of children include

  20. The cultural side of innovations: adding values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, D.

    2014-01-01

    In most discussions about the knowledge-based economy, innovation is associated or even equated with technology, while culture’s influence is ignored. Innovation is however embedded in cultural and social contexts, and neglecting these crucial contexts may impede an innovation’s diffusion—and

  1. The values of the cooperative economic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Estarlich

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the principles and values that permeate the cooperative should be done from a sociological and historical perspective. That is why there should be a mention of the story needed to find out why and how come the cooperative values and principles.

  2. Cultural diversity in organizations : Enhancing identification by valuing differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijters, Kyra; van der Zee, Karen I.; Otten, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    The present research investigated the role of perceived similarity in cultural values (associated with diversity in cultural backgrounds) and an intercultural group climate in predicting identification with both the organization and the work team. The relevance of perceived similarity in cultural va

  3. Cultural diversity in organizations : Enhancing identification by valuing differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijters, Kyra; van der Zee, Karen I.; Otten, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    The present research investigated the role of perceived similarity in cultural values (associated with diversity in cultural backgrounds) and an intercultural group climate in predicting identification with both the organization and the work team. The relevance of perceived similarity in cultural va

  4. Using Contemporary Art to Challenge Cultural Values, Beliefs, and Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Wanda B.

    2006-01-01

    Art educators, like many other educators born or socialized within the main-stream culture of a society, seldom have an opportunity to identify, question, and challenge their cultural values, beliefs, assumptions, and perspectives because school culture typically reinforces those they learn at home and in their communities (Bush & Simmons, 1990).…

  5. Cultural Values Predicting Acculturation Orientations: Operationalizing a Quantitative Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes that acculturation orientations are related to two sets of cultural values: utilitarianism (Ut) and traditionalism (Tr). While utilitarian values enhance assimilation, traditional values support language and identity maintenance. It is proposed that the propensity to either end of this value opposition can be measured by an…

  6. Cultural Values Predicting Acculturation Orientations: Operationalizing a Quantitative Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes that acculturation orientations are related to two sets of cultural values: utilitarianism (Ut) and traditionalism (Tr). While utilitarian values enhance assimilation, traditional values support language and identity maintenance. It is proposed that the propensity to either end of this value opposition can be measured by an…

  7. Cultural Value, Measurement and Policy Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dave

    2015-01-01

    No matter what the national context, the question of how to understand the impact of government programmes, particularly in terms of value for money, has emerged as a complex problem to be solved by social scientific management. This article engages with these trends in two ways. It focuses on the UK to understand how these tools and technologies…

  8. Cultural Value, Measurement and Policy Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dave

    2015-01-01

    No matter what the national context, the question of how to understand the impact of government programmes, particularly in terms of value for money, has emerged as a complex problem to be solved by social scientific management. This article engages with these trends in two ways. It focuses on the UK to understand how these tools and technologies…

  9. Creating a culture for value measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Michelle; Knuth, Melissa; McDonald, Jody

    2014-08-01

    OSF HealthCare's executive dashboard provides: A detailed view of top-level measures to frame OSF's mission and vision for all stakeholders. An easily understood, holistic snapshot of performance An assessment of relationships among system goals, initiatives, and results. Explicit understanding of the organization's priority performance measures and the extent to which they need to improve. A vehicle for transitioning to a value-based business model.

  10. Toward an Abortion Counseling Strategy for Pro-Life Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Phillip James

    1976-01-01

    What do counselors do when involved in a counseling encounter that brings two of their principal values, student freedom and the fetus' right to life, into contact? The author feels if a counselor makes his commitment regarding abortion known. Students will choose a counselor who reinforces their own feelings. (Author)

  11. Incorporating Feminism into Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mookyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The author describes how rehabilitation counselor educators can incorporate the feminist perspective in teaching rehabilitation counselors-in-training by exploring history, core values, and training methods of feminism. Method: Based on a literature review, the author compares philosophy and concepts of rehabilitation counseling and…

  12. Incorporating Feminism into Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mookyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The author describes how rehabilitation counselor educators can incorporate the feminist perspective in teaching rehabilitation counselors-in-training by exploring history, core values, and training methods of feminism. Method: Based on a literature review, the author compares philosophy and concepts of rehabilitation counseling and…

  13. Counselor Roles in Business and Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Robert J.

    Business and counseling professionals agree that counselors can have a place in the organizational and corporate setting and be a valued commodity for the success of business. Human resource development (HRD) provides an organization's personnel with cognitive experiences designed to improve job performance and productivity. Counselors are often…

  14. Career Counseling with Undocumented Latino Youth: A Qualitative Analysis of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlie, Cassandra Ann

    2013-01-01

    The career development trajectory of undocumented Latino youth can present unique challenges for school counselors. Undocumented Latino youth have few career choices due to holding different values from the majority culture, realistic fears of deportation, restrictions in obtaining lawful employment, and having an unconventional pathway to…

  15. CULTURAL VALUES OF WETLANDS IN BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION IN NEPAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kirat Kamal Sampang Rai

    2006-01-01

    Nepal is rich in wetlands and its biodiversity due to diverse geography, ecology, ecosystem, and cultures. Participatory research methodology was used. More than 59 different traditional societies reside in various geographical belts with diverse and distinct language, culture, custom, religion, beliefs, social norms, knowledge and practices have significant roles in the protection and wise use of wetland biodiversity. Wetland ecology, landscape and cultural values may be accordance with the geographic and human dimension. The bio - cultural diversity supports to enhance wetlands and biodiversity richness from millennia. Traditional cultural, religious, spiritual values, customary lore, folklore, knowledge of the societies are playing important responsibility in wetland ecology, landscapes and biodiversity restoration, conservation and sustainable use, and they should be recognised, respected in National legislation.Themes of CBD, and RAMSAR should be respected and implemented to protect the cultural, religious, ritual, and customary contribution of the society.

  16. Cultural Values of Puerto Rican Opiate Addicts: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzman, Ilyana; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the underutilization of drug rehabilitation programs among Puerto Rican addicts because of the failure of the programs to consider Hispanic cultural differences. Six cultural values specific to Hispanics are evaluated for their psychological implications and suggestions are made for clinicians working with Hispanic drug addicts.…

  17. Norway's New Culture Policy and the Arts: Values in Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Arne Martin

    The basis for the New Norwegian Culture policy (NCC) is discussed in terms of the political attempt to extend the fundamental values of equality and social security into art and cultural life. The NCC is a result of a series of reports presented in the early 1970s which reflected a desire to see a broader welfare policy in Norway. The old form of…

  18. Reasoning about the value of cultural awareness in international collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bernáld

    Full Text Available As international collaborations become a part of everyday life, cultural awareness becomes crucial for our ability to work with people from other countries. People see, evaluate, and interpret things differently depending on their cultural background and cultural awareness. This includes aspects such as appreciation of different communication patterns, the awareness of different value systems and, not least, to become aware of our own cultural values, beliefs and perceptions. This paper addresses the value of cultural awareness in general through describing how it was introduced in two computer science courses with a joint collaboration between students from the US and Sweden. The cultural seminars provided to the students are presented, as well as a discussion of the students\\' reflections and the teachers\\' experiences. The cultural awareness seminars provided students with a new understanding of cultural differences which greatly improved the international collaboration. Cultural awareness may be especially important for small countries like New Zealand and Sweden, since it could provide an essential edge in collaborations with representatives from more \\'powerful\\' countries.

  19. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF BUTON CULTURAL VALUES IN VALUE EDUCATION PLANNING IN BAUBAU REGION OF SOUTHEAST SULAWESI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Hindaryatiningsih

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at finding out the implementation of Buton cultural value into value education planning. This study employed qualitative approach by ethnographic method conducted at SMAN 2 Baubau, south east Sulawesi in 2012. For data collection, in-depth interview techniques, documentation review, and participant observation consisting descriptive, focused and selected observation were used. The observation focused on cultural events and interactive behavioral informants. The informants comprised of principal, teachers, staff, school committee, pupils, parents, community leaders and traditional leaders. For data analysis, spradley technique consisting of domain analysis, taxonomy, componential and theme analysis was used. The findings showed that 1 core values in “gau and pombala” culture in Buton community consisted of cooperative, democratic and ethic value; 2 Buton’s cultural values of “gau and pombala’ were practiced in educational value planning at school.

  20. A quarter century of Culture's Consequences: a review of empirical research incorporating Hofstede's cultural values framework

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley L Kirkman; Kevin B Lowe; Cristina B Gibson

    2006-01-01

    Since Geert Hofstede's Culture's Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values (Sage, 1980) was published, researchers have utilized Hofstede's cultural values framework in a wide variety of empirical studies. We review 180 studies published in 40 business and psychology journals and two international annual volumes between 1980 and June 2002 to consolidate what is empirically verifiable about Hofstede's cultural values framework. We discuss limitations in the Hofstede-inspir...

  1. Cultural values and health service quality in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsa, Pia; Fuxiang, Wei; Sääksjärvi, Maria; Shuyuan, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Several service quality studies show how cultural features may influence the way service quality is perceived. However, few studies specifically describe culture's influence on health service quality. Also, there are few studies that take into account patients' health service quality perceptions. This article seeks to present a first step to fill these gaps by examining patients' cultural values and their health service quality assessments. The study draws on published work and applies its ideas to Chinese healthcare settings. Data consist of hospital service perceptions in the People's Republic of China (PRC), a society that is socially, economically and culturally undergoing major changes. In total, 96 patients were surveyed. Data relationships were tested using partial least square (PLS) analysis. Findings show that Chinese patients' cultural values and their health service assessments are related and that the cultural values themselves seem to be changing. Additionally, further analyses provided interesting results pointing to which cultural values influenced service quality perceptions. The strongest service quality predictor was power distance. The sample is relatively small and collected from only one major hospital in China. Therefore, future research should extend the sample size and scope. Follow-up research could also include cross-cultural investigations of perceived health service quality to substantiate cultural influences on health service quality perceptions. In line with similar research in other contexts, the study confirms that power distance has a significant relationship with service quality perceptions. The study contributes to existing health service literature by offering patients' views on health service quality and by describing relationships between health service perceptions and cultural values--the study's main contribution.

  2. BUGISMAKASSAR SEAMANSHIP AND REPRODUCTION OF MARITIME CULTURAL VALUES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munsi Lampe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an initiative to develop the maritime anthropology field of study that up till now is stagnant and tends to be concerned with the surface structure of the maritime cultural phenomena. By application of the concept of reproduction maritime ethos disposition in explaining the navigational experience and maritime interaction of Bugis-Makassar seamen, some of their maritime cultural values can be discovered. Attitudes and main values such as knowledge and navigation skills, adaptation with physical environment and socio-culture, water spatial concept, brave and like adventure, hard working and competitive, honest and trustable, loyal and responsible, openness and freedom, strict to attitude and religious, collectivism, etc. which were applied in the trading and sailing activities of the Bugis-Makassar sailors can be understood as maritime cultural values. Indonesia maritime cultural values of Bugis-Makassar are also in the forms of awareness and diversity of values and relationships between ethnic groups and cultures, love to the country, language unity, and nationality. This article is based on historical annotation of Bugis-Makassar seamenship and field work data from Bira (Bugis region and Paotere (Makassar region conducted in six months (from April to September 2010.

  3. 教育叙事在高校辅导员成长中的价值体现%Value Reflection of Education Narrative in College Counselors' Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈武; 谢攀峰

    2014-01-01

    教育叙事作为一种研究方法,目前已成为国内教育理论和实践领域的热门话题,并被认为是教师专业发展的有效途径之一。本文从教育叙事的本体价值出发,从工作水平、科研能力、心理调节能力三个方面阐述教育叙事在高校辅导员成长中的价值体现。%Education narrative education as a research method, has become a hot topic in the field of educational theory and practice, and is considered one of the effective ways to teachers' professional development. In this paper, the value of educa-tion from the body of narrative expounds the narrative in counselor education colleges in the value of the growth reflected from the working level, research ability, and mental ability to regulate three aspects.

  4. The Mexican American Cultural Values Scale for Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Saenz, Delia S.; Bonds, Darya D.; German, Miguelina; Deardorff, Julianna; Roosav, Mark W.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    This research evaluates the properties of a measure of culturally linked values of Mexican Americans in early adolescence and adulthood. The article discusses the items derived from qualitative data provided by focus groups in which Mexican Americans' (adolescents, mothers, and fathers) perceptions of key values were discussed. The focus groups…

  5. Dissemination of Values and Culture through the E-Folklore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Normaliza Abd; Affendi, Nik Rafidah Nik Muhammad; Pawi, Awang Azman Awang

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the values and culture in the e-folklore. The objectives of the study were to identify and discuss the values in the song lyric "The Stork and the Mouse Deer." The song was taken from phone application in the compilation of the "Kingfisher stories" copyrighted by Dewan Bahasa and Pustaka. The e-folklore…

  6. Adherence to Asian Cultural Values and Cultural Fit in Korean American Undergraduates' Help-Seeking Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Park, Yong Sue; Kim, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Differences in and relationships of Asian cultural values, cultural congruity, perception of the university environment, and help-seeking attitudes for 1st- and 2nd-generation Korean American undergraduates (N = 228) were examined. Women reported significantly higher cultural congruity and more positive help-seeking attitudes than did men. Asian…

  7. Cultural values and immigrant entrepreneurship: the Chinese in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K B; Chiang, S N

    1994-01-01

    "It is the intent of this paper to examine the interrelationships between early socialisation into core Chinese cultural values, international migration and Chinese immigrant entrepreneurship.... It is through a developmental socialisation process by which [cultural] values are articulated in family and kin network dynamics that social organisations begin to develop and define what is popularly understood as the 'Chinese way of doing business'. We argue that among the overseas Chinese, this way of doing business must be viewed historically and developmentally, as it is intimately intertwined with transmigration experiences and their consequences in shaping values necessary for the emergence and development of entrepreneurship." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA) excerpt

  8. Occupational turnover intentions among substance abuse counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Tanja C; Abraham, Amanda J; Bride, Brian E; Roman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    This study examined predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of occupational turnover intention (OcTI) among substance abuse counselors. Data were obtained via questionnaires from 929 counselors working in 225 private substance abuse treatment (SAT) programs across the United States. Hierarchical multiple regression models were conducted to assess predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of OcTI. OcTI scores were relatively low on a 7-point scale, indicating that very few counselors definitely intended to leave the SAT field. Age, certification, positive perceptions of procedural and distributive justice, and hospital-based status negatively predicted OcTI. Counselors' substance use disorder-impacted history moderated the association between organizational commitment and OcTI. Organizational turnover intention partially mediated the link between organizational commitment and OcTI. Workforce stability might be achieved by promoting perceptions of advantages to working in a particular treatment program, having organizational commitment, showing appreciation for counselors' work, and valuing employees from diverse backgrounds.

  9. Computer Applications in Counselor Education: Developing Cultural Competencies Through Online Collaboration of Future School Counselors / L’informatique dans l’éducation des orienteurs : le développement du savoir-faire culturel par la collaboration en

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vessela Ilieva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the applications of computer-mediated student collaboration in a graduate multicultural counseling course. The course work included a reflective cultural competency building assignment that utilized online communication and collaboration using a wiki to extend and improve students’ multicultural counseling and social justice advocacy skills. The online assignment design was aligned with the current call for utilizing technology in the counseling profession. It further considered the needs of the future counselors, the current levels of exposure to and experience with available technology of the class members, and the opportunities for utilization of a variety of online-based tools to extend in-class and out-of-class discussions. Students’ response to this new form of class work and communication confirmed the potential of the online component to other aspects of counselor preparation, and the data analysis showed that the computer-mediated assignment was a valuable addition to developing students’ skills as multiculturally competent professionals. Cette étude a examiné les applications de la collaboration entre étudiants par l’entremise de l’informatique dans le cadre d’un cours d’études supérieures sur l’orientation en contexte multiculturel. Les travaux du cours comprenaient un travail de réflexion pour renforcer le savoir-faire culturel grâce à la communication et à la collaboration en ligne, en utilisant un wiki pour accroître et améliorer les aptitudes des étudiants en orientation en contexte multiculturel et en défense de la justice sociale. La conception du travail en ligne s’alignait sur la tendance actuelle pour une utilisation accrue de la technologie dans le métier de conseiller en orientation. On y tenait également compte des besoins des futurs conseillers, de leur degré d’exposition à la technologie et de leur expérience avec celle-ci, ainsi que des occasions pour l

  10. Cultural estrangement: the role of personal and societal value discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Mark M; Gebauer, Jochen E; Maio, Gregory R

    2006-01-01

    Study 1 examined whether cultural estrangement arises from discrepancies between personal and societal values (e.g., freedom) rather than from discrepancies in attitudes toward political (e.g., censorship) or mundane (e.g., pizza) objects. The relations between different types of value discrepancies, estrangement, subjective well-being, and need for uniqueness also were examined. Results indicated that personal-societal discrepancies in values and political attitudes predicted estrangement, whereas mundane attitude discrepancies were not related to estrangement. As expected, value discrepancies were the most powerful predictor of estrangement. Value discrepancies were not related to subjective well-being but fulfilled a need for uniqueness. Study 2 replicated the relations between value discrepancies, subjective well-being, and need for uniqueness while showing that a self-report measure of participants' values and a peer-report measure of the participants' values yielded the same pattern of value discrepancies. Together, the studies reveal theoretical and empirical benefits of conceptualizing cultural estrangement in terms of value discrepancies.

  11. Building classroom and organizational structure around positive cultural values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Badr F.; Corbo, Joel C.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Little, Angela; Zaniewski, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    The Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students-especially those from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. Compass fosters a diverse, collaborative student community by providing a wide range of services, including a summer program and fall/spring seminar courses. We describe Compass's cultural values, discuss how community members are introduced to and help shape those values, and demonstrate how a single set of values informs the structure of both our classroom and organization. We emphasize that all members of the Compass community participate in, and benefit from, our cultural values, regardless of status as student, teacher, or otherwise.

  12. Building Classroom and Organizational Structure Around Positive Cultural Values

    CERN Document Server

    Albanna, Badr F; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R; Little, Angela; Zaniewski, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    The Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students-especially those from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. Compass fosters a diverse, collaborative student community by providing a wide range of services, including a summer program and fall/spring seminar courses. We describe Compass's cultural values, discuss how community members are introduced to and help shape those values, and demonstrate how a single set of values informs the structure of both our classroom and organization.We emphasize that all members of the Compass community participate in, and benefit from, our cultural values, regardless of status as student, teacher, or otherwise.

  13. Values of Marriage and Love in Cross-culture Settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦育玲; 马金晶

    2014-01-01

    Marriage and love is the eternal topic of human, which everyone must to face, no matter in which country and what race. This essay will dis-cuss different values of marriage and love in different countries based on cross-cultural settings.

  14. Complementary Person-Culture Values Fit and Hierarchical Career Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtschlag, Claudia; Morales, Carlos E.; Masuda, Aline D.; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Although career success is an issue of global concern, few studies have examined the antecedents of career success across cultures. In this study we test whether the relationship between individuals' self-enhancement values (achievement and power) and hierarchical status differs across 29 countries and whether this variation depends on countries'…

  15. Organizational Culture, Values, and Routines in Iranian Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Zavareh, Davoud Khorasani; Masiello, Italo

    2009-01-01

    In Iran, restructuring of medical education and the health care delivery system in 1985 resulted in a rapid shift from elite to mass education, ultimately leading to an increase in the number of medical schools, faculties, and programs and as well as some complications. This study aimed to investigate views on academic culture, values, and…

  16. What Cultural Values Influence American Public Relations Practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Gabriel M.; Taylor, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of culture as a key variable in public relations research and practice. Finds (1) American practitioners continue to practice one-way models of public relations; and (2) public relations practitioners who have collectivistic values tend to practice two-way models of public relations. Discusses implications for theory and…

  17. Mass Media and Cultural Memory: Idealization of Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljana Siljanovska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical approach in defining the means for mass communication expressed in functionalist theory, especially in John Riley’s model, determines mass media as a social subsystem which is functionally connected with other systems in society that arises from their mutual conditionality and their causative and consequential connection with politics, economy, education, socialization and culture. The functions of articulating opinion by themselves problematize the creation of creative-thinking public because the imposition of topics, representation of individuals, values and norms of a culture, a space, a time is mediated by the ideological and functional mechanism of an organized structuring and transfer of messages simultaneously to as big an audience as possible. The vastness of the audience simply cannot by itself be understood as democratization of the culture in its broadest sense or simply because it is not a high, elite culture intended solely for a certain number of users.  It is that exact media reality, which almost always and exclusively is created through the selection of facts and values in relation to the audience and the factor of time, which simultaneously problematizes individual and collective memory. In the era of postmodernism and globalization of societies, media shaped content, in different mass media, especially on TV and the Internet, stimulate cultural development and pluralism of ideas in intercultural communication. However at the same time the setting of the stage for a media product, imposed by market logic of supply and demand erases the borders of difference, restructures the modalities of cultural identifiers and relativizes the dimensions of cultural identity through the unification of values transformed in surpassed or modern collective memories and concepts, such as – Balkanization, Americanization, Europeanization, civil society.

  18. The Effect of Personal Values, Organizational Values, and Person-Organization Fit on Ethical Behaviors and Organizational Commitment Outcomes among Substance Abuse Counselors: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tammara Petrill

    2013-01-01

    Numerous research studies have concluded that values drive perceptions, responses to situations, judgments, interactions among people, and behaviors. In addition, studies have found that congruence or agreement between individual values and organizational values can increase job satisfaction and commitment. Minimal research has explored the…

  19. The Effect of Personal Values, Organizational Values, and Person-Organization Fit on Ethical Behaviors and Organizational Commitment Outcomes among Substance Abuse Counselors: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tammara Petrill

    2013-01-01

    Numerous research studies have concluded that values drive perceptions, responses to situations, judgments, interactions among people, and behaviors. In addition, studies have found that congruence or agreement between individual values and organizational values can increase job satisfaction and commitment. Minimal research has explored the…

  20. VALUES AS A CULTURAL STANDARD IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Považanová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals the issue of meaningfulness, significance, importance, and pragmaticallyspeaking, the usefulness of human life, in his private and family or the public, the workingenvironment. The topic today is an important topic of thinking, at least with respect toeconomic and financial crisis that devastates the global economic environment, both inconnection with the growing influence of global problems of mankind or by naturalimpending natural disasters around the world. Through axiological reflection reveals ourfundamental notions about quality of life. Naming the biased dissemination strategydrinking lifestyle, satisfaction and pseudo saturation mainly consumer needs. Theenvironment needs a new sense of permanent, other, innovative, naturally loses and dullsthe sense of genuine, real and substantial work and life values. Their commemoration,historical significance and generate real cultural values, reveals the essential foundations ofvalues and culture in general shows a tendency of a transformed form perceptions of thecultural dimension of social interaction a person at any level of social life, family andfriends and from work and career ending. The promotion of social, cultural maturity ofindividuals and groups which in the process of socialization creates must build on thetradition of values that forms the history of each culture.

  1. Population policies and cultural values: a Mexican editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A new population policy for Mexico, based on the need to regulate demographic growth, should be developed without damaging the cultural values of the Mexican people. The role of cultural values in the identification of demographic problems, formulation of population policies, and implementation of programs, was studied in Mexico under sponsorship of the U.N. Population Fund. Population policies should be understood as a creative response to problems that life poses. Problems, policies, and national programs often originate with the elite or the middle class and are imposed with little respect for the real sense of the popular culture of the lower classes. It is an error to identify the traditional or folk values with a pronatalist attitude, because pronatalist attitudes can change when the people comprehend that birth control will aid in their fight for survival. The improvement of life for the Mexican peasant, proletarian and subproletarian is related to the modification of reproductive and migratory behavior. It is therefore an error to depict the new population policies as an interest of the upper classes and the imperialist countries. Population programs should be conceived and implemented by taking into account the values and aspirations of the popular majority.

  2. Measuring cultural values at the individual-level: considering morality in cross-cultural value research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin-Melanie Vauclair

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Valores compartilhados são tipicamente vistos como um dos aspectos centrais da cultura. O procedimento comum para derivar valores culturais compartilhados é feito por meio da análise das prioridades dos valores individuais no nível cultural. Este artigo delineia os problemas conceituais e metodológicos associados com esse procedimento. Descobertas feitas por meio de estudos empíricos selecionados são apresentadas para corroborar essa crítica. Meios alternativos para medir valores culturais no nível individual são apresentados e classificados em uma taxonomia de valores. Nessa taxonomia, estudos anteriores têm até agora focalizado a medição de valores por meio da importância atribuída, refletindo o que os indivíduos ou grupos sociais desejam. Contudo, argumenta-se que, se valores culturais são supostamente compartilhados, eles deveriam refletir o que é desejável, isto é, o que o indivíduo deve valorizar ou empenhar-se para alcançar como um objetivo de vida em uma determinada sociedade. Isso constitui uma nova abordagem para a mensuração de valores culturais que propõe que sejam medidos no nível individual, utilizando-se perguntas que envolvam moralidade. Sugestões são feitas sobre como os valores culturais poderiam ser operacionalizados, referindo-se aos valores morais individuais ou àqueles de um grupo social. Os benefícios da utilização de taxionomia de valores para pesquisas futuras são eventualmente descritos.

  3. Not all cultural values are created equal: Cultural change in China reexamined through Google books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Weng, Liping

    2017-06-20

    Given its major transformations in recent decades, China has figured prominently in research on cultural change. Previous research converges in showing a general trend towards individualism in contemporary China while noting that rising individualism tends to coexist with enduring collectivism. To further understand this, we tested whether perceived traditional importance of cultural values would modulate the trajectory of cultural change reflected in word usage frequencies in published books. We re-analysed Google's Chinese corpus since 1980 based on a broad sample of words associated with individualism-collectivism. We replicated the pattern of rising individualism and declining collectivism among words of modest and low perceived traditional importance. Most important, however, collectivistic words of high perceived traditional importance increased in usage frequencies with time, thus departing from the general trend towards individualism. Overall, our research underscores the role of core culture in cultural maintenance during times of rapid cultural change. © 2017 International Union of Psychological Science.

  4. Spreadable media: Creating value and meaning in a networked culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moderated by Louisa Stein

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Online Roundtable on Spreadable Media, by Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green, with participants Paul Booth, Kristina Busse, Melissa Click, Sam Ford, Henry Jenkins, Xiaochang Li, and Sharon Ross. Section 1 first published as the article "Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture", by Louisa Stein, from Cinema Journal Volume 53 Issue 3, pp152-177. Copyright 2014 by The University of Texas Press. All rights reserved.

  5. School Counselors' Experiences Working with Digital Natives: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Laura L.

    2017-01-01

    To better understand school counselors' experiences related to students' use of social media, the authors conducted a qualitative study, utilizing a phenomenological approach, with eight practicing high school counselors. Three major themes emerged from the study: "the digital cultural divide," "frustration and fear," and…

  6. Counselor Beliefs and Perceived Knowledge Regarding Clients with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Tamekia R.

    2012-01-01

    Clients with learning disabilities constitute a cultural group that has not been extensively studied. The professional literature has found that counselors have reported the need for additional training in working with clients with disabilities. This study explored counselors' beliefs and perceived knowledge regarding counseling clients with…

  7. School Counselors' Experiences Working with Digital Natives: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    To better understand school counselors' experiences related to students' use of social media, the authors conducted a qualitative study, utilizing a phenomenological approach, with eight practicing high school counselors. Three major themes emerged from the study: "the digital cultural divide," "frustration and fear," and…

  8. Integrating Social Justice across the Curriculum: The Catholic Mission and Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calley, Nancy G.; Pickover, Sheri; Bennett-Garraway, Jocelyn M.; Hendry, Simon J.; Garraway, Garbette M.

    2011-01-01

    Counselor education and the Catholic faith share an important core value: social justice. As a counselor education program within a Jesuit and Sisters of Mercy institution, the construct of social justice is a unifying value that is rooted in academic preparation and practice. To promote a lifestyle of social justice, the counselor education…

  9. An assessment of cultural values and resident-centered culture change in U.S. nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G; Lin, Michael; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2013-01-01

    Culture change initiatives propose to improve care by addressing the lack of managerial supports and prevalent stressful work environments in the industry; however, little is known about how culture change facilities differ from facilities in the industry that have not chosen to affiliate with the resident-centered care movements. The aim of this study was to evaluate representation of organizational culture values within a random sample of U.S. nursing home facilities using the competing values framework and to determine whether organizational values are related to membership in resident-centered culture change initiatives. We collected reports of cultural values using a well-established competing values framework instrument in a random survey of facility administrators and directors of nursing within all states. We received responses from 57% of the facilities that were mailed the survey. Directors of nursing and administrators did not differ significantly in their reports of culture and facility measures combined their responses. Nursing facilities favored market-focused cultural values on average, and developmental values, key to innovation, were the least common across all nursing homes. Approximately 17% of the facilities reported that all cultural values were strong within their facilities. Only high developmental cultural values were linked to participation in culture change initiatives. Culture change facilities were not different from non-culture change facilities in the promotion of employee focus as organizational culture, as emphasized in group culture values. Likewise, culture change facilities were also not more likely to have hierarchical or market foci than non-culture change facilities. Our results counter the argument that culture change facilities have a stronger internal employee focus than facilities more generally but do show that culture change facilities report stronger developmental cultures than non-culture change facilities, which

  10. Jesus and cultural values: Family life as an example

    OpenAIRE

    Carolyn Osiek

    1997-01-01

    'Family values' is a set of traditional images that most cultures collect, images drawn mostly from an idealized picture of family life in the recent past. For Christians, the popular image of Jesus gets included: the Holy Family as a nuclear family unit, Jesus blessing children, Jesus as advocate of traditional family life. A closer reading of both contemporary family life and the Gospels reveals that things are not what they seem. Contemporary family life in Western societies is structured ...

  11. The Role of Confucian Cultural Values and Politics in Planning Educational Programs for Adults in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kiung; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Program planning activities are not culturally neutral but are replete with various cultural values and affected by them. This qualitative study was conducted in Korea and examines how cultural values influence educational planning in Korea. Specifically, the study was to examine how Confucian cultural values play out in educational planning in…

  12. Social Change and Cultural Values in a Small Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanmartín Arce, Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how social change has affected the cultural values in a small community of fishermen in the Albufera Lake of Valencia. Industrial development, tourism, new employment and jobs changed the ecology of the lake, the mutual dependency among neighbours and the efficiency of old cultural values to orient social interaction. Both the new role played by of women and the Spanish Constitution of 1978 lie at the basis of new conflicts which are at once a challenge and an opportunity for the emergence of new horizons.

    El artículo describe cómo ha afectado el cambio social a los valores culturales en una pequeña comunidad de pescadores en el lago de la Albufera de Valencia. El desarrollo industrial, el turismo y el nuevo empleo y trabajos cambiaron la ecología del lago, la mutua dependencia entre los vecinos y la eficiencia de los viejos valores culturales para orientar la interacción social. El nuevo rol de la mujer y la Constitución están en la base de nuevos conflictos como reto y como apertura de nuevos horizontes a la vez.

  13. Counselor Awareness Improves Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirick, Ed

    1999-01-01

    Accidents at camps increase when counselors become fatigued or complacent, or step out of their primary roles as supervisors and become participants. Horseplay, time in bunks, and sports activities are hotspots for injuries. Camps must teach counselors how to monitor fatigue and recognize when activities exceed campers' abilities. A video is…

  14. The dynamics of democracy, development and cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaiser, Viktoria; Ranganathan, Shyam; Mann, Richard P; Sumpter, David J T

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades many countries have experienced rapid changes in their economies, their democratic institutions and the values of their citizens. Comprehensive data measuring these changes across very different countries has recently become openly available. Between country similarities suggest common underlying dynamics in how countries develop in terms of economy, democracy and cultural values. We apply a novel Bayesian dynamical systems approach to identify the model which best captures the complex, mainly non-linear dynamics that underlie these changes. We show that the level of Human Development Index (HDI) in a country drives first democracy and then higher emancipation of citizens. This change occurs once the countries pass a certain threshold in HDI. The data also suggests that there is a limit to the growth of wealth, set by higher emancipation. Having reached a high level of democracy and emancipation, societies tend towards equilibrium that does not support further economic growth. Our findings give strong empirical evidence against a popular political science theory, known as the Human Development Sequence. Contrary to this theory, we find that implementation of human-rights and democratisation precede increases in emancipative values.

  15. An Exploration of Career Counselors' Perspectives on Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickling, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Advocacy with and on behalf of clients is a major way in which counselors fulfill their core professional value of promoting social justice. Career counselors have a unique vantage point regarding social justice due to the economic and social nature of work and can offer useful insights. Q methodology is a mixed methodology that was used to…

  16. Counselors' and Supervisors' Perceptions of Professional Development Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Bill K.; Obermann, C. Esco

    This paper examines the perceptions of state agency vocational rehabilitation counselors and supervisors in regard to the values they attach to present inservice education programs and to supervision. Subjects were 282 rehabilitation counselors and 64 supervisors employed in state and federal vocational rehabilitation programs in Iowa, Illinois,…

  17. Jesus and cultural values: Family life as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Osiek

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available 'Family values' is a set of traditional images that most cultures collect, images drawn mostly from an idealized picture of family life in the recent past. For Christians, the popular image of Jesus gets included: the Holy Family as a nuclear family unit, Jesus blessing children, Jesus as advocate of traditional family life. A closer reading of both contemporary family life and the Gospels reveals that things are not what they seem. Contemporary family life in Western societies is structured quite differently than the ideal. Jesus' family life was spent in a peasant village surrounded by relatives and neighbors, with little privacy and strong social pressure towards conformity. The gospel records indicate that he did not conform, and paid the price: rejection and misunderstanding by his extended family. The Synoptic Gospels consistently ponray not only an estrangement between Jesus and his family, but Jesus' encouragement of his disciples to break family ties in favor of the surrogate family of the circle of disciples. In a culture in which kinship loyalty was essential, this  message caused deep problems for early Christians which the authors of the household codes of Ephesians, Colossians, the  Pastoral Epistles, and 1 Peter tried to alleviate.

  18. Measuring A Customer Intimacy Culture In A Value Discipline Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Potgieter

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate a questionnaire for the assessment of a customer intimacy culture in the value discipline context. The main survey was completed by using a convenience sample of permanent employees (N = 200 at line, middle and top management levels of an organisation in the entertainment industry. This sample was taken from staff on structured developmental paths, while attending scheduled training events. The 169 completed questionnaires that were returned were used for the final data analyses. Owing to the small sample size, an adapted procedure for first- and second-level factor analyses was used, followed by an iterative item analysis. The preliminary findings suggest that the questionnaire can be applied for assessing customer intimacy cultures. OpsommingDie doel van hierdie studie was om ’n vraelys te evalueer vir die beoordeling van ’n kliëntintimiteitskultuur in die waardedissipline konteks. Die hoofopname is voltooi deur ’n gerieflikheidsteekproef (N = 200 van permanente personeel in lyn, middel- en topbestuursvlakke van ’n organisasie in die vermaaklikheidsbedryf te gebruik. Dié steekproef is geneem vanuit personeel in gestruktureerde ontwikkelingspaaie wat geskeduleerde opleidingsgeleenthede bygewoon het. Die 169 voltooide vraelyste wat terugontvang is, is vir die finale dataontleding gebruik. Weens die klein steekproefgrootte, is ’n aangepaste prosedure vir eerste- en tweedevlakfaktorontleding gebruik, gevolg deur ’n iteratiewe itemontleding. Die voorlopige bevindinge dui daarop dat die vraelys toegepas kan word vir die beoordeling van ’n kliëntintimiteitskultuur.

  19. The Role of the Rural School Counselor: Counselor, Counselor-in-Training, and Principal Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro-Leitner, Julieta; Asner-Self, Kimberly K.; Milde, Cheryl; Leitner, Dennis W.; Skelton, Doris

    2006-01-01

    The American School Counselor Association developed a comprehensive set of school counseling guidelines to enhance the school counselor's role within schools in the United States. This study looks at counselors' and principals' perceptions of the school counselor's role in a Midwestern, regional rural educational environment. Results suggest that…

  20. The Role of the Rural School Counselor: Counselor, Counselor-in-Training, and Principal Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro-Leitner, Julieta; Asner-Self, Kimberly K.; Milde, Cheryl; Leitner, Dennis W.; Skelton, Doris

    2006-01-01

    The American School Counselor Association developed a comprehensive set of school counseling guidelines to enhance the school counselor's role within schools in the United States. This study looks at counselors' and principals' perceptions of the school counselor's role in a Midwestern, regional rural educational environment. Results suggest that…

  1. The Different Family Values between China and America---from a Cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Na

    2014-01-01

    With the development of globalization, intercultural contact is becoming increasingly axiomatic and pervasive;however, the values and behaviors of a particular culture may not be understandable and family values may not be acceptable in another culture. Therefore, communication among people from different cultures will become more complex. This paper aims at revealing some different family values possessed by Chinese and Americans and intends to introduce that different cultures have a strong impact on the family values.

  2. Using Values Clarification in Counseling Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Barbara; Kirschenbaum, Howard

    1980-01-01

    Counselors have found values clarification useful in individual and group counseling and in personalized instruction. The counselor can take advantage of values clarification for personal and professional growth. Other techniques for values discrimination are presented in a commentary. (Author)

  3. Experiential Training: Connecting School Counselors-in-Training, English as a Second Language (ESL) Teachers, and ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Joy J.; Mantero, Miguel; Hooper, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    English as a second language (ESL) students present challenges to counselors who are unaccustomed to working with students who speak limited English. A field experience prepared school counselors-in-training to develop cultural sensitivity while working with ESL teachers and students. The counselors suggested that early experiential learning…

  4. WORK-RELATED CULTURAL VALUES OF JAPANESE AND CZECH STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Cramer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Companies are very often confronted with external and internal cultural diversity to which they have to respond adequately. We need a deeper understanding of whether national cultures remain divergent in countries such as Japan and the Czech Republic following the pressures of globalization. One can argue that as cultures evolve they should constantly be assessed e.g., with respect to each of Hofstede‟s dimensions. By collecting data from one Eastern-European culture, the Czech Republic, and one Eastern culture, Japan, this study has re-examined Hofstede‟s (1984; 2001 cultural dimensions in these two cultures. Results suggest interesting changes have occurred in these cultures; a trend towards convergence may be derived. Explanations as well as implications are discussed.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Chinese and American Cultural Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-ting

    2011-01-01

    Being aware of the differences that exist between cultures and knowing how to act when we are faced with puzzling cross-cultural situations are important skills for harmonious intercultural relations.Cross-cultural research shows that we can examine all c

  6. From Cultural Path to Cultural Route: a Value-Led Risk Management Method for via Iulia Augusta in Albenga (italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meerbeek, L.; Barazzetti, L.; Valente, R.

    2017-08-01

    Today, the field of cultural heritage faces many challenges: cultural heritage is always at risk, the large amount of heritage information is often fragmented, climate change impacts cultural heritage and heritage recording can be time-consuming and often results in low accuracy. Four objectives, related to the challenges, were defined during this research work. It proposes a relevant value-led risk management method for cultural heritage, it identifies climate change impact on cultural heritage, it suggests a database lay-out for cultural heritage and demonstrates the potential of remote sensing tools for cultural heritage. The Via Iulia Augusta, a former Roman road in Albenga, was used as case study.

  7. Found in Translation: The Value of Teaching Law as Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Kerstin Bree

    2013-01-01

    Although the study of law within its larger culture is emerging, recognition of law as culture is still generally nascent within legal studies and preprofessional programs. In fact, the greater recognition of law’s social and political role may have impeded a consideration of law’s role...... as culturally specific. Yet, as law practice becomes more globalized, such awareness is an increasingly necessary element of any practitioner’s toolkit. This Article explores three examples of cross-cultural blunders to demonstrate the necessity of being sensitive to law in cultural context....

  8. Development of a high-value care culture survey: a modified Delphi process and psychometric evaluation.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, R.(Panjab University, Chandigarh, India); Moriates, C; Harrison, JD; Valencia, V; Ong, M; Clarke, R.; Steers, N; Hays, RD; Braddock, CH; De Wachter, R

    2016-01-01

    Organisational culture affects physician behaviours. Patient safety culture surveys have previously been used to drive care improvements, but no comparable survey of high-value care culture currently exists. We aimed to develop a High-Value Care Culture Survey (HVCCS) for use by healthcare leaders and training programmes to target future improvements in value-based care.We conducted a two-phase national modified Delphi process among 28 physicians and nurse experts with diverse backgrounds. We...

  9. Relationship between Individual Cultural Values and Knowledge Sharing in Selected Multinational Companies in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Manjit Singh Sandhu; Poon Wai Ching

    2014-01-01

    Managing knowledge in different locations around the globe has become a great concern for multinational corporations (MNCs) due to differences in individual cultural values. Such cultural differences inhibit the sharing of knowledge among employees. Ironically, the impact of individual cultural values on knowledge sharing has received limited attention in the international business literature. This research is an attempt to close this gap by examining the relationship between cultural values ...

  10. Cultural Nuances, Assumptions, and the Butterfly Effect: Addressing the Unpredictability Caused by Unconscious Values Structures in Cross-Cultural Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Rory

    2007-01-01

    Cultural values, cross-cultural interaction patterns that are produced by dynamical (chaotic) systems, have a significant impact on interaction, particularly among and between people from different cultures. The butterfly effect, which states that small differences in initial conditions may have severe consequences for patterns in the long run,…

  11. Making Career Theories More Culturally Sensitive: Implications for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard A.; Marshall, Sheila K.; Valach, Ladislav

    2007-01-01

    The primary question addressed in this article is whether and how career theories can be more culturally sensitive without losing value as conceptual explanations or their usefulness for counselors. Contextual action theory is identified as a means to develop culturally sensitive explanations. Six steps are proposed and illustrated, including…

  12. Cultural values associated with substance use among Hispanic adolescents in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Claradina; Unger, Jennifer B; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel W; Black, David Scott; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Cultural values can shape people's attitudes toward substance use and influence their risk of experimentation with drugs. This article examines the relationships between cultural values (familism, respeto, and machismo), fatalism (a culturally encouraged personality disposition), and substance use among Hispanic adolescents. In 2005, cross-sectional data were collected from 1,616 Hispanic ninth grade students in Los Angeles. Each cultural value was associated with lifetime substance use; however, these relationships depended on the type of substance and gender. Our findings suggest that it might be useful to incorporate the cultural values and address the personality trait of fatalism in prevention programs for Hispanic adolescents. The study's limitations are noted.

  13. Historical and contemporary cultural ecosystem service values in the rapidly urbanizing city state of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajah, Jharyathri; Wong, Shermaine K M; Richards, Daniel R; Friess, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    Cultural ecosystem services are a function of people and place, so may change as a location transitions from rural to urban. Singapore has undergone rapid urbanization after its independence in 1965, with a concomitant decline in natural habitat extent and accessibility. Using coastal mangrove forests as a case study habitat, changing cultural values were explored with a novel array of techniques, including qualitative archival analysis (photographs, oral histories), current sources (publically uploaded social media photographs), and surveys of (a) the general public and (b) visitors to publically accessible mangroves. Cultural value changed through time, with a significant transition from intrinsic, intrapersonal values (spiritual, cultural heritage) to instrumental, interpersonal values (recreation, education). Additionally, cultural value varied between different mangroves depending on their public accessibility, and the evolving degree of human interaction with the ecosystem as urban development occured. Cultural values change as development transitions, though mangroves still play an important cultural role in a heavily urbanized environment.

  14. Bilinguals' Creativity: Patricia Grace and Maori Culture and Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawake, Sandra

    Contemporary Pacific literature represents one of many bodies of new literatures written in English that have emerged from cultures of former colonies of European empires (contact literatures). They contain a blend of two or more linguistic contexts and a range of discourse devices and cultural assumptions distinct from the ones associated with…

  15. Impressions of Counselors as a Function of Counselor Physical Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jean A.

    1978-01-01

    Research assessed the effects of counselor physical attractiveness and inter-actions between attractiveness and counselor subject sex. It is suggested that sex of counselor and client may play a more important role independently and in conjunction with attractiveness than does attractiveness alone in influencing impressions and expectations.…

  16. Counselor Preferences of Clients Entering a Counselor-Training Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; Leiere, Stephen J.; Hotard, Jacqueline M.; Stuckey, Rebecca I.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the expressed counselor preferences of individuals entering a community-based counselor-training clinic. Clients were asked whether they had a preference regarding counselor age, disability status, education, gender, and race. Of these characteristics, only for gender did even a moderate number of clients (30%) express a preference.…

  17. Outplacement Counseling: Whither the Counselor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Dianne W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes current outplacement services and provides a rationale for professional counselor involvement in outplacement activities. Greater awareness of the field and its requirements may increase the effectiveness of outplacement services and encourage counselors to develop expertise in this area. (JAC)

  18. Outplacement Counseling: Whither the Counselor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Dianne W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes current outplacement services and provides a rationale for professional counselor involvement in outplacement activities. Greater awareness of the field and its requirements may increase the effectiveness of outplacement services and encourage counselors to develop expertise in this area. (JAC)

  19. Canadian Cultural Materialism: Personal Values and Television Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surlin, Stuart H.; Squire, Larry A.

    A study examined the relationship between social and material values and attitudes toward television advertising. Using the Rokeach Value Survey Form E, 157 Canadian college students ranked the 18 terminal and 18 instrumental values in order of their importance as guiding principles for life. The values were classified as either material, social,…

  20. Guidelines for Cultural Value Assessment of Heritage of Automobile Roads and Their Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Matijošaitienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available With the lapse of time roads and their landscapes gained historic and cultural significance. Understanding cultural value of roads and road landscapes can lead to the blanket information about the whole country, separate regions or communities, as well as about various historical periods, past technologies and road building traditions. The article presents three categories of cultural heritage of roads and roadscapes and a set of factors determining their cultural value .Article in Lithuanian

  1. Generational shifts in managerial values and the coming of a global business culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, A.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    In a globalizing world, cross-national differences in values and business culture and understanding these differences become increasingly central to a range of managerial issues. Studies of cultural (dis)similarities in the values of managers (so-called managerial values) and the development of a un

  2. Can cultural values help explain the positive aspects of caregiving among Chinese American caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Maggie

    2011-01-01

    This study used an adaptation of the caregivers' stress model to examine the positive aspects of caregiving with 113 Chinese American family caregivers who provided care to their elderly relatives. The hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that combination of caregiver background characteristics, stressors, and cultural values had direct effects on positive aspects of caregiving. Unlike previous studies in which cultural values were not measured, this study found that cultural values helped explain positive aspects of caregiving. Specifically, cultural values, caregiver's health, and caregiver's age predicted positive aspects of caregiving. Service implications are discussed based upon the findings.

  3. The promotion of mental health through cultural values, institutions, and practices: a reflection on some aspects of botswana culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabone, Motshedisi B

    2009-12-01

    Botswana has seen rapid socioeconomic development since the 1970s that has contributed to the erosion of the values, institutions, and practices that are believed to be supportive of mental health. In this paper, the author argues that the aspects of culture that are supportive of mental health have been diluted by the process of urbanization and the interactions of Batswana (the indigenous people of Botswana) with other cultural groups, particularly those from the western hemisphere. The paper further highlights some of the values, institutions, and practices native to Botswana and describes how they promote mental health. Lastly, recommendations for reviving the cultural values, institutions, and practices of Botswana are discussed.

  4. Culture and values - their relevance for marketing strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Rewerts, Astrid Lucie; Hanf, Jon Henrich

    2006-01-01

    Research on consumer behaviour has revealed that the prospect of reaching a personal value is the virtual buying motive. Bearing this in mind, the researcher, as well as the marketer, is not only able to observe whether one product is preferred to another, but also to understand why this product is preferred. Hence, identifying consumers' personal values contributes to explaining consumer preferences and buying motives, which is of great importance for marketing practice. Personal values that...

  5. Cultural values and international differences in business ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Dam, L.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze ethical policies of firms in industrialized countries and try to find out whether culture is a factor that plays a significant role in explaining country differences. We look into the firm's human rights policy, its governance of bribery and corruption, and the comprehensiveness, implemen

  6. Cultural values and international differences in business ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Dam, L.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze ethical policies of firms in industrialized countries and try to find out whether culture is a factor that plays a significant role in explaining country differences. We look into the firm's human rights policy, its governance of bribery and corruption, and the comprehensiveness,

  7. Cultural values and international differences in business ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, B.; Dam, L.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze ethical policies of firms in industrialized countries and try to find out whether culture is a factor that plays a significant role in explaining country differences. We look into the firm's human rights policy, its governance of bribery and corruption, and the comprehensiveness, implemen

  8. Immigrant and Refugee Youth: Migration Journeys and Cultural Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Rowena

    2007-01-01

    Professionals working with immigrant and refugee youth in schools, mental health clinics, hospitals, and adolescent-serving organizations are better equipped to offer culturally appropriate interventions and prevention strategies if they understand their clients' migration journeys and legal status. Professionals who understand the cultural…

  9. Values and the Scientific Culture of Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Maria R.; Roche, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    As scientists and practitioners, behavior analysts must make frequent decisions that affect many lives. Scientific principles have been our guide as we work to promote effective action across a broad spectrum of cultural practices. Yet scientific principles alone may not be sufficient to guide our decision making in cases with potentially…

  10. Cultural Values Represented in First Certificate Masterclass Taught in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alimorad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crucial role textbooks play in any educational system, an urgent need is felt to examine, evaluate, and choose the most suitable ones available. This study is an attempt to critically examine and uncover the hidden curriculum in First Certificate Masterclass (FCM that is taught at Navid institute in Iran. To this aim, FCM was deeply examined to identify any instances of Western cultural norms and preferences and their potential influences on Iranian EFL (English as a Foreign Language learners’ thoughts and ideologies. Peterson’s distinction between Big “C” culture and little “c” culture constituted the theoretical framework of the study. To collect the necessary data, all passages, texts, exercises, and even listening excerpts were closely studied and evaluated by the researcher. Results indicated that among the elements of little “c” culture introduced by Peterson, preferences or tastes, food, hobbies, popular music, and popular issues could mainly be observed in the book. Furthermore, the majority of the representations introduced and depicted in the book were incompatible with Iranian Muslim people’s ideologies and beliefs. Implications of these findings for Iranian material developers and textbook writers as well as English teachers are also discussed.

  11. Rising Value of Turkish Foreign Policy: Cultural Diplomacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fırat Purtaş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available “The 21st century is a period in which Turkey is going through deep changes not only in domestic policies, economic and social issues but also in foreign policies and diplomacy. The opening-up of Turkish people to the world in the 1990ies paved the way to their interaction with other countries which, in turn, played a major role in the transformation of the country. In this period, the parallel diplomacy practiced on a one-to-one basis by Turkish educational institutions, local governments and various NGOs through activities ranging from cultural events to humanitarian aid, has been the invisible power of Turkish foreign policy. As a country which has a universal narrative story of its own to tell the world, Turkey’s way to expressing itself in a correct and efficient way, goes through the development of individual rights and freedoms, the granting of a sense of belonging to its citizens which they will be proud of as well as the support of cultural diplomacy carried out by NGOs. Thus, a strategy to be developed by leading NGOs which are the main actors of cultural diplomacy, and providing them the resources they need, will not only strengthen the democratic structure of the country. Above all, through such a strategy, Turkey’s soft power which plays a leading role in the practice of cultural diplomacy on a global scale will become all the more so efficient and perceptible. Taking into consideration the changes currently occurring in the world, this article dealing with cultural diplomacy aims at shedding a light on the evolution which Turkish diplomacy is going through in terms of its enforcing institutions and practice.

  12. The Effect of the Cultural Values on the Destination Image: A Search in Eskisehir 2013 Turkish World Capital of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Köroğlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As the destination images being dynamic and changeable, continuous researches should be conducted in order to measure and progress the images in the context of tourism marketing. The aim of this study is to analyze the tourists’ characters and behaviors who direct through the cultural destinations and to determine the relationship between the visitors’ perceptions of cultural values and destination image. Based on this purpose, a questionnaire was held on the foreign cullture tourist who visited Eskisehir, chosen as the 2013 Turkish World Capital of Culture. The data obtained were evaluated using analysis methods such as frequency, arithmetic mean, reliability, regression, independent samples t-test, one-way variance analysis (ANOVA. The results obtain from these analysis have shown that many of the participants have used internet as a source of information and travelled to explore new cultures. On the one hand the most affecting cultural values of the destination image was emotional values.

  13. The value of blood culture audits at peripheral hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chris R; Fatti, Geoff; Schrueder, Neshaad; Bonorchis, Kim; Meintjes, Graeme

    2012-03-07

    Knowledge of local antibiotic sensitivities is crucial to creating appropriate empiric antibiotic guidelines. The new National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) Data Warehouse allows clinicians to access collated spreadsheets of culture isolates and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for their facilities. We used this service to study the trends in blood culture (BC) results at GF Jooste Hospital from 2005 to 2010. We investigated the BC contamination rate and changes in the antibiotic sensitivity profiles of selected organisms, and estimated the proportion of infections that were hospital-acquired. Over 3000 BCs were performed per year in this period. A very high contamination rate was observed (7 - 9%) in 2005 - 2007, with a gratifying reduction by 2010. Ceftriaxone resistance increased from 16% to 62% in Klebsiella pneumoniae (p<0.0001), and from 33% to 100% in Enterobacter spp. (p=0.053).

  14. Cultural Differences in Values as Self-Guides

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, W.-Y.; Maio, G. R.; Rees, Kerry J; Kamble, S.; Mane, S

    2016-01-01

    Three studies tested whether individualism-collectivism moderates the extent to\\ud which values are endorsed as ideal self-guides and ought self-guides, and the\\ud consequences for regulatory focus and emotion. Across Studies 1 and 2,\\ud individualists endorsed values that are relatively central to the self as\\ud stronger ideals than oughts, whereas collectivists endorsed them as ideals and\\ud oughts to a similar degree. Study 2 found that individualists justified central\\ud values using reas...

  15. Nurture Hidden Talents: Transform School Culture into One That Values Teacher Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Diane P.

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the school culture where teacher expertise is often hidden and underused. While the media-rich culture places a high value on talent, the irony is that talent is underrated in most schools, and educators often remain silent about their hidden talents. Many school cultures are not conducive to dialogue that supports displays…

  16. San Luis Valley - Taos Plateau Landscape-Level Cultural Heritage Values and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wescott, Konstance L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Abplanalp, Jennifer M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brown, Jeff [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Cantwell, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dicks, Merrill [Bureau of Land Management, Taos, NM (United States); Fredericks, Brian [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Krall, Angie [US Forest Service, Creede, CO (United States); Rollins, Katherine E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sullivan, Robert [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Valdez, Arnie [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verhaaren, Bruce [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vieira, Joseph [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Walston, Lee [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zvolanek, Emily A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The San Luis Valley – Taos Plateau Landscape-Level Cultural Heritage Values and Risk Assessment (hereafter referred to as cultural assessment) is a BLM pilot project designed to see whether the Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) framework (already established and implemented throughout many ecoregions in the West) can be applied to the cultural environment.

  17. Traditional Values, Socio-Cultural Factors and Human Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper assesses the effects of traditional values (collective conceptions of ... and arts) on human resource management (HRM) in public sector organizations in ... material, intellectual and emotional features that characterize a society or a ...

  18. Exploring definitions of financial abuse in elderly Korean immigrants: the contribution of traditional cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Lee, Sang E; Eaton, Charissa K

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the cultural definitions of financial abuse from the perspective of 124 elderly Korean immigrants and to examine the role of traditional cultural values in their definitions by using a mixed methods approach. The qualitative analysis generated four themes relevant to definition of financial abuse. A binary logistic regression indicated that those with stronger cultural adherence to traditional values had higher odds of providing culture-based definitions of financial abuse. Education is needed for health professionals, social service providers, and adult protective workers to increase their understanding of culture-specific experiences of financial abuse among ethnic minority elders.

  19. Organisational Culture and Values and the Adaptation of Academic Units in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zilwa, Deanna

    2007-01-01

    This study explores connections between the organisational culture and values of academic units in Australian universities and their efforts to adapt to external environmental pressures. It integrates empirical findings from case studies with theories of organisational culture and values and adaptation. It identifies seven dimensions of academic…

  20. Searching for Symbolic Value of Cattle: Tropical Livestock Units, Market Price, and Cultural Value of Maasai Livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Quinlan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine metabolic, market, and symbolic values of livestock relative to cultural “positioning” by gender, marriage, and household production among Maasai people in Simanjiro, Tanzania to assess local “proximate currencies” relevant for “cultural success.” Data from mixed methods ethnographic research include qualitative interviews since 2012, observation of 85 livestock market sales in 2013 and 2015, and 37 short key informant interviews in 2015. We examine fit between market values, Tropical Livestock Units (TLU, weight-based species exchange ratio, and perceived value from interviews for moran (unmarried men, muruo (married men, and tɔmɔnɔ́k (married women. Hedonic regression using livestock species, sex, maturity, and size accounted for 90% of the local market price of livestock. We compared the market-based exchange ratio between cattle and smallstock (sheep and goats to TLU and perceived values situating symbolic value of cattle in terms of Maasai household production schema. One TLU model accurately predicted market exchange ratios, while another predicted hypothetical exchanges, suggesting need for improved livestock wealth estimation for pastoralists. Ritual context, subsistence work, and cultural position influenced perceived values: Moran overvalued cattle by 100% of the local market value. Tɔmɔnɔ́k accurately perceived the market exchange ratio despite never directly engaging in livestock market transactions. Muruo perceived exchange ratios intermediate between moran and tɔmɔnɔ́k. We argue that these perceptions of value reflect distinct labor responsibilities of moran, muruo, and tɔmɔnɔ́k in livestock management, differential value of bridewealth, and control of meat and milk.Attention to value of different livestock species in cultural models of production may prove useful for development efforts.

  1. Building a values-based culture in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetley, Josie; Dobson, Fiona; Jack, Kirsten; Pearson, Beryl; Walker, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Nurse education has found itself challenged to select and educate nurses who on completion of? of their programme? have: excellent technical skills, an ability to critically analyse care and work compassionately in ways that support the values of care that are important to service users. Recent reports of care suggest that nursing still needs to develop the values base of its student selection and education processes. Against this backdrop, this paper presents two examples from pre registration nurse education that illustrate how a values based approach is used as part of the selection process in one university and used to inform the development of a reflective poetry initiative in another university. Having presented the two examples the authors debate some of the wider benefits and challenges linked to these ways of working. For example, the importance of connecting nurses' personal beliefs, attitudes and assumptions to service user values in recruitment are discussed. The use of poetry as a way of thinking about practice that moves beyond traditional models of reflection in nursing are also considered. However, the authors recognise that if developments in nurse education are to have a real impact on nursing practice and patient care, there is the need for values based initiatives to be more directly connected to the delivery of healthcare.

  2. African Urbanism: Preparation for Multi-Ethnic Schools' Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Olu

    1987-01-01

    Focuses on cross-cultural perspectives of urbanization and urbanism by comparing the Yoruba cities of western Nigeria with cities of Europe and North America. Concludes that cross-cultural counselors working with Yoruba clients must understand Yoruba city clients and their home life, physical environment, family structure, parent attitudes, and…

  3. Black Undergraduate Students Attitude toward Counseling and Counselor Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Lonnie E.; Johnson, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A help seeking survey and measures of socioeconomic status, cultural mistrust, and African Self-consciousness were administered to 315 Black college students to study attitudes toward counseling and counselor preference. Multiple Regression analysis indicated that gender, cultural mistrust, and socioeconomic status were statistically significant…

  4. Redirecting traditional professional values to support safety: changing organisational culture in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J S; Quijada, M A

    2004-12-01

    Professionals in healthcare organisations who seek to enhance safety and quality in an increasingly demanding industry environment often identify culture as a barrier to change. The cultural focus on individual autonomy, for example, seems to conflict with desired norms of teamwork, problem reporting, and learning. We offer a definition and explication of why culture is important to change efforts. A cultural analysis of health care suggests professional values that can be redirected to support change. We offer examples of organisations that drew upon cultural strengths to create new ways of working and gradually shifted the culture.

  5. A Comparison on Culture Value Conception between Chinese and Americans Proverbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雁; 雷丽娟

    2007-01-01

    The abundant resources of proverbs illustrate their meaningful ideas both in Chinese proverbs and English proverbs, reflecting ordinary lives and regarded as the essence of culture in both countries. So American culture inherited many marvelous traditions from English proverbs and American proverbs must be influenced by English proverbs too. My paper will compare Chinese and American culture through proverbs, aiming at observing the differences of the culture value conception between Chinese and Americans, ...

  6. Redirecting traditional professional values to support safety: changing organisational culture in health care

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, J.; Quijada, M.

    2004-01-01

    Professionals in healthcare organisations who seek to enhance safety and quality in an increasingly demanding industry environment often identify culture as a barrier to change. The cultural focus on individual autonomy, for example, seems to conflict with desired norms of teamwork, problem reporting, and learning. We offer a definition and explication of why culture is important to change efforts. A cultural analysis of health care suggests professional values that can be redirected to suppo...

  7. On the Construction of University Counselors' Quality from the Perspective of Traditional Culture%基于传统文化视角下高校辅导员素质的建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁涛

    2014-01-01

    高校辅导员队伍是加强和改进大学生思想政治教育的组织保证,同时,这支队伍还承担着大学生的人生发展辅导、职业发展规划以及其他相关指导和服务工作。辅导员的素质建设关系到高校人才培养的质量,因此要加强其自身的政治思想、道德品质、作风建设、知识技能等素质建设,在传统文化的视角下,这些素质体现了一个人的正气、朝气、志气、才气、大气和责任心的建设。%The university counselor team is the organization guar-antee of enhancing and improving the ideological and political e-ducation of university students, and meanwhile, the team shoul-ders the counseling of university students' life development and career development planning as well as other relevant guidance and service. The construction of counselors' quality is related to the quality of university talent cultivation, therefore, they should enhance the construction of their own ideological and political quality, moral quality, style of work, knowledge and skills, etc., and from the perspective of traditional culture, the construction of these qualities is embodied in the construction of their integrity, vitality, ambition, brilliance, great momentum and responsibility.

  8. Infant Sleeping Arrangements and Cultural Values among Contemporary Japanese Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eShimizu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined infant sleeping arrangements and parenting ethnotheories of Japanese mothers in 2008 and 2009. Based on Greenfield's theory of social change and human development, we predicted that social change in Japan over the last decades (higher economic and education level, urbanization, complex technology, more women in the work force would lead to a decline in mother-infant cosleeping, compared with published findings concerning Japanese sleeping arrangements in the 1960s and 1980s. We also predicted that the practice of having babies sleep in their own beds and/or own rooms would be supported by ethnotheories stressing infant independence and other values adaptive in an urban, technologically sophisticated, relatively wealthy, and highly educated populace. Fifty-one Japanese mothers’ comments posted on Internet parenting forums were analyzed. Contrary to our hypothesis, cosleeping was as frequent among Japanese mothers in 2008-2009 as it had been in the 1960s and 1980s. However, analysis of the values of cosleeping mothers revealed frequent discrepancies between values and practices. In contrast, the minority of mothers whose babies slept alone in a separate room all expressed consonant ethnotheories. Our qualitative analysis indicates that it is not always easy for Japanese mothers to construct values for child rearing and gender roles that integrate traditional infant care practices with current sociodemographic conditions.

  9. Determining the Clinical Utility of an Absolute Procalcitonin Value for Predicting a Positive Culture Result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarini, Erica M; DeMott, Joshua; Patel, Gourang; Lat, Ishaq

    2017-05-01

    Various procalcitonin ranges have been established to guide antimicrobial therapy; however, there are no data that establish whether the initial procalcitonin value can determine the likelihood of a positive culture result. This study aimed to establish if the initial procalcitonin value, on clinical presentation, has a positive predictive value for any positive culture result. This was a retrospective study of 813 medical intensive care unit patients. Data collected included patient demographics, procalcitonin assay results, sources of infection, culture results, and lengths of stay. Patients were excluded if they were immunocompromised. The primary outcome of this study was to determine a procalcitonin value that would predict any positive culture. Secondary outcomes included the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for procalcitonin. After exclusions, a total of 519 patient charts were reviewed to determine the impact of the initial procalcitonin value on culture positivity. In our analyses, the receiver operating characteristic values were 0.62 for all cultures, 0.49 for pulmonary infections, 0.43 for urinary tract infections, and 0.78 for bacteremia. A procalcitonin value of 3.61 ng/ml was determined to be the threshold value for a positive blood culture result (prevalence, 4%). For bacteremia, the sensitivity of procalcitonin was 75%, the specificity was 72%, the positive predictive value was 20%, and the negative predictive value was 97%. Procalcitonin was a poor predictor of culture positivity. An initial procalcitonin value of less than 3.61 ng/ml may be useful in predicting whether bacteremia is absent. Procalcitonin should not be used as the only predictor for determining initiation of antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Multicultural Leadership in School Counseling: An Autophenomenography of an African American School Counselor's Successes and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wines, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    This autophenomenography describes multicultural leadership in school counseling from the perspective of a female African American school counselor; who served as a lead counselor, researcher, and participant of a research study, while employed in a predominantly White-culture school district. The theoretical framework grounding this study was…

  11. Rape, Statutory Rape, and Child Abuse: Legal Distinctions and Counselor Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Clifton W.; Rogers, Reagan E.

    2003-01-01

    This article explains the legal distinctions between rape, statutory rape, and child abuse and school counselors' obligations related to each. In addition, complicating issues such as cultural differences as well as the potential effect of mandated reporting on counselors' roles are addressed. (Contains 18 references.) (GCP)

  12. Measuring Professional Identity Development among Counselor Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Hurt, Kara M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the differences in professional identity development between novice and advanced counselor trainees (N = 161). Multivariate analyses of variance indicated significant differences between groups. Specifically, advanced counselor trainees demonstrated greater professional development compared with novice counselor trainees. No…

  13. Tracing Cultural Landscape Values of Children with Participatory Geographic Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puolamäki Laura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The cultural landscape value categories found from the workshop evaluation describe the character of the cultural landscape of children: living, learning and moving in the network of places between home and the world outside based on the local and family culture creates both individually and collectively valuable places. When these places are situated in a listed building or landscape area, the cultural landscape values of expert evaluation and children ́s evaluation connect. But based on this case study these value objects are more often disconnected. Landscape evaluation produced with children by suitable methods reveal the network of places and ways to experience them. Experience is a key for opening cultural heritage to this group. By finding a way to afford the experience they desire in the places of listed heritage, children could connect better to cultural landscape.

  14. Transformation of values and design in the new socio-cultural space

    OpenAIRE

    Gasimova Elfana Nasimi gyzy

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays people often see the contradictions in understanding values that define human and cultural measuring of the events of the social reality happening in almost all areas of modern life. In addition, we are witnessing the controversial events of the transformation that characterize the processes of reconsideration of the values. These contradictions, of course, show up in the area of social cultural values that define the work of the designer. In this regard the study of transformation o...

  15. Similarities and differences in cultural values between Iranian and Malaysian nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Jaafar, Rogayah; Rahim, Ahmad F. Abul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cultural values are invisible and relatively constant in societies. The purpose of the present study is to find diversities in cultural values of Iranian and Malaysian nursing students. Materials and Methods: Convenience sampling method was used for this comparative-descriptive study to gather the data from full-time undergraduate degree nursing students in Iran and Malaysia. The data were collected using Values Survey Module 2008 and were analyzed by independent t-test. Results: ...

  16. The Importance of Cultural Values and Trust for Innovation - A European Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Bing; Habisch, André; Thøgersen, John

    2017-01-01

    Cultural values and social capital are important parts of the context that determines countries’ innovation performance (and, hence, economic development). This paper investigates the culture-innovation relationship in a European context, as well as the mediating role of the national level trust...... in this connection. Data are used to test the hypotheses that a country’s innovation performance is influenced by its cultural value emphases and societal trust, and that the culture-innovation relationship is mediated by societal trust. Based on data from the Global Innovation Index and the European Social Survey...

  17. Examining the impact of Culture's consequences: a three-decade, multilevel, meta-analytic review of Hofstede's cultural value dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Vas; Kirkman, Bradley L; Steel, Piers

    2010-05-01

    Using data from 598 studies representing over 200,000 individuals, we meta-analyzed the relationship between G. Hofstede's (1980a) original 4 cultural value dimensions and a variety of organizationally relevant outcomes. First, values predict outcomes with similar strength (with an overall absolute weighted effect size of rho = 0.18) at the individual level of analysis. Second, the predictive power of the cultural values was significantly lower than that of personality traits and demographics for certain outcomes (e.g., job performance, absenteeism, turnover) but was significantly higher for others (e.g., organizational commitment, identification, citizenship behavior, team-related attitudes, feedback seeking). Third, cultural values were most strongly related to emotions, followed by attitudes, then behaviors, and finally job performance. Fourth, cultural values were more strongly related to outcomes for managers (rather than students) and for older, male, and more educated respondents. Fifth, findings were stronger for primary, rather than secondary, data. Finally, we provide support for M. Gelfand, L. H. Nishii, and J. L. Raver's (2006) conceptualization of societal tightness-looseness, finding significantly stronger effects in culturally tighter, rather than looser, countries.

  18. The Paths of the Counselor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglese, Sal

    1970-01-01

    Discusses counseling dialogue in religious context, but applicable universally. Successful encounter stresses reception, acceptance, listening, understanding, prudence. Focuses on importance of reflective, rather than directive counselor response. (CJ)

  19. Let's go outside: using photography to explore values and culture in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, K; de Goeas, S; Davies, S; Radcliffe, M; Christoforou, A

    2015-06-01

    Creative and imaginative approaches to mental healthcare education are known to help students explore emotions, empathy and others' experiences, as well as address ambivalence and ambiguity. Very few studies in mental health nursing education specifically utilise photography as a participatory pedagogic tool, with even fewer utilising photography to explore understandings of culture, values and diversity. Photography makes visible complex, collaborative forms of learning and previously unidentified, unarticulated ideas about culture and values. Photography as a critical pedagogic method helps develop critical, politicized understandings of culture and values. Increasing culturally diverse populations means complex and conflicting values have become a common feature in mental health nursing. In education the need to critically examine such topics necessitates creative and engaging pedagogy, and visual methods are readily acknowledged as such. Yet while many studies advocate and demonstrate the value of art-based methods in student learning, very few studies in mental health nursing specifically utilize photography as a participatory pedagogic tool, and fewer still use photography to explore understandings of culture, values and diversity. In this paper, we discuss a qualitative study where mental health nursing students used photography to create images in order to explore their own and often dominant culture and attendant values. Findings suggest that photography makes visible situated, relational and collaborative learning, and surfaces previously unidentified, unarticulated ideas about culture and values. These practices mimic important processes central to mental health nursing practice and contemporaneous understandings of diverse cultures. We argue that photography provides an important resource with which to unearth subjugated knowledge, promote critical understandings of culture and values, and thereby help address inequalities in mental health care.

  20. Minding money: how understanding of value is culturally promoted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuya

    2011-03-01

    Adding to the issues of cognitive economics (Cortes and Londoño IPBS: Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science 43(2):178-184, 2009) and the social psychology of "shadow economics" (Salvatore et al. IPBS: Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science 43(2), 2009), the carrier of economic exchanges, money, plays a key role in children's socialization in different societies. Money given to children, 'pocket money,' is a negotiated settlement between children's social demands and those of their parents. I analyze such negotiations here on the basis of a concrete case of a Korean family in which the provision of pocket money given the child was inconsistent over time. The results indicate the social ecology of money use, in both children and their parents, sets the stage for value construction of the meaning of money.

  1. A Comparison on Culture Value Conception between Chinese and Americans Proverbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雁; 雷丽娟

    2007-01-01

    The abundant resources of proverbs illustrate their meaningful ideas both in Chinese proverbs and English proverbs,reflecting ordinary lives and regarded as the essence of culture in both countries.So American culture inherited many marvelous traditions from English proverbs and American proverbs must be influenced by English proverbs too.My paper will compare Chinese and American culture through proverbs,aiming at observing the differences of the culture value conception between Chinese and Americans,and hope that this study also can be regarded as a data to give referential meaning to the further research on cross-culture and language comparison.

  2. Trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values among Mexican American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P; Basilio, Camille D; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A; Liu, Yu; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2014-12-01

    Mexican Americans are one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States, yet we have limited knowledge regarding changes (i.e., developmental trajectories) in cultural orientation based upon their exposure to the Mexican American and mainstream cultures. We examined the parallel trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values in a sample of 749 Mexican American adolescents (49 % female) across assessments during the fifth grade (approximately 11 years of age), the seventh grade (approximately 13 years of age) and the tenth grade (approximately 16 years of age). We expected that these values would change over this developmental period and this longitudinal approach is more appropriate than the often used median split classification to identify distinct types of acculturation. We found four distinct acculturation trajectory groups: two trajectory groups that were increasing slightly with age in the endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was relatively stable in Mexican American cultural values while the other was declining in their endorsement of these values; and two trajectory groups that were declining substantially with age in their endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was also declining in Mexican American cultural values and the other which was stable in these values. These four trajectory groups differed in expected ways on a number of theoretically related cultural variables, but were not highly consistent with the median split classifications. The findings highlight the need to utilize longitudinal data to examine the developmental changes of Mexican American individual's adaptation to the ethnic and mainstream culture in order to understand more fully the processes of acculturation and enculturation.

  3. Success for All? The Role of the School Counselor in Creating and Sustaining Culturally Responsive Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betters-Bubon, Jennifer; Brunner, Todd; Kansteiner, Avery

    2016-01-01

    Successful implementation of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) programs should include culturally responsive practices to reduce disproportionality in school discipline referrals and create effective learning environments for all students. Sustaining culturally responsive PBIS programs requires attention to student demographics…

  4. Counselors' Use of Functional Assessment: A Survey of Pennsylvania Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Mildred D.

    As people with disabilities are becoming more included in society, professional counselors are required to develop skills and identify tools to assess, counsel, and advocate for these clients. This article presents Pennsylvania counselors' definition of functional assessment and procedures, techniques, and instruments currently in use. Most…

  5. Turkish counselor educators’ opinions about counselor candidates’ dispositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidan Korkut Owen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Counselor candidates are assessed though homework, exams, projects and thesis during their education. On the other hand, there are some discussions about assessments of their dispositions besides their academic achievement. Even though here is no consensus about what these characteristics are, openness, self-awareness, honesty can be given as an example. The purpose of this study is three­fold: a to describe what Turkish counselor educators think about which dispositions counselor candidates should have, b how these dispositions can be developed or enriched and c how they can be assessed. Researchers developed a questionnaire with five open ended questions and it was sent to 48 counselor educators via email, 34 of them from 23 universities (three of them were private sent their feedback, so return rate was 71%. The findings were analyzed by using descriptive statistics such as frequencies. According to findings, counselor educators mainly revealed that honesty, being open for communication, empathetic understanding, self-awareness, being flexible and helpful are fundamental dispositions. According to counselor educators these dispositions can be developed by increasing the number of practicum courses, adding counseling supervision courses and practices to education program, being a role model as counselor educators. Counselor educators suggested that dispositions can be assessed by evaluating students’ performance during practicum courses, using test and non-test assessment techniques, observing them and interviewing. Results were discussed in light of current literature.

  6. Turkish School Counselors and Counselor Educators' Perceptions about Multicultural Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatunoglu, Askim

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the topic of multicultural counseling in Turkey, where school-based multicultural counseling services remain comparatively limited in scope and application. Participants consisted of twenty-three counselors working in secondary or high schools and fourteen counselor educators from several state universities. While the…

  7. Cultural/interpersonal values and smoking in an ethnically diverse sample of Southern California adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jennifer B; Shakib, Sohaila; Gallaher, Peggy; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Mouttapa, Michele; Palmer, Paula H; Johnson, C Anderson

    2006-01-01

    In ethnically diverse school contexts, values from multiple cultures might influence adolescents' attitudes and behaviors. This study developed scales to assess cultural values among Southern California 6'-grade adolescents (N=2281) and evaluated the associations between values and smoking. The scales assessed values salient in many Hispanic and Asian cultures: Respect for Adults (e.g., filial piety, respeto), Interpersonal Harmony (e.g., saving face, simpatia), and Differentiated Gender Roles (e.g., machismo). In cross-sectional and one-year longitudinal models, Respect for Adults and Interpersonal Harmony were associated with a lower risk of lifetime smoking. The associations were significant even after controlling for demographic characteristics, friends' smoking, and parents' smoking, indicating that values influence adolescents' behavior over and above the effects of modeling and peer influence. Increased understanding of adolescents' values could inform the creation of smoking prevention programs for ethnically diverse adolescents.

  8. Genetic Counselors in Startup Companies: Redefining the Genetic Counselor Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabideau, Marina M; Wong, Kenny; Gordon, Erynn S; Ryan, Lauren

    2016-08-01

    Genetic counselors (GCs) have recently begun moving into non-clinic based roles in increasing numbers. A relatively new role for GCs is working for startup companies. Startups are newly established companies in the phase of developing and researching new scalable businesses. This article explores the experiences of four GCs working at different startup companies and aims to provide resources for GCs interested in learning more about these types of roles. The article describes startup culture, including a relatively flat organizational structure, quick product iterations, and flexibility, among other unique cultural characteristics. Financial considerations are described, including how to understand and evaluate a company's financial status, along with a brief explanation of alternate forms of compensation including stock options and equity. Specifically, the article details the uncertainties and rewards of working in a fast-paced startup environment that affords opportunities to try new roles and use the genetic counseling skill set in new ways. This article aims to aid GCs in determining whether a startup environment would be a good fit, learning how to evaluate a specific startup, and understanding how to market themselves for positions at startups.

  9. IKEA´s Organizational Culture in Diverse Contexts- A values-based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Arendt, Katarzyna; Bereng, Reitumtse Esther,; Obasi, Edith Uzoma

    2016-01-01

    In all organizations, processes of constructing shared meanings, assumptions and beliefs take place. Through these processes a sense of organization and its culture is constructed. The focus on the role of values for organizational culture and identity is critical to an understanding of the contemporary organizational dynamics. The main objective of this project is to examine how, IKEA constructs corporate culture through discourses, sensemaking processes and organizational practices. The ana...

  10. A framework to update Hofstede's cultural value indices: economic dynamics and institutional stability

    OpenAIRE

    Linghui Tang; Peter E Koveos

    2008-01-01

    This study offers an update of the Hofstede cultural value dimensions. We argue that changes in economic conditions are the source of cultural dynamics, while the endurance of institutional characteristics provides the foundation for cultural stability. It is found that national wealth, measured by GDP per capita, has a curvilinear relationship with individualism, long-term orientation, and power distance scores. Relatively speaking, uncertainty avoidance and masculinity mainly reflect some r...

  11. Partner effects of Mexican cultural values: the couple and parenting relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Jin; Lucero-Liu, Ana A; Gamble, Wendy C; Taylor, Angela R; Christensen, Donna Hendrickson; Modry-Mandell, Kerri L

    2008-03-01

    In this investigation, the authors explored the impact of individuals' cultural values on their partners' relationship adjustment and perceptions of their parenting relationship. The authors examined Mexican cultural values of simpatía (i.e., harmonious interpersonal relationships) and respeto (i.e., respect for authority figures) using a sample of 50 Mexican-origin couples in southern Arizona. Congruent with their hypotheses, results supported the proposition that fathers' simpatía is positively associated with both relationship adjustment and the parenting relationship as reported by mothers, whereas fathers' respeto is negatively associated with both relationship adjustment and the parenting relationship as reported by mothers. However, the authors found little evidence of a contribution of mothers' cultural values to fathers' perceptions of either relationship adjustment or the parenting relationship. They interpret these findings to suggest that mothers' relationship adjustment and parenting relationship are more sensitive to and dependent on fathers' degree of traditional cultural values among Mexican-origin families.

  12. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  13. The Relationships between Mexican American Acculturation, Cultural Values, Gender, and Help-Seeking Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Sanchez, Lucila; Atkinson, Donald R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between Mexican acculturation, cultural values, gender, and help-seeking intentions among Mexican American community college students. Findings suggest that as Mexican Americans lose their culture of origin and increase their generational status, their attitudes toward help seeking become less favorable. This…

  14. A BRIEF TALK ON AMERICAN CULTURAL VALUES: REFLECTED ON THE MOVIE THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temmy Temmy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available America as one of world’s biggest developed countries has a very strong influence on globaleconomy, politics, education, science, and military. America is also one of teaching Chinese as aforeign language destinations, therefore understanding American cultural values is very important.Article represents American cultural values based on a true story movie "The pursuit of Happiness".Research method applied was library research. It can be concluded that the characters, setting, andconflicts really presented the characteristics of American society.

  15. National cultural values and the evolution of process and outcome discrepancies in international strategic alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nti, Kofi O

    2004-01-01

    on differences in three value orientations among cultures. activity orientation, mastery over nature, and assumptions about human nature are the value orientations that affect alliance functioning. The author/s argue that alliances are prone to interpretational, attributional, and behavioral conflicts...... originating from differences in value orientations among partners. The three value orientations are shown to be the most useful in explaining the dynamics of alliances....

  16. The Influence of Economic Literacyon Consumption Behaviour Mediated by Local Cultural Values and Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldila Septiana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the influence of economics literacy on the students’ consumption behavior through local cultural values and promotions. The mediation used is based on the theories, the empirical studies and the previous studies.Quantitative approach was used in this study. The population was the Pamekasan Senior High Schools students (Class XI IPS, academic year 2012/2013. Proportional random sampling was conducted to take the samples in the population. The data was collected by using the questionnaire and test. Path analysis was used to analyze the data.The findings showe that the economic literacy level influences directly and significantly on the local cultural values, while affected negatively significant on the promotion. Also the economic literacy level influences directly and negatively significant on the consumption behavior. Contrary, the local cultural values influence directly, positively and significantly on the consumption behavior similar to the promotion. Moreover, the economic literacy level influences indirectly and significantly on the consumption behavior through the local cultural values. Similar to the local cultural values, the promotion aspect had the same influence direction. Therefore, this research provided evidence that the economic literacy affected consumption behaviour which are moderated through the value of local culture and promotion aspects

  17. Family Counseling for All Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David M.

    Counselors whose specialty is marriage and family counseling develop a theoretical and research base and acquire countless hours of experience upon which to base their interventions. Most counselors and other helping professionals whose specialty is in another area do as well as they can lacking specific theoretical concepts and experience from…

  18. Abortion, Birthright and the Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadale, Vincent E.; And Others

    This transcript is the result of panel presentation given on the implications of liberalized abortion laws for counselors. A new law which went into effect in July, 1970, in New York State presented women with the option of obtaining a legal abortion up to the 24th week of pregnancy. Counselors in New York State were, therefore, presented with new…

  19. Assessment of Counselors' Supervision Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Ali; Sürücü, Abdullah; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate elementary and high school counselors' supervision processes and efficiency of their supervision. The interview method was used as it was thought to be better for realizing the aim of the study. The study group was composed of ten counselors who were chosen through purposeful sampling method. Data were…

  20. School Counselors' Perceptions of Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kathy D.

    2010-01-01

    This was a qualitative study which examined school counselors' perceptions of cyberbullying. Thirty-two school counselors were asked seven reflection questions in regards to their experiences, roles/responsibilities, concerns, challenges and recommendations in handling cyberbullying occurrences with students. From the data analysis, three…

  1. A Futuristic Perspective for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Garry R.; Benjamin, Libby

    Some generalizations drawn from the literature on futurism are set forth in this monograph. Possible social and behavioral consequences of these as they relate to the work of the counselor are projected. The document then suggests some ways counselors can help clients to create rewarding personal futures, and describes a futures studies program…

  2. Counselor Hypothesis-Testing Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; Newman, Lisa J.

    1983-01-01

    Reports two experiments relevant to the questioning strategies counselors use in testing their hypotheses about clients. Results supported the idea that counselors are able to take a tentative hypothesis about a client and test its accuracy against additional independent, unbiased observations of the client. (LLL)

  3. Modeling Rehabilitation Counselor Clinical Judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; Leierer, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluate three proposed models of the rehabilitation counselor judgment process. Counselors made multiple judgments about clients whose information systematically varied across three dimensions. These data were then analyzed using path analytic techniques to determine which of the models was the best description of the process rehabilitation…

  4. The Effects of Counselor Disability Status and Reputation on Perceptions of Counselor Expertness, Attractiveness, and Trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leierer, Stephen J.; Strohmer, Douglas C.; Kern, Adrienne M.; Clemons-Guidry, Denise B.; Roberts, Kelly J.; Curry, Karen E.

    1998-01-01

    Adults with disabilities (N=60) viewed videotapes portraying client-counselor reactions to examine the influence of counselor disability status and counselor reputation. A significant effect was found for counselor disability status. Counselors without a disability received higher ratings. There was no effect for reputation, and no interaction was…

  5. Predicting attitudes toward nanotechnology: The influence of cultural and predispositional values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsung-Jen

    Past experience in dealing with biotechnology has suggested that public opinion plays an important role in determining the prosperity of emerging technologies. A great amount of money and energy, therefore, were invested to understand nanotechnology's impact on the society and the public, in addition to the technical advancement of the technology. However, most studies examining public opinion have focused on personal level factors and have ignored the potential influence of cultural factors. This study addresses this gap by analyzing public opinion in 21 countries, including the US and 20 European countries. Specifically, this study examines the impact of predispositional and cultural values on public support for nanotechnology, with the mediating roles of moral judgment and risk perception accounted for. This study also looks into the dynamics between cultural values and predispositional values; that is, how cultural values may moderate the effects of predispositional values in affecting attitudes toward nanotechnology. The results indicate that people rely on "information shortcuts," such as confidence and religious belief, for decision making. Individual-level factors still play an important role in shaping public attitudes even after country-level factors are controlled. Furthermore, aggregate cultural values provide people with important "mental programs" to interpret nanotechnology. They explain why people in different cultures have different moral and risk perceptions. However, most of the cultural values do not affect public support directly, suggesting that public support is contingent greatly on the core characteristics of nanotechnology, such as its usefulness, risk, and moral acceptability, which, in turn, is influenced by personal beliefs and cultural givens. The results also suggest that people in different cultures respond to survey questions in different manners. People living in cultures emphasizing uncertainty avoidance and individualism are more

  6. The Influence of Socio-Cultural Background and Product Value in Usability Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Sonderegger, Andreas; Sauer, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the influence of socio-cultural background and product value on different outcomes of usability tests. A study was conducted in two different socio-cultural regions, Switzerland and East Germany, which differed in a number of aspects (e.g. economic power, price sensitivity and culture). Product value (high vs. low) was varied by manipulating the price of the product. Sixty-four test participants were asked to carry out five typical user tasks in the context of coffee mac...

  7. An Analysis of Cultural Values of Chinese and Foreign Cities’Publicity Videos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Meng-chen

    2015-01-01

    The trend of globalization has a profound impact on the development of the whole world, and there are a lot of events held by several countries. The publicity videos have become a significant tool to disseminate connotation of the city and to attract people all over the world. At the same time, videos also show us different cultural values between China and foreign countries. To analyse different cultural values, the importance of intercultural communication will be deeply understood, and it will be help⁃ful for promoting China’s cultural soft power.

  8. The Study on the Preferences of Customer Personal Values with Chinese Culture Background in Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yue

    Customer personal values are the important factors which affect customer behaviors, and they guide and decide the customer's attitudes and behaviors on the products or the services. The paper thinks there are only several important customer personal values to guide customer's decisions, and these values will have -strong cultural differences. This study focuses on discussing the preferences of customer personal values with Chinese culture background when customers consume service and analyzes on the customer preferences of customer personal values with the deep interview method. After interviewing 16 responders with the semi-structured questionnaires, the study finds out some interesting results: (1) Some customers have recognized the existent of customer personal values, even though customer perceived values still have the strong influences on customer behaviors. (2) As they pursue to high quality lives, customers enjoy the lives in easy and pleasure way and care about the safe of the family. Quick response, simple and professional services contribute to enhance the experiences of easy and pleasure lives. (3) Non-rational consumers need the respect from the staff and the companies seriously. In comparison, the rational customers care less about the respect. (4) The sociable requirements have become a common consuming psychology of the customers. More and more customers try to gain the friends by consuming some services. (5) The preferences of customer personal values have a close relationship with the Chinese culture, such as collective values, family conception and "face" culture. The results benefit for service companies improving service brands and service quality.

  9. The Cultural Value of Older People's Experiences of Theater-making: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Miriam; Rickett, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    Although a number of existing reviews document the health and social benefits of arts participation by older people, there are none which focus specifically on theater and drama. This article presents the findings of a study conducted as part of the UK's Arts and Humanities Research Council "Cultural Value Project." The 2-year (2013-2015) "Cultural Value Project" sought to make a major contribution to how we think about the value of arts and culture to individuals and to society. It made 72 awards: 19 critical reviews of existing bodies of research, 46 research development awards to carry out new research, and 7 expert workshop awards to facilitate discussions among academics and practitioners. Together, these awards explored the components of cultural value and the ways in which cultural value is evidenced and evaluated. Following an extensive search of academic databases and E-mail requests via relevant organizations and networks, 77 publications formed the basis for our own critical review. Our findings highlight the benefits and value of older people's theater and drama participation on health and well-being, group relationships, learning and creativity, and draw attention to the importance of the esthetic value and quality of older people's drama. Despite the recent surge of interest in this field (a third of the reviewed literature was published between 2010 and 2014), we suggest that there are multiple areas for further research.

  10. The influence of socio-cultural background and product value in usability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderegger, Andreas; Sauer, Juergen

    2013-05-01

    This article examines the influence of socio-cultural background and product value on different outcomes of usability tests. A study was conducted in two different socio-cultural regions, Switzerland and East Germany, which differed in a number of aspects (e.g. economic power, price sensitivity and culture). Product value (high vs. low) was varied by manipulating the price of the product. Sixty-four test participants were asked to carry out five typical user tasks in the context of coffee machine usage, measuring performance, perceived usability, and emotion. The results showed that in Switzerland, high-value products were rated higher in usability than low-value products whereas in East Germany, high-value products were evaluated lower in usability. A similar interaction effect of socio-cultural background and product value was observed for user emotion. Implications are that the outcomes of usability tests do not allow for a simple transfer across cultures and that the mediating influence of perceived product value needs to be taken into consideration.

  11. The Aesthetic Value of Socio-Cultural Identities and the Cultural Dimension of the Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaros Elias Mavromatidis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes an individual theoretical study on how the landscape could be shaped by economic globalization and political restructuring. Providing a socio-cultural approach to the landscape notion I am trying to discover through the international literature the subjective dimension on landscape definition, in order to understand its ‘cultural dimension’. In this paper, the notion of ‘virtual landscape’ is introduced in order to investigate the incoherence that exists in the nowadays megacities regarding their social reality and their iconic existence through architecture and urban planning. In addition, it is also explored in theory how an ideological turn is re-inforced through political orientation focusing on ‘virtual landscape’ images in order to obtain a favorable publicity in a contemporary context of ‘globalised cities’ consisting in the elimination of the ‘cultural landscape’. Therefore, this contribution has as main objective to define, negotiate and start the debate on radical socio-cultural approaches of landscape notion in the nowadays ‘megacities’, inside a strict capitalistic context.

  12. A Typology of Burnout in Professional Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Min; Cho, Seong Ho; Kissinger, Daniel; Ogle, Nick T.

    2010-01-01

    The authors used a cluster analysis procedure and the Counselor Burnout Inventory (S. M. Lee et al., 2007) to identify professional counselors' burnout types. Three clusters were identified: well-adjusted, persevering, and disconnected counselors. The results also indicated that counselors' job satisfaction and self-esteem were good discriminators…

  13. Burnout and Job Satisfaction among Counselor Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Balkin, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between burnout and job satisfaction among counselor educators was investigated. A total of 220 full-time counselor educators participated in this quantitative research study. Emotional exhaustion seemed to be the most significant predictor of burnout among counselor educators. Implications for counselor education and future…

  14. The School Counselor, the Cactus, and Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, John D.; Walter, Paul B.

    1975-01-01

    The authors suggest that counselor supervision is a viable way to assist school counselors in dealing with lack of professional development opportunities. Supervision can facilitate the counselor's personal and professional development and can promote counselor competencies, accountability and the improvement of guidance services and programs. (SE)

  15. Burnout and Job Satisfaction among Counselor Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Balkin, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between burnout and job satisfaction among counselor educators was investigated. A total of 220 full-time counselor educators participated in this quantitative research study. Emotional exhaustion seemed to be the most significant predictor of burnout among counselor educators. Implications for counselor education and future…

  16. Latino cultural values as protective factors against sexual risks among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mindy; Malcolm, Lydia R; Diaz-Albertini, Kristine; Klinoff, Vera A; Leeder, Elisa; Barrientos, Sohani; Kibler, Jeffrey L

    2014-12-01

    The study objective was to examine the associations between cultural values and sexual risk factors among Latino youth. A sample of 226 Latino adolescents ages 13-16 completed a survey on cultural and sexual variables. Results indicate higher levels of Latino cultural orientation were related to greater sexual self-efficacy and fewer sexual partners for female adolescents and greater condom use self-efficacy for both males and females. Greater endorsement of simpatia (belief in interpersonal relationship harmony) was associated with sexual abstinence and greater sexual self-efficacy for all adolescents, and with being older at sexual debut for females. Stronger endorsement of respeto (respect towards parents and other authority figures) was correlated with a lower intention to have sex during secondary school and greater condom use self-efficacy. American cultural orientation was associated with less condom use. Our findings indicate Latino cultural values may serve as protective factors against sexual risk behaviors among Latino youth.

  17. Counselor and Theological Identity Formation and the Ethic of Inclusion for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study used interpretative phenomenological analysis to examine how Christian counselors-in-training engaged their theological beliefs about sexual orientation in relation to the Code of Ethics of the American Counseling Association (ACA). The ACA Code of Ethics requires counselors to refrain from imposing their personal values on…

  18. Mexican Americans' Bilingual Ability, Counselor Bilingualism Cues, Counselor Ethnicity, and Perceived Counselor Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Sanchez, Lucila; Atkinson, Donald R.; Fraga, Elizabeth D.

    1999-01-01

    Mexican-American college students (N=186) were exposed to a counselor introduction that identified her as either Mexican American or Canadian American, followed by a recorded bogus counseling session in which the counselor spoke English only or English combined with cues of Spanish-speaking ability. No effect was found on ratings of counselor…

  19. Value dimensions of corporate culture of state-owned enterprise employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Požega Željko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines value dimensions of the organizational culture of employees in Hrvatska elektroprivreda d.d., a joint stock company wholly owned by the government of the Republic of Croatia, with the aim of identifying the corporate culture and value differences within the company in relation to employee gender, age and type of workplace. Hofstede’s research on organizational culture value dimensions forms the theoretical framework of this paper. Descriptive statistical methods, i.e., frequencies, comparison of means and ranking were used in the analysis. The results show a difference in values between older and younger employees, as well as between employees working in an office and those working in the field which leads to the conclusion that in this company there are different sub-cultural elements within a single corporate culture. Moreover, the results show that value dimensions of employees in Hrvatska elektroprivreda d.d. are somewhat different from earlier findings of Hofstede’s research into value dimensions of employees in the Republic of Croatia in that the power distance is lower; uncertainty avoidance remains relatively high; individualism of employees has risen considerably, the culture is still impregnated with feminine values and there is a high degree of long-term orientation of employees. The analysis of respondents’ answers indicates that personal time and family time are highly valued. In addition, physical working conditions, good working relations with immediate supervisors and good cooperation with colleagues were also rated high on the scale of importance. It was also found that the most important work objective was job security, and that personal steadiness, stability and persistence were most valued personal traits.

  20. Relationship Marketing: A Quantitative Study of Individual Cultural Values as Predictors of Satisfaction Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Tracy Simone

    2017-01-01

    The economic value of international students to higher education had become important and global competition to attract and retain these lucrative students was fierce. In British Columbia, educational goals were set to ensure that all students receive quality learning experiences and provide maximum economic benefit. Cultural values affect…

  1. The Value of Risk: Noah's Ark at the Skirball Cultural Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Sheri; Gittleman, Marni

    2010-01-01

    In this article Bernstein and Gittleman address the role of risk in creating an exhibition that is of value to the public and is aligned with their cultural institution's core values. Through an examination of the development process, the authors present lessons that can assist others who are interested in undertaking an exhibition with similar…

  2. A New Measure of Traditional Values Across Cultures: China and Russia Compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Taormina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new measure of adherence to traditional values was created with the objective of facilitating research within and across cultures and nations. The measure was tested in China (N = 321 and Russia (N = 314 and factor analysis of the data revealed two subscales named Personal Traditional Values (10 items and Public Traditional Values (6 items. Empirical psychometric testing of the overall 16-item measure and the two subscales strongly supported the validity and reliability of all three measures. Means comparisons conducted to assess how well the measures could be used for cross-cultural comparisons revealed the Russians somewhat more than the Chinese living by traditional values overall, both nations about equal on living according to traditional values in their personal lives, and the Russians significantly more inclined to abide by traditional values in public. Also tested were several social and psychological variables as theoretical predictors of living by traditional values, and Life Satisfaction was tested as a possible correlate of living according to traditional values. Regression analyses on the combined data confirmed that Family Emotional Support, Conscientiousness, Collectivism, and Age were all significant positive predictors of living by traditional values. Additional regressions also found some unique predictors for each nation. These findings and the results of the parametric tests support the use of the new scales for measuring traditional values both within and across cultures.

  3. American Counseling in the Mind of a Chinese Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijun

    1994-01-01

    Illustrating three instances he encountered here in the United States, the Chinese counselor argues that American counseling is deeply rooted in rugged individualism, and often at the expense of the family and community. The suitability of American counseling for other cultures is thus questioned. (Author/NB)

  4. International Immersion in Counselor Education: A Consensual Qualitative Research Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Sejal M.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    This study used consensual qualitative research methodology to examine the phenomenon of international immersion on counselor education students' (N = 10) development and growth. Seven domains emerged from the data (cultural knowledge, empathy, personal and professional impact, process/reflection, relationships, personal characteristics, and…

  5. International Immersion in Counselor Education: A Consensual Qualitative Research Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Sejal M.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    This study used consensual qualitative research methodology to examine the phenomenon of international immersion on counselor education students' (N = 10) development and growth. Seven domains emerged from the data (cultural knowledge, empathy, personal and professional impact, process/reflection, relationships, personal characteristics, and…

  6. Transformation of values and design in the new socio-cultural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasimova Elfana Nasimi gyzy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays people often see the contradictions in understanding values that define human and cultural measuring of the events of the social reality happening in almost all areas of modern life. In addition, we are witnessing the controversial events of the transformation that characterize the processes of reconsideration of the values. These contradictions, of course, show up in the area of social cultural values that define the work of the designer. In this regard the study of transformation of social and cultural values of the national culturological thought is of great importance. The author comes to a conclusion that perfection, harmony, a sense of proportion, taste, an image of the world order, and a sense of beauty are aesthetic categories based on the aesthetic ideal and determine the possibility of its implementation.

  7. Cultural values and performance appraisal: assessing the effects of rater self-construal on performance ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vipanchi; Roch, Sylvia G

    2013-01-01

    Much of the prior research investigating the influence of cultural values on performance ratings has focused either on conducting cross-national comparisons among raters or using cultural level individualism/collectivism scales to measure the effects of cultural values on performance ratings. Recent research has shown that there is considerable within country variation in cultural values, i.e. people in one country can be more individualistic or collectivistic in nature. Taking the latter perspective, the present study used Markus and Kitayama's (1991) conceptualization of independent and interdependent self-construals as measures of individual variations in cultural values to investigate within culture variations in performance ratings. Results suggest that rater self-construal has a significant influence on overall performance evaluations; specifically, raters with a highly interdependent self-construal tend to show a preference for interdependent ratees, whereas raters high on independent self-construal do not show a preference for specific type of ratees when making overall performance evaluations. Although rater self-construal significantly influenced overall performance evaluations, no such effects were observed for specific dimension ratings. Implications of these results for performance appraisal research and practice are discussed.

  8. The Image of Nursing among High School Guidance Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippman, Doris, Troth; Ponton, Karen Stonkas

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 500 high school counselors received 313 responses indicating that they (1) viewed nurses more favorably than media portrayals; (2) perceived nurses as knowledgeable, caring professionals; (3) recognized the value of professional education; and (4) believed parents influenced career choices and needed to realize the value of nursing as…

  9. The Application of Hofstede’s Value Dimensions to Inter-culture Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜楠

    2013-01-01

    A manager, Mr. Wang, sent emails everyday to his employee, Dannis,to show his care, only leading Dannis to quit. The two sides of the confrontation in the above case actual-ly represent the different value dimension of two countries, with Dannis representing American people and Mr. Wang represent-ing Chinese people. American culture tends towards individual-ism and Chinese culture tends towards collectivism.

  10. The role of television in cultivating the values of pluralism and cultural diversity in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladkova A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the influence of the mass media and in particular television on the development of the values of pluralism and cultural diversity in children. The role of television is quite important in forming positive attitudes toward cultural, ethnic, and other groups and in inculcating an adequate perception of social reality and tolerant, multicultural awareness. The article also analyzes the functions and principles of public broadcasting, among which diversity of programming is one of the most significant.

  11. Achievement, Happiness and Trust – Hungary’s Location on the Map of Cultural Values

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    Hristina Sokolova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to determine the aspects of achievement, happiness and trust in Hungarian society in the light of cultural values. Analysis is based on results from the European Social Survey, European Values Survey and surveys completed by the Hungarian Social Research Institute. Results show that the concepts of achievement, happiness and trust are interdependent and key factors for both individual and social development. The concepts are defined by the cultural value systems in Hungary and serve an important role in individual and societal motivation for success. Results could be used for future comparative research between Hungary and other countries, as well as comparing these notions as a whole in order to determine individual motivations in different cultural contexts.

  12. National cultural values and the evolution of process and outcome discrepancies in international strategic alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nti, Kofi O

    2004-01-01

    discrepancies that may emerge during the course of an alliance. They argue that national culture affects alliance evolution by influencing partners sensitivity to discrepancy detection , shaping the nature of attributions they make, and by affecting the partners reactions to discrepancies. They focus...... on differences in three value orientations among cultures. activity orientation, mastery over nature, and assumptions about human nature are the value orientations that affect alliance functioning. The author/s argue that alliances are prone to interpretational, attributional, and behavioral conflicts......The article assesses the role played by national cultural values in shaping the evolution of international strategic alliances. The authors build on a systems dynamic model of alliance evolution in which the developmental path of an alliance depends on how the partners manage process and outcome...

  13. Improving the energy performance of historic buildings with architectural and cultural values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2017-01-01

    The thermal performance of solid walls of historic buildings can be improved by external or internal insulation. External insulation is preferred from a technical perspective, but is often disregarded as many such buildings have architectural or cultural values leaving internal insulation.......g. improvement of thermal indoor climate. The paper discusses different motivating factors for improving the thermal performance of solid walls in historic buildings with architectural and cultural values. It is argued that internal insulation, provided that it can be done without resulting in critical moisture......, instead of replacing them with new energy-efficient buildings, because of the architectural and cultural values that they possess. The underlying basis for this study is a 5-year research project, RIBuild, funded by the European Commission, running from 2015 to 2019....

  14. A Friction of Cultural Values and Characteristics of Imperial Mosque in Ternate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    muhammad tayeb

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has many religious culture that should be preserved one of  which is the imperial mosque. Most of the imperial mosque has its own characteristics in carrying out activities both religious and cultural. Sultanate of Ternate is the largest sultanates in eastern Indonesia which would give other peculiarities that need to be raised as a typical Indonesian culture. The purpose of this study is to identify the type of tradition in doing at the mosque sultanate by people of Ternate and changes in cultural values of the people of Ternate in the imperial mosque. In this study found the phenomenon characteristic changes in cultural values by linking changes in the physical aspect and non-physical. To determine the effect of these factors, the method used is the method of observation of physical traces. This method is expected to be able to explain the effect of the change occurred. Based on the results of the study indicate compliance is still customary rules of religious traditions in the imperial mosque although some traditions that formerly taboo has been done, the progress of the times, increase knowledge, and make the implementation of the reform and renewal of cultural values carried by the community for various reasons theTernate.

  15. Incorporating the cultural value of respeto into a framework of Latino parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Esther J; Fernandez, Yenny; Cortes, Dharma E

    2010-01-01

    Latino families face multiple stressors associated with adjusting to United States mainstream culture that, along with poverty and residence in inner-city communities, may further predispose their children to risk for negative developmental outcomes. Evidence-based mental health treatments may require culturally informed modifications to best address the unique needs of the Latino population, yet few empirical studies have assessed these cultural elements. The current study examined cultural values of 48 Dominican and Mexican mothers of preschoolers through focus groups in which they described their core values as related to their parenting role. Results showed that respeto, family and religion were the most important values that mothers sought to transmit to their children. Respeto is manifested in several domains, including obedience to authority, deference, decorum, and public behavior. The authors describe the socialization messages that Latina mothers use to teach their children respeto and present a culturally derived framework of how these messages may relate to child development. The authors discuss how findings may inform the cultural adaptation of evidence-based mental health treatments such as parent training programs.

  16. Work ethics through the lens of American and British linguocultures: dominant cultural values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova S.V.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article throws light on the peculiarities language consciousness functions and the way it reflects values of a certain linguocultural community. In particular, the article reveals the specificity of the verbalization of work ethics in American and British linguocultures. The language material testifies to deeply rooted discrepancies in the evaluative worldview of the cultures under study. If American culture considers work ethics as an indispensable part of a person’s life, the attitude to work in British culture is more complicated and ambiguous.

  17. Cultural value orientation and authoritarian parenting as parameters of bullying and victimization at school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Stelios N; Fousiani, Kyriaki; Michaelides, Michalis; Stavrinides, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the existing association between cultural value orientation, authoritarian parenting, and bullying and victimization at school. The participants (N = 231) were early adolescents, randomly selected from 11 different schools in urban and rural areas of Cyprus. Participants completed self reports measuring cultural value orientation, authoritarian parenting, bullying, and victimization. These instruments were the following: the cultural value scale (CVS), the parental authority questionnaire (PAQ), and the revised bullying and victimization questionnaire (BVQ-R). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine mediation effects. It was found that vertical individualism acted as a mediator between authoritarian parenting and bullying. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between authoritarian parenting and the vertical dimensions of both cultural value orientations (individualism and collectivism), but not with the horizontal dimensions of either cultural orientation. Further, authoritarian parenting was also positively associated with bullying and victimization at school. The main contribution of the present study is the finding that vertical individualism significantly mediates the relationship between authoritarian parental style and bullying propensity.

  18. The Tides People (Tlingit Indians of Southeast Alaska). A Narrative Account of Tlingit Culture and Values Written by a Tlingit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Cyrus E., Sr.

    Written by a Tlingit for purposes of affirming Tlingit life style, values, and laws, this narrative account of the Alaskan Tlingit culture and values presents illustrations of the cultural values and value systems manifest in Tlingit language, art forms, music, ceremonies, and rituals. Designed to be instructional, the chapters of this document…

  19. Students' inclusion to the value of physical culture during the process of athletic training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sychov S.O.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Means and methods of students' inclusion to the value of physical culture, during the process of athletic training on the classes of physical education are opened in this article. 52 students took part in research. It is developed the recommendation for the application of pedagogical conditions of use in the expressway strength and strength training, ability to determine dosing load for students with different level of physical background, methods of power properties development both for boys and for girls. It is shown that using of athletic training at the classes of physical education is contributing of students' inclusion to the value of physical culture.

  20. Processing Narratives Concerning Protected Values: A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Neural Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jonas T; Gimbel, Sarah I; Dehghani, Morteza; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Sagae, Kenji; Wong, Jennifer D; Tipper, Christine M; Damasio, Hanna; Gordon, Andrew S; Damasio, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Narratives are an important component of culture and play a central role in transmitting social values. Little is known, however, about how the brain of a listener/reader processes narratives. A receiver's response to narration is influenced by the narrator's framing and appeal to values. Narratives that appeal to "protected values," including core personal, national, or religious values, may be particularly effective at influencing receivers. Protected values resist compromise and are tied with identity, affective value, moral decision-making, and other aspects of social cognition. Here, we investigated the neural mechanisms underlying reactions to protected values in narratives. During fMRI scanning, we presented 78 American, Chinese, and Iranian participants with real-life stories distilled from a corpus of over 20 million weblogs. Reading these stories engaged the posterior medial, medial prefrontal, and temporo-parietal cortices. When participants believed that the protagonist was appealing to a protected value, signal in these regions was increased compared with when no protected value was perceived, possibly reflecting the intensive and iterative search required to process this material. The effect strength also varied across groups, potentially reflecting cultural differences in the degree of concern for protected values.

  1. Rehabilitation Counselor Certification: Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Jodi L.; Barros-Bailey, Mary; Chapman, Cindy; Nunez, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification and presents recent changes and strategic goals for moving forward. Challenges and opportunities for the profession in relation to certification are also discussed. (Contains 3 tables.)

  2. Examining Convergence in the Cultural Value Orientations of Norwegians in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Jennifer

    There is much debate in Norway as to whether Norwegian cultural values are being diluted by the increasing influx of international organizations. Little empirical work has been done to assess the effect of employment by international organizations on the cultural values of Norwegians. The aim of this study was to determine if individuals retain cultural values closest to their own nationality or the nationality of their employing organization. This objective was accomplished by comparing cultural value dimensions of Norwegians employed in organizations headquartered in one of five countries. Recruitment emails were sent to 612 possible participants and 160 individuals completed the survey completely, resulting in a sample size of N=160, a response rate of 26%. From the completed surveys, cultural dimension scores were calculated for each individual and group in the areas of power distance, individualism, masculinity, and uncertainty avoidance. Using those cultural dimension scores, three groups of one-way ANOVA tests were run in accordance with the parameters of each of three research questions. Comparing Norwegians employed in local government or a Norwegian oil and gas company, a significant difference existed only for uncertainty avoidance (p=.0074). Comparing cultural dimension scores of Norwegians employed in local government with those employed by one of four internationally-headquartered oil companies resulted in significant differences in scores for power distance (p=.0007), individualism (p=.0000), and uncertainty avoidance (p=.0000); however, there was not a statistically significant difference in masculinity scores between the two groups (p=.0792). Comparing cultural dimension scores of Norwegians employed in a Norwegian oil and gas company with those employed by one of four internationally-headquartered oil and gas companies also resulted in statistically significant differences in scores for power distance (p=.0015), individualism (p=.0000), and

  3. THE EFFECT OF PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CULTURAL VALUES TOWARDS THE MARKETING ETHICS OF ACADEMICIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuah Chin Wei

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the personal cultural values and professional values of academicians in regards to marketing ethics. This research uses Singhapakdi and Vitell’s (1993 marketing norms scale and professional value scale together with Yoo and Donthu’s (2002 three dimensional measures of culture operation alised at the individual level. The findings showed that Uncertainty Avoidance and Professional Values influenced academicians’ marketing ethics. It is therefore suggested that managers should look into methods and ways of cultivating professionalism among academicians in order for them to possess good marketing ethics. The findings also showed that demographic factors such as age, gender, years of working experience, academic qualification do not have any influence on academicians’ marketing ethics. Other implications of the study were also discussed.

  4. Perceived Maternal Parenting Styles, Cultural Values, and Prosocial Tendencies Among Mexican American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alexandra N; Carlo, Gustavo; Knight, George P

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to extend research on parenting and positive development of Latino youth. Participants were 207 Mexican American adolescents (M age = 10.9 years, SD = 0.83 years; 50% girls) who completed measures of their parents' supportive and firm parenting, their own endorsement of respect and traditional gender role values, and their tendency to engage in six forms of prosocial behaviors. Maternal nativity was also considered as an initial predictor of parenting, adolescents' cultural values, and adolescents' prosocial behaviors. Overall, the results demonstrated that maternal nativity was associated with traditional gender roles and specific forms of prosocial behaviors. Parenting dimensions were differentially associated with respect and traditional gender role values and prosocial behaviors. Cultural values, in turn, were associated with multiple forms of prosocial behaviors. Gender differences in the processes were also explored.

  5. Employment and Rehabilitation Counselors Characterize One Another Using Stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Harry J.; Reisch, Joan S.

    1981-01-01

    Employment counselors appraised personal and job-related attributes of rehabilitation counselors. Rehabilitation counselors rated themselves and how they believed employment counselors would rate rehabilitation counselors on the same scale. Results show rehabilitation counselors' self-ratings which, when compared to how they believed employment…

  6. Restoring local spiritual and cultural values in science education: The case of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Solomon Belay

    It has been repeatedly observed that home and local context matter in the education of children. A smooth transition between home and classroom prepares children for enjoyable and meaningful life-long learning. Knowledge building in children is influenced by previous experience, values, beliefs and sociocultural factors associated with community. Against this theoretical background, the thesis examined the integration of local spiritual and cultural values to improve science education in Ethiopia. This autoethnographic research used in-depth interviews, supplementary observations and focus group discussion and my biography to identify the perception and practice of common and unique spiritual and cultural values. The study examined whether these values were included and/or excluded in the school curriculum and explored the possibilities for incorporating values in science education and the anticipated tensions resulting from their inclusion. Students, science teachers, parents, employers, curriculum experts, policymakers, elders, and religious leaders participated in the research, conducted in a randomly selected secondary school in Addis Ababa. The sampling followed a kind of snowball method, with a total of twenty key informants participating in interviews, fifteen classroom observations, and one focus group discussion. The data collection aimed at generating stories, which underlie the auto-ethnography methodology. Findings indicated that belief in and fear of God animated and sustained the Ethiopian way of life. Although spiritual teachings derived from sacred writings were the initial foundation for Ethiopian cultural norms, the two merged together later, creating a mosaic pervading every aspect of life in Ethiopia. Education was sustained on this merger of spiritual and cultural norms and values. It was also shown that the now century-old system of formal education did not incorporate those local spiritual and cultural values. Current science education also

  7. In-Law and Mate Preferences in Chinese Society and the Role of Traditional Cultural Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingke; Li, Yujie; Yu, Shushuang

    2017-01-01

    Using 347 parent-child dyads as participants, this study directly examined in-law and mate preferences in a typical collectivist culture. The results showed (1) traits indicating social status and parental investment were more highly valued by the parents, while traits indicating genetic quality and traits related to romantic love were more highly valued by the children. (2) Parental preferences were moderated by gender of the in-laws. Good earning capacity was more preferred by parents in a son-in-law, traits connoting genetic quality and reproductive fitness were more preferred by parents in a daughter-in-law. (3) There was more convergence in in-law and mate preferences in Chinese culture than in Western cultures. (4) Traditional cultural values (i.e., filial piety) can be used as a predictor of traditional mate preferences and less parent-child divergences. Additionally, greater preference for kind and understanding by parents than by children as well as by daughters than by sons, and greater preference for social status by the daughters' than by the sons' parents have not been observed in the rating and the ranking instrument. These findings illustrated how culture handles the parent-child disagreement over mating by authorizing greater parental influence on children's mating decisions.

  8. Repercussions of Isinai Lyric Poetry on Culture-Based Values Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girlie F. Salas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available - Lyric poetry is an important manifestation of the people’s psychology, character, and individuality. Belonging to one of the ethnolinguistic groups of Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines which embraces a rich lyric poetry are the Isinais who inhabit Dupax del Sur, particularly the barangays of Domang, Dopaj, and Balzain, as well as those found in Barangays Buag and Banggot in Bambang. This qualitative study focused on the folksongs as a literary form evolved by the Isinais in the foregoing setting and how these pieces could contribute to a more meaningful culture-based values education among college students of the Nueva Vizcaya State University-Bambang Campus strategically located at the heart of southern Nueva Vizcaya populated primarily by Igorots, Ifugaos, Ilocanos and Isinais. Key informants divulged published and unpublished Isinai folksongs, whose features as to origin, musical structure, cultural and social traits, and implications to values education, were thoroughly investigated in this study. Problems were identified as an attempt to initially help derive a mechanism which can preserve and promote the Isinai lyric poetry. The findings incited better standpoints on preparing prospective teachers of the university by encouraging them to integrate culture in values education; participation of school administrators and local officials in preserving the Isinai culture; involvement of music and literature teachers and researchers of the university in exploring and promoting the Isinai culture; and supporting the program of the provincial government in preserving Isinai dialect, songs and dances.

  9. Mate value and self-esteem: evidence from eight cultural groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robin; Marshall, Tara; Fülöp, Marta; Adonu, Joseph; Spiewak, Slawomir; Neto, Felix; Hernandez Plaza, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores self-perceived mate value (SPMV), and its association with self-esteem, in eight cultures. 1066 participants, from 8 cultural groups in 7 countries, rated themselves on 24 SPMVs and completed a measure of self-esteem. Consistent with evolutionary theory, women were more likely to emphasise their caring and passionate romantic nature. In line with previous cross-cultural research, characteristics indicating passion and romance and social attractiveness were stressed more by respondents from individualistic cultures, and those higher on self-expression (rather than survival) values; characteristics indicative of maturity and confidence were more likely to be mentioned by those from Traditional, rather than Secular, cultures. Contrary to gender role theory, societal equality had only limited interactions with sex and SPMV, with honesty of greater significance for male self-esteem in societies with unequal gender roles. These results point to the importance of cultural and environmental factors in influencing self-perceived mate qualities, and are discussed in relation to broader debates about the impact of gender role equality on sex differences in personality and mating strategies.

  10. Mate value and self-esteem: evidence from eight cultural groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Goodwin

    Full Text Available This paper explores self-perceived mate value (SPMV, and its association with self-esteem, in eight cultures. 1066 participants, from 8 cultural groups in 7 countries, rated themselves on 24 SPMVs and completed a measure of self-esteem. Consistent with evolutionary theory, women were more likely to emphasise their caring and passionate romantic nature. In line with previous cross-cultural research, characteristics indicating passion and romance and social attractiveness were stressed more by respondents from individualistic cultures, and those higher on self-expression (rather than survival values; characteristics indicative of maturity and confidence were more likely to be mentioned by those from Traditional, rather than Secular, cultures. Contrary to gender role theory, societal equality had only limited interactions with sex and SPMV, with honesty of greater significance for male self-esteem in societies with unequal gender roles. These results point to the importance of cultural and environmental factors in influencing self-perceived mate qualities, and are discussed in relation to broader debates about the impact of gender role equality on sex differences in personality and mating strategies.

  11. The role of values-based leadership in sustaining a culture of caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    At the heart of healthcare are fundamental values like caring and compassion as well as the duty shared by healthcare organizations to address the care needs of those in their communities who are vulnerable, injured, or ill. A concern being raised by some political analysts in Canada is that fundamental values are being challenged by current economic and political influences that are reshaping the landscape of healthcare in this country. Influences from industry, technology, and business have significantly shifted healthcare from its moral foundations. A culture of caring is also challenged by the values and behaviours of individuals that negatively impact staff morale and inter-professional collaboration in many work settings. If a "culture of caring" is to survive the canons of cost containment, the impact of recurrent political wrangling, and other substantive influences, then healthcare must be guided by committed values-based leadership. Using case illustrations, this article attempts to explain the characteristics and role of values-based leaders in promoting those values that inspire a culture of caring.

  12. Cultivating Cultural Education Values of Islam Nusantara in MA (Islamic Senior High School Ali Maksum Krapyak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sembodo Ardi Widodo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to determine the cultural education values of Islam Nusantara atIslamic Senior High School of Ali Maksum Krapyak Yogyakarta and how those values are taught through education. This researchuses qualitative approach by usingdata collection technique through observation, interviews, and documentation. The process of analysis data used is qualitative. The results of this study show that Islam Nusantara is an Islamic style of Indonesia, a combination of Islamic theological values with the local traditions, culture and customs. There are three pillars in Islam Nusantara, there arethought, movement, and 'amaliyya (action and there are five signs of Islam Nusantara, namely reform (ishlahiyyah, tawazuniyyah, tathawwu'iyyah, akhlaqiyyah (politeness, and tasamuh;The cultural education values of Islam Nusantara in MA Ali Maksum is the value of nationalism, diversity (pluralism, and the value of NU (tasamuh, tawazun, tawasuth; The madrasah activities consist ofMuludan, grave pilgrimage, halal bi halal, Muharroman, haul of the founder (dies natalis, competitions reading kitab kuning(yellow books, etc., that those are the typical product of Islam Nusantara.

  13. An Investigation of the Relationship Between Self-reported Multicultural Counseling Competence and Middle School Counselorsâ Efforts to Broach Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Factors with Students

    OpenAIRE

    Zegley, Linda A

    2007-01-01

    AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SELF-REPORTED MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING COMPETENCE AND MIDDLE SCHOOL COUNSELORSâ EFFORTS TO BROACH RACIAL, ETHNIC AND CULTURAL FACTORS WITH STUDENTS Linda A. Zegley ABSTRACT Despite several decades of theoretical support and empirical validation concerning Multicultural Counseling Competence (MCC), the mental health field has been criticized for a lack of measurable constructs that embody multicultural counseling skills (Sanchez-Hucles ...

  14. Analysis on the Cultivation of Modern Chinese Farmers’ Values from the Perspective of Traditional Political Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwen; Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Farmers in traditional China have formed the cultural psychology of being reluctant to move from native land and hate to change during the long- term closed production and life. This has exerted negative effect on the values cultivation of farmers today,who possess weak democratic consciousness,low legal spirit and cultural quality as well as strong antagonistic psychology. Measures should be carried out to cultivate their modern values. Firstly,construction of villagers’ self-governance system should be stressed. Secondly,political socialization should be perfected to improve farmers’ political culture. Furthermore,channels of political participation should be widened in order to gradually promote the ordered political participation of farmers.

  15. The Relationship Between Burnout and Occupational Stress in Genetic Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Brittney; Kaiser, Amy; Injeyan, Marie C; Sappleton, Karen; Chitayat, David; Stephens, Derek; Shuman, Cheryl

    2016-08-01

    Burnout represents a critical disruption in an individual's relationship with work, resulting in a state of exhaustion in which one's occupational value and capacity to perform are questioned. Burnout can negatively affect an individual's personal life, as well as employers in terms of decreased work quality, patient/client satisfaction, and employee retention. Occupational stress is a known contributor to burnout and occurs as a result of employment requirements and factors intrinsic to the work environment. Empirical research examining genetic counselor-specific burnout is limited; however, existing data suggests that genetic counselors are at increased risk for burnout. To investigate the relationship between occupational stress and burnout in genetic counselors, we administered an online survey to members of three genetic counselor professional organizations. Validated measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (an instrument measuring burnout on three subscales: exhaustion, cynicism, and professional efficacy) and the Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised (an instrument measuring occupational stress on 14 subscales). Of the 353 respondents, more than 40 % had either considered leaving or left their job role due to burnout. Multiple regression analysis yielded significant predictors for burnout risk. The identified sets of predictors account for approximately 59 % of the variance in exhaustion, 58 % of the variance in cynicism, and 43 % of the variance in professional efficacy. Our data confirm that a significant number of genetic counselors experience burnout and that burnout is correlated with specific aspects of occupational stress. Based on these findings, practice and research recommendations are presented.

  16. The Influence of Principals Self Personality Values towards Their Work Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, Muhammad; Tahir, Lokman Bin Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the influence of principals' self personality values toward teachers' work culture in high schools. The sample consisted of 34 principals from SMAN, SMKN and MAN in the City of Makassar, South Sulawesi Indonesia. The sample of this study is population sample. The instrument used was a questionnaire. Data were analyzed…

  17. The Relationship between Cultural Values and Learning Preference: The Impact of Acculturation Experiences upon East Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Szu-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Globalization and technology advancement are creating more biculturalism at workplaces and learning settings. However, little is known about acculturation experience and its influence on a person's cultural values and learning preference. The research reported in this study investigates the impact of acculturation experiences upon the relationship…

  18. The Familial Socialization of Culturally Related Values in Mexican American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P.; Berkel, Cady; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Ettekal, Idean; Jaconis, Maryanne; Boyd, Brenna M.

    2011-01-01

    Research has documented a relation between parents' ethnic socialization and youth's ethnic identity, yet there has been little research examining the transmission of cultural values from parents to their children through ethnic socialization and ethnic identity. This study examines a prospective model in which mothers' and fathers' Mexican…

  19. Maternal Cultural Values and Parenting Practices: Longitudinal Associations with Chinese Adolescents' Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michael M.; Li, Yan; Shi, Junqi

    2012-01-01

    Interrelations among cultural values, parenting practices, and adolescent aggression were examined using longitudinal data collected from Chinese adolescents and their mothers. Adolescents' overt and relational aggression were assessed using peer nominations at Time 1 (7th grade) and Time 2 (9th grade). Mothers reported endorsement of cultural…

  20. Teachers' Moral Values and Their Interpersonal Relationships with Students and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Natasa; Wubbels, Theo

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether and how teachers' beliefs about moral values are reflected in the student-teacher relationships (i.e. levels of control and affiliation in teachers' and students' perceptions of this relationship), and in teachers' cultural competence. A positive association was found between teachers' paternalist beliefs and their own…

  1. Current Trends of the Linguistic and Cultural Values of the Greek Australian Community in South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeva, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    The paper investigates the perspectives of Greek origin people as regards their intention to maintain their ancestral culture within the Australian context of social values. This qualitative research study, influenced by Humanistic Sociology, analyses data collected through questionnaires from first and second generation parents and teachers of…

  2. Maternal Cultural Values and Parenting Practices: Longitudinal Associations with Chinese Adolescents' Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Michael M.; Li, Yan; Shi, Junqi

    2012-01-01

    Interrelations among cultural values, parenting practices, and adolescent aggression were examined using longitudinal data collected from Chinese adolescents and their mothers. Adolescents' overt and relational aggression were assessed using peer nominations at Time 1 (7th grade) and Time 2 (9th grade). Mothers reported endorsement of cultural…

  3. Heritage Language Education: Valuing the Languages, Literacies, and Cultural Competencies of Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Corinne A.; Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    2017-01-01

    This article argues for the value of heritage language programs and the micro-level language policies that support them, focusing on a case study of a program in the USA to make this argument. We also argue for the importance of recognizing students' heritage languages, cultures, and individual goals and identities in mainstream school programs.…

  4. Cultural Values at the Individual Level and the Malleability of Ways of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer-Aikins, Marlene; Easter, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    This research tested the relationship between individuals cultural values and the malleability in their ways of knowing in two social contexts. Two hundred and ninety-two college students majoring in either business or social sciences initially received two priming conditions (two weeks apart) where they reflected on either their in-group or their…

  5. International Christian Schoolteachers' Traits, Characteristics, and Qualities Valued by Third Culture Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Dale B.

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative grounded theory study, 24 participants, referred to as "third culture kids" (or TCKs), ages 18-30 years, who had previously attended international Christian schools were interviewed to determine the dispositions they valued in their teachers. Incorporating principles of grounded theory, a series of rigorous steps were…

  6. Report on Societal-cultural Norms and Values and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nie, Peng; Gwozdz, Wencke; Reisch, Lucia A.

    This report is part of Task 7.3.1. As outlined in the Description of Work, we aim to identify health related social norms and values on a national level and compare them cross-culturally, using publicly available, cross-national data sources. In our case, the best available public source...

  7. Essence or Practice? Conflicting Cultural Values in Chinese EFL Textbooks: A Discourse Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tao

    2012-01-01

    While increasing attention is being paid to the ideological debate on Confucian-influenced cultural values communicated in Chinese language textbooks, EFL textbooks remain under-examined since the TEFL/TESOL is typically assumed to be "technical" and "neutral". Drawing on critical theoretical perspectives on curriculum,…

  8. How Cultural Values Shape Learning in Older Adulthood: The Case of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Sharan B.; Mohamad, Mazanah

    2000-01-01

    Malaysian adults aged 60-83 (n=19) were interviewed about aging and learning activites. They primarily engaged in nonformal and experiential learning. Learning was communal and religious/spiritual in orientation; it was shaped by cultural context and values. (SK)

  9. Shared Values and Socio-Cultural Norms: E-Learning Technologies from a Social Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Patti; Velan, Gary M.; Shulruf, Boaz

    2017-01-01

    From a perspective of social practice, learning is a socially constituted practice that is imbued with socio-culturally significant meanings and shaped by the values and norms shared within a community of learners. This focus group study examines the role of e-learning technologies in mediating the social practice of learning among coursework…

  10. The Relationship between Cultural Values and Learning Preference: The Impact of Acculturation Experiences upon East Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Szu-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Globalization and technology advancement are creating more biculturalism at workplaces and learning settings. However, little is known about acculturation experience and its influence on a person's cultural values and learning preference. The research reported in this study investigates the impact of acculturation experiences upon the relationship…

  11. Ethnicity and cultural values as predictors of the occurrence and impact of experienced workplace incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbourne, Jennifer L; Gangadharan, Ashwini; Sariol, Ana M

    2015-04-01

    Workplace incivility is a subtle type of deviant work behavior that is low in intensity and violates workplace norms of respect. Past research demonstrates the harmful impact of incivility on work attitudes and employee wellbeing; however, little is known about how incivility is experienced by individuals of different ethnicities and cultural orientations. In the current study, we compared the amount and impact of workplace incivility that was experienced by Hispanic and white, non-Hispanic employees. Further, we examined whether cultural dimensions of vertical and horizontal individualism and collectivism moderated the relationships between workplace incivility and work and health outcomes. A sample of 262 university employees (50% Hispanic; 63% female) provided self-reports of experienced incivility, burnout, job satisfaction, and cultural values. Although male Hispanic employees experienced more incivility, female Hispanic employees experienced less incivility than non-Hispanic employees of the same gender. Hispanic employees displayed greater resilience against the impact of incivility on job satisfaction and burnout, compared with non-Hispanic employees. Additionally, employees with strong horizontal collectivism values (emphasizing sociability) were more resilient against the impact of incivility on burnout, whereas employees with strong horizontal individualism values (emphasizing self-reliance) were more susceptible to burnout and dissatisfaction when faced with incivility. These findings suggest that employees' ethnicity and cultural values may increase or decrease their vulnerability to the impact of incivility at work. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of blood cultures from cattle clinically suspected of bacterial endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houe, Hans; Eriksen, L.; Jungersen, Gregers;

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the number of blood culture-positive cattle among 215 animals clinically suspected of having bacterial endocarditis. For animals that were necropsied, the sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of the diagnosis of endocarditis were calculated on the basis...

  13. Indian Adolescents' Cyber Aggression Involvement and Cultural Values: The Moderation of Peer Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michelle F.; Kamble, Shanmukh V.; Soudi, Shruti P.

    2015-01-01

    Although research on cyberbullying and cyber aggression is growing, little attention has been given to examinations of these behaviors among adolescents in Asian countries, particularly in India. The present study examined the relationships among cyber aggression involvement and cultural values (i.e. individualism, collectivism), along with peer…

  14. The impact of spiritual and moral values of the youth on the Russian society civil culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N A Tkacheva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors conducted a sociological analysis of the spiritual and moral values of the youth and their impact on the civil culture, which largely determines the forms of individual and group social activity and the functioning of social institutions. The implementation of the key function of values, i.e. the achievement of material goods and the spiritual development, to a certain extent, will allow to overcome the cultural gap between elites and common citizens, which is considered one of the main reasons for the failure of reforms in Russia. The study of transformation processes determined great interest in the social potential of the youth as a subject of social reproduction, and the civil culture is a key factor and element of modernization for it changes and activates value orientations of the younger generations and leads to the qualitative transformations of all spheres of society. The article is based on the empirical data of a number of sociological surveys conducted in 2016 in five cities of the south of the Tyumen Region. The empirical data prove that there is an obvious emerging shift from paternalistic expectations, passivity and low estimates of the future to the rationality, individualization and self-reliance. The authors emphasize the influence of mass media as one of the factors of the civil culture formation, which is evident in the impact of media on the moral and spiritual values of the younger generations.

  15. Africentric Cultural Values: Their Relation to Positive Mental Health in African American Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Madonna G.; Alleyne, Vanessa L.; Wallace, Barbara C.; Franklin-Jackson, Deidre C.

    2006-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to test a path model exploring the relationships among Africentric cultural values, self-esteem, perceived social support satisfaction, and life satisfaction in a sample of 147 African American adolescent girls. This investigation also examined the possible mediating effects of self-esteem and perceived social…

  16. The Relationship of Culture Value Orientation Change and Rorschach Indices of Psychological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papajohn, John C.; Spiegel, John P.

    1971-01-01

    The relationship of culture value orientation change and Rorschach indices of psychological development was investigated using a sample of second-generation Greek-Americans undergoing the acculturation process by comparing the families with psychotic member with a matched group of families in which there was no history of psychopathology. (JM)

  17. Information and Communication Technology and Cultural Change How ICT Changes Self-Construal and Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Nina; Postmes, Tom; van der Vinne, Nikita; van Thiel, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies whether and how information and communication technology (ICT) changes self-construal and cultural values in a developing country. Ethiopian children were given laptops in the context of an ICT for development scheme. We compared children who used laptops (n = 69) with a control g

  18. Blood and urine physiological values in farm-cultured Rana catesbeiana (Anura: Ranidae) in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A total of 302 samples of healthy farm-cultured Rana catesbeiana specimens (9-21 months-old, 50- 350 g liveweight, 50% each sex) from the north-east of Argentina, were analyzed through spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, densitometry, refractometry and microscopy in order to obtain blood and urine normal values. Confidence intervals (p

  19. The Impact of Iranian Teachers Cultural Values on Computer Technology Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Karim; Saribagloo, Javad Amani; Aghdam, Samad Hanifepour; Mahmoudi, Hojjat

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of testing the technology acceptance model and the impact of Hofstede cultural values (masculinity/femininity, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism, and power distance) on computer technology acceptance among teachers at Urmia city (Iran) using the structural equation modeling approach. From among…

  20. Transmission of cultural values among Mexican-origin parents and their adolescent and emerging adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Brena, Norma J; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2015-06-01

    The integration of the U.S. and Mexican culture is an important process associated with Mexican-origin youths' adjustment and family dynamics. The current study examined the reciprocal associations in parents' and two offspring's cultural values (i.e., familism and respect) in 246 Mexican-origin families. Overall, mothers' values were associated with increases in youths' values 5 years later. In contrast, youths' familism values were associated with increases in fathers' familism values 5 years later. In addition, developmental differences emerged where parent-to-offspring effects were more consistent for youth transitioning from early to late adolescence than for youth transitioning from middle adolescence to emerging adulthood. Finally, moderation by immigrant status revealed a youth-to-parent effect for mother-youth immigrant dyads, but not for dyads where youth were U.S.-raised. Our findings highlight the reciprocal nature of parent-youth value socialization and provide a nuanced understanding of these processes through the consideration of familism and respect values. As Mexican-origin youth represent a large and rapidly growing segment of the U.S. population, research that advances our understanding of how these youth develop values that foster family cohesion and support is crucial. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  1. Transmission of Cultural Values among Mexican American Parents and their Adolescent and Emerging Adult Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Brena, Norma J.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of the U.S. and Mexican culture is an important process associated with Mexican-origin youths’ adjustment and family dynamics. The current study examined the reciprocal associations in parents’ and two offspring’s cultural values (i.e., familism and respect) in 246 Mexican-origin families. Overall, mothers’ values were associated with increases in youths’ values five years later. In contrast, youths’ familism values were associated with increases in fathers’ familism values five years later. In addition, developmental differences emerged where parent-to-offspring effects were more consistent for youth transitioning from early to late adolescence than for youth transitioning from middle adolescence to emerging adulthood. Finally, moderation by immigrant-status revealed a youth-to-parent effect for mother-youth immigrant dyads, but not for dyads where youth were U.S.-raised. Our findings highlight the reciprocal nature of parent-youth value socialization and provide a nuanced understanding of these processes through the consideration of familism and respect values. As Mexican-origin youth represent a large and rapidly growing segment of the U.S. population, research that advances our understanding of how these youth develop values that foster family cohesion and support are crucial. PMID:25470657

  2. Parents' Traditional Cultural Values and Mexican-Origin Young Adults' Routine Health and Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegraff, Kimberly A; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; McHale, Susan M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Wheeler, Lorey A

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prospective associations between Mexican-origin mothers' and fathers' traditional cultural values and young adults' health and dental care utilization and to test the moderating role of youth gender. Mexican-origin parents and youth (N = 246 families) participated in home interviews and provided self-reports of parents' cultural values (time 1) and young adults' health status and routine health and dental care (time 2; 5 years later). Logistic regressions tested parents' traditional cultural values as predictors of routine health and dental care, accounting for parent nativity, parent acculturation, family socioeconomic status, youth gender, youth age, and youth physical health status. We also tested whether youth gender moderated the associations between parents' cultural values and young adults' routine care. Young adults whose mothers endorsed strong familism values when they were in mid-to-late adolescence were more likely to report at least one routine physician visit in the past year as young adults (odds ratio [OR] = 3.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-9.83, p = .019). Furthermore, for females only, mothers' more traditional gender role attitudes predicted reduced odds of receiving routine health (OR = .22; 95% CI: .08-.64, p = .005) and dental care (OR = .26; 95% CI: .09-.75, p < .012) in young adulthood. Our findings highlight the importance of examining intragroup variability in culturally specific mechanisms to identify targets for addressing ethnic/racial disparities in health care utilization among Mexican-origin young adults, during a period of increased risk for health-compromising behaviors and reduced access to care. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Independent, Private Counselor: What Admission Officers and Secondary School Counselors Think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Mary K.; Fuller, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the role of the independent college counselor and reports the results of research on the perceptions of 125 college admission officers and 210 secondary school counselors toward this type of practitioner. Results showed mixed reactions to aspects of the independent counselor's role and doubts about the independent admission counselor's…

  4. Effects of Counselor Gender and Drinking Status on Perceptions of the Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark E.; Prentice, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Investigated the effects of counselor gender and drinking status on 93 mandated clients' perceptions of counselor trustworthiness, expertness and attractiveness, and confidence in the counselor. Results revealed no differences between ratings of recovering alcoholic, nonalcoholic, or no-statement counselors on any of the dependent measures.…

  5. Effects of Counselor Disability Status on Disabled Subjects' Perceptions of Counselor Attractiveness and Expertness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; Biggs, Donald A.

    1983-01-01

    Studied the influence of client-counselor group membership similarity, counselor reputation cues, and attending behavior on disabled subject's perceptions. Physically disabled adults (N=40) viewed a series of vignettes and rated counselor expertness and attractiveness. Results do not support the belief that client-counselor group membership…

  6. IMPACT OF ETHICAL VALUES PROMOTED BY PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANTS ON THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRETI DANIELA TOGOE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to point out the contribution of professional accountants to the sustainable development of organization and the way they generate sustainable organizational success through their direct involvement in creating organizational culture. Professional accountants can be considered value creators in organizations because of their commitment in developing and implementing strategies, policies, plans, structures and governance measures which set the framework for the creation of added value. The ethics and values of conduct in organizations are supported by professional accountants through their behavior and the actions they carry out. Thus, the quality of professional judgment becomes a differentiating factor for accounting professionals

  7. Project value creation: The case of a European Capital of Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Markus

    In recent years value creation has been reinforced as an important concept in project management research, and in this paper the service-dominant logic is applied to reinforce the shift from a focus on products to value in projects. The setting for the research is a public sector project...... – the European Capital of Culture (ECoC) in Aarhus, Denmark taking place in 2017. Based on engaged scholarship research we explore how value is conceptualized as a subjective construct and how it is created by a wide range of actors and captured by other actors, and we present a model of actor interactions over...

  8. Value of routine urine culture in the assessment of preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundley, Andrew F; Onderdonk, Andrew B; Greenberg, James A

    2003-11-01

    To assess the utility and expense of routine urine culture in women evaluated for preterm labor. A retrospective study of 1,429 patients evaluated for preterm labor over a calendar year. Patients evaluated for preterm labor were identified using the hospital's admissions database and then cross-referenced with the hospital microbiology laboratory's database to identify those who had urine cultures sent as part of their evaluation. The charts of patients with a positive urine culture were further reviewed to evaluate the diagnosis and outcome. Five hundred twelve urine cultures were sent for analysis of preterm labor, and 6 (1.2%) reported growth of > 100,000 colonies of a single bacterium. Of these 6 patients, 5 reported symptoms consistent with a urinary tract infection, while the 6th was asymptomatic. Fisher's exact test showed no clinical significance for a positive urine culture as a predictor of preterm delivery (P = .68). Sensitivity was 0.7% (95% CI, 0.0-4.3), and specificity was 98.6% (95% CI, 96.7-99.5). A cost difference of $29,676 existed between charges and reimbursements. A positive culture was not a significant risk factor for preterm delivery. The 1 patient who delivered preterm with a positive culture probably had cervical incompetence as the cause of preterm delivery. The routine use of urine cultures in the assessment of preterm labor is costly and adds little value to obtaining a diagnosis except in the presence of specific complaints at our institution. Urine culture identified a single patient with asymptomatic bacteriuria being evaluated for preterm labor, and she probably had another etiology for her advanced cervical examination.

  9. Status of Clinical Supervision among School Counselors in Southeast Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Anna Lila; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Bergin, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the role of clinical supervision in school counseling practice. This research explored the status and meaning of clinical supervision to school counselors employed in two southeastern Georgia counties. Results indicate that participants value clinical supervision even though their employers did not necessarily…

  10. Integrating Positive Psychology Techniques into Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Martha H.; Boykin, Rebecca B.

    2010-01-01

    Positive psychology offers rehabilitation counselor educators a framework to help students evaluate their own competencies and understand the value of a strengths-based approach to rehabilitation counseling. This article reviews several positive psychology techniques and discusses recommended uses as well as their effectiveness. Positive…

  11. Abortion Counseling and the School Counselor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jack A.; Moffett, Catherine F.

    1974-01-01

    Abortion counseling is now legally within the purview of the school counselor. It is therefore essential that counselors determine their role in abortion counseling, the kind of training necessary, and whether professional organizations should develop counseling guidelines. (RP)

  12. Peer Counselor Training with the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephanie B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a peer counselor training program for five older adult volunteers. Presents suggestions for advertising, screening, program format, and development of practica, and examines the role and helpfulness of the peer counselors who provided in-home counseling services. (JAC)

  13. Acculturation, cultural values, and Latino parental beliefs about the etiology of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Kathryn E; Gerdes, Alyson C; Haack, Lauren M; Schneider, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent mental health disorders of childhood. Despite the availability of several evidence-based interventions, Latino children are more likely than non-minority children to have an unmet need for services related to ADHD. Given that parental beliefs about the etiology of ADHD likely influence service utilization, research needs to focus on cultural factors that may influence parental beliefs about the etiology of child behavior problems. Thus, the goal of the current study was to investigate the role of acculturation and cultural values of familism, respect, spirituality, and traditional gender roles in explaining parental etiological beliefs about ADHD in a sample of Latino parents. Findings suggest that behavioral acculturation was not significantly correlated with biopsychosocial or sociological/spiritual etiological beliefs; however, the cultural values of familism and traditional gender roles were positively correlated with sociological/spiritual beliefs. Further, exploratory analyses suggested that after controlling for SES, familism and traditional gender roles accounted for 30.5 % of the total variance in sociological/spiritual beliefs about ADHD. Finally, post hoc analyses revealed that cultural values were associated with several individual belief categories within the sociological/spiritual domain, including beliefs about friends, spirituality, and nature disharmony. The current study supports the inclusion of etiological beliefs and cultural factors in research examining help-seeking and access to mental health services among Latino families and suggests that the incorporation of alternative etiological beliefs about child behavior may be an important factor in culturally-appropriate mental health services.

  14. A protocol for eliciting nonmaterial values through a cultural ecosystem services frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Rachelle K; Klain, Sarah C; Ardoin, Nicole M; Satterfield, Terre; Woodside, Ulalia; Hannahs, Neil; Daily, Gretchen C; Chan, Kai M

    2015-04-01

    Stakeholders' nonmaterial desires, needs, and values often critically influence the success of conservation projects. These considerations are challenging to articulate and characterize, resulting in their limited uptake in management and policy. We devised an interview protocol designed to enhance understanding of cultural ecosystem services (CES). The protocol begins with discussion of ecosystem-related activities (e.g., recreation, hunting) and management and then addresses CES, prompting for values encompassing concepts identified in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) and explored in other CES research. We piloted the protocol in Hawaii and British Columbia. In each location, we interviewed 30 individuals from diverse backgrounds. We analyzed results from the 2 locations to determine the effectiveness of the interview protocol in elucidating nonmaterial values. The qualitative and spatial components of the protocol helped characterize cultural, social, and ethical values associated with ecosystems in multiple ways. Maps and situational, or vignette-like, questions helped respondents articulate difficult-to-discuss values. Open-ended prompts allowed respondents to express a diversity of ecosystem-related values and proved sufficiently flexible for interviewees to communicate values for which the protocol did not explicitly probe. Finally, the results suggest that certain values, those mentioned frequently throughout the interview, are particularly salient for particular populations. The protocol can provide efficient, contextual, and place-based data on the importance of particular ecosystem attributes for human well-being. Qualitative data are complementary to quantitative and spatial assessments in the comprehensive representation of people's values pertaining to ecosystems, and this protocol may assist in incorporating values frequently overlooked in decision making processes. © 2014 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals

  15. Values and beliefs of psychedelic drug users: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Michael; Lyvers, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Psychedelic drugs such as LSD and psilocybin are often claimed to be capable of inducing life-changing experiences described as mystical or transcendental, especially if high doses are taken. The present study examined possible enduring effects of such experiences by comparing users of psychedelic drugs (n = 88), users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs (e.g., marijuana, amphetamines) (n = 29) and non illicit drug-using social drinkers (n = 66) on questionnaire measures of values, beliefs and emotional empathy. Samples were obtained from Israel (n = 110) and Australia (n = 73) in a cross-cultural comparison to see if values associated with psychedelic drug use transcended culture of origin. Psychedelic users scored significantly higher on mystical beliefs (e.g., oneness with God and the universe) and life values of spirituality and concern for others than the other groups, and lower on the value of financial prosperity, irrespective of culture of origin. Users of nonpsychedelic illegal drugs scored significantly lower on a measure of coping ability than both psychedelic users and non illicit drug users. Both groups of illegal drug users scored significantly higher on empathy than non illicit drug users. Results are discussed in the context of earlier findings from Pahnke (1966) and Doblin (1991) of the transformative effect of psychedelic experiences, although the possibility remains that present findings reflect predrug characteristics of those who chose to take psychedelic drugs rather than effects of the drugs themselves.

  16. Are the core values of the radiological protection system shared across cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zölzer, F

    2016-06-01

    In spite of ongoing globalisation in many fields, the ethics of radiological protection have long been discussed almost exclusively in terms of 'Western' moral philosophy concepts such as utilitarianism or deontology. A cross-cultural discourse in this field is only just beginning. In 'Principles of Biomedical Ethics', Beauchamp and Childress suggested that there exists a 'common morality' which is 'not relative to cultures or individuals, because it transcends both'. They proposed four cross-culturally valid principles for decision making in medicine: respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. A similar approach is being developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group 94 on the ethics of radiological protection. Here, the core values are: human dignity, beneficence/non-maleficence, prudence, and justice. Other values could be added, such as consideration for the interests of society as a whole or the interests of future generations, or procedural values such as transparency and accountability; this paper will include a brief discussion on how they relate to the four basic principles. The main question to be addressed here, however, is whether the proposed core values are indeed part of a 'common morality'. This, as it will be argued, cannot be decided by a global opinion poll, but has to be based on an analysis of the written and oral traditions that have provided ethical orientation throughout history, and are still considered seminal by the majority of people. It turns out that there are indeed many commonalities across cultures, and that the concept of globally shared core values for the radiological protection system is not hopelessly idealistic.

  17. New Direction in Preparation of College Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Mark E.; Valine, Warren J.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes a course which represents an attempt to develop curricular experiences to meet crucial needs of prospective college and university counselors not met in traditional counselor training programs. Enthusiastic student response, including that from former students employed as professional counselors and student personnel workers,…

  18. Increasing Minority Student Enrollment in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mona C.; Lewis, Denise; Henderson, DeAnna; Flowers, Carl R.

    2009-01-01

    Counselor education programs across the country often fail to attract, enroll and graduate students in proportion that reflects the diversity of the nation. As our country's demography changes, the impact of race and ethnicity within the client-counselor relationship is likely to have greater importance and, as such, counselor education programs…

  19. School Counselor's Perception of Their Multicultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Mary G.; Furgerson, Karen; Cook, Katrina; Wardle, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-01-01

    A school counselor's work environment is diverse by virtue of the student population that attends the school setting, yet it is possible that school counselors may not be prepared to deal with a diverse population. As part of counselor training a course in multicultural counseling is offered so that counseling students become familiar with the…

  20. Death and Bereavement: What Counselors Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Stephen J.; Ward, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Training in death education and grief counseling is not typically a part of a counselor's curriculum, yet the odds of a counselor seeing people in various stages of grieving are great. Beginning with Bowlby's attachment theory, this article provides an overview of the grieving process and what counselors should know. (Author/MKA)

  1. The Counselor and Student Discipline: Suggested Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Frank; O'Neill, Maude

    1979-01-01

    Provides summary and analysis of literature on the counselor's role in school discipline. Roles are grouped into six categories: mediator, ombudsman, consultant, psychological educator, special program developer, and counselor. Counselors may find roles that satisfy the needs of their students and are appropriate to their own personalities and…

  2. Communication Effectiveness: Listening from the Counselor's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Robert J.; Hurt, David J.

    Listening is an extremely important dimension of a counselor's vocational life. The counselor is constantly involved in the process of listening. Verbal and nonverbal messages sent by clients must be received, interpreted, and organized. Counselors need to be active in listening to clients and critical in their analysis of the messages being…

  3. Development of the Counselor Response Observation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Antti P.; Soini, Hannu S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the measures included in the Counselor Response Observation System. The Counselor Response Observation System consists of the Counselor Response Coding System and the Skilled Verbal Responding Scale. Detailed results of their validity and reliability are presented.

  4. An Existential Approach to Cross-Cultural Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vontress, Clemmont E.

    1988-01-01

    Defines existentialism, culture, and cross-cultural counseling and explains how various existential concepts can serve as guidelines for cross-cultural counseling. Advocates finding approach to help counselors and counselor trainees understand how their own cultural identities affect their ability to help culturally different clients. (NB)

  5. Kultura jako wartośc i jako system wartości (CULTURE AS A VALUE AND AS THE SYSTEM OF VALUES

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    Krystyna Skurjat

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the crisis of natural and mathematical science as well as positivistic philosophy the second half of the nineteenth century saw an increasing search for differences between natural and humanistic cognition. The problems such as what is important, what cultural substances and values shape individual and social consciousness, as well as what is the world of culture as a objective reality also require philosophical explanation. In the face of contemporary culture philosophy basically aims at answering the questions: can cultural transformations be measured by ethical criteria, what can we say about a human being as a subject of culture - creative activities, are there any tests, stating what is culture value and the direction in which cultural transformations should proceed. There exist many variations of culture philosophy just as there are many trends of philosophy itself and many culture labels of varied meaning. The article presents an outlook on culture rising from the tradition of humanistic philosophy by F. Znaniecki and from the spirit of phenomenology. Both these trends understand philosophy as a knowledge of universally significant values.

  6. The market value of cultural heritage in urban areas: an application of spatial hedonic pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazrak, Faroek; Nijkamp, Peter; Rietveld, Piet; Rouwendal, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The current literature often values intangible goods like cultural heritage by applying stated preference methods. In recent years, however, the increasing availability of large databases on real estate transactions and listed prices has opened up new research possibilities and has reduced various existing barriers to applications of conventional (spatial) hedonic analysis to the real estate market. The present paper provides one of the first applications using a spatial autoregressive model to investigate the impact of cultural heritage—in particular, listed buildings and historic-cultural sites (or historic landmarks)—on the value of real estate in cities. In addition, this paper suggests a novel way of specifying the spatial weight matrix—only prices of sold houses influence current price—in identifying the spatial dependency effects between sold properties. The empirical application in the present study concerns the Dutch urban area of Zaanstad, a historic area for which over a long period of more than 20 years detailed information on individual dwellings, and their market prices are available in a GIS context. In this paper, the effect of cultural heritage is analysed in three complementary ways. First, we measure the effect of a listed building on its market price in the relevant area concerned. Secondly, we investigate the value that listed heritage has on nearby property. And finally, we estimate the effect of historic-cultural sites on real estate prices. We find that, to purchase a listed building, buyers are willing to pay an additional 26.9 %, while surrounding houses are worth an extra 0.28 % for each additional listed building within a 50-m radius. Houses sold within a conservation area appear to gain a premium of 26.4 % which confirms the existence of a `historic ensemble' effect.

  7. Re-Organizing Cultural Values: Vers le Sud by Laurent Cantet

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    Judith Michelmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cantet's movie “Vers le sud/ Heading South“ (2005 explores cultural stereotypes and values without being moralizing in a common sense. His drama deals with female sex tourism, political and social violence, power and money in such a way that people are tempted to judge the protagonists: Their desire for young black men is called “embarrassing“, they are seen as corrupting and as actors in a new kind of imperialism. In fact the images in the film organize characters in a certain kind of dualism which leads easily to these argumentations. But having a look at the cultural values that produce the disgust, we see that they are all open to question.

  8. Scope insensitivity in helping decisions: Is it a matter of culture and values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Tehila; Slovic, Paul; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The singularity effect of identifiable victims refers to people's greater willingness to help a single concrete victim compared with a group of victims experiencing the same need. We present 3 studies exploring values and cultural sources of this effect. In the first study, the singularity effect was found only among Western Israelis and not among Bedouin participants (a more collectivist group). In Study 2, individuals with higher collectivist values were more likely to contribute to a group of victims. Finally, the third study demonstrates a more causal relationship between collectivist values and the singularity effect by showing that enhancing people's collectivist values using a priming manipulation produces similar donations to single victims and groups. Moreover, participants' collectivist preferences mediated the interaction between the priming conditions and singularity of the recipient. Implications for several areas of psychology and ways to enhance caring for groups in need are discussed.

  9. Cultural Values, U.S. Neighborhood Danger, and Mexican American Parents' Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rebecca M. B.; Zeiders, Katharine H.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Roosa, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    To begin accounting for cultural and contextual factors related to child rearing among Mexican American parents we examined whether parents' Mexican American cultural values and perceptions of neighborhood danger influenced patterns of parenting behavior in two-parent Mexican-origin families living in the U.S. To avoid forcing Mexican American parents into a predefined model of parenting styles, we used latent profile analysis to identify unique patterns of responsiveness and demandingness among mothers and fathers. Analyses were conducted using parent self-reports on parenting and replicated with youth reports on mothers' and fathers' parenting. Across reporters most mothers and fathers exhibited a pattern of responsiveness and demandingness consistent with authoritative parenting. A small portion of parents exhibited a pattern of less-involved parenting. None of the patterns were indicative of authoritarianism. There was a modicum of evidence for no nonsense parenting among fathers. Both neighborhood danger and parents' cultural values were associated with the likelihood of employing one style of parenting over another. The value of using person-centered analytical techniques to examine parenting among Mexican Americans is discussed. PMID:23750519

  10. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CULTURAL VALUES AND CONSUMER MOTIVATIONS FOR PURCHASING LUXURY BRANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa BEZZAOUIA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a global context, it is important for researchers and marketers alike to understand the behavior of consumers in general and their motivations in particular for purchasing luxury goods, while taking into account the cultural context of the buyers – an important aspect from the point of view of some marketing scholars. This research investigates if the differences between consumers from different parts of the world influence their motivation for purchasing luxury goods. Concerning motivations, we identified five categories: status, uniqueness, conformism, quality and hedonism, to which we added ostentation. With regard to cultural values, we relied on the framework provided by Hofstede and took into account the values for individualism-collectivism, power distance, masculinity-femininity, uncertainty avoidance. In this article we intend to develop a framework for analyzing the relationships between cultural values and motivations of purchase and consumption of luxury brands. For this purpose we conducted a literature review on this topic, we developed a conceptual model of research and we formulated the hypotheses of research. Conceptual model of research and the hypotheses will form the basis of a quantitative research that will take place in Tunisia and Romania on two samples of 100 respondents each. This will facilitate empirical research comparing purchasing behavior of luxury brands consumers on the two markets.

  11. Cultural values, U.S. neighborhood danger, and Mexican American parents' parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rebecca M B; Zeiders, Katharine H; Gonzales, Nancy A; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Roosa, Mark W

    2013-06-01

    To begin accounting for cultural and contextual factors related to child rearing among Mexican American parents we examined whether parents' Mexican American cultural values and perceptions of neighborhood danger influenced patterns of parenting behavior in two-parent Mexican-origin families living in the U.S. To avoid forcing Mexican American parents into a predefined model of parenting styles, we used latent profile analysis to identify unique patterns of responsiveness and demandingness among mothers and fathers. Analyses were conducted using parent self-reports on parenting and replicated with youth reports on mothers' and fathers' parenting. Across reporters, most mothers and fathers exhibited a pattern of responsiveness and demandingness consistent with authoritative parenting. A small portion of parents exhibited a pattern of less-involved parenting. None of the patterns were indicative of authoritarianism. There was a modicum of evidence for no nonsense parenting among fathers. Both neighborhood danger and parents' cultural values were associated with the likelihood of employing one style of parenting over another. The value of using person-centered analytical techniques to examine parenting among Mexican Americans is discussed.

  12. Cultural Collision and Collusion: Reflections on Hip-Hop Culture, Values, and Schools. Educational Psychology: Critical Pedagogical Perspectives. Volume 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachum, Floyd D.; McCray, Carlos R.

    2011-01-01

    "Cultural Collision and Collusion" addresses the complexity of problems that surround youth culture and school culture. By broadening the scholarly dialogue and examining and disseminating relevant research to practitioners, the book seeks to provide insight into youth culture and some manifestations of popular culture (e.g., hip-hop). In…

  13. The relationship between Mexican American cultural values and resilience among Mexican American college students: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L; Llamas, Jasmin D

    2013-10-01

    The current study investigated the role of cultural values in the resilience of Mexican American college students. Utilizing mixed methodology, 124 self-identified Mexican American college students were asked to complete an online survey, including a demographic questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, Mexican American Cultural Values Scale, and 2 open-ended questions concerning overcoming adversity and cultural values. As hypothesized, Mexican American traditional cultural values (Familismo, Respeto, Religiosidad, and Traditional Gender Roles) predicted resilience, with Familismo accounting for the majority of the variance. Consensual qualitative research (Hill, Thompson, & Nutt Williams, 1997) was used to identify emergent domains and themes within the open-ended question responses. Traditional Mexican American Value themes included Familismo, Ethnic Identity, Religiosidad, Perseverance, and Respeto. Results highlight the important role that certain Mexican American cultural values play in providing strength for overcoming adversities.

  14. STUDY REGARDING THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE KEY CULTURAL VALUES OF MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES. A COMPARATIVE STUDY: EUROPE, ASIA, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul PETRESCU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is an important aspect of the company success. Each company develops an authentic culture. Still it is important to know what are the key cultural commune values that are linked with the company success. Thus, the purpose of present study is to identify such key values, taking as analysis base the most performant companies worldwide. With this purpose 28 multinational companies were selected from Forbes 500 companies and were analyzed in Hofstede model perspective. The results of the study emphasized that the multinational companies have strong and some fundamental cultural values that are shaped to some extent by national culture.Organizational culture is an important aspect of the company success. Each company develops an authentic culture. Still it is important to know what are the key cultural commune values that are linked with the company success. Thus, the purpose of present study is to identify such key values, taking as analysis base the most performant companies worldwide. With this purpose 28 multinational companies were selected from Forbes 500 companies and were analyzed in Hofstede model perspective. The results of the study emphasized that the multinational companies have strong and some fundamental cultural values that are shaped to some extent by national culture.

  15. On Discussion of the Value Pursuit and Path Selection of Higher Vocational Counselor Specialization Construction%浅议高职辅导员专业化建设的价值诉求与路径选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛宝志

    2013-01-01

      辅导员专业化是高校学生思想政治教育工作专业化和系统化的必然要求,是学生管理工作科学化和制度化的重要体现。高职院校目前面临着辅导员队伍不稳定、专业理论研究薄弱、专业培训偏少等专业化建设的困境。因此,高职辅导员专业化建设必须突出德育的首要地位和辅导员职业化发展的需要,坚持以生为本、服务社会的理念,疏通辅导员职业发展通道,加强辅导员专业理论研究,拓展专业团体组织的服务、科研和教育功能,推行高职院校辅导员“双师化”建设。%Counselor specialization is not only the necessary requirement of the specialization and systematization about university students’ ideological and political education work, but also the important manifestation of students management’scientization and institutionalization. During the course of the professional construction, higher vocational colleges faces some trouble, such as instable counselor team, weak professional theoretical research, lack of professional training. Therefore, higher vocational counselor specialization construction must highlight the primacy of moral education and the needs of the counselors’professionalization development, stick to the principle of student-based and social service. dredge counselors’career development channel, strengthen counselor professional theoretical research, expanding the services function, scientific research function, education function of professional organizations, promote higher vocational college counselors’construction of"double quality".

  16. How and when do personal values guide our attitudes and sociality? Explaining cross-cultural variability in attitude-value linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Diana; Fischer, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    This article examines how and when personal values relate to social attitudes. Considering values as motivational orientations, we propose an attitude-value taxonomy based on Moral Foundation Theory (Haidt & Joseph, 2007) and Schwartz's (1992) basic human values theory allowing predictions of (a) how social attitudes are related to personal values, and (b) when macro-contextual factors have an impact on attitude-value links. In a meta-analysis based on the Schwartz Value Survey (Schwartz, 1992) and the Portrait Value Questionnaire (Schwartz et al., 2001; k = 91, N = 30,357 from 31 countries), we found that self-transcendence (vs. self-enhancement) values relate positively to fairness/proenvironmental and care/prosocial attitudes, and conservation (vs. openness-to-change) values relate to purity/religious and authority/political attitudes, whereas ingroup/identity attitudes are not consistently associated with value dimensions. Additionally, we hypothesize that the ecological, economic, and cultural context moderates the extent to which values guide social attitudes. Results of the multi-level meta-analysis show that ecological and cultural factors inhibit or foster attitude-value associations: Disease stress is associated with lower attitude-value associations for conservation (vs. openness-to-change) values; collectivism is associated with stronger attitude-value links for conservation values; individualism is associated with stronger attitude-value links for self-transcendence (vs. self-enhancement) values; and uncertainty avoidance is associated with stronger attitude-values links, particularly for conservation values. These findings challenge universalistic claims about context-independent attitude-value relations and contribute to refined future value and social attitude theories. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Legal Culture as the Determinant of Value Orientations in Youth in the Society of the Transition Period (Philosophical Analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulzhanova, Zhuldizay T.; Kulzhanova, Gulbaram T.

    2016-01-01

    This research is devoted to the philosophical analysis of legal culture as a determinant of value orientations in the transition period society. The purpose of the study is to discover the essence and specificity of legal culture as a determinant of value orientations in a transition society from the philosophical perspective. In accordance with…

  18. A cross-cultural analysis of work values and moral reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hugo

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The principal aim of this study was to explore the cultural differences with regard to work values and moral reasoning in the context of the management of diversity. A secondary aim was to determine whether individuals in the various stages of moral reasoning, differ with regard to the work values espoused. The sample group (N=182 consisted of black and white students at under-graduate and post-graduate levels. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences between cultural groups with regard to work values and moral reasoning, but indicated no difference in stages of moral reasoning with regard to work values. The implications of the findings for work organisations and tertiary institutions are discussed. Opsomming Die hoofdoel van die studie was om vanuit 'n bestuur-van-diversiteit konteks vas te stel of daar interkulturele verskille bestaan ten opsigte van werkwaardes en morele redenering. 'n Sekondere doelwit was om te bepaal of individue in verskillende fases van morele redenering verskil ten opsigte van werkwaardes. Die steekproef (N=182 is saamgestel uit swart en wit studente op voor- en nagraadse vlak. Statisties-beduidende verskille tussen kultuurgroepe ten opsigte van werkwaardes en morele redenering het na vore gekom, maar geen verskille tussen fases van morele redenering ten opsigte van werkwaardes is gevind nie. Die implikasies van die bevindinge soos dit werkorganisasies en tersiere instellings raak, word bespreek.

  19. Traducción literaria: valor cultural, intertextualidad y época / Literary Translation: Cultural Value, Time and Intertextuality

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    Vladimer Luarsabishvili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuestra propuesta en este artículo es la de considerar la traducción literaria como un fenómeno con tres características definitorias: la recreación de unos valores en la cultura meta, la posesión de los rasgos intertextuales que forma parte de la estrategia del traductor, y la vinculación con la época tanto de la creación del texto original como de su transferencia a la cultura meta. In the present article we evaluate the literary translation as the phenomena with three peculiarities: as the creator of the cultural values, as the possessor of the intertextual peculiarities and as the mediator between the epoch of creations and translation of the literary text.

  20. Dental health state utility values associated with tooth loss in two contrasting cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassani, M Z; Locker, D; Elmesallati, A A; Devlin, H; Mohammadi, T M; Hajizamani, A; Kay, E J

    2009-08-01

    The study aimed to assess the value placed on oral health states by measuring the utility of mouths in which teeth had been lost and to explore variations in utility values within and between two contrasting cultures, UK and Iran. One hundred and fifty eight patients, 84 from UK and 74 from Iran, were recruited from clinics at University-based faculties of dentistry. All had experienced tooth loss and had restored or unrestored dental spaces. They were presented with 19 different scenarios of mouths with missing teeth. Fourteen involved the loss of one tooth and five involved shortened dental arches (SDAs) with varying numbers of missing posterior teeth. Each written description was accompanied by a verbal explanation and digital pictures of mouth models. Participants were asked to indicate on a standardized Visual Analogue Scale how they would value the health of their mouth if they had lost the tooth/teeth described and the resulting space was left unrestored. With a utility value of 0.0 representing the worst possible health state for a mouth and 1.0 representing the best, the mouth with the upper central incisor missing attracted the lowest utility value in both samples (UK = 0.16; Iran = 0.06), while the one with a missing upper second molar the highest utility values (0.42, 0.39 respectively). In both countries the utility value increased as the tooth in the scenario moved from the anterior towards the posterior aspect of the mouth. There were significant differences in utility values between UK and Iranian samples for four scenarios all involving the loss of anterior teeth. These differences remained after controlling for gender, age and the state of the dentition. With respect to the SDA scenarios, a mouth with a SDA with only the second molar teeth missing in all quadrants attracted the highest utility values, while a mouth with an extreme SDA with both missing molar and premolar teeth in all quadrants attracted the lowest utility values. The study

  1. Incorporation of Socio-Cultural Values in Damage Assessment Valuations of Contaminated Lands in the Niger Delta

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    Victor A. Akujuru

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Damages on contaminated land have been mostly assessed for developments subsisting on the land, neglecting the goods and services derived from the land which possess only socio-cultural values. This paper aims to ascertain the importance of socio-cultural values in the total economic value of contaminated land, drawing from the experience of a coastal community oil spillage in the Niger Delta. The paper examines what constitutes a valuable interest on contaminated land and how socio-cultural factors are valued in the damage assessment process. After reviewing the literature and decided cases, a questionnaire survey was conducted and a sample valuation report was analysed. It is concluded that there exists a socio-cultural interest on contaminated land which professional valuers do not reflect in damage assessment claims. It is recommended that any comprehensive damage assessment requires the incorporation of socio-cultural values in the valuations.

  2. ‘God is my forest’ – Xhosa cultural values provide untapped opportunities for conservation

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    Susi Vetter

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa conservation is still largely framed in terms of Western scientific values, with a focus on material benefits to local communities, whilst little is known about the intangible values local people attach to nature and biodiversity. We explored the cultural, spiritual and emotional relationships with nature expressed by Xhosa people, within the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Hotspot, as well as the activities that mediate this relationship. A descriptive research approach was applied to document the emotions, meanings and values associated with landscape elements. This approach included group and individual interviews and ‘walk-in-the-woods’ interviews and participatory mapping exercises. Respondents portrayed a strong, although not always easily articulated, appreciation for nature, especially ihlathi lesiXhosa (‘Xhosa forest’, vegetation types within the Thicket Biome. Activities such as collecting fuelwood and other resources, hunting and time spent at initiation schools were described as key opportunities for spending time in nature. The benefits of being in nature were ascribed not only to the physical experience of the forest environment and its biota, but also to the presence of ancestral spirits. Being in nature thus contributes significantly to the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of local people, and is also integral to their sense of cultural identity. This study has made it clear that maintenance of biodiversity and natural vegetation is as much in the interest of the local community’s well-being as it is in the interest of conservation planners. We recommend that cultural values be incorporated into local conservation plans.

  3. Humanity and all-humanistic values in conditions and prospect of globalization of cultural and historical process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhina I. G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For studying the phenomenon of a humanity as the universal cultural tradition that sublimates culture-creation qualities of the human person and verifies optimum anthropological structure of culture, the axiological approach directed to allocation, accentuation and analysis of valuable and semantic contents and meaning of humanity in conditions and prospects of modern process of globalization is used. Globalization is considered in the context of formation of the world cultural space - oykumena connected with modern cultural and historical process in the conditions of scientific and technical progress and positioning in it universal values or valuable universals of common to all mankind meta-cultures. As an axiological strategy of globalization cultural and historical process, the doctrine of new humanity, which is put forward and propagandized by the international public organization the Roman club, proved as the universal cultural and anthropological project adequate to formation of universal meta-culture and its humanistic values is analyzed. The biofilic axiological doctrine of new humanity, which is based on the backbone valuable principle of love to life and optimism and assuming an affirmation of unconditional value of life as cultural humanistic value at the level of a global outlook of modern era, is offered. European (Faustian humanism is analyzed in the context of identification of valuable and anthropological sources of globalization and global problems of the present that connected with the western culture, civilization, and westernization process. The comparative analysis of valuable and world outlook dominants of the European and new or global humanity is performed.

  4. The relation between cultural values, euthanasia, and spiritual care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leget, Carlo

    2017-04-28

    The aim of this paper is to gain some understanding of euthanasia as a Dutch cultural practice, focusing on value orientations that lie beneath the surface of what is made visible in the many national surveys done in the Netherlands. In order to reach this aim, I take 2 steps. In the first place, I give a short sketch of euthanasia as it is understood and practiced in the Netherlands. This is followed by a cultural analysis by the American‑Dutch historian James Kennedy who studied the euthanasia debate in the Netherlands from the 1960s until 1985. Having arrived at some cultural understanding of Dutch mentality, I dive deeper into the understanding of the Dutch value orientations by focusing on the dimension of spiritual care at the end of life. After having defined the concept of spirituality, I sketch the contemporary state of affairs in this area and report how spiritual care in the Netherlands is understood and practiced by discussing the consensus‑based Dutch guideline on spiritual care in palliative care, recent research on hope among palliative care patients in the Netherlands, and an often used Dutch tool for spiritual care: the Ars moriendi model. I end this contribution by sketching how I think that spiritual care at the end of life should be developed further in the Netherlands from a palliative care perspective.

  5. The values of culture and architecture typology of Mandailing traditional house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthan, P. L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Mandailing is one of bataknesse ethnic in North Sumatera which belong to strong to hold the customs and traditions Mandailing culture which reflected in the parts of the traditional houses. However rapidly the construction modern house make possibility the traditional house which enriched with culture value will be extinct.This studyto identify the value of culture and architecture typology of traditional house in Mandailing Natal North Sumatera. A case study using phenomenology method that is recording and serving the phenomenon which found in field as evidence that include existing condition from building. The finding show that 1) religion system or reliance in the front of location election, ornamentation orientation, construction system and room arrangement, 2) kinship system in the front of room organization, room amount and the completeness, 3) live philosophy found in shape and room arrangement which can accomodate all activity, 4) leadership system in the front of ornamentation shape and the meaning, pillar shape, house size vertically, and 5) social system in the front of roof shape, the used of decoration style and room arrangement. Architecture typology of Mandailing house dug from the shape and the construction, room arrangement, and roof shape.

  6. Menopause: Salient Issues for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Marilyn M.; Lynch, Ann Q.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding menopause, with the idea that counselors are in an ideal position to help change attitudes toward viewing menopause as a time of positive change rather than a time of psychological distress. Reviews historical, sociological, psychological, and attitudinal factors that account for negative responses associated with…

  7. Ethics in Rehabilitation Counselor Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Terry L.; Strohmer, Douglas C.; Belcas, Eva M.; Burton, Kathryn A.

    2002-01-01

    Article is an exploration of some of the ethical issues facing rehabilitation counselors who provide clinical supervision. Ethical issues related to competence, evaluation and due process, dual relationships, confidentiality, and informed consent are discussed. (Contains 28references, 2 tables, and 1 appendix.) (Author)

  8. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  9. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  10. Counselor Supervision: A Consumer's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Geoffrey G.; Littrell, John M.

    This guide attempts to solve problems caused when a certain designated "brand" of supervision is forced on the counselor trainee with neither choice nor checklist of important criteria. As a tentative start on a guide to supervision the paper offers the following: a definition of supervision; a summary of the various types of supervision; a…

  11. Menopause: Salient Issues for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Marilyn M.; Lynch, Ann Q.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding menopause, with the idea that counselors are in an ideal position to help change attitudes toward viewing menopause as a time of positive change rather than a time of psychological distress. Reviews historical, sociological, psychological, and attitudinal factors that account for negative responses associated with…

  12. ADHD: Implications for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscome, Jennifer; Cunningham, Teddi; Kelley, Heather; Brown, Caitlyn

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this article is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of ADHD and to provide evidence-based training interventions for school counselors. An overview of basic information about ADHD will be provided, including diagnosis, presentation, causes, prevalence, and common misconceptions. Evidence-based training…

  13. The Debate on European Values and the Case of Cultural Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel N. Toggenburg

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available 'Values' have become a topic of discussion at the European level. This article tries to briefly track the reasons for this phenomenon as well as to detangle the foggy notion of 'values' in this context. The author differentiates between founding values, European ideas and common legal principles. All these different forms of European values differ in their respective legal and political character. Most importantly, they require a different level of European conformity. Special emphasis is given to the value of cultural diversity which can be considered, at most, a 'self-restrictive' value since it can be perceived from an inclusive perspective (including diversity within the states or from an exclusive perspective (diversity amongst the states. Placing too much emphasis on the inclusive reading endangers the exclusive reading, and vice versa. In this context, the author refers to the new constitutional motto of the European Union as proposed by the constitutional treaty. Unlike the situation in Indonesia and South Africa (which both use the same motto it does not seem to address subnational diversity. Instead, “United in diversity” aims at protecting national identities against excessive integration,and thus seems the very opposite of the US constitutional motto of “E pluribus unum”.

  14. Influence of feedback characteristics on perceived learning value of feedback in clerkships: does culture matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Van Hell, Elisabeth A; Kerdijk, Wouter; Emilia, Ova; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-04-05

    Various feedback characteristics have been suggested to positively influence student learning. It is not clear how these feedback characteristics contribute to students' perceived learning value of feedback in cultures classified low on the cultural dimension of individualism and high on power distance. This study was conducted to validate the influence of five feedback characteristics on students' perceived learning value of feedback in an Indonesian clerkship context. We asked clerks in Neurology (n = 169) and Internal Medicine (n = 132) to assess on a 5-point Likert scale the learning value of the feedback they received. We asked them to record whether the feedback provider (1) informed the student what went well, (2) mentioned which aspects of performance needed improvement, (3) compared the student's performance to a standard, (4) further explained or demonstrated the correct performance, and (5) prepared an action plan with the student to improve performance. Data were analyzed using multilevel regression. A total of 250 students participated in this study, 131 from Internal Medicine (response rate 99%) and 119 from Neurology (response rate 70%). Of these participants, 225 respondents (44% males, 56% females) completed the form and reported 889 feedback moments. Students perceived feedback as more valuable when the feedback provider mentioned their weaknesses (β = 0.153, p < 0.01), compared their performance to a standard (β = 0.159, p < 0.01), explained or demonstrated the correct performance (β = 0.324, p < 0.001) and prepared an action plan with the student (β =0.496, p < 0.001). Appraisal of good performance did not influence the perceived learning value of feedback. No gender differences were found for perceived learning value. In Indonesia, we could validate four out of the five characteristics for effective feedback. We argue that our findings relate to culture, in particular to the levels of individualism and power distance. The

  15. The impact of religion and cultural values on AIDS education programs in Malaysia and the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteria, T; Sullivan, G

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of cultural values and government policies on the content of AIDS educational literature prepared by public health agencies in Malaysia and the Philippines. The literature from these countries, which has been distributed to the public and is intended to inform them of the danger of AIDS, how the HIV is and is not transmitted, and how to avoid infection, is analyzed and evaluated for effectiveness and congruence with the dominant religious tenets and cultural practices in each country, and attitudes to sexual behavior. The paper also describes the response of these countries to the AIDS pandemic, and concludes with suggestions about how this form of AIDS education can be improved.

  16. Survey Guidelines and its Reading Criteria for Monitoring and Transmitting Cultural Heritage Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, A.

    2015-08-01

    The paper describes reading criteria for an analysis and interpretation of material systems in relation to a built space, survey guidelines and its reading criteria for Cultural Heritage (CH) values'monitoring and transmission. In addition, integrated systems of digital technologies and 2D/3D digitization of CH are introduced for an effective and accurate reading of Venice and Milan's monuments. Specifically, the guidelines for an architectural survey allow to organize and document historic monuments information, and to identify the significant cultural/physical elements of our past in order for them to be preserved and protected for future generations. In addition, in this paper the studied projects introduce a combination of virtual technologies and historical reality with experimenting innovative solutions for CH. From the methodological point of view, this study has made use of the identification of levels of study (LS) differentiated, each of which is capable of identifying categories.

  17. Counselors Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard C.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Three professionals in the field respond to four timely questions regarding counseling with children from culturally different settings. Each has had a long-term interest in elementary school counseling and each represents a minority group. (Author)

  18. Associations of learning style with cultural values and demographics in nursing students in Iran and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Ja'afar, Rogayah

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to identify associations between the learning style of nursing students and their cultural values and demographic characteristics. A non-probability purposive sampling method was used to gather data from two populations. All 156 participants were female, Muslim, and full-time degree students. Data were collected from April to June 2010 using two reliable and validated questionnaires: the Learning Style Scales and the Values Survey Module 2008 (VSM 08). A simple linear regression was run for each predictor before conducting multiple linear regression analysis. The forward selection method was used for variable selection. P-values ≤0.05 and ≤0.1 were considered to indicate significance and marginal significance, respectively. Moreover, multi-group confirmatory factor analysis was performed to determine the invariance of the Farsi and English versions of the VSM 08. The perceptive learning style was found to have a significant negative relationship with the power distance and monumentalism indices of the VSM 08. Moreover, a significant negative association was observed between the solitary learning style and the power distance index. However, no significant association was found between the analytic, competitive, and imaginative learning styles and cultural values (P>0.05). Likewise, no significant associations were observed between learning style, including the perceptive, solitary, analytic, competitive, and imaginative learning styles, and year of study or age (P>0.05). Students who reported low values on the power distance and monumentalism indices are more likely to prefer perceptive and solitary learning styles. Within each group of students in our study sample from the same school the year of study and age did not show any significant associations with learning style.

  19. Associations of learning style with cultural values and demographics in nursing students in Iran and Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of the current study was to identify associations between the learning style of nursing students and their cultural values and demographic characteristics. Methods: A non-probability purposive sampling method was used to gather data from two populations. All 156 participants were female, Muslim, and full-time degree students. Data were collected from April to June 2010 using two reliable and validated questionnaires: the Learning Style Scales and the Values Survey Module 2008 (VSM 08. A simple linear regression was run for each predictor before conducting multiple linear regression analysis. The forward selection method was used for variable selection. P-values ≤0.05 and ≤0.1 were considered to indicate significance and marginal significance, respectively. Moreover, multi-group confirmatory factor analysis was performed to determine the invariance of the Farsi and English versions of the VSM 08. Results: The perceptive learning style was found to have a significant negative relationship with the power distance and monumentalism indices of the VSM 08. Moreover, a significant negative association was observed between the solitary learning style and the power distance index. However, no significant association was found between the analytic, competitive, and imaginative learning styles and cultural values (P>0.05. Likewise, no significant associations were observed between learning style, including the perceptive, solitary, analytic, competitive, and imaginative learning styles, and year of study or age (P>0.05. Conclusion: Students who reported low values on the power distance and monumentalism indices are more likely to prefer perceptive and solitary learning styles. Within each group of students in our study sample from the same school the year of study and age did not show any significant associations with learning style.

  20. The imperative of culture: a quantitative analysis of the impact of culture on workforce engagement, patient experience, physician engagement, value-based purchasing, and turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens K

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Katie Owens,1 Jim Eggers,2 Stephanie Keller,1 Audrey McDonald1 1HealthStream Engagement Institute, Pensacola, FL, 2Analytics, HealthStream, Laurel, MD, USA Abstract: Current uncertainty for the future of the health care landscape is placing an increasing amount of pressure on leadership teams to be prepared to steer their organization forward in a number of potential directions. It is commonly recognized among health care leaders that culture will either enable or disable organizational success. However, very few studies empirically link culture to health care-specific performance outcomes. Nearly every health care organization in the US specifies its cultural aspirations through mission and vision statements and values. Ambitions of patient-centeredness, care for the community, workplace of choice, and world-class quality are frequently cited; yet, little definitive research exists to quantify the importance of building high-performing cultures. Our study examined the impact of cultural attributes defined by a culture index (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.88 on corresponding performance with key health care measures. We mapped results of the culture index across data sets, compared results, and evaluated variations in performance among key indicators for leaders. Organizations that perform in the top quartile for our culture index statistically significantly outperformed those in the bottom quartile on all but one key performance indicator tested. The culture top quartile organizations outperformed every domain for employee engagement, physician engagement, patient experience, and overall value-based purchasing performance with statistical significance. Culture index top quartile performers also had a 3.4% lower turnover rate than the bottom quartile performers. Finally, culture index top quartile performers earned an additional 1% on value-based purchasing. Our findings demonstrate a meaningful connection between performance in the culture index and

  1. Value of Children in Urban and Rural Indonesia : Socio-Demographic Indicators, Cultural Aspects, and Empirical Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, Isabelle; Trommsdorff, Gisela; Mayer, Boris; Schwarz, Beate

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to present the initial findings of the Indonesian sample of the interdisciplinary cross-cultural project "Value of Children and intergenerational Relations" (Nauck & Trommsdorff, 2001; Trommsdorff & Nauck, 2001). This study as a whole has the aim to examine the importance of value of children for parentchild relations over the life-span in different cultures and is an extension and modification of the original "Value of Children (VOC)" study of the 1970s which mainl...

  2. Work as a cultural and personal value: attitudes towards work in Polish society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzyńska, Krystyna

    2002-01-01

    The meaning of work for Poles is analyzed here from 2 perspectives: macrosocial and individual. From the macrosocial perspective work attitudes are explained by 3 factors: traditional Polish Catholicism, cultural patterns (influence of noble class tradition), and experience of "real socialism." From an individual perspective some psychological and demographic predictors of an autonomous (intrinsic) work attitude are empirically tested. The autonomous attitude towards work is understood here as treating work as an important autonomous value versus only an instrumental means for earning money. The data was collected by means of standardized interviews run on a representative random sample of adult working Poles, N = 1340.

  3. Functional Values and Characteristics of Food Brand Name Based on the Relation between Language and Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Lu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For commodities, labeling is a mark enabling food producers or manufacturers to differ their goods from others in a same classification. As a kind of labeling, food brand is various in form and its name is the focus of this study. With market economic system, Chinese food industry is facing much severer market competitions, so studying on languages of food brand name has significant guidance to the sustainable development of food brand. This study investigates characteristics of food brand name whose functional values are analyzed and discussed in the view of culture, leading to the indication of main problems and naming principles of food brand name.

  4. A study on relationship between cultural values and earnings quality: A case study on Iranian banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ghodrati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This performs an empirical investigation to evaluate the relationship between cultural values and earnings quality in some Iranian banks over the period 2005-2011. The individualism, uncertainty avoidance, power distance and masculinity dimensions are regarded as criteria for cultural values. The study also considers change in return on assets and loan loss provisions as the main criteria for earnings quality of banks. For measuring the cultural values, the questionnaire of Hofstede [Hofstede, G. (1994. The business of international business is culture. International business review, 3(1, 1-14.]. The study also uses two measures to calculate earnings quality: 1-just-meet-or-beat the prior year’s earnings and 2- Income smoothing through loan loss provisions based on compound linear regression. Research results showed that there was a weak relationship between cultural values and earnings management.

  5. Counselor Demographics, Ageist Attitudes, and Multicultural Counseling Competence among Counselors and Counselor Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Rebecca G.; Hays, Danica G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship among counselors' self-reported multicultural counseling competence and their attitudes of the geriatric population. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between participants' attitudes of the geriatric population and their self-reported multicultural counseling…

  6. Therapist Multicultural Competence, Asian American Participants' Cultural Values, and Counseling Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shihwe; Kim, Bryan S K

    2010-10-01

    Asian Americans drop out of mental health treatment at a high rate. This problem could be addressed by enhancing therapists' multicultural competence and by examining clients' cultural attitudes that may affect the counseling process. In the present study, we used a video analogue design with a sample of 113 Asian American college students to examine these possibilities. The result from a t test showed that the session containing therapist multicultural competencies received higher ratings than the session without therapist multicultural competence. In addition, correlational analyses showed that participant values acculturation was positively associated with participant ratings of counseling process, while the value of emotional self-control was negatively correlated. The results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis did not support any interaction effects among the independent variables on counseling process. All of these findings could contribute to the field of multicultural competence research and have implications for therapist practices and training.

  7. The influences of cultural values, ethnic identity, and language use on the mental health of Korean American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Joseph D; Kim, Sheena E; Seligman, Laura D

    2006-09-01

    Little research has examined ethnic identity, cultural values, and native language maintenance as predictors of mental health in Korean Americans. The authors explored the influences of ethnic identity, maintenance of Asian cultural values, and maintenance of Korean language usage on self-esteem, anxiety, and depression in Korean American college students (N = 133). Findings indicated that Korean American men reported relatively high levels of state and trait anxiety and that the overall sample reported a relatively high level of depression. Whereas language and ethnic identity had a minimal influence on the mental health of students, greater cultural value maintenance was associated with decreased self-esteem and increases in state anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression. The positive relationship between cultural values and mental health problems may be indicative of being caught in an ethnic bind, in which the clash of traditional and modern values contributes to psychological distress. The authors discuss clinical implications of the findings.

  8. National cultural values: reflections on the formation process of future leaders in international economic cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIJA NIKOLIC

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The trend towards foreign investments in Serbia has been in rapid progress in recent years. The biggest and most valuable numbers of investments are coming from Italy. The authors’ expectation is that the trend of Italian investments in future will continue; therefore it is of high importance for the representatives of both countries’ business sectors to understand and accept differences and similarities to the other country’s business culture. Research of cultural differences between two nations , which are considered like a frame of business culture, helps avoiding possible misunderstandings and improving business cooperation between two countries. Having in mind students of economics and management, on one hand like future leaders of Italian and Serbian business and on other like representatives of the current education value system in the field of economics and management, this study consists of an application of the 7-D Hofstede Model. The application of the model takes place through the administration of two surveys done by students of Serbian Megatrend University, in Belgrade, and Italian Università degli Studi Gabriele d’Annunzio, in Pescara.

  9. Defining the role of laboratory genetic counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Susan; Lilley, Margaret; Hume, Stacey; Scott, Patrick; Somerville, Martin

    2012-08-01

    An increasing number of genetic counselors are moving into non-clinical roles, where their primary duties do not involve direct patient contact. According to the National Society of Genetic Counselors Professional Status Survey in 2010, 23% of counselors working in non-clinical roles identified laboratory or genetic testing as their primary area of work. Using a survey, we identified 43 genetic counselors who work predominately in laboratory settings. The two primary tasks performed by participants, include acting as a customer liaison (95%) and calling out test results (88%). Nineteen participants (44.2%) also reported spending a considerable amount of time signing reports. The most prevalent areas of job satisfaction were support from laboratory directors (76.8%), autonomy (76.7%), interactions with clinicians (69.7%) and interaction with other genetics counselors (67.5%). This is the first study specifically looking at the roles of laboratory genetic counselors, which is an expanding area of genetic counseling.

  10. Profiling nurses' job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, stress, cultural values and coping abilities: A cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong-Shian; Lee, Alice; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Chan, Moon Fai

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine whether definable profiles existed in a cohort of nursing staff with regard to demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, stress, cultural values and coping abilities. A survey was conducted in one hospital in Singapore from June to July 2012, and 814 full-time staff nurses completed a self-report questionnaire (89% response rate). Demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, perceived stress, cultural values, ways of coping and intention to leave current workplace were assessed as outcomes. The two-step cluster analysis revealed three clusters. Nurses in cluster 1 (n = 222) had lower acculturation scores than nurses in cluster 3. Cluster 2 (n = 362) was a group of younger nurses who reported higher intention to leave (22.4%), stress level and job dissatisfaction than the other two clusters. Nurses in cluster 3 (n = 230) were mostly Singaporean and reported the lowest intention to leave (13.0%). Resources should be allocated to specifically address the needs of younger nurses and hopefully retain them in the profession. Management should focus their retention strategies on junior nurses and provide a work environment that helps to strengthen their intention to remain in nursing by increasing their job satisfaction.

  11. Z型文化及其现代价值%Z Culture and Its Contemporary Value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠龙克

    2012-01-01

    二战后,日本经济获得了飞速的发展,而美国经济的增速却落后于作为战败国的H本。于是美国的有关专家把探究H本企业如何取得如此巨大的增速作为重点,其中威廉·大内的《Z理论》就是此时的代表作之一,书中提出了Z型组织和Z型文化,其文化中体现了企业具有履行社会责任的意识。因此,作者首先阐述了Z型文化,进而分析了Z型文化的价值观及其特点,最后论述了Z型文化对我国目前企业管理所具有的价值。%After World War II, the Japanese economy experienced rapid development, but American economic growth lagged behind defeated Japan. So certain American experts laid emphasis on exploring how the Japanese enterprises had made such great growth, among the findings of which we can find one of William Ouchi's representative works Z Theory. The book puts forward Z type organization and Z cul- ture, which is reflected in the enterprises" fulfillment of their social responsibility awareness. Therefore, the author of this essay analyzes the Z culture,followed by an analysis of the Z culture values and their characteristics, and finally discusses the value of Z culture in the management of Chinese enterprises.

  12. Should Universalism Trump Cultural Relativism in Counseling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnier, Richard T.; Dixon, Andrea L.; Barratt, Tyler M.; Moyer, Erika L.

    2008-01-01

    Certain cultural customs and practices are viewed as abhorrent by many people, yet contemporary American counselors rarely criticize any specific culture. In this article, the authors explore why counselors abstain from such criticism. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that universalism, often regarded as a politically incorrect and an…

  13. Cultural differences in family, marital, and gender-role values among immigrants and majority members in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends-Tóth, Judit; van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the size of differences in self-reported family, marital, and gender-role values in five cultural groups in the Netherlands (6338 Dutch mainstreamers and 422 Turkish, 369 Moroccan, 429 Surinamese, and 394 Antillean first- and second-generation immigrants). It was found that the three value scales were neither completely independent, nor could they be merged into a single value scale. The factor structures of all scales were identical for the five cultural groups, implying that the concepts can be compared. Age, sex, and notably education accounted for a substantial part of the cultural differences in all values. Cultural differences were larger for marital and family values than for gender-role values. Family and marital values yielded the same rank order of mean scores in the five cultural groups: Turks and Moroccans scored the lowest (having the most traditional values), followed by Surinamers, Antilleans, and Dutch mainstreamers. This rank order corresponds with the ethnic hierarchy of cultural groups that is based on the evaluation of ethnic groups by mainstreamers according to their liking of and likeness to ethnic groups. Generational differences were not found for family and gender-role values but first-generation immigrants in all groups had more traditional marital values than had second-generation immigrants. It was concluded that the theoretical framework based on a combination of three Hofstede dimensions (individualism-collectivism, power-distance, and femininity-masculinity), a model of the hierarchy of the ethnic groups in the Dutch society, and acculturation theory provided an adequate way to address family, marital, and gender-role value differences in the five cultural groups.

  14. [Evaluation of cultural service value of aquaculture pond ecosystem: a case study in a water conservation area of Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Guo, Zong-xiang; Yang, Huai-yu; Yang, Zheng-yong

    2009-12-01

    Pond aquaculture has existed in China for thousands of years, which has not only contributed great economic value, but also presented cultural value for human beings. With the development and upgrading of Chinese economy and culture, these values will be highlighted further. To evaluate the cultural service value of pond aquaculture ecosystem would provide a scientific base to the policy-making to avoid or reduce the wrong design-making or avoid the policy-malfunction, and also, to promote the development of aquaculture and related recreational fishing industry, increase the added value of aquaculture and the income of fish-farmers, and promote the economic development of rural area. Based on the survey data from the aquaculture ponds in the water conservation area of Dianshan Lake in Qingpu District of Shanghai and the related statistical data, the cultural service value including recreational value and existence value of the aquaculture pond ecosystem in the area was estimated by means of travel cost method (TCM) and contingent valuation method (CVM). The total cultural service value of this ecosystem was about 213 million Yuan x a(-1) or 231296. 69 Yuan x hm(-2) x a(-1), being 5. 25 times of the market value of aquaculture products, among which, recreational value was about 189 million Yuan x a(-1), and existence value was about 24 million Yuan x a(-1). It was suggested that in the construction of new rural areas of Shanghai, sufficient attention should be paid on the full play of the cultural service value of aquaculture pond ecosystem.

  15. An Analysis on Cultural Values of Companies from China and the United States-Based on Hofstede’s Cultural Dimension Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    占小海; 张若晨

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, commercial competition is becoming fiercer and fiercer, and with the globalization proceeding, when a company tries to expand, promote and develop, it needs to adapt itself to the open business society while not losing its own cul-ture. Since English has been widely used in the world, an effective and suitable English website is essential for a company to use as a kind of advertisement and publicity, where its cultural values are presented.With companies’websites as subjects and Hofst-ede’s cultural dimension theory as the theoretical basis, this study, through text content and data analysis of company profiles, strategies and cultures, tries to find out the tendency of Chinese and American companies on the five cultural value dimensions, which is power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism, masculinity and long-term orientation. Accordingly, constructive suggestions are put forward to help appease and avoid misunderstandings, and promote business communication and collabora-tion.

  16. Attire, an influence on perceptions of counselors' characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmeyer, J R; Goldsmith, E B

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the initial impressions formed by 86 clients of counselors based on the counselors' attire. Clients' perceptions of counselors' selected characteristics of caring, authenticity, competency, and trustworthiness were assessed. In addition, clients reported their willingness to see a counselor based on their initial impression of the counselors' attire. Analysis showed that most of the clients preferred a moderate style of dress (neither too formal nor too casual) for both male and female counselors. A strong positive association was found between the counselors' attire and the clients' perception of the four selected characteristics of counselors.

  17. Sex Education and Intellectual Disability: Practices and Insight from Pediatric Genetic Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Carly; Lincoln, Sharyn; Meredith, Stephanie; Cross, Elizabeth M; Rintell, David

    2016-06-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) with or without other anomalies is a common referral for genetic counseling. Sessions may include discussions of reproductive implications and other issues related to sex education. Patients with ID regularly meet barriers when trying to obtain sex education due to the misperceptions of others as being either asexual or that such education would promote inappropriate sexual behavior. In this pilot study, we surveyed genetic counselors to explore their experiences with being asked to provide sex education counseling and their comfort in doing so for patients with ID ages 9-17. Results were analyzed from 38 respondents. Caregivers and patients most frequently requested information on puberty, sex abuse prevention, and reproductive health. Genetic counselors were most comfortable when they could provide sex education counseling within the context of a particular condition or constellation of features. They were least comfortable when they lacked familiarity with the patient, caregiver, or the family's culture. The most frequently cited barriers that prevented genetic counselors from providing sex education counseling were lack of time, lack of training, the patient's ID being too profound, and a belief that genetic counselors should not be responsible for providing sex education counseling. While many respondents reported that providing sex education counseling is not considered within the scope of a genetic counselor's practice, they also noted that patients' families initiate discussions for which counselors should be prepared. Respondents indicated that resource guides specifically designed for use by genetic counselors would be beneficial to their practice. Genetic counselors have the opportunity to embrace the role of advocate and broach the issue of sexual health with caregivers and patients by directing them toward educational resources, if not providing sex education directly to effectively serve the needs of patients and

  18. A protocol for eliciting nonmaterial values through a cultural ecosystem services frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Rachelle K; Klain, Sarah C; Ardoin, Nicole M; Satterfield, Terre; Woodside, Ulalia; Hannahs, Neil; Daily, Gretchen C; Chan, Kai M

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders’ nonmaterial desires, needs, and values often critically influence the success of conservation projects. These considerations are challenging to articulate and characterize, resulting in their limited uptake in management and policy. We devised an interview protocol designed to enhance understanding of cultural ecosystem services (CES). The protocol begins with discussion of ecosystem-related activities (e.g., recreation, hunting) and management and then addresses CES, prompting for values encompassing concepts identified in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) and explored in other CES research. We piloted the protocol in Hawaii and British Columbia. In each location, we interviewed 30 individuals from diverse backgrounds. We analyzed results from the 2 locations to determine the effectiveness of the interview protocol in elucidating nonmaterial values. The qualitative and spatial components of the protocol helped characterize cultural, social, and ethical values associated with ecosystems in multiple ways. Maps and situational, or vignette-like, questions helped respondents articulate difficult-to-discuss values. Open-ended prompts allowed respondents to express a diversity of ecosystem-related values and proved sufficiently flexible for interviewees to communicate values for which the protocol did not explicitly probe. Finally, the results suggest that certain values, those mentioned frequently throughout the interview, are particularly salient for particular populations. The protocol can provide efficient, contextual, and place-based data on the importance of particular ecosystem attributes for human well-being. Qualitative data are complementary to quantitative and spatial assessments in the comprehensive representation of people's values pertaining to ecosystems, and this protocol may assist in incorporating values frequently overlooked in decision making processes. Un Protocolo para Obtener Valores No Materiales por medio de un Marco de

  19. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Symptoms of Depression in Hispanic Youth: The Roles of Gender, Hispanic Cultural Values, and Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Soto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The risk for depression increases as Hispanic youth acculturate to U.S. society. This association is stronger for Hispanic girls than boys. To better understand the influence of culture and family on depressive symptoms, we tested a process-oriented model of acculturation, cultural values, and family functioning. The data came from Project RED,…

  20. Conflicted Heritage: Values, Visions and Practices in the Management and Preservation of Cultural and Environmental Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Kearsley

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage has become of great importance in a number of areas, including self-identity, community identity and as an economic sector through cultural tourism. Most definitions of heritage now accept that it is a perceptual construct with many meanings, both for those who identify and manage it and for those who consume it in various ways. Because heritage can be seen in many lights, the potential for conflict between users, managers and those who own heritage is high. This article examines the nature of heritage and heritage landscapes and discusses the many symbolic and economic benefits that can ensue; the changing nature of the markets for heritage is described. The various monetary and opportunity costs of heritage are discussed and the resultant conflicts outlined. The article goes on to examine the contradictions and conflicts inherent in the concept of authenticity and the issues involved in various modes of interpretation. Here the article asks that if heritage is accepted as that which ‘we’ wish to preserve, then who are ‘we’? This question is explored in the context of the impacts of tourism upon heritage in Southern New Zealand, including the impacts of recent development, perceptions of crowding and the nature of wilderness. Inter-cultural perceptions are explained through the differing perceptions of, and attitudes to, the natural world held by Maori and by others. The article concludes by noting that, while much heritage research is still based upon the product and its presentation, future studies will need to learn more on consumers, their attitudes , expectations and values.

  1. Turning Cultural Heritage into Cultural and Creative Products: A Case Study of Value Creation Out of Cultural Artifacts Collaborated between the National Palace Museum and the Bright Ideas Design, Co. Ltd.

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Fen Chen; Yann-Jy Yang

    2016-01-01

    This paper analysed the value creation activities of cultural and creative products developed from cultural heritage. It employed the case study methodology to examine two collaboration projects between the Bright Ideas Design, Co. Ltd. and National Palace Museum. A framework was developed based on the review of the relevant literature on cultural products, value creation and digital content. Research data included information obtained from semi-structured interviews and secondary sources. Th...

  2. Using the competing values framework (CVF to investigate organisational culture in a major private security company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Kokt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of crime, especially in the South African context, has placed considerable emphasis on the private security industry.  This has also increased fierce competition in the private security domain with both national and international private security companies infiltrating the South African market.  Like public policing private security has an important role to play in combating crime and other transgressions, with the exception that private security owes its existence to paying customers.  By using the Competing Values Framework (CVF as conceptual guide, the researchers are able to provide the managers of the company under investigation with insight on how their cultural orientation affects their functioning and ultimately their competitive advantage.

  3. Religiosity and social welfare: competing influences of cultural conservatism and prosocial value orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Ariel; Soto, Christopher J; Cohen, Adam B; Miller, Dale T

    2011-08-01

    This research examines the hypothesis that religiosity has two competing psychological influences on the social welfare attitudes of contemporary Americans. On the one hand, religiosity promotes a culturally based conservative identity, which in turn promotes opposition to federal social welfare provision. On the other hand, religiosity promotes a prosocial value orientation, which in turn promotes support of federal social welfare provision. Across two national samples (Ns = 1,513 and 320) and one sample of business employees (N = 710), reliable support for this competing pathways model was obtained. We argue that research testing influences of nonpolitical individual differences on political preferences should consider the possibility of competing influences that are rooted in a combination of personality processes and contextual-discursive surroundings.

  4. CULTURAL ISSUES OF SOCIAL NETWORKS, THEIR PRINCIPLES AND VALUES IN SOCIAL INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Marco Rosini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show the importance of a samba school for the local community (in relation to social inclusion and redemption of human values, reflect on the application of this learning created at community to a (organization and discuss the role of people in organizational and cultural strengthening in a social networking environment. It also shows how the use of information technology and communication (ITC can contribute to the evolution of educational scenario of those communities. The scientific method for this is case study, using Delphi technique, where the main community stakeholders are interviewed. Care, respect and consideration for the people who are part of the community are important factors in these social communities. The learning generated by the community and their leaders’ effort are determining for them. ITC can help this learning.

  5. Political Culture, Values and Economic Utility: A Different Perspective on Norwegian Party-based Euroscepticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne S. Skinner

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on a content analysis of party manifestos and a survey of Norwegian MPs, this article examines the nuances in, and the causality of, the different Norwegian parties’ Euroscepticism. The study of the comparative party politics of Euroscepticism, which focuses on ideology and strategy, falls short of accounting for the Norwegian case, where, unlike other European countries, the parties’ Euroscepticism is exceptionally stable and appears across the political spectrum. Therefore, the article tests an alternative set of theories, drawn from the literature on opinion formation on European integration, to find a more suitable framework for analysing and explaining the motivation of Norwegian Euroscepticism. The analysis shows that Norwegian party-based Euroscepticism can be divided into three types when it comes to its strength and policy opposition, with the Centre Party and the Socialist Left Party on the ‘hardest’ end of the Euroscepticism scale, followed by the Christian Democratic Party and the Liberal Party, and finally, the Labour Party and the Progress Party. Furthermore, the analysis indicates that Norwegian Eurosceptic party stances on Europe are primarily driven by political values and political culture concerns, except for the Progress Party, which base its Eurosceptic motivation on economic utilitarianism and political culture.

  6. Personal value preferences, group identifications, and cultural practices of Palestinian Israelis working in close contact with Jewish Israelis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene; Abu Kheit, Ayat

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the connection between personal value preferences, group identifications, and cultural practices among Palestinian Israelis working in close contact with the Jewish population in Israel. One hundred twenty-two Palestinian Israelis participated in the study. The participants were employed in different professional positions in the Tel Aviv Metropolitan area and were recruited to the study using the snowball technique. A stronger national identification was associated with a higher preference for the security and conformity values, and a lower preference for the humility values. A stronger ethnic identification was associated with a lower preference for the security, power, and stimulation values. Group identifications mediated the connection between personal value preferences and cultural practices. A longer time working in close contact with the majority group and less frequent visits home were associated with a greater adherence to the majority group's cultural practices but not with adherence to the ethnic group's practices and not with the group identifications.

  7. Depression in the barrio: An analysis of the risk and protective nature of cultural values among Mexican American substance users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Yolanda R; Torres, Luis R; Stotts, Angela L; Ren, Yi; Sampson, Mcclain; Klawans, Michelle R; Bordnick, Patrick S

    2017-06-07

    Understanding the effect of cultural values on depression and how social networks influence these relationships may be important in the treatment of substance-using, Mexican American populations. Latino cultural values, familismo, personalismo, fatalismo, and machismo, may be associated with depression among Latinos. The current study identified the association of traditional Latino values on depressive symptomatology among a sample of Mexican American heroin injectors. A cross-sectional research design and field-intensive outreach methodology were utilized to recruit 227 Mexican American men. Participants were categorized into depressed and nondepressed groups. Relations among cultural values and depression were examined using logistic regression. Findings indicate that drug-using men with higher familismo and fatalismo scores are protected against depressive symptomatology. Relations between familismo and depression seem to be moderated by having a drug use network. In addition, findings reveal that age is inversely related to depressive symptomatology. Young Mexican American heroin users who do not ascribe to traditional Latino values may be highly associated with depression and therefore more vulnerable to riskier drug use behaviors. Moreover, drug-using social networks may affect the protective nature of certain cultural values. Further research is needed to identify whether culturally tailored treatments can cultivate these values while simultaneously undermining the effect of substance-using social networks in order to reduce depression symptoms among this group of high-risk substance users.

  8. Attitudes to cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority groups in Britain: cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, and ethnic identity salience as protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Hendrikse, Sinead

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that ethnic minority women have more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery than British Whites, but reasons for this are not fully understood. To overcome this dearth in the literature, the present study asked 250 British Asian and 250 African Caribbean university students to complete measures of attitudes to cosmetic surgery, cultural mistrust, adherence to traditional cultural values, ethnic identity salience, self-esteem, and demographics. Preliminary analyses showed that there were significant between-group differences only on cultural mistrust and self-esteem, although effect sizes were small (d values = .21-.37). Further analyses showed that more negative attitudes to cosmetic surgery were associated with greater cultural mistrust, stronger adherence to traditional values, and stronger ethnic identity salience, although these relationships were weaker for African Caribbean women than for British Asians. These results are discussed in relation to perceptions of cosmetic surgery among ethnic minority women.

  9. Influence of Cultural Belief and Values on Secondary School Students' Understanding of Atmospheric Related Physics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Theodora Olufunke

    2015-01-01

    The study identified the different cultural concepts that secondary school students' believe in and determined the belief and idea of students about the cultural concepts. It also investigated students' source of information about the cultural concepts and determined the influence of these cultural believes on students' academic performance in…

  10. An Innovative Implication of the Atlas of European Values for Bridging Cultural Differences within the Danube Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Popova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss the positioning of the Danube countries in the Atlas of European Values and to outline the possibility for the establishment of a common identity among the inhabitants of the Danube region on the basis of shared values and attitudes. Exploration of the prerequisites for an integrated cultural identity within the Romanian-Bulgarian cross-border region along the Danube river. Comparative study of the empirical data about the Danube countries, extracted from all data in the Atlas of European Values.: Identified similarities among the citizens of the Danube countries in relation to the components of their cultural identity. Outlined necessity for increasing the intercultural awareness of the inhabitants of the Danube region in order to overcome the existing cultural barriers and to create prerequisites for common cultural identity. The paper presents the applicability of the Atlas of European Values for wide range of studies in the area of cultural, societal and political sciences. The comparative study of the cultural similarities and differences of the Danube countries is the first of its kind and can serve as a basis of multilayer research of the values within the Danube region.

  11. The Flipped Classroom in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kristen; Milsom, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is proposed as an effective instructional approach in counselor education. An overview of the flipped-classroom approach, including advantages and disadvantages, is provided. A case example illustrates how the flipped classroom can be applied in counselor education. Recommendations for implementing or researching flipped…

  12. Reading Disability and the Elementary School Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, David H.; Phelps, R. Neal

    1980-01-01

    Provides the elementary school counselor with a knowledge base in the reading and reading disability areas. The discussion on reading highlights four major areas with which the elementary school counselor should be familiar: definition of reading, proliferation of terms, reading skills assessment, and reading disability. (Author)

  13. The Professional School Counselor and Accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Jeannine R.; Sommers, Judith A.

    2000-01-01

    Too often school counselors are evaluated through a teacher-assessment process bearing little relevance to (poorly defined) counseling tasks or roles. Evaluation is hindered by lack of a developmental model and by administrative pressures to perform tasks outside counselors' training and experience. Improvement measures are outlined. (Contains 16…

  14. Portfolio Assessment: A Model for Counselor Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltimore, Michael L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of portfolio assessment to counselor education programs. Provides a definition of portfolio and outlines a portfolio approach in counselor education. Asserts that portfolio assessment relies on performance in measuring learning outcomes. Gives an example of portfolio content, along with strategies for evaluating student…

  15. Vision: A Conceptual Framework for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, Jennifer Scaturo

    2013-01-01

    Vision is essential to the implementation of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model. Drawing from research in organizational leadership, this article provides a conceptual framework for how school counselors can incorporate vision as a strategy for implementing school counseling programs within the context of practice.…

  16. The Guidance Counselor and the Reading Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    There are many ways guidance counselors can help teachers achieve more optimal reading instruction. Counselors first may have to ascertain the kinds of problems faced by a student in learning to read. Assessing a student's ability to use picture clues to decipher words may be necessary with primary grade students. Knowledge about phonics, using…

  17. Interdisciplinary Training: Preparing Counselors for Collaborative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Geroski, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    This article utilizes one counselor education program's experience as a framework for exploring how to prepare counselors to work in interdisciplinary teams. Based on an interdisciplinary training program that involves faculty and graduate students from counseling, social work, nursing, internal medicine and family medicine, the article explores…

  18. Supervision Experiences of New Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultsma, Shawn A.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the supervision experiences of 11 new professional school counselors. They reported that their supervision experiences were most often administrative in nature; reports of clinical and developmental supervision were limited to participants whose supervisors were licensed as professional counselors. In addition,…

  19. Getting Your Counselor to Support Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Is there a disconnect between counselors and educators in technology and vocational education? What is counseling, and what is a school counselor's role in a secondary school setting? How can one work with his or her guidance staff to ensure that students better understand your course offerings? The development of relationships, knowledge, and…

  20. African American Women Counselors, Wellness, and Spirituality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Debora; Bryant, Rhonda M.

    2011-01-01

    Given their tremendous professional responsibilities, professional counselors face daunting challenges to remaining healthy and avoiding role stress and overload. This article explores the intersection of race, gender, wellness, and spirituality in the self-care of African American women counselors. The authors give particular attention to…

  1. Legislation Vs. Obligation: Regarding Counselor Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Frank H.

    1970-01-01

    Employment service and vocational counselors must be aware of future technological trends. In counseling the unemployed the interviewer should focus on manhood rather than manpower. Employment counselors have a commitment to implement a positive course of action through role playing, psychodrama, audiovisual tapes showing how to take job…

  2. Eating Disorders: The School Counselor's Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omizo, Sharon A.; Omizo, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses role of school counselor in providing assistance to students who may be at risk for developing anorexia nervosa and bulimia and students who already display behaviors and physical symptoms of either of these illnesses. Addresses specific concerns regarding intervention strategies used by the school counselor in the student's recovery…

  3. Former substance users working as counselors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    All helping professionals risk participation in "dual relationships". But in the case of former substance users working as counselors, specific dilemmas and problems are accentuated. A qualitative analysis highlights some of the ethical and personal dilemmas faced by these counselors. The data is...

  4. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and the School Counselor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertlieb, Ellen C.

    2008-01-01

    The current article is designed to provide school counselors an understanding of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The causes, characteristics, and treatment approaches are presented with examples focusing on school-related issues. The article concludes with a discussion about the role that the school counselor can take in helping the child…

  5. Rural and Small Town School Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Richard E.; Sutton, John M., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Group discussions and interviews with counselors in small and rural schools in Maine and upstate New York focused on the advantages and disadvantages of working in small schools, role generalization and confusion experienced by school counselors, professional autonomy and accountability, and the need for relevant inservice training. (Contains 33…

  6. The role of gender, values, and culture in adolescent bystanders' strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Anni; Tulviste, Tiia

    2015-02-01

    We examined the relationship between adolescent bystanders' strategies for intervening in the bullying-like situation and their gender, values, and cultural origin. The sample consisted of 682 Estonian and Russian-Estonian adolescents (M age = 13.02 years). They were shown a video of a bullying-like situation with a non-intervening adult bystander and asked to describe what they would do if they, instead of the adult, witnessed that situation. Only 10% said that they would not intervene. Girls were more likely than boys to suggest multiple actions. Adolescents who valued conformity were less likely to propose using physical aggression. Doing nothing was less likely suggested by those who placed more importance on conformity and less on power. Estonian adolescents were more likely than their Russian-Estonian peers to suggest finding out what is going on, and less likely to say that they would do nothing. The findings suggest that although most adolescents express willingness to help the victim, they might not actually know how to intervene.

  7. Navigating hybridity: investigating the dance between culture and values within the cuban national education system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Byker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybridity is the dynamic relationship between local and global factors that push and pull on people and nations. Hybridity is deeply situated in socio-contextual factors, like cultural beliefs, education, and political systems, that aid and hinder a people’s navigation of globalized phenomena. Simply put, hybridity is how people and societies adapt to a changing world. This article examines the case of Cuba in response to hybridity. Specifically, the article’s purpose is to examine ways that the Cuban National Education System impacts how Cubans navigate the global march towards hybridity. The article reports on a focused ethnographic study of a week long education trip to Cuba during February 2013. The ethnography includes over 100 hours of data collection, including semi-structured interviews with 26 Cuban participants. The study uses Freire’s (1970 notion of “humanizing pedagogy” to analyze how the impact of the Cuban National Education System values in the context of Cuba and larger global context. The study found that three values in particular, amor, solidaridad, and conciencia de derechos y response, were deeply embedded in the Cuban National Education System and effect the way that Cubans navigate the complex hybridity that situates their island nation.

  8. Using the Cultural Dimension and Accounting Value Classification Frameworks to Investigate Cultural Diversity in a Multi-National South African-Based Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stander

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The developing South African economy provides good business opportunities for global companies. Despite the popularity of mergers and acquisitions as a way to expand into a developing economy, many such business transaction fail to create sustainable organisations due to issues pertaining to national and corporate cross-cultural issues. This study investigated the potential impact of national cultural differences pertinent to the acquisition of a South African-based resource company by a French-based international group. It was evident that there were cultural differences in the manner which certain attitudes and actions were expressed within the workplace, which have led to some conflict that hampered the optimum functioning of the accounting-related functions within the company. By using Hofstede’s cultural dimensions andGray’s accounting value classification frameworks within this case study, the organization’s management was provided with insights into how national cultural orientation affects their functioning.

  9. Cultural evolution over the last 40 years in China: using the Google Ngram Viewer to study implications of social and political change for cultural values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong; Greenfield, Patricia M

    2015-02-01

    Chinese people have held collectivistic values such as obligation, giving to other people, obedience and sacrifice of personal interests for thousands of years. In recent decades, China has undergone rapid economic development and urbanisation. This study investigates changing cultural values in China from 1970 to 2008 and the relationship of changing values to ecological shifts. The conceptual framework for the study was Greenfield's (2009) theory of social change and human development. Changing frequencies of contrasting Chinese words indexing individualistic or collectivistic values show that values shift along with ecological changes (urbanisation, economic development and enrollment in higher education), thereby adapting to current sociodemographic contexts. Words indexing adaptive individualistic values increased in frequency between 1970 and 2008. In contrast, words indexing less adaptive collectivistic values either decreased in frequency in this same period of time or else rose more slowly than words indexing contrasting individualistic values.

  10. Sami Culture and Values: A Study of the National Mathematics Exam for the Compulsory School in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    Norway ratified the ILO convention 169 concerning indigenous and tribal people in independent countries in 1990. In accordance with the convention the education programs for the Sami shall address their value systems and their cultural aspirations. Our aim is to investigate the implementation of this convention. The focus is on how Sami values are…

  11. On the Cultural Value of Taijquan%太极拳的文化价值探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张靖

    2011-01-01

    太极拳具有浓郁的中国文化特色,是中国传统身体文化、健身文化的凝结,也是中国人民奉献给世界的宝贵文化遗产。对太极拳的文化价值进行深入的探讨对传承中国传统武术文化,发扬中华武术精神,促进武术的国际化进程具有十分重要的意义。%Taijiquan has strong Chinese cultural characteristics,is a kind of product of Chinese traditional culture and fitness culture,also is a precious cultural heritage of world culture devoted by Chinese.Probing the cultural value of Taijiquan is meaningful fo

  12. Human development and ecology of the urban landscape in the context of evolutionary values of modern culture in the framework of cultural-environmental module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the features of cultural-ecological approach, which is an important methodological basis of modernization of Russian education, held in a worsening of environmental problems and understanding the leading role of culture in their resolution. This confirms the importance of the use of this approach for the development of modern geographic education. The particular value it has in the initial course of physical geography, where we have developed a cultural-ecological module “I am Nizhny Novgorod native”, comprehensively revealing different aspects of the urban landscape.

  13. School Counselors and Child Abuse Reporting: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jill K.

    2009-01-01

    A study was done to investigate school counselors' child abuse reporting behaviors and perceptions regarding the child abuse reporting process. Participants were randomly selected from the American School Counselor Association membership database with 193 school counselors returning questionnaires. Overall, school counselors indicated that they…

  14. Preferences for Physically Disabled Counselors in Hypothetical Counseling Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David C.; Frederickson, William A.

    1975-01-01

    The preferences of 320 undergraduate students for one of three disabled counselors or for a nondisabled counselor on each of Brabham and Thoreson's 20 hypothetical counseling situations were obtained. Significant counselor preferences existed for 18 of the 20 situations, and when categorized by sex, significant counselor preferences existed for 4…

  15. School Counselors and Child Abuse Reporting: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jill K.

    2009-01-01

    A study was done to investigate school counselors' child abuse reporting behaviors and perceptions regarding the child abuse reporting process. Participants were randomly selected from the American School Counselor Association membership database with 193 school counselors returning questionnaires. Overall, school counselors indicated that they…

  16. Gender Differences in Counselors' Attitudes toward and Attributions about Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Eve M.; Betz, Nancy E.

    1993-01-01

    Examined extent to which offender's, victim's, and counselor's gender were related to 111 counselors' attributions about and attitudes toward cases of incest. Found no significant differences as function of either victim or offender gender. Female counselors had broader definitions of incest than did male counselors and were less likely to view…

  17. Diagnostic value of culture and serological tests in the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in HIV and non-HIV Colombian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Bustamante, Karen; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz Elena; de Bedout, Catalina; Tobón, Angela Maria; González, Angel

    2013-11-01

    We determined the value of culture and serological tests used to diagnose histoplasmosis. The medical records of 391 histoplasmosis patients were analyzed. Diagnosis of the mycosis was assessed by culture, complement fixation, and immunodiffusion tests; 310 patients (79.5%) were male, and 184 patients (47.1%) were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Positivity value for cultures was 35.7% (74/207), reactivity of serological tests was 95.2% (160/168), and a combination of both methodologies was 16.9% (35/207) for non-HIV patients. Positivity value for cultures was 75.0% (138/184), reactivity of serological tests was 92.4% (85/92), and a combination of both methodologies was 26.0% (48/184) for HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients; 48.1% (102/212) of extrapulmonary samples from HIV/AIDS patients yielded positive cultures compared with 23.1% (49/212) in non-HIV patients. Lymphocyte counts made for 33.1% (61/184) of HIV/AIDS patients showed a trend to low CD4+ numbers and higher proportion of positive cultures. These results indicate that culture is the most reliable fungal diagnostic method for HIV/AIDS patients, and contrary to what is generally believed, serological assays are useful for diagnosing histoplasmosis in these patients.

  18. Differences in prevalence rates of PTSD in various European countries explained by war exposure, other trauma and cultural value orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Andrea; Maercker, Andreas

    2014-06-28

    Guided by previous explorations of historical and cultural influences on the occurrence of PTSD, the aim of the present study was to investigate the contributions of war victimisation (in particular, World War II) and other civil trauma on the prevalence of PTSD, as mediated by cultural value orientation. Secondary data analysis was performed for 12 European countries using data, including PTSD prevalence and number of war victims, crime victims, and natural disaster victims, from different sources. Ten single value orientations, as well as value aggregates for traditional and modern factors, were investigated. Whilst differences in PTSD prevalence were strongly associated with war victim rates, associations, albeit weaker, were also found between crime victims and PTSD. When cultural value orientations, such as stimulation and conformity as representatives of modern and traditional values, were included in the multivariate predictions of PTSD prevalence, an average of approximately 80% of PTSD variance could be explained by the model, independent of the type of trauma exposure. The results suggest that the aftermath of war contributes to current PTSD prevalence, which may be explained by the high proportion of the older population who directly or indirectly experienced traumatic war experiences. Additional findings for other types of civil trauma point towards an interaction between value orientation and country-specific trauma rates. Particularly, being personally oriented towards stimulation appears to interact with differences in trauma prevalence. Thus, cultural value orientation might be viewed not only as an individual intrinsic process but also as a compensatory strategy after trauma exposure.

  19. Assessing an organizational culture instrument based on the Competing Values Framework: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohr David C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Competing Values Framework (CVF has been widely used in health services research to assess organizational culture as a predictor of quality improvement implementation, employee and patient satisfaction, and team functioning, among other outcomes. CVF instruments generally are presented as well-validated with reliable aggregated subscales. However, only one study in the health sector has been conducted for the express purpose of validation, and that study population was limited to hospital managers from a single geographic locale. Methods We used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to examine the underlying structure of data from a CVF instrument. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a work environment survey conducted in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA. The study population comprised all staff in non-supervisory positions. The survey included 14 items adapted from a popular CVF instrument, which measures organizational culture according to four subscales: hierarchical, entrepreneurial, team, and rational. Results Data from 71,776 non-supervisory employees (approximate response rate 51% from 168 VHA facilities were used in this analysis. Internal consistency of the subscales was moderate to strong (α = 0.68 to 0.85. However, the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales had higher correlations across subscales than within, indicating poor divergent properties. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors, comprising the ten items from the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales loading on the first factor, and two items from the hierarchical subscale loading on the second factor, along with one item from the rational subscale that cross-loaded on both factors. Results from confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the two-subscale solution provides a more parsimonious fit to the data as compared to the original four-subscale model. Conclusion This study suggests that there may be problems

  20. Culture in Prenatal Development: Parental Attitudes, Availability of Care, Expectations, Values, and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Irene M.; Noya, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Culture is a universal phenomenon, but most interest about culture during pregnancy has focused on medical care, neglecting psychological aspects of normative development. Objective: The purpose of this article was to examine normative gestational experiences using the framework of a broaden and build model of culture, positive…

  1. The Impact of Value-Orientations on Cross-cultural Encounters and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Claude-Hélène Mayer holds a Master's and Doctorate in Social and Cultural Anthropology and a Doctorate in .... to determine in which culture categories cross-cultural interaction. ◇ ..... the sample included a number of single-gender schools.

  2. An Organizational Culture Assessment Using the Competing Values Framework: A Profile of Ohio State University Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrio, Angel A.

    2003-01-01

    Current and preferred culture of Ohio State University Extension was assessed by 297 extension staff categorized by gender, location, program area, title, age, and years employed. Most categories selected a Clan culture type as dominant in both the current and preferred situations. The Clan culture portrays an organization that concentrates on…

  3. The additional value of blood cultures in patients with complicated urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, V.; Prins, J.M.; Opmeer, B.C.; Reijke, T.M. de; Hulscher, M.E.; Geerlings, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated 800 hospitalized patients with a complicated urinary tract infection, from whom both a blood and a urine culture were obtained on the first day of antibiotic treatment. Urine cultures were positive in 70% of patients, and blood cultures were positive in 29%. In 7% of patients, uropathog

  4. The value of process safety culture for inspection in major hazard industies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Bezemer, R.; Guldener, V.

    2015-01-01

    Safety culture is increasingly recognised as the third important determinant of safety, complementary to technology and safety organisation. There are no legal requirements with respect to safety culture, except for nuclear power plants. Safety culture is and remains therefore a responsibility of th

  5. Culture in Prenatal Development: Parental Attitudes, Availability of Care, Expectations, Values, and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Irene M.; Noya, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Culture is a universal phenomenon, but most interest about culture during pregnancy has focused on medical care, neglecting psychological aspects of normative development. Objective: The purpose of this article was to examine normative gestational experiences using the framework of a broaden and build model of culture, positive…

  6. Professional School Counselors as Social Justice Advocates for Undocumented Immigrant Students in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eric C.; Budianto, Lina; Wong, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Due to cultural and linguistic barriers, as well as a fear of deportation, undocumented immigrant students have remained an invisible group face in the existing school system. We provide specific strategies for school counselors to consider in advocating social justice and in facilitating empowerment of undocumented immigrant students through…

  7. How Counselors Are Trained to Work with Bisexual Clients in CACREP-Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjo, Laurie Anne

    2013-01-01

    In spite of recent progress toward addressing the need for cultural competence with lesbian and gay-identified clients, bisexual-identified clients continue to be marginalized in the principles, theories, and methods of studying sexuality as well as in the training provided by counselor educators. A descriptive content analysis was conducted to…

  8. Professional School Counselors as Social Justice Advocates for Undocumented Immigrant Students in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eric C.; Budianto, Lina; Wong, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Due to cultural and linguistic barriers, as well as a fear of deportation, undocumented immigrant students have remained an invisible group face in the existing school system. We provide specific strategies for school counselors to consider in advocating social justice and in facilitating empowerment of undocumented immigrant students through…

  9. Multicultural and Diversity Considerations in the New "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Brenda Y.; Fleming, Christine L.

    2010-01-01

    As the demographic transformation of the U.S. population continues, the challenges of multicultural and diversity-based considerations remain a central focus, as does the need to incorporate cultural competencies into the practice of rehabilitation. The Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification's 2010 "Code of Professional Ethics for…

  10. Obesity Prevention among Latino Youth: School Counselors' Role in Promoting Healthy Lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.; Hayden, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Given the burgeoning obesity problem among Latino youth and concomitant health problems (Spiotta & Luma, 2008), school counselors have begun to recognize the need for culturally sensitive programming to promote healthy lifestyles. More theoretical, evidence-based programs are needed, however, to ensure Latino youth receive appropriate…

  11. Obesity Prevention among Latino Youth: School Counselors' Role in Promoting Healthy Lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.; Hayden, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Given the burgeoning obesity problem among Latino youth and concomitant health problems (Spiotta & Luma, 2008), school counselors have begun to recognize the need for culturally sensitive programming to promote healthy lifestyles. More theoretical, evidence-based programs are needed, however, to ensure Latino youth receive appropriate…

  12. Differences in prevalence rates of PTSD in various European countries explained by war exposure, other trauma and cultural value orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Burri, Andrea; Maercker, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guided by previous explorations of historical and cultural influences on the occurrence of PTSD, the aim of the present study was to investigate the contributions of war victimisation (in particular, World War II) and other civil trauma on the prevalence of PTSD, as mediated by cultural value orientation. Secondary data analysis was performed for 12 European countries using data, including PTSD prevalence and number of war victims, crime victims, and natural disaster victims, from...

  13. Differences in prevalence rates of PTSD in various European countries explained by war exposure, other trauma and cultural value orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Burri, Andrea; Maercker, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guided by previous explorations of historical and cultural influences on the occurrence of PTSD, the aim of the present study was to investigate the contributions of war victimisation (in particular, World War II) and other civil trauma on the prevalence of PTSD, as mediated by cultural value orientation. Secondary data analysis was performed for 12 European countries using data, including PTSD prevalence and number of war victims, crime victims, and natural disaster victims, from...

  14. Differences in prevalence rates of PTSD in various European countries explained by war exposure, other trauma and cultural value orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Burri, Andrea; Maercker, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Guided by previous explorations of historical and cultural influences on the occurrence of PTSD, the aim of the present study was to investigate the contributions of war victimisation (in particular, World War II) and other civil trauma on the prevalence of PTSD, as mediated by cultural value orientation. Secondary data analysis was performed for 12 European countries using data, including PTSD prevalence and number of war victims, crime victims, and natural disaster victims, from ...

  15. The Brief Exploration of the Value of Culture in English Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Hui

    2008-01-01

    In the recent age of globalization, the cultural elements prevail in people's everyday life. As a social discourse, cultural elements offer valuable resources of language use to English learners. It is also of great importance to fully utilize these resources to improve the quality of EFL teaching, especially learners' abilities to gain English proficiency. Based on an analysis of recent findings in the differences of culture, the present paper proposes a framework of employing cultural elements in EFL teaching from linguistic, pragnmtic and cultural perspectives.

  16. Cultured construction: global evidence of the impact of national values on sanitation infrastructure choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Jessica A

    2015-06-16

    Case study research often claims culture-variously defined-impacts infrastructure development. I test this claim using Hofstede's cultural dimensions and newly available data representing change in national coverage of sewer connections, sewerage treatment, and onsite sanitation between 1990 and 2010 for 21 developing nations. The results show that the cultural dimensions of uncertainty avoidance, masculinity-femininity, and individualism-collectivism have statistically significant relationships to sanitation technology choice. These data prove the global impact of culture on infrastructure choice, and reemphasize that local cultural preferences must be considered when constructing sanitation infrastructure.

  17. Promoting Hmong refugees' well-being through mutual learning: valuing knowledge, culture, and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Jessica R

    2006-03-01

    Refugees who resettle in a new country face numerous struggles, including overcoming past traumas and coping with post-migration stressors, such as lack of meaningful social roles, poverty, discrimination, lack of environmental mastery, and social isolation. Thus, in addition to needing to learn concrete language skills and gain access to resources and employment, it is important for refugees to become a part of settings where their experiences, knowledge, and identity are valued and validated. The Refugee Well-Being Project (RWBP) was developed to promote the well-being of Hmong refugees by creating settings for mutual learning to occur between Hmong adults and undergraduate students. The RWBP had two major components: (1) Learning Circles, which involved cultural exchange and one-on-one learning opportunities, and (2) an advocacy component, which involved undergraduates advocating for and transferring advocacy skills to Hmong families to increase their access to resources in their communities. The project was evaluated using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. This article discusses data from qualitative interviews with participants, during which the importance of reciprocal helping relationships and mutual learning emerged as significant themes.

  18. From "Kickeando las malias" (kicking the withdrawals) to "Staying clean": The impact of cultural values on cessation of injection drug use in aging Mexican-American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, David V; Torres, Luis R; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Bordnick, Patrick S; Ren, Yi; Torres, Melissa I M; Deleon, Freddie; Pericot-Valverde, Irene; Lopez, Tenee

    2014-06-01

    Drug use among older adults is a growing concern, particularly for the burgeoning Hispanic population. Older adults seeking drug treatment will double over the next decade to almost 6 million. Cultural factors influence drug use, and more specifically, Hispanic cultural values influence heroin use. This study explored Mexican-American injection drug users' adherence to traditional Hispanic cultural values and their impact on cessation. Ethnographic interviews endorsed contextualized influences of values on heroin use. Cultural values functioned dichotomously, influencing both initiation and cessation. Understanding the impact of cultural values on substance abuse is critical given the changing demographics in American society.

  19. Cultural Mismatch in Roma Parents' Perceptions: The Role of Culture, Language, and Traditional Roma Values in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrev, Veselina

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on data from a two-year qualitative study exploring the factors contributing to Roma students' disparate outcomes in Bulgaria. I utilize ethnographic observations, oral history, and in-depth interviews with twenty Roma parents to gain understanding of Roma children's "cultural capital" and relation to formal schools.…

  20. Cultural Mismatch in Roma Parents' Perceptions: The Role of Culture, Language, and Traditional Roma Values in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrev, Veselina

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on data from a two-year qualitative study exploring the factors contributing to Roma students' disparate outcomes in Bulgaria. I utilize ethnographic observations, oral history, and in-depth interviews with twenty Roma parents to gain understanding of Roma children's "cultural capital" and relation to formal schools.…

  1. The value of curiosity and naiveté for the cross-cultural psychotherapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyche, L; Zayas, L H

    1995-12-01

    Therapists today face a dramatic increase in the cultural diversity of their client populations. Cultural literacy, long the dominant model for preparing to do cross-cultural therapy, advocates study of the prospective client's history and culture. This model, however, poses logistical problems, emphasizes scholarship over the experiential and phenomenological, and risks seeing clients as their culture and not as themselves. In this essay, we argue that teaching culture alone can obscure therapists' view of human diversity. To balance the cognitive model of preparation, a process-oriented approach is considered, whereby the therapists' attitudes of cultural naiveté and respectful curiosity are given equal importance to knowledge and skill. We begin from a concern with clients' vulnerability in the power distribution that inevitably exists in therapy, especially with immigrant and marginalized populations. The use of acculturation narratives, which the therapist explores with naiveté and curiosity, helps clients to find their voices.

  2. Model Development of Isan Country Song Compositions for Economic, Social and Cultural Value-Added

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipinth Suwanrong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Country Song was related to history, society, culture and economic. The objectives of this study were: (1 the historical background in composing the Isan Country Song, (2 the current situation and problem of composing style of Isan Country Song and (3 the development of composing pattern the Isan Country Song for elevating the economic value. Approach: The research area consisted of Isan Region including Chiaya Phume, Ubon Rachatani, Amnat Charoen and Sri-Sa-ket Provinces. The samples providing information included 170 persons. The instruments using for collecting data included: The Survey Form, Interview Form, Focus Group Discussion and Participatory Workshop. The data were classified into groups. Qualitative data were analyzed according to the specified objectives. The research findings were presented in descriptive analysis. Results: The research findings found that the historical background of Isan Country Song, reflected lifestyle, social situation, ideal, and Thai Culture with the rhyme developed from traditional Country Song blending with Big Brand Music Band mixing with the local singing words and rhythm. The current situation and problem after listening to the Country Song was more increasing popular since there were many song composers and chords. There were advertisements through the media as radio, television, mobile phone and internet network. Therefore, the buying and selling of song were easier and quicker. For the song composing, the text of a song didn’t focus on the rhyme and lacked of morality enhancement. The supplementary music sometimes lacked of beauty based on aesthetic principle. For the commercial problems, there were many violations of right. Consequently, the entrepreneur sometimes faced with the lost. For development, the god points of Isan Country Song were analyzed both of the text and rhyme. The composed song model was created by bringing Pentatonic scale mixing with message of Dorian Mode. The

  3. Former substance users working as counselors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    is derived from an interview study initiated in 2000 in Denmark on former substance users with 4 -8 years of abstinence. Through an analysis of interview data from a larger group of former substance users, it became evident that those working as counselors experienced specific dilemmas and problems......All helping professionals risk participation in "dual relationships". But in the case of former substance users working as counselors, specific dilemmas and problems are accentuated. A qualitative analysis highlights some of the ethical and personal dilemmas faced by these counselors. The data...

  4. The Culture and Development Index (CDI: Measuring Values and Attitudes Associated With Development In Selected Asian and Latin American Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph I. B. Gonzales

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing data gathered in five waves in the period 1981–2005 for up to 97 societies (most of which are independent countries, the World Values Survey Organization (WVSO identified two orthogonal factors, Traditional/Secular-Rational Values, and Survival/Self-Expression Values, that account for up to 70 percent of cross-cultural variation worldwide. However, one weakness of the two-factor construct is that it overlooks regional or local patterns in values and attitudes that may be vitally related to development. Alternatively, the Culture and Development Index (CDI and the closely related Culture and Corruption Index (CCI are constructed for selected South and Southeast Asian, Latin American, and East Asian countries to account for cross-cultural variation in terms of a different set of orthogonal factors, some of which are strongly associated with leading measures of development and of corruption. Both CDI and CCI reveal patterns of value and attitudinal change relevant to promoting development and to mitigating corruption.

  5. A Comparison between China and America’s Political Cultures on the Perspective of Value Orientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋卓航

    2015-01-01

    <正>How do we define political culture and how do we understand Chinese political culture and American culture?Political culture is defined by the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences as"the set of attitudes,beliefs and sentiments that give order and meaning to a political process and which provide the underlying assumptions and rules that govern behavior in the political system".Such kind of attitudes,beliefs and sentiments can be seen as the reflection of culture.A political culture is the result of both the collective history of a political system and the life histories of the members of the system and thus it is rooted equally in public events and private

  6. Empathy and Cross-Cultural Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Robbie J.; Jo, Hanik; Roberts, Amber

    Multicultural empathy has been recognized as an important factor in successfully treating ethnic minority clients. A study detailing the relationship between White counselor trainees' general ability to empathize and their ability to interact comfortably outside their culture of origin is described in this paper. Thirty-three counselor trainees…

  7. Nurturing the Growing Generation’s Values in the Process of Socio-Cultural Transformation of Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asbi Khaleb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arab minority in Israel is in the process of socio-cultural transformation, its force rising and splitting the society. Modernization, the Arab society undergoes, is influenced by the constant contacts with the Jew- ish nation representing in its majority the western culture, the other influenc- ing factors being technologies and mass media. Some changes affect the soci- ety in a positive way, whereas the global uncontrollable ones can bring about the system crisis and the full split of society. In order to retain the integrity it is necessary to control this process on the level of basic elements of cultural awareness by nurturing both cultural and moral values within the framework of educational system. One of the main functions of educational system is the man’s adapta- tion in society including its cultural aspect; and the upbringing process should be performed in the context of belonging to cultural and national val- ues. Well-balanced organic system of education combining cardinal, national and religious values can facilitate harmonious personal growth, and affect the society in a positive way. However, the Arab educational system in Israel faces some challenges in the course of implementing the value nurturing programs. They include the lack of political initiative and control over the educational system devel- opment performed by the Arabs; and the absence of the definite and steady value system that can be given to the growing generation by means of school education. To overcome the problem the author recommends developing and implementing a special training program focused on the value component de- velopment, as the students might have difficulty getting by in the real world without it. 

  8. The impact of market-based 'reform' on cultural values in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, L L

    1999-12-01

    The many issues managed care poses for providers and health networks are crystallized in the moral problems occasioned by its shifting of the financial risks of care from insurer to provider. The issues occasioned by market-based reform include: the problems presented by clashes between public expectations and payer restrictions; the corporatization of health service delivery and the cultural shift from humanitarian endeavor to business enterprise the depersonalization of treatment as time and money constraints stretch resources, and the culture rewards efficient "business-like" behavior the underfunding of care for the poor and uninsured, even as these populations grow the restructuring of care and reengineering of healthcare roles as the emphasis shifts from quality of care to conservation of resources rapid mergers of both health plans and institutional providers with all the inherent turmoil as rules change, services are eliminated, and support services are minimized to save money the unhealthy competition inherent in market-based reform that posits profit taking and market share as the measures of successful performance the undermining of the professional ethic of advocacy the use of incentives that pander to greed and self-interest. The costs of sophisticated technologies and the ongoing care of increasingly fragile patients have pulled many other elements into what previously were considered "privileged" professional interactions. The fact that very few citizens indeed could pay out-of-pocket for the treatment and ongoing care they might need led to social involvement (few people remember that both widespread health insurance and public programs are relatively recent phenomena--only about 30 years old). However, whether in tax dollars or insurance premiums, other people's money is being spent on the patient's care. Clearly, those "other people" never intended to give either the patient or the professional open-ended access to their collective pocketbooks

  9. The Buddha Images and Conservation and Adherence to Cultural Values in Northeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athikan Suksri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study is caused by the problem of conservation of the Buddha images to exist in the original condition and by the problem of transference and adherence to indigenous knowledge of local craftsmen. At present there have not yet been systematic and wide conservation and adherence to the Buddha images. Other causes are such as incorrect techniques of conserving the Buddha images, lack of encouraging people and the community to appreciate the Buddha images, incorrect techniques of restoring the Buddha images, lack of increment of economic and cultural values in terms of tourism, lack of correct techniques of studying styles of the Buddha images to rebuild the styles for the community to appreciate local art, lack of clear examination of the background and there have not been comparative studies to find out relationships with other localities. Purposes were to examine backgrounds of Isan Buddha images and iconology, to examine current conditions and problems of the Buddha images and to investigate models of conservation and adherence to cultural values in Iran. Study area covered Changwat Maha Sarakham, Changwat Kalasin and Changwat Roi Et where there have been long backgrounds and continuous developments of the Buddha image in all Ages. Approach: This study used qualitative methodology by collecting data from related literature and from field studies by interviews and focused group discussion from totally 66 informants. Findings were presented by means of a descriptive analysis. Results: The result of this research revealed that there were 5 models of the Buddha image art found in Isan: Sandstone Buddha images, baked-clay votive tablets, cast motar Buddha images, bronze Buddha images and wooden Buddha images. They were in the Periods of Dvaravati, Lop Buri and Lan Chang. The Buddha images were popularly built in many different styles such as concentration style, double-miracle style, nag-over-his-head style, blessing style

  10. Blood and urine physiological values in farm-cultured Rana catesbeiana (Anura: Ranidae) in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, José A; Mussart, Norma B; Fioranelli, Santiago A

    2005-01-01

    A total of 302 samples of healthy farm-cultured Rana catesbeiana specimens (9-21 months-old, 50-350 g liveweight, 50% each sex) from the north-east of Argentina, were analyzed through spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, densitometry, refractometry and microscopy in order to obtain blood and urine normal values. Confidence intervals (pratio (0.50-0.58), creatinine (4.09-5.56 mg/L). urea (76.1-92.4 mg/L), uric acid (11.5-15.4 mg/L), triglycerides (0.34-0.52 g/L), total cholesterol (0.56-0.67 g/L), HDL-C (0.03-0.05 g/L), LDL-C (0.34-0.44 g/L), alpha lipoprotein (6.01-8.67%). beta lipoprotein (91.3-93.9%), glucose (0.45-0.54 g/L), Na (116-121 meq/L), K (3.42-3.81 meq/L), Cl (100-116 meq/L), Ca (7.98-8.61 mg/dL). P (8.319.36 mg/dL), Mg (2.26-2.55 mg/dL), Fe (105-178 ug/dL), ALP (144-170 [U/L), ALT (10.0-14.8 IU/L), AST (42.8-53.4 IU/L), GGT (7.8-10.6 IU/L), LDH (99-135 IU/L), CHE (151-185 lU/L) and CPK (365-500 IU/L), were obtained. Some parameter ranges were similar to those obtained in amphibians, birds or mammals; others were very different. These parameters are useful to evaluate sanitary, metabolic and nutritional state on captive bullfrogs.

  11. A qualitative evaluation of a breastfeeding peer counselor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Emily R; Olson, Beth H; Benton, Patricia; Eghtedary, Kobra; Song, Won O

    2007-08-01

    The Breastfeeding Initiative program is a collaboration between the Michigan Department of Community Health (Women, Infants, and Children Division) and Michigan State University Extension. It aims to increase breastfeeding rates among low-income women through the use of peer counselors. The study's purpose was to identify the program's strengths, operation procedures, and improvement areas from participants' and peer counselors' perspectives. Six focus groups were conducted: 3 of peer counselors and 3 of program participants. Findings revealed that peer counselors and participants were satisfied with the quality of services due to emotional and practical assistance and breast pumps provided by peer counselors. Peer counselors' job satisfaction was explained positively by the intrinsic rewards of helping others and negatively by perceived inadequate resources and recognition. Operating procedures varied greatly. Possible improvements include expanding services, providing peer counselors with additional support, and standardizing peer counselor operating procedures. The peer counselor model can effectively support low-income breastfeeding women.

  12. Looking Back to Look Forward: Maori Cultural Values and the Impact on Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lynette

    2011-01-01

    The career stories of 22 Maori in this study expressed the dynamic cultural contexts in which career processes have been enacted. A new typology of cultural career identities was developed focusing on diversity among Maori on issues pertaining to what being Maori means to them and the subsequent influence on participants' career stories. The three…

  13. Information Technology Cost Center Employee Perception of Their Contribution Value in a For Profit Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A literature review revealed a lack of academic research related to cultural dynamics within organizations that influence information technology investments. The goal of this single descriptive case study of a for profit international company was to examine one area of cultural influence on investments. The aim was to gain an understanding of…

  14. Organizational Culture and the Deployment of Agile Methods: The Competing Values Model View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iivari, Juhani; Iivari, Netta

    A number of researchers have identified organizational culture as a factor that potentially affects the deployment of agile systems development methods. Inspired by the study of Iivari and Huisman (2007), which focused on the deployment of traditional systems development methods, the present paper proposes a number of hypotheses about the influence of organizational culture on the deployment of agile methods.

  15. Valuing Difference in Students' Culture and Experience in School Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Susan Harper writes about how a cross-cultural learning community can be formed where people from different cultures are not simply assimilated into a school science community but are seen and heard. This makes learning reciprocal and meaningful for both recent refugees and the dominant population. Although maybe not refugees, students from poorer…

  16. Chinese Cultural Values and Their Applicability of Successful Sino-Foreign Educational Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Alliances between Chinese and foreign usually western universities continue to attract considerable attention and one of the issues which remains of particular interest is the cross cultural dimension of such alliances and, in particular, the importance of understanding various strands and aspects of Chinese culture when negotiating and managing a…

  17. The value of Europeana: the welfare effects of better access to digital cultural heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poort, J.; van der Noll, R.; Ponds, R.; Rougoor, W.; Weda, J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, Europeana was launched as a service platform for digital cultural heritage and content from libraries, archives, galleries and museums from all over the European Union. The aim was to make Europe’s rich cultural heritage accessible for all. Since its launch, the number of records in the Eur

  18. Communication and Social Values in Cross Cultural Adjustment: Conceptual Background and Some Propositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwanko, R. Nwafo; Onwumechili, Chuka

    In discussing reprogramming as a cultural process, for better intercultural adaptation theory construction, more attention should be paid to macroscopic, motivating, and contextual factors such as the mass media institution. The learning of new cultures from individual systems (e.g., interpersonal interaction) cannot be as efficient or effective…

  19. The value of Europeana: the welfare effects of better access to digital cultural heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poort, J.; van der Noll, R.; Ponds, R.; Rougoor, W.; Weda, J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, Europeana was launched as a service platform for digital cultural heritage and content from libraries, archives, galleries and museums from all over the European Union. The aim was to make Europe’s rich cultural heritage accessible for all. Since its launch, the number of records in the

  20. Information Technology Cost Center Employee Perception of Their Contribution Value in a For Profit Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A literature review revealed a lack of academic research related to cultural dynamics within organizations that influence information technology investments. The goal of this single descriptive case study of a for profit international company was to examine one area of cultural influence on investments. The aim was to gain an understanding of…

  1. Turning Cultural Heritage into Cultural and Creative Products: A Case Study of Value Creation Out of Cultural Artifacts Collaborated between the National Palace Museum and the Bright Ideas Design, Co. Ltd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fen Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analysed the value creation activities of cultural and creative products developed from cultural heritage. It employed the case study methodology to examine two collaboration projects between the Bright Ideas Design, Co. Ltd. and National Palace Museum. A framework was developed based on the review of the relevant literature on cultural products, value creation and digital content. Research data included information obtained from semi-structured interviews and secondary sources. The findings suggest that there are two stages and two dimensions in the value creation activities of culture-creative products. The stages include the generation of design ideas as well as the substantiation of creativity. In each stage, the designers must take the dimensions of symbol instantiation as well as user experiences into account. In the first stage of idea generation, the key points were the decoding and extraction of cultural symbols, which were then turned into designs that trigger new experiences. In the second stage of substantiation of creativity, the major tasks were the reshaping of the cultural symbols and the integration of the transformed symbols into design that meets expected experiences. The collaboration projects have produced trifold effects which addressed cross the gaps caused by different generations, forms and cultures. The analysis and the findings of this paper may shed lights on the future cultural and creative productions between memory organizations and collaborating designers. [Article content in Chinese

  2. Valuing difference in students' culture and experience in school science lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Indira

    2016-08-01

    Susan Harper writes about how a cross-cultural learning community can be formed where people from different cultures are not simply assimilated into a school science community but are seen and heard. This makes learning reciprocal and meaningful for both recent refugees and the dominant population. Although maybe not refugees, students from poorer backgrounds in many countries are less likely to choose science at a post-compulsory level. This article discusses some of the potential barriers that are faced by many of these students, that prevent them from participating in school science. It suggests how people involved in school science might address these issues to allow a smoother cultural border crossing between the students' cultures and school science culture by reducing the significance of the crossing.

  3. Valuing difference in students' culture and experience in school science lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Indira

    2016-12-01

    Susan Harper writes about how a cross-cultural learning community can be formed where people from different cultures are not simply assimilated into a school science community but are seen and heard. This makes learning reciprocal and meaningful for both recent refugees and the dominant population. Although maybe not refugees, students from poorer backgrounds in many countries are less likely to choose science at a post-compulsory level. This article discusses some of the potential barriers that are faced by many of these students, that prevent them from participating in school science. It suggests how people involved in school science might address these issues to allow a smoother cultural border crossing between the students' cultures and school science culture by reducing the significance of the crossing.

  4. Adolescent Pregnancy: A Challenge for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Carolyn D.; Miller, Gary M.

    1980-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy has medical, psychological, sociological and educational repercussions. The counselor's objective is to assist the adolescent in developing adaptive mechanisms for dealing with adolescence and pregnancy and to integrate the two conditions into a growth-producing situation. (Author)

  5. Effects of Parental Expectations and Cultural-Values Orientation on Career Decision-Making Difficulties of Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, S. Alvin; Hou, Zhi-Jin; Gati, Itamar; Li, Xixi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of cultural-values conflict and parental expectations on the career decision-making difficulties of university students in three cities in China (Beijing, Wuhan, and Hong Kong, N = 1342). The Multidimensional Scales of Individual Traditionality and Modernity (Yang, Yu, & Ye, 1989) were used as a measure of…

  6. Effects of Parental Expectations and Cultural-Values Orientation on Career Decision-Making Difficulties of Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, S. Alvin; Hou, Zhi-Jin; Gati, Itamar; Li, Xixi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of cultural-values conflict and parental expectations on the career decision-making difficulties of university students in three cities in China (Beijing, Wuhan, and Hong Kong, N = 1342). The Multidimensional Scales of Individual Traditionality and Modernity (Yang, Yu, & Ye, 1989) were used as a measure of…

  7. Discrimination and Mexican-Origin Adolescents' Adjustment: The Moderating Roles of Adolescents', Mothers', and Fathers' Cultural Orientations and Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Melissa Y.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Roosa, Mark W.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Garcia Coll et al.'s integrative framework and the risk and resilience model, this study examined the relationships between adolescents' perceived discrimination and psychosocial adjustment and the moderating roles of adolescents', mothers', and fathers' cultural orientations and values, and adolescent gender in a sample of 246…

  8. Linking Early Childhood Education with Indigenous Education Using Gamification: The Case of Maintaining Cultural Value and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukala, Catherine Chinyere; Agabi, Ogar G.

    2017-01-01

    Cultural values and identities remain the bench mark for national identity, cohesion, patriotism and harmonious coexistence in any society. The introduction of western education into West Africa created a weak bridge between the indigenous education and the western education which needs to be properly linked using curriculum harmonisation. This…

  9. Discrimination and Adjustment for Mexican American Adolescents: A Prospective Examination of the Benefits of Culturally Related Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkel, Cady; Knight, George P.; Zeiders, Katharine H.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Roosa, Mark W.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Saenz, Delia

    2010-01-01

    Mexican American adolescents face disparities in mental health and academic achievement, perhaps in part because of discrimination experiences. However, culturally related values, fostered by ethnic pride and socialization, may serve to mitigate the negative impact of discrimination. Guided by the Stress Process Model, the current study examined…

  10. Organizational Culture and Organizational Effectiveness: A Meta-Analytic Investigation of the Competing Values Framework's Theoretical Suppositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnell, Chad A.; Ou, Amy Yi; Kinicki, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    We apply Quinn and Rohrbaugh's (1983) competing values framework (CVF) as an organizing taxonomy to meta-analytically test hypotheses about the relationship between 3 culture types and 3 major indices of organizational effectiveness (employee attitudes, operational performance [i.e., innovation and product and service quality], and financial…

  11. Hairy root culture for mass-production of high-value secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2007-01-01

    Plant cell cultivations are being considered as an alternative to agricultural processes for producing valuable phytochemicals. Since many of these products (secondary metabolites) are obtained by direct extraction from plants grown in natural habitat, several factors can alter their yield. The use of plant cell cultures has overcome several inconveniences for the production of these secondary metabolites. Organized cultures, and especially root cultures, can make a significant contribution in the production of secondary metabolites. Most of the research efforts that use differentiated cultures instead of cell suspension cultures have focused on transformed (hairy) roots. Agrobacterium rhizogenes causes hairy root disease in plants. The neoplastic (cancerous) roots produced by A. rhizogenes infection are characterized by high growth rate, genetic stability and growth in hormone free media. These genetically transformed root cultures can produce levels of secondary metabolites comparable to that of intact plants. Hairy root cultures offer promise for high production and productivity of valuable secondary metabolites (used as pharmaceuticals, pigments and flavors) in many plants. The main constraint for commercial exploitation of hairy root cultivations is the development and scaling up of appropriate reactor vessels (bioreactors) that permit the growth of interconnected tissues normally unevenly distributed throughout the vessel. Emphasis has focused on designing appropriate bioreactors suitable to culture the delicate and sensitive plant hairy roots. Recent reactors used for mass production of hairy roots can roughly be divided as liquid-phase, gas-phase, or hybrid reactors. The present review highlights the nature, applications, perspectives and scale up of hairy root cultures for the production of valuable secondary metabolites.

  12. What makes astronomical heritage valuable? Identifying potential Outstanding Universal Value in cultural properties relating to astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Michel

    2016-10-01

    This communication presents the situation regarding astronomical and archaeoastronomical heritage related to the World Heritage Convention through recent years up until today. Some parallel events and works were promoted strongly within the IAU-UNESCO Initiative during the International Year of Astronomy (2009). This was followed by a joint program by the IAU and ICOMOS-an official advisory body assisting the World Heritage Committee in the evaluation of nomination dossiers. The result of that work is an important publication by around 40 authors from 20 different countries all around the world: Heritage Sites of Astronomy and Archaeoastronomy in the Context of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention (Ruggles & Cotte 2010). A second volume is under preparation (2015). It was also accompanied by some initiatives such as the ``Windows to the Universe" organisation and the parallel constitution of local ``Starlight Reserves''. Some regional meetings studying specific facets or regional heritage in the field giving significant knowledge progresses also accompanied the global trend for astronomical heritage. WH assessment is defined by a relatively strict format and methodology. A key phrase is ``demonstration of Outstanding Universal Value'' to justify the WH Listing by the Committee. This communication first examines the requirements and evaluation practices about of demonstrating OUV for a given place in the context of astronomical or archaeoastronomical heritage. That means the examination of the tangible attributes, an inventory of the property in terms of immoveable and moveable components and an inventory of intangible issues related to the history (history of the place in the context of the history of astronomy and cultural history). This is also related to the application to the site of the concept of integrity and authenticity, as regards the place itself and in comparison with other similar places (WH sites already listed, sites on national WH Tentative Lists

  13. Examination on the View of School Administrators and Teachers to School Counselor (Psychological Counselor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camadan, Fatih; Kahveci, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the view of school administrators and teachers to school counselor (Psychological Counselor) by metaphor analysis. Comparison method of relational screening models has been followed during the research. Content analysis of qualitative analysis methods has been followed to analyze collected data. Study…

  14. Mexican-American Acculturation, Counselor Ethnicity, Counseling Style, and Perceived Counselor Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Francisco Q.; Atkinson, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    Used 3 X 2 X 2 factorial design to study effects of acculturation (low, medium, or high), counselor ethnicity (Anglo-American or Mexican-American) and counseling style (directive or nondirective) on 169 Mexican-American subjects' perceptions of and willingness to see counselor. Subjects gave higher credibility ratings and were more willing to see…

  15. Effects of Counselor Race and Counseling Approach on Asian Americans' Perceptions of Counselor Credibility and Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Donald R.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Two studies are described in which Asian Americans rated a counselor's performance in a simulated counseling session with an Asian American student. The counselor was rated as more credible and approachable when employing a directive counseling approach than when using a nondirective counseling approach. (Author/MFD)

  16. Rehabilitation Counselor Hypothesis Testing: The Role of Negative Information, Client Disability, and Counselor Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the way that rehabilitation counselors (n=41) select information to test a hypothesis about a client. Consistent with previous research, rehabilitation counselors systematically noted more negative client information when presented with equal numbers of equivalently weighted positive and negative client factors. (JPS)

  17. Preparing School Counselors to Address Concerns Related to Giftedness: A Study of Accredited Counselor Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jean Sunde; Morris, Carrie Wachter

    2010-01-01

    Professional school counselors are responsible for serving students across a wide range of cognitive ability, yet counselor educators may not attend to issues related to giftedness, such as how and when developmental phenomena may be experienced by highly able students, and the need to differentiate counseling approaches for this population. This…

  18. Adult Children of Divorce and Relationship Education: Implications for Counselors and Counselor Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Veronica I.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the impact of relationship education on young adults' optimism about relationships and attitudes toward marriage whose parents were divorced and offers implications and suggestions for counselors and counselor educators. Previous research in the area of intimate and family relationships has demonstrated that adults who have…

  19. Estimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather A. Sander; Robert G. Haight

    2012-01-01

    A need exists to increase both knowledge and recognition of the values associated with ecosystem services and amenities. This article explores the use of hedonic pricing as a tool for eliciting these values. We take a case study approach, valuing several services provided by ecosystems, namely aesthetic quality (views), access to outdoor recreation, and the benefits...

  20. 仁道文化的核心价值观念%Core Value Concept of Benevolence Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵孔发

    2012-01-01

    追溯中国儒道墨文化源流,梳理中国文化史,可以大致见出中国文化是从人性、人心出发,讲求自性修养的"将心比心"的道德文化,核心价值观念在于仁道。仁道由儒家哲学中仁的内涵,如克己、利他、取义诸精神,道家哲学"人之道"中仁的内涵,如谦退、无私、公平诸精神,墨子思想中仁的内涵,如"兼相爱,交相利"精神共同建构而成。中国历史文化核心价值观念中合理的因素,作为一种普世价值,对于中国及世界文化产生深远影响,为当代文化核心价值观探讨提供了借鉴。%Through thinking about Chinese cultural origins of Confucianism, Taoism and Mohism, and combing the history of Chinese culture, Chinese culture can be roughly regarded as a kind of moral culture starting from human nature and people and showing emphasis on self cultivation and "feel for others", of which the core value concept is benevolence. Benevolence is composed of Confucian benevolence philosophy such as self-control, altruism and the spirit of justice, Taoist philosophy of "benevolence connotation" such as non-aggressiveness, selflessness and the spirit of justice and Motse thought on benevolence such as the spirit of mutual benefit. Being reasonable factors in Chinese historical and cultural core values and as a universal value, benevolence culture has profound effects on researches into contemporary culture and core values of both Chinese and the world culture.

  1. Asian Indians in America: The influence of values and culture on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Rohit M; Arora, Lily; Mehta, Urvakhsh M; Asnaani, Anu; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv

    2016-08-01

    Asian Indians represent a significant portion of the largest growing race of Asians in the past decade in the United States. This selective review examines major cultural themes related to first- and second-generation Asian Indians living in the United States as they impact psychological and psychiatric dysfunction in this population. Specifically, we review the impact of Asian Indian culture on mental health, discuss the impact of acculturation and ethnic identity development on the mental health of Indian-Americans, and focus on typical mental health problems of Asian Indian adolescents, women and elderly in America. Finally, we provide a brief overview of empirically-supported treatment approaches and cultural considerations for additional treatments relevant to this population. This review is intended to provide an important foundation for more systematic empirically-driven investigation into better understanding how Asian Indian cultural themes impact mental health for Indian-Americans, and how to develop effective treatments for these issues in this cultural group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cultural values and random breath tests as moderators of the social influence on drunk driving in 15 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestac, Julien; Kraïem, Sami; Assailly, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-01

    The social influence on drunk driving has been previously observed in several countries. It is noteworthy, however, that the prevalence of alcohol in road fatalities is not the same in all countries. The present study aimed to explore whether cultural values and the number of roadside breath tests moderate the link between the perceived drunk driving of one's peers and self-reported behavior. Based on the European survey SARTRE 4, the responses of 10,023 car drivers from 15 countries were analyzed. Two cultural values, "tradition" and "conformism," were identified as possibly being linked to social influence. Country scores for these values were taken from the European Social Survey. The number of random roadside breath tests per inhabitant was used as an indicator of drunk-driving enforcement in each country. A hierarchical multilevel modeling analysis confirmed the link between friends' drunk driving and one's own drunk driving in all countries, but the strength of the link was much stronger in some countries (e.g., Italy, Cyprus, and Israel) than in others (e.g., Finland, Estonia, and Sweden). Both the measured value of "tradition" and the number of alcohol breath tests were found to moderate the link between friends' and one's own drunk driving. European stakeholders should take into account cultural specificities of target countries when designing campaigns against drunk driving. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Prestige Ratings of Contemporary Occupations: Perceptions of High School Students and Implications for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Harry J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study in which 97 high school seniors from urban and suburban settings commented on 100 occupations and their perceived prestige. Supports the idea that counselors should consider integrating prestige and social status information with traditional occupational data. Discusses occupational statuses and prestige values in regard to…

  4. Self-Compassion: A Mentorship Framework for Counselor Educator Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Coralis; Barden, Sejal Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Counselor educators experience high levels of stress. Mothers in academia face an additional set of emotional stressors. The authors offer a self-compassion framework for mentors to increase emotional resilience of mothers in counselor education.

  5. The Ultimate Disappointment: The Burned-Out Counselor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnath, Charles F.; Shelton, John L.

    1976-01-01

    Examine the reasons why full-time direct service work as a counselor loses its appeal for large numbers of agency counselors and offers some suggestions to help maintain counseling enthusiasm. (Author/HMV)

  6. Women and Peers As Counselors: A Look at Client Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hilda G.; Miles, Johnnie H.

    1978-01-01

    This article deals with male and female college students' preferences for types of counselors for various problem areas. The results indicate a trend toward preferences for female and peer counselors, which may have implications for staffing counseling services centers. (Author)

  7. Blood and urine physiological values in farm-cultured Rana catesbeiana (Anura: Ranidae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Coppo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 302 samples of healthy farm-cultured Rana catesbeiana specimens (9-21 months-old, 50- 350 g liveweight, 50% each sex from the north-east of Argentina, were analyzed through spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, densitometry, refractometry and microscopy in order to obtain blood and urine normal values. Confidence intervals (pCon el propósito de obtener valores normales sanguíneos y urinarios, 302 muestras de ejemplares sanos de Rana catesbeiana del nordeste argentino (9-21 meses de edad, 50-350 g de peso vivo, 50% de cada sexo, fueron analizados por espectrofotometría, electroforesis, densitometría, refractometría y microscopía. Fueron obtenidos intervalos de confianza (p<0.05 para hematocrito (28.6-31.6%, eritrocitos (0.40-0.44 T/L, VCM (686-732 fL, hemoglobina (6.41-7.20 g/dL, HCM (151-164 pg, CHCM (22.6-24.0%, leucocitos (18.7-22.3 G/L, neutrófilos (58.4-63.4%, linfocitos (23.9-29.8%, monocitos (2.1-3.8%, eosinófilos (4.6-7.0%, basófilos (2.9-4.1%, tiempo de sangría (289-393s, tiempo de coagulación (452- 696s, tiempo de protrombina (76-128s, densidad urinaria (1.0061-1.0089 g/mL, pH urinario (6.38-6.96, fibrinógeno (0.59-0.99 g/dL, proteínas totales (4.19-4.49 g/dL, albúmina (1.49-1.67 g/dL, alfa-1 globulina (0.20-0.24 g/dL, alfa-2 globulina (0.48-0.54 g/dL, beta globulina (0.68-0.77 g/dL, gamma globulina (1.28-1.42 g/dL, relación albúmina/globulinas (0.50-0.58, creatinina (4.09-5.56 mg/L, urea (76.1-92.4 mg/L, ácido úrico (11.5-15.4 mg/L, triglicéridos (0.34-0.52 g/L, colesterol total (0.56-0.67 g/L, C-HDL (0.03-0.05 g/L, C-LDL (0.34-0.44 g/L, alfa lipoproteína (6.01-8.67%, beta lipoproteína (91.3-93.9%, glucosa (0.45-0.54 g/L, Na (116-121 meq/L, K (3.42- 3.81 meq/L, Cl (100-116 meq/L, Ca (7.98-8.61 mg/dL, P (8.31-9.36 mg/dL, Mg (2.26-2.55 mg/dL, Fe (105-178 ug/dL, ALP (144-170 IU/L, ALT (10.0-14.8 IU/L, AST (42.8-53.4 IU/L, GGT (7.8-10.6 IU/L, LDH (99-135 IU/L, CHE (151-185 IU/L y CPK (365-500 IU/L. Algunos

  8. Cultural Hegemony in Traditional Chinese Mainstream Value Culture%从中国传统主流价值文化看文化领导权问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄力之

    2015-01-01

    To study contemporary mainstream value and culture in China,it is necessary to draw reference from the existence and operation rule of traditional Chinese cultural hegemony. In history,the greatest fact of Chinese cultural leadership remains the priority of Confucian thoughts,and such a position gears into the trend of unification of Chinese civilization. In fact,the exclusive position of Confucian leadership in culture is also relative. It gives a hint for descendants in three aspects;firstly,the formation of cultural hegemony must guide the function of state organs,secondly,morality remains a fundamentally legal source of cultural leadership;thirdly,it could expand itself in relative existence by transfer and permeation.%研究当下中国的主流价值文化问题,有必要借鉴中国传统文化领导权的存在及运行规律。历史上中国文化领导权的最大事实是儒家思想的文化领导权地位,这一地位的形成与中华文明的大一统趋势是相吻合的。但实际上,中国儒家思想的文化领导权既绝对存在又具有相对性的特征。这一事实给后人提供了三方面的启迪:第一,文化领导权的形成必须自觉发挥国家机器的引领功能;第二,道义性是文化领导权的根本合法性来源;第三,在相对性存在中以渗透、转移的方式延续自身。

  9. Organizational culture and organizational effectiveness: a meta-analytic investigation of the competing values framework's theoretical suppositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnell, Chad A; Ou, Amy Yi; Kinicki, Angelo

    2011-07-01

    We apply Quinn and Rohrbaugh's (1983) competing values framework (CVF) as an organizing taxonomy to meta-analytically test hypotheses about the relationship between 3 culture types and 3 major indices of organizational effectiveness (employee attitudes, operational performance [i.e., innovation and product and service quality], and financial performance). The paper also tests theoretical suppositions undergirding the CVF by investigating the framework's nomological validity and proposed internal structure (i.e., interrelationships among culture types). Results based on data from 84 empirical studies with 94 independent samples indicate that clan, adhocracy, and market cultures are differentially and positively associated with the effectiveness criteria, though not always as hypothesized. The findings provide mixed support for the CVF's nomological validity and fail to support aspects of the CVF's proposed internal structure. We propose an alternative theoretical approach to the CVF and delineate directions for future research.

  10. To the rescue of traditions: Emotional Design and Cultural Values, A Case Study Based on Barranquilla´s Carnival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Lascar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heritage, as a cultural expression, refers to a set of tangible and intangible assets that certain groups of individuals use to express themselves. Design is part of these productions that empower objects and create emotional bonds between people and their culture. "The Guacherna: Funny dolls" is a collection of characters inspired in Barranquilla´s Carnival that focuses on the relation between cultural and symbolic values as raw material for emotional design. Throughout this process, it was found that narrative as derived from traditions, as the carnival encourages and strengthens emotional bonds between people and objects, opens possibilities for these traditions to be renewed, divulged, and helps them remain alive in the memory.

  11. Motivational-value attitude technical students to self-employment physical culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Korzh N.L.

    2012-01-01

    The directions of motivational-value ratio of students to physical education, healthy lifestyles, physical self, the need for regular physical education and sport. In the survey attended by 310 students. The factors that reduce or increase the motivational value attitude to self-employment. Showing the direction of formation of students' vitality while learning and future careers. Identified two levels of values: social and personal. Recommended a smooth transition from compulsory forms of ph...

  12. Comparing instrumental and deliberative paradigms underpinning the assessment of social values for cultural ecosystem services

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond, C.M.; Kenter, J.O.; Plieninger, T; Turner, N J; Alexander, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite rapid advancements in the development of non-monetary techniques for the assessment of social values for ecosystem services, little research attention has been devoted to the evaluation of their underpinning paradigms. This study evaluates two contrasting paradigms for the assessment of social values in non-monetary terms: an instrumental paradigm involving an objective assessment of the distribution, type and/or intensity of values that individuals assign to the current ...

  13. On The Folk Customs of Huazhao Festival Which Is a Kind Of Intangible Cultural Heritage and its Modern Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Ma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Huazhao Festival is a traditional one that is celebrated in early spring and appeals to both highbrows and lowbrows. Once, it was as significant as Lantern Festival and Mid-autumn Festival. Ever since Tang Dynasty, it has undergone stages of emerging, thriving, declining and restoring. Originally, people only had a spring outing enjoying beautiful flowers at this festival; later, various other folk activities were also carried out on this day, including catching butterflies, picking wild vegetables, offering sacrifices to gods, predicting bumper and poor harvest, fastening strips of red cloth to stems of flowers and trees (shang hong, having competitions on grass, encouraging agriculture, holding and attending banquets, writing articles, paying court and so on. These activities demonstrated such characteristics of the national culture of China as elegance, harmony and life-friendliness. Obviously different from other traditional festivals like Spring Festival, Mid-autumn Festival, Dragon Boat Festival, etc, Huazhao Festival has unique style and value. Despite its fading away from people’s life due to changes in modern society, its cultural glamour and comprehensive value still exist. Along with economic and social development and the increase of people’s spiritual and cultural demands, Huazhao Festival has regained people’s attention. It has been restored and hosted in some regions and identified as an intangible cultural heritage. By means of literature review, the folk customs of Huazhao Festival was re-presented to some extent in this paper. Its modern values in areas including health, culture, ecology and industry were analyzed. This paper is of certain significance, in respect of conserving and inheriting this national festival, promoting its restoration in more regions in a way more approximate to historical tradition and giving play to its unique role to benefit modern society.

  14. Toward the Integration of Cultural Values and Alternative School Models: Challenges in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesky, Aimi Kono

    2013-01-01

    The project development school idea in Japan started in the late 1970s. Both public and private schools can become project schools. Public schools' districts and private schools' boards develop the project plan and submit the application to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). Once approved, the project school…

  15. Machismo: Manifestations of a cultural value in the Latin American casino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W N

    1991-06-01

    Casino operations were observed in twelve Latin American countries. Owners, managers, employees, players, and government regulators in each of these countries were interviewed. The concept of machismo is described in its historical and cultural context. It is then used to illuminate casino operations and the mode of play in existence in these casinos.

  16. Sex Education and Cultural Values: Experiences and Attitudes of Latina Immigrant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Maria Elena; Concha, Maritza

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims to further explore the role that culture plays in the provision and assimilation of sex education among Latina immigrants in the USA. To accomplish this, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with 30 women from Central and South America who have lived in the USA for at least five years. Participants were asked to reflect…

  17. Toward the Integration of Cultural Values and Alternative School Models: Challenges in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesky, Aimi Kono

    2013-01-01

    The project development school idea in Japan started in the late 1970s. Both public and private schools can become project schools. Public schools' districts and private schools' boards develop the project plan and submit the application to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). Once approved, the project school…

  18. Learning in Place, Cultural Mapping and Sustainable Values on the Millawa Billa (Murray River)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckenberg, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an Indigenous perspective on the significance of land, culture and Indigenous rights. The United Nations (UN) Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples promote the importance of traditional Indigenous societies, such as Aboriginal Australians. Participating in caring for country methods and having a close on-going…

  19. A Comparative Study of Ethical Values of Business Students: American vs. Middle Eastern Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurden, Michael; Shurden, Susan; Cagwin, Douglass

    2008-01-01

    Business schools must prepare students to face the world and yet maintain strong ethical convictions. The question of ethics in the business environment is not exclusive to the United States. Ethical business behavior is a multinational issue, and all business schools world-wide must deal with this issue. However, cultural differences often define…

  20. Chinese Cultural Values and Performance at Job Interviews: A Singapore Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Irene F. H.; Phooi-Ching, Lai

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes transcripts of job interviews involving nine English-speaking applicants from Chinese backgrounds and two experienced interviewers from Anglo-American MNCs (Multinational Corporations) in Singapore in order to reveal subtle clashes in culture. Finds that applicants from a Chinese background may be disadvantaged when being interviewed for…

  1. Learning in Place, Cultural Mapping and Sustainable Values on the Millawa Billa (Murray River)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckenberg, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an Indigenous perspective on the significance of land, culture and Indigenous rights. The United Nations (UN) Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples promote the importance of traditional Indigenous societies, such as Aboriginal Australians. Participating in caring for country methods and having a close on-going…

  2. Experiential Learning and Values Education at a School Youth Camp: Maintaining Jewish Culture and Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Zehavit; Rutland, Suzanne D.

    2017-01-01

    In our post-modern, globalised world, there is a risk of unique cultural heritages being lost. This loss contributes to the detriment of civilization, because individuals need to be rooted in their own specific identity in order to actively participate in community life. This article discusses a longitudinal case study of the efforts being made by…

  3. Global Connectedness in Higher Education: Student Voices on the Value of Cross-Cultural Learning Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtomäki, Elina; Moate, Josephine; Posti-Ahokas, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    The study explores how sense of global connectedness can be enhanced by creating opportunities for cross-cultural dialogue in higher education. Thematic analysis of randomly selected 15 learning journals, students' reflections on their learning during an international seminar was used to identify students' significant learning experiences. The…

  4. Sex Education and Cultural Values: Experiences and Attitudes of Latina Immigrant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Maria Elena; Concha, Maritza

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims to further explore the role that culture plays in the provision and assimilation of sex education among Latina immigrants in the USA. To accomplish this, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with 30 women from Central and South America who have lived in the USA for at least five years. Participants were asked to reflect…

  5. Analysis of personal and cultural values as key determinants of novel food acceptance. Application to an ethnic product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrena, Ramo; García, Teresa; Sánchez, Mercedes

    2015-04-01

    This paper sets out to analyse whether the complexity and the type of benefits and values pursued in the consumer choice process for a novel food product (couscous) varies with the consumer's ethnic origin (Spanish and Arab). A qualitative study was used to explore these issues in an application of the "means-end chain" theory. The hierarchical value maps obtained point to the presence of an important emotional dimension in the consumption of the selected product, particularly Arab consumers, suggesting that greater familiarity with the product results in a more complex choice process. Some cross-cultural variation can also be observed. Arab consumers attach more importance to issues such as the geographic origin of the product, cultural identification, and fulfilment of family duty. Spanish couscous consumers, meanwhile, claim that it is a way to follow the latest trends, and be more cosmopolitan and more successful within their environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Links between race/ethnicity and cultural values as mediated by racial/ethnic identity and moderated by gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, S O; Marelich, W D; Bledsoe, K L; Steers, W N; Henderson, M C; Granrose, C S; Barájas, L; Hicks, D; Lyde, M; Takahashi, Y; Yum, N; Ríos, D I; García, B F; Farris, K R; Page, M S

    1997-06-01

    Two studies examined whether individualism (orientation toward one's own welfare), collectivism (orientation toward the welfare of one's larger community), and familism (orientation toward the welfare of one's immediate and extended family) are distinct cultural values predicted by race/ ethnicity. The 3 constructs proved to be separate dimensions, although collectivism and familism were positively correlated. In Study 1, persons of color scored higher on collectivism and familism than did Anglos. No differences emerged for individualism. Also, persons of color scored higher than Anglos on racial/ethnic identity, which in turn was a positive predictor of all 3 cultural values. In Study 2, we replicated the group differences on collectivism and familism for men but not for women.

  7. Value of bacterial culture of vaginal swabs in diagnosis of vaginal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenadić Dane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Vaginal and cervical swab culture is still very common procedure in our country’s everyday practice whereas simple and rapid diagnostic methods have been very rarely used. The aim of this study was to show that the employment of simple and rapid diagnostic tools [vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy (VFWMM, vaginal pH and potassium hydroxide (KOH test] offers better assessment of vaginal environment than standard microbiologic culture commonly used in Serbia. Methods. This prospective study included 505 asymptomatic pregnant women undergoing VFWMM, test with 10% KOH, determination of vaginal pH and standard culture of cervicovaginal swabs. Combining findings from the procedures was used to make diagnoses of bacterial vaginosis (BV and vaginitis. In addition, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN was determined in each sample and analyzed along with other findings. Infections with Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis were confirmed or excluded by microscopic examination. Results. In 36 (6% patients cervicovaginal swab cultures retrieved several aerobes and facultative anaerobes, whereas in 52 (11% women Candida albicans was isolated. Based on VFWMM findings and clinical criteria 96 (19% women had BV, 19 (4% vaginitis, and 72 (14% candidiasis. Of 115 women with BV and vaginitis, pH 4.5 was found in 5, and of 390 with normal findings 83 (21% had vaginal pH 4.5. Elevated numbers of PMN were found in 154 (30% women - in 83 (54% of them VFWMM was normal. Specificity and sensitivity of KOH test and vaginal pH determination in defining pathological vaginal flora were 95% and 81%, and 79% and 91%, respectively. Conclusion. Cervicovaginal swab culture is expensive but almost non-informative test in clinical practice. The use of simpler and rapid methods as vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy, KOH test and vaginal pH offers better results in diagnosis, and probably in the treatment and prevention of sequels of vaginal

  8. Linkages between mental health need and help-seeking behavior among adolescents: Moderating role of ethnicity and cultural values

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Sisi; Nguyen, Hannah; Weiss, Bahr; Ngo, Victoria; Lau, Anna S.

    2015-01-01

    Risk of developing of emotional and behavioral mental health problems increases markedly during adolescence. Despite this increasing need, most adolescents, particularly ethnic minority youth, do not seek professional help. Informed by conceptual models of health behavior, the current study examined how cultural values are related to help-seeking among adolescents from two distinct racial/ethnic groups. In a prospective survey design, 169 10th and 11th grade Vietnamese American and European A...

  9. Influence of spiritual and moral values of young people on the formation of the civic culture of the Russian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Alekseevna Tkacheva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a sociological analysis of the spiritual and moral orientations of young people and their influence on the formation of civic culture, which largely determines the form of the activity of individuals and social groups, the functioning of social institutions. Implementation of the objective function value consists in the achievement of a modern person in not only different kinds of material goods, but also, more importantly, in spiritual development. This, to a certain extent, will help to overcome the cultural gap between the elite of society and the main mass of citizens which can be considered as one of the important reasons for the failure of reform in Russia. Research of transformation processes have aroused great interest in the study of the social potential of youth as a subject of the reproduction of society. One of the factors in favor of subjectivity of youth is a civic culture, which is a key element of modernization. As a result of its formation, there is a change and activation of value orientations of young people, causing a qualitative transformation in all spheres of society. The empirical base of an article presents the results of original research conducted during 2016 among residents of five cities on the south of the Tyumen region, on the basis of which the authors point out the emerging shift from paternalistic expectations and passivity, the low value of the future to rationality, individualization, orientation on their own power. As one of the factors in the formation of civic culture the potential of the media were highlighted, which allowed the authors to justify the impact of the media on the formation of moral and spiritual values of the younger generation.

  10. Estimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecosystem services and amenities are undeniable valuable. However, their values are poorly recognized and, as a result, ecosystem services and amenities tend to be treated as though valueless. A need thus exists to increase both knowledge and recognition of these values. In this ...

  11. Comparing instrumental and deliberative paradigms underpinning the assessment of social values for cultural ecosystem services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raymond, Christopher M.; Kenter, Jasper O.; Plieninger, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    of social values in non-monetary terms: an instrumental paradigm involving an objective assessment of the distribution, type and/or intensity of values that individuals assign to the current state of ecosystems and a deliberative paradigm involving the exploration of desired end states through group......Despite rapid advancements in the development of non-monetary techniques for the assessment of social values for ecosystem services, little research attention has been devoted to the evaluation of their underpinning paradigms. This study evaluates two contrasting paradigms for the assessment...... discussion. We present and then justify through case examples two approaches for assessing social values for ecosystem services using the instrumental paradigm and two approaches using the deliberative paradigm. Each approach makes different assumptions about: the underlying rationale for values assessment...

  12. The Path from Ethical Organisational Culture to Employee Commitment: Mediating Roles of Value Congruence and Work Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Huhtala

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the Job Demands-Resources model’s motivational process, this study investigates the role of person-organisation fit and work engagement as mediating processes between ethical culture and employee commitment, where ethical culture is seen as an organisational resource. It was expected that the stronger the ethical values and practices are experienced to be, the more compatible employees feel with the organisation. A good person-organisation fit was further hypothesised to act as a personal job resource for the employees, who would consequently experience higher work engagement leading to stronger affective commitment and less turnover intentions. The study used questionnaire data gathered from 270 Finnish school psychologists. The analyses were performed by using SEM and mediation modelling with the bootstrapping method. Ethical organisational culture had a significant positive association with experienced person-organisation fit, which in turn was related to higher work engagement. Both person-organisation fit and work engagement were associated with higher affective commitment and with lower turnover intentions. This study contributes to understanding the mechanisms through which ethical culture affects employee commitment by integrating the concept of person-organisation fit with the Job Demands-Resources model. Organisations can retain committed and motivated workforce through fostering a strong ethical culture, which can support employees’ affective commitment to the organisation.

  13. The Path from Ethical Organisational Culture to Employee Commitment: Mediating Roles of Value Congruence and Work Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Huhtala

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the Job Demands-Resources model’s motivational process, this study investigates the role of person-organisation fit and work engagement as mediating processes between ethical culture and employee commitment, where ethical culture is seen as an organisational resource. It was expected that the stronger the ethical values and practices are experienced to be, the more compatible employees feel with the organisation. A good person-organisation fit was further hypothesised to act as a personal job resource for the employees, who would consequently experience higher work engagement leading to stronger affective commitment and less turnover intentions. The study used questionnaire data gathered from 270 Finnish school psychologists. The analyses were performed by using SEM and mediation modelling with the bootstrapping method. Ethical organisational culture had a significant positive association with experienced person-organisation fit, which in turn was related to higher work engagement. Both person-organisation fit and work engagement were associated with higher affective commitment and with lower turnover intentions. This study contributes to understanding the mechanisms through which ethical culture affects employee commitment by integrating the concept of person-organisation fit with the Job Demands-Resources model. Organisations can retain committed and motivated workforce through fostering a strong ethical culture, which can support employees’ affective commitment to the organisation.

  14. Working with Business: Counselor Expectations, Actions, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnall, Michele C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to (a) explore state-federal vocational rehabilitation (VR) agency expectations for counselor engagement with business, (b) determine what VR counselors are actually doing in terms of interacting with businesses, and (c) identify challenges VR counselors experience to working with business. Method: A…

  15. Rehabilitation Counselor Education and the New Code of Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosoff, Harriet L.; Cottone, R. Rocco

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss recent changes in the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors", effective January 1, 2010, that are most relevant to rehabilitation counselor educators. The authors provide a brief overview of these key changes along with implications…

  16. Integrating Personal and Career Counseling: A Challenge for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbimbo, Patricia V.

    1994-01-01

    Argues for use of eclectic career counseling model that embraces both personality and career development theories. Notes that model requires counselor to be able to move back and forth between active and directive role of career counselor and facilitative and exploratory role of personal counselor. Presents case to demonstrate model's application…

  17. Promoting Tolerance for Ambiguity in Counselor Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Dana Heller; Jacques, Jodi D.

    2005-01-01

    Counselors-in-training are challenged with the ambiguity inherent in skill acquisition and development processes. This article explores the concept of ambiguity and ambiguity tolerance in counselors-in-training. A framework is provided for conceptualizing the inherent challenges of counselor training and how they may be addressed.

  18. Examining School Counselors' Commitments to Social Justice Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldwisch, Rachel P.

    2016-01-01

    Many school counselors endorse using social justice advocacy to close achievement gaps. In this study, school counselors from a single state scored in the moderate to high range on the Social Issues Advocacy Scale. Results showed alignment between school counselors' self-endorsement of social justice advocacy and scores on the Advocacy…

  19. Sexting: New Challenges for Schools and Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, Adriana G.; McEachern-Ciattoni, Renee T.; Martin, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    Sexting, the practice of sending sexually explicit messages or photographs of oneself or others on digital electronic devices, presents challenges for schools and professional school counselors. The implications of sexting for schools, school counselors, students, and parents are discussed. School counselor interventions, developing school…

  20. Counselors' Evaluation of Rogers-Perls-Ellis's Relationship Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Wallace S.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Participants (12 employment counselors and 10 counselor supervisors) attending a three-week workshop on enhancing relationship skills, evaluated the Rogers, Perls, Ellis film, Three Approaches to Psychotherapy, on 15 skills. Results indicate there was general agreement between the counselors and the supervisors when judging levels of therapist…