WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural studies biological

  1. A cross-cultural comparison of biology lessons between China and Germany: a video study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Neuhaus, Birgit Jana

    2017-08-01

    Given the globalization of science education and the different cultures between China and Germany, we tried to compare and explain the differences on teacher questions and real life instances in biology lessons between the two countries from a culture-related perspective. 22 biology teachers from China and 21 biology teachers from Germany participated in this study. Each teacher was videotaped for one lesson on the unit blood and circulatory system. Before the teaching unit, students' prior knowledge was tested with a pretest. After the teaching unit, students' content knowledge was tested with a posttest. The aim of the knowledge tests here was for the better selection of the four samples for qualitative comparison in the two countries. The quantitative analysis showed that more lower-order teacher questions and more real life instances that were introduced after learning relevant concepts were in Chinese lessons than in German lessons. There were no significant differences in the frequency of higher-order questions or real life instances that were introduced before learning concepts. Qualitative analysis showed that both German teachers guided students to analyze the reasoning process of Landsteiner experiment, but nor Chinese teachers did that. The findings reflected the subtle influence of culture on classroom teaching. Relatively, Chinese biology teachers focused more on learning content and the application of the content in real life; German biology teachers emphasized more on invoking students' reasoning and divergent thinking.

  2. The Biological Study of the Cultured Human Lens Epithelial Cells in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    The human lens epithelial cells (HLE) cultured in vitro was established in normal and cataractous lenses. The biological feature, histological characteristics and the ultrastructure of the cultured HLE cells were investigated. The results reveal that the proliferative capacity of the culutured HLE cells is reversely proportional to the donour age; the cultured HLE cells has the limited proliferative capacity in vitro. The relieve of the contact inhibition is the effective trigger of the HLE cell prolife...

  3. Isolation and culture of human hematopoietic progenitors for studies of dendritic cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of distinct dendritic cell (DC) function and differentiation pathways is important in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. This includes infectious and neoplastic diseases, vaccination and immunotherapy, allograft rejection, and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Isolation and culture of human hematopoietic progenitor cells provide a valuable model for studies on DC biology and may help uncover new means to manipulate DC differentiation and function in therapeutic settings. Here, a detailed protocol for the isolation of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from human cord blood is described. The isolated cell population consists of approximately 85% CD34+ CD45+ hematopoietic progenitor cells that in response to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expand and differentiate into CD11c+ HLA-DR+ DC-expressing CD1a.

  4. Computer diagnostics of level of professional competence formation of future physical culture teachers in the biological disciplines study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voitovska O.N.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the level of professional competence formation of future physical culture teachers in the biological disciplines study was provided. The study involved 79 students. It is applied methods of teaching observation and experiment. The computer program of monitoring of professional competence of future teachers of physical education was described in the study of the biological sciences. Analyzed the results of 448 students questionnaire of the first and second year, studying at specialty "teacher of physical culture." Found that the results of the formative stages of the experiments show significant positive changes in the levels of formation of professional competence of students of the experimental group. Found that the increase in the number of students with high and medium level of formation of professional competence and reduced the number of students with low level of formation of professional competence.

  5. Primary culture of glial cells from mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion: a valuable tool for studying glial cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2010-12-15

    Central nervous system glial cells as astrocytes and microglia have been investigated in vitro and many intracellular pathways have been clarified upon various stimuli. Peripheral glial cells, however, are not as deeply investigated in vitro despite its importance role in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Based on our previous experience of culturing neuronal cells, our objective was to standardize and morphologically characterize a primary culture of mouse superior cervical ganglion glial cells in order to obtain a useful tool to study peripheral glial cell biology. Superior cervical ganglia from neonatal C57BL6 mice were enzymatically and mechanically dissociated and cells were plated on diluted Matrigel coated wells in a final concentration of 10,000cells/well. Five to 8 days post plating, glial cell cultures were fixed for morphological and immunocytochemical characterization. Glial cells showed a flat and irregular shape, two or three long cytoplasm processes, and round, oval or long shaped nuclei, with regular outline. Cell proliferation and mitosis were detected both qualitative and quantitatively. Glial cells were able to maintain their phenotype in our culture model including immunoreactivity against glial cell marker GFAP. This is the first description of immunocytochemical characterization of mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion glial cells in primary culture. This work discusses the uses and limitations of our model as a tool to study many aspects of peripheral glial cell biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Culture, Urbanism and Changing Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Schell, L M

    2014-01-01

    Anthropologists have long known that human activity driven by culture changes the environment. This is apparent in the archaeological record and through the study of the modern environment. Perhaps the largest change since the paleolithic era is the organization of human populations in cities. New environments can reshape human biology through evolution as shown by the evolution of the hominid lineage. Evolution is not the only process capable of reshaping our biology. Some changes in our hum...

  7. Biological Effects of Clinically Relevant CoCr Nanoparticles in the Dura Mater: An Organ Culture Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraklis Papageorgiou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical interventions for the treatment of spinal disc degeneration include total disc replacement and fusion devices. There are, however, concerns regarding the generation of wear particles by these devices, the majority of which are in the nanometre sized range with the potential to cause adverse biological effects in the surrounding tissues. The aims of this study were to develop an organ culture model of the porcine dura mater and to investigate the biological effects of CoCr nanoparticles in this model. A range of histological techniques were used to analyse the structure of the tissue in the organ culture. The biological effects of the CoCr wear particles and the subsequent structural changes were assessed using tissue viability assays, cytokine assays, histology, immunohistochemistry, and TEM imaging. The physiological structure of the dura mater remained unchanged during the seven days of in vitro culture. There was no significant loss of cell viability. After exposure of the organ culture to CoCr nanoparticles, there was significant loosening of the epithelial layer, as well as the underlying collagen matrix. TEM imaging confirmed these structural alterations. These structural alterations were attributed to the production of MMP-1, -3, -9, -13, and TIMP-1. ELISA analysis revealed that there was significant release of cytokines including IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, ECP and also the matrix protein, tenascin-C. This study suggested that CoCr nanoparticles did not cause cytotoxicity in the dura mater but they caused significant alterations to its structural integrity that could lead to significant secondary effects due to nanoparticle penetration, such as inflammation to the local neural tissue.

  8. Writing Amish culture into genes: biological reductionism in a study of manic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floersch, J; Longhofer, J; Latta, K

    1997-06-01

    Critical realism is used to explore the problem of reductionism in a classic (the Amish Study) and widely-cited study of manic depression. Along with related ideas drawn from the works of R.C. Lewontin, Arthur Kleinman, and Byron Good, it is shown that natural and social scientists deploy atomistic and holistic reductionism; this, in turn, leads to the construction of artificially 'closed systems' through the control of variables or exogenous forces. The psychiatric genetic studies of the Amish were predicated on the assumption that Amish society is homogeneous and unchanging and, therefore, closed. We conclude by arguing that interactions between behaviors and genes, where they exist, take place only within open systems, characterized by multiple mechanisms-social and biological-that together co-determine any event. To move forward, it is argued, behavior and gene research requires recognition and resolution of the philosophical conundrums that accompany reductionism.

  9. Biological studies of Chlorella pyrenoidosa (strain LARG-1) cultures grown under space flight conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, V A; Shepelev, E Y; Meleshko, G I; Setlik, I; Kordyum, E L; Sytnik, K M; Mashinsky, A L; Popova, A F; Dubinin, N P; Vaulina, E N; Polivoda, L V

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports data from an electron microscopic analysis of Chlorella pyrenoidosa (LARG-1) cultures after five days of growth in the dark on a semiliquid mineral/glucose medium in the IFS-2 device on board the Soyuz 27-Salyut 6-Soyuz 28 orbital research complex (Soviet-Czechoslovak experiment "Chlorella-1"). For space flight of five days duration the ultrastructural cellular organization of the flight and control cultures were similar. This testifies to normal cell function.

  10. A comparison of biological and cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, Petter

    2015-03-01

    This review begins with a definition of biological evolution and a description of its general principles. This is followed by a presentation of the biological basis of culture, specifically the concept of social selection. Further, conditions for cultural evolution are proposed, including a suggestion for language being the cultural replicator corresponding to the concept of the gene in biological evolution. Principles of cultural evolution are put forward and compared to the principles of biological evolution. Special emphasis is laid on the principle of selection in cultural evolution, including presentation of the concept of cultural fitness. The importance of language as a necessary condition for cultural evolution is stressed. Subsequently, prime differences between biological and cultural evolution are presented, followed by a discussion on interaction of our genome and our culture. The review aims at contributing to the present discussion concerning the modern development of the general theory of evolution, for example by giving a tentative formulation of the necessary and sufficient conditions for cultural evolution, and proposing that human creativity and mind reading or theory of mind are motors specific for it. The paper ends with the notion of the still ongoing coevolution of genes and culture.

  11. A comparison of biological and cultural evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Petter Portin

    2015-03-01

    This review begins with a definition of biological evolution and a description of its general principles. This is followed by a presentation of the biological basis of culture, specifically the concept of social selection. Further, conditions for cultural evolution are proposed, including a suggestion for language being the cultural replicator corresponding to the concept of the gene in biological evolution. Principles of cultural evolution are put forward and compared to the principles of biological evolution. Special emphasis is laid on the principle of selection in cultural evolution, including presentation of the concept of cultural fitness. The importance of language as a necessary condition for cultural evolution is stressed. Subsequently, prime differences between biological and cultural evolution are presented, followed by a discussion on interaction of our genome and our culture. The review aims at contributing to the present discussion concerning the modern development of the general theory of evolution, for example by giving a tentative formulation of the necessary and sufficient conditions for cultural evolution, and proposing that human creativity and mind reading or theory of mind are motors specific for it. The paper ends with the notion of the still ongoing coevolution of genes and culture.

  12. Is whole-culture synchronization biology's 'perpetual-motion machine'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Stephen

    2004-06-01

    Whole-culture or batch synchronization cannot, in theory, produce a synchronized culture because it violates a fundamental law that proposes that no batch treatment can alter the cell-age order of a culture. In analogy with the history of perpetual-motion machines, it is suggested that the study of these whole-culture 'synchronization' methods might lead to an understanding of general biological principles even though these methods cannot be used to study the normal cell cycle.

  13. Cultural and biological evolution of phonemic speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B.; Freitas, A.A.; Capcarrere, M.S.; Bentley, Peter J.; Johnson, Colin G.; Timmis, Jon

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the interaction between cultural evolution and biological evolution in the emergence of phonemic coding in speech. It is observed that our nearest relatives, the primates, use holistic utterances, whereas humans use phonemic utterances. It can therefore be argued that our las

  14. Cultural and biological evolution of phonemic speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B.; Freitas, A.A.; Capcarrere, M.S.; Bentley, Peter J.; Johnson, Colin G.; Timmis, Jon

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the interaction between cultural evolution and biological evolution in the emergence of phonemic coding in speech. It is observed that our nearest relatives, the primates, use holistic utterances, whereas humans use phonemic utterances. It can therefore be argued that our

  15. Flow cytometric applications of tumor biology: prospects and pitfalls. [Applications in study of spontaneous dog tumors and in drug and radiation effects on cultured V79 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.; Johnson, T.S.; Tokita, N.; Gillette, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review of cytometry instrumentation and its potential applications in tumor biology is presented using our recent data. Age-distribution measurements of cells from spontaneous dog tumors and cultured cells after exposure to x rays, alpha particles, or adriamycin are shown. The data show that DNA fluorescence measurements have application in the study of cell kinetics after either radiation or drug treatment. Extensive and careful experimentation is needed to utilize the sophisticated developments in flow cytometry instrumentation.

  16. Introductory biology and ecological literacy: A critical cultural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Joseph Damian

    Despite the lack of accepted standards for the introductory biology course for students majoring in biology, the content and format of the first-year biology course is remarkably uniform in terms of both curriculum and pedagogy. This investigation is a critical cultural analysis of the purpose of, and practices within, undergraduate biology education in general, and the introductory biology course in particular. Drawing on a theoretical framework that combines critical philosophical inquiry, ecological literacy, science studies, and cultural studies, I argue that the failure of biology educators within the university to acknowledge the diversity of their student body and to actively engage social and ecological issues has resulted in a curriculum that has almost no meaning for students, and that is socially and ecologically irresponsible. This work is a search for meaningful alternatives. Within this work, I attempt to provide biology educators, as well as would-be reformers, with a seldom-seen view of academic biology. This is done to unsettle the status quo, and to initiate processes of seeking out spaces for change. Through the discourses of critical pedagogy and ecological literacy I examine the laboratories, lecture halls, teaching practices, and course materials that students encounter as they experience "the study of life." Additionally, I place the genesis and evolution of the introductory biology course within the sociohistorical context of reform in science education and academic biology in an effort to explain the amazing and problematic stability of this course.

  17. A multifunctional 3D co-culture system for studies of mammary tissue morphogenesis and stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan J; Davidenko, Natalia; Caffarel, Maria M; Cameron, Ruth E; Watson, Christine J

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM) in three dimensional (3D) space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA) scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this scaffold recapitulating normal tissue morphology in the absence of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM) hydrogel. Furthermore, organoid developmental outcome can be controlled by the ratio of collagen to HA, with a higher HA concentration favouring acinar morphological development. Importantly, this culture system recapitulates the stem cell niche as primary mammary stem cells form complex organoids, emphasising the utility of this approach for developmental and tumorigenic studies using genetically altered animals or human biopsy material, and for screening cancer therapeutics for personalised medicine.

  18. A multifunctional 3D co-culture system for studies of mammary tissue morphogenesis and stem cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Campbell

    Full Text Available Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM in three dimensional (3D space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this scaffold recapitulating normal tissue morphology in the absence of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM hydrogel. Furthermore, organoid developmental outcome can be controlled by the ratio of collagen to HA, with a higher HA concentration favouring acinar morphological development. Importantly, this culture system recapitulates the stem cell niche as primary mammary stem cells form complex organoids, emphasising the utility of this approach for developmental and tumorigenic studies using genetically altered animals or human biopsy material, and for screening cancer therapeutics for personalised medicine.

  19. Systems Biology for Organotypic Cell Cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grego, Sonia [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Dougherty, Edward R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Alexander, Francis J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Auerbach, Scott S. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Berridge, Brian R. [GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Bittner, Michael L. [Translational Genomics Research Inst., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Casey, Warren [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cooley, Philip C. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Dash, Ajit [HemoShear Therapeutics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Ferguson, Stephen S. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Fennell, Timothy R. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hawkins, Brian T. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hickey, Anthony J. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kleensang, Andre [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing; Liebman, Michael N. [IPQ Analytics, Kennett Square, PA (United States); Martin, Florian [Phillip Morris International, Neuchatel (Switzerland); Maull, Elizabeth A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Paragas, Jason [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Qiao, Guilin [Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Ft. Belvoir, VA (United States); Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Sumner, Susan J. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Yoon, Miyoung [The Hamner Inst. for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ScitoVation, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, “organotypic” cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomic data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data. This consensus report summarizes the discussions held.

  20. Integration of culture and biology in human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    The challenge of integrating biology and culture is addressed in this chapter by emphasizing human development as involving mutually constitutive, embodied, and epigenetic processes. Heuristically rich constructs extrapolated from cultural psychology and developmental science, such as embodiment, action, and activity, are presented as promising approaches to the integration of cultural and biology in human development. These theoretical notions are applied to frame the nascent field of cultural neuroscience as representing this integration of culture and biology. Current empirical research in cultural neuroscience is then synthesized to illustrate emerging trends in this body of literature that examine the integration of biology and culture.

  1. Biological conversion of synthesis gas culture development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Research continues on the conversion of synthesis by shift reactions involving bacteria. Topics discussed here include: biological water gas shift, sulfur gas utilization, experimental screening procedures, water gas shift studies, H{sub 2}S removal studies, COS degradation by selected CO-utilizing bacteria, and indirect COS utilization by Chlorobia. (VC)

  2. [Biology and culture: a dimension of collaboration between anthropology and epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Leiming; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the important basis of epidemiological study. Based on biology, psychology, social and cultural factors can influence human's health and disease incidence. The medical mode has changed from "biomedical mode" to "bio-psycho-social medical model" , but culture factor was neglected somewhat during this process, so paying attention to culture factor in anthropologic study and using it as biologic basis in epidemiologic study might be a dimension of collaboration between of anthropology and epidemiology.

  3. A three-dimensional cell culture model to study the mechano-biological behavior in periodontal ligament regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Yu, N.; Bronckers, A.L.; Yang, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease affecting the supporting structures of the teeth, which can eventually result in tooth loss. A three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture model was developed that may serve to grow a 3D construct that not only transplants into defective periodontal sites, but also allows to exa

  4. A three-dimensional cell culture model to study the mechano-biological behavior in periodontal ligament regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Yu, N.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Yang, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease affecting the supporting structures of the teeth, which can eventually result in tooth loss. A three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture model was developed that may serve to grow a 3D construct that not only transplants into defective periodontal sites, but also allows to exa

  5. Cultural interaction and biological distance in postclassic period Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Corey S; Edgar, Heather J H

    2015-05-01

    Economic, political, and cultural relationships connected virtually every population throughout Mexico during Postclassic period (AD 900-1520). Much of what is known about population interaction in prehistoric Mexico is based on archaeological or ethnohistoric data. What is unclear, especially for the Postclassic period, is how these data correlate with biological population structure. We address this by assessing biological (phenotypic) distances among 28 samples based upon a comparison of dental morphology trait frequencies, which serve as a proxy for genetic variation, from 810 individuals. These distances were compared with models representing geographic and cultural relationships among the same groups. Results of Mantel and partial Mantel matrix correlation tests show that shared migration and trade are correlated with biological distances, but geographic distance is not. Trade and political interaction are also correlated with biological distance when combined in a single matrix. These results indicate that trade and political relationships affected population structure among Postclassic Mexican populations. We suggest that trade likely played a major role in shaping patterns of interaction between populations. This study also shows that the biological distance data support the migration histories described in ethnohistoric sources. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A second inheritance system: the extension of biology through culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Andrew

    2017-10-06

    By the mid-twentieth century (thus following the 'Modern Synthesis' in evolutionary biology), the behavioural sciences offered only the sketchy beginnings of a scientific literature documenting evidence for cultural inheritance in animals-the transmission of traditional behaviours via learning from others (social learning). By contrast, recent decades have seen a massive growth in the documentation of such cultural phenomena, driven by long-term field studies and complementary laboratory experiments. Here, I review the burgeoning scope of discoveries in this field, which increasingly suggest that this 'second inheritance system', built on the shoulders of the primary genetic inheritance system, occurs widely among vertebrates and possibly in invertebrates too. Its novel characteristics suggest significant implications for our understanding of evolutionary biology. I assess the extent to which this second system extends the scope of evolution, both by echoing principal properties of the primary, organic evolutionary system, and going beyond it in significant ways. This is well established in human cultural evolution; here, I address animal cultures more generally. The further major, and related, question concerns the extent to which the consequences of widespread animal cultural transmission interact with the primary, genetically based inheritance systems, shaping organic evolution.

  7. Comparing the biological and cultural inheritance of personality and social attitudes in the Virginia 30,000 study of twins and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, L; Heath, A; Martin, N; Maes, H; Neale, M; Kendler, K; Kirk, K; Corey, L

    1999-06-01

    Measures of four dimensions of personality (Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Lie scores) and six aspects of social attitudes (to sex, taxation, militarism, politics, religion and a general conservatism scale) were obtained by mailed questionnaire from 29,691 US subjects including adult twins (n = 14,761) their parents (n = 2360), their spouses (n = 4391), siblings (n = 3184) and adult children (n = 4800). After correction for the average effects of age, sex and source of sample, familial correlations were computed for 80 distinct biological and social relationships. The data allow for the estimation of the additive and non-additive effects of genes, assortative mating, vertical cultural inheritance and other non-parental effects of the shared environment on differences in personality and social attitudes. The interaction of genetic and environmental effects with sex may also be analyzed. Model-fitting analyses show that personality and social attitude measures differ markedly in major features of family resemblance. Additive and dominant genetic effects contribute to differences in both personality and attitudes, but the effects of the family environment, including vertical cultural transmission from parent to child, are much more marked for social attitudes than for personality. There is substantial assortative mating for social attitudes and almost none for personality. The causes of family resemblance depend significantly on sex for almost every variable studied. These findings clarify and extend the more tentative findings derived from previous twin, family and adoption studies.

  8. Biologic characteristics of fibroblast cells cultured from the knee ligaments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鸿辉; 唐毅; 李斯明; 沈雁; 刘向荣; 钟灿灿

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To culture fibroblast cells from the kneeligaments and to study the biological characteristics of thesecells.Methods: Cells of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) fromNew Zealand white rabbit were cultured in vitro. Cellulargrowth and expression of the collagen were analyzed.Moreover, an in vitro wound closure model was establishedand the healing of the ACL and the MCL cells wascompared.Results: Maximal growth for all these cells wereobtained with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's mediumsupplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, but RPMI 1640and Ham's F12 media were not suitable to maintain thesecells. Morphology of both ACL and MCL cells from NewZealand white rabbit was alike in vitro, but the MCL cellsgrew faster than the ACL cells. Both cell types producedsimilar amount of collagen in culture, but the ratio ofcollage type I to type III produced by ACL cells was higherthan that produced by MCL cells. Wound closure assayshowed that at 36 hours after injury, cell-free zones createdin the ACL cultures were occupied partially by the ACLcells; in contrast, the wounded zone in the MCL cultureswas almost completely covered by the cells.Conclusions: Although the ACL cells and the MCLcells from New Zealand white rabbit show similarappearance in morphology in culture, the cellular growthand the biochemical synthesis of collagen as well as thehealing in vitro were significantly different. Thesedifferences in intrinsic properties of the two types of cells invitro might contribute to the differential healing potentialsof these ligaments in vivo.

  9. Comparing results of cultured and uncultured biological methods used in biological phosphorus removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) for their important role in biological phosphorus removal. In this study, microbial communities of PAOs cultivated under different carbon sources (sewage, glucose, and sodium acetate) were investigated and compared through culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, respectively. The results obtained using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rDNA fragments revealed that the diversity of bacteria in a sewage-fed reactor (1#) was much higher than in a glucose-fed one (2#) and a sodium acetate-fed one (3#); there were common PAOs in three reactors fed by different carbon sources. Five strains were separated from three systems by using a phosphate-rich medium; they were from common bacteria isolated and three isolates could not be found in DGGE profile at all. Two isolates had good phosphorus removal ability. When the microbial diversity was studied, the molecular biological method was better than the culture-dependent one. When phosphorus removal characteristics were investigated, culture-dependent approach was more effective. Thus a combination of two methods is necessary to have a comprehensive view of PAOs.

  10. Culture and social support: neural bases and biological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, David K; Kim, Heejung S; Taylor, Shelley E

    2009-01-01

    Social support is an effective means by which people cope with stressful events, and consequently, it beneficially affects health and well-being. Yet there are profound cultural differences in the effectiveness of different types of support and how people use their support networks. In this paper, we examine research on the impact of culture on social support, the neural underpinnings of social support, and how cultural differences in social support seeking are manifested biologically. We focus on cultural factors that may affect individuals' decisions to seek or not to seek social support and how culture moderates the impact of support seeking on biological and psychological health outcomes. We also examine recent research on the interaction between genes and culture in social support use. Discussion centers on the importance of developing an overarching framework of social support that integrates health psychology, cultural psychology, social neuroscience, and genetics.

  11. Cultural and biological factors modulate spatial biases over development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girelli, Luisa; Marinelli, Chiara Valeria; Grossi, Giuseppe; Arduino, Lisa S

    2017-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contribution of both biological and cultural factors to visuospatial processing. The present study adds to the literature by exploring the interplay of perceptual and linguistic mechanisms in determining visuospatial asymmetries in adults (Experiment 1) and children (Experiment 2). In particular, pre-schoolers (3 and 5 year-olds), school-aged children (8 year-old), and adult participants were required to bisect different types of stimuli, that is, lines, words, and figure strings. In accordance with the literature, results yielded a leftward bias for lines and words and a rightward bias for figure strings, in adult participants. More critically, different biases were found for lines, words, and figure strings in children as a function of age, reflecting the impact of both cultural and biological factors on the processing of different visuospatial materials. Specifically, an adult-like pattern of results emerged only in the older group of children (8 year-old), but not in pre-schoolers. Results are discussed in terms of literacy, reading habits exposure, and biological maturation.

  12. Cultural Carrying Capacity: A Biological Approach to Human Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Garrett

    1992-01-01

    In discussing the human and cultural implications of scientific discoveries and knowledge, the biological concept of carrying capacity is explored. Maintaining that human beings are truly animals answering to principles that govern all animals, the author addresses the need for human populations to work within the context of culture and carrying…

  13. The Colorado Plateau: cultural, biological, and physical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kenneth L.; van Riper, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Stretching from the four corners of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah, the Colorado Plateau is a natural laboratory for a wide range of studies. This volume presents 23 original articles drawn from more than 100 research projects presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau. This scientific gathering revolved around research, inventory, and monitoring of lands in the region. The book's contents cover management techniques for cultural, biological, and physical resources, representing collaborative efforts among federal, university, and private sector scientists and land managers. Chapters on cultural concerns cover benchmarks of modern southwestern anthropological knowledge, models of past human activity and impact of modern visitation at newly established national monuments, challenges in implementing the 1964 Wilderness Act, and opportunities for increased federal research on Native American lands. The section on biological resources comprises sixteen chapters, with coverage that ranges from mammalian biogeography to responses of elk at the urban-wildland interface. Additional biological studies include the effects of fire and grazing on vegetation; research on bald eagles at Grand Canyon and tracking wild turkeys using radio collars; and management of palentological resources. Two final chapters on physical resources consider a proposed rerouting of the Rio de Flag River in urban Flagstaff, Arizona, and an examination of past climate patterns over the Plateau, using stream flow records and tree ring data. In light of similarities in habitat and climate across the Colorado Plateau, techniques useful to particular management units have been found to be applicable in many locations. This volume highlights an abundance of research that will prove useful for all of those working in the region, as well as for others seeking comparative studies that integrate research into land management actions.

  14. Biological studies of dysthymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, R H; Thase, M E

    1991-08-01

    Dysthymic disorder (DD) is a chronic subsyndromal depressive condition that has generated increasing interest since its formal introduction into the psychiatric nomenclature in 1980. Although DD was included among the affective disorders in DSM-III, this classification was controversial. Some clinical and family studies support an association between DD and major depression disorder (MDD), but there has been little additional research firmly establishing the diagnostic validity of DD or clarifying its relation to MDD and to personality disorders. In this article, the literature on the biology of DD is reviewed. Studies of rapid eye movement (REM) latency, electrodermal activity, and the thyroid axis show similarities between DD and MDD, but the findings are mixed. Other investigations, including the Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST), catecholamines, and several other electroencephalogram (EEG) sleep variables, show more consistent differences between DD and MDD. These findings suggest that DD manifests primarily trait characteristics of depression, thus differentiating it from the state characteristics of MDD. The methodological problems and implications of these studies, and suggestions for future research, are discussed.

  15. Beyond the 'new cross-cultural psychiatry': cultural biology, discursive psychology and the ironies of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2006-03-01

    The 'new cross-cultural psychiatry' heralded by Kleinman in 1977 promised a revitalized tradition that gave due respect to cultural difference and did not export psychiatric theories that were themselves culture bound. In the ensuing years, the view of culture within anthropology has continued to change, along with our understanding of the relationship of biological processes to cultural diversity, and the global political economic contexts in which mental health care is delivered. This article considers the implications of these new notions of culture, biology and the context of practice for theory in cultural psychiatry. The future of cultural psychiatry lies in advancing a broad perspective that: (a) is inherently multidisciplinary (involving psychiatric epidemiology, medical anthropology and sociology, cognitive science and social psychology), breaking down the nature/culture dichotomy with an integrative view of culture as a core feature of human biology, while remaining alert to cultural constructions of biological theory; (b) attends to psychological processes but understands these as not exclusively located within the individual but as including discursive processes that are fundamentally social; and (c) critically examines the interaction of both local and global systems of knowledge and power. Globalization has brought with it many ironies for cultural psychiatry: Transnational migrations have resulted in cultural hybridization at the same time as ethnicity has become more salient; the call for evidence-based medicine has been used to limit the impact of cultural research; and cultural psychiatry itself has been co-opted by pharmaceutical companies to inform marketing campaigns to promote conventional treatments for new populations. Cultural psychiatry must address these ironies to develop the self-critical awareness and flexibility needed to deliver humane care in shifting contexts.

  16. A culture-independent study of free-living fungi in biological soil crusts of the Colorado Plateau: their diversity and relative contribution to microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Scott T; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2009-01-01

    Molecular methodologies were used to investigate free-living fungal communities associated with biological soil crusts (BSCs), along km-scale transects on the Colorado Plateau (USA). Two cyanobacteria-dominated crust types that did not contain significant lichen cover were examined. Fungal community diversity and composition were assessed with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and sequencing, and fungi-specific quantitative PCR was used to measure fungal population densities as compared with those of bacteria. Our results clearly indicate that free-living fungi, while ubiquitous in BSCs, are less diverse and contribute far less biomass than their bacterial counterparts. Biological soil crust fungal community structure differed from that of uncrusted soils in their surroundings. Phylogenetic analyses placed the majority of BSC fungi within the Ascomycota, confirmed the importance of dematiaceous fungi, and pointed to members of the genera Alternaria and Acremonium as the most common free-living fungi in these crusts. Phylotypes potentially representing novel taxa were recovered, as were several belonging to the Basidiomycota that would not have been readily recognized by culture-dependant means.

  17. Discovering networks of perturbed biological processes in hepatocyte cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Lasher

    Full Text Available The liver plays a vital role in glucose homeostasis, the synthesis of bile acids and the detoxification of foreign substances. Liver culture systems are widely used to test adverse effects of drugs and environmental toxicants. The two most prevalent liver culture systems are hepatocyte monolayers (HMs and collagen sandwiches (CS. Despite their wide use, comprehensive transcriptional programs and interaction networks in these culture systems have not been systematically investigated. We integrated an existing temporal transcriptional dataset for HM and CS cultures of rat hepatocytes with a functional interaction network of rat genes. We aimed to exploit the functional interactions to identify statistically significant linkages between perturbed biological processes. To this end, we developed a novel approach to compute Contextual Biological Process Linkage Networks (CBPLNs. CBPLNs revealed numerous meaningful connections between different biological processes and gene sets, which we were successful in interpreting within the context of liver metabolism. Multiple phenomena captured by CBPLNs at the process level such as regulation, downstream effects, and feedback loops have well described counterparts at the gene and protein level. CBPLNs reveal high-level linkages between pathways and processes, making the identification of important biological trends more tractable than through interactions between individual genes and molecules alone. Our approach may provide a new route to explore, analyze, and understand cellular responses to internal and external cues within the context of the intricate networks of molecular interactions that control cellular behavior.

  18. Interactions between cultural, social and biological explanations for language evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steels, Luc

    2012-03-01

    This is a reply to commentaries on a target article in this volume reviewing models for the cultural evolution of language. Many commentaries amplify positions taken in this article but they also cover novel issues in social evolution and biological evolution, which are briefly addressed here.

  19. Biological Sampling Variability Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amidan, Brett G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hutchison, Janine R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-08

    There are many sources of variability that exist in the sample collection and analysis process. This paper addresses many, but not all, sources of variability. The main focus of this paper was to better understand and estimate variability due to differences between samplers. Variability between days was also studied, as well as random variability within each sampler. Experiments were performed using multiple surface materials (ceramic and stainless steel), multiple contaminant concentrations (10 spores and 100 spores), and with and without the presence of interfering material. All testing was done with sponge sticks using 10-inch by 10-inch coupons. Bacillus atrophaeus was used as the BA surrogate. Spores were deposited using wet deposition. Grime was coated on the coupons which were planned to include the interfering material (Section 3.3). Samples were prepared and analyzed at PNNL using CDC protocol (Section 3.4) and then cultured and counted. Five samplers were trained so that samples were taken using the same protocol. Each sampler randomly sampled eight coupons each day, four coupons with 10 spores deposited and four coupons with 100 spores deposited. Each day consisted of one material being tested. The clean samples (no interfering materials) were run first, followed by the dirty samples (coated with interfering material). There was a significant difference in recovery efficiency between the coupons with 10 spores deposited (mean of 48.9%) and those with 100 spores deposited (mean of 59.8%). There was no general significant difference between the clean and dirty (containing interfering material) coupons or between the two surface materials; however, there was a significant interaction between concentration amount and presence of interfering material. The recovery efficiency was close to the same for coupons with 10 spores deposited, but for the coupons with 100 spores deposited, the recovery efficiency for the dirty samples was significantly larger (65

  20. US Cultural Studies: Oxymoron?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Breen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay began in 1999 as an attempt to update my perceptions and experiences as a resident alien in the USA. Written expressly for what was then The UTS Review, it was intended to follow up my earlier piece published in 1997, ‘The Cultural Studies Thing You Do: In the USA after Sokal’. Just as the challenges initiated by that ‘affair’ seem to have evaporated, or been absorbed into the apparatus of systemic reinvention in the US academy, I am reinventing my correspondence.

  1. Culture, and a Metrics Methodology for Biological Countermeasure Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Mary J.

    2007-03-15

    Outcome Metrics Methodology defines a way to evaluate outcome metrics associated with scenario analyses related to biological countermeasures. Previous work developed a schema to allow evaluation of common elements of impacts across a wide range of potential threats and scenarios. Classes of metrics were identified that could be used by decision makers to differentiate the common bases among disparate scenarios. Typical impact metrics used in risk calculations include the anticipated number of deaths, casualties, and the direct economic costs should a given event occur. There are less obvious metrics that are often as important and require more intensive initial work to be incorporated. This study defines a methodology for quantifying, evaluating, and ranking metrics other than direct health and economic impacts. As has been observed with the consequences of Hurricane Katrina, impacts to the culture of specific sectors of society are less obvious on an immediate basis but equally important over the ensuing and long term. Culture is used as the example class of metrics within which • requirements for a methodology are explored • likely methodologies are examined • underlying assumptions for the respective methodologies are discussed • the basis for recommending a specific methodology is demonstrated. Culture, as a class of metrics, is shown to consist of political, sociological, and psychological elements that are highly valued by decision makers. In addition, cultural practices, dimensions, and kinds of knowledge offer complementary sets of information that contribute to the context within which experts can provide input. The quantification and evaluation of sociopolitical, socio-economic, and sociotechnical impacts depend predominantly on subjective, expert judgment. Epidemiological data is limited, resulting in samples with statistical limits. Dose response assessments and curves depend on the quality of data and its relevance to human modes of exposure

  2. Between biology and culture. Eight drawings for Remo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Mainardi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Drawing has been associated with man's cultural history since its very beginning, when the need to express oneself arose. With the passing of time, it has gained autonomy and lost the function of support and integration to written and oral verbal communication. This writing is about the 'accessory' function of drawing, with some examples taken from a recent dialogue between Remo Ceserani and the author. Finally, it is remarked the phylogenetic relationship between drawing and writing, which involves, in different species, both the biologic and the cultural evolution.

  3. The preferred traits of mates in a cross-national study of heterosexual and homosexual men and women: an examination of biological and cultural influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, Richard A

    2007-04-01

    BBC Internet survey participants (119,733 men and 98,462 women) chose from a list of 23 traits those they considered first, second, and third most important in a relationship partner. Across all participants, the traits ranked most important were: intelligence, humor, honesty, kindness, overall good looks, face attractiveness, values, communication skills, and dependability. On average, men ranked good looks and facial attractiveness more important than women did (d = 0.55 and 0.36, respectively), whereas women ranked honesty, humor, kindness, and dependability more important than men did (ds = 0.23, 0.22, 0.18, and 0.15). Sexual orientation differences were smaller than sex differences in trait rankings, but some were meaningful; for example, heterosexual more than homosexual participants assigned importance to religion, fondness for children, and parenting abilities. Multidimensional scaling analyses showed that trait preference profiles clustered by participant sex, not by sexual orientation, and by sex more than by nationality. Sex-by-nation ANOVAs of individuals' trait rankings showed that sex differences in rankings of attractiveness, but not of character traits, were extremely consistent across 53 nations and that nation main effects and sex-by-nation interactions were stronger for character traits than for physical attractiveness. United Nations indices of gender equality correlated, across nations, with men's and women's rankings of character traits but not with their rankings of physical attractiveness. These results suggest that cultural factors had a relatively greater impact on men's and women's rankings of character traits, whereas biological factors had a relatively greater impact on men's and women's rankings of physical attractiveness.

  4. Studying Popular Culture in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    This working paper – written for inclusion as a chapter on Japanese society, to be published in Chinese by the Beijing University of Foreign Studies later in 2011 – looks at popular culture as a form of cultural production. It argues for the need to study popular cultural forms like advertisement...

  5. Case Studies in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  6. Co-culture systems and technologies: taking synthetic biology to the next level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Lisa; Freemont, Paul; Polizzi, Karen M

    2014-07-06

    Co-culture techniques find myriad applications in biology for studying natural or synthetic interactions between cell populations. Such techniques are of great importance in synthetic biology, as multi-species cell consortia and other natural or synthetic ecology systems are widely seen to hold enormous potential for foundational research as well as novel industrial, medical and environmental applications with many proof-of-principle studies in recent years. What is needed for co-cultures to fulfil their potential? Cell-cell interactions in co-cultures are strongly influenced by the extracellular environment, which is determined by the experimental set-up, which therefore needs to be given careful consideration. An overview of existing experimental and theoretical co-culture set-ups in synthetic biology and adjacent fields is given here, and challenges and opportunities involved in such experiments are discussed. Greater focus on foundational technology developments for co-cultures is needed for many synthetic biology systems to realize their potential in both applications and answering biological questions.

  7. Doing Cultural Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Hall, Stuart; Janes, Linda

    to the past - unpack the key concepts of contemporary culture, such as mobility and materiality - look with fresh eyes at today's media world and the cultural practices it gives rise to - practice their critical skills with up-to-date exercises and activities This book remains the perfect 'how to...

  8. Doing Cultural Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Hall, Stuart; Janes, Linda

    What does the Walkman have to do with the 21st century? The long-awaited second edition of this classic textbook takes students on a journey between past and present, giving them the skills do to cultural analysis along the way. Through the notion of the 'circuit of culture', this book teaches st...

  9. The (Biological or Cultural) Essence of Essentialism: Implications for Policy Support among Dominant and Subordinated Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu Yalcinkaya, Nur; Estrada-Villalta, Sara; Adams, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Most research links (racial) essentialism to negative intergroup outcomes. We propose that this conclusion reflects both a narrow conceptual focus on biological/genetic essence and a narrow research focus from the perspective of racially dominant groups. We distinguished between beliefs in biological and cultural essences, and we investigated the implications of this distinction for support of social justice policies (e.g., affirmative action) among people with dominant (White) and subordinated (e.g., Black, Latino) racial identities in the United States. Whereas, endorsement of biological essentialism may have similarly negative implications for social justice policies across racial categories, we investigated the hypothesis that endorsement of cultural essentialism would have different implications across racial categories. In Studies 1a and 1b, we assessed the properties of a cultural essentialism measure we developed using two samples with different racial/ethnic compositions. In Study 2, we collected data from 170 participants using an online questionnaire to test the implications of essentialist beliefs for policy support. Consistent with previous research, we found that belief in biological essentialism was negatively related to policy support for participants from both dominant and subordinated categories. In contrast, the relationship between cultural essentialism and policy support varied across identity categories in the hypothesized way: negative for participants from the dominant category but positive for participants from subordinated categories. Results suggest that cultural essentialism may provide a way of identification that subordinated communities use to mobilize support for social justice.

  10. Plant Tissue Culture Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert Alan

    Plant tissue culture has developed into a valid botanical discipline and is considered a key area of biotechnology, but it has not been a key component of the science curriculum because of the expensive and technical nature of research in this area. This manual presents a number of activities that are relatively easy to prepare and perform. The…

  11. C22-bronchial and T7-alveolar epithelial cell lines of the immortomouse are excellent murine cell culture model systems to study pulmonary peroxisome biology and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnati, Srikanth; Palaniswamy, Saranya; Alam, Mohammad Rashedul; Oruqaj, Gani; Stamme, Cordula; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2016-03-01

    In pulmonary research, temperature-sensitive immortalized cell lines derived from the lung of the "immortomouse" (H-2k(b)-tsA58 transgenic mouse), such as C22 club cells and T7 alveolar epithelial cells type II (AECII), are frequently used cell culture models to study CC10 metabolism and surfactant synthesis. Even though peroxisomes are highly abundant in club cells and AECII and might fulfill important metabolic functions therein, these organelles have never been investigated in C22 and T7 cells. Therefore, we have characterized the peroxisomal compartment and its associated gene transcription in these cell lines. Our results show that peroxisomes are highly abundant in C22 and T7 cells, harboring a common set of enzymes, however, exhibiting specific differences in protein composition and gene expression patterns, similar to the ones observed in club cells and AECII in situ in the lung. C22 cells contain a lower number of larger peroxisomes, whereas T7 cells possess more numerous tubular peroxisomes, reflected also by higher levels of PEX11 proteins. Moreover, C22 cells harbor relatively higher amounts of catalase and antioxidative enzymes in distinct subcellular compartments, whereas T7 cells exhibit higher levels of ABCD3 and plasmalogen synthesizing enzymes as well as nuclear receptors of the PPAR family. This study suggest that the C22 and T7 cell lines of the immortomouse lung are useful models to study the regulation and metabolic function of the peroxisomal compartment and its alterations by paracrine factors in club cells and AECII.

  12. Biological phosphorus removal inhibition by roxarsone in batch culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingfeng; Liu, Li; Hu, Zhenhu; Chen, Guowei

    2013-06-01

    Roxarsone has been extensively used in the feed of animals, which is usually excreted unchanged in the manure and eventually enter into animal wastewater, challenging the biological phosphorus removal processes. Knowledge of its inhibition effect is key for guiding treatment of roxarsone-contaminated wastewater, and is unfortunately keeping unclear. We study the inhibition of roxarsone on biological phosphorus removal processes for roxarsone-contaminated wastewater treatment, in terms of the removal and rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), phosphate. Results showed that presence of roxarsone considerably limited the COD removals, especially at roxarsone concentration exceeding 40 mg L(-1). Additionally, roxarsone inhibited both phosphorus release and uptake processes, consistent with the phosphate profiles during the biological phosphorus removal processes; whereas, roxarsone is more toxic to phosphorus uptake process, than release function. The results indicated that it is roxarsone itself, rather than the inorganic arsenics, inhibit biological phosphorus removal processes within both aerobic and anaerobic roxarsone-contaminated wastewater treatment.

  13. [Experimental models in oncology: contribution of cell culture on understanding the biology of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Mariana; Enes, Margarida; Pereira, Marta; Dourado, Marília; Sarmento Ribeiro, Ana Bela

    2009-01-01

    In the beginning of the 20th century, tissue culture was started with the aim of studying the behaviour of animal cells in normal and stress conditions. The cell study at molecular level depends on their capacity of growing and how they can be manipulated in laboratory. In vitro cell culture allows us the possibility of studying biological key processes, such as growth, differentiation and cell death, and also to do genetic manipulations essential to the knowledge of structure and genes function. Human stem cells culture provides strategies to circumvent other models' deficiencies. It seems that cancer stem cells remain quiescent until activation by appropriated micro-environmental stimulation. Several studies reveal that different cancer types could be due to stem cell malignant transformations. Removal of these cells is essential to the development of more effective cancer therapies for advanced disease. On the other hand, dendritic cells modified in culture may be used as a therapeutic vaccine in order to induce tumour withdraw.

  14. Biology, Culture and Society: An Explanation of Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Barbara

    Traditional sociological conceptions of human group development and early human group behavior are critiqued in light of anthropological, biological, and physiological data. The objective of the study was to identify shortcomings of sociological research when non-sociological data is consistently ignored. Review of sociological studies of human…

  15. In vitro cultured cells as probes for space radiation effects on biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meli, A.; Perrella, G.; Curcio, F.; Ambesi-Impiombato, F.S. [Dipartimento di Patologia e Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Universita di Udine, P.le S. Maria della Misericordia, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    1999-12-06

    Near future scenarios of long-term and far-reaching manned space missions, require more extensive knowledge of all possible biological consequences of space radiation, particularly in humans, on both a long-term and a short-term basis. In vitro cultured cells have significantly contributed to the tremendous advancement of biomedical research. It is therefore to be expected that simple biological systems such as cultured cells, will contribute to space biomedical sciences. Space represents a novel environment, to which life has not been previously exposed. Both microgravity and space radiation are the two relevant components of such an environment, but biological adaptive mechanisms and efficient countermeasures can significantly minimize microgravity effects. On the other hand, it is felt that space radiation risks may be more relevant and that defensive strategies can only stem from our deeper knowledge of biological effects and of cellular repair mechanisms. Cultured cells may play a key role in such studies. Particularly, thyroid cells may be relevant because of the exquisite sensitivity of the thyroid gland to radiation. In addition, a clone of differentiated, normal thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5 cells) is available in culture, which is well characterized and particularly fit for space research.

  16. Biological Effects of Culture Substrates on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, as human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been commonly cultured in feeder-free conditions, a number of cell culture substrates have been applied or developed. However, the functional roles of these substrates in maintaining hPSC self-renewal remain unclear. Here in this review, we summarize the types of these substrates and their effect on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression has been shown to be crucial in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. These ECM molecules interact with integrin cell-surface receptors and transmit their cellular signaling. We discuss the possible effect of integrin-mediated signaling pathways on maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK, which transmits ECM-integrin signaling to AKT (also known as protein kinase B, has been shown to be critical in maintaining hPSC self-renewal. Also, since naïve pluripotency has been widely recognized as an alternative pluripotent state of hPSCs, we discuss the possible effects of culture substrates and integrin signaling on naïve hPSCs based on the studies of mouse embryonic stem cells. Understanding the role of culture substrates in hPSC self-renewal and differentiation enables us to control hPSC behavior precisely and to establish scalable or microfabricated culture technologies for regenerative medicine and drug development.

  17. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1949-11-16

    This paper discusses procedures for research on biological effects of radiation, using mouse tissue: activation trace analysis including methods and proceedures for handling samples before during and after irradiation; methods and procedures for ion exchange study; method of separation and recovery of copper, iron, zinc, cobalt, pubidium and cesium. Also included are studies of trace elements with radioactive isotopes: the distribution of cobalt 60, zinc 65, and copper 64 in the cytoplasm and nuclei of normal mice and those with tumors. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Biological aspects on the cultures of the entomophthoralean fungus Pandora delphacis grown on broomcorn millets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Mingguang; LIANG Yong

    2003-01-01

    A novel method was developed to use glutinous broomcorn millets (Panicum miliaceum L.) as solid substrate to make cultures of the entomophthoralean fungus Pandora delphacis specifically pathogenic to planthoppers, leafhoppers and aphids. Steamed millets with water content of 45% were inoculated with a liquid culture of P. delphacis at a ratio of 20% (v/w) and then incubated at 25℃ and L:D 12:12. The millets cultured for 3-17 d exhibited high potential for conidialproduction. The 5-d-old millet culture sporulated most abundantly, discharging up to 17.12 (±1.31) × 104 conidia/ millet. The cultures incubated for 7-11 d also had a satisfactory sporulation capability, yielding 13.00-13.90 × 104 conidia/millet. Compared to 2.32 (±0.34) × 104 conidia discharged from each of Myzus persicae adults killed by P. delphacis and a ≤60-h duration of sporulation, eachof the millets cultured for 5-11 d produced 5.6-7.4 times more conidia with an over doubled duration for conidial discharge (144 h). Among 106 M. persicae adults exposed to the shower of conidia discharged from the cultured millets, a total mortality of 69.8% caused by P. delphacis infection was observed within 7 d after exposure, but no death was attributed to the fungal infection in the aphids unexposed. The results indicate that the millet cultures of P. delphacis are biologically similar to aphid cadavers killed by the same fungus. Due to the superiority of the cultured millets to the cadavers in sporulation potential and duration, the method for making cultures of P. delphacis on the broomcorn millets is highly recommended for use in study of entomophthoralean fungi for microbial control. This is the first report on the success of the solid culture of Pandora species on cereals.

  19. Biology and mathematics: a fruitful merger of two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemmen, J Leo

    2007-07-01

    The great promise of biological science is not its 'mathematization' per se, but the creative interaction between experimental biology and what one, in analogy to physics, may simply call theoretical biology. The key to, and also the great challenge in, fulfilling this promise is to find the correct fundamental notions to mathematically describe biological reality.

  20. Cu(Nor)2·5H2O, a complex of Cu(II) with Norfloxacin: theoretic approach and biological studies. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, A L; León, I E; Franca, C A; Henao, I; Tobón, G; Etcheverry, S B

    2013-04-01

    Norfloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic used in the treatment of bacterial infections. In this article, we studied the potential antitumoral action of a complex of Norfloxacin with Cu(II), Cu(Nor)(2)·5H(2)O on osteosarcoma cells (UMR106) and calvaria-derived cells (MC3T3-E1), evaluating its cytotoxicity and genitoxicity. We have also elucidated the more stable conformation of this complex under physiologic conditions by Molecular Dynamic simulations based on the model of the canonical ensemble and PM6 force field. When solvent effect was taken into account, the complex conformation with both carbonyl groups in opposite sides displayed lower energy. Cu(Nor)(2)·5H(2)O caused an inhibitory effect on the proliferation on both cell lines from 300 μM (P < 0.01). Nevertheless, the decline on cell proliferation of UMR106 cells was more pronounced (45 % vs basal) than in MC3T3-E1 cells (20 % vs basal) at 300 μM (P < 0.01). Cu(Nor)(2)·5H(2)O altered lysosomal metabolism (Neutral Red assay) in a dose-dependent manner from 300 μM (P < 0.001). Morphological studies showed important transformations that correlated with a decrease in the number of cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, Cu(Nor)(2)·5H(2)O caused statistically significant genotoxic effects on both osteoblast cell lines in a lower range of concentrations (Micronucleus assay) (P < 0.05 at 10 μM, P < 0.001 from 25 to 50 μM). UMR106 cells displayed a dose-related genotoxic effect between 5 and 25 μM while the MC3T3-E1 cells showed a narrower concentration dependent range. Altogether, these results suggest that Cu(Nor)(2)·5H(2)O is a good candidate to be further evaluated for alternative therapeutics in cancer treatment.

  1. Biological characterization of cultured dermal papilla cells and hair follicle regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Zhong-fa; CAI Sui-qing; WU Jin-jin; ZHENG Min

    2006-01-01

    Background Dermal papilla cells (DPC) are a group of mesenchyme-derived cells at the base of the hair follicle, where they regulate and control hair follicle growth through the expression and secretion of cytokines. Nevertheless, the role of DPC derived chemokines and other cytokines in the hair follicle biology remain speculative. In this study, we investigated the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and stem cell factor (SCF) in different passages of cultured DPC and their effects on the biological behaviour of DPC.Methods The expression of bFGF, ET-1 and SCF in different passages of cultured DPC and their possible effects on the biological behavior of DPC are investigated using in situ hybridization and immunochemistry. In addition, we performed transplantation of hair follicle cells into nude mice. The cultured DPC, dermal sheath cells and fibroblast of human scalp, respectively, were mixed with cells of the hair follicle epithelium in different ratios, and then were cultured in hair follicle organotypic cultures or implanted into the subcutis of nude mice.Results The expression of ET-1 and SCF in early passages of cultured DPC became stronger, but turned weaker and even negative in late passages (>6 passages). Hair follicle-like structures were formed after DPC combined with the cells of hair follicle epithelium cells in hair follicle organotypic cultures. When hair follicle organotypic cultures were implanted into the subcutis of nude mice, the relative intact hair follicles were formed. After the transplantation of hair follicle cells into the nude mice, the hair follicle-like structure was formed in the group that contained DPC mixed with hair follicle epithelium cells. However, no hair follicles were formed in the other two groups. It was found that the higher the expression of ET-1 and SCF in DPC, the stronger the ability of DPC to induce hair follicle regeneration.Conclusions The cultured DPC can induce hair follicle

  2. Cultural Language Study: Grade 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Betty L.; Tappenden, Jacqueline W.

    This course guide, the first in a two-year sequence, is designed to give students an overview of Greek and Roman culture and language from the era of the early Aegean civilizations in Greece and Asia Minor to the Augustan Age in Rome. Six units of study are concerned with the growth and development of Greece and with the metamorphosis of Rome from…

  3. Anthropological Studies of Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Žikić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the questions raised at the symposium "Our World, Other Worlds. Anthropology, Science Fiction and Cultural Identity", held in Belgrade in December 2009, is how anthropology is to study contemporary art forms: how research issues are to be defined and approached; how research is to be organized in a specific semantic area, which cannot always and with absolute certainty be said not to be an anthropological construction; whether the subject of research can be said to have the shared nature of cultural communication; whether the anthropologist is to interpret the author/artist’s intention, or that which is produced as a result of that intention, etc. The aim of this paper is to suggest some answers to these questions, from the point of view of a researcher focused on cultural communication.

  4. Market study: Biological isolation garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The biological isolation garment was originally designed for Apollo astronauts to wear upon their return to earth from the moon to avoid the possibility of their contaminating the environment. The concept has been adapted for medical use to protect certain patients from environmental contamination and the risk of infection. The nature and size of the anticipated market are examined with certain findings and conclusions relative to clinical acceptability and potential commercial viability of the biological isolation garment.

  5. Biological performance of Asian catfish (Clarias batrachus (Teleostei, Clariidae cultured in recirculating aquaculture system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Fadhil

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to assess the biological performance of Asian catfish in RAS by using4 tanks (3 culture tanks and 1 sedimentation tank measuring 2 m x 1 m x 0.60 m with a volume of 900liters and bio-filter as water purification unit. The numbers of catfish cultured in each tank were as manyas 300 fish i each tank, with a size of 5-8 cm (Tank 1, 8-12 cm (Tank 2 and 12-15 cm (Tank 3,respectively. This study was conducted for 30 days (August-September 2010 by considering the waterquality during experiment, indicates that the RAS are able to provide proper conditions for growth andsurvival of catfish with a survival rate more than 92% on all tank experiments with specific growth ratefrom 0.64 to 0.89% per day and feed conversion rate of about 0.18-0.27. The existence of the impuritiesfrom the fish waste directly influences water quality, but the decline of water quality still at a decent levelfor the culture of catfish. The ANOVA test to the biological performance and water quality showed thatthe difference in the size of fish in each tank has no significant influence between each other.

  6. Introducing Mammalian Cell Culture and Cell Viability Techniques in the Undergraduate Biology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowey-Dellinger, Kristen; Dixon, Luke; Ackerman, Kristin; Vigueira, Cynthia; Suh, Yewseok K; Lyda, Todd; Sapp, Kelli; Grider, Michael; Crater, Dinene; Russell, Travis; Elias, Michael; Coffield, V McNeil; Segarra, Verónica A

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students learn about mammalian cell culture applications in introductory biology courses. However, laboratory modules are rarely designed to provide hands-on experience with mammalian cells or teach cell culture techniques, such as trypsinization and cell counting. Students are more likely to learn about cell culture using bacteria or yeast, as they are typically easier to grow, culture, and manipulate given the equipment, tools, and environment of most undergraduate biology laboratories. In contrast, the utilization of mammalian cells requires a dedicated biological safety cabinet and rigorous antiseptic techniques. For this reason, we have devised a laboratory module and method herein that familiarizes students with common cell culture procedures, without the use of a sterile hood or large cell culture facility. Students design and perform a time-efficient inquiry-based cell viability experiment using HeLa cells and tools that are readily available in an undergraduate biology laboratory. Students will become familiar with common techniques such as trypsinizing cells, cell counting with a hemocytometer, performing serial dilutions, and determining cell viability using trypan blue dye. Additionally, students will work with graphing software to analyze their data and think critically about the mechanism of death on a cellular level. Two different adaptations of this inquiry-based lab are presented-one for non-biology majors and one for biology majors. Overall, these laboratories aim to expose students to mammalian cell culture and basic techniques and help them to conceptualize their application in scientific research.

  7. Influence of Culture and Gender on Secondary School Students' Scientific Creativity in Biology Education in Turkana County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruan, Susan A.; Okere, Mark I. O.; Wachanga, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the extent to which biology scientific creativity skills are influenced by the students' culture and gender in Turkana County. A mixed method research design was used. This involved cross sectional survey and ethnographic study. The target population comprised all form three students in sub county schools…

  8. Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ... varied spatially and temporally but were generally within safe ranges for freshwater habitats. ... and depressed zooplankton diversity at WC suggested impacts from the fish ...

  9. Temporal and Spatial Development of Red Deer Harvesting in Europe: Biological and Cultural Factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jos M. Milner; Christophe Bonenfant; Atle Mysterud; Jean-Michel Gaillard; Sándor Csányi; Nils Chr. Stenseth

    2006-01-01

    1. Deer numbers have increased dramatically throughout Europe and North America over the last century, but empirical analyses of variation in harvesting and the influence of biological and cultural factors are lacking. 2...

  10. Jasmonic and salicylic acids enhanced phytochemical production and biological activities in cell suspension cultures of spine gourd (Momordica dioica Roxb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Thiruvengadam, Muthu

    2017-03-01

    In vitro cell suspension culture was established for the production of commercially valuable phytochemicals in Momordica dioica. The influence of elicitors in jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) increased their effect on phytochemical production and biomass accumulation in M. dioica. The results indicate that compared with non-elicited cultures, JA- and SA-elicited cell suspension cultures had significantly enhanced phenolic, flavonoid, and carotenoid production, as well as antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiproliferative activities. Furthermore, elicited cultures produced 22 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols, hydroxycinnamic acids, and hydroxybenzoic acids. Greater biomass production, phytochemical accumulation, and biological activity occurred in JA- than in SA-elicited cell cultures. This study is the first to successfully establish M. dioica cell suspension cultures for the production of phenolic compounds and carotenoids, as well as for biomass accumulation.

  11. Biological characteristics of marine bacterium S - 9801 strain and its culture conditions of pigment production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田黎; 何培青; 武洪庆; 温占波; 刘晨临; 李光友

    2002-01-01

    Strain of Flavobacterium sp. (S- 9801), was screened from 207 strains of marine bacteria isolated from the Bohai Sea continental shelf and the Zhujiang Estuary, for its red pigment production. The biological characteristics of strain S- 9801 and culture conditions of pigment production have been checked out in this study. The color of the bacterial colony on 2216E medium was from coccineus to rose bengal. Optimum culture conditions were sodium chloride concentration(g/dm3), 10~30; pH,3~8; temperature, 25~28℃; tryptone and yeast extract as nitrogen sources and gluccse as carbon source. Under optimum conditions, pigment accumulation started after 12 h, reaching a maximum rate of synthesis at 36 h.

  12. [Culture-filtrate producing condition and biological activity of Fusarium solani].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenjiao; Li, Jinhua; Chai, Zhaoxiang

    2009-10-01

    To study the culture-filtrate producing condition of Fusarium Solani isolated from Astragalus root and explore the mechanism Astragalus root rot disease caused by, in order to find theoretical support for screening resistant germ plasma via mycotoxin. The method of germinating seeds in petri dish with filter paper and inhibition method for embryo growth were used to study the biological activity and the specialty of cultural filtrate of 10 F. solani isolates. The toxin produced by F. solani had strong inhibition effect in the different nutrient media, at different temperatures and under different light conditions. With extension of culturing time, embryo inhibition rate went up gradually with the strongest inhibition at the 12th day and the inhibition ratio between 92.0% -52.0%. The toxin produced at 5 degrees C to 35 degrees C inhibited embryo germination of Astragalus differently with the strongest at 25 degrees C, and next to it at 20,30 degrees C. The impact of light on bioactive substances of the toxin was not statistically distinctive, but the 24-hour darkness was benefit to toxin production. PSC had a stronger inhibition rate than the other nutrient media, next to it was PDB. After autoclaving, the toxin still kept toxic to embryo of Astragalus, which indicated that the toxin was tolerant to high temperatures. The toxin produced by F. solani at different growing condition had strong biological activity, was tolerant to high temperature. The best condition for F. solani to produce toxin was that it was cultured in PSC liquid medium, in dark, at 25 degrees C for 12 d. The toxin produced by isolate HQM40 was non-host specific toxin.

  13. Studying Legal Cultures and Encounters?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the cultural and other turns in relation to legal culture and situates Western legal culture in context. It deals with concepts and their relations to trends and fashions and introduces methodological reflections such as use of interdisciplinary methods, personal experience...... and looks at the overlapping roles of authors as activists, teachers, communicators etc....

  14. Learning bias, cultural evolution of language, and the biological evolution of the language faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenny

    2011-04-01

    The biases of individual language learners act to determine the learnability and cultural stability of languages: learners come to the language learning task with biases which make certain linguistic systems easier to acquire than others. These biases are repeatedly applied during the process of language transmission, and consequently should effect the types of languages we see in human populations. Understanding the cultural evolutionary consequences of particular learning biases is therefore central to understanding the link between language learning in individuals and language universals, common structural properties shared by all the world’s languages. This paper reviews a range of models and experimental studies which show that weak biases in individual learners can have strong effects on the structure of socially learned systems such as language, suggesting that strong universal tendencies in language structure do not require us to postulate strong underlying biases or constraints on language learning. Furthermore, understanding the relationship between learner biases and language design has implications for theories of the evolution of those learning biases: models of gene-culture coevolution suggest that, in situations where a cultural dynamic mediates between properties of individual learners and properties of language in this way, biological evolution is unlikely to lead to the emergence of strong constraints on learning.

  15. We Need to Talk about Cultural Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin O'Connor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of Graeme Turner, What’s Become of Cultural Studies (Sage, London, 2012 and Lawrence Grossberg, Cultural Studies in the Future Tense (Duke University Press, Durham, 2010.

  16. Multiweek Cell Culture Project for Use in Upper-Level Biology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Rebecca E.; Gardner, Grant E.; Parks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF,…

  17. Multiweek Cell Culture Project for Use in Upper-Level Biology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Rebecca E.; Gardner, Grant E.; Parks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF,…

  18. Sex Roles: Their Relationship to Cultural and Biological Determinants. [Draft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This paper examines relevant research in comparative sociology, social anthropology with primitive societies, the behavior of primates, the hormonal control of social behavior, and contemporary social psychology. The reciprocal influence of social and biological factors on human societies is discussed. Moreover, the effect of attitudes on social…

  19. The distribution of cultural and biological diversity in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Joslin L; Manne, Lisa; Brooks, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Anthropologists, biologists and linguists have all noted an apparent coincidence in species diversity and human cultural or linguistic diversity. We present, to our knowledge, one of the first quantitative descriptions of this coincidence and show that, for 2 degrees x 2 degrees grid cells across...

  20. MILK KEFIR: COMPOSITION, MICROBIAL CULTURES, BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES AND RELATED PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosa Prado

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance.

  1. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Maria R; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir's exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir's microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance.

  2. Mammalian synthetic biology for studying the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Melina; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2017-01-02

    Synthetic biology is advancing the design of genetic devices that enable the study of cellular and molecular biology in mammalian cells. These genetic devices use diverse regulatory mechanisms to both examine cellular processes and achieve precise and dynamic control of cellular phenotype. Synthetic biology tools provide novel functionality to complement the examination of natural cell systems, including engineered molecules with specific activities and model systems that mimic complex regulatory processes. Continued development of quantitative standards and computational tools will expand capacities to probe cellular mechanisms with genetic devices to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the cell. In this study, we review synthetic biology tools that are being applied to effectively investigate diverse cellular processes, regulatory networks, and multicellular interactions. We also discuss current challenges and future developments in the field that may transform the types of investigation possible in cell biology. © 2017 Mathur et al.

  3. Cell Culture Derived AgMNPV Bioinsecticide: Biological Constraints and Bioprocess Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodas, Valeria M; Marques, Fabiano H; Honda, Marcelo T; Soares, Daniela M; Jorge, Soraia A C; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Medugno, Claudia; Castro, Maria E B; Ribeiro, Bergmann M; Souza, Marlinda L; Tonso, Aldo; Pereira, Carlos A

    2005-06-01

    performance of PIBs/cell. Correlations between MOI and CCI indicate that a MOI 0.1 to 1.4 and a CCI of 10(6) to 2x10(6) cells/ml led to the best PIBs production performances. The virulence of PIBs produced in cultures infected at low or high MOI showed comparable DL(50). Culture and infection in scaling-up conditions, performed in a bioreactor, were shown to provide the cells with a better environment and be capable of potentially improving the shaker-Schott findings. For an accurate qualitative control of PIB virulence, hemolymph from AgMNPV infected Anticarsia gemmatalis was used as starting material for passages in Sf9 cells. These led to a loss of virulence among the PIBs with an increase in the DL(50). The loss of virulence was accompanied by a loss in budded virus titer, a decreased number of PIBs produced and an altered DNA restriction pattern, suggesting the generation of defective interference particles (DIPs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that after cell passages, PIBs lacking virions were progressively synthesized. The study described here point out the biological constraints and bioprocess issues for the preparation of AgMNPV PIBs for biological control.

  4. Chemical biology approaches for studying posttranslational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aerin; Cho, Kyukwang; Park, Hee-Sung

    2017-09-13

    Posttranslational modification (PTM) is a key mechanism for regulating diverse protein functions, and thus critically affects many essential biological processes. Critical for systematic study of the effects of PTMs is the ability to obtain recombinant proteins with defined and homogenous modifications. To this end, various synthetic and chemical biology approaches, including genetic code expansion and protein chemical modification methods, have been developed. These methods have proven effective for generating site-specific authentic modifications or structural mimics, and have demonstrated their value for in vitro and in vivo functional studies of diverse PTMs. This review will discuss recent advances in chemical biology strategies and their application to various PTM studies.

  5. The Biological Safety of Condom Material Can Be Determined Using an In Vitro Cell Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Motsoane

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Latex products have long been recognized as a cause of latex protein allergy. The increased usage of latex gloves, with the consequent increased occurrence of latex allergies appears to have escalated with increasing awareness of the transmission of HIV–AIDS and other infections. The use of condoms as a means to prevent the transmission of STD's (sexually transmitted diseases and HIV–AIDS has been widely promoted. Although extensive testing is done to evaluate the physical quality of condoms, no information is available regarding the biological safety of condoms. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of short‐term exposure to physiological levels of condom surface material on cell viability (MTT assay and cell growth (crystal violet assay. A direct contact cell culture testing method (FDA test method F813‐83 used to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of medical materials and devices was used. The modified test method was found to be a sensitive test system for the evaluation of the biological safety of condoms. This study reveals the importance of evaluating the biological safety of all condoms that are commercially available, because of the potential health risk that may be associated with prolonged use of certain types of condoms.

  6. Biological Control of Aphid Using Fungal Culture and Culture Filtrates of Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Jun; Jeong, Gayoung; Han, Ji Hee; Lee, Sangyeob

    2013-12-01

    Aphids are one of the most destructive pests in crop production such as pepper, cucumber, and eggplants. The importance of entomopathogenic fungi as alternative pest control agents is increasing. Conidia of entomopathogenic fungi are influenced by environmental conditions, such as temperature and relative humidity, and cause slow and fluctuating mortality. These factors have prevented wider application and use of biocontrol agents. For investigation of means of mitigation of such problems, we conducted bioassays with 47 fungal culture filtrates in order to evaluate the potential of secondary metabolites produced by entomopathogenic fungi for use in aphid control. Among 47 culture filtrates cultured potato dextrose broth, filtrate of Beauveria bassiana Bb08 showed the highest mortality (78%) against green peach aphid three days after treatments. Filtrate of Bb08 cultured in Adamek's medium showed higher toxicity as 100% to third instar nymphs of the aphid compared with seven other filtrates cultured in different broths amended with colloidal chitin or oil. The culture filtrates and fungal cultures from media amended with colloidal chitin or oil had lower control efficacies than filtrates without these additives in three different media. These results indicate that the fungal culture fluid or culture filtrate of B. bassiana Bb08 cultured in Adamek's medium has potential for development as a mycopesticide for aphid control.

  7. Moving from High Culture to Ordinary Culture-On Raymond Wil-liams’Culture Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆育红

    2015-01-01

    Culture study has become a new trend in the academic fields, while how to define the scope and object of the cultural study, different people have different opinions. Ranging from Matthew Arnold’s Culture and Anarchy to Raymond Williams’The Long Revolution, scholars have been constantly exploring the core of cultural study of different periods. Raymond Williams had committed himself to the field of the study, and his study also has pushed ahead the people’s understanding of the theory. His con⁃tribution to the study has been analyzed here and that has brought a great influence to the study of the field.

  8. Study of Politeness in Cross Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂仁娜; 姜艳

    2012-01-01

      Politeness is a universal linguistic phenomenon but also relative by nature and subject to culture. The politeness in pragmatic study and its cultural specificity in cross cultural communication are explained. Some tactics in cross communication are also suggested.

  9. Studying cell biology in the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Angel; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cell biology have often been driven by studies in diverse organisms and cell types. Although there are technical reasons for why different cell types are used, there are also important physiological reasons. For example, ultrastructural studies of vesicle transport were aided by the use of professional secretory cell types. The use of tissues/primary cells has the advantage not only of using cells that are adapted to the use of certain cell biological machinery, but also of highlighting the physiological roles of this machinery. Here we discuss advantages of the skin as a model system. We discuss both advances in cell biology that used the skin as a driving force and future prospects for use of the skin to understand basic cell biology. A unique combination of characteristics and tools makes the skin a useful in vivo model system for many cell biologists. PMID:26564861

  10. preliminary study of American legal culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周杨

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is a preliminary study of American legal culture. Nowadays more and more scholars see the importance of legal culture and do studies on it. The author selects a number of American legal TV plays and movies; analyzes their topics, main characters, and plots; then finds out why United States adopt the legal system; what kind of legal culture it has; and how the legal culture is reflected in those movies and TV plays. The author hopes this thesis can work not only as an insight into the American legal culture, but also a source of reference for china to improve its legal system.

  11. Immunization to regulate fertility: biological and cultural frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrater, A F

    1995-09-01

    Deliberate immunization to control fertility differs from that to control disease. Those differences can be discussed within various frameworks, e.g., intent, recipient population, biological bases, and immunological targets. Others include differing perspectives of developers, providers and users, and rights of the state to impose programs of control. Almost all of the differences are grounded in the social, economic, and gendered aspects of societies. The intent of providing a fertility-regulating vaccine is to prevent pregnancy. In theory, men as well as women could receive such vaccines; in reality, most are designed for women. Traditional vaccines are intended to prevent disease and are generally given to susceptible individuals whether male or female, child or adult. The biological bases of contraceptive vaccines are molecules specific to reproduction. The immune response generated by most anti-fertility vaccines is directed toward 'self', one's own cells and molecules. In contrast, the bases of traditional vaccines are materials derived from non-self, disease-causing microorganisms; the immunological targets are those microorganisms or their toxic products. From a developer perspective vaccines that regulate fertility differ little from those that control disease; both prevent a particular condition. Developers cite these advantages to contraceptive vaccines: non-invasive, no serious side-effects, easy to use, reduced patient failure, and long-lasting but naturally reversible. Because anti-fertility vaccines have been tested only in small-scale clinical trials, information on user reactions and experiences is limited. Not surprisingly, the perspectives of women's health advocates and of potential users (mostly women) often differ markedly from those of developers. Women cite as disadvantages the cryptic nature of immunity which leaves one without an obvious signal for the beginning of protection (against pregnancy) and its decline, and the inability to 'turn

  12. Transmission of biology and culture among post-contact Native Americans on the western Great Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycett, Stephen J; von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen

    2016-08-12

    The transmission of genes and culture between human populations has major implications for understanding potential correlations between history, biological, and cultural variation. Understanding such dynamics in 19th century, post-contact Native Americans on the western Great Plains is especially challenging given passage of time, complexity of known dynamics, and difficulties of determining genetic patterns in historical populations for whom, even today, genetic data for their descendants are rare. Here, biometric data collected under the direction of Franz Boas from communities penecontemporaneous with the classic bison-hunting societies, were used as a proxy for genetic variation and analyzed together with cultural data. We show that both gene flow and "culture flow" among populations on the High Plains were mediated by geography, fitting a model of isolation-by-distance. Moreover, demographic and cultural exchange among these communities largely overrode the visible signal of the prior millennia of cultural and genetic histories of these populations.

  13. Photonic engineering for biological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei

    My dissertation focuses on designing and developing prototypes of optical tools in the laboratory that can facilitate practical medical therapies. More specifically, this dissertation examines two novel biophotonic techniques: (1) a frequency multiplexed confocal microscope with the potential to provide rational therapy of congestive heart failure (CHF), and (2) the "optical comb" with the potential to improve results of retina reattachment surgery and accelerate post surgical recovery. Next, I will discuss the background, design and initial experimental results of each study individually. Part I: The Frequency Multiplexed Confocal Microscope. To overcome the limitations of existing confocal microscope technology, this dissertation proposes a non-scanning, real-time, high resolution technique (a multi-point frequency multiplexed confocal microscope) to measure 3-D intracellular calcium ion concentration in a living cardiac myocyte. This method can be also applied to measure the intracellular sodium ion concentration, or other ions in which high quantum-yield fluorescent probes are available. The novelty of the proposed research lies in the introduction of carrier frequency multiplexing techniques which can differentiate fluorescence emitted at different spatial locations in cardiac myocyte by their modulated frequency. It therefore opens the possibility to visualize the transient dynamics of intracellular dynamics at multiple locations in cells simultaneously, which will shine a new light on our understanding of CHF. The procedure for frequency multiplexing proposed is described below. Multiple incident laser beams are focused onto different locations in an isolated rat cardiac myocyte with each beam modulated at a different carrier frequency. The fluorescence emission at each location therefore bears the same modulated frequency as the stimulation laser beam. Each fluorescence signal is sent to the photo multiplier tube (PMT) after being spatially filtered by a

  14. Biology, Culture, and the Origins of Pet-Keeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold A. Herzog

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Attachments between non-human animals of different species are surprisingly common in situations involving human agency (e.g., homes, zoos, and wildlife parks. However, cross-species animal friendships analogous to pet-keeping by humans are at least rare and possibly non-existent in nature. Why has pet-keeping evolved only in Homo sapiens? I review theories that explain pet-keeping either as an adaptation or an evolutionary by-product. I suggest that these explanations cannot account for the wide variation in the distribution and forms of pet-keeping across human societies and over historical time. Using fluctuations in the popularity of dog breeds in the United States, I show how shifts in choices of pets follow the rapid changes in preferences that characterize fashion cycles. I argue that while humans possess some innate traits that facilitate attachment to members of other species (e.g., parental urges, attraction to creatures with infantile features, pet-keeping is largely a product of social learning and imitation-based cultural evolution.

  15. Biological performance of Asian catfish (Clarias batrachus) (Teleostei, Clariidae) cultured in recirculating aquaculture system

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmat Fadhil; Johari Endan; Farah S. Taip; Muhammad S. b. Hj. Ja’afar

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to assess the biological performance of Asian catfish in RAS by using4 tanks (3 culture tanks and 1 sedimentation tank) measuring 2 m x 1 m x 0.60 m with a volume of 900liters and bio-filter as water purification unit. The numbers of catfish cultured in each tank were as manyas 300 fish i each tank, with a size of 5-8 cm (Tank 1), 8-12 cm (Tank 2) and 12-15 cm (Tank 3),respectively. This study was conducted for 30 days (August-September 2010) by considering the waterqu...

  16. Out of Context: Thinking Cultural Studies Diasporically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Farred

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay on cultural studies and the African Diaspora argues for a rethinking of cultural studies in two critical ways: firstly, that cultural studies, from its founding institutional and conceptual moment, cannot but be thought diasporically; and, secondly, that cultural studies be thought ‘out of’, or, against, context—that is, cultural studies is most revealing in its political and literary articulation when it is not read, as many of its advocates claim, contextually. This essay offers a broad critique of cultural studies and the (African diaspora but derives its most cogent and creative argument from its ability to read together the work of two diasporic authors, deracinated South African and Australian writers, J. M. Coetzee and David Malouf.

  17. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Topical report: Bioreactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the proposed research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H{sub 2} from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; evaluation of biological synthesis gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses. The purpose of this report is to present results from bioreactor studies involving H{sub 2} production by water gas shift and H{sub 2}S removal to produce elemental sulfur. Many of the results for H{sub 2} production by Rhodospirillum rubrum have been presented during earlier contracts. Thus, this report concentrates mainly on H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur by R. rubrum.

  18. Comparison of Selective Culturing and Biochemical Techniques for Measuring Biological Activity in Geothermal Process Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryfogle, Peter Albert

    2000-09-01

    For the past three years, scientists at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have been conducting studies aimed at determining the presence and influence of bacteria found in geothermal plant cooling water systems. In particular, the efforts have been directed at understanding the conditions that lead to the growth and accumulation of biomass within these systems, reducing the operational and thermal efficiency. Initially, the methods selected were based upon the current practices used by the industry and included the collection of water quality parameters, the measurement of soluble carbon, and the use of selective medial for the determination of the number density of various types of organisms. This data has been collected on a seasonal basis at six different facilities located at the Geysers’ in Northern California. While this data is valuable in establishing biological growth trends in the facilities and providing an initial determination of upset or off-normal conditions, more detailed information about the biological activity is needed to determine what is triggering or sustaining the growth in these facilities in order to develop improved monitoring and treatment techniques. In recent years, new biochemical approaches, based upon the analyses of phospholipid fatty acids and DNA recovered from environmental samples, have been developed and commercialized. These techniques, in addition to allowing the determination of the quantity of biomass, also provide information on the community composition and the nutritional status of the organisms. During the past year, samples collected from the condenser effluents of four of the plants from The Geysers’ were analyzed using these methods and compared with the results obtained from selective culturing techniques. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate the cost-benefit of implementing these techniques for tracking microbial activity in the plant study, in place of the selective culturing

  19. Cultural variances in composition of biological and supernatural concepts of death: a content analysis of children's literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Seong; Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Younyoung; Koo, Ja Hyouk

    2014-01-01

    Children's reasoning about the afterlife emerges naturally as a developmental regularity. Although a biological understanding of death increases in accordance with cognitive development, biological and supernatural explanations of death may coexist in a complementary manner, being deeply imbedded in cultural contexts. This study conducted a content analysis of 40 children's death-themed picture books in Western Europe and East Asia. It can be inferred that causality and non-functionality are highly integrated with the naturalistic and supernatural understanding of death in Western Europe, whereas the literature in East Asia seems to rely on naturalistic aspects of death and focuses on causal explanations.

  20. Toxicity Studies on "840 Biologic Pesticide"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    [Objective] "840 Biologic Pesticide" is a very effective biologic pesticide. It consists of Abamectin and celastrus angulatus. Toxicity study was aimed to provide scientific toxicological basis. [Methods] The acute toxicity test,Ames test,micronucleus test and testicle chromosome aberration test were done. [Results] The acute toxicity of single dose of "840 Biologic Pesticide" showed that acute oral LD50 for female and male rats are 4 300 and 4 280 mg/kg,and for female and male mice are 2 330 and 5 110 mg/kg,respectively. The dermal LD50 was >2 000 mg/kg for female and male rats. The mutagenesis studies indicated that Ames test,micronucleus test and testicle chromosome aberration test were negative. [Conclusion] Tested pesticidc belongs to low toticity grade.

  1. Studying cell biology in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Angel; Lechler, Terry

    2015-11-15

    Advances in cell biology have often been driven by studies in diverse organisms and cell types. Although there are technical reasons for why different cell types are used, there are also important physiological reasons. For example, ultrastructural studies of vesicle transport were aided by the use of professional secretory cell types. The use of tissues/primary cells has the advantage not only of using cells that are adapted to the use of certain cell biological machinery, but also of highlighting the physiological roles of this machinery. Here we discuss advantages of the skin as a model system. We discuss both advances in cell biology that used the skin as a driving force and future prospects for use of the skin to understand basic cell biology. A unique combination of characteristics and tools makes the skin a useful in vivo model system for many cell biologists. © 2015 Morrow and Lechler. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Cultural Studies of Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    El-Hani, Charbel Niño; Muñoz, Yupanqui J.

    2012-01-01

    Texto completo: acesso restrito. p. 909-943 Video games, as technological and cultural artifacts of considerable influence in the contemporary society, play an important role in the construction of identities, just as other artifacts (e.g., books, newspapers, television) played for a long time. In this paper, we discuss this role by considering video games under two concepts, othering and technopoly, and focus on how these concepts demand that we deepen our understanding of the ethics of v...

  3. Biological preservation of foods with reference to protective cultures, bacteriocins and food-grade enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, W H; Geisen, R; Schillinger, U

    1995-01-01

    A review is presented on the present status of biological preservation of foods. Recent developments are discussed with respect to underlying mechanisms of inhibition by 'protective' cultures, and special reference is made to lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their 'food-grade' safety. The role of bacteriocins, their limitations and potentiating role in biological systems, is also addressed. The use of enzymes (e.g. lysozyme) for food preservation is mainly restricted by economic factors, their inactivation by endogenous food components and their limited activity spectrum. Practical applications of protective cultures refer to particular food commodities that either constitute novel systems with respect to packaging and/or composition, or represent special hygienic risks. It is concluded that biological preservation cannot substitute GMP; it, however, offers an additional (and acceptable) processing parameter for improving the safety and assuring the quality of a given food.

  4. Therapeutic Potential of Biologically Reduced Silver Nanoparticles from Actinomycete Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Sukanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles are applied in nanomedicine from time immemorial and are still used as powerful antibiotic and anti-inflammatory agents. Antibiotics produced by actinomycetes are popular in almost all the therapeutic measures, and this study has proven that these microbes are also helpful in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles with good surface and size characteristics. Silver can be synthesized by various chemical methodologies, and most of them have turned to be toxic. This study has been successful in isolating the microbes from polluted environment, and subjecting them to the reduction of silver nanoparticles, characterizing the nanoparticles by UV spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticles produced were tested for their antimicrobial property, and the zone of inhibition was greater than those produced by their chemically synthesized counterparts. Actinomycetes, helpful in bioremediating heavy metals, are useful for the production of metallic nanoparticles. The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles loaded with antibiotics prove to be better in killing the pathogens and have opened up new areas for developing nanobiotechnological research based on microbial applications.

  5. Experimental Approaches to Studying Biological Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview on biological electron-transfer reactions, summarizing what is known about how distance, spatial organization, medium, and other factors affect electron transfer. Experimental approaches, including studies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions (electrostatic effects and precursor complexes), are considered. (JN)

  6. Development of an Integrated Microfluidic Perfusion Cell Culture System for Real-Time Microscopic Observation of Biological Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chin Oh-Yang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports an integrated microfluidic perfusion cell culture system consisting of a microfluidic cell culture chip, and an indium tin oxide (ITO glass-based microheater chip for micro-scale perfusion cell culture, and its real-time microscopic observation. The system features in maintaining both uniform, and stable chemical or thermal environments, and providing a backflow-free medium pumping, and a precise thermal control functions. In this work, the performance of the medium pumping scheme, and the ITO glass microheater were experimentally evaluated. Results show that the medium delivery mechanism was able to provide pumping rates ranging from 15.4 to 120.0 μL·min−1. In addition, numerical simulation and experimental evaluation were conducted to verify that the ITO glass microheater was capable of providing a spatially uniform thermal environment, and precise temperature control with a mild variation of ±0.3 °C. Furthermore, a perfusion cell culture was successfully demonstrated, showing the cultured cells were kept at high cell viability of 95 ± 2%. In the process, the cultured chondrocytes can be clearly visualized microscopically. As a whole, the proposed cell culture system has paved an alternative route to carry out real-time microscopic observation of biological cells in a simple, user-friendly, and low cost manner.

  7. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  8. Traditional Music in Igbo Culture: A Case Study of Idu Cultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditional Music in Igbo Culture: A Case Study of Idu Cultural Dance of ... It further investigates among other things the history and performance of Idu cultural dance. ... remained the climax of every cultural and social event in Akpo community.

  9. Study on culturing Trichodema mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-ai; WANG Wei-ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichodema mutants strains T5, T0803, T1010, T1003were cultured in different conditions and media, also in the presence of fungicides at 40 mg/kg (CK or procymidone + chlorothalonil, or maneb or phosethyl-Al) . The pH values of media were 5, 6, 7 and 8 and hyphae were grown at temperatures of 15, 20, 25 and 30 ℃. After being cultured for 3, 4, 5, or 6 days, the strains were transferred at a lower temperature to sporulate (20℃) Obtained data were analyzed statistically, with the orthogonal array and ranges (R) differing dependes on the treatments (R = 40.0,42.4, 48.0, 62.8,107.0). The results indicated that the most important factor was the nature of the strain (R =107.0), while the change in temperature and time of cultivation produced the lowest effect (R =40.0). Each factor variance was significant and A3B4C2D1E3 was the optimum combined condition, in which strain T1010 grew more quickly and sporulated most.

  10. Re-imagining South African Cultural Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies as, amongst other things, the study of areas of culture largely ignored ... the canon, its boundaries and functions ~ particularly in a context where the cul- .... the complicated relationship between subjects and their symbolic structures.

  11. Study of Cultural Negative Transfer in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国玲

    2015-01-01

    Different nations in the world have their own cultures, and these cultures are characterized by both universality and particularity. The former provides a foundation and guarantee for intercultural communication, while the latter often leads to neg⁃ative cultural transfer in communication if the speakers are unconscious of cultural differences. This paper makes a general analysis of the negative transfer of surface-structure culture in language forms and that of deep-structure culture in values, thought pat⁃terns, religious beliefs and ethics. It holds that failure in intercultural communication will occur if inadequate attention is paid to cultural differences in the process of language and culture learning.

  12. Biological Characteristics of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultured in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA Xian'en; WANG Lixia; HOU Jianfeng; ZHANG Ruicheng; WANG Haiyong; YANG Chenyuan

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Some biological characteristics of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in vitro were observed. hMSCs were isolated from bone marrow and purified by density gradient centrifugation method, and then cultured in vitro. The proliferation and growth characteristics of hMSCs were observed in primary and passage culture. MSCs of passage 3 were examined for the purify by positive rate of CD29 and CD44 through flow cytometry. Human bone marrow MSCs showed active proliferation capacity in vitro. The purify of MSCs separated by our method was higher than 90 %. It was concluded that hMSCs have been successfully cultured and expanded effectively. It provided a foundation for further investigation and application of MSCs.

  13. Review of Studies on Just Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Kyung Joo; Choi, Young Sung; Jung, Su Jin [Safety Policy Department, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Safety culture represents patterns of behavior and ways of thinking on safety for both individuals and organizations. Besides nuclear industry, many fields such as transport and health care have focused on the value and effectiveness of safety culture. In this paper, the definition and characteristics of just culture, which is one component of safety culture, and related studies reported by other researchers are described. We hope this review will serve to understand the current condition and underlying problems of the just culture of nuclear industry in Korea. This paper describes the definition and basic principle of just culture in nuclear industry based on the review of researches on safety and just culture in various fields. To establish just culture solidly in organization, each individual needs to understand the nature of the just culture first. And it is necessary to create an atmosphere encouraging to report and suggest safety-related issues. Most of all, to draw clear lines of blame and punishment for human error is essential.

  14. Space Biology Initiative. Trade Studies, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The six studies which are the subjects of this report are entitled: Design Modularity and Commonality; Modification of Existing Hardware (COTS) vs. New Hardware Build Cost Analysis; Automation Cost vs. Crew Utilization; Hardware Miniaturization versus Cost; Space Station Freedom/Spacelab Modules Compatibility vs. Cost; and Prototype Utilization in the Development of Space Hardware. The product of these six studies was intended to provide a knowledge base and methodology that enables equipment produced for the Space Biology Initiative program to meet specific design and functional requirements in the most efficient and cost effective form consistent with overall mission integration parameters. Each study promulgates rules of thumb, formulas, and matrices that serves as a handbook for the use and guidance of designers and engineers in design, development, and procurement of Space Biology Initiative (SBI) hardware and software.

  15. Space Biology Initiative. Trade Studies, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The six studies which are addressed are entitled: Design Modularity and Commonality; Modification of Existing Hardware (COTS) vs. New Hardware Build Cost Analysis; Automation Cost vs. Crew Utilization; Hardware Miniaturization versus Cost; Space Station Freedom/Spacelab Modules Compatibility vs. Cost; and Prototype Utilization in the Development of Space Hardware. The product of these six studies was intended to provide a knowledge base and methodology that enables equipment produced for the Space Biology Initiative program to meet specific design and functional requirements in the most efficient and cost effective form consistent with overall mission integration parameters. Each study promulgates rules of thumb, formulas, and matrices that serves has a handbook for the use and guidance of designers and engineers in design, development, and procurement of Space Biology Initiative (SBI) hardware and software.

  16. Biological ancestries, kinship connections, and projected identities in four central Anatolian settlements: insights from culturally contextualized genetic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcumen, Ömer; Gultekin, Timur; Alakoc, Yesim Dogan; Tug, Aysim; Gulec, Erksin; Schurr, Theodore G

    2011-01-01

    Previous population genetics studies in Turkey failed to delineate recent historical and social factors that shaped Anatolian cultural and genetic diversity at the local level. To address this shortcoming, we conducted focused ethnohistorical fieldwork and screened biological samples collected from the Yuksekyer region for mitochondrial, Y chromosome, and autosomal markers and then analyzed the data within an ethnohistorical context. Our results revealed that, at the village level, paternal genetic diversity is structured among settlements, whereas maternal genetic diversity is distributed more homogenously, reflecting the strong patrilineal cultural traditions that transcend larger ethnic and religious structures. Local ancestries and origin myths, rather than ethnic or religious affiliations, delineate the social boundaries and projected identities among the villages. Therefore, we conclude that broad, ethnicity-based sampling is inadequate to capture the genetic signatures of recent social and historical dynamics, which have had a profound influence on contemporary genetic and cultural regional diversity.

  17. Pathogen and biological contamination management in plant tissue culture: phytopathogens, vitro pathogens, and vitro pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassells, Alan C

    2012-01-01

    The ability to establish and grow plant cell, organ, and tissue cultures has been widely exploited for basic and applied research, and for the commercial production of plants (micro-propagation). Regardless of whether the application is for research or commerce, it is essential that the cultures be established in vitro free of biological contamination and be maintained as aseptic cultures during manipulation, growth, and storage. The risks from microbial contamination are spurious experimental results due to the effects of latent contaminants or losses of valuable experimental or commercial cultures. Much of the emphasis in culture contamination management historically focussed on the elimination of phytopathogens and the maintenance of cultures free from laboratory contamination by environmental bacteria, fungi (collectively referred to as "vitro pathogens", i.e. pathogens or environmental micro-organisms which cause culture losses), and micro-arthropods ("vitro pests"). Microbial contamination of plant tissue cultures is due to the high nutrient availability in the almost universally used Murashige and Skoog (Physiol Plant 15:473-497, 1962) basal medium or variants of it. In recent years, it has been shown that many plants, especially perennials, are at least locally endophytically colonized intercellularly by bacteria. The latter, and intracellular pathogenic bacteria and viruses/viroids, may pass latently into culture and be spread horizontally and vertically in cultures. Growth of some potentially cultivable endophytes may be suppressed by the high salt and sugar content of the Murashige and Skoog basal medium and suboptimal temperatures for their growth in plant tissue growth rooms. The management of contamination in tissue culture involves three stages: disease screening (syn. disease indexing) of the stock plants with disease and endophyte elimination where detected; establishment and pathogen and contaminant screening of established initial cultures

  18. An Exchange on Theory and Cultural Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Various Authors

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The following exchange grew out of a series of posts to the Cultural Studies Association of Australasia discussion list.1 As a talking point leading into a regular meeting for early career cultural studies researchers in Brisbane, Melissa Gregg, Jean Burgess and Joshua Green quoted a passage from Simon During’s recent Cultural Studies: A Critical Introduction (Routledge, 2005 in the hope of provoking a wider debate about the current state of Australian cultural studies. Various members of the list were duly provoked, and the ensuing discussion was later picked up in a paper by John Frow and continued in private correspondence and then in invited responses to the developing exchange.

  19. Biología Cultural, psicología social y sinergia organizacional

    OpenAIRE

    Palacio Gómez, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    El presente escrito desarrolla una reflexión sobre los aportes de la biología cultural a la psicología social organizacional, como ciencias comprometidas respectivamente con la comprensión sistémica de la condición humana y con la comprensión del psiquismo humano en relación con el vivir social y con la sinergia organizacional. Para tal efecto, en primer lugar, se expone el significado de la expresión biología cultural, entendida tanto como fenómeno y como ámbito de reflexión.Luego se diferen...

  20. Children and media: a cultural studies approach

    OpenAIRE

    D av i d B u c k i n g h a m

    2012-01-01

    Defying the traditional psychology understanding on what are the effects of the media and also the researches made on the subject, the present article offers an approach to the study of the relationship between children and the media, focusing mainly on television. We retrace the Cultural Studies perspective, although the researches from the Birmingham Centre have not worked over such age group.The work includes the model of the cultural circuit, it refuses to understand meaning as something ...

  1. Biological Studies of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Roger K.; Rasmusson, Ann M.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Shin, Lisa M.; Orr, Scott P.; Gilbertson, Mark W.; Milad, Mohammed R.; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Preface Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the only major mental disorder for which a cause is considered to be known, viz., an event that involves threat to the physical integrity of oneself or others and induces a response of intense fear, helplessness, or horror. Although PTSD is still largely regarded as a psychological phenomenon, over the past three decades the growth of the biological PTSD literature has been explosive, and thousands of references now exist. Ultimately, the impact of an environmental event, such as a psychological trauma, must be understood at organic, cellular, and molecular levels. The present review attempts to present the current state of this understanding, based upon psychophysiological, structural and functional neuroimaging, endocrinological, genetic, and molecular biological studies in humans and in animal models. PMID:23047775

  2. Biological control of cultural heritage pest Coleoptera and Lepidoptera with the help of parasitoid Hymenoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Schöller; Sabine Prozell

    2011-01-01

    Natural enemies are known from many cultural heritage pests, but their potential for biological control has been marginally exploited only. In this publication, examples of practical and commercial application of parasitoids of beetles and moths are compiled as well as laboratory research that contributes to the development of guidelines for parasitoid releases. One the one hand there are parasitoids found to occur simultaneously with the pests in buildings, on the other hand there are parasi...

  3. Macro-evolutionary studies of cultural diversity: a review of empirical studies of cultural transmission and cultural adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Ruth; Jordan, Fiona M

    2011-02-12

    A growing body of theoretical and empirical research has examined cultural transmission and adaptive cultural behaviour at the individual, within-group level. However, relatively few studies have tried to examine proximate transmission or test ultimate adaptive hypotheses about behavioural or cultural diversity at a between-societies macro-level. In both the history of anthropology and in present-day work, a common approach to examining adaptive behaviour at the macro-level has been through correlating various cultural traits with features of ecology. We discuss some difficulties with simple ecological associations, and then review cultural phylogenetic studies that have attempted to go beyond correlations to understand the underlying cultural evolutionary processes. We conclude with an example of a phylogenetically controlled approach to understanding proximate transmission pathways in Austronesian cultural diversity.

  4. Macro-evolutionary studies of cultural diversity: a review of empirical studies of cultural transmission and cultural adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Ruth; Jordan, Fiona M.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of theoretical and empirical research has examined cultural transmission and adaptive cultural behaviour at the individual, within-group level. However, relatively few studies have tried to examine proximate transmission or test ultimate adaptive hypotheses about behavioural or cultural diversity at a between-societies macro-level. In both the history of anthropology and in present-day work, a common approach to examining adaptive behaviour at the macro-level has been through correlating various cultural traits with features of ecology. We discuss some difficulties with simple ecological associations, and then review cultural phylogenetic studies that have attempted to go beyond correlations to understand the underlying cultural evolutionary processes. We conclude with an example of a phylogenetically controlled approach to understanding proximate transmission pathways in Austronesian cultural diversity. PMID:21199844

  5. Microbubble generation by piezotransducer for biological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Alkhazal, M.; Cho, M.; Xiao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Bubbles induced by blast waves or shocks are speculated to be the major cause of damages in biological cells in mild traumatic brain injuries. Microbubble collapse was found to induce noticeable cell detachment from the cell substrate, changes in focal adhesion and biomechanics. To better understand the bubble mechanism, we would like to construct a system, which allows us to clearly differentiate the impact of bubbles from that of shocks. Such a generator needs to be low profile in order to place under a microscope. A piezoelectric transducer system was designed to meet the need. The system uses either a flat or a spherical focusing piezoelectric transducer to produce microbubbles in a cuvette loaded with cell-culture medium. The transducer is placed on the side of the cuvette with its axis lining horizontally. A cover slip is placed on the top of the cuvette. The impact of the waves to the cells is minimized as the cover slip is parallel to the direction of the wave. Only bubbles from the medium reach the cover slip and interact with cells. The effect of bubbles therefore can be separated that of pressure waves. The bubbles collected on a cover slip range in size from 100 μm to 10 μm in radius, but the dominant size is 20-30 μm.

  6. Cultural Transduction and Adaptation Studies: The Concept of Cultural Proximity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrick Cattrysse

    2017-01-01

    ...). [...]it expands the analytical scope. The author bases his claims on the observation that, in spite of cultural imperialist trends, audiences may prefer audiovisual programs from or about their own or a nearby culture...

  7. Cultural Studies and Media Ecology: Meyrowitz's Medium Theory and Carey's Cultural Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flayhan, Donna P.

    2001-01-01

    Examines work of two communication and media studies scholars, Joshua Meyrowitz and James Carey. Suggests their studies represent media ecology with analyses of the dynamic interaction between communication, consciousness, and culture. Highlights how their work embodies a North American cultural studies approach to media studies (moving away from…

  8. Cultural Studies and Media Ecology: Meyrowitz's Medium Theory and Carey's Cultural Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flayhan, Donna P.

    2001-01-01

    Examines work of two communication and media studies scholars, Joshua Meyrowitz and James Carey. Suggests their studies represent media ecology with analyses of the dynamic interaction between communication, consciousness, and culture. Highlights how their work embodies a North American cultural studies approach to media studies (moving away from…

  9. Pragmatics Study of Politeness and Cultural Difference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐岩

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims at study the politeness in the pragmatic framework and reviews the main studies of politeness by western and Chinese scholars.Meanwhile,the writer tries to reveal the cultural difference existing in politeness by comparative study of western and Chinese language.

  10. Survey on Agricultural Biological Resources and Traditional Cultural Knowledge of Hani People in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqin; ZHANG; Hong; LUO; Wenjie; LONG; Yongtao; LEI; Qing; CAI; Mei; LAN; Li; ZHONG

    2015-01-01

    In 2007- 2008,a systematic survey,collection and arrangement was carried out for agricultural biological resources and traditional cultural knowledge of Hani People in 8 counties,15 towns,and 23 village committees of Yunnan Province. A total of 299 samples were obtained about agricultural biological resources related to production and living of Hani People. According to purpose of utilization,samples were divided into grain crops,medicinal plants,vegetables,fruit trees,and oil crops,taking up 48. 2%,21. 7%,18. 4%,7. 7%,and 2. 0% of the samples respectively. The survey indicated that planting industry and breeding industry take up the dominant role in rural social economy of Hani People,so agricultural biological resources are the fundamental means of production maintaining rural social development of Hani People.The current situation of agricultural biological resources of Hani People in Yunnan,reasons for growth and decline were analyzed,and the utilization,protection and development of agricultural biological resources were discussed.

  11. High school biology evolution learning experiences in a rural context: a case of and for cultural border crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.

    2016-12-01

    Although the concept of "rural" is difficult to define, rural science education provides the possibility for learning centered upon a strong connection to the local community. Rural American adolescents tend to be more religious than their urban counterparts and less accepting of evolution than their non-rural peers. Because the status and perception of evolutionary theory may be very different within the students' lifeworlds and the subcultures of the science classroom and science itself, a cultural border crossing metaphor can be applied to evolution teaching and learning. This study examines how a teacher may serve as a cultural border crossing tour guide for students at a rural high school as they explore the concept of biological evolution in their high school biology class. Data collection entailed two formal teacher interviews, field note observations of two biology class periods each day for 16 days during the Evolution unit, individual interviews with 14 students, student evolution acceptance surveys, student evolution content tests, and classroom artifacts. The major findings center upon three themes regarding how this teacher and these students had largely positive evolution learning experiences even as some students continued to reject evolution. First, the teacher strategically positioned himself in two ways: using his unique "local" trusted position in the community and school and taking a position in which he did not personally represent science by instead consistently teaching evolution "according to scientists." Second, his instruction honored local "rural" funds of knowledge with respect to local knowledge of nature and by treating students' religious knowledge as a form of local expertise about one set of answers to questions also addressed by evolution. Third, the teacher served as a border crossing "tour guide" by helping students identify how the culture of science and the culture of their lifeworlds may differ with respect to evolutionary

  12. High school biology evolution learning experiences in a rural context: a case of and for cultural border crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.

    2017-03-01

    Although the concept of "rural" is difficult to define, rural science education provides the possibility for learning centered upon a strong connection to the local community. Rural American adolescents tend to be more religious than their urban counterparts and less accepting of evolution than their non-rural peers. Because the status and perception of evolutionary theory may be very different within the students' lifeworlds and the subcultures of the science classroom and science itself, a cultural border crossing metaphor can be applied to evolution teaching and learning. This study examines how a teacher may serve as a cultural border crossing tour guide for students at a rural high school as they explore the concept of biological evolution in their high school biology class. Data collection entailed two formal teacher interviews, field note observations of two biology class periods each day for 16 days during the Evolution unit, individual interviews with 14 students, student evolution acceptance surveys, student evolution content tests, and classroom artifacts. The major findings center upon three themes regarding how this teacher and these students had largely positive evolution learning experiences even as some students continued to reject evolution. First, the teacher strategically positioned himself in two ways: using his unique "local" trusted position in the community and school and taking a position in which he did not personally represent science by instead consistently teaching evolution "according to scientists." Second, his instruction honored local "rural" funds of knowledge with respect to local knowledge of nature and by treating students' religious knowledge as a form of local expertise about one set of answers to questions also addressed by evolution. Third, the teacher served as a border crossing "tour guide" by helping students identify how the culture of science and the culture of their lifeworlds may differ with respect to evolutionary

  13. Organisms for Teaching: "Artemia salina": An Easily Cultured Invertebrate Ideally Suited for Ecological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Booth, Kirsty; Reiss, Michael

    1988-01-01

    This paper includes a general account of the biology of the brine shrimp, instructions on how the organism may be cultured, the results of some experiments on the ecology and population biology of the species, and some suggestions for further studies. (Author/CW)

  14. Types of cross-cultural studies in cross-cultural psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Lonner, W.J.; Dinnel, D.L.; Hayes, S.A.; Sattler, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    From a methodological perspective cross-cultural studies in psychology differ in three dimensions. First, cross-cultural psychological studies can be exploratory or test specific hypotheses. Second, some cross-cultural studies compare countries or ethnic groups while other cross-cultural studies

  15. History of migration studies in biological anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascie-Taylor, C G Nicholas; Little, Michael A

    2004-01-01

    The earliest studies of human biological factors in migration in which a clear research design was employed date back to the early 20th century in the United States. Maurice Fishberg's study of Jewish migrants, published in 1905, antedated the classic study of Franz Boas initiated in 1908. There have been two main approaches. The first approach examined the impact of migration in relation to changing environment and the importance of environmental plasticity. For example, Fishberg reported that migrants had offspring different in stature from themselves and with differences thought to be due to improvements in the environment, although some selection of genetically determined traits was suggested. Subsequently, a number of research designs have been used, ranging from Boas's simple design of sedente (nonmigrant) adults and children compared with first- and second-generation migrants; Shapiro's extension of this study in Japanese migrants to Hawai'i; Goldstein's four-fold comparison of Mexican sedentes and their offspring in Mexico, and migrants to the USA and their offspring in the USA; and Lasker's extension of Goldstein's Mexican study by including comparison of sedentes with returning emigrants. More sophisticated designs were used by Harrison and Baker in examining altitude effects and changes in subsistence and lifestyle during the 1960s through to the 1980s. The second approach has focused on the effect of migration on gene flow. For example, the clinal variation of ABO blood groups in Europe and Australia is generally purported to result from past migration, although increasing random migration for blood groups is likely to eliminate clinal variation. Migration has usually been considered from a spatial (geographic) perspective, but more recent studies have also investigated the impact of social or occupational movement (social mobility) alone, or in combination with geographic migration, and tested whether such movements are selective or random for a number

  16. Culture and IS: A criticism of predefined cultural archetypes studies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Although there are many different models of national culture, most IS research has tended to rely almost solely on Hofstede’s cultural model (Keil et al., 2000; Straub, 1994; Tan et al., 1995; Watson et al., 1994; Myers and Tan, 2002; Kirkman et al. 2006).). This is perhaps not surprising, given that Hofstede’s typology of culture has been one of the most popular in many different fields of management (Myers and Tan, 2002). Although, this paper focuses on Hofstede’s model of national culture,...

  17. Biological adaptations for functional features of language in the face of cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Morten H; Reali, Florencia; Chater, Nick

    2011-04-01

    Although there may be no true language universals, it is nonetheless possible to discern several family resemblance patterns across the languages of the world. Recent work on the cultural evolution of language indicates the source of these patterns is unlikely to be an innate universal grammar evolved through biological adaptations for arbitrary linguistic features. Instead, it has been suggested that the patterns of resemblance emerge because language has been shaped by the brain, with individual languages representing different but partially overlapping solutions to the same set of nonlinguistic constraints. Here, we use computational simulations to investigate whether biological adaptation for functional features of language, deriving from cognitive and communicative constraints, may nonetheless be possible alongside rapid cultural evolution. Specifically, we focus on the Baldwin effect as an evolutionary mechanism by which previously learned linguistic features might become innate through natural selection across many generations of language users. The results indicate that cultural evolution of language does not necessarily prevent functional features of language from becoming genetically fixed, thus potentially providing a particularly informative source of constraints on cross-linguistic resemblance patterns.

  18. Civilisation/Cultural Studies in Grenoble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revauger, Jean-Paul

    1993-01-01

    The professional core of civilization/cultural studies (CCS) lies in the study of the relationship between context and discourse. Here, the necessity for the perspective of the outsider, combined with linguistic competence, creates the possibility of a distinctive disciplinary basis for CCS. (Author)

  19. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of a complete transverse electromagnetic cell loaded with liquid biological media in culture dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, M; Hagness, S C; Taflove, A

    1998-08-01

    Transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cells can be used for exposing biological culture specimens to electromagnetic fields and observing possible anomalous effects. The uniformity of field exposure is critical to quantifying the biological response versus the electromagnetic dose. Standing waves and other electromagnetic field nonuniformities can cause nonuniform exposure. This paper reports the results of high-resolution three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations of a complete TEM cell designed for operation at 837 MHz. Several different cases were studied in which the number of culture dishes, the depth of the culture liquid, and the orientation of the culture dishes were varied. Further, the effect of the culture-dish glass bottom thickness and the meniscus of the liquid medium were examined. The FDTD results show that there is a significant nonuniform field and specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution within the culture medium for each case examined. Hence, biological dose-response experiments using the TEM cells should account for the possibility of strong localized SAR peaking in the culture media to provide useful data in setting exposure standards for wireless communications.

  20. Cultural Studies and Sociology of Culture in Germany: Relations and Interrelations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Göttlich

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, attitudes towards cultural studies in Germany have developed within contexts of contact and conflict with a variety of disciplines, e.g. ethnology, anthropology, sociology, as well as the sociology of culture, liter-ary studies and Kulturwissenschaft(en. On the one hand there is a strong academ-ic interest in how cultural studies perceives and analyzes media culture, popular culture and everyday life. On the other hand boundaries with humanities and so-cial science remain, which leads to criticism and conflicts with cultural studies and its achievements.I will discuss some of the problems concerning the perception and reception of cultural studies among representatives of Kulturwissenschaft(en and sociology of culture. Furthermore I will draw on the role of cultural studies in thematizing cul-tural change and conflicts, and its ability to do so in a way that shows the im-portance of culture and politics.

  1. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  2. Study of Perceptions on Cultural Events’ Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina Letiţia Negruşa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultural events and festivals can have a significant and important influence on the development of local communities. Their utilization of the endogenous resources of an area means that these events, most often, have a positive impact on the local economy. Quite consequentially, they may also extend the socio-cultural opportunities of local citizens. However, their utilization of time and space does raise concerns regarding environmental impact. Therefore, it is imperative that stakeholders study their net impact on a region. This present paper examines the economic, socio-cultural, and environmental impact of the Transilvania International Film Festival (TIFF. With a history of 15 editions, the festival gathers, year by year, an increasing number of people in Cluj-Napoca. The growth of the event has had unmistakable and important effects on the city. The purpose of the paper is to analyze resident participants’ perceptions on economic, socio-cultural, and environmental effects. To reach this goal, an exploratory and descriptive research was conducted. Both primary and secondary data were used in the analysis, the questionnaire being the main tool used for collecting data about participants’ perceptions. The results emphasize the positive effects at the socio-cultural level. The festival provides multiple possibilities to spend free time in a pleasant way, it sustains the development of cultural life, and it improves the educational and the cultural level of community. Moreover, the festival does not influence, in a negative manner, the moral principles of the society and it does not generate an increase in crime rate. From the economic point of view, the festival has the capacity to attract investments and additional revenues for the local government, it sustains the development of the city infrastructure, and it creates opportunities for residents to develop new economic activities. Lastly, from the environmental point of view, the

  3. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  4. Integrating biological treatment of crop residue into a hydroponic sweetpotato culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, A A; David, P P; Bonsi, C K; Hill, W A; Mortley, D G; Loretan, P A

    1997-01-01

    Residual biomass from hydroponic culture of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was degraded using natural bacterial soil isolates. Sweetpotato was grown for 120 days in hydroponic culture with a nutrient solution comprised of a ratio of 80% modified half Hoagland solution to 20% filtered effluent from an aerobic starch hydrolysis bioreactor. The phytotoxicity of the effluent was assayed with Waldmann's Green' lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and the ratio selected after a 60-day bioassay using sweetpotato plants propagated vegetatively from cuttings. Controlled environment chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of filtrate from biological treatment of crop residue on growth and storage root production with plants grown in a modified half Hoagland solution. Incorporation of bioreactor effluent, reduced storage root yield of 'Georgia Jet' sweetpotato but the decrease was not statistically significant when compared with yield for plants cultured in a modified half Hoagland solution without filtrate. However, yield of 'TU-82-155' sweetpotato was significantly reduced when grown in a modified half Hoagland solution into which filtered effluent had been incorporated. Total biomass was significantly reduced for both sweetpotato cultivars when grown in bioreactor effluent. The leaf area and dry matter accumulation were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced for both cultivars when grown in solution culture containing 20% filtered effluent.

  5. Integrating biological treatment of crop residue into a hydroponic sweetpotato culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, A. A.; David, P. P.; Bonsi, C. K.; Hill, W. A.; Mortley, D. G.; Loretan, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    Residual biomass from hydroponic culture of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was degraded using natural bacterial soil isolates. Sweetpotato was grown for 120 days in hydroponic culture with a nutrient solution comprised of a ratio of 80% modified half Hoagland solution to 20% filtered effluent from an aerobic starch hydrolysis bioreactor. The phytotoxicity of the effluent was assayed with `Waldmann's Green' lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and the ratio selected after a 60-day bioassay using sweetpotato plants propagated vegetatively from cuttings. Controlled environment chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of filtrate from biological treatment of crop residue on growth and storage root production with plants grown in a modified half Hoagland solution. Incorporation of bioreactor effluent, reduced storage root yield of `Georgia Jet' sweetpotato but the decrease was not statistically significant when compared with yield for plants cultured in a modified half Hoagland solution without filtrate. However, yield of `TU-82-155' sweetpotato was significantly reduced when grown in a modified half Hoagland solution into which filtered effluent had been incorporated. Total biomass was significantly reduced for both sweetpotato cultivars when grown in bioreactor effluent. The leaf area and dry matter accumulation were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced for both cultivars when grown in solution culture containing 20% filtered effluent.

  6. Development of secondary school student’s cultural competence during studies of History of Culture

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Development of secondary school student’s cultural competence during studies of History of Culture The purpose of the thesis is to analyze the impact of the subject History of Culture on the development of secondary school students’ cultural competence. In addition the thesis analyzes the implemented methodology of the subject History of Culture and defines research results as suggestions for the improvement of the cultural competence. The thesis consists of three parts, where the...

  7. World Languages and Cultures Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklarz, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to conduct a comprehensive review of the research and best practices of exemplary elementary school World Language and Culture Programs. Specifically, (1) to assess the degree to which various program designs had most closely met the measurable goals of the American Council of Teachers of a Foreign Language, commonly…

  8. Studies in Philippine Languages and Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Sherri, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of Studies in Philippine Languages and Cultures contains the following articles: "Functions of Locatives in Northern Subanen Expository and Hortatory Discourse" (Josephine Sanicas-Daguman); "Functions of Demonstratives in Sama Bangingi' Expository Discourse" (John Blakely); "A Brief Look at Sinama Basic Verbs…

  9. Repetitions: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kumiko

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated how repetition is used in conversation among native speakers of British English, native speakers of Japanese, and Japanese speakers of English. Five interactional functions of repetition (interruption-orientated, solidarity, silence-avoidance, hesitation, and reformulation) were identified, as well as the cultural factors…

  10. Cultural commons and cultural evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Giangiacomo Bravo

    2010-01-01

    Culture evolves following a process that is akin to biological evolution, although with some significant differences. At the same time culture has often a collective good value for human groups. This paper studies culture in an evolutionary perspective, with a focus on the implications of group definition for the coexistence of different cultures. A model of cultural evolution is presented where agents interacts in an artificial environment. The belonging to a specific memetic group is a majo...

  11. Culturing Fern Gametophytes on Solid Mineral Media for Classroom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Glen; Graham, Lane C.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the techniques and results of using this tissue culture activity. Discusses the advantages of using such techniques in teaching alternation of generation life cycles to biology students. (CW)

  12. Study on Biological Characteristics of Livestock Eperythrozoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Haisheng; Xie Minghua; Mu Qionghua

    2015-01-01

    Based on the study of infection and morphological characteristics of 12 kinds of livestock Eperythrozoon,disinfection test by drugs in vitro,disinfection test by ultraviolet light,Eperythrozoon survival test at different times and temperatures,drug sensitivity test and clinical treatment of infected swines were carried out on Eperythrozoon suis and Eperythrozoon wenyonii to further study the biological characteristics. Test results showed that infection level of livestock Eperythrozoon was high,while morbidity was low. Eperythrozoon suis and Eperythrozoon wenyonii could survive for 1 year at 3- 5 ℃,180 d at 16- 26 ℃ and 30 min at- 20 ℃,while which died instantly at 65 ℃. Eperythrozoon was sensitive to general chemical disinfection drugs,while not sensitive to ultraviolet light disinfection. Transmission of Eperythrozoon mainly included contagious transmission and vertical transmission. Results of drug sensitivity test showed that Eperythrozoon was sensitive to Tetracycline and antigen insect drugs. Sizes and shapes of different livestock Eperythrozoon were different. The study provided a scientific basis for the effective prevention and treatment of livestock Eperythrozoonosis.

  13. Multiweek cell culture project for use in upper-level biology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Rebecca E; Gardner, Grant E; Parks, Lisa D

    2012-06-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF, caffeine, epinephrine, heavy metals, and FBS. Students researched primary literature to determine their experimental variables, made their own solutions, and treated their cells over a period of 2 wk. Before this, a sterile technique laboratory was developed to teach students how to work with the cells and minimize contamination. Students designed their experiments, mixed their solutions, seeded their cells, and treated them with their control and experimental media. Students had the choice of manipulating a number of variables, including incubation times, exposure to treatment media, and temperature. At the end of the experiment, students observed the effects of their treatment, harvested and dyed their cells, counted relative cell numbers in control and treatment flasks, and determined the ratio of living to dead cells using a hemocytometer. At the conclusion of the experiment, students presented their findings in a poster presentation. This laboratory can be expanded or adapted to include additional cell lines and treatments. The ability to design and implement their own experiments has been shown to increase student engagement in the biology-related laboratory activities as well as develop the critical thinking skills needed for independent research.

  14. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  15. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  16. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  17. Phytochemical and biological studies of Agave attenuata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Komal; Zubair, Muhammad; Rasool, Nasir; Riaz, Muhammad; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; de Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine various biological activities of a methanol extract of Agave attenuata leaves. GC-MS analysis of the n-hexane fraction from the extract revealed the presence of 31 compounds, with mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (11.37%), 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (6.33%), n-docosane (6.30%) and eicosane (6.02%) as the major components. The leaves contained appreciable levels of total phenolic contents (10.541-39.35 GAE, mg/100 g) and total flavonoid contents (43.35-304.8 CE, mg/100 g). The extract and some of its fractions showed moderate antimicrobial effects. Leaves extract and fractions also exhibited a good antioxidant potential when measured by DPPH radical scavenging activity and inhibition of lipid peroxidation assays. The hemolytic effect of the plant was found to be in a range of 1.01%-2.64%. From the present study it is concluded that this plant could be used as a source of natural antioxidants and functional food nutraceutical applications.

  18. (Emerging Discourses: Architecture and Cultural Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McGaughey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Three recent works, Rosalind Galt’s Pretty, Anne Cheng’s Second Skin, and Daniel Purdy’s On the Ruins of Babel incorporate architectural history and architectural discourse into their analyses in ways that are new to their respective fields ranging from studies of film, gender, and race to intellectual history. Placing these three works in one essay allows for a detailed review of the ways in which each author employs architecture, at the same time as it reveals the benefits and challenges of incorporating architecture into cultural studies. The essay discusses the contributions of each work to their fields and also takes advantage of the different approaches to culture and architecture to explore the ways in which this relationship might continue to inform and generate productive studies.

  19. Biological control of cultural heritage pest Coleoptera and Lepidoptera with the help of parasitoid Hymenoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schöller

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural enemies are known from many cultural heritage pests, but their potential for biological control has been marginally exploited only. In this publication, examples of practical and commercial application of parasitoids of beetles and moths are compiled as well as laboratory research that contributes to the development of guidelines for parasitoid releases. One the one hand there are parasitoids found to occur simultaneously with the pests in buildings, on the other hand there are parasitoids that were never found to be associated with the respective pests but accept them if brought into the cultural heritage environments. An example for the latter is the egg parasitoid Trichogramma evanescens euproctidis, a parasitoid of moth eggs including those of the cloth moth Tineola bisselliella. In semi-field trials it was shown that inundative releases of the egg parasitoids are necessary and that effectiveness is reduced on thick cloth with long strand. Trichogramma release units have to be placed directly on the cloth to be protected. A naturally occuring parasitoid of Anobiid beetles is the pteromalid larval parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus. This parasitoid was applied against the drugstore beetle Stegobium paniceum in historic libraries and against spider beetles (Ptininae in historic buildings. A simulation model for the population-dynamics of L. distinguendus and the golden spider beetle Niptus hololeucus is presented. Finally, monitoring of the Braconid larval parasitoid Spathius exarator used for indirect monitoring of the common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum is described. The future potential of parasitoids to control cultural heritage pests is discussed.

  20. Studies on suspension culture of virginia mallow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kasprzyk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Virginia mallow (Sida hermaphrodita (L. Rusby belongs to the Malvaceae family. It is a very important industrial and energetic crop (Kasprzyk et al. 2013. In our studies, we used plant cell suspension cultures due to the fact that it is a useful tool to investigate biochemical, molecular and physiological aspects of many cellular functions (Dong et al. 2010. Virginia mallow seeds, obtained from Prof. Borkowska (University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland, were used in this investigation to obtain plants which were grown in sterile conditions in the Department of Plant Anatomy and Cytology, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Poland. The seeds were surface sterilized and washed three times in sterile, distilled water. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, young seedlings were used as a source of explants (to callus induction. Two types of explants were used to form callus culture: leaf and petiole. Callus tissues were then aseptically transferred to an Erlenmeyer flask with liquid medium and placed on an orbital shaker moving at 120 rpm. The observations of this suspense culture were conducted under light and confocal LSM microscopes. The authors observed that depending on the type of explants and composition of medium, callus tissue has varied in color and character of growth.

  1. Antithrombogenic investigation and biological behavior of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells on Ti-O film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Junying; WAN; Guojiang; LENG; Yongxiang; YANG; Ping; SUN; Hong; WANG; Jin; HUANG; Nan; CHEN; Huaiqing; TANG; Rong

    2006-01-01

    Our previous research results have shown that the Ti-O films with appropriate characteristics possess great potentials for biomaterials application. In this paper, using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII-D), titanium oxide thin films are fabricated onto silicon wafer. The antithrombogenesis of films is evaluated in vitro through the platelet adhesion investigation. The biological behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on the film surface is investigated in vitro by endothelial cell (EC) culture. Our results reveal that the crystalline Ti-O films exhibit attractive blood compatibility. The in vitro HUVEC-cultured investigation of Ti-O film surface has justified that the biological behavior of HUVECs on different structure surfaces is significantly different. The adherence, growth and proliferation of HUVECs to the crystalline Ti-O film surface are in order, by forming a perfect single layer, preserving the natural original shape and displaying the cobblestone road metal rank, and obviously superior to that on the amorphous Ti-O film surface. According to our study, the crystalline Ti-O film, with proper microstructure, is helpful for seeding Ecs and can be used as a functional surface for the adherence and growth of ECS.

  2. Pattern secretion of matrix Metalloproteinases and their biological tissue inhibitors by human glomerular mesangial cells in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Hosseini R

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The glomerular mesangial cells (GMC play a central role in the synthesis and turnover of the glomerular mesangial matrix. The breakdown of the matrix likely depends on the balance between of a variety of proteinases including matrix metalloproteinases and their biological inhibitors secreted by the GMC, and any disturbance in the balance may result in appearance of various pathological states such as glomerulosclerosis. We therefore studied pattern secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9 and their biological tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 by cultured human GMC. We also measured MMP-1/TIMP-1 complex level in the cell culture supernatants. For this purpose, the GMC were incubated under serum-free conditions with medium (RPMI-1640 alone or in combination with TNF-α (30 ng/ml or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA (50 ng/ml for exactly 24, 48 and 72 hours. The above parameters were assayed by established ELISA techniques. Our results showed that the lowest and largest secretions were related to MMP-9 and MMP-2, respectively. The results indicated that the MMPs and TIMPs secretion were increased by TNF-α (MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 and PMA (MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, significantly (P<0.05. These results suggest that the GMC can synthesis and release various MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs that, in part, control turnover of extracellular matrix proteins.

  3. Chocolate cravings in American and Spanish individuals: biological and cultural influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Jamie L; Sobal, Jeffery

    2006-11-01

    This study investigated relationships of culture and physiology with chocolate cravings. Gender differences in chocolate cravings in Spaniards and Americans were examined using parallel Spanish- and English-version questionnaires administered to 259 undergraduate students at one university in Spain and 306 at one university in the US. Responses were examined separately for men and women in American and Spanish samples using multivariate analyses to control for variables like chocolate availability and cultural involvement (which was described by country of birth, years spent in that country, media use, and cultural identification). Chocolate was the most craved food among all Spanish students, but only female American students. A total of 91% of American women and 59% of American men reported chocolate cravings, and this significant difference persisted when controlling for American cultural involvement. In contrast, 90% of Spanish women versus 78% of Spanish men reported chocolate cravings, but the gender difference was no longer significant when controlling for Spanish cultural involvement. These results do not reject a role of physiology in chocolate cravings, but suggest that American culture encourages disproportionately more chocolate cravings among females than males, and that globalization may have led to a similar craving pattern among Spaniards, although gender differences in cravings are less clear-cut than they are in the US.

  4. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    OpenAIRE

    KOMAR RUSLAN; ARTRI; ELFAHMI

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesi...

  5. Cell Culture in Microgravity: Opening the Door to Space Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Adaptational response of human cell populations to microgravity is investigated using simulation, short-term Shuttle experiments, and long-term microgravity. Simulation consists of a clinostatically-rotated cell culture system. The system is a horizontally-rotated cylinder completely filled with culture medium. Low speed rotation results in continuous-fall of the cells through the fluid medium. In this setting, cells: 1) aggregate, 2) propagate in three dimensions, 3) synthesize matrix, 4) differentiate, and 5) form sinusoids that facilitate mass transfer. Space cell culture is conducted in flight bioreactors and in static incubators. Cells grown in microgravity are: bovine cartilage, promyelocytic leukemia, kidney proximal tubule cells, adrenal medulla, breast and colon cancer, and endothelium. Cells were cultured in space to test specific hypotheses. Cartilage cells were used to determine structural differences in cartilage grown in space compared to ground-based bioreactors. Results from a 130-day experiment on Mir revealed that cartilage grown in space was substantially more compressible due to insufficient glycosaminoglycan in the matrix. Interestingly, earth-grown cartilage conformed better to the dimensions of the scaffolding material, while the Mir specimens were spherical. The other cell populations are currently being analyzed for cell surface properties, gene expression, and differentiation. Results suggest that some cells spontaneously differentiate in microgravity. Additionally, vast changes in gene expression may occur in response to microgravity. In conclusion, the transition to microgravity may constitute a physical perturbation in cells resulting in unique gene expressions, the consequences of which may be useful in tissue engineering, disease modeling, and space cell biology.

  6. Cell Culture in Microgravity: Opening the Door to Space Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Adaptational response of human cell populations to microgravity is investigated using simulation, short-term Shuttle experiments, and long-term microgravity. Simulation consists of a clinostatically-rotated cell culture system. The system is a horizontally-rotated cylinder completely filled with culture medium. Low speed rotation results in continuous-fall of the cells through the fluid medium. In this setting, cells: 1) aggregate, 2) propagate in three dimensions, 3) synthesize matrix, 4) differentiate, and 5) form sinusoids that facilitate mass transfer. Space cell culture is conducted in flight bioreactors and in static incubators. Cells grown in microgravity are: bovine cartilage, promyelocytic leukemia, kidney proximal tubule cells, adrenal medulla, breast and colon cancer, and endothelium. Cells were cultured in space to test specific hypotheses. Cartilage cells were used to determine structural differences in cartilage grown in space compared to ground-based bioreactors. Results from a 130-day experiment on Mir revealed that cartilage grown in space was substantially more compressible due to insufficient glycosaminoglycan in the matrix. Interestingly, earth-grown cartilage conformed better to the dimensions of the scaffolding material, while the Mir specimens were spherical. The other cell populations are currently being analyzed for cell surface properties, gene expression, and differentiation. Results suggest that some cells spontaneously differentiate in microgravity. Additionally, vast changes in gene expression may occur in response to microgravity. In conclusion, the transition to microgravity may constitute a physical perturbation in cells resulting in unique gene expressions, the consequences of which may be useful in tissue engineering, disease modeling, and space cell biology.

  7. A Review on the Study of Ethnic Minorities’ Cultural Identity Influenced by Different Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Dan; Liu Yi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the rich content of cultural iden ̄tity, the research related to this aspect involves many disciplines, including anthropology, sociolo ̄gy, psychology, philosophy, literature, religion and education,etc. Based on their own academic back ̄ground,scholars have done a lot of research on va ̄rious aspects of the cultural identity of ethnic mi ̄norities. This article classifies cultural identity in ̄fluenced by different cultures, and focuses on a study of the impact and role of different cultural forms on the ethnic minorities’ cultural identity. The influences on the cultural identity of ethnic mi ̄norities include the following.

  8. A comparative study about learning styles preferences of two cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutay, Huban

    From an anthropologist's (Maddock, 1981) point of view, "science and science education are cultural enterprises which form a part of the wider cultural matrix of society and educational considerations concerning science must be made in the light of this wider perspective" (p.10). In addition, Spindler (1987) states that teaching science is considered cultural transmission while, Wolcott (1991) focuses on learning science as culture acquisition. In these statements, culture is defined as "an ordered system of meaning and symbols, in terms of which social interaction takes place" (Geertz, 1973). Thus, learning and culture are a partnership. Jones and Fennimore (1990) state: "Every culture brings habits of thought, resources, and context, which have built into them vehicles that promote learning and inquiry. Accordingly, children of any culture can and should have curriculum and instructional practices that draw from that culture." (p.16). Unfortunately, even though this statement is probably accurate, most schools still use the same curriculum, instructional methods, and assessment strategies for all students regardless of their differences in learning styles. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between students' learning styles and their culture. This is a correlational study. Does culture limit or expand the learning of individuals? For this study Turkish students who graduated from a Turkish high school and undertook undergraduate education in the United States or finished their undergraduate education in Turkey and pursued graduate education in the United States were identified. These Turkish subjects were compared to American college students through learning styles data and anxiety levels as cultural markers. To identify individuals' learning styles we used the Building Excellence (BE) instrument, which is an adult version of The Learning Style Inventory by Dunn, and Rundle (1996.1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000). BE assesses twenty four

  9. Studies on reproductive biology of Mystus tengara (Ham.-Buch., 1822), a freshwater catfish of West Bengal, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sandipan Gupta; Samir Banerjee

    2013-01-01

    Studies on reproductive biology are essential to assess culture potential of a fish species. Mystus tengara is a popular food fish as well as preferred as an ornamental fish in West Bengal. Till date detailed report on reproductive biology of this fish species in the agro-climatic context of West Bengal is lacking. Therefore, the present work was aimed to study the detailed reproductive biology of Mystus tengara with an emphasis on sex ratio, length at first sexual maturity, cycle of gonadal ...

  10. Cell and Molecular Biology of Ataxia Telangiectasia Heterozygous Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Irradiated in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Autologous isolates of cell types from obligate heterozygotes with the autosomal disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)were used to begin a tissue culture model for assessing pathways of radiation-induced cancer formation in this target tissue. This was done by establishing cultures of stromal fibroblasts and long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in standard 2-dimensional tissue culture in order to establish expression of markers detailing early steps of carcinogenesis. The presumptive breast cancer susceptibility of A-T heterozygotes as a sequel to damage caused by ionizing radiation provided reason to study expression of markers in irradiated HMEC. Findings from our study with HMEC have included determination of differences in specific protein expression amongst growth phase (e.g., log vs stationary) and growth progression (e.g., pass 7 vs pass 9), as well as differences in morphologic markers within populations of irradiated HMEC (e.g., development of multinucleated cells).

  11. Cell and Molecular Biology of Ataxia Telangiectasia Heterozygous Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Irradiated in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Autologous isolates of cell types from obligate heterozygotes with the autosomal disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)were used to begin a tissue culture model for assessing pathways of radiation-induced cancer formation in this target tissue. This was done by establishing cultures of stromal fibroblasts and long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in standard 2-dimensional tissue culture in order to establish expression of markers detailing early steps of carcinogenesis. The presumptive breast cancer susceptibility of A-T heterozygotes as a sequel to damage caused by ionizing radiation provided reason to study expression of markers in irradiated HMEC. Findings from our study with HMEC have included determination of differences in specific protein expression amongst growth phase (e.g., log vs stationary) and growth progression (e.g., pass 7 vs pass 9), as well as differences in morphologic markers within populations of irradiated HMEC (e.g., development of multinucleated cells).

  12. Study on human chondrocyte culture viability for autologous transplantation in clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Lombello

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The limited regenerative capacity of the cartilage tissuemakes the treatment of chondral lesions difficult. The techniquescurrently available to treat cartilage lesions may relieve symptoms,but do not regenerate the injured tissue. Autologous chondrocytetransplantation uses cell biology and cell culture techniques toregenerate the hyaline cartilage. Methods: In this study, we analyzechondrocyte biopsy collection and culture for autologoustransplantation. Ultrastructural analyses of hyaline cartilage biopsieswere performed 0, 6, 24 and 48 hours after collection. The tissue evenafter 48 hours. Eleven cell culture assays were performed to evaluateisolation, viability, morphology, proliferation and absence ofcontaminants. Results: The cell culture techniques used allowedchondrocyte proliferation. Rates on cell viability were maintained abovethe acceptable patterns (above 90. Control of cell culture laboratoryconditions showed absence of contaminants, assuring safety of theprocess. The chondrocytes obtained presented the morphology typicalof cultured cell monolayers. Conclusion: The results indicate viabilityof chondrocyte culture technique for clinical application in autologoustransplantation.

  13. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOMAR RUSLAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesia showed to contain relatively the same profile of chemical contents. Dominant compounds that were detected by GCMS are hidrocarbon such as 2-heptenal, decadienal, hexsadecane, pentadecane, cyclooctane etc, fatty acid such as oktadecanoate acid, etthyl linoleate, ethyl stearate, heksadecanoate acid and steroid such as stigmasterol, fucosterol, sitosterol. No phorbol ester and its derivatives have been detected yet by the GCMS method. Callus and suspension cultures of J. curcas have been established to be used for further investigation.

  14. Phytochemical and biological studies of bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Nagashima, Fumihiro

    2013-07-01

    The bryophytes contain the Marchantiophyta (liverworts), Bryophyta (mosses) and Anthocerotophyta (hornworts). Of these, the Marchantiophyta have a cellular oil body which produce a number of mono-, sesqui- and di-terpenoids, aromatic compounds like bibenzyl, bis-bibenzyls and acetogenins. Most sesqui- and di-terpenoids obtained from liverworts are enantiomers of those found in higher plants. Many of these compounds display a characteristic odor, and can have interesting biological activities. These include: allergenic contact dermatitis, antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral, cytotoxic, insecticidal, insect antifeedant, superoxide anion radical release, 5-lipoxygenase, calmodulin, hyaluronidase, cyclooxygenase, DNA polymerase β, and α-glucosidase and NO production inhibitory, antioxidant, piscicidal, neurotrophic and muscle relaxing activities among others. Each liverwort biosynthesizes unique components, which are valuable for their chemotaxonomic classification. Typical chemical structures and biological activity of the selected liverwort constituents as well as the hemi- and total synthesis of some biologically active compounds are summarized.

  15. Polyketide stereocontrol: a study in chemical biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The biosynthesis of reduced polyketides in bacteria by modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) proceeds with exquisite stereocontrol. As the stereochemistry is intimately linked to the strong bioactivity of these molecules, the origins of stereochemical control are of significant interest in attempts to create derivatives of these compounds by genetic engineering. In this review, we discuss the current state of knowledge regarding this key aspect of the biosynthetic pathways. Given that much of this information has been obtained using chemical biology tools, work in this area serves as a showcase for the power of this approach to provide answers to fundamental biological questions.

  16. Sex Dilemmas, Amazons and Cyborgs: Feminist Cultural Studies and Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Tolvhed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss sport and physical activities as a field of empirical investi-gation for feminist cultural studies with a potential to contribute to theorizing the body, gender and difference. Sport has, historically, served to legitimize and rein-force the gender dichotomy by making men “masculine” through developing phys-ical strength and endurance, while women generally have been excluded or di-rected towards activities fostering a “feminine suppleness”. The recent case of runner Caster Semenya, who was subjected to extensive gender tests, demon-strates how athletic superiority and “masculine” attributes in women still today stir public emotions and evoke cultural anxieties of gender blurring. But the rigid gen-der boundaries have also made sport a field of transgressions. From the “Soviet amazon” of the Cold War, transgressions in sport have publicly demonstrated, but also pushed, the boundaries of cultural understandings of gender. Gender verifica-tion tests have exposed a continuum of bodies that cannot easily be arranged into two stable, separate gender categories.In spite of the so called “corporeal turn”, sport is still rather neglected within cultural studies and feminist research. This appears to be linked to a degradation, and fear, of the body and of the risk that women – once again – be reduced to biology and physical capacity. But studies of sport might further develop under-standings of the processes through which embodied knowledge and subjectivity is produced, in a way that overcomes the split between corporeality and discursive regimes or representations. Furthermore, with the fitness upsurge since the 1980s, the athletic female body has emerged as a cultural ideal and a rare validation of “female masculinity” (Halberstam in popular culture. This is an area well-suited for “third wave” feminist cultural studies that are at ease with complexities and contradictions: the practices and

  17. The diamondback terrapin: The biology, ecology, cultural history, and conservation status of an obligate estuarine turtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, K.M.; Lee, D.S.; ,

    2006-01-01

    Ranging from Cape Cod to nearly the Texas-Mexico border, the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) is the only species of North American turtle restricted to estuarine systems. Despite this extensive distribution, its zone of occurrence is very linear, and in places fragmented, resulting in a relatively small total area of occupancy. On a global scale, excluding marine species, few turtles even venture into brackish water on a regular basis, and only two Asian species approach the North American terrapin's dependency on estuarine habitats. Here we describe some of the biological and behavioral adaptations of terrapins that allow them to live in the rather harsh estuarine environment. In this chapter we review the natural and cultural history of this turtle, discuss conservation issues, and provide information on the types of research needed to make sound management decisions for terrapin populations in peril.

  18. Study Circles and Socio-cultural Animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Malečkar

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Informal learning and participating in study circles is a way of applying the ideas of socio-cultural animation. It is based on the assumption that within a society there are mechanisms that institutions don't comprise and therefore don't fulfil various, often urgent needs deriving from everyday life and the community. What is going on here is identifying and solving burning problems; some of them have already become an integral part of the way of living in a community. Study circles as an informal phenomenon in Slovenia create new possibilities of social activities based on common learning and participating in a community.

  19. Missile Studies with a Biological Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-23

    Biology and Medicine of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and to the Office of Civil Defense and Mobilization (formerly the Federal Civil Defense...None Ear. left, laceration severed a peripheral blood vessel. 4P3A 4 1 Shoulder, left, 14 mm deep to scapular spine with small "nick" fracture

  20. Study of biocompatible and biological materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pecheva, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The book gives an overview on biomineralization, biological, biocompatible and biomimetic materials. It reveals the use of biomaterials alone or in composites, how their performance can be improved by tailoring their surface properties by external factors and how standard surface modification techniques can be applied in the area of biomaterials to beneficially influence their growth on surfaces.

  1. Accumulation of biologically active furanocoumarins in Ruta graveolens ssp. divaricata (Tenore) Gams in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiert, H; Abou-Mandour, A A; Czygan, F Ch

    2005-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate dynamics of accumulation of five linear furanocoumarins and umbelliferone in stationary liquid cultures of Ruta graveolens ssp. divaricata (Tenore) Gams during 6-week growth cycles. The contents of individual metabolites in biomass increased 1.8-3.5 times while their total content rose 2.3 times. Maximum contents of xanthotoxin, bergapten and isopimpinellin (112.3, 76.2 and 84.0mg/100g d.w., respectively) and maximum total content of all metabolites (283.4 mg/100 g d.w.), obtained on 35th culture day, are interesting from practical point of view.

  2. Preventing adolescent pregnancy: biological, social, cultural, and political influences on age at first sexual intercourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Raquel; Araújo-Pedrosa, Anabela; Pereira, Joana; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Age at first sexual intercourse (AFSI) is the initial factor related to adolescents' sexual life that may increase the risk of adolescent pregnancy. We explored the biological, social, cultural, and political predictors of AFSI addressing several gaps that prevent us from generalizing the results of past research to adolescent pregnancy prevention. We also explored the moderating effects of cultural variables on the links between social and political predictors and AFSI. Our sample consisted of 889 Portuguese female adolescents aged 12-19. Earlier age at menarche, non-intact family structure, maternal history of adolescent pregnancy, lower maternal emotional warmth, absence of religious involvement, and living in Portugal's mainland and in a legal context penalizing abortion predicted earlier AFSI. School attendance predicted earlier AFSI among adolescents of European ethnic origin; adolescents of non-European ethnic origin presented the opposite, but non-significant, pattern. These findings suggest that, in addition to isolated characteristics, factors from different ecological contexts should be considered when planning interventions designed to foster healthy and informed transitions to sexual initiation and prevent the related risks of unwanted outcomes. We discuss implications for future research and practice.

  3. Studies of human intervertebral disc cell function in a constrained in vitro tissue culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Hoyland, Judith Alison; Freemont, Anthony J

    2004-06-01

    This is a laboratory-based study examining a novel in vitro culture system for intervertebral disc tissue. Address the hypothesis that "the novel culture system will preserve intervertebral disc tissue matrix and cell function and prevent cellular apoptosis for periods up to 21 days." Studies of cell function in human intervertebral disc tissue are scarce. In vivo study of human intervertebral disc cells remains impracticable; in situ molecular biology in histologic sections lacks a dynamic dimension; and as for in vitro studies, cell culture often lacks physiologic relevance and explant cultures are subject to loss of tissue integrity and altered cell behavior. There is a biologic and therapeutic need for a satisfactory explant culture system for studying human intervertebral disc tissue in a controlled environment. Samples of human intervertebral disc tissue, obtained at surgery, were examined for a number of tissue and cell parameters immediately after excision (controls) and following culture of tissue samples either in a plastic ring or unconstrained in tissue culture medium for up to 3 weeks. Data were compared between cultured tissue and controls. By comparison with control tissue, unconstrained explants swelled, tissue structure was disturbed, and there were profound changes in cell function. By contrast, tissue cultured in plastic rings maintained tissue structure, and after 3 weeks, the cellular parameters were the same as in controls. This is the first reported system to preserve cell function of human discal explants for long periods in tissue culture. It will be a useful tool for a wide range of investigations of intervertebral disc biology that have not hitherto been possible.

  4. Penerapan Cultural Studies dan Aliran Filsafat dalam Desain Komunikasi Visual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Christina Luzar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cultural studies is a diversity knowledge from different variety of perspectives, through the production of theory trying to intervene in political culture. Cultural studies explores culture as a practice purport in the context of social force. In this case, cultural studies is not only based on one point only, but also cultural studies tries to compose a variety of theoretical studies of other disciplines developed wider, so that covers a wide range of academic theories that already existed, including Marxism, Structuralism, Post-structuralism, and feminism. By eclectic method, cultural studies puts the positioning to all knowledges, including on its knowledge which integrates with culture, practice of signification, representation, discourse, authority, articulation, text, read, and consumption. Cultural studies could be described as a language game or formation of discourse associated with relation to power in signification practice of human life. In addition to cultural studies, there is also feminism theory participated in the concept of feminist cultural studies that reconstructs and transforms view of misperception between feminism and cultural studies. Feminism affects cultural studies, but not all feminism can be viewed as cultural studies, and not all cultural studies talks about gender. Both of cultural studies and feminism have substantive importance in relation to power, representation, pop-culture, subjectivity, identity and consumption. The theory of social construction is also has connectivity with cultural studies. Construction of reality is inseparable from mark, symbol, and language. Media are full of reality constructed for people to affect people as ethics persuasion in media do. 

  5. Culture medium type affects endocytosis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in BEAS-2B cells and subsequent biological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniu, Hisao; Saito, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Maruyama, Kayo; Usui, Yuki; Aoki, Kaoru; Takanashi, Seiji; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Nomura, Hiroki; Okamoto, Masanori; Shimizu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-01

    We examined the cytotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and the resulting cytokine secretion in BEAS-2B cells or normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEpCs) in two types of culture media (Ham's F12 containing 10% FBS [Ham's F12] and serum-free growth medium [SFGM]). Cellular uptake of MWCNT was observed by fluorescent microscopy and analyzed using flow cytometry. Moreover, we evaluated whether MWCNT uptake was suppressed by 2 types of endocytosis inhibitors. We found that BEAS-2B cells cultured in Ham's F12 and HBEpCs cultured in SFGM showed similar biological responses, but BEAS-2B cells cultured in SFGM did not internalize MWCNTs, and the 50% inhibitory concentration value, i.e., the cytotoxicity, was increased by more than 10-fold. MWCNT uptake was suppressed by a clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor and a caveolae-mediated endocytosis inhibitor in BEAS-2B cells cultured in Ham's F12 and HBEpCs cultured in SFGM. In conclusion, we suggest that BEAS-2B cells cultured in a medium containing serum should be used for the safety evaluation of nanomaterials as a model of normal human bronchial epithelial cells. However, the culture medium composition may affect the proteins that are expressed on the cytoplasmic membrane, which may influence the biological response to MWCNTs.

  6. The Virginian's Cultural Clashes: A Study of Cultural Representation in Owen Wister's novel The Virginian

    OpenAIRE

    Aksnes, Karoline

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a cultural study of Owen Wister's novel The Virginian. Its main focus is on the ways in which cultural differences between East and West are staged and acted out in the novel's depiction of a culturally diverse frontier environment in nineteenth century Wyoming, USA. Central in this study are the story's three main characters as they represent different cultural backgrounds, and, by their personal experiences with the Western environment as well as wi...

  7. On the Importance of Cultural Factors in Oral English Studying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Juan

    2016-01-01

    Language communication, in some way, is cultural communication, in order to have a better ability of communicating, students have to know and understand enough culture knowledge. This paper will analyze the relationship between language and culture, emphasize the importance of cultural factors in oral English studying.

  8. Chemical approaches to studying stem cell biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenlin Li; Kai Jiang; Wanguo Wei; Yan Shi; Sheng Ding

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells,including both pluripotent stem cells and multipotent somatic stem cells,hold great potential for interrogating the mechanisms of tissue development,homeostasis and pathology,and for treating numerous devastating diseases.Establishment of in vitro platforms to faithfully maintain and precisely manipulate stem cell fates is essential to understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology,and to translate stem cells into regenerative medicine.Chemical approaches have recently provided a number of small molecules that can be used to control cell selfrenewal,lineage differentiation,reprogramming and regeneration.These chemical modulators have been proven to be versatile tools for probing stem cell biology and manipulating cell fates toward desired outcomes.Ultimately,this strategy is promising to be a new frontier for drug development aimed at endogenous stem cell modulation.

  9. Gravitational studies in cellular and developmental biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paucity of data on the role of gravity in cellular and developmental biology has been examined, and a hypothesis has been generated that unifies potential gravity sensitivity in both plant and animal systems. This hypothesis considers the macromolecular order and functional importance of the extracellular matrix compartment, the intracellular cytoskeleton compartment, and the connecting plasma membrane-signal transduction compartment of plant and animal systems as potentially sensitive to alterations in the unit gravity environment in which they evolved.

  10. Karl Marx and the Study of Media and Culture Today

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The task of this paper discusses the role of Marx in analysing media, communica-tion and culture today. An analysis of three contemporary Cultural Studies works – Lawrence Grossberg’s monograph Cultural Studies in the Future Tense, John Hartley’s monograph Digital Futures for Cultural and Media Studies and Paul Smith’s edited volume The Renewal of Cultural Studies – shows that there is an agreement that the economy needs to be taken more into account by Cultural Studies, but disagreement on w...

  11. Bayesian networks: a powerful tool for systems biology study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Jie WANG

    2010-01-01

    @@ Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010The wide application of omics research approaches caused a burst of biological data in the past decade, and also promoted the growth of systems biology, a research field that studies biological questions from a genome-wide point of view. One feature of systems biology study is to integrate and identify. Not only experiments are carried out at whole-genome scales, but also data from various resources, such as genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics,and metabolics data, need to be integrated to identify correlations among targeted entities. Therefore, plenty amounts of experimental data, robust statistical methods, and reliable network construction models are indispensable for systems biology study. Among the available network construction models, Bayesian network is considered as one of the most effective methods available so far for biological network predictions (Pe'er, 2005).

  12. Cultural Studies und kritische Pädagogik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Winter

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Der Autor stellt die Cultural Studies als transdisziplinäre Forschungsrichtung vor, die in den 50er Jahren in Großbritannien begründet wurde. Diese orientieren sich an alltäglichen Lebenswelten, "Kultur" bezeichnet ein Netzwerk von gesellschaftlichen Strukturen, die durch Herrschaftsverhältnisse determiniert sind. Ziel ist es, diese Strukturen transparent und transformierbar zu machen. Hier nähert sich der Ansatz der kritischen Pädagogik, die davon ausgeht, dass die Bildungssysteme die bestehenden Herrschaftsverhältnisse nicht einfach hinnehmen, sondern als veränderbar determinieren müssen. Übertragen auf mediale Texte werden die RezipientInnen als Subjekte wahrgenommen, die die Bedeutung der Texte vor dem Hintergrund ihrer sozialen Bedingungen produzieren. Der Autor beleuchtet Ansätze der Cultural Studies und der kritischen Pädagogik und stellt fest, dass beide Forschungsrichtungen einander implizieren. Im Zeitalter des Neoliberalismus und der interaktiven Medien sei es erforderlich, Jugendliche zu handlungsfähigen Subjekten zu erziehen, damit eine gerechtere und demokratischere Gesellschaft möglich sei. Dies erfordere die Erkenntnis, dass gesellschaftliche Strukturen in Medien sichtbar werden, aber auch veränderbar sind.

  13. System chemical biology studies of endocrine disruptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Oprea, Tudor I.

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) alter hormonal balance and other physiological systems through inappropriate developmental or adult exposure, perturbing the reproductive function of further generations. While disruption of key receptors (e.g., estrogen, androgen, and thyroid) at the ligand...... binding domain (LBD) has been associated with EDCs, a significant number of EDCs do not appear to influence the LBDs of these receptors. Therefore, we evaluated the potential biological effects of EDCs in humans with the aim to rationalize the etiology of certain disorders associated with the reproductive...

  14. New advances in pollination biology and the studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Pollination biology is the study of the various biological features in relation to the event of pollen transfer. It is one of the central concerns of plant reproductive ecology and evolutionary biology. In this paper, we attempt to introduce the main advances and some new interests in pollination biology and make a brief review of the research work that has been done in China in recent years. We also give some insights into the study that we intend to carry out in this field in the future.

  15. Comparing protein VEGF inhibitors: In vitro biological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lanlan; Liang, Xiao Huan [Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States); Ferrara, Napoleone, E-mail: nf@gene.com [Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} VEGF is a mediator of angiogenesis. {yields} VEGF inhibitors have clinical applications in cancer and eye disorders. {yields} Five protein VEGF inhibitors were compared for their ability to inhibit. {yields} VEGF-induced activities in cultured endothelial cells. -- Abstract: VEGF inhibitors are widely used as a therapy for tumors and intravascular neovascular disorders, but limited and conflicting data regarding their relative biological potencies are available. The purpose of the study is to compare different protein VEGF inhibitors for their ability to inhibit VEGF-stimulated activities. We tested ranibizumab, the full-length variant of ranibizumab (Mab Y0317), bevacizumab, the VEGF-TrapR1R2 and Flt(1-3)-IgG in bioassays measuring VEGF-stimulated proliferation of bovine retinal microvascular endothelial cells or chemotaxis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The inhibitors were also compared for their ability to inhibit MAP kinase activation in HUVECs following VEGF addition. Ranibizumab, VEGF-TrapR1R2 and Flt(1-3)-IgG had very similar potencies in the bioassays tested. Bevacizumab was over 10-fold less potent than these molecules. Mab Y0317 was over 30-fold more potent than bevacizumab. The findings reported in this manuscript describe important intrinsic characteristics of several VEGF inhibitors that may be useful to design and interpret preclinical or clinical studies.

  16. Cutting the gordian knot-development and biological relevance of hepatitis C virus cell culture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith Margarete; Bukh, Jens

    2008-01-01

    described. Research on the viral life cycle, efficient therapeutics, and a vaccine has been hampered by the absence of suitable cell culture systems. The first system permitting studies of the full viral life cycle was intrahepatic transfection of RNA transcripts of HCV consensus complementary DNA (c...... studies of the function of viral proteins, their interaction with each other and host proteins, new antivirals, and neutralizing antibodies in the context of the full viral life cycle. However, several challenges remain, including development of cell culture systems for all major HCV genotypes...... isolate JFH1, which for unknown reasons showed an exceptional replication capability and resulted in formation of infectious viral particles in the human hepatoma cell line Huh7, led in 2005 to the development of the first full viral life cycle in vitro systems. JFH1-based systems now enable in vitro...

  17. How Culture Affects Female Inequality across Countries: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Hoi Yan; Chan, Alex W. H.

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have commented that culture has an influence on gender inequality. However, few studies have provided data that could be used to investigate how culture actually influences female inequality. One of the aims of this study is to investigate whether Hofstede's cultural dimensions have an impact on female inequality in education in terms…

  18. DISCOURSE OF POWER AND DISCOURSE OF MASSES IN MODERN PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: CULTURAL, BIOLOGICAL AND RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Karpenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is the identification of anthropological content of the power and mass discourses in contemporary social transformations. The theme of philosophical and anthropological meaning of discourse communication between mass and power in post-modern society acquires the significant relevance because of technologization of the governance processes and transformation of previously sacred power as a set of standard procedures. Methodology of the paper consists on the disclosure of cultural peculiarities and substantial forms of power discourse and mass discourse properties in major directions of philosophical anthropology of middle XX and at the beginning of the XXI century. Scientific novelty. The directions of the institutional sense expression in the discourse of power supply are disclosed and the process of mixing power and management and representative anthropology is fixed. The biological, cultural and religious levels of displaying the anthropological significance discourse of power are identified. The definition is given to the anthropic content of discursive power of speech activities and methods and philosophical reflection of the discursive self-expression of powerful masses. The specificity of the interaction of power and mass discourses of national and universal semantic spaces are defined. In conclusions it is indicated that the anthropic space of the contemporary mass human is narrowing significantly, because the individuals’ participation in technology of society management is finally excluded. On this basis even the key aspect of mass discourse breaks – the mass narrations about the power, because the power performs the direct intervention in the mass discourse structure of sense-creation by the way of suggestion.

  19. Cultural Studies Methodologies and Narrative Family Therapy: Therapeutic Conversations About Pop Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilsen, Julie; Nylund, David

    2016-06-01

    Therapists recognize that popular media culture is an influential force that shapes identities and relationships in contemporary society. Indeed, people have serious relationships with the commodities and practices that emerge from pop culture. However, they often lack the conceptual and conversational resources to engage meaningfully with clients about pop culture's influence in their lives. Cultural studies is introduced as an interdisciplinary approach that provides frameworks for both theory and practice that position therapists and clients to critically examine the role of pop culture in their lives. Cultural studies and narrative therapy are discussed as praxis allies that share a populist political intention and counter-hegemonic discursive practices. The integration of cultural studies methodologies into narrative therapy practice with a parent and her teenage daughter is illustrated through a case vignette.

  20. Phytochemical and biological studies of Ochna species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Anil Kumar Reddy; Lee, Dong-Ung; Tih, Raphaël Ghogomu; Gunasekar, Duvvuru; Bodo, Bernard

    2012-02-01

    The genus Ochna L. (Gr, Ochne; wild pear), belonging to the Ochnaceae family, includes ca. 85 species of evergreen trees, shrubs, and shrublets, distributed in tropical Asia, Africa, and America. Several members of this genus have long been used in folk medicine for treatment of various ailments, such as asthma, dysentery, epilepsy, gastric disorders, menstrual complaints, lumbago, ulcers, as an abortifacient, and as antidote against snake bites. Up to now, ca. 111 constituents, viz. flavonoids (including bi-, tri-, and pentaflavonoids), anthranoids, triterpenes, steroids, fatty acids, and a few others have been identified in the genus. Crude extracts and isolated compounds have been found to exhibit analgesic, anti-HIV-1, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic activities, lending support to the rationale behind several of its traditional uses. The present review compiles the informations concerning the traditional uses, phytochemistry, and biological activities of Ochna.

  1. [Effects of culture supernatant of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells on biological characteristics of human fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi'er; Lyu, Lu; Xin, Haiming; Luo, Liang; Tong, Yalin; Mo, Yongliang; Yue, Yigang

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of culture supernatant of human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs-CS) on biological characteristics of human fibroblasts. (1) hAMSCs were isolated from deprecated human fresh amnion tissue of placenta and then sub-cultured. The morphology of hAMSCs on culture day 3 and hAMSCs of the third passage were observed with inverted phase contrast microscope. (2) Two batches of hAMSCs of the third passage were obtained, then the expression of vimentin of cells was observed with immunofluorescence method, and the expression of cell surface marker CD90, CD73, CD105, and CD45 was detected by flow cytometer. (3) hAMSCs-CS of the third passage at culture hour 72 were collected, and the content of insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ (IGF-Ⅰ), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. (4) Human fibroblasts were isolated from deprecated human fresh prepuce tissue of circumcision and then sub-cultured. Human fibroblasts of the third passage were used in the following experiments. Cells were divided into blank control group and 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% hAMSCs-CS groups according to the random number table (the same grouping method below), with 48 wells in each group. Cells in blank control group were cultured with DMEM/F12 medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS), while cells in the latter 4 groups were cultured with DMEM/F12 medium containing corresponding volume fraction of hAMSCs-CS and 2% FBS. The proliferation activity of cells was detected by cell counting kit 8 and microplate reader at culture hour 12, 24, 48, and 72, respectively, and corresponding volume fraction of hAMSCs-CS which causing the best proliferation activity of human fibroblasts was used in the following experiments. (5) Human fibroblasts were divided into blank control group and 50% hAMSCs-CS group and treated as in (4), with 4 wells in each group, at post

  2. Culturally relevant inquiry-based laboratory module implementations in upper-division genetics and cell biology teaching laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students' interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students' professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate.

  3. Systems biology studies of Aspergilli - from sequence to science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2008-01-01

    The recent dawn of the new biological mindset called systems biology has put forth a new way of analyzing and understanding biology. Carried by the notion that no element of a cell is an island, systems biology takes a holistic approach, and attempts to understand life as systems that have co...... a few. The recent publication of the genome sequences of several filamentous fungi of the Aspergillus species (Aspergilli), has, along with the accumulation of years of reductionist studies, been a catalyst for the application of systems biology to this interesting group of fungi. Among the genome...... biology approach has been applied to a wide range of issues. These tools include the compilation of data from literature on A. niger enzymes to form a re-constructed metabolic network and model of metabolism, allowing assessment of the industrial production potential of metabolites from this fungus. Based...

  4. Investigation of the effect of culture type on biological hydrogen production from sugar industry wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Leyla; Erguder, Tuba H; Demirer, Goksel N

    2010-05-01

    The bio-hydrogen generation potential of sugar industry wastes was investigated. In the first part of the study, acidogenic anaerobic culture was enriched from the mixed anaerobic culture (MAC) through acidification of glucose. In the second part of the study, glucose acclimated acidogenic seed was used, along with the indigenous microorganisms, MAC, 2-bromoethanesulfonate treated MAC and heat treated MAC. Two different COD levels (4.5 and 30g/L COD) were investigated for each culture type. Reactors with initial COD concentration of 4.5g/L had higher H(2) yields (20.3-87.7mL H(2)/g COD) than the reactors with initial COD concentration of 30g/L (0.9-16.6mL H(2)/g COD). The 2-bromoethanesulfonate and heat treatment of MAC inhibited the methanogenic activity, but did not increase the H(2) production yield. The maximum H(2) production (87.7mL H(2)/g COD) and minimum methanogenic activity were observed in the unseeded reactor with 4.5g/L of initial COD.

  5. Terahertz applications in cultural heritage: case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannacci, D.; Martos-Levif, D.; Walker, G. C.; Menu, M.; Detalle, V.

    2013-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging is a non-destructive, non-contact, non-invasive technology emerging as a tool for the analysis of cultural heritage. THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) techniques have the ability to retrieve information from different layers within a stratified sample, that enable the identification of hidden sub-layers in the case of paints and mural paintings. In this paper, we present the THz TDS2 system developed in the European Commission's 7th Framework Program project CHARISMA [grant agreement no. 228330]. Bespoke single processing algorithms; including a deconvolution algorithm can be deployed to increase the resolution and the global performance of the system. The potential and impact of this work is demonstrated through two case studies of mural paintings, where the capability to reveal the stratigraphy of the artworks is demonstrated.

  6. ALOUD biological: Adult Learning Open University Determinants study - Association of biological determinants with study success in formal lifelong learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 15 March). ALOUD biological: Adult Learning Open University Determinants study - Association of biological determinants with study success in formal lifelong learners. Presentation given at the plenary meeting of Learning & Cognitio

  7. ALOUD biological: Adult Learning Open University Determinants study - Association of biological determinants with study success in formal lifelong learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 15 March). ALOUD biological: Adult Learning Open University Determinants study - Association of biological determinants with study success in formal lifelong learners. Presentation given at the plenary meeting of Learning &

  8. Cultural Studies in Turkey: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gönül Pultar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent socio-political developments have rendered cultural studies of the Repub-lic of Turkey an ever-widening field of study, as they lead apparently to a proba-ble paradigm shift in a society that was once thought to be purely Western-oriented. The analysis of this transformation is before all else a cultural studies task. Accordingly, this paper has two aims: one, to make a a brief survey of cultur-al studies work that has been done so far in Turkey; and two, draw attention to the various problems encountered by the instruction and practice of cultural stud-ies in the country.

  9. The social production of health: critical contributions from evolutionary, biological, and cultural anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Betty Wolder; Browner, C H

    2005-08-01

    In 1946, the newly formed World Health Organization boldly sought to conceptualize "health" as wellbeing in the positive sense, "not merely the absence of disease or infirmity." Yet nearly six decades later, researchers are still principally concerned with pathology and its characteristics and consequences. This special issue is the result of an effort to broaden the focus. Anthropologists working from evolutionary, biological and sociocultural perspectives and in diverse geographic regions were asked to examine meanings associated with health and/or to identify social conditions and practices that have contributed to positive physiological and psychological states in particular cultures, times, or across time. Most notable, perhaps, was discovering how difficult it is for Western social scientists to move beyond pathology-based thinking; most authors represented here regard health primarily as the absence of disease. Still, these papers articulate and address questions key to understanding health in and of itself, including: How is health conceptualized? What kinds of social conditions lead to health? And, how do social inequalities affect health? This introduction critically discusses previous work on the subject to contextualize the original research papers offered here.

  10. Isolation, culture and biological characteristics of multipotent porcine skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinjuan; Liu, Hao; Wang, Kunfu; Li, Lu; Yuan, Hongyi; Liu, Xueting; Liu, Yingjie; Guan, Weijun

    2017-03-02

    Skeletal muscle has a huge regenerative potential for postnatal muscle growth and repair, which mainly depends on a kind of muscle progenitor cell population, called satellite cell. Nowadays, the majority of satellite cells were obtained from human, mouse, rat and other animals but rarely from pig. In this article, the porcine skeletal muscle satellite cells were isolated and cultured in vitro. The expression of surface markers of satellite cells was detected by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays. The differentiation capacity was assessed by inducing satellite cells into adipocytes, myoblasts and osteoblasts. The results showed that satellite cells isolated from porcine tibialis anterior were subcultured up to 12 passages and were positive for Pax7, Myod, c-Met, desmin, PCNA and NANOG but were negative for Myogenin. Satellite cells were also induced to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts and myoblasts, respectively. These findings indicated that porcine satellite cells possess similar biological characteristics of stem cells, which may provide theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application in the treatment of dystrophic muscle and other muscle injuries.

  11. Effects of space environment on biological characters of tissue cultured rose seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Huai; LIU Min; LU Jinying; PAN Yi; ZHANG Chunhua

    2005-01-01

    Tissue cultured rose seedlings were carried into space by SHENZHOU-4 spacecraft and then used as the experimental material to investigate effects of the space environmental conditions on morphology, cytology, physiology and molecular biology of the seedlings. After loaded on the space flight, the plant's height, number of leaves, and fresh weight per seedling were all increased significantly compared to the ground controls. The content of chlorophyll was basically unchanged. In some cells, the ultrastructural changes involved twist, contraction and deformation of cell wall, curvature and loose arrangement of lamellae of some chloroplasts, and a significant increase in number of starch grains per chloroplast. In addition, the number of mitochondria increased, but some mitochondrial outer membrane broke, and some mitochondrial cristae disappeared. The activities of the defense enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalyse, in rose leaves increased and the content of malondialdehyde decreased. In the RAPD analysis with 40 10-mer primers, 36 primers generated 148 DNA bands from both of the space flight treated seedlings and the ground controls, and five primers amplified polymorphic products. The rate of DNA variation was 6.34 %.

  12. Development of a biocidal treatment regime to inhibit biological growths on cultural heritage: BIODAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. E.; Alakomi, H.-L.; Fortune, I.; Gorbushina, A. A.; Krumbein, W. E.; Maxwell, I.; McCullagh, C.; Robertson, P.; Saarela, M.; Valero, J.; Vendrell, M.

    2008-12-01

    Existing chemical treatments to prevent biological damage to monuments often involve considerable amounts of potentially dangerous and even poisonous biocides. The scientific approach described in this paper aims at a drastic reduction in the concentration of biocide applications by a polyphasic approach of biocides combined with cell permeabilisers, polysaccharide and pigment inhibitors and a photodynamic treatment. A variety of potential agents were screened to determine the most effective combination. Promising compounds were tested under laboratory conditions with cultures of rock deteriorating bacteria, algae, cyanobacteria and fungi. A subsequent field trial involved two sandstone types with natural biofilms. These were treated with multiple combinations of chemicals and exposed to three different climatic conditions. Although treatments proved successful in the laboratory, field trials were inconclusive and further testing will be required to determine the most effective treatment regime. While the most effective combination of chemicals and their application methodology is still being optimised, results to date indicate that this is a promising and effective treatment for the control of a wide variety of potentially damaging organisms colonising stone substrates.

  13. Biología y cultivo de Macrobrachium tenellum: Estado del arte Biology and culture of Macrobrachium tenellum: State of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Daniel Espinosa-Chaurand

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo tiene como propósito reunir y clasificar la información existente sobre aspectos biológicos y de cultivo del langostino Macrobrachium tenellum, de una forma clara y secuencial, que permita integrar el conocimiento para desarrollar nuevos caminos en la investigación y aprovechamiento sustentable de este recurso. Se abordan diversos temas que incluyen la taxonomía y sistemática, distribución geográfica, ecología, reproducción, desarrollo, patologías, pesca y acuicultura de la especie, tomando en cuenta toda la información generada por diversos autores, desde hace cuatro décadas a la fecha. Se concluye que existen vacíos importantes en el conocimiento de aspectos básicos y aplicados sobre la biología de la especie y que se requiere un gran esfuerzo de investigación para la correcta comprensión de este organismo nativo, que permita su protección y adecuado aprovechamiento. Se recomienda poner especial interés en estudios que permitan conocer completamente su distribución, el efecto de la contaminación y la pérdida de sus hábitats naturales. Es necesario también revisar la normatividad de aprovechamiento y conservación, así como desarrollar y mejorar las técnicas de manejo acuicultural.This research aims to collect and classify information on the biology and culture of the prawn Macrobrachium tenellum, in a clear and sequential manner, which would integrate the knowledge to develop new ways in research and sustainable exploitation of this resource. It covers various topics including taxonomy and systematics, geographic distribution, ecology, reproduction, development, pathology, fisheries and aquaculture of this species, taking into account all the information generated by different authors, from four decades to today. We conclude that there are significant knowledge gaps of basic and applied aspects of the biology of the species and this requires a great deal of research for the correct understanding

  14. In-Depth Cultural Studies in Multicultural Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina-Jasjukevica, Gunta; Briška, Ilze

    2016-01-01

    There is much research and educational practices at all levels of education on how to deal with promoting acceptance and understanding between different cultures. A cultural study forms an important part of shaping intercultural understanding. "The aim" of the research is to analyze an innovative way of incorporating cultural studies in…

  15. Promoting Teacher Growth through Lesson Study: A Culturally Embedded Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaeguin, Marlon

    2015-01-01

    Lesson Study has captured the attention of many international educators with its promise of improved student learning and sustained teacher growth. Lesson Study, however, has cultural underpinnings that a simple transference model overlooks. A culturally embedded approach attends to the existing cultural orientations and values of host schools.…

  16. Dilemmas of Cultural Mediation: A Case Study of Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Ajtony Zsuzsanna

    2015-01-01

    Travelling implies the encounter and, in certain cases, the clash of cultures. By interpreting translation as a means of transfer between languages and cultures, the present study looks into the different views on translating culture-specific realia. Through a close analysis of texts with the purpose of informing foreign tourists it offers ways of how to carry out this mediation. The study calls for further research into closely related issues, such as the translator’s cultural awareness of a...

  17. Sex determination of Joseon people skeletons based on anatomical, cultural and molecular biological clues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Suk; Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Sang Jun; Park, Jun Bum; Kim, Myeung Ju; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2011-12-20

    Sex determination is very integral to examinations conducted by anatomists on human skeletons discovered in the archaeological field. In Korea, as in other countries, cultural or anatomical information has been the tool of first resort in making such determinations. In cases in which anatomical examination has revealed only borderline characteristics, PCR-based analysis of X/Y-chromosome genes has been employed. Even so, there are as yet very few reports on how accurately the respective results correspond with each other. In this study on 34 examined medieval Korean skeletons, 11 (32.3%) showed perfectly matching results for the three methods of sex determination. In the cases in which the cultural and anatomical findings were discordant, the amelogenin assay corroborated either the former or the latter. Although we must admit the relatively limited role of aDNA analysis, when only very small amounts of amplifiable DNA remain, we believe that the amelogenin assay can be very meaningful to Korean anatomists when employed in adjunct to conventional anatomically or culturally based sex determination.

  18. Software theory a cultural and philosophical study

    CERN Document Server

    Frabetti, Federica

    2014-01-01

    This book engages directly in close readings of technical texts and computer code in order to show how software works. It offers an analysis of the cultural, political, and philosophical implications of software technologies that demonstrates the significance of software for the relationship between technology, philosophy, culture, and society.

  19. Convergence, Creative Industries and Civil Society Towards a New Agenda for Cultural Policy and Cultural Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Mercer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article I start with a personal experience "cameo" from 1996 in Australia and extrapolate from that some issues that remain relevant in the sometimes trou-bled relationship between cultural studies and cultural policy. These are encapsu-lated in the three "cs" of convergence, creative industries and civil society which provide a new context for both new research and new policy settings. The argu-ment is developed and situated in historical terms by examining the "cultural technologies", especially the newspaper, and subsequently print media in the 19th century, electronic media in the 20th century and digital media in the 21st century which provide the content, the technologies and the rituals for "imagining" our sense of place and belonging. This is then linked to ways of understanding culture and cultural technologies in the context of governmentality and the emergence of culture as a strategic object of policy with the aim of citizen- and population for-mation and management. This argument is then linked to four contemporary "testbeds" - cultural mapping and planning, cultural statistics and indicators, cul-tural citizenship and identity, and research of and for cultural policy - and priori-ties for cultural policy where cultural studies work has been extremely enabling and productive. The article concludes with an argument, derived from the early 20th century work of Patrick Geddes of the necessity of linking, researching, un-derstanding and operationalising the three key elements and disciplines of Folk (anthropology, Work (economics, and Place (geography in order to properly situate cultural policy, mapping and planning and their relationship to cultural studies and other disciplines.

  20. Study of the structure and dynamics of complex biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Areejit

    2008-12-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the large scale structure and system level dynamics of certain biological networks using tools from graph theory, computational biology and dynamical systems. We study the structure and dynamics of large scale metabolic networks inside three organisms, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Staphylococcus aureus. We also study the dynamics of the large scale genetic network controlling E. coli metabolism. We have tried to explain the observed system level dynamical properties of these networks in terms of their underlying structure. Our studies of the system level dynamics of these large scale biological networks provide a different perspective on their functioning compared to that obtained from purely structural studies. Our study also leads to some new insights on features such as robustness, fragility and modularity of these large scale biological networks. We also shed light on how different networks inside the cell such as metabolic networks and genetic networks are interrelated to each other.

  1. Cell and molecular biology of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias and little skate Leucoraja erinacea: insights from in vitro cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D W

    2012-04-01

    Two of the most commonly used elasmobranch experimental model species are the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias and the little skate Leucoraja erinacea. Comparative biology and genomics with these species have provided useful information in physiology, pharmacology, toxicology, immunology, evolutionary developmental biology and genetics. A wealth of information has been obtained using in vitro approaches to study isolated cells and tissues from these organisms under circumstances in which the extracellular environment can be controlled. In addition to classical work with primary cell cultures, continuously proliferating cell lines have been derived recently, representing the first cell lines from cartilaginous fishes. These lines have proved to be valuable tools with which to explore functional genomic and biological questions and to test hypotheses at the molecular level. In genomic experiments, complementary (c)DNA libraries have been constructed, and c. 8000 unique transcripts identified, with over 3000 representing previously unknown gene sequences. A sub-set of messenger (m)RNAs has been detected for which the 3' untranslated regions show elements that are remarkably well conserved evolutionarily, representing novel, potentially regulatory gene sequences. The cell culture systems provide physiologically valid tools to study functional roles of these sequences and other aspects of elasmobranch molecular cell biology and physiology. Information derived from the use of in vitro cell cultures is valuable in revealing gene diversity and information for genomic sequence assembly, as well as for identification of new genes and molecular markers, construction of gene-array probes and acquisition of full-length cDNA sequences. © 2012 The Author. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Biology and cytotoxicity of dental materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gociu, M; Pătroi, D; Prejmerean, Cristina; Păstrăv, O; Boboia, Stanca; Prodan, Doina; Moldovan, Marioara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to determine the degree of biocompatibility of a sealer (RO, laboratory made product) dental material in terms of cytotoxicity and animal tests. In the present study, the biological compatibility of eight experimental composite materials was examined by in vitro methods. The bio-composites used for the cytotoxicity test were placed into direct contact with normal human fibroblasts in a cell-culture dish. After fibroblast bioassay was performed, a duplicate sample of biomaterial was placed in each well, and then the fibroblasts were incubated for 48 hours at 37°C and 5% carbon dioxide. Local reactions after the implantation of the material regarding preclinical evaluation have been carried out within the Biobase Laboratory of the "Iuliu Hatieganu" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The biocompatibility was studied using the tolerance test by the subcutaneous and intramuscular implantation of the cured specimens. The sealant C3 scored the highest value to the cell viability. The results of the present study showed that different dental materials had different effects on cells. The resin monomer TEGDMA, present in the sealer's composition, increased the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Resin-based composites are cytotoxic before polymerization and immediately thereafter, whereas already set specimens cause almost no reaction. The test of tolerance showed that the composite materials do not contain any toxic, irritant substances or destructive ones for the living cells or tissues. The tests with experimental composite materials revealed that they are not cytotoxic for the living cells, in all versions of the materials used. All the samples of composite materials have maintained their integrity during the experiment, allowing the testing together with the embedded cells, which proved good viability, so they are suitable for dentistry use.

  3. Concepts of Culture in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Hecker

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducing the seventh issue of META, this editorial discusses prevalent concepts of culture in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies. Different conceptualizations of culture that explicitly or implicitly contain qualitative differentiations between cultures are revisited and discussed. Bearing considerable weight in the respective disciplines, the Islam-andthe-West paradigm, the delineation of diverging cultures along ethnic lines, the equation of culture with art or religion, and the culture-as-civilization paradigm are being scrutinized. Serving as an example for the confusion and lack of clarity regarding the concept of "culture", the book The Culture of Ambiguity by the German scholar of Islamic Studies Thomas Bauer is analyzed regarding its use of the term.

  4. Tumor tissue slice cultures as a platform for analyzing tissue-penetration and biological activities of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Lea; Höbel, Sabrina; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Ewe, Alexander; Bechmann, Ingo; Franke, Heike; Merz, Felicitas; Aigner, Achim

    2017-03-01

    The success of therapeutic nanoparticles depends, among others, on their ability to penetrate a tissue for actually reaching the target cells, and their efficient cellular uptake in the context of intact tissue and stroma. Various nanoparticle modifications have been implemented for altering physicochemical and biological properties. Their analysis, however, so far mainly relies on cell culture experiments which only poorly reflect the in vivo situation, or is based on in vivo experiments that are often complicated by whole-body pharmacokinetics and are rather tedious especially when analyzing larger nanoparticle sets. For the more precise analysis of nanoparticle properties at their desired site of action, efficient ex vivo systems closely mimicking in vivo tissue properties are needed. In this paper, we describe the setup of organotypic tumor tissue slice cultures for the analysis of tissue-penetrating properties and biological activities of nanoparticles. As a model system, we employ 350μm thick slice cultures from different tumor xenograft tissues, and analyze modified or non-modified polyethylenimine (PEI) complexes as well as their lipopolyplex derivatives for siRNA delivery. The described conditions for tissue slice preparation and culture ensure excellent tissue preservation for at least 14days, thus allowing for prolonged experimentation and analysis. When using fluorescently labeled siRNA for complex visualization, fluorescence microscopy of cryo-sectioned tissue slices reveals different degrees of nanoparticle tissue penetration, dependent on their surface charge. More importantly, the determination of siRNA-mediated knockdown efficacies of an endogenous target gene, the oncogenic survival factor Survivin, reveals the possibility to accurately assess biological nanoparticle activities in situ, i.e. in living cells in their original environment. Taken together, we establish tumor (xenograft) tissue slices for the accurate and facile ex vivo assessment of

  5. Screening of static culture and comparison of batch and continuous culture for the textile dye biological decolorization by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Urra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of manganese dependent peroxidase (MnP by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and the level of decolorization of 13 dyes were evaluated using static and agitated batch cultures and continuous cultures. A screening carried out under static conditions showed that the oxidative system has a certain affinity for azoic structures. For concentrations of 100 mg l-1 of Acid Black 1, Reactive Black 5, Reactive Orange 16 and Acid Red 27, decolorization percentages higher than 90% were obtained. In batch cultures with Acid Black 1 and Reactive Black 5 a significant increment in primary post-metabolism biomass was observed. For these last two dyes, it was possible to explore the response of the continuous system during 32 to 47 days, with concentrations between 25 to 400 mg l-1, obtaining decolorization percentages greater than 70% for 400 mg l-1.

  6. Improving patient safety culture in general practice: An interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verbakel (Natasha J.); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.J. Verheij; C. Wagner (Cordula); D.L.M. Zwart (Dorien Lyd Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground When improving patient safety a positive safety culture is key. As little is known about improving patient safety culture in primary care, this study examined whether administering a culture questionnaire with or without a complementary workshop could be used as an interventio

  7. Do organizations reflect national cultures? A 10-nation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oudenhoven, JP

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to cross-validate Hofstede's classification of national cultures. An additional aim was to investigate the relationship between culture as perceived and culture as desired. Over 800 advanced students of economics, business administration and management from 10 coun

  8. Japanese Culture: A Study of Origins and Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Eiichiro

    The culture and people of Japan are described from an ethnological/cultural anthropology viewpoint. The author begins his description with an introduction to the study of cultures and peoples. He then discusses the Japanese as a racial, ethnic, and language group. He later presents a historical/anthropological discussion of the formation of the…

  9. Effects of different culture conditions on biological potential and metabolites production in three Penicillium isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Filipa S; Ćirić, Ana; Stojković, Dejan; Barros, Lillian; Ljaljević-Grbić, Milica; Soković, Marina; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-02-01

    The genus Penicillium is well known for its importance in drug and food production. Certain species are produced on an industrial scale for the production of antibiotics (e.g. penicillin) or for insertion in food (e.g. cheese). In the present work, three Penicillium species, part of the natural mycobiota growing on various food products were selected - P. ochrochloron, P. funiculosum and P. verrucosum var. cyclopium. The objective of our study was to value these species from the point of view of production of bioactive metabolites. The species were obtained after inoculation and growth in Czapek and Malt media. Both mycelia and culture media were analyzed to monitor the production of different metabolites by each fungus and their release to the culture medium. The concentrations of sugars, organic acids, phenolic acids and tocopherols were determined. Antioxidant activity of the phenolic extracts was evaluated, as also the antimicrobial activity of phenolic acids, organic acids and tocopherols extracts. Rhamnose, xylose, fructose and trehalose were found in all the mycelia and culture media; the prevailing organic acids were oxalic and fumaric acids, and protocatechuic and p-hydroxybenzoic acids were the most common phenolic acids; γ-tocopherol was the most abundant vitamin E isoform. Generally, the phenolic extracts corresponding to the mycelia samples revealed higher antioxidant activity. Concerning the antimicrobial activity there were some fluctuations, however all the studied species revealed activity against the tested strains. Therefore, the in-vitro bioprocesses can be an alternative for the production of bioactive metabolites that can be used by pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Peroxisystem: harnessing systems cell biology to study peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldiner, Maya; Zalckvar, Einat

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modelling of cells, recently dubbed systems cell biology, has been harnessed to study the organisation and dynamics of simple biological systems. Here, we suggest that the peroxisome, a fascinating dynamic organelle, can be used as a good candidate for studying a complete biological system. We discuss several aspects of peroxisomes that can be studied using high-throughput systematic approaches and be integrated into a predictive model. Such approaches can be used in the future to study and understand how a more complex biological system, like a cell and maybe even ultimately a whole organism, works. © 2015 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. In vitro study of biofilm growth on biologic prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Charles; Smith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Biologic prosthetics are increasingly used for the repair of abdominal wall hernia defects but can become infected as a result of peri- or early post-operative bacterial contamination. Data evaluating biofilm formation on biologic prosthetics is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different biologic prosthetics on the growth behavior of two different bacterial species and their ability to form biofilms. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomrnonas aeruginosa were incubated on disks of two biologic prosthetics-human acellular dermis (ADM), and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The bacteria were allowed to attach to the prosthetics and propagate into mature biofilms for 24 hours at 370C. Images of biofilms were obtained using confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of viable cells and the biofilm biomass were quantified by colony forming units (CFUs) and crystal violet staining respectively. Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean values for the different prosthetics. Each biologic matrix had a distinct surface characteristic. SEM visualized mature biofilms characterized by highly organized multi-cellular structures on surface of both biologic prosthetics. Quantification of bacterial growth over time showed that ADM had the lowest CFUs and biofilm biomass at 24 hours post-inoculation compared to SIS for both bacterial strains. MRSA and P. aeruginosa can form mature biofilms on biologic prosthetics but the relative abundance of the biofilm varies on different prosthetic constructs. Biologic material composition and manufacturing methods may influence bacterial adherence.

  12. Importance of Hofstede's study of cultural dimensions to the field of cross-cultural communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周斌

    2008-01-01

    In 1980, Culture's Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values showed Geert Hofstede' s study of five cuhural dimensions: individualism versus collectivism, masculinity versus femininity, power distance, uncertainty avoidance and long-term versus short-term orientation to life. This essay discusses this theory' s weakness and usefulness as well as its importance to the cross-cultural communication that will give readers a better understanding about this cultural dimension. It concludes that Geert Hofstede's study of these five cultural dimensions is a starting point to the beginners to know about this field and the government offices even can establish economic policies according to the specific culture. It is really a useful research to the field of cross-cultural communication.

  13. Biologic Discontinuations Studies: A Systematic Review of Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Kishimoto, Mitsumasa; Matsui, Kazuo; Tohma, Shigeto; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a systematic review to assess the design and “failure definition” in studies of biologic discontinuation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We found 403 studies on PubMed, and included 9 published papers and 5 abstracts from scientific meetings. We used a structured extraction form to collect information regarding study design and outcome (failure) definition. Results Three types of studies were found: randomized controlled trials, long-term extension studies of clinical trials, and prospective discontinuation studies. The largest study had 196 subjects in the discontinuation arm. Most studies allowed concomitant use of non-biologic drugs at biologic discontinuation. Heterogeneity was also found in the failure definition. Although all studies used measures of disease activity, the threshold for failure and the time point of assessment differed among studies. Few studies incorporated changing use of non-biologic drugs or glucocorticoids into the failure definition. Conclusions Although many studies have examined the outcome of biologic discontinuation, they have all been relatively small. Typical practice studies from registries may add important information, but will likely need to rely on a broader failure definition. PMID:23723316

  14. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how activity theory can be used in (cross-)cultural medical education research. We discuss activity theory's theoretical background and principles, and we show how these can be applied to the cultural research practice by discussing the steps involved in a cross-cultural study that we conducted, from formulating research questions to drawing conclusions. We describe how the activity system, the unit of analysis in activity theory, can serve as an organizing principle to grasp cultural complexity. We end with reflections on the theoretical and practical use of activity theory for cultural research and note that it is not a shortcut to capture cultural complexity: it is a challenge for researchers to determine the boundaries of their study and to analyze and interpret the dynamics of the activity system.

  15. A Thorough Study between Language and Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于莹

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, language skill has already become an essential skill for modern people in this increasingly competitive en-vironment. Some of those training institutions and schools may only focus on teaching the language without introduction of the culture behind it. So such language education is a long-term and profitable teaching process for the students? This essay will ex-plore the relationship between language and culture and gives advice on how to learn the language.

  16. Studies of the metabolism of cell cultures by microspectrofluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehne, Wolfgang; Schramm, Werner; Moritzen, V.; Burgmann, U.; Kronfeldt, Heinz D.

    1996-01-01

    The monitoring of the state of cellular energy metabolism and respiratory activity is a necessary procedure in cell biology and pharmacology. One method is the observation of the redox state by NADH and FAD autofluorescence measurements. Using this technique, investigations on endothelial cell cultures were done to study their behavior under pharmacologic influences. One application was the investigation of cytotoxicity of cyanides, blocking the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Further we studied the activation of energy metabolism as a step of the cellular reaction on extracellular impacts. The measurements have been performed with a fluorescence microscope Zei(beta) Axioplan, extended by a PMT and a CCD camera. During examination, the cell cultures were kept under nearly physiological conditions using a specialized perfusion chamber. The measurements took place on cellular monolayers. Different excitation geometries have been studied to overcome the difficulties, which arose from the very weak absorption of the cell monolayer, resulting in a low quantum yield and SNR. In classical cytotoxicity studies, only the statistical long-time effects (e.g. IC50) of cell damages are recorded. By redox microspectrofluorometry it is possible to observe the process of damage in its progress, shown by the presented results. In the second, more complex model, we studied the reaction of cells on ligands like PIA (Phenylisopropyladenosin). In this case, the intracellular reaction is connected with an increased production of cAMP. Again, this requires an increased production of ATP, which leads to an activation of the cellular energy metabolism. The spectroscopic results are interpreted by a first model.

  17. Biological - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem response:...

  18. Dilemmas of Cultural Mediation: A Case Study of Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajtony Zsuzsanna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Travelling implies the encounter and, in certain cases, the clash of cultures. By interpreting translation as a means of transfer between languages and cultures, the present study looks into the different views on translating culture-specific realia. Through a close analysis of texts with the purpose of informing foreign tourists it offers ways of how to carry out this mediation. The study calls for further research into closely related issues, such as the translator’s cultural awareness of and sensitivity to similarity and difference, identity and alterity in culture.

  19. Biological responses of three-dimensional cultured fibroblasts by sustained compressive loading include apoptosis and survival activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Kanazawa

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are characterized by chronicity, which results in delayed wound healing due to pressure. Early intervention for preventing delayed healing due to pressure requires a prediction method. However, no study has reported the prediction of delayed healing due to pressure. Therefore, this study focused on biological response-based molecular markers for the establishment of an assessment technology to predict delayed healing due to pressure. We tested the hypothesis that sustained compressive loading applied to three dimensional cultured fibroblasts leads to upregulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs, CD44, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2, and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 along with apoptosis via disruption of adhesion. First, sustained compressive loading was applied to fibroblast-seeded collagen sponges. Following this, collagen sponge samples and culture supernatants were collected for apoptosis and proliferation assays, gene expression analysis, immunocytochemistry, and quantification of secreted substances induced by upregulation of mRNA and protein level. Compared to the control, the compressed samples demonstrated that apoptosis was induced in a time- and load- dependent manner; vinculin and stress fiber were scarce; HSP90α, CD44, HAS2, and COX2 expression was upregulated; and the concentrations of HSP90α, hyaluronan (HA, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were increased. In addition, the gene expression of antiapoptotic Bcl2 was significantly increased in the compressed samples compared to the control. These results suggest that compressive loading induces not only apoptosis but also survival activity. These observations support that HSP90α, HA, and, PGE2 could be potential molecular markers for prediction of delayed wound healing due to pressure.

  20. Karl Marx and the Study of Media and Culture Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The task of this paper discusses the role of Marx in analysing media, communica-tion and culture today. An analysis of three contemporary Cultural Studies works – Lawrence Grossberg’s monograph Cultural Studies in the Future Tense, John Hartley’s monograph Digital Futures for Cultural and Media Studies and Paul Smith’s edited volume The Renewal of Cultural Studies – shows that there is an agreement that the economy needs to be taken more into account by Cultural Studies, but disagreement on which approach should be taken and what the role of Karl Marx’s works shall be. The paper argues that Marx’s labour theory of value is especially important for critically analysing the media, culture and communica-tion. Labour is still a blind spot of the study of culture and the media, although this situation is slowly improving. It is maintained that the turn away from Marx in Cultural and Media Studies was a profound mistake that should be reverted. Only an engagement with Marx can make Cultural and Media Studies topical, politically relevant, practical and critical, in the current times of global crisis and resurgent critique.

  1. In Vivo Models to Study Chemokine Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, F A; Boff, D; Teixeira, M M

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are essential mediators of leukocyte movement in vivo. In vitro assays of leukocyte migration cannot mimic the complex interactions with other cell types and matrix needed for cells to extravasate and migrate into tissues. Therefore, in vivo strategies to study the effects and potential relevance of chemokines for the migration of particular leukocyte subsets are necessary. Here, we describe methods to study the effects and endogenous role of chemokine in mice. Advantages and pitfalls of particular models are discussed and we focus on description in model's joint and pleural cavity inflammation and the effects and relevance of CXCR2 and CCR2 ligands on cell migration.

  2. Experimental studies of animal social learning in the wild: Trying to untangle the mystery of human culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kim

    2010-08-01

    Here I discuss how studies on animal social learning may help us understand human culture. It is an evolutionary truism that complex biological adaptations always evolve from less complex but related adaptations, but occasionally evolutionary transitions lead to major biological changes whose end products are difficult to anticipate. Language-based cumulative adaptive culture in humans may represent an evolutionary transition of this type. Most of the social learning observed in animals (and even plants) may be due to mechanisms that cannot produce cumulative cultural adaptations. Likewise, much of the critical content of socially transmitted human culture seems to show no parallel in nonhuman species. Thus, with regard to the uniquely human extent and quality of culture, we are forced to ask: Are other species only a few small steps away from this transition, or do they lack multiple critical features that make us the only truly cultural species? Only future research into animal social learning can answer these questions.

  3. From Mental Game to Cultural Praxis: A Cultural Studies Model's Implications for the Future of Sport Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryba, Tatiana V.; Wright, Handel Kashope

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of a cultural studies as praxis heuristic "model: for transforming sport psychology". It provides a brief introduction to both cultural studies and sport psychology and discusses a cultural studies intersection with sport studies and sport psychology. Cultural studies, it asserts, provides one of several…

  4. [Changes of biological characteristics and gene expression profile of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells during senescence in culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xue; Li, Dong; Wang, Da-Kun; Fu, Jin-Qiu; Ju, Xiu-Li

    2012-04-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the changes of biological properties and expression patterns of the aging related genes in umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSC) during in vitro culture. UC-MSC at passage 3 were served as the control cells and those at passage 15 were considered as the aged cells. The biological features of those two kinds of cells including morphology, proliferation activity and phenotypic profile were observed, and the differences of gene expression were analysed by the whole human genome oligo microarray. Several differential genes were selected for further confirmation by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that UC-MSC at passage 15 were larger in size and their proliferation rate was slower compared with those of cells at passage 3, while the positivity of CD44 and CD105 remained unchanged. Compared with UC-MSC at passage 3, relatively aged cells expressed higher levels of genes that are associated with small subunit of ribosome. Further analysis with Gene Ontology functional categories showed that the up-regulated genes were concentrated in those related to steroid biosynthesis, galactose metabolism and the development of autoimmune diseases and degenerative diseases and the down-regulated genes in UC-MSC at passage 15 were concentrated in cytoskeleton molecules, DNA structure binding, mRNA binding and protein function. Functional analysis with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes functional pathway revealed that the expression of some genes responsible for ribosome composition was elevated while those of associated with extracellular matrix, focal adhesion and cell cycle progression were down-regulated. It is concluded that UC-MSC become senescent due to the declines in metabolism and proliferation activities.

  5. A common basis for facilitated legitimate exchange of biological materials proposed by the European Culture Collections' Organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Fritze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Being charged with the task of accessioning and supplying of living microbiological material, microbial culture collections are institutions that play a central role between the interests of a variety of user communities. On the one side are the providers of living microbiological material, such as individual scientists, institutions and countries of origin and on the other side are the various kinds of recipients/users of cultures of microorganisms from academia and industry. Thus, providing access to high quality biological material and scientific services while at the same time observing donor countries' rights, intellectual property rights, biosafety and biosecurity aspects poses demanding challenges. E.g. donor countries rights relate to Article 15 of the Convention on Biological Diversity: "Contracting parties …. recognize the sovereign rights of states over their natural resources …. shall facilitate access to resources … and not impose restrictions that run counter to the aims of the Convention. Access to natural resources shall be by mutually agreed terms and subject to prior informed consent ..." The use of a proposed standard contract by culture collections is discussed as a way of contractually safeguarding the existing research commons, while observing the new rights established in the Convention on Biological Diversity as well as other existing and new legislation impacting on the accessibility of living microbial material.

  6. A bio-cultural approach to the study of food choice: The contribution of taste genetics, population and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide S; Giuliani, Cristina; Antinucci, Marco; Morini, Gabriella; Garagnani, Paolo; Tofanelli, Sergio; Luiselli, Donata

    2017-03-31

    The study of food choice, one of the most complex human traits, requires an integrated approach that takes into account environmental, socio-cultural and biological diversity. We recruited 183 volunteers from four geo-linguistic groups and highly diversified in terms of both genetic background and food habits from whom we collected genotypes and phenotypes tightly linked to taste perception. We confirmed previous genetic associations, in particular with stevioside perception, and noted significant differences in food consumption: in particular, broccoli, mustard and beer consumption scores were significantly higher (Adjusted P = 0.02, Adjusted P groups. Licorice and Parmesan cheese showed lower consumption and liking scores in the Sri Lankan group (Adjusted P = 0.001 and Adjusted P contribution of genetics, population diversity and cultural aspects in taste perception and food consumption.

  7. Rereading of the Design of New College English at Culture Level and Culture Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛维莉

    2012-01-01

    In order to know the whole procedures of a thesis and improve my own ability of writing a thesis, the thesis of The Design of New College English at Culture Level and Culture Studies which is a graduation thesis of master degree will be reread.

  8. Data handling in cross-cultural studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Sound marketing research can significantly reduce the risk associated with new product decisions. In a globalised economy, this often requires the collection of market and consumer data across different countries, cultures, and language communities. However, are such data actually comparable? Thi......, model specification, estimation, testing, and interpretation. The chapter includes a worked example, complete with command syntax for three different software packages.......? This chapter will familiarise the reader with a set of statistical techniques by which the cross-cultural comparability of data - their measurement invariance - can explicitly be assessed. The statistical framework (multi-group confirmatory factor analysis) is described in detail, including data requirements...

  9. In-depth Cultural Studies in Multicultural Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siliņa-Jasjukeviča Gunta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is much research and educational practices at all levels of education on how to deal with promoting acceptance and understanding between different cultures. A cultural study forms an important part of shaping intercultural understanding. The aim of the research is to analyze an innovative way of incorporating cultural studies in teacher education program from the perspective of encouraging multinational students to reveal common values within diverse manifestations of different cultures. The present article describes a qualitative study of multinational students’ experiences in international project related to the learning about Nordic and Baltic cultural traditions. In the conclusion of the article, the efficiency of the structure of content and the process of in-depth cultural studies are analyzed. The discussion contains problems for further research of this topic.

  10. Biological Recovery of Platinum Complexes from Diluted Aqueous Streams by Axenic Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Synthia; Props, Ruben; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; De Smet, Rebecca; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2017-01-01

    The widespread use of platinum in high-tech and catalytic applications has led to the production of diverse Pt loaded wastewaters. Effective recovery strategies are needed for the treatment of low concentrated waste streams to prevent pollution and to stimulate recovery of this precious resource. The biological recovery of five common environmental Pt-complexes was studied under acidic conditions; the chloro-complexes PtCl42- and PtCl62-, the amine-complex Pt(NH3)4Cl2 and the pharmaceutical complexes cisplatin and carboplatin. Five bacterial species were screened on their platinum recovery potential; the Gram-negative species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34, Geobacter metallireducens, and Pseudomonas stutzeri, and the Gram-positive species Bacillus toyonensis. Overall, PtCl42- and PtCl62- were completely recovered by all bacterial species while only S. oneidensis and C. metallidurans were able to recover cisplatin quantitatively (99%), all in the presence of H2 as electron donor at pH 2. Carboplatin was only partly recovered (max. 25% at pH 7), whereas no recovery was observed in the case of the Pt-tetraamine complex. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of both intra- and extracellular platinum particles. Flow cytometry based microbial viability assessment demonstrated the decrease in number of intact bacterial cells during platinum reduction and indicated C. metallidurans to be the most resistant species. This study showed the effective and complete biological recovery of three common Pt-complexes, and estimated the fate and transport of the Pt-complexes in wastewater treatment plants and the natural environment. PMID:28046131

  11. Qualitative study of three cell culture methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiguo; Xia, Tao; Ran, Peng; Chen, Xuemin; Nuessler, Andreas K

    2002-01-01

    Primary rat hepatocytes were cultured using different in vitro models and the enzyme leakage, albumin secretion, and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP 1A) activity were observed. The results showed that the level of LDH was decreased over time in culture. However, on day 5, LDH showed a significant increase in monolayer culture (MC) while after day 8 no LDH was detectable in sandwich culture (SC). The levels of AST and ALT did not change significantly over the investigated time. The CYP 1A activity was gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner in MC and SC. The decline of CYP 1A was faster in MC than in SC. This effect was partially reversed by using cytochrome P450 (CYP450) inducer such as Omeprazol and 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and the CYP 1A induction was always higher in MC than in SC. In bioreactor basic CYP 1A activity was preserved over 2 weeks and the highest albumin production was observed in bioreactor followed by SC and MC. Taken together, it was indicated each investigated model had its advantages and disadvantages. It was also underlined that various in vitro models may address different questions.

  12. Amnesiology: Towards the study of cultural oblivion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plate, L.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that memory is a dialectic involving both remembering and forgetting. Also, there is agreement among cultural memory scholars that acts of memory seek to counter the effects of forgetting: they serve the imperative to remember and impede the work of forgetting. This article

  13. Geographical Study of American Blues Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Music is not often utilized in teaching geography, despite the fact that many scholars orient their research around analyzing both the historical and spatial dimensions of musical expression. This article reports on the use of a teaching module that utilizes blues culture as a lens to understand the geographical history of the United States. The…

  14. Data handling in cross-cultural studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Sound marketing research can significantly reduce the risk associated with new product decisions. In a globalised economy, this often requires the collection of market and consumer data across different countries, cultures, and language communities. However, are such data actually comparable? Thi...

  15. Why Lesson Study Works in Japan: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaeguin, Marlon; Stephens, Max

    2014-01-01

    Japanese lesson study has attracted many international educators who have been impressed by its capacity to foster student learning and sustained professional growth of teachers. This paper reports a study on its cultural orientations that may explain why lesson study works seamlessly in Japan. Hofstede's dimensions of national culture are…

  16. The method for calculation of the energy density of culture media based on stoichiometrical patterns of the biological oxidative process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Khokhlova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposed method for calculation of the energy value of culture media is based on stoichiometric properties of biological oxidative reactions in the cell and allows for assessment of the nutritional value of organic substrates with consideration of their elemental composition. Three organogen elements (carbon, hydrogen and oxygen participate in the third stage of catabolism, which is the universal way of biological oxidation of organic nutritive substrate compounds. Their content in the composition of an organic compound (or food substrate allows for calculation of the amount of energy converted into work during cellular metabolism. The idea to calculate the energy value of a food substrate is based on the principle of energetic conjugation, according to which the useful energy of food substrates within the cell is accumulated in the energy-rich adenosine triphosphate (ATP bonds formed by biological oxidation of the substrate. Calculation of the energy values of organic substrate is traditionally based on the energy of the abiotic oxidation. The proportion of the useful energy converted into work is not considered in this case. The inherent problem of this approach is that the amount of ATP has been calculated only for several universal metabolites with known oxidative pathways, such as pyruvate and acetate. The proposed method is based on stoichiometric patterns and makes it possible to calculate the amount of ATP from the elemental composition of compounds and the mass fractions of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. The results of calculation of biological oxidation energy obtained by this method coincide with the published data on biological oxidation metabolites in the citric acid cycle. The presented method, based on the composition of the compounds, allows for calculation of the energy value of any food substrate or culture medium containing a variety of organic compounds, including the case when their metabolic pathway of biological

  17. Insights from Systems Biology in Physiological Studies: Learning from Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Imenez Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology presents an integrated view of biological systems, focusing on the relations between elements, whether functional or evolutionary, and providing a rich framework for the comprehension of life. At the same time, many low-throughput experimental studies are performed without influence from this integrated view, whilst high-throughput experiments use low-throughput results in their validation and interpretation. We propose an inversion in this logic, and ask which benefits could be obtained from a holistic view coming from high-throughput studies―and systems biology in particular―in interpreting and designing low-throughput experiments. By exploring some key examples from the renal and adrenal physiology, we try to show that network and modularity theory, along with observed patterns of association between elements in a biological system, can have profound effects on our ability to draw meaningful conclusions from experiments.

  18. STUDY OF CULTURING CARDIOVASCULAR TISSUE IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成少飞; 叶清

    2004-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of utilizing vascular cells combined with folded and framed culture model to develop completely autologous human tissue without using any scaffold material under the principles of Tissue Engineering. Methods Human vascular cells cultured from ascending aorta (group A) and saphenous vein (group B) were seeded into 15cm-dishes (each n =12 ) and cultured to form cell sheets over a period of four weeks with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with lmmol/L L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate. Thereafter, cell sheets (6 samples of each group) were four-layer folded and cultured in a newly developed frame device for additional four weeks. Controls remained under standard culture conditions. Tissue development was evaluated by light and electron microscopy, biochemical assays. Results The formation of multi-layered cell sheets and production of extracellular matrix were observed in each group after the initial four weeks. Analysis of the folded and framed neo-tissue revealed a solid structure with increased matrix formation and tissue organization compared to the control groups after additional four weeks. DNA assay indicated significantly lower cell proliferation in folded and framed cell sheets than in that of unframed counterparts. Yet hydroxyproline assay demonstrated significant increase of collagen content in the framed aortic and venous derived tissues, which contained 82 % and 42 % that of human pericardium. Conclusion It is feasible to obtain completely autologous human cardiovascular tissue with the alternative new approach. Numerous issues including improvement of mechanical strength of neo-tissue remain to be investingated.

  19. Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    hippocampal slice samples to better understand blast-induced brain damage. 15. SUBJECT TERMS RDX spheres , organotypic cultures of hippocampus, small...Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices by Thuvan Piehler, Rohan Banton, Lars Piehler, Richard Benjamin, Ray...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-TR-7197 April 2015 Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices Thuvan

  20. From Cultural Studies to Cultural Research: Engaged Scholarship in the Twenty-first Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ien Ang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Is, or should cultural studies be, a discipline or not? What exactly is its object? Should cultural studies be focused on influencing policy or be an agent of critique? What is the role of theory? What kind of theory? Should textual analysis or ethnography predominate? The regular reiteration of such questions reveals an ongoing sense of crisis, a general apprehensiveness over the question whether cultural studies is able to live up to its own self-declared aspirations, both intellectually and politically.

  1. From Cultural Studies to Cultural Research: Engaged Scholarship in the Twenty-first Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ien Ang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available  Is, or should cultural studies be, a discipline or not? What exactly is its object? Should cultural studies be focused on influencing policy or be an agent of critique? What is the role of theory? What kind of theory? Should textual analysis or ethnography predominate? The regular reiteration of such questions reveals an ongoing sense of crisis, a general apprehensiveness over the question whether cultural studies is able to live up to its own self-declared aspirations, both intellectually and politically.

  2. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Liao, WeiMing; Sheng, PuYi; Fu, Ming; He, AiShan; Huang, Gang

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell's replication activity and the donor's age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering. hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: 61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell, and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro. The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula "TD = t x log2/logNt - logN0" was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the 61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=0.002, PhADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger donators, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  3. Systems Toxicology Assessment of the Biological Impact of a Candidate Modified Risk Tobacco Product on Human Organotypic Oral Epithelial Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Filippo; Sewer, Alain; Mathis, Carole; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Schlage, Walter K; Leroy, Patrice; Majeed, Shoaib; Guedj, Emmanuel; Trivedi, Keyur; Martin, Florian; Elamin, Ashraf; Merg, Céline; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Frentzel, Stefan; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-08-15

    Cigarette smoke (CS) has been reported to increase predisposition to oral cancer and is also recognized as a risk factor for many conditions including periodontal diseases, gingivitis, and other benign mucosal disorders. Smoking cessation remains the most effective approach for minimizing the risk of smoking-related diseases. However, reduction of harmful constituents by heating rather than combusting tobacco, without modifying the amount of nicotine, is a promising new paradigm in harm reduction. In this study, we compared effects of exposure to aerosol derived from a candidate modified risk tobacco product, the tobacco heating system (THS) 2.2, with those of CS generated from the 3R4F reference cigarette. Human organotypic oral epithelial tissue cultures (EpiOral, MatTek Corporation) were exposed for 28 min to 3R4F CS or THS2.2 aerosol, both diluted with air to comparable nicotine concentrations (0.32 or 0.51 mg nicotine/L aerosol/CS for 3R4F and 0.31 or 0.46 mg/L for THS2.2). We also tested one higher concentration (1.09 mg/L) of THS2.2. A systems toxicology approach was employed combining cellular assays (i.e., cytotoxicity and cytochrome P450 activity assays), comprehensive molecular investigations of the buccal epithelial transcriptome (mRNA and miRNA) by means of computational network biology, measurements of secreted proinflammatory markers, and histopathological analysis. We observed that the impact of 3R4F CS was greater than THS2.2 aerosol in terms of cytotoxicity, morphological tissue alterations, and secretion of inflammatory mediators. Analysis of the transcriptomic changes in the exposed oral cultures revealed significant perturbations in various network models such as apoptosis, necroptosis, senescence, xenobiotic metabolism, oxidative stress, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NFE2L2) signaling. The stress responses following THS2.2 aerosol exposure were markedly decreased, and the exposed cultures recovered more completely compared

  4. Identification of bacterial cultures from archaeological wood using molecular biological techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, A.C.; Martiny, Adam Camillo; Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider

    2004-01-01

    with 21 clones was constructed by extracting and amplifying 16S rDNA sequences from the individual cultures. One clone was phylogenetically affiliated to the Spirochaeta. Eleven clones affiliated to an unidentified member of the alpha-Proteobacteria were present in all culture samples. Three clones were...

  5. "We Share the Same Biology..." Cultivating Cross-Cultural Empathy and Global Ethics through Multilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolbin, Cyrus; Chiesa, Bruno Della

    2010-01-01

    The "language-culture tesseract" hypothesized in the September 2010 issue of "Mind, Brain, and Education" suggests successive links between non-native language (NNL) acquisition, the development of cross-cultural empathy, and prosocial global ethics. Invoking Goethe's (1833/1999) aphorism, "those who do not know other languages know nothing of…

  6. Reproductive biology of feather back, chital (Notopterus chitala, Ham. cultured in a pond of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H.M. Kohinoor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on Gonadosomatic index (GSI, ova diameter and histology of the gonad were performed to understand reproductive biology of Feather back, Chital (Notopterus chitala for a period of 6 months from January to June 2010. Thirty live chital fish were used in this study. The mean GSI values for female chital were found to range between 0.20±0.013 and 4.63±0.50. The highest GSI value was found in June. The smallest diameter of ovum was recorded 0.04 mm (January and the largest was 4.00 mm (June. During the experimental period, the fecundity was ranged from 8,238 to 18,569 (mean 13,052±4607 in fish samples with body weight range from 1,296 to 2,360 (mean 1,742.50±474.44 g while the relative fecundity was 5.65 to 14.33. Histological study revealed that the percentage of late perinucleolus (LPN stage was highest in April and Cortical alveoli (CA stage appeared from April and reached to maximum in May. Vitellogenic stage (VG appeared in the month of May and chronologically increased through June. Vitellogenic stage (VG of oocyte as well as highest ova diameter reached to the peak in June. The variations in the gonad weight and GSI of the female fish reached to the peak during June indicating maturity of ovary and definite spawning season.

  7. CULTURAL STUDIES: INSTITUTIONAL CRISIS OR THE TIME OF STRATEGIC DECISIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Ya. Murzina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to signify of the problems of cultural studies as a science and educational practice in a situation of modernization of education. The publication continues the discussion started at the alignment meeting of Heads of Cultural Studies Departments in Russia – «The science of culture and cultural education: time for strategic decisions». Methods. The author has applied the following methods: analysis of existing points of view; reflection of the essence of the cultural knowledge and perspectives of cultural development of cultural studies science in Russia. Results. The research outcomes show that cultural studies in modern Russia are experiencing institutional crisis: insufficient definiteness and awareness by experts and publicity due to places and roles of culturological disciplines in educational process, but also the methodological bases of activity of culturologists. Aspects of culturological formation are considered and prospects of its development are specified. It was proposed to continue the discussion started at the alignment meeting of Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, and it will give an option to discuss the solution ways of current recessionary situation more fundamentally and subjectively on territory-regional level. Scientific novelty. The approaches to understanding the culture as areas of scientific knowledge are methodized; the areas of cultural education in the conditions of modernization are summarized. Practical significance. The research implementations can be used while improving the theoretical-methodological component of cultural education, and extending the horizons for topical current research works in the field of cultural studies

  8. A Cultural Interpretation of a Social Studies Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcott, John H.

    Social studies documents were collected from teachers in the Tucson, Arizona area and examined using three theories of culture as a way to explore the interrelationships between social studies curriculum and United States society. Malinowski's functionalist position suggests that culture is composed of traits each of which provide a specific…

  9. Third Culture Kids and College Support: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdren, Sarah Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This single site case study applies the "Transition Cycle" framework (Pollock & Van Reken, 2009) to an institutionally-based, student-run support program for Third Culture Kids. The purpose of this study was to examine how Lewis and Clark College responded to the presence of Third Culture Kid, or Global Nomad, students on campus by…

  10. Communicating Investment: Cultural Studies, Affect and the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, publishers' catalogues have showcased a continuing supply of introductory readers, taxonomies and evaluations of cultural studies, largely for teaching purposes. In this article, the author suggests that the current climate of academic publishing has allowed cultural studies' particular investment and commitment to scholarly…

  11. Cultural Awareness of Chinese English Teacher:a Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hong; LUO Liu-ping

    2014-01-01

    As English is becoming an international Language, English teaching in China, especially at tertiary level, is transform-ing from linguistic study to interpersonal communication and cross-cultural communication. The case study of this article reaches a conclusion that English teachers should make every effort to cultivate cultural awareness.

  12. Directing experimental biology: a case study in mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Matthew A; Myers, Chad L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Hess, David C; Li, Kai; Caudy, Amy A; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2009-03-01

    Computational approaches have promised to organize collections of functional genomics data into testable predictions of gene and protein involvement in biological processes and pathways. However, few such predictions have been experimentally validated on a large scale, leaving many bioinformatic methods unproven and underutilized in the biology community. Further, it remains unclear what biological concerns should be taken into account when using computational methods to drive real-world experimental efforts. To investigate these concerns and to establish the utility of computational predictions of gene function, we experimentally tested hundreds of predictions generated from an ensemble of three complementary methods for the process of mitochondrial organization and biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The biological data with respect to the mitochondria are presented in a companion manuscript published in PLoS Genetics (doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000407). Here we analyze and explore the results of this study that are broadly applicable for computationalists applying gene function prediction techniques, including a new experimental comparison with 48 genes representing the genomic background. Our study leads to several conclusions that are important to consider when driving laboratory investigations using computational prediction approaches. While most genes in yeast are already known to participate in at least one biological process, we confirm that genes with known functions can still be strong candidates for annotation of additional gene functions. We find that different analysis techniques and different underlying data can both greatly affect the types of functional predictions produced by computational methods. This diversity allows an ensemble of techniques to substantially broaden the biological scope and breadth of predictions. We also find that performing prediction and validation steps iteratively allows us to more completely characterize a biological

  13. Directing experimental biology: a case study in mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Hibbs

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Computational approaches have promised to organize collections of functional genomics data into testable predictions of gene and protein involvement in biological processes and pathways. However, few such predictions have been experimentally validated on a large scale, leaving many bioinformatic methods unproven and underutilized in the biology community. Further, it remains unclear what biological concerns should be taken into account when using computational methods to drive real-world experimental efforts. To investigate these concerns and to establish the utility of computational predictions of gene function, we experimentally tested hundreds of predictions generated from an ensemble of three complementary methods for the process of mitochondrial organization and biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The biological data with respect to the mitochondria are presented in a companion manuscript published in PLoS Genetics (doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000407. Here we analyze and explore the results of this study that are broadly applicable for computationalists applying gene function prediction techniques, including a new experimental comparison with 48 genes representing the genomic background. Our study leads to several conclusions that are important to consider when driving laboratory investigations using computational prediction approaches. While most genes in yeast are already known to participate in at least one biological process, we confirm that genes with known functions can still be strong candidates for annotation of additional gene functions. We find that different analysis techniques and different underlying data can both greatly affect the types of functional predictions produced by computational methods. This diversity allows an ensemble of techniques to substantially broaden the biological scope and breadth of predictions. We also find that performing prediction and validation steps iteratively allows us to more completely

  14. Study of cultured bovine capsular bag in pure ocular tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-qing; LI Qiu-ming

    2006-01-01

    @@ The proliferation, differentiation and fibrosis of lens epithelia cells (LECs) is mainly responsible for posterior capsular opacification (PCO). From the primary culture of LECs to the culture of lens capsular bag, the models of posterior capsular opacification have been developed. At present, the most commonly used model is cell culture in medium with serum. But the culture in pure ocular tissue has not been reported. Therefore, we established a new model of posterior capsular opacification-culturing bovine lens capsular bag in pure ocular tissue to exclude the role of serum. Our study established a new culture method to investigate the proliferation,differentiation and apoptosis of lens epithelia cells in the aqueous humor with or without lens cortex and vitreous humor. The purpose of the study is to model posterior capsular opacification in vivo as closely as possible and to discuss the influence of ocular tissue on posterior capsular opacification.

  15. Psychological and biological foundations of time preference: evidence from a day reconstruction study with biological tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Michael; Delaney, Liam; Harmon, Colm

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between the economic concept of time preference and relevant concepts from psychology and biology. Using novel data from a time diary study conducted in Ireland that combined detailed psychometric testing with medical testing and real-time bio-tracking, we examine the distribution of a number of psychometric measures linked to the economic concept of time preferences and test the extent to which these measures form coherent clusters and the degree to whic...

  16. Pilot Study on Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cultured with Biological Materials P (3HB-co-4HB) as Cell Patch%骨髓间充质干细胞与聚3-羟基丁酸酯-co-4-羟基丁酸酯生物材料共培养细胞补片的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛红星; 穆军升; 张健群; 胡平; 伯平; 王艳

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究聚3-羟基丁酸酯-co-4-羟基丁酸酯[P(3HB-co-4HB)]这种新型高分子材料与骨髓间充质干细胞(BMSCs)共培养,观察材料对干细胞的存活及增殖的影响,形成细胞补片的效果;从而找到一种适合BMSCs生长、增殖的高分子生物材料,作为治疗心肌梗死,软骨损伤等多种组织损伤疾病的修复方法之一.方法:取清洁级雄性健康BSL-C57小鼠作为实验对象,通过分离培养获得小鼠BMSCs,并进行流式细胞仪鉴定表面标志物.BMSCs培养至5代后,将BMSCs与P(3HB-co-4HB)制成的生物材料薄膜共培养,24h后固定进行电镜扫描,并用DAPI荧光染料染色处理,在荧光显微镜下观察并进行细胞计数,并描绘生长曲线.结果:BMSCs流式细胞术鉴定:CD34、CD45阴性,CD90弱阳性,CD73阳性.扫描电镜下,P(3HB-co-4HB)材料与BMSCs共培养形成的细胞补片,其表面细胞数量多,细胞状态正常.荧光显微镜下,对其细胞补片表面的细胞进行计数,并绘制生长曲线,显示表面细胞有逐渐增多的趋势.结论:P (3HB-co-4HB)材料与BMSCs共培养制成的细胞补片表面有细胞存活及增殖,由于P(3HB-co-4HB)材料本身具有良好的生物组织相容性及可降解等性质,所以该新型高分子材料可以作为干细胞治疗多种疾病的支架材料之一.%Objective: To study poly 3 - hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate [P (3HB-co-4HB)] new polymer materials co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, observe the impact of materials of cell proliferation, find a polymer biomaterials fit for the stem cell survival, as one of the treatment of variety of diseases patch. Method; Take clean male healthy BSL-C57 mice as an experiment animals, use the 3rd generations through isolated and cultured for murinev and the identification with flow cytometry. Use 3rd generation bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell and P (3HB-co-4HB) made of biological material film a total of culture, After 24h fixed

  17. A case study of organisational Cultural Competence in mental healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Jean; Warfa, Nasir; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2011-09-15

    Ensuring Cultural Competence (CC) in health care is a mechanism to deliver culturally appropriate care and optimise recovery. In policies that promote cultural competence, the training of mental health practitioners is a key component of a culturally competent organisation. This study examines staff perceptions of CC and the integration of CC principles in a mental healthcare organisation. The purpose is to show interactions between organisational and individual processes that help or hinder recovery orientated services. We carried out a case study of a large mental health provider using a cultural competence needs analysis. We used structured and semi-structured questionnaires to explore the perceptions of healthcare professionals located in one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse areas of England, its capital city London. There was some evidence that clinical staff were engaged in culturally competent activities. We found a growing awareness of cultural competence amongst staff in general, and many had attended training. However, strategic plans and procedures that promote cultural competence tended to not be well communicated to all frontline staff; whilst there was little understanding at corporate level of culturally competent clinical practices. The provider organisation had commenced a targeted recruitment campaign to recruit staff from under-represented ethnic groups and it developed collaborative working patterns with service users. There is evidence to show tentative steps towards building cultural competence in the organisation. However, further work is needed to embed cultural competence principles and practices at all levels of the organisation, for example, by introducing monitoring systems that enable organisations to benchmark their performance as a culturally capable organisation.

  18. A case study of organisational cultural competence in mental healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhui Kamaldeep

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ensuring Cultural Competence (CC in health care is a mechanism to deliver culturally appropriate care and optimise recovery. In policies that promote cultural competence, the training of mental health practitioners is a key component of a culturally competent organisation. This study examines staff perceptions of CC and the integration of CC principles in a mental healthcare organisation. The purpose is to show interactions between organisational and individual processes that help or hinder recovery orientated services. Methods We carried out a case study of a large mental health provider using a cultural competence needs analysis. We used structured and semi-structured questionnaires to explore the perceptions of healthcare professionals located in one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse areas of England, its capital city London. Results There was some evidence that clinical staff were engaged in culturally competent activities. We found a growing awareness of cultural competence amongst staff in general, and many had attended training. However, strategic plans and procedures that promote cultural competence tended to not be well communicated to all frontline staff; whilst there was little understanding at corporate level of culturally competent clinical practices. The provider organisation had commenced a targeted recruitment campaign to recruit staff from under-represented ethnic groups and it developed collaborative working patterns with service users. Conclusion There is evidence to show tentative steps towards building cultural competence in the organisation. However, further work is needed to embed cultural competence principles and practices at all levels of the organisation, for example, by introducing monitoring systems that enable organisations to benchmark their performance as a culturally capable organisation.

  19. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  20. Advancement in bioprocess technology: parallels between microbial natural products and cell culture biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A; Khetan, Anurag; Malmberg, Li-Hong; Zhou, Weichang; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2017-02-09

    The emergence of natural products and industrial microbiology nearly eight decades ago propelled an era of bioprocess innovation. Half a century later, recombinant protein technology spurred the tremendous growth of biologics and added mammalian cells to the forefront of industrial producing cells in terms of the value of products generated. This review highlights the process technology of natural products and protein biologics. Despite the separation in time, there is a remarkable similarity in their progression. As the new generation of therapeutics for gene and cell therapy emerges, its process technology development can take inspiration from that of natural products and biologics.

  1. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  2. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  3. Examining Culture's Impact on the Learning Behaviors of International Students from Confucius Culture Studying in Western Online Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haijun; Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of shared understanding of how culture impacts learning in online environment. Utilizing document analysis, the authors in this research study culture's impact on the learning behaviors of student sojourners from Confucius culture studying in Western online learning context. The shared understandings of Confucius culture and…

  4. Hydro biological Characteristics of Some Semi-intensive fish culture ponds of Lumding town of Nagaon district, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapashi Gupta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrobiological assessment is useful for assessing the ecological quality of aquatic ecosystem since biological communities integrate the environmental effects of water chemistry. Ten fish ponds from Lumding town, which were under semi-intensive culture practice, were selected for hydrobiological investigations. Physico-chemical properties were studied for a period of two years from July 2009 to June 2011.Some selected parameters like pH, dissolve oxygen, free carbon dioxide, TDS , total alkalinity, total hardness, sp. Conductivity, transparency and BOD were studied on some fish pond water. P H ranges from 6.1 to8.5. Temperature ranges from 18 0 C-32 0 C. Color shows light green to dirty green. Transparency ranges 17-42cm, dissolve oxygen ranges from 3.2-8.0 ppm, total alkalinity ranges from 7.9-20.0ppm, Hardness ranges from 60-135 ppm, sp.conductance ranges from123-247µmhos/cm and BOD ranges from3.1-5.0ppm. The phytoplankton belonging to division Chlorophycae and Cyanophycae are predominant over the others and zooplanktons belonging to group Protozoa, Rotifers are predominant. . A total of 30 species of belonging to Chlorophycae. Cyanophycae were identified and a total of 20 species of Rotifera, 2 species of Cladocera and 1 genus of Copepods were found. The present study is expected to help achieve better and higher yield of fish by the fish farmer with increasing awareness regarding the hydrobiological feature of the pond and implement scientific management practices accordingly

  5. Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) Cell Culture Unit (CCU) and incubator for International Space Station (ISS) cell culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriesche, Donald; Parrish, Joseph; Kirven-Brooks, Melissa; Fahlen, Thomas; Larenas, Patricia; Havens, Cindy; Nakamura, Gail; Sun, Liping; Krebs, Chris; de Luis, Javier; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Searby, Nancy D

    2004-03-01

    The CCU and Incubator are habitats under development by SSBRP for gravitational biology research on ISS. They will accommodate multiple specimen types and reside in either Habitat Holding Racks, or the Centrifuge Rotor, which provides selectable gravity levels of up to 2 g. The CCU can support multiple Cell Specimen Chambers, CSCs (18, 9 or 6 CSCs; 3, 10 or 30 mL in volume, respectively). CSCs are temperature controlled from 4-39 degrees C, with heat shock to 45 degrees C. CCU provides automated nutrient supply, magnetic stirring, pH/O2 monitoring, gas supply, specimen lighting, and video microscopy. Sixty sample containers holding up to 2 mL each, stored at 4-39 degrees C, are available for automated cell sampling, subculture, and injection of additives and fixatives. CSCs, sample containers, and fresh/spent media bags are crew-replaceable for long-term experiments. The Incubator provides a 4-45 degrees C controlled environment for life science experiments or storage of experimental reagents. Specimen containers and experiment unique equipment are experimenter-provided. The Specimen Chamber exchanges air with ISS cabin and has 18.8 liters of usable volume that can accommodate six trays and the following instrumentation: five relocatable thermometers, two 60 W power outlets, four analog ports, and one each relative humidity sensor, video port, ethernet port and digital input/output port.

  6. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 1: synthesis, characterization, and biological evaluation in 2D cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumors. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on the cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be significantly enhanced through receptor mediated endocytosis. In addition, if the receptor is recycled to the cell surface, the NP cargo can be transported out of the cells, which is then taken up by neighboring cells thus enhancing solid tumor penetration. To validate our hypothesis, in the first of two articles, we report the synthesis of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded, hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44, a receptor expressed on the cancer cell surface. HA was conjugated onto amine-functionalized SNPs prepared through an oil-water microemulsion method. The immobilization of the cytotoxic drug DOX was achieved through an acid sensitive hydrazone linkage. The NPs were fully characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-vis absorbance, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Initial biological evaluation experiments demonstrated that compared to ligand-free SNPs, the uptake of HA-SNPs by the CD44-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was significantly enhanced when evaluated in the 2D monolayer cell culture. Mechanistic studies suggested that cellular uptake of HA-SNPs was mainly through CD44 mediated endocytosis. HA-SNPs with immobilized DOX were endocytosed efficiently by the SKOV-3 cells as well. The enhanced tumor penetration and drug delivery properties of HA-SNPs will be evaluated in 3D tumor models in the subsequent paper.Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumors. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on the cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be

  7. Application of culture culture-independent molecular biology based methods to evaluate acetic acid bacteria diversity during vinegar processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilabaca, Carolina; Navarrete, Paola; Mardones, Pamela; Romero, Jaime; Mas, Albert

    2008-08-15

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are considered fastidious microorganisms because they are difficult to isolate and cultivate. Different molecular approaches were taken to detect AAB diversity, independently of their capacity to grow in culture media. Those methods were tested in samples that originated during traditional vinegar production. Bacterial diversity was assessed by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, obtained by PCR amplifications of DNA extracted directly from the acetification container. Bacterial composition was analyzed by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA gene, Temporal Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) separation of amplicons containing region V3-V5 of 16S rRNA gene and cloning of those amplicons. TTGE bands and clones were grouped based on their electrophoretic pattern similarity and sequenced to be compared with reference strains. The main microorganism identified in vinegar was Acetobacter pasteurianus, which at the end of the acetification process was considered to be the only microorganism present. The diversity was the highest at 2% acetic acid, where indefinite species of Gluconacetobacter xylinus/europaeus/intermedius were also present.

  8. Inhibitory effects of butyrate on biological hydrogen production with mixed anaerobic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xian-Jun; Yu, Han-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this study batch experiments were conducted to investigate the inhibitory effects of butyrate addition on hydrogen production from glucose by using anaerobic mixed cultures. Experimental results showed that addition of butyrate at 4.18 and 6.27 g/l only slightly inhibited hydrogen production, and addition of butyrate at 8.36-12.54 g/l imposed a moderate inhibitory effect on hydrogen production. At addition of 25.08 g/l, butyrate had a strong inhibitory influence on substrate degradation and hydrogen production. The distribution of the volatile fatty acids produced from the acidogeneisis of glucose was significantly influenced by the addition of butyrate. The inhibition of butyrate addition on hydrogen production was described well by a non-competitive and non-linear inhibition model, with the maximum hydrogen production rate of 59.3 ml/g-SS/h, critical added butyrate concentration of 25.08 g/l, and inhibition degree of 0.323, respectively. The C(I,50) values (the butyrate concentration at which bioactivity is reduced by 50%) for hydrogen production rate and yield were estimated as 19.39 and 20.78 g/l of added butyrate, respectively.

  9. Biological effects of cigarette smoke in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice L Yu

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to determine whether treatment with cigarette smoke extract (CSE induces cell loss, cellular senescence, and extracellular matrix (ECM synthesis in primary human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells. Primary cultured human RPE cells were exposed to 2, 4, 8, and 12% of CSE concentration for 24 hours. Cell loss was detected by cell viability assay. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by loss of cis-parinaric acid (PNA fluorescence. Senescence-associated ß-galactosidase (SA-ß-Gal activity was detected by histochemical staining. Expression of apolipoprotein J (Apo J, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, fibronectin, and laminin were examined by real-time PCR, western blot, or ELISA experiments. The results showed that exposure of cells to 12% of CSE concentration induced cell death, while treatment of cells with 2, 4, and 8% CSE increased lipid peroxidation. Exposure to 8% of CSE markedly increased the number of SA-ß-Gal positive cells to up to 82%, and the mRNA expression of Apo J, CTGF, and fibronectin by approximately 3-4 fold. Treatment with 8% of CSE also increased the protein expression of Apo J and CTGF and the secretion of fibronectin and laminin. Thus, treatment with CSE can induce cell loss, senescent changes, and ECM synthesis in primary human RPE cells. It may be speculated that cigarette smoke could be involved in cellular events in RPE cells as seen in age-related macular degeneration.

  10. Studies on experimental culture of a marine ciliate Fabrea salina

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rattan, R.; Ansari, Z.A.; Chatterji, A.

    Studies were conducted on the culture of a marine ciliate, Fabrea salina in the laboratory condition. Three types of inert feed; commercial yeast, fermented wheat bran and fermented rise bran were tested to study their suitability as artificial feed...

  11. "Two Cultures" Topics for General Studies Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Theses proposed in C. P. Snow's book "The Two Cultures," including uncommunicative scientific and literary groups, gap between rich and poor, overpopulation, and nuclear war remain viable topics. Discusses the scientific and literary cultural gap and what can be done in general studies science courses to ameliorate the condition. (Author/JN)

  12. A Longitudinal Study on Newcomers' Perception of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Duygu; Altuntas, Ceren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse how newcomers' perceptions of organisational culture can change over time. The study tries to address whether initial working experience changes newcomers' perceptions about the ideal organisational culture, and whether these perceptions converge with those of their supervisors.…

  13. A Longitudinal Study on Newcomers' Perception of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Duygu; Altuntas, Ceren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse how newcomers' perceptions of organisational culture can change over time. The study tries to address whether initial working experience changes newcomers' perceptions about the ideal organisational culture, and whether these perceptions converge with those of their supervisors.…

  14. Rapid Rural Appraisal: A Study of Gullah Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Charles W.; Lucas, David M.

    Principles of rural sociology and interpersonal communication provide the foundation for a study of "Gullah" culture. The Gullahs are a group of African Americans living along the southwestern U.S. coastal territory. Gullah culture began to evolve with the enslavement of African people in the Sea Islands off the coasts of South Carolina, Georgia,…

  15. The Limits of Cultural Competence: An Indigenous Studies Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Taking the Universities Australia report, "National best practice framework for Indigenous cultural competency in Australian universities" (2011) as the starting point for its discussion, this paper examines the applicability of cultural competence in the design and delivery of Australian Indigenous Studies. It argues that both the…

  16. "Two Cultures" Topics for General Studies Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Theses proposed in C. P. Snow's book "The Two Cultures," including uncommunicative scientific and literary groups, gap between rich and poor, overpopulation, and nuclear war remain viable topics. Discusses the scientific and literary cultural gap and what can be done in general studies science courses to ameliorate the condition.…

  17. "Two Cultures" Topics for General Studies Science Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.

    1982-01-01

    Theses proposed in C. P. Snow's book "The Two Cultures," including uncommunicative scientific and literary groups, gap between rich and poor, overpopulation, and nuclear war remain viable topics. Discusses the scientific and literary cultural gap and what can be done in general studies science courses to ameliorate the condition.…

  18. The Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparedness Scale: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the competencies of culturally responsive teaching and construct a Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparedness Scale (CRTPS) for the use of teacher preparation programs and preservice teachers. Competencies listed in the scale were identified through literature reviews and input from experts. The…

  19. The transmission and stability of cultural life scripts: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Steve M J; Haque, Shamsul

    2017-06-06

    Cultural life scripts are shared knowledge about the timing of important life events. In the present study, we examined whether cultural life scripts are transmitted through traditions and whether there are additional ways through which they can be attained by asking Australian and Malaysian participants which information sources they had used to generate the life script of their culture. Participants hardly reported that they had used cultural and religious traditions. They more often reported that they had used their own experiences and experiences of relatives and friends. They also reported the use of comments of relatives and friends and the use of newspapers, books, movies and television programmes. Furthermore, we examined the stability of life scripts and similarities and differences across cultures. We found that life scripts are stable cognitive structures and that there are, besides cross-cultural differences in the content, small cross-cultural differences in the valence and distribution of life script events, with the Australian life script containing more positive events and more events expected to occur before the age of 16.

  20. Vitamin D biology and heart failure : Clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meems, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, vitamin D biology has been studied more extensively than ever before.. The use of vitamin D supplements is common, and so is determination of plasma vitamin D status. Besides its role in bone homeostasis, vitamin D is thought to be an important player in the development and treat

  1. Stable isotope methods in biological and ecological studies of arthropods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hood-Nowotny, R.C.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    This is an eclectic review and analysis of contemporary and promising stable isotope methodologies to study the biology and ecology of arthropods. It is augmented with literature from other disciplines, indicative of the potential for knowledge transfer. It is demonstrated that stable isotopes can

  2. Subject Didactic Studies of Research Training in Biology and Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybeck, Leif

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and design of a 3-year study of research training and supervision in biology and physics are discussed. Scientific problems arising from work on the thesis will be a focus for the postgraduate students and their supervisors. Attention will be focused on supervisors' and students' conceptions of science, subject range, research,…

  3. Vitamin D biology and heart failure : Clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meems, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, vitamin D biology has been studied more extensively than ever before.. The use of vitamin D supplements is common, and so is determination of plasma vitamin D status. Besides its role in bone homeostasis, vitamin D is thought to be an important player in the development and

  4. Considerations for clinical pharmacology studies for biologics in emerging markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Bharat; White, Robert; Wang, Huifen Faye

    2015-03-01

    Registration of innovative biologics in Emerging Markets (EMs) poses many opportunities and challenges. The BRIC-MT countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, Mexico, and Turkey) that are the fastest growing markets and regulators in these countries have imposed certain requirements, including the need for local clinical studies, for registration of biologics. The regulatory landscape in these countries is rapidly evolving, which necessitates an up-to-date understanding of such requirements. There is growing evidence which suggests that race, after accounting for body weight differences, may not influence the pharmacokinetics of biologics to the same extent that it does for small molecules. Thus, the requirements for clinical pharmacology trials in EMs are driven mainly by regulatory needs set forth by local Ministry of Health. In addition to the clinical Phase I to III studies done in the global program that supports registration in large geographies, countries such as China require local single and multiple dose Phase I studies. Participating in global studies with clinical sites within their country may be sufficient for some markets, while other regulators may be satisfied with a Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product. This paper discusses the current requirements for registration of innovative biologics in key EMs.

  5. Learning Experiences of University Biology Faculty: A Qualitative Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The study described in this article incorporates qualitative research through in-depth, individual, structured interviews with 12 biology faculty from two Midwestern universities to explore perceptions about how they have learned to teach and how they work to improve their skills.

  6. Culture evolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Andrew; Hinde, Robert A; Laland, Kevin N; Stringer, Christopher B

    2011-04-12

    Culture pervades human lives and has allowed our species to create niches all around the world and its oceans, in ways quite unlike any other primate. Indeed, our cultural nature appears so distinctive that it is often thought to separate humanity from the rest of nature and the Darwinian forces that shape it. A contrary view arises through the recent discoveries of a diverse range of disciplines, here brought together to illustrate the scope of a burgeoning field of cultural evolution and to facilitate cross-disciplinary fertilization. Each approach emphasizes important linkages between culture and evolutionary biology rather than quarantining one from the other. Recent studies reveal that processes important in cultural transmission are more widespread and significant across the animal kingdom than earlier recognized, with important implications for evolutionary theory. Recent archaeological discoveries have pushed back the origins of human culture to much more ancient times than traditionally thought. These developments suggest previously unidentified continuities between animal and human culture. A third new array of discoveries concerns the later diversification of human cultures, where the operations of Darwinian-like processes are identified, in part, through scientific methods borrowed from biology. Finally, surprising discoveries have been made about the imprint of cultural evolution in the predispositions of human minds for cultural transmission.

  7. 生物属性·文化属性·可译性%Biological Phenomenon, Cultural Phenomenon and Translatability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万茂林

    2000-01-01

    This paper approaches translatability from the perspective that language is both a biological and a cultural phenomenon and presents several skills that could be used in the translation of those culture-bound words and expressions.%语言既有生物属性,又有文化属性,一种语言表达的内容可以相当确切地译入另一种语言。虽两种文化之间由于文化差异造成了交际的障碍,但在差异的基础上译者总是可以找到能为读者接受的文化对等的翻译方法。

  8. Depicting favorite organizational culture: An empirical case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Ranaei kordshouli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a model to depict favorite organizational culture. The research population consists of all Mapna’s executive managers and the research sample includes 19 managers. In order to depict favorite organizational culture, in the first step, three approaches are applied and then the results of these three approaches are compared. In the first approach, Cameron and Quinn (1999 framework [Cameron, K. S., & Quinn, R. E. (2011. Diagnosing and changing organizational culture: Based on the competing values framework. John Wiley & Sons] and success indexes are used to determine favorite organizational culture. In the second approach, benchmarking technique is applied by implementing the Denison organizational culture database. In the third approach, based on competitive value framework (CVF, a questionnaire is developed and distributed among managers and the result is applied to depict favorite organizational culture. In order to analyze data, descriptive statistics are applied and the results indicate that all of these three approaches maintain the same results. Regarding to these approaches, one or all of these approaches are applicable for depicting favorite culture. Finally, the rate of gap between status quo and favorite organizational culture can be assessed and we can develop and implement plans for improving organizational culture.

  9. Police culture influences the brain function underlying compassion: a gender study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Alcauter, Sarael; Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Barrios, Fernando A

    2015-04-01

    Compassion is a prototypical moral emotion supporting cooperation and involves empathic decision-making and motor processes representing the interplay of biologically evolved and cultural mechanisms. We propose a social neuroscience approach to identify gender differences and to assess biological and cultural factors shaping compassion. We consider the police force as a cultural model to study this emotion, because it comprises a mixed-gender group using specific codes for collective safety that influence empathy and cooperativeness. From a sample of Mexican police officers working in a violent environment we integrated ethnographic data categorizing compassionate elements in the officers' activities, psychometric measures evaluating empathic attitudes, and fMRI scans identifying the brain activity related to compassionate experiences and decisions. The results suggest that the police culture influences genders equally with respect to empathic behavioral expressions. Nevertheless, women showed insular and prefrontal cortical activation, suggesting a more empathic experience of compassion. Officers manifested activity in the caudate nucleus, amygdala, and cerebellum, suggesting a more a highly accurate process to infer another's suffering and a reward system motivated by the notion of service and cooperation, both of which are cultural traits represented in the police force.

  10. Determining School Administrators’ Perceptions on Institutional Culture: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secil Eda Kartal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Schools, the where educational activities are carried out, are among the major institutions society considers as important. Schools undertake strategic responsibilities in maintaining cultural values and conveying them to future generations. The primary responsibility in achieving these missions is assigned to the school administrators. The purpose of this study is to determine the perceptions of school administrators on institutional culture. This is a qualitative study conducted on school administrators who were selected based on the volunteering principle. Perceptions of school administrators concerning their institutions’ culture and the differences between their institutional culture and other institution’s cultures were determined and analyzed. Findings of this study suggest that school administrators have both positive and negative opinions regarding their institutional culture and cultural difference. While love-respect, collaboration-solidarity and common history were prominent positive opinions; lack of communication, lack of shared values and low expectation were prominent negative opinions. In addition, participants stated the environment as a crucial factor when defining culture.

  11. New frontiers in the study of human cultural and genetic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cody T; Richerson, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    In this review, we discuss the dynamic linkages between culture and the genetic evolution of the human species. We begin by briefly describing the framework of gene-culture coevolutionary (or dual-inheritance) models for human evolutionary change. Until recently, the literature on gene-culture coevolution was composed primarily of mathematical models and formalized theory describing the complex dynamics underlying human behavior, adaptation, and technological evolution, but had little empirical support concerning genetics. The rapid progress in the fields of molecular genetics and genomics, however, is now providing the kinds of data needed to produce rich empirical support for gene-culture coevolutionary models. We briefly outline how theoretical and methodological progress in genome sciences has provided ways for the strength of selection on genes to be evaluated, and then outline how evidence of selection on several key genes can be directly linked to human cultural practices. We then describe some exciting new directions in the empirical study of gene-culture coevolution, and conclude with a discussion of the role of gene-culture evolutionary models in the future integration of medical, biological, and social sciences.

  12. [Application of cell co-culture techniques in medical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun; Sun, Gui-Bo; Qin, Meng; Yao, Fan; Sun, Xiao-Bo

    2012-11-01

    As the cell co-culture techniques can better imitate an in vivo environment, it is helpful in observing the interactions among cells and between cells and the culture environment, exploring the effect mechanisms of drugs and their possible targets and filling the gaps between the mono-layer cell culture and the whole animal experiments. In recently years, they has attracted much more attention from the medical sector, and thus becoming one of research hotspots in drug research and development and bio-pharmaceutical fields. The cell co-culture techniques, including direct and indirect methods, are mainly used for studying pathological basis, new-type treatment methods and drug activity screening. Existing cell co-culture techniques are used for more pharmacological studies on single drug and less studies on interaction of combined drugs, such as collaborative compatibility and attenuation and synergistic effect among traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). In line with the action characteristics of multi-component and multi-target, the cell co-culture techniques provide certain reference value for future studies on the effect and mechanism of combined TCMs on organisms as well as new methods for studies on TCMs and their compounds. This essay summarizes cell co-culture methods and their application and look into the future of their application in studies on TCMs and compounds.

  13. "Gestaltomics": Systems Biology Schemes for the Study of Neuropsychiatric Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez Najera, Nora A; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Nicolini, Humberto

    2017-01-01

    The integration of different sources of biological information about what defines a behavioral phenotype is difficult to unify in an entity that reflects the arithmetic sum of its individual parts. In this sense, the challenge of Systems Biology for understanding the "psychiatric phenotype" is to provide an improved vision of the shape of the phenotype as it is visualized by "Gestalt" psychology, whose fundamental axiom is that the observed phenotype (behavior or mental disorder) will be the result of the integrative composition of every part. Therefore, we propose the term "Gestaltomics" as a term from Systems Biology to integrate data coming from different sources of information (such as the genome, transcriptome, proteome, epigenome, metabolome, phenome, and microbiome). In addition to this biological complexity, the mind is integrated through multiple brain functions that receive and process complex information through channels and perception networks (i.e., sight, ear, smell, memory, and attention) that in turn are programmed by genes and influenced by environmental processes (epigenetic). Today, the approach of medical research in human diseases is to isolate one disease for study; however, the presence of an additional disease (co-morbidity) or more than one disease (multimorbidity) adds complexity to the study of these conditions. This review will present the challenge of integrating psychiatric disorders at different levels of information (Gestaltomics). The implications of increasing the level of complexity, for example, studying the co-morbidity with another disease such as cancer, will also be discussed.

  14. Biological tissue and cell culture specimen preparation for TEM nanoparticle characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kunio; Zheng, Jiwen; Parmiter, David; Patri, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    This chapter outlines the procedures for ex vivo TEM preparation of nanoparticle-containing tissue or cell culture samples using an epoxy resin embedding method. The purpose of this procedure is to preserve the structure of tissue in a hardened epoxy block with minimal disruption of cellular structures, to aid in the meaningful analysis of in vivo or cell culture experiments. The process begins with hydrated tissue and ends with tissue that is virtually water-free and preserved in a static state within a plastic resin matrix. The resin mixture permeates the dehydrated tissue, making the sample firm enough to cut. Procedures are also given for fixing nanoparticle-containing cell culture samples.

  15. Socio-biological, psychological and pedagogical foundations of a culture of healthy living individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vovk Larisa Viktorovna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the theoretical and methodological foundations of a culture of healthy living individual. It is established that a lack of knowledge, culture, behavior, empathy in pupils, students and adults is the main reason for not maintaining their healthy lifestyle. It is proved that the main factors creating a culture of healthy living is the family, school, college or university. It is established that the effective activation of the educational process need interactive forms of education and physical education teacher concepts of cooperation and active dialogue. Pointed out that the form of cooperation between teacher and student influence to enhance sports and athletic activities of students. Such cooperation provides opportunities invidual creative manifestations of the individual student and teacher.

  16. Effect study on a biological prevention method applying mix-culturing of saltmarsh and Avicennia marina mangrove trees to reduce marine fouling fauna damage%盐沼草--白骨壤混种减轻污损动物危害的生物防治效果研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    In Beilun estuarine area of Guangxi,China,the intertidal flat were filled to an elevation of about 220 cm Yellow Sea Datum to mix-culture Avicennia marina (AM)seedlings with four species of saltmarsh,aimed at stud-ying the effect of biological prevention method for reducing the fouling damage on mangrove trees.The results showed that Cyperus malaccensis (CM)and Zoysia matrella (ZM)were able to grow and spread faster,and more ef-ficient to slow down water velocity and accelerate sedimentation than Scirpus validus var.laeviglumis (SV)and Phragmites australis (PA).19 species of fouling fauna were found on saltmarsh and mangroves,among which Bala-nus littoralis ,Euraphia withersi ,Littorina melanostoma and L .scabra were major dominant species.Among four saltmarsh species,the fouled degrees on CM and ZM were significantly less than those on other two species.And the fouled degrees on four saltmarsh species were all significantly less than that on A .marina tree.The mix-culturing of saltmarsh CM or ZM with mangrove tree AM could efficiently reduce the fouling damage,resulting in better tree growth indexes i.e.tree height,leaf number,branch number,branch conservation and survival rate than those in mono-species treatment areas.In general,a saltmarsh-mangrove cooperating ecological conservation system could be a practical model for mangrove afforestation.%广西北仑河口区新造高程约220 cm 的潮间带裸滩,移植白骨壤与茳芏、沟叶结缕草、芦苇和南水葱四种盐沼草进行混种,研究盐沼草-红树混种减轻污损动物对人工红树林危害的生物防治效果。结果表明:沟叶结缕草和茳芏可快速生长和扩展,缓流、促淤能力高于长势较差的南水葱和芦苇。在盐沼和白骨壤上发现19种污损动物,其中潮间藤壶、白条地藤壶、黑口滨螺和粗糙滨螺为优势种。茳芏和沟叶结缕草受污损程度较南水葱和芦苇轻。四种盐沼草受污损程度均低于白骨壤

  17. Indigenous Cultural Self-Representation and Its Internal Critiques: A Case Study of the Woodland Cultural Centre, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Naohiro

    2014-01-01

    This research report discusses Indigenous cultural representation and its internal critiques, based on the case study of an Indigenous-run museum, the Woodland Cultural Centre, in Canada. Since its establishment in 1972, the Woodland Cultural Centre has strived to promote Indigenous culture, especially First Nations art, and has challenged the…

  18. Artefactual effects of oxygen on cell culture models of cellular senescence and stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Olivier; Weemaels, Geoffroy; Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Wlaschek, Meinhard

    2011-02-01

    In life sciences, modelling of the in vivo conditions using in vitro models is an important tool to generate knowledge. Although aerobic organisms including mammals depend on accurate oxygen tension, mimicking physiological conditions in cell culture experiments is not very common. Due to the need for simple technical and experimental design, the requirement for simulating the in vivo oxygen tension parameters has been neglected over long time. Fortunately, due to increasing knowledge in recent years the attention has shifted towards this scientific demand. In this short review, we summarize data substantiating the necessity to adequately mimic physiological oxygen tension using cell culture models in life science research. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Human mesenchymal stem cells possess different biological characteristics but do not change their therapeutic potential when cultured in serum free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youwei; Wu, Hehe; Yang, Zhouxin; Chi, Ying; Meng, Lei; Mao, Aibin; Yan, Shulin; Hu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Wenbo; Ma, Yue; Li, Tao; Cheng, Yan; Wang, Yongjuan; Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Jing; Han, Jingwen; Li, Caiyun; Liu, Li; Xu, Jian; Han, Zhi Bo; Han, Zhong Chao

    2014-12-04

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely investigated in clinical researches to treat various diseases. Classic culture medium for MSCs, even for clinical use, contains fetal bovine serum. The serum-containing medium (SCM) seems a major obstacle for MSCs-related therapies due to the risk of contamination of infectious pathogens. Some studies showed that MSCs could be expanded in serum free medium (SFM); however, whether SFM would change the biological characteristics and safety issues of MSCs has not been well answered. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) were cultured in a chemical defined serum free medium. Growth, multipotency, surface antigen expression, telomerase, immunosuppressive ability, gene expression profile and genomic stability of hUC-MSCs cultured in SFM and SCM were analyzed and compared side by side. hUC-MSCs propagated more slowly and senesce ultimately in SFM. SFM-expanded hUC-MSCs were different from SCM-expanded hUC-MSCs in growth rate, telomerase, gene expression profile. However, SFM-expanded hUC-MSCs maintained multipotency and the profile of surface antigen which were used to define human MSCs. Both SFM- and SCM-expanded hUC-MSCs gained copy number variation (CNV) in long-term in vitro culture. hUC-MCSs could be expanded in SFM safely to obtain enough cells for clinical application, meeting the basic criteria for human mesenchymal stem cells. hUC-MSCs cultured in SFM were distinct from hUC-MSCs cultured in SCM, yet they remained therapeutic potentials for future regenerative medicine.

  20. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Lei; LIAO WeiMing; SHENG PuYi; FU Ming; HE AiShan; HUANG Gang

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell's replication activity and the donor's age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering, hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: <20 years old, 21-40years old, 41-60 years old and >61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45,CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell,and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro.The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula "TD = t log2/logNt - logN0 "was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the <20 years old group was lower than that of the >61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=-0.002, P<0.05). These findings suggested that a higher level of hADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger donators, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  1. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell’s replication activity and the donor’s age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering. hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: <20 years old, 21―40 years old, 41―60 years old and >61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell, and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro. The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula “ log2T D = t logN t ? logN 0” was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the <20 years old group was lower than that of the >61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=0.002, P<0.05). These find- ings suggested that a higher level of hADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger dona- tors, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  2. Study of complex molecules of biological interest with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, K.C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, in Area Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Molecular Model Discovery Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Melbourne, Victoria, 3122 (Australia); Bolognesi, P., E-mail: paola.bolognesi@cnr.it [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy); Feyer, V. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Research Center Jülich, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Plekan, O. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14–km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Avaldi, L. [CNR-ISM, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria Km. 29,300, Monterotondo (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Synchrotron radiation and synchrotron based spectroscopic techniques have found important applications in the study of isolated molecular species of biological interest. In this paper, some examples of spectroscopic and dynamic studies of amino acids and small peptides, nucleobases and pharmaceuticals are reviewed. Opportunities offered by the advent of new radiation sources combined with novel methods for the production of beams of these molecules are also discussed.

  3. New biological assay to test viability of cultured cells for in vitro research applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijtenhuijs, P.; Buttafoco, L.; Poot, A.A.; Sterk, L.M.Th.; Vos, de R.A.I.; Geelkerken, R.H.; Feijen, J.; Vermes, I.

    2004-01-01

    The balance between apoptosis and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is responsible for mediating profound changes in vascular architecture in development and disease. New insights in the biology of SMCs can be important to our understanding of (patho) physiological mechanisms and

  4. Glucose Transport in Cultured Animal Cells: An Exercise for the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane transport is a fundamental concept that undergraduate students of cell biology understand better with laboratory experience. Formal teaching exercises commonly used to illustrate this concept are unbiological, qualitative, or intricate and time consuming to prepare. We have developed an exercise that uses uptake of radiolabeled nutrient…

  5. Glucose Transport in Cultured Animal Cells: An Exercise for the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane transport is a fundamental concept that undergraduate students of cell biology understand better with laboratory experience. Formal teaching exercises commonly used to illustrate this concept are unbiological, qualitative, or intricate and time consuming to prepare. We have developed an exercise that uses uptake of radiolabeled nutrient…

  6. A simple device for culturing marine calanoid copepods and notes on the biology of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yassen, S.T.

    1973-01-01

    A simple device for culturing marine calanoid copepods is described. Calanus helgolandicus Pacificus, Acartia clausi Giesbrecht, Temora longicornis Muller, and Eurytemora hirundoides Nordquist, were reared in this device. The latter had been bred in the laboratory for

  7. Cultural Studies og kritisk diskursanalyse i 8. klasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarstad, Lone

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an exploration of a Cultural Studies and Critical Cultural Pedagogy approach to intercultural competence in lower secondary English classes in Denmark. The presentation is based on the second intervention in a participatory action research project in connection with my doctoral...... thesis in the school year 2013-2014.The approach is based on Cultural Studies and knowledge of social categories and representation, and how these can be taught and discussed in class through an intersectional lens. An intersectional lens allows for the conceptualization of categories...

  8. Health communication: a media and cultural studies approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Belinda; Lewis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    "This book is about communicating for health and social change. With a clear focus on public health and health promotion practice, it provides a unique introduction to media and cultural studies perspectives on health communication...

  9. After Progressivism: Modern Composition, Institutional Service, and Cultural Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Outlines the historical development of composition theory as autonomous field and its relation to surrounding academic and social situations, especially progressivism. Discusses composition as a "service" course. Critiques recent alliances between composition and cultural studies theory. (HB)

  10. A study on relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khalili

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between organizational culture and organization commitment. The study uses two questionnaires, one for measuring organizational commitment originally developed by Meyer and Allen (1991 [Meyer, J. P., & Allen, N. J. (1991. A three-component conceptualization of organizational commitment. Human resource management review, 1(1, 61-89.] and the other one for organizational culture developed by Denison and Spreitzer (1991 [Denison, D. R., & Spreitzer, G. M. (1991. Organizational culture and organizational development: A competing values approach. Research in organizational change and development, 5(1, 1-21.]. The study is accomplished among selected full time employees who work for an Iranian bank named Bank Saderat Iran. Using Pearson correlation test as well as linear regression methods, the study has determined that there were some positive and meaningful relationship between all components of organizational commitment and organizational culture.

  11. Program for Culture and Conflict Studies, web page capture

    OpenAIRE

    Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)

    2014-01-01

    web page capture from the NPS website The Program for Culture and Conflict Studies (CCS) is premised on the belief that the United States must understand the cultures and societies of the world to effectively interact with local people. It is dedicated to the study of anthropological, ethnographic, social, political, and economic data to inform U.S. policies at both the strategic and operational levels.

  12. Accumulation of biologically active furanocoumarins in agitated cultures of Ruta graveolens L. and Ruta graveolens ssp. divaricata (Tenore) Gams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiert, H; Czygan, F-Ch

    2005-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the dynamics of accumulation of linear furanocoumarins (psoralen, bergapten, xanthotoxin, isopimpinellin, imperatorin) and their biogenetic precursor, umbelliferone, in agitated cultures of Ruta graveolens L. and Ruta graveolens ssp. divaricata (Tenore) Gams during 6-week growth cycles. The metabolites under study were almost exclusively accumulated in the cultured biomass. The total content of all metabolites increased 4.8- and 2.0-fold, in R. graveolens and R. graveolens ssp. divaricata cultures, respectively. Xanthotoxin and bergapten, which are the most important therapeutic compounds, were the dominating metabolites in cultures of both plants. The maximum content of xanthotoxin (25.0 mg/100 g dry wt.) and bergapten (18.4 mg/100 g dry wt) and the maximum content of all metabolites (64.0 mg/100 g dry wt) in R. graveolens ssp. divaricata callus obtained on the 35th culture day were relatively low. However, maximum contents of xanthotoxin (136.8 mg/100 g dry wt), bergapten (210.4 mg/100 g dry wt.) and isopimpinellin (96.7 mg/100 g dry wt), and total content of all metabolites in R. graveolens shoots (520.8 mg/100 g dry wt) obtained on the 42nd culture day are interesting from a practical point of view.

  13. Microfluidics co-culture systems for studying tooth innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierfrancesco ePagella

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Innervation plays a key role in the development and homeostasis of organs and tissues of the orofacial complex. Among these structures, teeth are peculiar organs as they are not innervated until later stages of development. Furthermore, the implication of neurons in tooth initiation, morphogenesis and differentiation is still controversial. Co-cultures constitute a valuable method to investigate and manipulate the interactions of nerve fibres with their target organs in a controlled and isolated environment. Conventional co-cultures between neurons and their target tissues have already been performed, but these cultures do not offer optimal conditions that are closely mimicking the in vivo situation. Indeed, specific cell populations require different culture media in order to preserve their physiological properties. In this study we evaluate the usefulness of a microfluidics system for co-culturing mouse trigeminal ganglia and developing teeth. This device allows the application of specific media for the appropriate development of both neuronal and dental tissues. The results show that mouse trigeminal ganglia and teeth survive for long culture periods in this microfluidics system, and that teeth maintain the attractive or repulsive effect on trigeminal neurites that has been observed in vivo. Neurites are repealed when co-cultured with embryonic tooth germs, while postnatal teeth exert an attractive effect to trigeminal ganglia-derived neurons.In conclusion, microfluidics system devices provide a valuable tool for studying the behaviour of neurons during the development of orofacial tissues and organs, faithfully imitating the in vivo situation.

  14. Researching measurement equivalence in cross-cultural studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Kankaraš

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In cross-cultural comparative studies it is essential to establish equivalent measurement of relevant constructs across cultures. If this equivalence is not confirmed it is difficult if not impossible to make meaningful comparison of results across countries. This work presents concept of measurement equivalence, its relationship with other related concepts, different equivalence levels and causes of inequivalence in cross-cultural research. It also reviews three main approaches to the analysis of measurement equivalence – multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, differential item functioning, and multigroup latent class analysis – with special emphasis on their similarities and differences, as well as comparative advantages.

  15. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    This report documents a study with the objective of enhancing safety culture in the Swedish nuclear power industry. A primary objective of this study was to ensure that the latest thinking on human factors principles was being recognised and applied by nuclear power operators as a means of ensuring optimal safety performance. The initial phase of the project was conducted as a pilot study, involving the senior management group at one Swedish nuclear power-producing site. The pilot study enabled the project methodology to be validated after which it was repeated at other Swedish nuclear power industry sites, providing a broad-ranging analysis of opportunities across the industry to enhance safety culture. The introduction to this report contains an overview of safety culture, explains the background to the project and sets out the project rationale and objectives. The methodology used for understanding and analysing the important safety culture issues at each nuclear power site is then described. This section begins with a summary of the processes used in the information gathering and data analysis stage. The six components of the Management Workshops conducted at each site are then described. These workshops used a series of presentations, interactive events and group exercises to: (a) provide feedback to site managers on the safety culture and safety leadership issues identified at their site, and (b) stimulate further safety thinking and provide 'take-away' information and leadership strategies that could be applied to promote safety culture improvements. Section 3, project Findings, contains the main observations and output from the project. These include: - a brief overview of aspects of the local industry operating context that impinge on safety culture; - a summary of strengths or positive attributes observed within the safety culture of the Swedish nuclear industry; - a set of identified opportunities for further improvement; - the aggregated

  16. Study Abroad in Psychology: Increasing Cultural Competencies through Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, David R.; Rosenbusch, Katherine; Wallace-Williams, Devin; Keim, Alaina C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prominence of study abroad programs, few are offered in the field of psychology. The current study sought to investigate the impact of study abroad programs in psychology through a comparison of study abroad and domestic student cultural competencies. Participants included 104 undergraduate students enrolled in either a psychology…

  17. Study Abroad in Psychology: Increasing Cultural Competencies through Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, David R.; Rosenbusch, Katherine; Wallace-Williams, Devin; Keim, Alaina C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prominence of study abroad programs, few are offered in the field of psychology. The current study sought to investigate the impact of study abroad programs in psychology through a comparison of study abroad and domestic student cultural competencies. Participants included 104 undergraduate students enrolled in either a psychology…

  18. Neurospora as a model fungus for studies in cytogenetics and sexual biology at Stanford

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Namboori B Raju

    2009-03-01

    Dodge’s early work (1927–1940) on Neurospora genetics and sexual biology inspired Beadle and Tatum at Stanford to use N. crassa for their landmark discovery that genes specify enzymes. Neurospora has since become a model organism for numerous genetic, cytogenetic, biochemical, molecular and population biology studies. Neurospora is haploid in the vegetative phase with a transient diploid sexual phase. Its meiotic cells (asci) are large, allowing easy examination of dividing nuclei and chromosomes under a light microscope. The haploid meiotic products are themselves the sexual progeny that grow into vegetative cultures, thus avoiding the cumbersome testcrosses and complex dominance–recessive relationships, as in diploid organisms. The Perkins’ laboratory at Stanford (1949–2007) played a pivotal role in advancing our knowledge of Neurospora genetics, sexual biology, cytogenetics and population biology. Since 1974, I have taken advantage of various chromosome-staining methods to examine ascus and ascospore development in wild type and in numerous mutant strains. In addition, I have used GFP-tagged genes to visualize the expression or silencing of unpaired genes in a post-transcriptional gene silencing process (meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA) that operates specifically during meiosis. The genome of N. crassa contains over 10 000 protein-coding genes. Gene knockouts or mutations in specific sequences may now be readily correlated with the observed cytological defects in the sexual stage, thus advancing our molecular understanding of complex processes during ascus and ascospore development.

  19. Induction of Biologically Active Flavonoids in Cell Cultures of Morus nigra and Testing their Hypoglycemic Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Mawla, Ahmed M A; Mohamed, Khaled M; Mostafa, Ashraf M

    2011-01-01

    The antidiabetic activity of both leaves and MJ-treated cell cultures of Morus nigra was evaluated after their oral administration to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The antidiabetic activity of extracts from leaves given to streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats for 10 days increased with increasing doses of leaves extract up to 500 mg/kg/day. The administration of 500 mg/kg/day of leaves extract reduced the concentration of glucose from 370 ± 7.31 mg/dl (control) to 154 ± 6.27 mg/dl, and a significant increase in the insulin level from 11.3 ± 0.31 μU/ml (control) to 14.6 ± 0.43 μU/ml was recorded. Cell suspension cultures were established from the young leaves of Morus nigra cultivated on modified MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg/l 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), 0.2 mg/l 6-(furfurylamino)purine (kinetin). The changes in cell weight and flavonoid content were monitored between day zero and 12. The linear increase in fresh weight was found to be parallel to flavonoids production. Cell cultures treated with 100 μM methyl jasmonate for 24 hours showed a noticeable increase in level of flavonoids and significant and more effective hypoglycemic activity than that for extract from leaves. The major flavonoids were isolated by TLC and HPLC and identified as rutin, quercetin, Morusin and cyclomorusin by co-chromatography and mass spectrometry in comparison to samples of authentic reference compounds.

  20. BIOLOGICAL NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER BY DENITRIFICATION OF MIX-CULTURING FUNGI AND BACTERIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAKAYA; Naoki; SHOUN; Hirofumi

    2006-01-01

    Denitrificationis a biological processin which nitrateand/or nitrite is reduced to gaseous nitrogen,dinitrogen(N2)or nitrous oxide(N2O)while carbon dioxide is thesecond gaseous product of the process.This is one of themain mechanisms of the global nitrogen cycle,and playsanimportant role as the reverse reaction of nitrogen fixa-tion in maintaining global environmental homeostasis[1].Denitrification has beenlongthought to be a unique char-acteristic of prokaryotes[2,3].Anumber of bacteria(suchasPseudomonas s...

  1. Unmanned Aircraft Systems complement biologging in spatial ecology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita; Barasona, Jose Ángel; Acevedo, Pelayo; Vicente, Joaquín; Negro, Juan José

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge about the spatial ecology and distribution of organisms is important for both basic and applied science. Biologging is one of the most popular methods for obtaining information about spatial distribution of animals, but requires capturing the animals and is often limited by costs and data retrieval. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) have proven their efficacy for wildlife surveillance and habitat monitoring, but their potential contribution to the prediction of animal distribution patterns and abundance has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this study, we assess the usefulness of UAS overflights to (1) get data to model the distribution of free-ranging cattle for a comparison with results obtained from biologged (GPS-GSM collared) cattle and (2) predict species densities for a comparison with actual density in a protected area. UAS and biologging derived data models provided similar distribution patterns. Predictions from the UAS model overestimated cattle densities, which may be associated with higher aggregated distributions of this species. Overall, while the particular researcher interests and species characteristics will influence the method of choice for each study, we demonstrate here that UAS constitute a noninvasive methodology able to provide accurate spatial data useful for ecological research, wildlife management and rangeland planning.

  2. Study of β-NMR for Liquid Biological Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Beattie, Caitlin

    2017-01-01

    β-NMR is an exotic form of NMR spectroscopy that allows for the characterization of matter based on the anisotropic β-decay of radioactive probe nuclei. This has been shown to be an effective spectroscopic technique for many different compounds, but its use for liquid biological samples is relatively unexplored. The work at the VITO line of ISOLDE seeks to employ this technique to study such samples. Currently, preparations are being made for an experiment to characterize DNA G-quadruplexes and their interactions with stabilizing cations. More specifically, the work in which I engaged as a summer student focused on the experiment’s liquid handling system and the stability of the relevant biological samples under vacuum.

  3. Biological studies of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Roger K; Rasmusson, Ann M; Koenen, Karestan C; Shin, Lisa M; Orr, Scott P; Gilbertson, Mark W; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel

    2012-11-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the only major mental disorder for which a cause is considered to be known: that is, an event that involves threat to the physical integrity of oneself or others and induces a response of intense fear, helplessness or horror. Although PTSD is still largely regarded as a psychological phenomenon, over the past three decades the growth of the biological PTSD literature has been explosive, and thousands of references now exist. Ultimately, the impact of an environmental event, such as a psychological trauma, must be understood at organic, cellular and molecular levels. This Review attempts to present the current state of this understanding on the basis of psychophysiological, structural and functional neuroimaging, and endocrinological, genetic and molecular biological studies in humans and in animal models.

  4. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  5. [Comparison of the biological tolerance of titanium and titanium alloys in human gingiva cell cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehner, B; Heidemann, D

    1989-01-01

    Mirror-finished solid specimens of pure titanium and the titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V as well as Ti-5Al-2.5Fe showed no effects on the growth behavior and cell morphology of human gingival epithelial cell and fibroblast cultures. The growth of the cells contacting all three materials was uninhibited. SEM revealed growth of fibroblasts on the surfaces of the specimens, too. No differences could be found between the biocompatibility of titanium alloys and that of pure titanium. The formation of a stable surface oxide layer providing resistance to corrosion may be decisive.

  6. Social, biological, psychological, economic and cultural contexts of people with wounded legs

    OpenAIRE

    González Consuegra, Renata Virginia; Gómez Ochoa, Ana Maritza

    2010-01-01

    La presente investigación caracteriza los contextos cultural, económico, social, biológico y psicológico de las personas usuarias del programa Clínica de Heridas dirigido por un grupo de profesoras del área de Fundamentación en enfermería de la Facultad de Enfermería de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Se sabe que el cuidado de personas con heridas exige el conocimiento de la severidad de las mismas, especialmente las heridas vasculares que son crónicas y de lenta cicatrización. Las ...

  7. Differences in the primary culture, purification and biological characteristics between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells from rat aorta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaobo Hu; Zifang Song; Qichang Zheng; Jun Nie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differences of primary culture, purification and biological characteristics between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells from rat aorta. Methods: Endothelial cells were obtained using the vascular ring adherence, collagenase digestion method and an improved vascular ring adherence method, while smooth muscle cells were separated from tissue sections of rat aorta. Clones of endothelial cells were selected by limiting dilution assay. Both cell types were identified using specific cell immunofluorescent markers,and phase contrast microscopy was used to observe the morphological disparity between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells at the single cell and colony level. Cell proliferation was determined by the cell counting kit-8. Differences between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were evaluated in trypsin digestion 6me, attachment time and recovery after cryopreservation. Results: Endothelial cells were obtained by all three methods. The improved vascular ring method provided the most reproducible results. Cells were in good condition, and of high purity. Smooth muscle cells were cultured successfully by the tissue fragment culture method. Clonal expansion of singleendothelial cells was attained. The two cell types expressed their respective specific markers, and the rate of proliferation of smooth muscle cells exceeded that of endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were more sensitive to trypsin digestion than smooth muscle cells. In addition, they had a shorter adherence time and better recovery following cryopreservation than smooth muscle cells. Conclusion: The improved vascular ring method was optimal for yielding endothelial cells. Limiting dilution is a novel and valid method for purifying primary endothelial cells from rat aorta. Primary rat endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cell cultures exhibited different morphological characteristics, proliferation rate, adherence time, susceptibility to trypsin

  8. Studies about space radiation promote new fields in radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken

    2002-12-01

    Astronauts are constantly exposed to space radiation of various types of energy with a low dose-rate during long-term stays in space. Therefore, it is important to determine correctly the biological effects of space radiation on human health. Studies about biological the effects at a low dose and a low dose-rate include various aspects of microbeams, bystander effects, radioadaptive responses and hormesis which are important fields in radiation biology. In addition, space radiations contain high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. In particular, neutrons may cause reverse effectiveness at a low dose-rate in comparison to ionizing radiation. We are also interested in p53-centered signal transduction pathways involved in the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis induced by space radiations. We must also study whether the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation is affected by microgravity which is another typical component in space. To confirm this, we must prepare centrifuge systems in an International Space Station (ISS). In addition, we must prepare many types of equipment for space experiments in an ISS, because we cannot use conventional equipment from our laboratories. Furthermore, the research for space radiation might give us valuable information about the birth and evolution of life on the Earth. We can also realize the importance of preventing the ozone layer from depletion by the use of exposure equipment to sunlight in an ISS. For these reasons, we desire to educate space researchers of the next generation based on the consideration of the preservation of the Earth from research about space radiation.

  9. Multilayer microfluidic systems with indium-tin-oxide microelectrodes for studying biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiang-Chiu; Lyau, Jia-Bo; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chen, Hsin

    2017-07-01

    Contemporary semiconductor and micromachining technologies have been exploited to develop lab-on-a-chip microsystems, which enable parallel and efficient experiments in molecular and cellular biology. In these microlab systems, microfluidics play an important role for automatic transportation or immobilization of cells and bio-molecules, as well as for separation or mixing of different chemical reagents. However, seldom microlab systems allow both morphology and electrophysiology of biological cells to be studied in situ. This kind of study is important, for example, for understanding how neuronal networks grow in response to environmental stimuli. To fulfill this application need, this paper investigates the possibility of fabricating multi-layer photoresists as microfluidic systems directly above a glass substrate with indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrodes. The microfluidic channels are designed to guide and trap biological cells on top of ITO electrodes, through which the electrical activities of cells can be recorded or elicited. As both the microfluidic system and ITO electrodes are transparent, the cellular morphology is observable easily during electrophysiological studies. Two fabrication processes are proposed and compared. One defines the structure and curing depth of each photoresist layer simply by controlling the exposure time in lithography, while the other further utilizes a sacrificial layer to defines the structure of the bottom layer. The fabricated microfluidic system is proved bio-compatible and able to trap blood cells or neurons. Therefore, the proposed microsystem will be useful for studying cultured cells efficiently in applications such as drug-screening.

  10. Preliminary Study of Greywater Treatment through Rotating Biological Contactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Ahmed Pathan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the greywater vary from country to country and it depends upon the cultural and social behavior of the respective country. There was a considerable need to characterize and recycle the greywater. In this regard greywater was separated from the black water and analyzed for various physiochemical parameters. Among various greywater recycling treatment technologies, RBC (Rotating Biological Contactor is more effective treatment technique in reducing COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand and organic matters from the greywater. But this technology was not applied and tested in Pakistan. There was extensive need to investigate the RBC technology for greywater recycling at small scale before applying at mass scale. To treat the greywater, a single-stage RBC simulator was designed and developed at laboratory scale. An electric motor equipped with gear box to control the rotations of the disks was mounted on the tank. The simulator was run at the rate of 1.7 rpm. The disc area of the RBC was immersed about 40% in the greywater. Water samples were collected at each HRT (Hydraulic Retention Time and analyzed for the parameters such as pH, conductivity, TDS (Total Dissolved Solids, salinity, BOD5 (Biochemical Oxygen Demand, COD and suspended solids by using standard methods. The results are encouraging with percentage removal of BOD5 and COD being 53 and 60% respectively.

  11. Applied Bayesian statistical studies in biology and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    D’Amore, G; Scalfari, F

    2004-01-01

    It was written on another occasion· that "It is apparent that the scientific culture, if one means production of scientific papers, is growing exponentially, and chaotically, in almost every field of investigation". The biomedical sciences sensu lato and mathematical statistics are no exceptions. One might say then, and with good reason, that another collection of bio­ statistical papers would only add to the overflow and cause even more confusion. Nevertheless, this book may be greeted with some interest if we state that most of the papers in it are the result of a collaboration between biologists and statisticians, and partly the product of the Summer School th "Statistical Inference in Human Biology" which reaches its 10 edition in 2003 (information about the School can be obtained at the Web site http://www2. stat. unibo. itleventilSito%20scuolalindex. htm). is common experience - and not only This is rather important. Indeed, it in Italy - that encounters between statisticians and researchers are spora...

  12. Study of Nosocomial Clostridium Difficile Diarrhea by Culture and Tissue Culture Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Salari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clostridium difficult is an identified cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, antibiotic-associated colitis, pseudomembranous colitis and nosocomial diarrhea. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of nosocomial C. difficile-associated diarrhea in Tehran University of Medical Science Hospitals. Methods: In this study a total of 942 stool samples from patients with nosocomial diarrhea that were hospitalized in Imam Khomeini hospital, Shariati hospital and Children clinical center were collected. The samples were cultured on a selective cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA and incubated in anaerobic conditions, at 37 °C for 5 days. Isolated C. difficile by conventional biochemical tests, bacterial cytotoxicity by Vero tissue culture and antimicrobial sensitivity to antibiotics by Kirby Bauer method (disk diffusion were investigated. Results: Of the total patients, 57 Toxigenic C. difficile (6.1% were isolated. Results of statistical analysis show significant differences between the rate of isolated Toxigenic C. difficile and age group of patients (P< 0.05. Among the units of selected hospitals, Toxigenic C. difficile was isolated most frequently in gastroenterology of Children clinical center. Meanwhile, the isolated Toxigenic C. difficile were sensitive to vancomycin, Chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone. Conclusion: Our findings show that, Toxigenic C. difficile was found in 6.1% hospitalized patients. Therefore, further studies to evaluate the role of Toxigenic C. difficile in nosocomial diarrhea processes, ecological and pathogenic terms by culture, Tissue culture and molecular methodes are suggested.

  13. Ultrastructural study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, M

    1989-01-01

    An electron microscopical study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium is presented. Biopsy samples were collected from four patients with full thickness burns at 9 days, 6 weeks and 5-21 months after grafting of the cultured epithelium. By the sixth week after transplantation, grafted cultured epithelial sheets had developed to consist of 10 to 20 layers of cells and the epithelium showed distinct basal, spinous, granular and horny layers, and a patchy basement membrane had formed. Langerhans cells and melanocytes were identifiable. From 5 months onwards flat basal cells became oval, and oval keratohyalin granules in the keratinocytes also assumed a normal irregular shape. Membrane-coating granules in the keratinocytes increased in number. The fine structures of desmosomes also showed a normal mature appearance. Furthermore, complete extension of the basement membrane could be observed. The maturation of cultured human epithelium is complete by 5 months after grafting.

  14. A Cross-Cultural Study of Adolescent Procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Ang, Rebecca P.; Chong, Wan Har; Krawchuk, Lindsey L.; Huan, Vivien S.; Wong, Isabella Y. F.; Yeo, Lay See

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we explore academic procrastination and associated motivation variables in 612 adolescents from Canada and Singapore. Few studies have explored adolescent procrastination and no previous studies have investigated adolescent procrastination using a cross-cultural framework. Singaporean adolescents reported higher levels of…

  15. Algebraic Systems Biology: A Case Study for the Wnt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Elizabeth; Harrington, Heather A; Rosen, Zvi; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state analysis of dynamical systems for biological networks gives rise to algebraic varieties in high-dimensional spaces whose study is of interest in their own right. We demonstrate this for the shuttle model of the Wnt signaling pathway. Here, the variety is described by a polynomial system in 19 unknowns and 36 parameters. It has degree 9 over the parameter space. This case study explores multistationarity, model comparison, dynamics within regions of the state space, identifiability, and parameter estimation, from a geometric point of view. We employ current methods from computational algebraic geometry, polyhedral geometry, and combinatorics.

  16. Morphological and Biological Study of Sanguisorba Officinalis Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sh. Dodonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the study of influence of terms and storage conditions on Sanguisorba officinalis seed material quality, put into various containers (paper, plastic, fabric, glass, in the different temperature conditions, light and dark grown. The morphology, biology of Sanguisorba officinalis seeds was described and experiments on cryopreservation were made. Basing on the study, we recommend to store Sanguisorba officinalis seed material within 3 months at a temperature of +4˚С in glass container, use plastic container for cryopreservation and to defreeze seeds by double boiling.

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans - A model system for space biology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in studies spanning aspects of development, aging, and radiobiology is reviewed. These topics are interrelated via cellular and DNA repair processes especially in the context of oxidative stress and free-radical metabolism. The relevance of these research topics to problems in space biology is discussed and properties of the space environment are outlined. Exposure to the space-flight environment can induce rapid changes in living systems that are similar to changes occurring during aging; manipulation of these environmental parameters may represent an experimental strategy for studies of development and senescence. The current and future opportunities for such space-flight experimentation are presented.

  18. Study on the biological characteristics of Homalotglus flaminus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Homalotglus flaminus (Dalman) is an important natural enemy of the Chilocorus kuwanae. Its biological characteristic, life history, the action style on hosts were studied at Hongqi Forest Farm, Daqing City, Heilongjiang Province from June 1998 to October 2000, in order to control H. flaminus and raise the control ability of Chilocorus kuwanae to Quadraspidiotus gigas pest. The observed results indicated that H. flaminus has two generation one year in study area, the pupating span is 12.7 d, life span of females and males is 17.6 d and 10.8 d respectively, egg span is 10 d, and the sex ratio of females to males is 1:3.

  19. Genome-wide studies of telomere biology in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Harari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are specialized DNA-protein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres are essential for chromosomal stability and integrity, as they prevent chromosome ends from being recognized as double strand breaks. In rapidly proliferating cells, telomeric DNA is synthesized by the enzyme telomerase, which copies a short template sequence within its own RNA moiety, thus helping to solve the “end-replication problem”, in which information is lost at the ends of chromosomes with each DNA replication cycle. The basic mechanisms of telomere length, structure and function maintenance are conserved among eukaryotes. Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been instrumental in deciphering the basic aspects of telomere biology. In the last decade, technical advances, such as the availability of mutant collections, have allowed carrying out systematic genome-wide screens for mutants affecting various aspects of telomere biology. In this review we summarize these efforts, and the insights that this Systems Biology approach has produced so far.

  20. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  1. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    This report documents a study with the objective of enhancing safety culture in the Swedish nuclear power industry. A primary objective of this study was to ensure that the latest thinking on human factors principles was being recognised and applied by nuclear power operators as a means of ensuring optimal safety performance. The initial phase of the project was conducted as a pilot study, involving the senior management group at one Swedish nuclear power-producing site. The pilot study enabled the project methodology to be validated after which it was repeated at other Swedish nuclear power industry sites, providing a broad-ranging analysis of opportunities across the industry to enhance safety culture. The introduction to this report contains an overview of safety culture, explains the background to the project and sets out the project rationale and objectives. The methodology used for understanding and analysing the important safety culture issues at each nuclear power site is then described. This section begins with a summary of the processes used in the information gathering and data analysis stage. The six components of the Management Workshops conducted at each site are then described. These workshops used a series of presentations, interactive events and group exercises to: (a) provide feedback to site managers on the safety culture and safety leadership issues identified at their site, and (b) stimulate further safety thinking and provide 'take-away' information and leadership strategies that could be applied to promote safety culture improvements. Section 3, project Findings, contains the main observations and output from the project. These include: - a brief overview of aspects of the local industry operating context that impinge on safety culture; - a summary of strengths or positive attributes observed within the safety culture of the Swedish nuclear industry; - a set of identified opportunities for further improvement; - the aggregated

  2. Enhancing Student Success in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics by Transforming the Faculty Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Howard; Smith, Leigh; Koenig, Kathleen; Beyette, Jill; Kinkle, Brian; Vonderheide, Anne

    We present preliminary results of an effort to enhance undergraduate student success in the STEM disciplines. We explore a multistep approach that reflects recent literature and report initial results by each of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics of implementing several change strategies. The central elements of our approach involve identified departmental Teaching and Learning Liaisons, a unique faculty development component by our teaching center, a vertical integration of leadership across department heads, the Dean, and the Provost, and the explicit acknowledgement that change happens locally. Teaching and Learning lunches across the departments have attracted an attendance of ~65% of the faculty. The use of Learning Assistants in classrooms has also increased sharply. Modest changes in the student success rates have been observed. These efforts and others at the decanal and provostal levels promise changes in student success. We acknowledge the financial support of the National Science Foundation through DUE 1544001 and 1431350.

  3. [Effects of bio-fertilizer on organically cultured cucumber growth and soil biological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dan; Zong, Liang-gang; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Yan

    2010-10-01

    Field trials of organic farming were conducted to examine the effects of different bio-fertilizers on the organically cultured cucumber growth, soil enzyme activities, and soil microbial biomass. Four treatments were installed, i. e., organic fertilizer only (CK), bio-fertilizer "Zhonghe" combined with organic fertilizer (ZHH), bio-fertilizer "NST" combined with organic fertilizer (NST), and bio-fertilizer "Bio" combined with organic fertilizer (BIO). Bio-fertilizers combined with organic fertilizer increased the cucumber yield significantly, and improved the root growth and leaf chlorophyll content. Comparing with that in CK, the cucumber yield in treatments ZHH, NST, and BIO was increased by 10.4%, 12.4%, and 29.2%, respectively. At the seedling stage, early flowering stage, and picking time of cucumber, the soil microbial biomass C and N in treatments ZHH, NST, and BIO were significantly higher than that in CK, and the activities of soil urease, acid phosphatase, and catalase were also higher.

  4. Academic capitalism and academic culture: A case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mendoza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this department and they consider industrial sponsorship as a highly effective vehicle for enhancing the quality of education of students and pursuing their scientific interests. This study provides valuable insights to federal and institutional policiescreated to foster industry-academia partnerships and commercialization of academic research.

  5. Systems biology strategies to study lipidomes in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Orešič, Matej

    2014-07-01

    Lipids are a diverse group of metabolites that have many key biological functions, acting as structural components of cell membranes, energy storage sources and intermediates in signaling pathways. Due to their importance lipids are under tight homeostatic control and exhibit spatial and dynamic complexity at multiple levels. It is thus not surprising that altered lipid metabolism plays important roles in the pathogenesis of most of the common diseases. Lipidomics emerged as a discipline which is dedicated to global study of lipidomes, including pathways and networks of lipids in biological systems. When studying the lipidomes at a systems level, one of the key challenges is how to address the lipid functionality at many physiological levels, from metabolic and signaling pathways to spatial systems such as cellular membranes and lipoprotein particles. Besides the better analytical techniques to study lipids, computational techniques have started to emerge which enable modeling of lipidomes in their spatial and dynamic context. Together, the recent methodological advances in lipidomics have a potential to open novel avenues for predictive and preventive medicine. This review focuses on progress in systems approaches to study lipids in health and disease, with specific emphasis on clinical applications.

  6. Adult Learning Open University Determinants study (ALOUD): Biological lifestyle factors associated with study success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 7 November). Adult Learning Open University Determinants study (ALOUD): Biological lifestyle factors associated with study success. Poster presentation at the International ICO Fall School, Girona, Spain.

  7. CULTURAL CHANGE IN TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Alves Anacleto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to propose a model for the conduct of cultural change in the IT department of a company in the telecommunications industry. To achieve the goal proposed exploratory, technical procedures used were the case study and literature review. The techniques of data collection in the case study were: participant observation, unstructured interview and document analysis. The proposed model consists of five steps: analysis of the company's strategic planning, cultural diagnosis of the IT department, brainstorming with the staff and managers, compared to the case studies surveyed and proposed actions for the conduct of cultural change. We conclude that a receptive environment, employees not only understand why the changes are necessary, but engage with the process and faithfully executes the steps required, favoring the strategic positioning of the company.

  8. Selling the Internet: A Cultural Studies Approach to Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the ideology of Internet public relations. Takes a cultural studies approach to modern public relations, using public relations material as representation. Presents a case study of the MassNetworks Education Partnership, which was set up in 1996 to ensure that the Internet gets into the classroom. (PA)

  9. Organizational Mavericks and Innovation: A Triangulation Study of Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugbah, Steve; And Others

    A study examined the communicative behavior of mavericks as they relate to innovation in organizations and the impact of such non-conforming behavior on organizational change. Two approaches were used: (1) studying organizational life from the cultural perspective and (2) collecting both qualitative and quantitative data. Subjects, 32 employees of…

  10. Study Tours and the Diversification of Cultural Capital Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Michael H.; Vamosi, Alexander R.; Perez, Enrique M.; Durie, Christopher J.; Eisenberg, Jarin R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide evidence on the role study tours play in expanding student cultural capital via increased confidence in international travel. Design/methodology/approach: In this paper, survey data from individuals who participated in a study tour experience offered by a Florida-based university are analyzed for the assessment…

  11. A Comparative Study between Chinese and Western Food Culture in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦体霞

    2014-01-01

    The differences of food culture play an important role in cross-cultural communication. Learn the cultural rooted causes of food culture between Chinese and Western countries, will promote mutual understanding between people and enjoy different feelings different foods brings, enhance cultural exchange, complement and integration.

  12. State-of-the-art exposure chamber for highly controlled and reproducible THz biological effects studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna, Cesario Z.; Elam, David P.; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Sloan, Mark A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging and sensing technologies are increasingly being used at international airports for security screening purposes and at major medical centers for cancer and burn diagnosis. The emergence of new THz applications has directly resulted in an increased interest regarding the biological effects associated with this frequency range. Knowledge of THz biological effects is also desired for the safe use of THz systems, identification of health hazards, and development of empirically-based safety standards. In this study, we developed a state-of-the-art exposure chamber that allowed for highly controlled and reproducible studies of THz biological effects. This innovative system incorporated an industry grade cell incubator system that permitted a highly controlled exposure environment, where temperatures could be maintained at 37 °C +/- 0.1 °C, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels at 5% +/- 0.1%, and relative humidity (RH) levels at 95% +/- 1%. To maximize the THz power transmitted to the cell culture region inside the humid incubator, a secondary custom micro-chamber was fabricated and incorporated into the system. This micro-chamber shields the THz beam from the incubator environment and could be nitrogen-purged to eliminate water absorption effects. Additionally, a microscope that allowed for real-time visualization of the live cells before, during, and after THz exposure was integrated into the exposure system.

  13. Biological activities of indoleacetylamino acids and their use as auxins in tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangarter, R.P.; Peterson, M.D.; Good, N.E.

    1980-05-01

    The auxin activities of a number of indoleacetylamino acid conjugates have been determined in three test systems: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-L-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetlyglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-L-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formatin weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-L-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid.

  14. Biological activities of indoleacetylamino acids and their use as auxins in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangarter, R P; Peterson, M D; Good, N E

    1980-05-01

    THE AUXIN ACTIVITIES OF A NUMBER OF INDOLEACETYLAMINO ACID CONJUGATES HAVE BEEN DETERMINED IN THREE TEST SYSTEMS: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-l-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-l-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formation weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-l-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid.

  15. Are archetypes transmitted more by culture than biology? Questions arising from conceptualizations of the archetype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The archetype is one of the most important, if not the central concept of analytical psychology. Nevertheless from the beginning the concept was controversial. This paper attempts to review the debate around the term archetype and tries to point out some of the main problems the concept has in the light of contemporary knowledge especially in genetics and neurosciences. It becomes clear that for its use in the practice of Jungian psychotherapy the element of universality in the concept of archetypes is crucial. However, it must be concluded that there is still no firm scientific foundation for the claim that complex symbolic patterns (as for example the myth of the hero) can be transmitted in a way that every human individual has access to them. The paper attempts to show possible ways in which this transmission may be more successfully conceptualized. I would like to have Jung have the last word here. We find a hint in Jung's work where he opens up to ideas much like the ones I have developed here, and this is where Jung says: culture is part of man's nature.

  16. Studies of In Vitro Embryo Culture of Guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, LiLi; Lee, Ki-Young

    2014-09-01

    Different with other fishes, the guppies (Poecilia reticulata) is ovoviviparity, which retain their fertilized eggs within the follicle throughout gestation. The synchronously growing diplotene oocytes store nutrients in droplets and yolk, before their maturation and fertilization. The lecithotrophic strategy of development entails the provisioning of embryos with resources from the maternal yolk deposit rather than from a placenta, it allows the extracorporeal culture of guppy embryo. Studies on their early development of live bearers like the guppy including lineage tracing and genetic manipulations, have been limited. Therefore, to optimize conditions of embryo in vitro culture, explanted embryos from pregnant females were incubated in embryo medium (L-15 medium, supplemented with 5, 10, 15, 20% fetal bovine serum, respectively). We investigated whether the contents of FBS in vitro culture medium impact the development of embryos, and whether they would hatch in vitro. Our study found that in 5% of FBS of the medium, although embryos developed significantly slower in vitro than in the ovary, it was impossible to exactly quantify the developmental delay in culture, due to the obvious spread in developmental stage within each batch of eggs, and embryos can only be maintained until the early-eyed. And although in culture with 20% FBS the embryos can sustain rapid development of early stage, but cannot be cultured for the entire period of their embryonic development and ultimately died. In the medium with 10% and 15% FBS, the embryos seems well developed, even some can continue to grow after follicle ruptures until it can be fed. We also observed that embryonic in these two culture conditions were significantly different in development speed, in 15% it is faster than 10%. But 10% FBS appears to be more optimizing condition than 15% one on development process of embryos and survival rate to larvae stage.

  17. Student perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life: A study in higher education biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himschoot, Agnes Rose

    The purpose of this mixed method case study was to examine the effects of methods of instruction on students' perception of relevance in higher education non-biology majors' courses. Nearly ninety percent of all students in a liberal arts college are required to take a general biology course. It is proposed that for many of those students, this is the last science course they will take for life. General biology courses are suspected of discouraging student interest in biology with large enrollment, didactic instruction, covering a huge amount of content in one semester, and are charged with promoting student disengagement with biology by the end of the course. Previous research has been aimed at increasing student motivation and interest in biology as measured by surveys and test results. Various methods of instruction have been tested and show evidence of improved learning gains. This study focused on students' perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life and the methods of instruction that increase it. A quantitative survey was administered to assess perception of relevance pre and post instruction over three topics typically taught in a general biology course. A second quantitative survey of student experiences during instruction was administered to identify methods of instruction used in the course lecture and lab. While perception of relevance dropped in the study, qualitative focus groups provided insight into the surprising results by identifying topics that are more relevant than the ones chosen for the study, conveying the affects of the instructor's personal and instructional skills on student engagement, explanation of how active engagement during instruction promotes understanding of relevance, the roll of laboratory in promoting students' understanding of relevance as well as identifying external factors that affect student engagement. The study also investigated the extent to which gender affected changes in students' perception of

  18. A study on relationship between organizational culture and communication apprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Farhangi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and communication apprehension among some employees who worked for Iran broadcasting channel. The study has adopted two well-known questionnaires developed by Hofstede (1984 [Hofstede, G. (1984. Culture's Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values (2nd ed.. Beverly Hills CA: SAGE Publications. ISBN 0-8039-1444-X] for organizational culture and McCroskey et al. (1985 [McCroskey, J. C., Beatty, M. J., Kearney, P., & Plax, T. G. (1985. The content validity of the PRCA‐24 as a measure of communication apprehension across communication contexts. Communication Quarterly, 33(3, 165-173.] for communication apprehension (CA. We have used Chi-Square test to verify different hypotheses of the survey and the results of the survey have indicated that while there was no relationship between CA and three components including cultures of masculinity, individualistic culture and ambiguity aversion, there was a significance relationship between CA and power distance. The results of our survey indicate that as the power distance increases we may expect a higher level on CA.

  19. Geomorphology's role in the study of weathering of cultural stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Gregory A.; Meierding, Thomas C.; Paradise, Thomas R.

    2002-10-01

    Great monumental places—Petra, Giza, Angkor, Stonehenge, Tikal, Macchu Picchu, Rapa Nui, to name a few—are links to our cultural past. They evoke a sense of wonderment for their aesthetic fascination if not for their seeming permanence over both cultural and physical landscapes. However, as with natural landforms, human constructs are subject to weathering and erosion. Indeed, many of our cultural resources suffer from serious deterioration, some natural, some enhanced by human impact. Groups from the United Nations to local civic and tourism assemblies are deeply interested in maintaining and preserving such cultural resources, from simple rock art to great temples. Geomorphologists trained in interacting systems, process and response to thresholds, rates of change over time, and spatial variation of weathering processes and effects are able to offer insight into how deterioration occurs and what can be done to ameliorate the impact. Review of recent literature and case studies presented here demonstrate methodological and theoretical advances that have resulted from the study of cultural stone weathering. Because the stone was carved at a known date to a "baseline" or zero-datum level, some of the simplest methods (e.g., assessing surface weathering features or measuring surface recession in the field) provide useful data on weathering rates and processes. Such data are difficult or impossible to obtain in "natural" settings. Cultural stone weathering studies demonstrate the importance of biotic and saline weathering agents and the significance of weathering factors such as exposure (microclimate) and human impact. More sophisticated methods confirm these observations, but also reveal discrepancies between field and laboratory studies. This brings up two important caveats for conservators and geomorphologists. For the conservator, are laboratory and natural setting studies really analogous and useful for assessing stone damage? For the geomorphologist, does

  20. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Geider, R. [Delaware Univ., Lewes, DE (United States). Coll. of Marine Studies

    1992-07-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  1. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Geider, R. (Delaware Univ., Lewes, DE (United States). Coll. of Marine Studies)

    1992-01-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  2. Experimental stand for studying the impact of laser-accelerated protons on biological objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Ignatova, N. I.; Osmanov, R. R.; Sladkov, A. D.; Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Revet, G.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Chen, S.; Shaykin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    An original experimental stand is presented, aimed at studying the impact of high-energy protons, produced by the laser-plasma interaction at a petawatt power level, on biological objects. In the course of pilot experiments with the energy of laser-accelerated protons up to 25 MeV, the possibility is demonstrated of transferring doses up to 10 Gy to the object of study in a single shot with the magnetic separation of protons from parasitic X-ray radiation and fast electrons. The technique of irradiating the cell culture HeLa Kyoto and measuring the fraction of survived cells is developed. The ways of optimising the parameters of proton beams and the suitable methods of their separation with respect to energy and transporting to the studied living objects are discussed. The construction of the stand is intended for the improvement of laser technologies for hadron therapy of malignant neoplasms.

  3. Student nurses' experiences of living and studying in a different culture to their own and the development of cultural sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruddock, Heidi

    With the increase of culturally diverse people residing in Denmark, it has become imperative to provide student nurses with knowledge and skills that will enable them to become culturally sensitive in order interact effectively with clients from culturally diverse backgrounds. The aim of this study...... was to explore whether student nurses develop cultural sensitivity as a consequence of living and studying in a culture that is different from their own. Seven Danish student nurses who had participated in student exchanges in Jamaica, Australia, Malta and Greenland took part in this study. A qualitative...... characteristics of openness and flexibility and support networks facilitated the students transition and adjustment to the host culture. Reflection on their experiences with students from a similar background to themselves and clinical mentors from the host culture assisted the students in their understanding...

  4. Characterizing parameters of Jatropha curcas cell cultures for microgravity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Wagner A.; Pinares, Ania

    2013-06-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a tropical perennial species identified as a potential biofuel crop. The oil is of excellent quality and it has been successfully tested as biodiesel and in jet fuel mixes. However, studies on breeding and genetic improvement of jatropha are limited. Space offers a unique environment for experiments aiming at the assessment of mutations and differential gene expression of crops and in vitro cultures of plants are convenient for studies of genetic variation as affected by microgravity. However, before microgravity studies can be successfully performed, pre-flight experiments are necessary to characterize plant material and validate flight hardware environmental conditions. Such preliminary studies set the ground for subsequent spaceflight experiments. The objectives of this study were to compare the in vitro growth of cultures from three explant sources (cotyledon, leaf, and stem sections) of three jatropha accessions (Brazil, India, and Tanzania) outside and inside the petriGAP, a modified group activation pack (GAP) flight hardware to fit petri dishes. In vitro jatropha cell cultures were established in petri dishes containing a modified MS medium and maintained in a plant growth chamber at 25 ± 2 °C in the dark. Parameters evaluated were surface area of the explant tissue (A), fresh weight (FW), and dry weight (DW) for a period of 12 weeks. Growth was observed for cultures from all accessions at week 12, including subsequent plantlet regeneration. For all accessions differences in A, FW and DW were observed for inside vs. outside the PetriGAPs. Growth parameters were affected by accession (genotype), explant type, and environment. The type of explant influenced the type of cell growth and subsequent plantlet regeneration capacity. However, overall cell growth showed no abnormalities. The present study demonstrated that jatropha in vitro cell cultures are suitable for growth inside PetriGAPs for a period of 12 weeks. The parameters

  5. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (Φ/Ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  6. IN VITRO TISSUE CULTURE, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PLUMBAGO SCANDENS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Farcio-Villarreal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A protocol was developed for the micropropagation of Plumbago scandens L. from the shoot tip and node explants.The best response of shoot elongation (10.18±2.01 mm was observed on MS basal medium supplemented with 0.02 mg/L IAA – 0.02 mg/L GA3. The maximum number of root induction (10.0±2.21 and shoot elongation (8.24±3.24 mm was observed on medium containing 0.01 mg/L IBA and 0.01 mg/L GA3. The in vitro propagated plants were transferred to soil with 80% survival rate. Profuse compact callus was induced and proliferated from several explants (cotyledons, internodes, hypocotyls and roots cultured on MS medium supplemented with all the combinations of 2,4-D – GA3 or 2,4-D alone and combinations of IAA – BAP or IAA alone, and the highest percentage of friable callus (90% were induced in the sections of compact callus using 2.0 mg/L IAA – 0.02 mg/L BAP – 0.5 mg/L GA3.The qualitative determination of chemical constituents in the extracts was evaluated by a gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometry, and it was verified the presence of plumbagin only in root extracts but not in in vitro plantlets.The antibacterial activity of root extracts against various pathogenic bacteria, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs was determined. Chloroform extracts showed good antibacterial activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae between 0.4 to 1.0 mg/L with 20.4 to 30.0 mm (diameter zone of inhibition; inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus was moderate, and lower against Escherichia coli. Chloroform extracts had the lowest MICs for N. gonorrhoeae (<0.1 mg/mL per disc, and the activities against S. aureus (MIC 0.2 mg/mL and E. coli (MIC 0.4 mg/mL were less pronounced.

  7. Studying Mobile Media Cultural Technologies, Mobile Communication, and the IPhone

    CERN Document Server

    Hjorth, Larissa; Richardson, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The iPhone represents an important moment in both the short history of mobile media and the long history of cultural technologies. Like the Walkman of the 1980s, it marks a juncture in which notions about identity, individualism, lifestyle and sociality require rearticulation. this book explores not only the iPhone's particular characteristics, uses and "affects," but also how the "iPhone moment" functions as a barometer for broader patterns of change. In the iPhone moment, this study considers the convergent trajectories in the evolution of digital and mobile culture, and

  8. Culture Studies in the Field of International Business Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Verner; Li, Xin; Jakobsen, Michael

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of culture studies within the field of international business research, and to examine how two main paradigms – essentialism and social constructivism – relate to the discourse in this field. We analyze the main points of the two...... in this paper. Practical implications: We encourage practitioners to learn how to switch, both sequentially and spatially, between the two paradigms of culture (fundamentally incommensurable though they are). This involves taking a “both/or” approach to the two paradigms. Originality/Value: We show...

  9. Instituting Cultural Change at a Major Organization: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulek, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the development and implementation of a strategic cultural change program from a case study perspective. Initially, the article describes how the program was developed, including an explanation as to how a communication component was integrated into the program from inception. This integration helped reduce the anxiety that…

  10. Cultural Competence and School Counselor Training: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith A.; Bustamante, Rebecca; Sawyer, Cheryl; Sloan, Eva D.

    2015-01-01

    This collective case study investigated the experiences of bilingual counselors-in-training who assessed school-wide cultural competence in public schools. Analysis and interpretation of data resulted in the identification of 5 themes: eye-opening experiences, recognition of strengths, the role of school leaders, road maps for change, and…

  11. Cultural Competence and School Counselor Training: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith A.; Bustamante, Rebecca; Sawyer, Cheryl; Sloan, Eva D.

    2015-01-01

    This collective case study investigated the experiences of bilingual counselors-in-training who assessed school-wide cultural competence in public schools. Analysis and interpretation of data resulted in the identification of 5 themes: eye-opening experiences, recognition of strengths, the role of school leaders, road maps for change, and…

  12. Cultures of the World: Administrative Manual [And] Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Charles Howard

    This learning package is a three-semester-hour, independent-study course in geography and cultures of the world designed for postsecondary, external degree students. Keyed to the commercially published textbook "Between Two Worlds: A New Introduction to Geography" (Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1973), the package consists of an…

  13. Transforming Cultures of Care: A Case Study in Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Karyn; Cross, David; Jones, Daren; Buff, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on a small organizational case study highlighting the dimensions of trauma-informed care, the processes of organizational change, and the growth of caregiver expertise. The article is framed by the notion of caregiving cultures, which refers to the beliefs, languages, and practices of caregivers and caregiving organizations.…

  14. Study Abroad: Enhanced Learning Experience in Cultural Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaoko, Japheth

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how a study abroad experiential learning course in diversity provided a cultural immersion experience for a group of social work students from a small private university in central Kentucky. The students participated in a three-week international education experience in Kenya and reported this experience helped them become more…

  15. A Cross-cultural Study on American and Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志远

    2015-01-01

    Compliment is one of the most commonly used speech acts in social communication. This thesis, through the comparative studies on topic distribution and compliment response of Chinese compliments and Ameri-can compliments, aims at helping English learners have a profound understanding on compliments in cross-cultural communication.

  16. Studying Another Culture through Children's Games: Examples from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski

    1988-01-01

    Identifying games as being common to children worldwide, Sunal focuses on Nigerian group games in order to illustrate the range of game variations and their use in a social studies program. Describes hiding games, singing games, and a fine-motor skills game, stating that they help acquaint students with foreign cultures and reveal similarities in…

  17. Transforming Cultures of Care: A Case Study in Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Karyn; Cross, David; Jones, Daren; Buff, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on a small organizational case study highlighting the dimensions of trauma-informed care, the processes of organizational change, and the growth of caregiver expertise. The article is framed by the notion of caregiving cultures, which refers to the beliefs, languages, and practices of caregivers and caregiving organizations.…

  18. Marxism in Vygotskian Approaches to Cultural Studies of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo, Jr.; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research,…

  19. Twenty years of protein interaction studies for biological function deciphering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrain, Pierre; Rain, Jean-Christophe

    2014-07-31

    Intensive methodological developments and technology innovation have been devoted to protein-protein interaction studies over 20years. Genetic indirect assays and sophisticated large scale biochemical analyses have jointly contributed to the elucidation of protein-protein interactions, still with a lot of drawbacks despite heavy investment in human resources and technologies. With the most recent developments in mass spectrometry and computational tools for studying protein content of complex samples, the initial goal of deciphering molecular bases of biological functions is now within reach. Here, we described the various steps of this process and gave examples of key milestones in this scientific story line. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 20years of Proteomics in memory of Viatliano Pallini. Guest Editors: Luca Bini, Juan J. Calvete, Natacha Turck, Denis Hochstrasser and Jean-Charles Sanchez.

  20. Armand Mattelard et Erik Neveu. Introduction aux Cultural Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Imbert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet ouvrage retrace en cinq chapitres la génèse et le développement d’un courant de recherche jusqu’à un certain point méconnu en France. Dans les années 60, l’école de Birmingham (Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies a élargi la notion de culture au sens noble du terme en accordant aux styles de vie de la classe ouvrière et aux médias l’attention jusque là réservée à la culture des lettrés.Le premier chapitre évoque les travaux des pères fondateurs : le retentissement profond de l’ouvra...

  1. Culture, perception, and artistic visualization: a comparative study of children's drawings in three Siberian cultural groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, Kirill V; Panáková, Jaroslava; Heady, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In a study of three indigenous and non-indigenous cultural groups in northwestern and northeastern Siberia, framed line tests and a landscape drawing task were used to examine the hypotheses that test-based assessments of context sensitivity and independence are correlated with the amount of contextual information contained in drawings, and with the order in which the focal and background objects are drawn. The results supported these hypotheses, and inspection of the regression relationships suggested that the intergroup variations in test performance were likely to result from differences in the attention accorded to contextual information, as revealed by the drawings. Social and environmental explanations for the group differences in context sensitivity are also discussed. The conclusions support the argument that cultural differences in artistic styles and perceptual tests reflect the same underlying perceptual tendencies, and they are consistent with the argument that these tendencies reflect corresponding differences in patterns of social and environmental interaction.

  2. Chemical Biology Studies on Molecular Diversity of Annonaceous Acetogenins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Zhu-Jun

    2004-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins, isolated from the Annonaceae plants, have been attracting worldwide attention in recent years due to their biological activities, especially as growth inhibitors of certain tumor ceils [ 1 ]. They have been shown to function by blocking complex I in mitochondria [2] as well as ubiquinone-linked NADPH oxidase in the cells of specific tumor cell lines, including some multidrug-resistant ones [3]. These features make these acetogenins excellent leads for the new antitumor agents. In our previous work, the compounds 1a to 1d (Figure 1), which relies on structure simplification while maintaining all essential functionalities of the acetogenins, was in vitro tested against several human solid tumor cell lines and showed interesting cell selectivity [4]. All four analogues show remarkable activity against the HCT-8 and HT-29 cell lines, while compound 1c was found the best [4bi. In order to further investigate the effects of key structural features, a convergent parallel fragments assembly strategy was developed [4e]. In addition, the biological relevancies of typical annonaceous acetogenin mimetics were also studied [4f].

  3. Kinship and altruism: a cross-cultural experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Elainie A; Tunney, Richard J; Fieldman, George; Plotkin, Henry C; Dunbar, Robin I M; Richardson, Jean-Marie; McFarland, David

    2007-05-01

    Humans are characterized by an unusual level of prosociality. Despite this, considerable indirect evidence suggests that biological kinship plays an important role in altruistic behaviour. All previous reports of the influence of kin selection on human altruism have, however, used correlational (rather than experimental) designs, or imposed only a hypothetical or negligible time cost on participants. Since these research designs fail either to control for confounding variables or to meet the criteria required as a test of Hamilton's rule for kin selection (that the altruist pays a true cost), they fail to establish unequivocally whether kin selection plays a role. We show that individuals from two different cultures behave in accordance with Hamilton's rule by acting more altruistically (imposing a higher physical cost upon themselves) towards more closely related individuals. Three possible sources of confound were ruled out: generational effects, sexual attraction and reciprocity. Performance on the task however did not exhibit a perfect linear relationship with relatedness, which might reflect either the intrusion of other variables (e.g. cultural differences in the way kinship is costed) or that our behavioural measure is insufficiently sensitive to fine-tuned differences in the way individuals view their social world. These findings provide the first unequivocal experimental evidence that kinship plays a role in moderating altruistic behaviour. Kinship thus represents a baseline against which individuals pitch other criteria (including reciprocity, prosociality, obligation and a moral sense) when deciding how to behave towards others.

  4. Mouse pancreas tissue slice culture facilitates long-term studies of exocrine and endocrine cell physiology in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Marciniak

    Full Text Available Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To overcome these limitations, we aimed to establish a pancreas tissue slice culture platform to allow long-term studies on exocrine and endocrine cells in the intact pancreatic environment. Mouse pancreas tissue slice morphology was assessed to determine optimal long-term culture settings for intact pancreatic tissue. Utilizing optimized culture conditions, cell specificity and function of exocrine acinar cells and endocrine beta cells were characterized over a culture period of 7 days. We found pancreas tissue slices cultured under optimized conditions to have intact tissue specific morphology for the entire culture period. Amylase positive intact acini were present at all time points of culture and acinar cells displayed a typical strong cell polarity. Amylase release from pancreas tissue slices decreased during culture, but maintained the characteristic bell-shaped dose-response curve to increasing caerulein concentrations and a ca. 4-fold maximal over basal release. Additionally, endocrine beta cell viability and function was well preserved until the end of the observation period. Our results show that the tissue slice culture platform provides unprecedented maintenance of pancreatic tissue specific morphology and function over a culture period for at least 4 days and in part even up to 1 week. This analytical advancement now allows mid -to long-term studies on the cell biology of pancreatic disorder pathogenesis and therapy in an intact surrounding in situ.

  5. The emerging molecular biology toolbox for the study of long noncoding RNA biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Ezio T; Scholefield, Janine; Fanucchi, Stephanie; Mhlanga, Musa M

    2017-09-06

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in many biological processes. However, due to the unique nature of lncRNAs and the consequential difficulties associated with their characterization, there is a growing disparity between the rate at which lncRNAs are being discovered and the assignment of biological function to these transcripts. Here we present a molecular biology toolbox equipped to help dissect aspects of lncRNA biology and reveal functionality. We outline an approach that begins with a broad survey of genome-wide, high-throughput datasets to identify potential lncRNA candidates and then narrow the focus on specific methods that are well suited to interrogate the transcripts of interest more closely. This involves the use of imaging-based strategies to validate these candidates and observe the behaviors of these transcripts at single molecule resolution in individual cells. We also describe the use of gene editing tools and interactome capture techniques to interrogate functionality and infer mechanism, respectively. With the emergence of lncRNAs as important molecules in healthy and diseased cellular function, it remains crucial to deepen our understanding of their biology.

  6. Axenically culturing the bryophytes: a case study of the moss Herzogiella seligeri (Brid. Z. Iwats. (Plagiotheciaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujičić, M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A moss genus Herzogiella, from the pleurocarpous family Plagiotheciaceae contains only seven species world wide. It occurs in North, Central and South America, Europe and Asia. In Europe, only three species occurred, namely H. seligeri, H. striatella and H. turfacea of which, the last one is threatened. With aim to develop the methodology for protection, conservation and active propagation of H. turfacea, more commonly distributed counterpart, H. seligeri, were taken from the National Park Fruška Gora and axenically culture were established. The study gives overview into the problems of sterilization, in vitro establishing, development, propagation and biology of species, as well as indices applicable to threatened counterpart.

  7. Fern Gametophytes in Culture--A Simple System for Studying Plant Development and Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses fern life cycle and basic techniques for culturing fern gametophytes in the classroom. Also discusses investigations into the reproductive biology of ferns and into the early development of gametophytes. (JN)

  8. Education for a Culture of Peace: The Culture of Peace News Network as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David

    2013-01-01

    The Culture of Peace News Network, an internet news service, is analyzed in the framework of a general approach to education for a culture of peace. Its format reflects the eight program areas for a culture of peace as adopted by the UN General Assembly. Among its other operating principles are universality of news with all cultures and regions of…

  9. A conceptual approach to studying the organisational culture of construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayaparan Gajendran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Studying the culture of project organisations requires a robust theoretical framework, which provides a platform for generating understanding. It is argued that cultural analysis frameworks are most effectively conceptualised from multiple philosophical and multi-methodological positions. To this end this paper presents a cultural analysis framework for studying construction project organisations, based on a synthesis of the culture literature. Four key aspects underpinning organisational cultural framework are explored: the paradigms used to conceptualise organisational culture, the methods by which individuals represent and assess cultural dimensions, the cultural perspectives assumed by the observer when defining and describing culture, and the managers’ orientation to culture in their organisations. The proposed framework comprises three synthesised cultural philosophical positions: integration-technical, differentiation-practical and fragmentation-emancipation. These philosophical positions span the polar extremes defining the cultural paradigm continuum, which together provide researchers and organisational managers with a sound foundation from which to study the culture of project organisations.

  10. A conceptual approach to studying the organisational culture of construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayaparan Gajendran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Studying the culture of project organisations requires a robust theoretical framework, which provides a platform for generating understanding. It is argued that cultural analysis frameworks are most effectively conceptualised from multiple philosophical and multi-methodological positions. To this end this paper presents a cultural analysis framework for studying construction project organisations, based on a synthesis of the culture literature. Four key aspects underpinning organisational cultural framework are explored: the paradigms used to conceptualise organisational culture, the methods by which individuals represent and assess cultural dimensions, the cultural perspectives assumed by the observer when defining and describing culture, and the managers’ orientation to culture in their organisations. The proposed framework comprises three synthesised cultural philosophical positions: integration-technical, differentiation-practical and fragmentation-emancipation. These philosophical positions span the polar extremes defining the cultural paradigm continuum, which together provide researchers and organisational managers with a sound foundation from which to study the culture of project organisations.  

  11. Study on and Redefinition of the Concept of Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴剑飞

    2015-01-01

    So far, various opinions about the concept of culture are come up with in both China and the West in which three kinds of culture are classified as follows. The culture in narrow sense denotes merely the ideas. The culture in medium sense embraces ideas, customs, norms, symbols and behaviors, etc. The culture in broad sense refers to the lifestyle constituted of both the material culture and spiritual culture. There is an urgent necessity to redefine the concept of culture by exploring the history of the etymolo-gy of the word"culture"in order to figure out the deviance of different concepts of culture.

  12. Culture of Human Tendon Cell Transfected by Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Plasmid and their Biological CharacteristicsIn Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe proliferative and functional characteristics of tendon cell are the key issue in the research of tissue engineered tendon. The standard tendon cell line, which has normal functional characteristics, and can be subcultured continuously and permanently, will not only meet the demands of seeding cell in tissue engineered tendon, but also control the variable of tendon cell. In our previous study, it showed that the proliferative ability of human tendon cell cultured in vitro is depressed grad...

  13. Growth control of the eukaryote cell: a systems biology study in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrillo Juan I

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell growth underlies many key cellular and developmental processes, yet a limited number of studies have been carried out on cell-growth regulation. Comprehensive studies at the transcriptional, proteomic and metabolic levels under defined controlled conditions are currently lacking. Results Metabolic control analysis is being exploited in a systems biology study of the eukaryotic cell. Using chemostat culture, we have measured the impact of changes in flux (growth rate on the transcriptome, proteome, endometabolome and exometabolome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each functional genomic level shows clear growth-rate-associated trends and discriminates between carbon-sufficient and carbon-limited conditions. Genes consistently and significantly upregulated with increasing growth rate are frequently essential and encode evolutionarily conserved proteins of known function that participate in many protein-protein interactions. In contrast, more unknown, and fewer essential, genes are downregulated with increasing growth rate; their protein products rarely interact with one another. A large proportion of yeast genes under positive growth-rate control share orthologs with other eukaryotes, including humans. Significantly, transcription of genes encoding components of the TOR complex (a major controller of eukaryotic cell growth is not subject to growth-rate regulation. Moreover, integrative studies reveal the extent and importance of post-transcriptional control, patterns of control of metabolic fluxes at the level of enzyme synthesis, and the relevance of specific enzymatic reactions in the control of metabolic fluxes during cell growth. Conclusion This work constitutes a first comprehensive systems biology study on growth-rate control in the eukaryotic cell. The results have direct implications for advanced studies on cell growth, in vivo regulation of metabolic fluxes for comprehensive metabolic engineering, and for

  14. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  15. Simulation of Interval Censored Data in Medical and Biological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Kaveh; Arasan, Jayanthi

    This research looks at the simulation of interval censored data when the survivor function of the survival time is known and attendance probability of the subjects for follow-ups can take any number between 0 to 1. Interval censored data often arise in the medical and biological follow-up studies where the event of interest occurs somewhere between two known times. Regardless of the methods used to analyze these types of data, simulation of interval censored data is an important and challenging step toward model building and prediction of survival time. The simulation itself is rather tedious and very computer intensive due to the interval monitoring of subjects at prescheduled times and subject's incomplete attendance to follow-ups. In this paper the simulated data by the proposed method were assessed using the bias, standard error and root mean square error (RMSE) of the parameter estimates where the survival time T is assumed to follow the Gompertz distribution function.

  16. Visual Literacy in Preservice Teachers: a Case Study in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Gallardo, José Reyes; García Fernández, Beatriz; Mateos Jiménez, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we explore the competence of preservice teachers (n = 161) in labelling and creating new cross-sectional human diagrams, based on anatomy knowledge depicted in longitudinal sections. Using educational standards to assess visual literacy and ad hoc open questions, results indicate limited skills for both tasks. However, their competence is particularly poor creating diagrams, where shortcomings were observed not only in visual literacy but in content knowledge. We discuss the misconceptions detected during these assessments. Visual literacy training should be strengthened for these students, as it is a skill that is especially important for future teachers to use in learning, assessing, and reflecting on content in science education. This is particularly important in preservice teachers since they should be fluent in the use of visual teaching tools in teaching anatomy and other content in the biology curriculum.

  17. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes.

  18. MODERN TECHNOLOGIES AND APPROACHES TO APOPTOSIS STUDIES IN EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kudriavtsev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This review is focused on analysis of currently used flow cytometric methods designed foridentifying apoptotic cells in various invertebrate and vertebrate species. Apoptosis can be characterized by stage-specific morphological and biochemical changes that are typical to all kinds of eukaryotic cells. In this article, we consider different techniques of apoptosis detection based on assessment of cellular morphology and plasma membrane alterations, activation of intracellular enzymes and components of a caspase cascade, as well as DNA fragmentation and failure of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, as assessed in various animal groups. Apoptosis recognized as a key mechanism aiming at maintenance of cellular homeostasis in multicellular organisms, and such investigations represent a necessary component of fundamental and applied studies in diverse fields of experimental biology and immunology. A broad spectrum of apoptosis markers isused, and the preference is given to optimal approaches, as determined by experimental tasks, and technical opportunities of the laboratory.

  19. The Effect of a New Seventh-Grade Biology Curriculum on the Achievements and Attitudes of Intellectually and Culturally Heterogeneous Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabar, Naama; Kaplan, Eugene H.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated was the adequacy of a teaching-learning model for improving the level of achievement and attitudes of culturally deprived children in heterogeneous classes, while offering adequate learning opportunity to those who were not deprived. A seventh grade biology course on aquatic zoo ecology was developed for this model. (Author/HM)

  20. Placenta-on-a-chip: a novel platform to study the biology of the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Soo; Romero, Roberto; Han, Yu Mi; Kim, Hee Chan; Kim, Chong Jai; Hong, Joon-Seok; Huh, Dongeun

    2016-01-01

    Studying the biology of the human placenta represents a major experimental challenge. Although conventional cell culture techniques have been used to study different types of placenta-derived cells, current in vitro models have limitations in recapitulating organ-specific structure and key physiological functions of the placenta. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to leverage microfluidic and microfabrication technologies to develop a microengineered biomimetic model that replicates the architecture and function of the placenta. A "Placenta-on-a-Chip" microdevice was created by using a set of soft elastomer-based microfabrication techniques known as soft lithography. This microsystem consisted of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels separated by a thin extracellular matrix (ECM) membrane. To reproduce the placental barrier in this model, human trophoblasts (JEG-3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded onto the opposite sides of the ECM membrane and cultured under dynamic flow conditions to form confluent epithelial and endothelial layers in close apposition. We tested the physiological function of the microengineered placental barrier by measuring glucose transport across the trophoblast-endothelial interface over time. The permeability of the barrier study was analyzed and compared to that obtained from acellular devices and additional control groups that contained epithelial or endothelial layers alone. Our microfluidic cell culture system provided a tightly controlled fluidic environment conducive to the proliferation and maintenance of JEG-3 trophoblasts and HUVECs on the ECM scaffold. Prolonged culture in this model produced confluent cellular monolayers on the intervening membrane that together formed the placental barrier. This in vivo-like microarchitecture was also critical for creating a physiologically relevant effective barrier to glucose transport. Quantitative investigation of barrier function was

  1. Using Game Theory to Study the Evolution of Cultural Norms

    CERN Document Server

    De, Soham; Gelfand, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how to use evolutionary game theory (EGT) as a framework for studying how cultural dynamics and structural properties can influence the evolution of norms and behaviors within a society. We provide a brief tutorial on how EGT works, and discuss what kinds of insights it can provide. We then describe three published studies in which we have developed EGT models that help explain how structural and external conditions in a society affect the emergence of social norms.

  2. Systems biology studies of Aspergilli - from sequence to science

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Nielsen, Jens; Nielsen, Michael Lynge

    2008-01-01

    The recent dawn of the new biological mindset called systems biology has put forth a new way of analyzing and understanding biology. Carried by the notion that no element of a cell is an island, systems biology takes a holistic approach, and attempts to understand life as systems that have co-evolved and not as a haphazardly compiled list of parts. This has been made possible by the socalled genomic revolution — the sequencing of the genomic DNA of a rapidly increasing number of organisms — a...

  3. STUDY ON THE BIOLOGICAL VALUE OF PROTEINS WITH HYPOTENSIVE PROPERTIES FROM AIR-DRIED BEEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Kovaleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines an effect of starter culture incorporation into the technology of air-dried beef products on a degree of protein hydration and solubility. The processes of the protein macromolecule hydrolysis on dipeptides, polypeptides and free amino acids are described. It was shown air-dried beef products that contain starter cultures had the high biological value. It was noticed that microorganisms being constituents of starter cultures had the high proteolytic activity and accelerated the biochemical transformation of meat proteins upon curing, which resulted in higher rates of biochemical processes. The molecular weight distribution of protein fractions was determined. The derivatives of meat proteins, peptides, which can have a physiological effect on the body, are the most promising for studying. This study presents an assessment of a protein complex of air-dried beef products made according to different technologies of air drying and shows that the majority of protein spectra in the air-dried beef products with starter cultures are in the zones of proteins with potential hypotensive properties (medium and light zones with molecular weights of 50 kDa — 70 kDa and 5 kDa — 20 kDa, respectively. It is shown that when using the traditional technology of air drying, an accumulation of the protein spectra in meat was observed in the zone of heavy fractions with a molecular weight of 85 кDа — 100 кDа, the medium and light fractions were poorly pronounced. The highest rate of hydrolysis of the air-dried meat products with starter cultures by the enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract makes it possible to predict in a greater degree a level of protein utilization by the human body. It was established that the highest growth indicators were in the laboratory animals, which diet was supplemented with air-dried products that contained starter cultures. A live weight gain over a 30 day period of feeding was 14.37 g and 12.82 g

  4. Study of the Relationship between Cultural differences and Language teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆瑜

    2014-01-01

    Language is an important part of culture,each language belong to a certain culture.Language and culture are interdependent from each other.So,language teaching must be concerned with teaching the culture which it belongs to.Language teaching should pay more attention to the cultural differences.

  5. A Study of the Cultural Factors Influencing SLA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiTong; HuangRenfeng; YangWeizhong

    2004-01-01

    The cultural factors that affect Second Language Acquisition (SLA) result from many aspects, some derived from the level of the acquirer's mother language, other soriginated from the stratum of his native culture. Based on the relations between language and culture - language is the carrier of culture, while culture is the contents of language-it

  6. Promoting and Financing Cultural Tourism in Europe through European Capitals of Culture: A Case Study of Košice, European Capital of Culture 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Šebová

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the link between the European Capital of Culture (ECoC designation and the development of cultural tourism in Europe. Cultural tourism is the fastest growing segment of tourism in the world and is the desirable objective of new defined cultural policies in European cities. According to the European Commission (2012, it is estimated that cultural tourism accounts for around 40% of all European tourism. In general, the European Commission confirms the significant role of cultural tourism in the development of tourism in Europe and one of the most visible tools of this strategy is the designation of the ECoC. Cultural policy has also become an important tool of urban regeneration and in the rebranding of European cities. The case study of Košice ECoC 2013 presents part of the results from the Košice ECoC evaluation project. The Košice ECoC 2013 project was designed as a community led project which was targeted at increasing the cultural consumption of residents rather than the number of foreign cultural tourists. However, the biggest events such as White night attracted a lot of tourists from the wider region. More than 70 million EUR was dedicated to investments, which have significantly improved the culture infrastructure in Košice. The ECoC designation supported the local cultural buzz and led to new local production of modern culture, art and the creative industries. Other visible effects have already been seen in the advantages gained by the decentralization of the cultural infrastructure and events in the neighbourhoods. The involvement of people outside the city centre has avoided gentrification in the city. From this point of view the project Košice ECoC 2013 has had the prerequisite to sustainable cultural tourism in Košice

  7. Biological anthropology and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, Gillian H

    2005-06-01

    As the number of persons aged 65 and older is increasing dramatically in both developed and developing nations of the world, the health and well-being of elders has become a worldwide public health concern. Although older adults are now found in higher proportions across all cultures, the biology, behavior, and environment vary tremendously across older populations. Biomedical research largely follows a reductionist paradigm separating the domains of culture and biology. Even when health is examined in association with culture and behavior, biomedical researchers largely focus on static unidirectional associations instead of examining the dynamic multidirectional impact of culture, behavior, and the environment on physiology and ultimately health. Since aging and the processes of senescence clearly involve complex interactions among biological, environmental, and cultural domains, anthropologists with a bio-cultural and evolutionary perspective are well-equipped to study variation in aging and senescence. While relatively few biological anthropologists have focused their attention on aging, a growing literature has demonstrated the utility of biocultural approaches to aging. This paper serves as an introduction to a special issue that highlights the core of the biological anthropology of aging.

  8. Experimental study of bioartificial liver with cultured human liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AIM To establish an extracorporeal bioartificial liver support system (EBLSS) using cultured human liver cells and to study its support effect for fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).METHODS The liver support experiment of EBLSS consisting of aggregates cultured human liver cells, hollow fiber bioreactor, and circulation unit was carried out in dizhepatic dogs.RESULTS The viability of isolated hepatocytes and nonparenchymal liver cells reached 96%. These cells were successfully cultured as multicellular spheroids with synthetic technique. The typical morphological appearance was retained up to the end of the artificial liver experiment. Compared with the control dogs treated with EBLSS without liver cells, the survival time of artificial liver support dogs was significantly prolonged. The changes of blood pressure, heart rate and ECG were slow. Both serum ammonia and lactate levels were significantly lowered at the 3rd h and 5th h. In addition, a good viability of human liver cells was noted after 5 h experiment.CONCLUSION EBLSS playing a metabolic role of cultured human hepatocytes, is capable of compensating the function of the liver, and could provide effective artificial liver support and therapy for patients with FHF.

  9. [Cytotoxicity studies on T-3262 in cultured Chinese hamster cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, T; Nakamura, S; Nojima, Y; Nishio, Y

    1989-04-01

    T-3262 is an antibacterial drug which belongs to the group of pyridonecarboxylic acids. In this study, we investigated cytotoxicity of T-3262 for inhibition of cell growth and effects on viability of, and morphological changes in cultured Chinese hamster cells (V79 cells). The following results were obtained. 1. The 50% inhibition dose of T-3262 for cell growth (ID50, cultured for 48 hours) was 12 micrograms/ml, showing that the inhibitory effect of T-3262 on the cell growth was stronger than that of enoxacin (ENX: ID50 44 micrograms/ml), norfloxacin (NFLX: ID50 105 micrograms/ml) or ofloxacin (OFLX: ID50 145 micrograms/ml). 2. The number of cells increased and dead cells were scarcely seen at the highest concentration tested in culture medium (40 micrograms/ml of T-3262 for 48 hours). At this concentration, degeneration of cytoplasm (atrophy and round shape) and decrease of mitotic cells were observed. These morphological changes were similar to those of the cells treated 400 micrograms/ml of NFLX or OFLX for 48 hours. 3. After the removal of T-3262 from culture medium, the cells began to grow actively and recovered from the morphological changes. The similar phenomenon was observed with ENX treated cells but not with fluorouracil or mitomycin C treated cells.

  10. 生物与文化:流行病学与人类学跨学科合作%Biology and culture: a dimension of collaboration between anthropology and epidemiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋雷鸣; 汪宁

    2016-01-01

    Biology is the important basis of epidemiological study.Based on biology,psychology,social and cultural factors can influence human's health and disease incidence,The medical mode has changed from "biomedical mode" to "bio-psycho-social medical model",but culture factor was neglected somewhat during this process,so paying attention to culture factor in anthropologic study and using it as biologic basis in epidemiologic study might be a dimension of collaboration between of anthropology and epidemiology.%生物学是流行病学研究的重要基础,基于此,心理、社会和文化等因素也将影响或作用于疾病和健康.以往的“生物医学模式”向“生物-心理-社会医学模式”转变,在此过程中“文化”因素尚未被充分重视.因此重视人类学中“文化”研究,以之与流行病学的生物基础相结合,可成为人类学与流行病学跨学科合作的角度之一.

  11. Biological control of fouling incrustation on the scallop Nodipecten nodosus (Linnaeus, 1758 cultured in Ubatuba, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Stojanov Bueno

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was developed at the marine farm of the São Paulo State Fisheries Institute in Ubatuba, SP, Brazil, aiming to compare the efficiency of three organisms (the sea urchins Echinometra lucunter, Lytechinus variegatus and the gastropod Tegula viridula in controlling fouling incrustation in lantern net and on Nodipecten nodosus valves. Scallops measuring 32.6 + 4.9mm of initial height were cultivated in eight Japanese lanterns with five floors each, at a density of 25 scallops/floor, according to the following delineament: T1 – control (scallops alone; T2 – scallops with E. lucunter; T3 – scallops with L. variegatus; T4 – scallops with T. viridula. Densities of the bio-controllers were: four (E. lucunter, three (L. variegatus and 15 animals/floor (T. viridula. The experiment was finished 150 days later and the remaining fouling in the lanterns and on the scallops valves was removed and weighed (dry weights. The sea-urchin species E. lucunter and L. variegatus were significantly more efficient in removing the lantern fouling (86% and 59% relative to the control treatment respectively, but there were no significant differences among the biocontrollers in controlling the fouling on the scallop valves. These results suggest that biological control can be helpful as an auxiliary method in scallop culture fouling removal.

  12. Culturing Life from Air: Using a Surface Air System to Introduce Discovery-Based Research in Aerobiology into the Undergraduate Biology Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn F. Weber

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the field of aerobiology predates Louis Pasteur’s classic experiments in the late 19th century, the atmosphere has recently emerged as one of the last great frontiers in the field of microbiology. Recent research has demonstrated that airborne microbes are more diverse than previously thought and are metabolically active in some cases, influencing atmospheric chemistry and meteorological patterns.  Furthermore, concern continues to grow regarding airborne travel of biothreat agents and emerging infectious diseases in an increasingly global society.  Despite the increased recognition of the atmosphere as a frontier for microbiological exploration in both basic and applied sciences, students are generally not exposed to this field of research in the undergraduate biology curriculum.  We describe the use of the Surface Air System (SAS SUPER 180 (Bioscience International, Rockville, MD, an extremely rugged, easy-to-use, portable and nearly maintenance-free instrument that impacts defined volumes of air directly onto petri dishes to facilitate the study of culturable airborne microorganisms.  We successfully employed this instrument in a Biology I course in which freshmen, with no prior research experiences, conducted discovery-based research that produced data that was presented at a national meeting and made a genuine contribution to the field of aerobiology.  We also describe how such discovery-based research experiences in aerobiology can be used as a platform for teaching core biological concepts and basic laboratory skills. Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory safety section of the ASM Curriculum Recommendations: Introductory Course in Microbiology and the Guidelines for Biosafety in Teaching Laboratories, available at www.asm.org. The Editors of JMBE recommend that adopters of the

  13. Biological studies and electrical conductivity of paper sheet based on PANI/PS/Ag-NPs nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A M; Mohamed, S A; Abdel-Aziz, M S; Abdel-Aziz, M E; Turky, G; Kamel, S

    2016-08-20

    Polyaniline (PANI) with/without polystyrene (PS), was successfully manufactured in the occurrence of dispersed pulp fibers via the oxidative polymerization reaction of aniline monomer to produce conductive paper sheets containing PANI, PANI/PS composites. Additionally, sliver nitrate (Ag-NO3) was added by varied loadings to the oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer to provide sliver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) emptied into the prepared paper sheets. The prepared paper sheets were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (IR), the mechanical properties of the prepared paper sheets were evaluated. Moreover, the electrical conductivity and biological studies such as cellulases assay, Microorganism & culture condition and detection of the released of Ag-NPs were evaluated. Furthermore, the prepared paper sheets were displayed good antibacterial properties contrary to gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Consequently, the prepared paper sheet may be used as novel materials for packaging applications.

  14. Biological carbon fixation: A study of Isochrysis sp. growth under actual coal-fired power plant's flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    >Liyana Yahya, Muhammad Nazry Chik, Mohd Asyraf Mohd Azmir Pang,

    2013-06-01

    Preliminary study on the growth of marine microalgae Isochrysis sp. was carried out using actual flue gas from a coal-fired power station. The species was cultured using a 2×10-L customized bubble column photobioreactor skid under specified culture conditions. With an initial culture density of 0.459 Abs (optical density at 560 nm wavelength), the species was found able to survive - observed by increases in optical densities, number of cells and weights - in the presence of actual coal-fired flue gas containing on average 4.08 % O2, 200.21 mg/m3 SO2, 212.29 mg/m3 NOx, 4.73 % CO2 and 50.72 mg/m3 CO. Results thus add value to the potential and capability of microalgae, especially for Isochrysis sp., to be the biological carbon fixer in neutralizing carbon emissions from power plants.

  15. Recombinant human thrombopoietin: basic biology and evaluation of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuter, David J; Begley, C Glenn

    2002-11-15

    Thrombocytopenia is a common medical problem for which the main treatment is platelet transfusion. Given the increasing use of platelets and the declining donor population, identification of a safe and effective platelet growth factor could improve the management of thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin (TPO), the c-Mpl ligand, is the primary physiologic regulator of megakaryocyte and platelet development. Since the purification of TPO in 1994, 2 recombinant forms of the c-Mpl ligand--recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) and pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor (PEG-rHuMGDF)--have undergone extensive clinical investigation. Both have been shown to be potent stimulators of megakaryocyte growth and platelet production and are biologically active in reducing the thrombocytopenia of nonmyeloablative chemotherapy. However, neither TPO has demonstrated benefit in stem cell transplantation or leukemia chemotherapy. Other clinical studies have investigated the use of TPO in treating chronic nonchemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia associated with myelodysplastic syndromes, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, thrombocytopenia due to human immunodeficiency virus, and liver disease. Based solely on animal studies, TPO may be effective in reducing surgical thrombocytopenia and bleeding, ex vivo expansion of pluripotent stem cells, and as a radioprotectant. Ongoing and future studies will help define the clinical role of recombinant TPO and TPO mimetics in the treatment of chemotherapy- and nonchemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia.

  16. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Ollinger, O.; Howell, C.; Venables, A.; Huggins, D.; Gladue, R.

    1984-01-01

    In many respects, algae would be the ideal plant component for a biologically based controlled life support system, since they are eminently suited to the closely coupled functions of atmosphere regeneration and food production. Scenedesmus obliquus and Spirulina platensis were grown in three continuous culture apparatuses. Culture vessels their operation and relative merits are described. Both light and nitrogen utilization efficiency are examined. Long term culture issues are detailed and a discussion of a plasmid search in Spirulina is included.

  17. Identifying sports cultural opportunity – Case Study of Mazandaran Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sport is an important tool to draw the national attention. Sport is a big assembly to make identity. Also, sport is a cause for identity and unity. The purpose of this study is to identify the cultural opportunity of sport in the province of Mazandaran in Iran. The research method was mixed. Sequential exploratory mixed method of the first method is qualitative and quantitative methods. The study included all the Mazandaran managers, coaches, experts, judges and athletes at the national level. The results show that directors, judges and experts believe that people's happiness and euphoria in winning the sports events is the most sport important cultural opportunity in Mazandaran (All kinds of sport were included. A lot of money is spent on TV programs and movies to fill the people's free time.

  18. Cultural Studies and the Subaltern: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Györke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available My article discusses the theoretical and practical implications of applying the methodology of cultural studies, as it is delineated by Stuart Hall, in the East-Central European context. Despite the celebrated “internationalization” of the discipline as well as “de-Eurocentrizing” initiatives, a number of scholars, such as G. C. Spivak and Hall himself, claim that research taking a cultural studies approach has offered little innovative intervention in recent years, and the discipline remains defined by a Western, (postmodern theoretical framework. I argue that scholars in Hungary (and Slovenia have an unprecedented opportunity to contribute to the field, yet in order to avoid falling into the trap of repeating obvious claims and conclusion, we need to take an approach that Spivak associates with the toleration of uncertainty and paradox, and Jessica Benjamin calls intersubjective interaction.

  19. Measuring innovation culture: Application at four case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ramón Tejeiro Koller

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present article proposes a tool for the measurement of a corporate culture that makes companies more innovative. In a fast changing environment, such as the current one, the capacity to innovate has become very important. It allows companies to adapt better and faster or even leapfrog competition by creating the change themselves. Organizational Theory has come to understand corporate culture –a group of shared values and philosophies– as a powerful management tool and it is due to this that me intent to measure it. Design/methodology: After extracting the characteristics of an innovation culture from the literature review, a group of indicators relating to these cultural traits was selected. The further revision of prior measurement tools allowed us to compare the findings and summarize our selection in a set of 67 questions. In order to contrast he validity of these, we applied the questionnaire at four innovative firms. During this process we tried to confirm our indicators and add new ones, resulting from the conducted interviews, introducing an inductive perspective to our study. Findings: We conclude with a revised and expanded version of the questionnaire, which includes a revision of the indicators and the contributions of the interviewees. Through this process we believe to have contributed to elaborating a measurement tool for innovation culture, since we were able to apply the majority of questions selected in the first place, eliminating and redefining the others. A revised version of the questionnaire is offered for further research. Practical implications: The measurement tool developed in this article allows those managers interested in benchmarking their company’s corporate culture against one that promotes innovation. We increased the capability of expressing one of the most significant intangibles of the company, thus increasing its visibility and value recognition. Originality/value: The contributes in the

  20. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational Methods for Studying the Interaction between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Biological Macromolecules .The mechanisms for the processes that result in significant biological activity of PAHs depend on the interaction of these molecules or their metabol...

  1. Studies of In Vitro Embryo Culture of Guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lili; Lee, Ki-Young

    2014-01-01

    Different with other fishes, the guppies (Poecilia reticulata) is ovoviviparity, which retain their fertilized eggs within the follicle throughout gestation. The synchronously growing diplotene oocytes store nutrients in droplets and yolk, before their maturation and fertilization. The lecithotrophic strategy of development entails the provisioning of embryos with resources from the maternal yolk deposit rather than from a placenta, it allows the extracorporeal culture of guppy embryo. Studie...

  2. Cultural Phenomena Seen from the Perspective of Language Issues (Globalisation, Multiculturalism, Interculturalism and Transculturalism): Preliminary Reflections for Cultural Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Tendera, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of developing methods of cultural research, the language of cultural studies is undergoing evolution and enrichment as well. This phenomenon obviously applies to all evolving academic fields, but in the area of the humanities a particular impact, consisting of the (sometimes deliberate) creation of successive cultural spaces, is manifested. For example, the introduction of a new concept may result in the initiation of a trend in the description and categorisation of reality. This ...

  3. A robust co-localisation measurement utilising z-stack image intensity similarities for biological studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhai Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-localisation is a widely used measurement in immunohistochemical analysis to determine if fluorescently labelled biological entities, such as cells, proteins or molecules share a same location. However the measurement of co-localisation is challenging due to the complex nature of such fluorescent images, especially when multiple focal planes are captured. The current state-of-art co-localisation measurements of 3-dimensional (3D image stacks are biased by noise and cross-overs from non-consecutive planes. METHOD: In this study, we have developed Co-localisation Intensity Coefficients (CICs and Co-localisation Binary Coefficients (CBCs, which uses rich z-stack data from neighbouring focal planes to identify similarities between image intensities of two and potentially more fluorescently-labelled biological entities. This was developed using z-stack images from murine organotypic slice cultures from central nervous system tissue, and two sets of pseudo-data. A large amount of non-specific cross-over situations are excluded using this method. This proposed method is also proven to be robust in recognising co-localisations even when images are polluted with a range of noises. RESULTS: The proposed CBCs and CICs produce robust co-localisation measurements which are easy to interpret, resilient to noise and capable of removing a large amount of false positivity, such as non-specific cross-overs. Performance of this method of measurement is significantly more accurate than existing measurements, as determined statistically using pseudo datasets of known values. This method provides an important and reliable tool for fluorescent 3D neurobiological studies, and will benefit other biological studies which measure fluorescence co-localisation in 3D.

  4. [Studies on biological characteristics and germination conditions of Thladiantha dubia seeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-Ying; Su, Zhan-Hui; Mao, Xiao-Xia; Tong, Ji-Ming

    2013-07-01

    To study the biological characteristics and find out the optimum condition for germination of seed of Thladiantha dubia Bunge for its standardized culturing. The weight per 1 000 seeds, seed moisture content and seed viability were determined. The biological characteristics were studied and germination conditions of seed of T. dubia were tested under following conditions: different seed soaking time, different temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 degrees C) and different irradiation time (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 min). The average length, width and thickness of T. Dubia seed were 4.96, 3.25 and 1.08 mm, respectively. The weight per 1 000 seeds was 14.03 g; the seed moisture content was 10.10%; the seed viability was 90.33%. Under the same condition of light, temperature and other factors, the seed germination percentage and germination energy were the highest after seed soaking 24 h. The suitable temperature range of seeds was form 25 degrees C to 35 degrees C. Under different irradiation time, the seed germination percentage and germination energy were the highest after irradiation 10 min. In different germinating beds, the seeds germination percentage and germination energy were the highest on paper (TP), which was 89.33%. The optimum condition for the germination of the seed of T. dubia is seed soaking 12 h, irradiation 10 min, 25-30 degrees C on filter paper.

  5. Cultural and Personality Predictors of Facebook Intrusion: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Agata; Przepiorka, Aneta; Benvenuti, Martina; Cannata, Davide; Ciobanu, Adela M.; Senol-Durak, Emre; Durak, Mithat; Giannakos, Michail N.; Mazzoni, Elvis; Pappas, Ilias O.; Popa, Camelia; Seidman, Gwendolyn; Yu, Shu; Wu, Anise M. S.; Ben-Ezra, Menachem

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the number of users of social networking sites (SNS) has inspired intense efforts to determine intercultural differences between them. The main aim of the study was to investigate the cultural and personal predictors of Facebook intrusion. A total of 2628 Facebook users from eight countries took part in the study. The Facebook Intrusion Questionnaire, the Ten-Item Personality Inventory, and the Singelis Scale were used. We found that two variables related to Country were significantly related to Facebook intrusion: uniqueness (negatively) and low context (positively); of the personality variables, conscientiousness, and emotional stability were negatively related to the dependent variable of Facebook intrusion across different countries, which may indicate the universal pattern of Facebook intrusion. The results of the study will contribute to the international debate on the phenomenon of SNS. PMID:27994566

  6. Cultural and Personality Predictors of Facebook Intrusion: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Błachnio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the number of users of social networking sites has inspired intense efforts to determine intercultural differences between them. The main aim of the study was to investigate the cultural and personal predictors of Facebook intrusion. A total of 2,628 Facebook users from eight countries took part in the study. The Facebook Intrusion Questionnaire, the Ten-Item Personality Measure, and the Singelis Scale were used. We found that two variables related to Country were significantly related to Facebook intrusion: uniqueness (negatively and low context (positively; of the personality variables, conscientiousness and emotional stability were negatively related to the dependent variable of Facebook intrusion across different countries, which may indicate the universal pattern of Facebook intrusion. The results of the study will contribute to the international debate on the phenomenon of social networking sites (SNS.

  7. Cultural and Personality Predictors of Facebook Intrusion: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Agata; Przepiorka, Aneta; Benvenuti, Martina; Cannata, Davide; Ciobanu, Adela M; Senol-Durak, Emre; Durak, Mithat; Giannakos, Michail N; Mazzoni, Elvis; Pappas, Ilias O; Popa, Camelia; Seidman, Gwendolyn; Yu, Shu; Wu, Anise M S; Ben-Ezra, Menachem

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the number of users of social networking sites (SNS) has inspired intense efforts to determine intercultural differences between them. The main aim of the study was to investigate the cultural and personal predictors of Facebook intrusion. A total of 2628 Facebook users from eight countries took part in the study. The Facebook Intrusion Questionnaire, the Ten-Item Personality Inventory, and the Singelis Scale were used. We found that two variables related to Country were significantly related to Facebook intrusion: uniqueness (negatively) and low context (positively); of the personality variables, conscientiousness, and emotional stability were negatively related to the dependent variable of Facebook intrusion across different countries, which may indicate the universal pattern of Facebook intrusion. The results of the study will contribute to the international debate on the phenomenon of SNS.

  8. Data management in a longitudinal cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R J; Musick, B S; Olley, B; Hall, K S; Hendrie, H C; Oyediran, A B

    The Indianapolis-Ibadan Dementia Project compares the rates of dementia at two sites, one in the U.S.A. and one in Nigeria. This paper concentrates on the data management issues in this longitudinal cross-cultural study. Approximately 2500 elderly people were recruited at each site, and continue to be re-assessed every two years. All the data are collected on paper and then entered into a FoxPro relational database. Most of the data management, including data cleaning, is done in Indianapolis. The design of the data collection forms is particularly important in a cross-cultural study, with the questions and the coding of responses clear and simple. Since Nigeria and the U.S.A. have different levels of technological development, the computer hardware and software were chosen to be suitable for use at either site. Exchange visits have been needed to address data management issues and resolve unexpected problems. The data management on cross-cultural studies can be handled successfully, given careful planning.

  9. [Preliminary study on pollination biology of Tulipa edulis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengjun; Zhu, Zaibiao; Guo, Qiaosheng; Xu, Hongjian; Ma, Hongliang; Miao, Yuanyuan

    2012-02-01

    Current study on the pollination biology of Tulipa edulis was conducted to investigate its pollination characteristics and to provide references for artificial domestication and breeding of T. edulis. Flowering dynamics, pollinators, morphology and structure of flower were observed. Different methods were adopted to evaluate the pollen vitality, and benzidine-H2O2 method was used for estimation of the stigma receptivity. Breeding system was evaluated based on out-crossing index (OCI) , pollen-ovule ratio (P/O) and the results of emasculation, bagging and artificial pollination studies. The flower of T. edulis showed typical characteristics of Liliaceae. The pollen remained viable to some extent during all the anthesis and peaked within three days after blossoming. Stigma acceptability peaked in the first day of blossom and dwindled away in the next four days. The type of breeding system of T. edulis was facultative xenogamy, three species of Halictus are the main pollination insects. The type of breeding system of T. edulis was facultative xenogamy, withal cross-pollination give priority to self-pollination, and the insects play a main role on the pollination of T. edulis, further validation are needed to judge if the wind is helpful to pollination.

  10. Comparative study of nickel resistance of pure culture and co-culture of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferriphilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Yin, Huaqun; Jiang, Huidan; Liang, Yili; Guo, Xue; Ma, Liyuan; Xiao, Yunhua; Liu, Xueduan

    2013-09-01

    The effect of Ni²⁺ on the growth and functional gene expression of the pure culture and co-culture of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferriphilum has been studied. Compared with the pure culture, the co-culture showed a stronger sulfur and ferrous ion oxidation activity. At 100 mM, A. thiooxidans in co-culture grew faster and had 48 h shorter lag phases. The cell number of A. thiooxidans in co-culture was about 5 times higher than that in pure culture. The existence of A. thiooxidans in co-culture activated the expression of some metal resistance genes in L. ferriphilum at least 16 h in advance. A. thiooxidans in co-culture tends to chose more efficient pathways to transport nickel ion, ensuring the export of heavy metal was faster and more effective than that in pure culture. All the data indicated that there were synergetic interactions between iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria under the stress of Ni²⁺.

  11. Human epithelial tissue culture study on restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, András; Ungvári, Krisztina; Györgyey, Ágnes; Kukovecz, Ákos; Turzó, Kinga; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Health condition of the gingival tissues contacting the surfaces of fixed prostheses is a result of multiple etiologic factors. The aim of the investigation discussed here was to evaluate the attachment and proliferation rate of cultured human epithelial cells on three commonly used restorative materials under in vitro conditions. Morphological and chemical structure of polished lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Germany), yttrium modified zirconium dioxide (5-TEC ICE Zirkon Translucent, Zirkonzahn GmbH Srl, Germany) and cobalt chromium alloy (Remanium star, Dentaurum GmbH & Co. KG, Germany) discs were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human epithelial cells harvested and cultured from one donor, were applied to investigate cell attachment (24h observation) and proliferation (72h observation) via dimethylthiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and AlamarBlue(®) (AB) assays on control surface (cell-culture plate) and on the restorative materials (n=3×20 specimens/material). SEM and AFM revealed typical morphology and roughness features for the materials. Zirconia presented significantly higher Ra value. EDS confirmed typical elements on the investigated restorative materials: lithium-disilicate (Si, O); Zirconia (Zi, Y, O); CoCr (Co, Cr, W). All surfaces except CoCr exhibited significant cell proliferation according to MTT and AB assays after 72h compared to 24h. Among the restorative materials, CoCr samples showed the highest cell attachment as indicated by MTT assay. AB results showed that attachment and proliferation of human epithelial cells is supported more on lithium-disilicate. Both assays indicated the lowest value for zirconia. The results indicate that the restorative materials examined are equally suitable for subgingival restorations. Lithium-disilicate exhibited the best biocompatibility. The examined materials are indicated for use

  12. Culture Studies in the Field of International Business Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Verner; Li, Xin; Jakobsen, Michael

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of culture studies within the field of international business research, and to examine how two main paradigms – essentialism and social constructivism – relate to the discourse in this field. We analyze the main points of the two...... paradigms, and discuss how the relationship between them has evolved. Findings: We show that essentialism and social constructivism have a paradoxical relationship. They seem to be mutually exclusive, yet each offers unique insights into the notion of culture. Both are necessary for a complete understanding...... for the first time that Bohr’s complementarity principle is illustrative and useful for understanding the paradoxical relationship between essentialism and social constructivism. Inspired by two principles enunciated by Bohr – that of complementarity and that of classical concepts – we argue that the two...

  13. Cahaba River: Biological and Water Quality Studies, Birmingham, AL,

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Excessive sedimentation and nutrient enrichment are affecting the biology of the Cahaba Riverwatershed. Deleterious effects of sediment deposition on the fish and...

  14. Application of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology in Medicinal Plant Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG You-ping; AI Jun-mei; XIAO Pei-gen

    2010-01-01

    One important purpose to investigate medicinal plants is to understand genes and enzymes that govern the biological metabolic process to produce bioactive compounds.Genome wide high throughput technologies such as genomics,transcriptomics,proteomics and metabolomics can help reach that goal.Such technologies can produce a vast amount of data which desperately need bioinformatics and systems biology to process,manage,distribute and understand these data.By dealing with the"omics"data,bioinformatics and systems biology can also help improve the quality of traditional medicinal materials,develop new approaches for the classification and authentication of medicinal plants,identify new active compounds,and cultivate medicinal plant species that tolerate harsh environmental conditions.In this review,the application of bioinformatics and systems biology in medicinal plants is briefly introduced.

  15. Study of the biology of Trichogramma chilonis Ishii (Hymenoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    KEYWORDS: Trichogramma chilonis, Maruca vitrata, biology, Plutella xylostella ... Egg parasitoids play an important role in the control of lepidopterous pests. (Li, 1994). ..... I am also grateful to Mr D. Abeeluck, Principal Research Scientist of.

  16. The Continuing Importance of the "Cultural" in the Study of Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The academic study of youth culture has changed markedly in the past two decades. The early 1990s saw a "cultural turn" as the sociological focus moved from "institutional and structural features of society to the study of culture". Andy Bennett begins this article with a critical evaluation of the "cultural turn" and its impact on the field of…

  17. The Cultural Adaptation Process during a Short-Term Study Abroad Experience in Swaziland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Nathan W.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2015-01-01

    Globalization continuously shapes our world and influences post-secondary education. This study explored the cultural adaptation process of participants during a short-term study abroad program. Participants experienced stages which included initial feelings, cultural uncertainty, cultural barriers, cultural negativity, academic and career growth,…

  18. Gold complexes with benzimidazole derivatives: synthesis, characterization and biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Vinicius Zamprogno; de Carvalho, Gustavo Senra Gonçalves; da Silva, Adilson David; Costa, Luiz Antônio Sodré; de Almeida Machado, Patrícia; Coimbra, Elaine Soares; Ferreira, Carmen Veríssima; Shishido, Silvia Mika; Cuin, Alexandre

    2014-02-01

    Synthesis, characterization, DFT studies and biological assays of new gold(I) and gold(III) complexes of benzimidazole are reported. Molecular and structural characterizations of the compounds were based on elemental (C, H and N) and thermal (TG-DTA) analyses, and FT-IR and UV-Visible spectroscopic measurements. The structures of complexes were proposed based DFT calculations. The benzimidazole compounds (Lig1 and Lig2) and the gold complexes were tested against three Leishmania species related to cutaneous manifestations of leishmaniasis. The free benzimidazole compounds showed no leishmanicidal activity. On the other hand, the gold(I and III) complexes have shown to possess significant activity against Leishmania in both stages of parasite, and the gold(III) complex with Lig2 exhibited expressive leishmanicidal activity with IC50 values below 5.7 μM. Also, the gold complexes showed high leishmania selectivity. The gold(I) complex with Lig1, for example, is almost 50 times more toxic for the parasite than for macrophages. Besides the leishmanicidal activity, all complexes exhibited toxic effect against SK-Mel 103 and Balb/c 3T3, cancer cells.

  19. Biological studies on Brazilian plants used in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C; Fronza, M; Goettert, M; Geller, F; Luik, S; Flores, E M M; Bittencourt, C F; Zanetti, G D; Heinzmann, B M; Laufer, S; Merfort, I

    2009-04-21

    n-Hexanic and ethanolic extracts from twelve plants (Brugmansia suaveolens Brecht. et Presl., Eupatorium laevigatum Lam., Galinsoga parviflora Cav., Iresine herbstii Hook., Kalanchöe tubiflora Hamet-Ahti, Petiveria alliacea L., Pluchea sagittalis (Lam.) Cabrera, Piper regnellii DC., Schinus molle L., Sedum dendroideum Moç et Sessé ex DC., Waltheria douradinha St. Hill., Xanthium cavanillesii Schouw.) used in traditional South Brazilian medicine as wound healing agents were investigated in various biological assays, targeting different aspects in this complex process. The extracts were investigated on NF-kappaB DNA binding, p38alpha MAPK, TNF-alpha release, direct elastase inhibition and its release as well as on caspase-3. Fibroblasts migration to and proliferation into the wounded monolayers were evaluated in the scratch assay, the agar diffusion test for antibacterial and the MTT assay for cytotoxic effects. The hydrophilic extracts from Galinsoga parviflora, Petiveria alliacea, Schinus molle, Waltheria douradinha and Xanthium cavanillesii as well as the lipophilic extract of Waltheria douradinha turned out to be the most active ones. These results increase our knowledge on the wound healing effects of the investigated medicinal plants. Further studies are necessary to find out the effective secondary metabolites responsible for the observed effects.

  20. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  1. Race in biology and anthropology: A study of college texts and professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Leonard; Hampton, Raymond E.; Littlefield, Alice; Hallead, Glen

    Information about social issues is underemphasized in college science education. This article takes the race concept as an example of this neglect. We review the history of the race concept and report the current status of the concept in textbooks and among professors. Responses to surveys of faculty at Ph.D.-granting departments indicate that 67% of biologists accept the concept of biological races in the species Homo sapiens, while only 50% of physical anthropologists do so. Content analysis of college textbooks indicates a significant degree of change over time (1936-1984) in physical anthropology but a lesser degree in biology. We suggest several reasons for the dissimilarity in the two disciplines. We propose continued use of the concept for some infrahuman species, while abandoning its application to Homo sapiens. For those biologists and anthropologists who continue to use the concept, scientific accuracy can be achieved by the presentation in lecture and text of the following ideas: first, consensus among scientists on the race concept's utility and accuracy does not exist; second, there is more variation within than between so-called races; third, discordant gradations due to natural selection, drift, and interbreeding make consistent racial boundary lines impossible to identify; fourth, past use of the race concept has had harmful consequences; fifth, the most precise study of human hereditary variation maps one trait at a time; and sixth, racial labels are misleading, especially as most populations have a cultural designation.

  2. Biological and Cultural Control of Olive Fruit Fly in California---Utilization of Parasitoids from USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Guatemala and Cultural Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parasitoid Psytallia humilis = P. cf. concolor (Szépligeti) was reared on sterile Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), larvae at the USDA, APHIS, PPQ, Moscamed biological control laboratory in San Miguel Petapa, Guatemala and shipped to the USDA, ARS, Parlier, for biological ...

  3. Agrobacterium rhizogenes: Transformed root cultures for the study of polyacetylene metabolism and biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, Y.Y.

    1988-02-01

    Biologically active polyacetylenes are produced at low levels by the roots of members of the Coreopsidinae subtribe in the Asteraceae. Ten taxa of Coreopsis and Bidens were tranformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes Strain A/sub 4/ and hairy root cultures established. These cultures grew rapidly and produced the same arrays of polyacetylenes as intact roots. The use of transformed roots for the study of polyacetylene biosynthesis is described in this paper. The engineering of plants with resistance to herbicides is now a practical reality because there are economic, intellectual and environmental incentives for using recombinant DNA technology in crop improvement programs, and because the biochemical and genetic basis for herbicide resistance is a simple trait conferred by a single gene. The transformation of plants with genes conferring resistance to insects or disease is more daunting, however, as biologically active secondary metabolites such as some alkaloids are typically products of multienzyme reactions. Photoactive polyacetylenes are probably plant defense chemicals and they are derived by a sequence of desaturation steps from oleic acid, which occurs ubiquitously in higher plants. Although the acetylene pathway may encompass as many genetic messages as those for morphine biosynthesis, it is likley that the genes controlling the biosynthesis of polyacetylenes may be isolated, identified in the near future and transferred via Agrobacterium to economically important plants susceptible to pathogen attack. 58 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Recommendations for designing and conducting veterinary clinical pathology biologic variation studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freeman, Kathleen P; Baral, Randolph M; Dhand, Navneet K

    2017-01-01

    The recent creation of a veterinary clinical pathology biologic variation website has highlighted the need to provide recommendations for future studies of biologic variation in animals in order to help standardize and improve the quality of published information and to facilitate review and sele......). These recommendations provide a valuable resource for clinicians, laboratorians, and researchers interested in conducting studies of biologic variation and in determining the quality of studies of biologic variation in veterinary laboratory testing.......The recent creation of a veterinary clinical pathology biologic variation website has highlighted the need to provide recommendations for future studies of biologic variation in animals in order to help standardize and improve the quality of published information and to facilitate review...... and selection of publications as standard references. The following recommendations are provided in the format and order commonly found in veterinary publications. A checklist is provided to aid in planning, implementing, and evaluating veterinary studies on biologic variation (Appendix S1...

  5. Teaching Evolution: A Heuristic Study of Personal and Cultural Dissonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Larry G.

    Darwinian evolution is a robustly supported scientific theory. Yet creationists continue to challenge its teaching in American public schools. Biology teachers in all 50 states are responsible for teaching science content standards that include evolution. As products of their backgrounds and affiliations teachers bring personal attitudes and beliefs to their teaching. The purpose of this study was to explore how biology teachers perceive, describe, and value their teaching of evolution. This research question was explored through a heuristic qualitative methodology. Eight veteran California high school biology teachers were queried as to their beliefs, perceptions, experiences and practices of teaching evolution. Both personal and professional documents were collected. Data was presented in the form of biographical essays that highlight teachers' backgrounds, experiences, perspectives and practices of teaching evolution. Of special interest was how they describe pressure over teaching evolution during a decade of standards and No Child Left Behind high-stakes testing mandates. Five common themes emerged. Standards have increased the overall amount of evolution that is taught. High-stakes testing has decreased the depth at which evolution is taught. Teacher belief systems strongly influence how evolution is taught. Fear of creationist challenges effect evolution teaching strategies. And lastly, concern over the potential effects of teaching evolution on student worldviews was mixed. Three categories of teacher concern over the potential impact of evolution on student worldviews were identified: Concerned, Strategist, and Carefree. In the final analysis teacher beliefs and attitudes still appeared to he the most important factor influencing how evolution is taught.

  6. A General Study of the Wine Culture in China and the Western World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Na

    2016-01-01

    Wine culture is considered as an indispensible part of the culture in different countries. Distinctive differences exist be-tween Chinese wine culture and the wine culture in western countries due to their historical backgrounds, different values, cul-tures and customs, etc. A general study of the comparison between Chinese wine culture and western wine culture is given in this paper in order to help us have a better understanding of the wine culture and make us be aware of showing mutual respect for each other.

  7. Teaching Biochemestry in Biology and Microbiology in the Faculty of Biology, University of Havana, in Studies Plan D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Oscar González Bacerio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a review of the contents traditionally studied on Biochemistry I and II courses for Biology and Microbiology careers, at the Faculty of Biology, University of Havana, is realized. This analysis was done taking into account the agreement of contents with the Knowledge and Skills Systems recognized in the current Study Plan D. From this analysis, compa-rative with the equivalent courses on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology career, a redesign of the studied contents is presented. According to this, these con-tents were displaced, when was possible and conve-nient, from the classical mammal model to the study objects of these professionals: the living world in all its diversity, for biologists, and microorganisms and viru-ses, for microbiologists. In this manner, we use on Bio-chemistry I lectures specific examples of structure-function relationship of biomolecules from models of organisms more appropriated for the two careers. Similarly, we exploit on Biochemistry II the extraordi-nary metabolic diversity that is present in different groups of living organisms, as well as we introduced the teaching of other metabolic routes, characteristic of each group or which constitute variations of classi-cal mammalian pathways. These modifications could make easier the teaching and learning of Biochemistry for biologists and microbiologists, as well as could increase the contribution of these courses to the for-mation of professionals in these domains of Biological Sciences.

  8. Studying Linguistic and Cultural Contact in Borneo: Prospects and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Soriente

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the variegated landscape of languages and cultures of Borneo, the study of languages is a powerful tool to shed light on the intricate history of relations that has long been obscured by the polarization between ‘Dayak’ and ‘Malay’. This article looks at some of the features of Lebu’ Kulit Kenyah, Penan Benalui, Punan Tubu’ and Ma’ Pnaan (Punan Malinau/Segah languages to clarify the linguistic and cultural affiliations among groups that were otherwise lumped together in vague classifications. It demonstrates what is to follow: according to a number of phonological, morphological and lexical evidence, and other historical evidence, Lebu’ Kulit has to be listed among the Kayanic languages. Penan Benalui, like the other Penan languages, is not a Kenyah language, whereas Punan Tubu’, despite the alleged cultural and social similarity with other Punan groups, cannot be classified within the Penan branch nor with other Punan languages. Ma’ Pnaan or Punan Malinau/Segah is not a Punan language and is linguistically classified within the Kayanic branch of the Kayan-Kenyah subgroup.

  9. Twentieth-Century Latin American Literary Studies and Cultural Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Lindstrom

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1920s, when scholars first began to specialize in Latin American writing, the subject of Latin American literary studies has grown from a small subset of Spanish and Portuguese literary research and teaching to become the largest field within Hispanism and a significant presence in comparative literature. The expansion of their place in the academic world has often prompted students of Latin American literature to wonder whether, in being swept into the mainstream, their field has not left out of account the historical situations of Latin American nations. These reflections lead critics back to a problem that has troubled Latin American thinkers since Independence: the achievement, or erosion, of cultural autonomy. Though undeniably close to major powers, the Latin American nations are unequal partners in trade and cultural exchange. Corresponding to their uneven and shifting relations with Europe and later the United States, their cultural life evolves following a distinctive historical dynamic. This article considers recent efforts by scholars and essayists to characterize the features that distinguish Latin America from more politically and economically advantaged nations. Special attention goes to those scholars who, drawing on anthropological research, examine communicative and expressive practices of indigenous origin, and those who borrow from economic theory to view Latin America as shaped by its history of dependence on more powerful nations and regions.

  10. Recent trends in IBA for cultural heritage studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Lucile, E-mail: lucile.beck@cea.fr

    2014-08-01

    Ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques play an important role in the field of cultural heritage. IBA was one of the first physical methods applied to archaeology in the 70s. 40 years later, more than 25 accelerator laboratories were or are involved in cultural heritage applications. The advantages of the IBA techniques match very well the requirements for the analysis of archaeological or museum objects: non destructiveness, major, minor and trace element analysis, information in depth, elemental mapping… Thanks to this collected information, IBA techniques can answer archaeological and conservation questions: provenance determination, ancient technologies (fabrication, transformation, recipes…) and conservation issues. In spite of the competition with portable devices and large facilities (such as synchrotron or neutron reactors), the IBA methods keep their interest due to the possibility of associating two or three of them according to the archaeological or art issue. In this article, some examples chosen for their original approach are presented: PIXE for X-radiography, provenance of prehistoric pigments and painting characterisation. They illustrate the useful versatility of IBA for cultural heritage studies. Perspectives for further improvements are also proposed.

  11. Training on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview improves cultural competence in general psychiatry residents: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stacia; Xiao, Anna Q; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Lim, Russell; Lu, Francis G

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether a 1-hour didactic session on the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) improves the cultural competence of general psychiatry residents. The main hypothesis was that teaching adult psychiatry residents a 1-hour session on the CFI would improve cultural competence. The exploratory hypothesis was that trainees with more experience in cultural diversity would have a greater increase in cultural competency scores. Psychiatry residents at a metropolitan, county hospital completed demographics and preintervention questionnaires, were exposed to a 1-hour session on the CFI, and were given a postintervention questionnaire. The questionnaire was an adapted version of the validated Cultural Competence Assessment Tool . Paired samples t tests compared pre- to posttest change. Hierarchical linear regression assessed whether pretraining characteristics predicted posttest scores. The mean change of total pre- and posttest scores was significant ( p = .002), as was the mean change in subscales Nonverbal Communications ( p < .001) and Cultural Knowledge ( p = .002). Demographic characteristics did not predict higher posttest scores (when covarying for pretest scores). Psychiatry residents' cultural competence scores improved irrespective of previous experience in cultural diversity. More research is needed to further explore the implications of the improved scores in clinical practice.

  12. Biology, literacy, and the African American voice: A case study of meaningful learning in the biology classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Keturah

    Under the direction of Sharon Murphy Augustine, Ph.D./Ph.D Curriculum and Instruction There was a substantial performance gap among African Americans and other ethnic groups. Additionally, African American students in a Title I school were at a significantly high risk of not meeting or exceeding on performance tests in science. Past reports have shown average gains in some subject areas, and declines in others (NCES, 2011; GADOE, 2012). Current instructional strategies and the lack of literacy within the biology classroom created a problem for African American high school students on national and state assessments. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of African American students and teachers in the context of literacy and biology through the incorporation of an interactive notebook and other literacy strategies. The data was collected three ways: field notes for a two week observation period within the biology classroom, student and teacher interviews, and student work samples. During the observations, student work collection, and interviews, I looked for the following codes: active learning, constructive learning, collaborative learning, authentic learning, and intentional learning. In the process of coding for the pre-determined codes, three more codes emerged. The three codes that emerged were organization, studying/student ownership, and student teacher relationships. Students and teachers both solidified the notion that literacy and biology worked well together. The implemented literacy strategies were something that both teachers and students appreciated in their learning of biology. Overall students and teachers perceived that the interactive notebook along Cornell notes, Thinking maps, close reads, writing, lab experiments, and group work created meaningful learning experiences within the biology classroom.

  13. Study on drug release of and biological response to UHMWPE wear debris carrying estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Shuxin, E-mail: qushuxin@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Liu Aiqin; Liu Xiaomin; Bai Yinlong; Weng Jie [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) to treat osteolysis after artificial joint replacement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the in vitro release of E2 and the cell biological response to UHMWPE-E2 wear debris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro E2 release included three stages during the release process: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The UHMWPE-E2 wear debris could promote the proliferation and ALP activity of osteoblasts and inhibit the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 would play a role in the treatment of the osteolysis after artificial hip joint replacement. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro release of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2), the potential drug to treat osteolysis, and the biological response to ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene loaded with E2 (UHMWPE-E2) wear debris. The osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and macrophages (RAW264.7) were co-cultured with UHMWPE-E2 wear debris via inversion culture technique, respectively. MTT, ALP and ELISA assay were employed to evaluate the cell proliferation, ALP activity and the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In vitro E2 release included: initial burst release, celerity release and steady release. The E2 released steadily after 40 d and lasted more than 60 d. The E2 in UHMWPE-E2 wear debris promoted the proliferation and ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 cells at the high debris dosages of 8-10 mg. In particular, the UHMWPE-E2 wear debris inhibited the expression of IL-6 of osteoblasts at all dosages in the present study. RAW264.7 cells cultured with UHMWPE-E2 and UHMWPE wear debris exhibited large sizes about 100 {mu}m in diameter. The small size wear debris presented inside of cells indicated that the wear debris activated the phagocytosis of macrophages. The results indicated

  14. Anaerobic culture by Total Air Barrier: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Sarkar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFor study with obligate anaerobes, inoculated platescontaining suitable reduced media need handling andincubation under strict anaerobic condition. Instead ofensuring a confined oxygen free chamber for placing seededplates, same purpose may be achieved by creating total airbarrier to the surface.MethodUpper moist surface of freshly prepared anaerobic media inPetri plates were intimately covered with very thintransparent bacteriological inert sterile polyester sheets.Stock culture of Bacteroides fragilis, ATCC 23745 andClostridium sporogenes, ATCC 11437 were grown in cookedmeat broth and then sub-cultured on respective plates, afterlifting the cover sheets. Sheets were again covered andincubated at 37oC ordinary incubator. To performantimicrobial susceptibility test, similarly covered seededplates with well inoculums were inverted en-block afterstripping sides with the help of a spatula. Now antibiotic diskswere placed on upper bare surfaces. After short pre-diffusion,plates were incubated keeping inoculated surface below.Same study was performed by conventional method usingGaspak.ResultsGood growths were noted in both sets of the study;however discrete colonies appeared more flat in nature intest set. Almost identical zones of inhibition were noted inboth sets of sensitivity study. Seven days old growths incovered blood agar plates were found viable when subculturedin cooked meat broths.ConclusionIsolation, identification and susceptibility study for mostclinically important obligate anaerobes may be performedby simple barrier method after appropriatestandardization.

  15. World Culture and ICT use – a Study from Bhutan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Pär-Ola Mikael; Choeda, Choeda; Dukpa, Dorji

    2015-01-01

    understanding in international projects and global appropriation of technology may be larger than the current theorizing implies. In this paper we investigate the ICT use, with emphasis on World Culture, within Higher Education in Bhutan. We find a remarkably strong presence of World Culture among faculty......The HCI community has recognized the importance of culture and to be culturally sensitive when designing interaction. Local culture should not be overlooked when designing. On the other hand, recent advances in theorizing of cultural patterns have reported that in some sectors, World Cultures has...... permeated institutions across the world. Such cultures can be said to consist of a dynamic system of values, beliefs, behaviours, norms, rules, tools and technologies, and show similar patterns across the world. If such a culture is present to the degree argued by World Culturalists, the scope for mutual...

  16. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P.; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Swayne, David E.; Suarez, David L.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  17. [Studies on acetylspiramycin. II. Biological activities of spiramycin components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, A; Sato, K; Shuto, K; Yamashita, K; Ichikawa, S; Takahashi, K; Kita, K; Nishiie, Y; Sano, H; Yamaguchi, K

    1990-09-01

    Acetylspiramycin (ASPM) was fractionated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The peak fractions were named F1 to F7 successively in order of increasing retention times (Rt), i.e., increasing hydrophobicity, and studied for 1) antibacterial activities (MIC), 2) antibacterial potency against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, 3) therapeutic effect on mice infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae III, Staphylococcus aureus Smith, 4) acute toxicity by i.p. administration to mice (LD50) and 5) cytotoxicities to fibroblasts derived from Chinese-hamster lung (CHL), cow pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAE) and rat hepatic cells. The results obtained are summarized below. 1. Components F1 and 4'-acetylspiramycin F2 had significantly different biological activities from those of other components: F1 showed the lowest antibacterial potency of 492 micrograms (potency)/mg, F2 showed the highest antibacterial potency of 2,040 micrograms (potency)/mg and correspondingly the lowest LD50 value of 692 mg/kg (the highest toxicity). The therapeutic effect of F2 on infections in mice was found to be the second smallest and was superior only to that of F1. The LD50 value of F1 was 1,200 mg/kg and similar to that of ASPM. 2. Antibacterial potencies of F3, F4, F5 and F6 were 1,165, 1,266, 1,374 and 1,530 micrograms (potency)/mg, respectively; fraction with the higher antibacterial activities corresponded to the longer retention times, i.e., the greater hydrophobicities. The most hydrophobic component, F7, 3-propionyl-3",4"-diacetylspiramycin, however, showed a low antibacterial potency of 1,085 micrograms (potency)/mg, next to the lowest one, F1, a fact which was in contradiction to with the sequential relation between hydrophobicities and potencies from F3 to F6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Bovine lactotroph cultures for the study of prolactin synthesis functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfa; Yang, Zhanqing; Fu, Shoupeng; Liu, Bingrun; Wu, Dianjun; Wang, Wei; Sun, Dongbo; Wu, Rui; Liu, Juxiong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a bovine anterior pituitary-derived lactotroph (BAPDL) line that expresses prolactin (PRL) in vitro to study the mechanisms of bovine PRL synthesis and secretion. Immunohistochemistry assay of PRL in the newborn calves' anterior pituitary glands showed that most lactotrophs were located within the superior border of the lateral wings of the anterior pituitary. Tissues of the superior border of the lateral wings of the anterior pituitary were dispersed and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). The limiting dilution method was used to establish BAPDL from single cell clone. BAPDL cells constantly expressed mRNAs for PRL and pituitary-specific transcription factor 1 (Pit-1) gene and grew steadily and rapidly in the DMEM supplemented with 10% FBS. PRL immunoreactivity was present in BAPDL at passage 20. The concentration of bovine PRL in BAPDL at passage 20 culture supernatant was decreased to below 35% compared with that in BAPDL at passage 1. The effects of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and dopamine (DA) on the expression and secretion of PRL in BAPDL at passage 4 were also investigated. The results are consistent with those of previous studies. Thus, it can be used successfully for studying the mechanisms of stimuli regulating PRL synthesis and release.

  19. Systems biology of persistent infection: tuberculosis as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Douglas; Stark, Jaroslav; Kirschner, Denise

    2008-07-01

    The human immune response does an excellent job of clearing most of the pathogens that we encounter throughout our lives. However, some pathogens persist for the lifetime of the host. Despite many years of research, scientists have yet to determine the basis of persistence of most pathogens, and have therefore struggled to develop reliable prevention and treatment strategies. Systems biology provides a new and integrative tool that will help to achieve these goals. In this article, we use Mycobacterium tuberculosis as an example of how systems-biology approaches have begun to make strides in uncovering important facets of the host-pathogen interaction.

  20. In vitro 3-D model based on extending time of culture for studying chronological epidermis aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Metral, Elodie; Boher, Aurélie; Rousselle, Patricia; Thepot, Amélie; Damour, Odile

    2015-09-01

    expression of hyaluronan and its surface receptor CD44 drastically decreased as observed during chronological skin aging. Finally, we found that the level of p16INK4A expression significantly increased supporting cellular senescence process associated to our model. To conclude, the major morphological and ultrastructural epidermal modifications observed in both our extended culture skin equivalent model and skin biopsies from old donors validate the relevance of our model for studying chronological aging, understanding and elucidating age-related modifications of basic skin biological processes. In addition, our model provides a unique tool for identifying new targeted molecules intended at improving the appearance of aging skin.

  1. Sterilization monitoring by biological indicators and conventional swab test of different sterilization processes used in orthodontics: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu Khattri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The need of effective sterilization method and their monitoring is necessary. Biological indicators are specific microorganisms with high resistance toward particular sterilization methods. Their processes include steam autoclave, dry heat sterilizer, ethylene oxide sterilizer. This article has considered various methods to monitor the effectiveness of different sterilization methods used in orthodontics. Materials and Methods: The parameters for comparison were the control and experimental instruments utilized in orthodontic treatment. The efficacy of sterilization was evaluated by comparison of bacterial growth obtained in monitoring by biological indicators and swab test method. Results: No spore growth was found when sterilization process was evaluated by biological indicators in comparison to swab test where spore growth was present. Instruments dipped in Bioclenz-G solution for 10 min showed spore growth, but no spore growth was seen in 10 h cycle. Discussion: The result of the study verifies the established effectiveness of biological indicators over conventional swab test method in monitoring various sterilization processes used in orthodontics. Bioclenz-G solution can be used as an effective cold sterilization method for sterilization. Conclusion: For evaluating the effectiveness of sterilization, biological indicators preclude the drawbacks of incomplete verification of destruction of all vegetation and inordinate delay in procurement of results as is the case with chemical indicators and lab culture, respectively.

  2. Chalcone dimethylallyltransferase from Morus nigra cell cultures. Substrate specificity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Alberto; Giardina, Bruno; Delle Monache, Giuliano; Rocca, Filippo; Silvestrini, Andrea; Tafi, Andrea; Botta, Bruno

    2004-01-16

    A new prenyltransferase (PT) enzyme derived from the microsomal fractions of cell cultures of Morus nigra was shown to be able to prenylate exclusively chalcones with a 2',4'-dihydroxy substitution and the isoflavone genistein. Computational studies were performed to shed some light on the relationship between the structure of the substrate and the enzymatic activity. PT requires divalent cations, particularly Mg(2+), to be effective. The apparent K(m) values for gamma,gamma-dimethylallyldiphosphate and 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone were 63 and 142 microM, respectively. The maximum activity of the enzyme was expressed during the first 10 days of cell growth.

  3. Buddhism, Poststructuralist Thought, Cultural Studies: A Profession of Faith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Ng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay is a result of the author's research into Buddhism and poststructuralist theories on knowledge, self and ethics and attempts to articulate the ethico-political implications of his own practice of Vipassana (a form of Buddhist meditation and interrogate what is called the politics of spirituality. He explores the role of faith within cultural studies by first contextualising the relevant discursive fields, then  analysing Vipassana with a ‘religious’ Foucauldian approach oriented around the critico-political aims of Foucault's late work. This elucidates how Buddhist and poststructuralist thought share certain concerns, and identifies trajectories for further inquiry.

  4. Cultural Studies og kritisk diskurs analyse i 8. klasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarstad, Lone Krogsgaard

    2015-01-01

    to be multiplicative and dynamic and power is foregrounded. Critical discourse analysis is used as a tool in class to analyse a dispute on Facebook between Miley Cyrus and Sinead O’Connor. Students work with active construction, making connections, social interaction, reflection, responsibility and they do so...... thesis in the school year 2013-2014.The approach is based on Cultural Studies and knowledge of social categories and representation, and how these can be taught and discussed in class through an intersectional lens. An intersectional lens allows for the conceptualization of categories...

  5. Culture Industry Development and Regional Economy - Case Study of Tianjin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu-sheng, Li

    Cultural industry is one of the fastest growing industries and the added value of culture industry is almost more than 10% of GDP in developed countries. This paper first introduced the boundaries of cultural industries and the development of that in Tianjin. Then the logistic growth model was used to detect the stage of the life cycle of culture industry in Tianjin. We draw the conclusion that culture industry is in the rapid growth stage in Tianjin, and we must take scientific development, increasing innovation through structural reform, technological advances, personnel training and other measures to promote the cultural industry development in Tianjin by leaps.

  6. The double pedigree: a method for studying culturally and genetically inherited behavior in tandem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Danchin

    Full Text Available Transgenerational sources of biological variation have been at the center of evolutionary studies ever since Darwin and Wallace identified natural selection. This is because evolution can only operate on traits whose variation is transmitted, i.e. traits that are heritable. The discovery of genetic inheritance has led to a semantic shift, resulting in the tendency to consider that only genes are inherited across generations. Today, however, concepts of heredity are being broadened again to integrate the accruing evidence of non-genetic inheritance, and many evolutionary biologists are calling for the inclusion of non-genetic inheritance into an inclusive evolutionary synthesis. Here, we focus on social heredity and its role in the inheritance of behavioral traits. We discuss quantitative genetics methods that might allow us to disentangle genetic and non-genetic transmission in natural populations with known pedigrees. We then propose an experimental design based on cross-fostering among animal cultures, environments and families that has the potential to partition inherited phenotypic variation into socially (i.e. culturally and genetically inherited components. This approach builds towards a new conceptual framework based on the use of an extended version of the animal model of quantitative genetics to integrate genetic and cultural components of behavioral inheritance.

  7. The double pedigree: a method for studying culturally and genetically inherited behavior in tandem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Etienne; Pujol, Benoit; Wagner, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    Transgenerational sources of biological variation have been at the center of evolutionary studies ever since Darwin and Wallace identified natural selection. This is because evolution can only operate on traits whose variation is transmitted, i.e. traits that are heritable. The discovery of genetic inheritance has led to a semantic shift, resulting in the tendency to consider that only genes are inherited across generations. Today, however, concepts of heredity are being broadened again to integrate the accruing evidence of non-genetic inheritance, and many evolutionary biologists are calling for the inclusion of non-genetic inheritance into an inclusive evolutionary synthesis. Here, we focus on social heredity and its role in the inheritance of behavioral traits. We discuss quantitative genetics methods that might allow us to disentangle genetic and non-genetic transmission in natural populations with known pedigrees. We then propose an experimental design based on cross-fostering among animal cultures, environments and families that has the potential to partition inherited phenotypic variation into socially (i.e. culturally) and genetically inherited components. This approach builds towards a new conceptual framework based on the use of an extended version of the animal model of quantitative genetics to integrate genetic and cultural components of behavioral inheritance.

  8. Organ culture-cell culture system for studying multistage carcinogenesis in respiratory epithelium. [Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Vernon E.; Marchok, Ann C.; Nettesheim, Paul

    1977-01-01

    An organ culture-cell culture system was used to demonstrate carcinogen dose-dependent transformation of tracheal epithelial cells in vitro. Tracheal explants were exposed to MNNG (N-methyl-N/sup 1/-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine) in organ culture. Outgrowths from these explants provided epithelial cell cultures. The numbers of long term epithelial cell cultures and cell lines that were established per explant increased as MNNG exposure concentration increased. At the present time, more cell lines derived from explants exposed to the highest MNNG concentration have produced palpable tumors than cell lines derived from explants exposed to lower MNNG concentrations. No cell lines were established from primaries derived from control explants. TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate), stimulates DNA synthesis in tracheal epithelium in organ culture in a manner simular to that described for mouse skin. Short exposures to TPA not only stimulated DNA synthesis earlier, but the stimulation was greater than that obtained with continuous exposure. At the present time, exposure of tracheal organ cultures to MNNG followed by TPA has resulted in an enhanced production of morphologically altered cells in primary epithelial cell cultures, than exposure to either agent alone.

  9. Characteristic and Cultural Study of the Politeness in Chinese and English Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席晓

    2008-01-01

    s This paper shows that people lays special emphasis on difference aspects of politeness principle in the light of their own culture in cross-communication. And it analyses what the differences of PP in the language us-ing in Pragmatic are, and why? It deals with the differences between English and Chinese cultures.

  10. Education Abroad and Domestic Cultural Immersion: A Comparative Study of Cultural Competence among Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare Landa, Melissa; Odòna-Holm, Jocelyn; Shi, Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    As the demographics of the United States continue to shift, American classrooms reflect the richness of cultural diversity and the vibrancy of immigrant populations. Education abroad programs provide opportunities for preservice teachers to develop their cultural competence, required for effectively teaching children from a range of cultural…

  11. Social, biological, psychological, economic and cultural contexts of people with wounded legs Contexto social, biológico, psicológico, económico y cultural en personas con heridas en miembros inferiores

    OpenAIRE

    GÓMEZ OCHOA ANA MARITZA; GONZÁLEZ CONSUEGRA RENATA VIRGINIA

    2008-01-01

    This research characterizes the cultural, economic, social, biological and psychological context of users of the Injury Treatment Center program led by a group of lecturers of the area of Groundwork in Nursing of the Nursery Faculty of Colombia's National University. It is well known that the care of injured people demands the knowledge of the severity thereof, especially vascular injuries that are chronic and heal slowly. The conditions delaying the recovery from these injuries i...

  12. Marxism in Vygotskian approaches to cultural studies of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Junior, Paulo; Ostermann, Fernanda; Rezende, Flavia

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we initially address the main categories of Marxism, illustrating how Vygotsky has appropriated them as mediational meta-theoretical tools for building concepts for his psychological approach. In order to investigate the influence of Marxism in cultural studies of science education, we make an account of how current research, sustained by Vygotsky's original and successor theories, has been appropriating meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism. Once we identified Cultural Studies of Science Education as a journal that would probably concentrate papers that follow these perspectives, we decided to take it as the context of this study. In the process of selecting the corpus to be reviewed from the editions published from 2006 to 2011, we have found that 16 % of the articles that matched keywords denoting frameworks related to the Vygotskian tradition developed and appropriated the categories of dialectical materialism. The quality and originality of contemporary development of CHAT denote that this framework has been playing a very important role in recent expansion of Vygotskian approaches to research in science education. Among the papers that we considered to develop and appropriate Vygotskian frameworks, incompletion in the appropriation of meta-theoretical categories of dialectical materialism and the misusage of dialectics intertwined with dialogism were highlighted. Our findings suggest that overcoming these limitations can enhance political analysis of sociocultural phenomena in the context of science education. It also represents a strengthening of the role of dialectical materialism in expanding sociocultural perspectives toward a better articulation between individual and institutional-centered analyses.

  13. Assessment of Military Cultural Competence: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eric G; Hall-Clark, Brittany N; Hamaoka, Derrick; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-08-01

    Cultural competence is widely considered a cornerstone of patient care. Efforts to improve military cultural competency have recently gained national attention. Assessment of cultural competence is a critical component to this effort, but no assessment of military cultural competence currently exists. An assessment of military cultural competence (AMCC) was created through broad input and consensus. Careful review of previous cultural competency assessment designs and analysis techniques was considered. The AMCC was organized into three sections: skills, attitudes, and knowledge. In addition to gathering data to determine absolute responses from groups with different exposure levels to the military (direct, indirect, and none), paired questions were utilized to assess relative competencies between military culture and culture in general. Piloting of the AMCC revealed significant differences between military exposure groups. Specifically, those with personal military exposure were more likely to be in absolute agreement that the military is a culture, were more likely to screen for military culture, and had increased knowledge of military culture compared to those with no military exposure. Relative differences were more informative. For example, all groups were less likely to agree that their personal culture could be at odds with military culture as compared to other cultures. Such perceptions could hinder asking difficult questions and thus undermine care. The AMCC is a model for the measurement of the skills, attitudes, and knowledge related to military cultural competence. With further validity testing, the AMCC will be helpful in the critical task of measuring outcomes in ongoing efforts to improve military cultural competence. The novel approach of assessing variance appears to reduce bias and may also be helpful in the design of other cultural competency assessments.

  14. Biological and Cultural Evolution: A Proper Analogy : Comment on Martin Stuart-Fox, " Rethinking the Evolution of Culture and Cognitive Structure "

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez, Juan Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the 70s of the past century, different authors and schools of thought have been providing theories of cultural evolution moulded to the Darwinist model of evolution by natural selection. Martin Stuart-Fox, biologist, philosopher and renowned historian has given an interesting account, wherein mediating a behavioural definition of culture, he links the processes of development and evolution, worldviews being the common link thereof. Mentemes are the basic distinctive units of worldv...

  15. Systems Biology based studies on anti-inflammatory compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeckx, Kitty Catharina Maria

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of the ‘omics’ techniques (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) and systems biology, has caused fundamental changes in the drug discovery process and many other fields in the life science area. In this thesis we explored the possibilities to apply these holistic technologi

  16. Teacher's Study Guide on the Biology of Human Populations: Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    Factual and conceptual information dealing with the biology of human populations is offered in this guide for secondary science teachers. Instructional approaches are reviewed and suggestions are offered for use of the problem method approach, the discussion technique, and the project option. Information is organized into an introduction and five…

  17. Teacher's Study Guide on the Biology of Human Populations: Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This teacher's guide is designed to give background information on current biological subjects not usually treated in student texts. The book is divided into five parts, each representing one of the following topics: (1) evolution of human populations; (2) environment of human populations; (3) dynamics of human populations; (4) reproduction in…

  18. Study on Biological Characters of Asparagus macowanii Baker.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Asparagus macowanfi Baker, is a climbing herbaceous foliage species in genus Asparagus of Liliaceae, This paper summarized its multiple uses, morphologi- cal characteristics, biological habit, reproduction methods, management after cultiva- tion, prevention and control of pests and disease, as well as harvest and grading, with the objective to provide references for the exploitation and utilization of As- paragus macowanii Baker.

  19. Mössbauer study of some biological iron complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sikander Ali; Alimuddin; V R Reddy

    2005-12-01

    Some biological complexes containing iron are investigated experimentally at room temperature using the Mössbauer resonance. The complexes show quadrupole doublet and Kramer's degeneracy is found to exist. The electric field gradient, difference in -electron densities and quadrupole coupling constant have been calculated in each case. These parameters are used to obtain information on the surroundings of the Mössbauer atom.

  20. A Brief Study on Culture Shock over Overseas Students and the Solution to New Cultural Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维

    2014-01-01

    Culture shock is one of the common experiences by students and people abroad. They may experience the feeling of anxiety, disorientation, confusion, and even hostility because of misunderstanding to each other.“Culture shock”refers to the phenomenon in which people engage in the interaction feel depressed, discomfortable, etc. Culture shock may be caused by the conflict of various value systems when students and people enter a new culture and other value system. Culture shock is also a consequence of the influence of the negative life event. The changes in one ’s life and lack of support from family members, friends will make them more vulnerable and cause great discomfort in the new environment.