WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural resources inventory

  1. Great III - Cultural Resource Inventory. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    Historical Sketch of St. Louis University. Patrick Fox, • St. Louis. Historical look at the St. Louis mound complex. Holmes, Nathaniel 1868 Loess...Saint Louis to Me. St. Louis, Missouri: Hawthorn Pub- lishing Company, 1978. 305 p., illus. £ates, Giwendolyn Lewis 1976 Historic Sites Inventory for...Watercolors by Marilynne Bradley. St. Louis: Hawthorn Publishing Company, c. 1977. 259 p., illus. (part color). Includes: Old Courthouse, Old

  2. Whistlin' Dixie project: A cultural resource inventory on Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A cultural resource inventory of 147 acres was completed on the Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge in Jackson County, Colorado. The inventory was conducted in...

  3. A Cultural Resources Site Inventory at Painted Rock Reservoir, Maricopa County, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    sherds" present (Teague and Baldwin 1978:31). It was postulated that site PRS-5 may represent residual artifactual material from site AZ Z:2:2. The... Agua Fria River Valley, Arizona. Arizona State University Anthropological Researach Paper, No. 7. Tempe. -88- 70-I3772 A CULTURAL RESOURCES SITE

  4. Historic, enthnohistoric and prehistoric cultural resource inventory. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this study is to provide a literature search and write a historical narrative of the cultural significance of the study area for the proposed WyCoalGas Inc., pipeline, railroad, well fields, and coal gasification plant. The request for a cultural resource investigation states at a minimum the study shall be a literature search on the narrow one mile corridor along the proposed pipelines, areas included within the various facilities plus a one mile buffer surrounding these facilities. In addition, the study must be tied into appropriate local, state, and national history. The writer of this history has felt a responsibility for providing a realistic assessment of the themes of the study area's historical development. Several ideas have been concentrated upon: its American Indian heritage; the Euro-American's exploitive relationship with the region; and the overriding fragile, arid nature of its land. It is hoped that the government agencies and ultimately the energy company will feel a similiar responsibility toward the study area's historical integrity.

  5. Cultural Resources Reconnaissance Inventory of Portions of the Eau Galle Recreation Area, St. Croix County, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    near Dorchester, Clark County, Wis. ETC Engineering Inc. An archaeological survey of Copeland Park. City of La Crosse. An archaeological inspection of...Project participation included: i .. -Archaeological Inventory and Evaluation of Weston , Unit 3 Power Plant, N: Marathon County, Wisconsin

  6. A Cultural Resources Inventory and Historical Evaluation of the Smoky Atmospheric Nuclear Test, Areas 8, 9, and 10, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Robert C. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); King, Maureen L. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Beck, Colleen M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Falvey, Lauren W. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Menocal, Tatianna M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the results of a National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 cultural resources inventory and historical evaluation of the 1957 Smoky atmospheric test location on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Desert Research Institute (DRI) was tasked to conduct a cultural resources study of the Smoky test area as a result of a proposed undertaking by the Department of Energy Environmental Management. This undertaking involves investigating Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 for potential contaminants of concern as delineated in a Corrective Action Investigation Plan. CAU 550 is an area that spatially overlaps portions of the Smoky test location. Smoky, T-2c, was a 44 kt atmospheric nuclear test detonated at 5:30 am on August 31, 1957, on top of a 213.4 m (700 ft) 200 ton tower (T-2c) in Area 8 of the NNSS. Smoky was a weapons related test of the Plumbbob series (number 19) and part of the Department of Defense Exercise Desert Rock VII and VIII. The cultural resources effort involved the development of a historic context based on archival documents and engineering records, the inventory of the cultural resources in the Smoky test area and an associated military trench location in Areas 9 and 10, and an evaluation of the National Register eligibility of the cultural resources. The inventory of the Smoky test area resulted in the identification of structures, features, and artifacts related to the physical development of the test location and the post-test remains. The Smoky test area was designated historic district D104 and coincides with a historic archaeological site recorded as 26NY14794 and the military trenches designed for troop observation, site 26NY14795. Sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795 are spatially discrete with the trenches located 4.3 km (2.7 mi) southeast of the Smoky ground zero. As a result, historic district D104 is discontiguous and in total it covers 151.4 hectares (374 acres). The Smoky test location, recorded as historic

  7. Forest Service Resource Inventories: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA Forest Service

    1992-01-01

    Forest and related resource inventories are conducted by the US. Forest Service to provide the quantitative base necessary for making sound management, conservation, and stewardship decisions affecting these valuable resources. Inventory information has guided the management of 191 million acres (77.3 million ha) of publicly-owned National Forest land. Forest...

  8. VT County National Resources Inventory Data 1982-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This collection provides tabular USDA - Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), National Resources Inventory (NRI) data (1982-1997), by...

  9. Hanford cultural resources laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, M.K.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) which was established by the Richland Operations Office in 1987 as part of PNL.The HCRL provides support for the management of the archaeological, historical, and traditional cultural resources of the site in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

  10. Natural resources inventory system ASVT project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, A. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. One of the main advantages, both cost-wise and time-wise, of the natural resource inventory system involved the use of LANDSAT-acquired digital data for the land cover information component; thereby, eliminating the need to digitize such dynamic information from a map or aerial photo base. It was thought that the utility and the cost of information as derived from LANDSAT data for the various applications justified the operational use of data generated by LANDSAT.

  11. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Port Louisa NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) for Port Louisa NWR, including an inventory, assessment, and summary of water rights, water quantity, water quality,...

  12. An inventory of wildlife resources, Marsh Fork, summer 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife contracted us to do a wildlife resource inventory of the Marsh Fork in summer, 1973. We had planned the inventory in two...

  13. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Water Resource Inventory and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) for Okefenokee National Wildlife Refugesummarizes available information relevant to refuge water resources,...

  14. Quivira National Wildlife Refuge Water Resource Inventory and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Quivira NWR describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of water resource needs and...

  15. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment: Pixley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Pixley National Wildlife Refuge describes hydrologic information, provides an assessment of water resource...

  16. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment: Patuxent Research Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Patuxent Research Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of water resource...

  17. The natural resources inventory system ASVT project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, A. T.

    1979-01-01

    The hardware/software and the associated procedures for a natural resource inventory and information system based on the use of LANDSAT-acquired multispectral scanner digital data is described. The system is designed to derive land cover/vegetation information from LANDSAT data and geographically reference this information for the production of various types of maps and for the compilation of acreage by land cover/vegetation category. The system also provides for data base building so that the LANDSAT-derived information can be related to information digitized from other sources (e.g., soils maps) in a geographic context in order to address specific applications. These applications include agricultural crop production estimation, erosion hazard-reforestation need assessment, whitetail deer habitat assessment, and site selection. The system is tested in demonstration areas located in the state of Mississippi, and the results of these application demonstrations are presented. A cost-efficiency comparison of producing land cover/vegetation maps and statistics with this system versus the use of small-scale aerial photography is made.

  18. Satellite inventory of Minnesota forest resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Marvin E.; Burk, Thomas E.; Ek, Alan R.; Coppin, Pol R.; Lime, Stephen D.; Walsh, Terese A.; Walters, David K.; Befort, William; Heinzen, David F.

    1993-01-01

    The methods and results of using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to classify and estimate the acreage of forest covertypes in northeastern Minnesota are described. Portions of six TM scenes covering five counties with a total area of 14,679 square miles were classified into six forest and five nonforest classes. The approach involved the integration of cluster sampling, image processing, and estimation. Using cluster sampling, 343 plots, each 88 acres in size, were photo interpreted and field mapped as a source of reference data for classifier training and calibration of the TM data classifications. Classification accuracies of up to 75 percent were achieved; most misclassification was between similar or related classes. An inverse method of calibration, based on the error rates obtained from the classifications of the cluster plots, was used to adjust the classification class proportions for classification errors. The resulting area estimates for total forest land in the five-county area were within 3 percent of the estimate made independently by the USDA Forest Service. Area estimates for conifer and hardwood forest types were within 0.8 and 6.0 percent respectively, of the Forest Service estimates. A trial of a second method of estimating the same classes as the Forest Service resulted in standard errors of 0.002 to 0.015. A study of the use of multidate TM data for change detection showed that forest canopy depletion, canopy increment, and no change could be identified with greater than 90 percent accuracy. The project results have been the basis for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the Forest Service to define and begin to implement an annual system of forest inventory which utilizes Landsat TM data to detect changes in forest cover.

  19. Strategic Management of Cultural-Tourism Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Graèan; Zrinka Zadel; Andreja Rudanèiæ-Lugariæ

    2010-01-01

    contact with local residents. Cultural tourists are in their traveling motivated by cultural-tourism resources including culture of a particular population and destination, their tradition, meeting different lifestyles, and visiting material cultural heritage … Within cultural tourism, tourists search for authentic experiences affecting cultural-tourism resources. Cultural resources represent potential tourist resources. With transformation of cultural resources from potential into real ones,...

  20. Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge Water Resource Inventory and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) report for Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment...

  1. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Horicon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Horicon National Wildlife Refuges describes current hydrologic information, provides an...

  2. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) describes current hydrologic information, provides...

  3. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment: Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of water...

  4. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment: Cape May National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Cape May National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of water...

  5. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of...

  6. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment: Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of...

  7. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment: Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of water...

  8. Cache River National Wildlife Refuge Water Resource Inventory and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) for Cache River National Wildlife Refuge summarizes available and relevant information for refuge water...

  9. Fire and tribal cultural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank K. Lake; Jonathan W. Long

    2014-01-01

    Native American tribes regard plants that have evolved with frequent fire and other natural resources as living cultural resources that provide, water, food, medicines, and other material goods while also sustaining tribal cultural traditions. Collaborations between management agencies and tribes and other Native American groups can incorporate traditional ecological...

  10. Literature Search and Records Inventory for Cultural Resources Along the East Side of the Missouri River, Miles 498.03-732.31,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    replacing their ear- lier cultures. Hunting continued, but a wider range of animals were hunted including bison, elk, deer, wolf , and coyote. Smaller animals...Company set a new trend in the business by employing steamboats in its river trade. In that year the company’s Yellowstone reached Pierre, and in 1832...1890. The post office operated from 1877 to 1901. Its other busines- ses consisted of two stores, a livestock dealer, phy- sician, blacksmith, and a

  11. Revising and Updating the Inventory of Cross-Cultural Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Jennifer A.; Cushner, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The following article outlines research conducted to examine cross-cultural sensitivity in a sample of 949 incoming university students in the USA. The study was conducted during the process of updating an existing measure of cross-cultural sensitivity known as the Inventory of Cross-Cultural Sensitivity (ICCS), and to examine the various levels…

  12. Sampling for spatial inventory and monitoring of natural resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruijter, de J.J.

    2000-01-01

    A broad review is presented of statistical methodology for spatial inventory and monitoring of natural resources. This report deals with sampling design and analysis of sample data, and is intended to help researchers with developing good sampling schemes and monitoring systems. The emphasis is on

  13. Sampling for spatial inventory and monitoring of natural resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruijter, de J.J.

    2000-01-01

    A broad review is presented of statistical methodology for spatial inventory and monitoring of natural resources. This report deals with sampling design and analysis of sample data, and is intended to help researchers with developing good sampling schemes and monitoring systems. The emphasis is on t

  14. Hanford cultural resources management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Great 3 - Cultural Resource Inventory. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    Spanish entry into the war in 1779, British launched an attack against St. Louis in order to gain control of the Mississippi River. In a battle on May...62914. Magnolia Manor Historical Museum, 2700 Washington Avenue, Cairo, Illinois 62914. Thebes Pioneer Museum, Thebes , Illinois 62990. Calhoun County...CAIRO HISTORICAL DISTRICT, Cairo MAGNOLIA MANOR, 2700 Washington Avenue, Cairo [ OLD CUSTOM HOUSE, Washington and 15th Streets, Cairo THEBES COURTHOUSE

  16. Developing a cultural competence inventory for nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, D; Kunaviktikul, W; Klunklin, A; Sripusanapan, A; Avant, P K

    2017-06-01

    To develop and psychometrically test the Cultural Competence Inventory for Nurses in China. Cultural competence is expected worldwide from nurses due to the increasing cultural diversity of people in healthcare establishments. Yet, no cultural competence framework or instrument for nurses has been identified to guide nursing practice in China where the cultural diversity of the populations and the characteristics of the healthcare system are different from those of the West. A review of literature and individual interviews among nurse experts generated 74 items, which were evaluated by six experts in transcultural nursing. A stratified random sampling technique was used to recruit 520 Chinese nurses for the field test. Construct validity and internal consistency reliability of the instrument were estimated by exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha, respectively. The data were collected from May 2015 to January 2016. The final instrument consists of 29 items in five dimensions, namely 'cultural awareness, cultural respect, cultural knowledge, cultural understanding and cultural skills'. Cronbach's alpha for the instrument was 0.94, with a range of 0.79-0.92 for the individual dimensions. The evidence for contrast-group validity (P Cultural Competence Inventory for Nurses in China is reliable, valid and culturally sensitive for measuring nurses' cultural competence. The instrument development process facilitates the understanding of cultural competence globally. Cultural competence of nurses can be evaluated for self-development, workforce management and quality assurance. The instrument can also serve as the foundation to develop education curricula and nursing procedures or protocols to improve culturally competent nursing practice. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  17. Korean Cultural Influences on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsalus, Ae-Jung Chang; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of Korean culture on the results of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) by comparing profiles of 147 Korean and 132 American college students. Results indicate that MCMI-III personality profile differences exist between Korean and American college students. Discusses implications for mental health…

  18. Korean Cultural Influences on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsalus, Ae-Jung Chang; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effect of Korean culture on the results of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) by comparing profiles of 147 Korean and 132 American college students. Results indicate that MCMI-III personality profile differences exist between Korean and American college students. Discusses implications for mental health…

  19. Cultural Resources, landmarks, Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Haskell County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Not Provided information as of 2008. It is described as...

  20. Alaska Energy Inventory Project: Consolidating Alaska's Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, K.; Clough, J.; Swenson, R.; Crimp, P.; Hanson, D.; Parker, P.

    2007-12-01

    Alaska has considerable energy resources distributed throughout the state including conventional oil, gas, and coal, and unconventional coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass. While much of the known large oil and gas resources are concentrated on the North Slope and in the Cook Inlet regions, the other potential sources of energy are dispersed across a varied landscape from frozen tundra to coastal settings. Despite the presence of these potential energy sources, rural Alaska is mostly dependent upon diesel fuel for both electrical power generation and space heating needs. At considerable cost, large quantities of diesel fuel are transported to more than 150 roadless communities by barge or airplane and stored in large bulk fuel tank farms for winter months when electricity and heat are at peak demands. Recent increases in the price of oil have severely impacted the price of energy throughout Alaska, and especially hard hit are rural communities and remote mines that are off the road system and isolated from integrated electrical power grids. Even though the state has significant conventional gas resources in restricted areas, few communities are located near enough to these resources to directly use natural gas to meet their energy needs. To address this problem, the Alaska Energy Inventory project will (1) inventory and compile all available Alaska energy resource data suitable for electrical power generation and space heating needs including natural gas, coal, coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass and (2) identify locations or regions where the most economic energy resource or combination of energy resources can be developed to meet local needs. This data will be accessible through a user-friendly web-based interactive map, based on the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Land Records Information Section's (LRIS) Alaska Mapper, Google Earth, and Terrago Technologies' Geo

  1. 78 FR 53781 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and... Natural Resources DHPA through the University of Indianapolis. If no additional requestors come...

  2. 78 FR 45960 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson... Natural Resources has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... Missouri Department of Natural Resources. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control...

  3. 75 FR 36676 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson... completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources... Department of Natural Resources professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Osage...

  4. 76 FR 9051 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources... inventory of human remains in the control of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia... control of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources at the time of removal, and as such...

  5. 7 CFR 767.201 - Real estate inventory property with important resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Real estate inventory property with important... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INVENTORY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Real Estate Property With Important Resources or Located in Special Hazard Areas § 767.201 Real estate inventory...

  6. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, G.V.; Wright, M.K.; Crist, M.E.; Cadoret, N.A.; Dawson, M.V.; Simmons, K.A.; Harvey, D.W.; Longenecker, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA), the Archaeological Resources Protection Agency of 1979, the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. The HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan as a prioritized list of tasks to be undertaken to keep the DOE-RL in compliance with federal statutes, regulations, and guidelines. For FY 1993, these tasks were to: conduct cultural resource reviews pursuant to Section 106 of the NHPA; monitor the condition of known historic properties; identify, recover, and inventory artifacts collected from the Hanford Site; educate the public about cultural resources values and the laws written to protect them; conduct surveys of the Hanford Site in accordance with Section 110 of the NHPA. Research also was conducted as a spin-off of these tasks and is reported here.

  7. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Great River NWR and Clarence Cannon NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of water resource needs and...

  8. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA): Erwin National Fish Hatchery, Unicoi County, Tennessee

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) for Erwin National Fish Hatchery (NFH) summarizes available and relevant information for hatchery water resources...

  9. Cultural Resources, CTS Mail, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Tooele County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'CTS...

  10. Cultural Resources, common places, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'common...

  11. Cultural Resources, general plan, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is described as 'general...

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices

  15. National hydroelectric power resources study. Preliminary inventory of hydropower resources. Volume 3. Mid-Continent region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    The US Corps of Engineers' assessment of the nation's hydroelectric resources provides a current and comprehensive estimate of the potential for incremental or new generation at existing dams and other water resource projects, as well as for undeveloped sites in the US. The demand for hydroelectric power is addressed and various related policy and technical considerations are investigated to determine the incentives, constraints, and impacts of developing hydropower to meet a portion of the future energy demands. The comprehensive data represent the effort of the Corps of Engineers based on site-specific analysis and evaluation. Summary tables include estimates of the potential capacity and energy at each site in the inventory. The number of sites and potential capacity in each state are identified, but specific detailed information is included for sites in Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming.

  16. The Timber Resource Inventory Model (TRIM): a projection model for timber supply and policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.L. Tedder; R.N. La Mont; J.C. Kincaid

    1987-01-01

    TRIM (Timber Resource Inventory Model) is a yield table projection system developed for timber supply projections and policy analysis. TRIM simulates timber growth, inventories, management and area changes, and removals over the projection period. Programs in the TRIM system, card-by-card descriptions of required inputs, table formats, and sample results are presented...

  17. 76 FR 48177 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources... Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Washington State Department of Natural Resources and the... Natural Resources. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Indian...

  18. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment of Modoc National Wildlife Refuge near Alturas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Water Resource Inventory and Assessment Report for Modoc National Wildlife Refuge is to describe current hydrologic information, provide an...

  19. Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge Water Resource Inventory and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) for Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge summarizes available and relevant information for refuge...

  20. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an...

  1. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Iowa Corridor Project Area (Port Louisa NWR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Iowa Corridor Project Area describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of...

  2. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - DeSoto and Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for DeSoto and Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuges describes current hydrologic information,...

  3. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA)- Big Muddy National Fish & Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Big Muddy National Fish & Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information,...

  4. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Hamden Slough National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Hamden Slough National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) describes current hydrologic information,...

  5. [FY 2014 progress report]: Water Resource Inventory and Assessments in Region 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This progress report for Water Resource Inventory and Assessment documents activities occurring on Region 5 Refuges during FY2014. The goal of the WRIAs is to help...

  6. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA)- Middle Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Middle Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information,...

  7. Water resource inventory and assessment, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1989 stream discharge gaging data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This progress report provides an accounting of the accomplishments made during the second year of a multi-year water resource inventory in the coastal plain (1002...

  8. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an...

  9. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment for Kern National Wildlife Refuge and Tulare Basin Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Kern National Wildlife Refuge and Tulare Basin Wildlife Management Area describes hydrologic information,...

  10. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA)- Mingo, Pilot Knob, and Ozark Cavefish National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Mingo/Pilot Knob/Ozark Cavefish National Wildlife Refuges describes current hydrologic...

  11. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and...

  12. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and...

  13. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and Assessment...

  14. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Dixie and Levy Counties, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) report for Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information relevant to the...

  15. Prioritization of Water Resources Inventory Assessments (WRIA) and 6 Year Plan for Region 8 Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Regional management have requested that a prioritization process be developed for Region 8 for development and completion of Water Resources Inventory and...

  16. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Cypress Creek NWR (CCNWR) describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of...

  17. Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA), Appendices, and geoPDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) for the Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) compiles the results of data mining from national and regional...

  18. Cultural Landscape Inventory for Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Building 1095. ................................... 50 Figure 40. Navy Hill perimeter wall south of Main gate, 1915 (Picatinny Cultural Resources...Painting fence, 1933 (NARA 71-CA-213 Lake Denmark folder). ........................ 51 Figure 42. Perimeter fence north of Bear Swamp Road (ERDC-CERL...The forge trip hammer (with a 14-inch square face and weighing 600 pounds) and the anvil (two feet square and weighing an estimated 4,000 pounds

  19. Cultural resource management: The risk of compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, S.A.

    1994-02-01

    The statutory mandate for federal agencies to involve American Indians in the management of cultural resources may create a cultural risk for the people those statutes are intended to protect. A conceptual framework is given to help understand this dilemma. Factors that can exacerbate the severity of the adverse cultural impacts for tribal people are also examined. Policy recommendations are offered for reducing tensions among an the participants in the statutory process.

  20. Cultural resource management: The risk of compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, S.A.

    1994-02-01

    The statutory mandate for federal agencies to involve American Indians in the management of cultural resources may create a cultural risk for the people those statutes are intended to protect. A conceptual framework is given to help understand this dilemma. Factors that can exacerbate the severity of the adverse cultural impacts for tribal people are also examined. Policy recommendations are offered for reducing tensions among an the participants in the statutory process.

  1. Cross-Cultural Equivalency of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskifoglu, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the cross-cultural applicability of a multidimensional inventory of students' evaluation of critical thinking dispositions (California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory). The goal was to assess the cross-cultural psychometric equivalency of the CCTDI through testing measurement invariance across American and Turkish…

  2. Development and Standardization of Inventory for Measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esomonu, Nkechi Patricia-Mary; Okeaba, James Uzoma

    2016-01-01

    The study developed and standardized an Inventory for measuring Students' Integration into University Academic Culture named Inventory for Students' Integration into University Academic Culture (ISIUAC). The increase in dropout rates, substance use, cultism and other deviant behaviours in Nigerian universities makes it necessary for one to ask the…

  3. An evaluation of resource inventory and monitoring program used in national forest planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Michael L.; Marcot, Bruce G.

    1995-01-01

    The National Forest Management Act (1976) specifies that multiresource inventories be conducted to provide baseline data for development and, later, monitoring of national forest management plans. This mandate entails the most ambitious and complex resource planning effort ever attempted. In this paper we evaluate the structure and use of current inventory-monitoring programs and recommend a framework for gathering data to improve national forest planning. Current national guidelines are general and provide only basic directions to forest-level planners. Forest inventories have traditionally concentrated on timber. Although these inventories are often well designed, the questions we are now asking about forest resources have outgrown these methods. Forest management is impeded by general confusion over definitions of resources and the interactions among them. We outline a simple classification scheme that centers on identification of basic ecosystem elements that can be readily measured. Furthermore, spatial and temporal scales must be considered in the design of inventory-monitoring programs. The concept of ecological indicators is reviewed, and caution is advised in their use. Inventory-monitoring programs should be goal-directed and based on as rigorous a statistical design as possible. We also review fundamental issues of variable selection, validation, and sampling bias. We conclude by developing a flexible inventory-monitoring program that is designed to provide information on individual characteristics of the environment, rather than being based on fixed definitions of resources.

  4. Skills Inventory for Teams (SIFT): A Resource for Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Corinne; And Others

    The Skills Inventory for Teams (SIFT) was developed for early intervention practitioners from a variety of disciplines to help them evaluate their ability to work as part of an early intervention team in identifying and serving young children with disabilities. The Team Member section is designed to help individual team members identify the skills…

  5. Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge Water Resource Inventory and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes available information relevant to refuge water resources, provides an assessment of refuge water resource needs and issues of concern, and...

  6. An Inventory of Natural, Human, and Social Overhead Capital Resources in North-Central New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Garrey; Eastman, Clyde

    Concerned with the north-central area of New Mexico (Rio Arriba, Taos, Colfax, Mora, Santa Fe, and San Miguel counties), this inventory describes the situation and delineation of the region, the natural resources (physical characteristics, land, land-ownership patterns, land-use patterns, land-title problems, water resources, and minerals); human…

  7. Cultural Resources as Sustainability Enablers: Towards a Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan O. Keitumetse

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available People inhabit and change environments using socio-cultural and psycho-social behaviors and processes. People use their socio-cultural understanding of phenomena to interact with the environment. People are carriers of cultural heritage. These characteristics make cultural values ubiquitous in all people-accessed and people-inhabited geographic spaces of the world, making people readily available assets through which environmental sustainability can be implemented. Yet, people’s conservation development is rarely planned using cultural resources. It is against this background that a Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM model is initiated as a new approach that outlines the symbiosis between cultural heritage, environment and various stakeholders, with a view to create awareness about neglected conservation indicators inherent in cultural resources and better placed to complement already existing natural resources conservation indicators. The model constitutes a two-phased process with four (04 levels of operation, namely: level I (production; level II (reproduction; level III (consumption that distinguish specific components of cultural heritage resources to be monitored at level IV for sustainability using identified cultural conservation indicators. Monitored indicators, which are limitless, constitute work in progress of the model and will be constantly reviewed, renewed and updated through time. Examples of monitoring provided in this article are the development of cultural competency-based training curriculum that will assist communities to transform cultural information into certifiable intellectual (educational and culture-economic (tourism assets. Another monitoring example is the mainstreaming of community cultural qualities into already existing environmental conservation frameworks such as eco-certification to infuse new layers of conservation indicators that enrich resource sustainability. The technical

  8. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  9. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  10. The Cultural Resources Investigation of the Wild Rice River - South Branch and Felton Ditch Flood Control Project Area, Clay and Norman Counties, Minnesota,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Resource Inventory of the - Historic and Prehistoric Cultural Resources of the Chippewa National Forest. With Nancy L. Woolworth . For the United States...Near Pollock and Herreid, Campbell County, South Dakota. With Nancy L. Woolworth . Summer, 1978. Field Supervisor: Site Survey at Garvin Park, Lyons...Dakota. With Nancy L. Woolworth . For the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 6 63 Cultural Resource Inventory of the Historic and

  11. Inventory of geothermal resources in Nebraska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnold, W.D.; Eversoll, D.A.

    1983-06-30

    The goal of the State Coupled Resource Assessment Program is to identify and evaluate geothermal resources in the state, particularly low-temperature potential. Eight tasks were identified and documented in this report as follows: bottom-hole temperature survey, heat flow and temperature gradient survey, data translation studies, gravity data, substate regions, information dissemination, state geothermal map, and reports. The project had three major products: (1) a map, Geothermal Resources of Nebraska; (2) a significant amount of thermal data collected and documented within the state; and (3) a series of publications, presentations and meetings (documented as an Appendix).

  12. Inventory of geothermal resources in Nebraska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnold, W.D.; Eversoll, D.A.

    1983-06-30

    The goal of the State Coupled Resource Assessment Program is to identify and evaluate geothermal resources in the state, particularly low-temperature potential. Eight tasks were identified and documented in this report as follows: bottom-hole temperature survey, heat flow and temperature gradient survey, data translation studies, gravity data, substate regions, information dissemination, state geothermal map, and reports. The project had three major products: (1) a map, Geothermal Resources of Nebraska; (2) a significant amount of thermal data collected and documented within the state; and (3) a series of publications, presentations and meetings (documented as an Appendix).

  13. Development of mobile GIS system for forest resources second-class inventory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chong-gui; JIANG You-yi

    2011-01-01

    A special mobile GIS (Geographic Information System) system used for forest resources second-class inventory was developed on the basis of traditional forest resources inventory, remote sensing, GPS (Globe Positioning System) and embedded technology. Portable instrument, embedded development and the integration technology of RS (Remote Sensing), GIS and GPS are all used in this special mobile GIS system. Further, the system composition, key techniques, and current situation of the practical application in China were analyzed in the study.The results are important for applying modem high-tech for the planning and design of digital forest resources to improve the precision and efficiency of inventory and reduce the labor cost and financial investment.

  14. 75 FR 16175 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central... possession of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI. The... notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Museum of Cultural and Natural...

  15. 78 FR 36241 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History has completed an inventory of human remains and associated... request to the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. If no additional requestors... Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the address in this notice by July 17, 2013. ADDRESSES:...

  16. 75 FR 45658 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central... funerary objects in the possession of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan... detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Museum of Cultural and Natural...

  17. 75 FR 58429 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA... & Culture, aka Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA. The human remains and associated... the human remains was made by the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture professional staff in...

  18. Colorado cultural resource survey: cultural resource re-evaluation form [5JA784

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document includes the survey forms necessary to assess cultural resources in Colorado. This document assesses the Allard ranch (5JA784) on Arapaho National...

  19. Colorado cultural resource survey: cultural resource re-evaluation form [5JA783

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document includes the survey forms necessary to assess cultural resources in Colorado. This document assesses the Case ranch (5JA783) on Arapaho National...

  20. Renewable energy resource and technology assessment: Southern Tier Central Region, New York, New York. Renewable Energy Resource Inventory; renewable energy technology handbook; technology assessment workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Resource Inventory contains regional maps that record the location of renewable energy resources such as insolation, wind, biomass, and hydropower in the Southern Tier Central Region of New York State. It contains an outline of a process by which communities can prepare local renewable energy resource inventories using maps and overlays. The process starts with the mapping of the resources at a regional scale and telescopes to an analysis of resources at a site-specific scale. The resource inventory presents a site analysis of Sullivan Street Industrial Park, Elmira, New York.

  1. Digital Inventory and Documentation of Korea's Important Cultural Properties Using 3D Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongseok, K.; Gyesoo, K.; Siro, K.; Eunhwa, K.

    2015-08-01

    As a country with 11 properties included on the World Heritage List and approximately 12,000 important cultural properties, Korea has been continuously carrying out the inventory and documentation of cultural properties to conserve and manage them since the 1960s. The inventory of cultural properties had been carried out by making and managing a register which recorded basic information mainly on state-designated cultural properties such as their size, quantity, and location. The documentation of cultural properties was also carried out by making measured drawings. However, the inventory and documentation done under the previous analog method had a limit to the information it could provide for the effective conservation and management of cultural properties. Moreover, in recent times important cultural properties have frequently been damaged by man-made and natural disasters such as arson, forest fires, and floods, so an alternative was required. Accordingly, Korea actively introduced digital techniques led by the government for the inventory and documentation of important cultural properties. In this process, the government established the concept of a digital set, built a more efficie nt integrated data management system, and created standardized guidelines to maximize the effectiveness of data acquisition, management, and utilization that greatly increased the level of digital inventory, documentation, and archiving.

  2. Management of natural resources through automatic cartographic inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, P. A.; Gourinard, Y.; Cambou, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Significant correspondence codes relating ERTS imagery to ground truth from vegetation and geology maps have been established. The use of color equidensity and color composite methods for selecting zones of equal densitometric value on ERTS imagery was perfected. Primary interest of temporal color composite is stressed. A chain of transfer operations from ERTS imagery to the automatic mapping of natural resources was developed.

  3. Multilingual Access to Cultural Heritage Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Oberländer-Târnoveanu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available For the visitor to the ARENA Portal for Archaeological Records of Europe Networked Access, the first option is to choose the language of the interface: Danish, English, Icelandic, Polish, Norwegian or Romanian. These are the languages of the six partners in the European project developed between 2001 and 2004. We expect a significant number of visitors from these countries, which made the choice of each respective mother tongue a natural one. Is the option of several languages just a courtesy for our public? It is more than that - it is a tool to facilitate access to multilingual archaeological information. Before we were ready for visitors to our sites, we had to understand each other, to index our digital resources using common terms, to find the right equivalents for archaeological realities described in several languages, to explain the concepts behind the words. Language is related to culture, identity and memory. There is a growing concern about the dominance of English as a global language of communication, while probably the majority of known languages are in danger of disappearing and cultural diversity is menaced. If we wish to make cultural heritage resources accessible to more people and to share knowledge, language is a key. My article is an attempt to address these issues. I will explore the role of language in scientific communication, multilingualism on the Internet, language policies, and also have a closer look at terminological tools for cultural heritage, especially for archaeology.

  4. Vegetation resources inventory of southwest Alaska: development and application of an innovative, extensive sampling design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willem W.S. van Hees

    1999-01-01

    An assessment of the vegetation resources of southwest Alaska was made by using an inventory design developed by the Pacific Northwest Research Station. Satellite imagery (LANDSAT MSS), high-altitude aerial photography, and ground sampling were the major components of the design. Estimates of area for all land cover classes in the southwest region were produced....

  5. Statewide Inventories of Heritage Resources: Macris and the Experience in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, P. H.

    2017-08-01

    The Massachusetts Historical Commission (MHC) is the State Historic Preservation Office for Massachusetts. Established in 1963, MHC has been inventorying historic properties for over half a century. Since 1987, it has maintained a heritage database, the Massachusetts Cultural Resource Information System, or MACRIS. Today MACRIS holds over 206,000 records from the 351 towns and cities across the Commonwealth. Since 2004, a selection of the more than 150 MACRIS fields has been available online at mhcmacris. net. MACRIS is widely used by independent consultants preparing project review files, by MHC staff in its regulatory responsibilities, by local historical commissions monitoring threats to their communities, as well as by scholars, historical organizations, genealogists, property owners, reporters, and the general public interested in the history of the built environment. In 2016 MACRIS began migration off of its three-decade old Pick multivalue database to SQL Server, and in 2017, the first redesign of its thirteen-year old web interface should start to improve usability. Longer-term improvements have the goal of standardizing terminology and ultimately bringing interoperability with other heritage databases closer to reality.

  6. Are indigenous personality dimensions culture specific? Philippine inventories and the five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katigbak, Marcia S; Church, A Timothy; Guanzon-Lapeña, Ma Angeles; Carlota, Annadaisy J; del, PilarGregorioH

    2002-01-01

    The authors addressed the culture specificity of indigenous personality constructs, the generalizability of the 5-factor model (FFM), and the incremental validity of indigenous measures in a collectivistic culture. Filipino college students (N = 508) completed 3 indigenous inventories and the Filipino version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). On the basis of the factor and regression analyses, they concluded that (a) most Philippine dimensions are well encompassed by the FFM and thus may not be very culture specific: (b) a few indigenous constructs are less well accounted for by the FFM: these constructs are not unknown in Western cultures, but they may be particularly salient or composed somewhat differently in the Philippines; (c) the structure of the NEO-PI-R FFM replicates well in the Philippines: and (d) Philippine inventories add modest incremental validity beyond the FFM in predicting selected culture-relevant criteria.

  7. Natural resources inventory and land evaluation in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, H. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Using MSS channels 5 and 7 and a supervised classification system with a PPD classification algorithm, it was possible to map the exact areal extent of the snow cover and of the transition zone with melting snow patches and snow free parts of various sizes over a large area under different aspects such as relief, exposure, shadows etc. A correlation of the data from ground control, areal underflights and earth resources satellites provided a very accurate interpretation of the melting procedure of snow in high mountains.

  8. Cultural Resources, Lafayette County Comprehensive Plan, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Lafayette County Land Records.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale as of 2007. It is described as 'Lafayette County Comprehensive Plan'. Data by this publisher...

  9. CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavian Clipa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available When the multinational firms employ human resources from different countries they have to submit to the restrictions concerning cultural differences. The paper is an attempt to show how the human resource management administrates these cultural differences.

  10. St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge Cultural Resource Review Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The main purpose of the review was to examine the various roles the refuge has regarding cultural resource management needs and develop a cultural resource...

  11. Alianza Bilingue Cultural Progress Inventory. Revised September 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Lilia; And Others

    The continuum was developed to provide: (1) a uniform measure of student progress and (2) a progress inventory of the ABC Unified School District's Bilingual Multicultural Program. Six components of the Bilingual Multicultural Curriculum are considered in this management system: Spanish Oral Language Development Objectives, Spanish Reading…

  12. e-MIR2: a public online inventory of medical informatics resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Calle Guillermo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years, the number of available informatics resources in medicine has grown exponentially. While specific inventories of such resources have already begun to be developed for Bioinformatics (BI, comparable inventories are as yet not available for the Medical Informatics (MI field, so that locating and accessing them currently remains a difficult and time-consuming task. Description We have created a repository of MI resources from the scientific literature, providing free access to its contents through a web-based service. We define informatics resources as all those elements that constitute, serve to define or are used by informatics systems, ranging from architectures or development methodologies to terminologies, vocabularies, databases or tools. Relevant information describing the resources is automatically extracted from manuscripts published in top-ranked MI journals. We used a pattern matching approach to detect the resources’ names and their main features. Detected resources are classified according to three different criteria: functionality, resource type and domain. To facilitate these tasks, we have built three different classification schemas by following a novel approach based on folksonomies and social tagging. We adopted the terminology most frequently used by MI researchers in their publications to create the concepts and hierarchical relationships belonging to the classification schemas. The classification algorithm identifies the categories associated with resources and annotates them accordingly. The database is then populated with this data after manual curation and validation. Conclusions We have created an online repository of MI resources to assist researchers in locating and accessing the most suitable resources to perform specific tasks. The database contains 609 resources at the time of writing and is available at http://www.gib.fi.upm.es/eMIR2. We are continuing to expand the number

  13. e-MIR2: a public online inventory of medical informatics resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the past years, the number of available informatics resources in medicine has grown exponentially. While specific inventories of such resources have already begun to be developed for Bioinformatics (BI), comparable inventories are as yet not available for the Medical Informatics (MI) field, so that locating and accessing them currently remains a difficult and time-consuming task. Description We have created a repository of MI resources from the scientific literature, providing free access to its contents through a web-based service. We define informatics resources as all those elements that constitute, serve to define or are used by informatics systems, ranging from architectures or development methodologies to terminologies, vocabularies, databases or tools. Relevant information describing the resources is automatically extracted from manuscripts published in top-ranked MI journals. We used a pattern matching approach to detect the resources’ names and their main features. Detected resources are classified according to three different criteria: functionality, resource type and domain. To facilitate these tasks, we have built three different classification schemas by following a novel approach based on folksonomies and social tagging. We adopted the terminology most frequently used by MI researchers in their publications to create the concepts and hierarchical relationships belonging to the classification schemas. The classification algorithm identifies the categories associated with resources and annotates them accordingly. The database is then populated with this data after manual curation and validation. Conclusions We have created an online repository of MI resources to assist researchers in locating and accessing the most suitable resources to perform specific tasks. The database contains 609 resources at the time of writing and is available at http://www.gib.fi.upm.es/eMIR2. We are continuing to expand the number of available resources by

  14. Interchance and cooperation with user agencies. [dissemination of earth resources data to inventory and management personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, D. T.

    1973-01-01

    It is apparent that the rate of remote sensing technique development is increasing at a much faster pace than is the rate at which these same techniques are being put to practical use by earth resource managers and inventory specialists. It has become increasingly important to bridge this widening gap between remote sensing specialists and potential users. Members of the University of California project on remote sensing of earth resources have been actively participating in efforts to overcome this gap by maintaining library facilities, disseminating research findings, training remote sensing specialists, and interacting with resource managers.

  15. Interchance and cooperation with user agencies. [dissemination of earth resources data to inventory and management personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, D. T.

    1973-01-01

    It is apparent that the rate of remote sensing technique development is increasing at a much faster pace than is the rate at which these same techniques are being put to practical use by earth resource managers and inventory specialists. It has become increasingly important to bridge this widening gap between remote sensing specialists and potential users. Members of the University of California project on remote sensing of earth resources have been actively participating in efforts to overcome this gap by maintaining library facilities, disseminating research findings, training remote sensing specialists, and interacting with resource managers.

  16. Folk Culture Resources as a Component of Tourism Space

    OpenAIRE

    Mokras-Grabowska, Justyna

    2014-01-01

    The paper concerns folk tourism - describes the mutual relations between folk culture and tourism and the main mechanisms of the commercialization of cultural heritage. Moreover it locates folk culture resources in tourism space and includes hospitality.

  17. Merging national forest and national forest health inventories to obtain an integrated forest resource inventory--experiences from Bavaria, Slovenia and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Marko; Bauer, Arthur; Ståhl, Göran

    2014-01-01

    To meet the demands of sustainable forest management and international commitments, European nations have designed a variety of forest-monitoring systems for specific needs. While the majority of countries are committed to independent, single-purpose inventorying, a minority of countries have merged their single-purpose forest inventory systems into integrated forest resource inventories. The statistical efficiencies of the Bavarian, Slovene and Swedish integrated forest resource inventory designs are investigated with the various statistical parameters of the variables of growing stock volume, shares of damaged trees, and deadwood volume. The parameters are derived by using the estimators for the given inventory designs. The required sample sizes are derived via the general formula for non-stratified independent samples and via statistical power analyses. The cost effectiveness of the designs is compared via two simple cost effectiveness ratios. In terms of precision, the most illustrative parameters of the variables are relative standard errors; their values range between 1% and 3% if the variables' variations are low (s%forest resources to be used for decision making and national and international policy making. Such information can be cost-efficiently provided through integrated forest resource inventories.

  18. A Cultural Resources Inventory of the John Martin Reservoir, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-31

    indicating the influence of pueblo styles of construction. The Villasur expedition left Santa Fe in late From chief Carlana of the Sierra Blanca...alienated the viceroy about the policy of his predecessor. Comanche, and were thus effectively blocked Governor Mendoza , in permitting the Mallets, from

  19. CINERGI: Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geoscience Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, Ilya; Bermudez, Luis; Grethe, Jeffrey; Gupta, Amarnath; Hsu, Leslie; Lehnert, Kerstin; Malik, Tanu; Richard, Stephen; Valentine, David; Whitenack, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Organizing geoscience data resources to support cross-disciplinary data discovery, interpretation, analysis and integration is challenging because of different information models, semantic frameworks, metadata profiles, catalogs, and services used in different geoscience domains, not to mention different research paradigms and methodologies. The central goal of CINERGI, a new project supported by the US National Science Foundation through its EarthCube Building Blocks program, is to create a methodology and assemble a large inventory of high-quality information resources capable of supporting data discovery needs of researchers in a wide range of geoscience domains. The key characteristics of the inventory are: 1) collaboration with and integration of metadata resources from a number of large data facilities; 2) reliance on international metadata and catalog service standards; 3) assessment of resource "interoperability-readiness"; 4) ability to cross-link and navigate data resources, projects, models, researcher directories, publications, usage information, etc.; 5) efficient inclusion of "long-tail" data, which are not appearing in existing domain repositories; 6) data registration at feature level where appropriate, in addition to common dataset-level registration, and 7) integration with parallel EarthCube efforts, in particular focused on EarthCube governance, information brokering, service-oriented architecture design and management of semantic information. We discuss challenges associated with accomplishing CINERGI goals, including defining the inventory scope; managing different granularity levels of resource registration; interaction with search systems of domain repositories; explicating domain semantics; metadata brokering, harvesting and pruning; managing provenance of the harvested metadata; and cross-linking resources based on the linked open data (LOD) approaches. At the higher level of the inventory, we register domain-wide resources such as domain

  20. An Inventory-Theory-Based Inexact Multistage Stochastic Programming Model for Water Resources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Q. Suo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An inventory-theory-based inexact multistage stochastic programming (IB-IMSP method is developed for planning water resources systems under uncertainty. The IB-IMSP is based on inexact multistage stochastic programming and inventory theory. The IB-IMSP cannot only effectively handle system uncertainties represented as probability density functions and discrete intervals but also efficiently reflect dynamic features of system conditions under different flow levels within a multistage context. Moreover, it can provide reasonable transferring schemes (i.e., the amount and batch of transferring as well as the corresponding transferring period associated with various flow scenarios for solving water shortage problems. The applicability of the proposed IB-IMSP is demonstrated by a case study of planning water resources management. The solutions obtained are helpful for decision makers in not only identifying different transferring schemes when the promised water is not met, but also making decisions of water allocation associated with different economic objectives.

  1. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for Coastal Resource Service Area (CRSA) boundaries, mineral sites, airports, boat ramps, marinas, and Coast Guard...

  2. Optimal Production and Inventory Policy for Multiple Products Under Resource Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory A. DeCroix; Antonio Arreola-Risa

    1998-01-01

    We show that a modified base-stock policy is optimal for multiproduct, infinite-horizon production-inventory systems, where demand for the products is random and the products share a finite resource every period. We characterize the optimal policy for the case of homogeneous products. Because of the difficulty in computing the optimal base-stock levels for the heterogeneous case, we propose a heuristic that is simple enough for practical applications. We present numerical results that suggest...

  3. 36 CFR 9.47 - Cultural resource protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cultural resource protection... INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights § 9.47 Cultural resource protection. (a) Where... value of historical, archeological, or other cultural scientific importance in violation of...

  4. Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Leach

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available What is the value, now, in conducting historical research into architectural ideas? The paper addresses the function of contemporary PhD research in light of a the so-called historiographical turn in architectural history, theory and criticism research consolidated in the last decade or so; b the broader positions in which critical and historical knowledge and practices are implicated within present-day architectural culture; and c the particular circumstances of PhD research in architecture in Australian universities.It revisits a paper written in 2005 that constructs the PhD in architecture as a space of authorized release from the burdens of habitual knowledge within the architecture discipline, accountable both to disciplinary knowledge and a broader architectural culture represented most obviously by the architecture profession. In light of the positions it explores and contemporary circumstances, it will consider the question of how legitimacy of subject is construed and defended for the doctorate in architectural history.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Braun

    2009-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2009 (FY 2009). Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-two prehistoric archaeological sites, six historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, two historic trails, and two nuclear resources, including Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2009 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations and monitor the effects of ongoing project activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and trespassing citations were issued in one instance, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  6. National hydroelectric power resources study. Preliminary inventory of hydropower resources. Volume 1. Pacific Northwest region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    The preliminary inventory and analysis procedures provide a comprehensive assessment of the undeveloped hydroelectric power potential in the US and determines which sites merit more thorough investigation. Over 5400 existing structures have been identified as having the physical potential to add hydropower plants or increase hydropower output thereby increasing our present hydropower capacity from a total of 64,000 MW to 158,000 MW and our energy from 280,000 GWH to 503,000 GWH. While the physical potential for this increase is clearly available, some of these projects will undoubtedly not satisfy more-detailed economic analysis as well as the institutional and environmental criteria which will be imposed upon them. Summary tables include estimates of the potential capacity and energy at each site in the inventory. In some cases, individual projects may be site alternatives to others in the same general location, when only one can be considered for hydropower development. The number of sites per state is identified, but specific information is included for only the sites in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington in this first volume.

  7. Integrating Semantic Information in Metadata Descriptions for a Geoscience-wide Resource Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, I.; Richard, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Valentine, D.; Whitenack, T.; Ozyurt, I. B.; Grethe, J. S.; Schachne, A.

    2016-12-01

    Integrating semantic information into legacy metadata catalogs is a challenging issue and so far has been mostly done on a limited scale. We present experience of CINERGI (Community Inventory of Earthcube Resources for Geoscience Interoperability), an NSF Earthcube Building Block project, in creating a large cross-disciplinary catalog of geoscience information resources to enable cross-domain discovery. The project developed a pipeline for automatically augmenting resource metadata, in particular generating keywords that describe metadata documents harvested from multiple geoscience information repositories or contributed by geoscientists through various channels including surveys and domain resource inventories. The pipeline examines available metadata descriptions using text parsing, vocabulary management and semantic annotation and graph navigation services of GeoSciGraph. GeoSciGraph, in turn, relies on a large cross-domain ontology of geoscience terms, which bridges several independently developed ontologies or taxonomies including SWEET, ENVO, YAGO, GeoSciML, GCMD, SWO, and CHEBI. The ontology content enables automatic extraction of keywords reflecting science domains, equipment used, geospatial features, measured properties, methods, processes, etc. We specifically focus on issues of cross-domain geoscience ontology creation, resolving several types of semantic conflicts among component ontologies or vocabularies, and constructing and managing facets for improved data discovery and navigation. The ontology and keyword generation rules are iteratively improved as pipeline results are presented to data managers for selective manual curation via a CINERGI Annotator user interface. We present lessons learned from applying CINERGI metadata augmentation pipeline to a number of federal agency and academic data registries, in the context of several use cases that require data discovery and integration across multiple earth science data catalogs of varying quality

  8. [Inventories of the Earth. Mineral resource appraisals and the rise of resource economics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    How do the earth sciences mediate between the natural and social world? This paper explores the question by focusing on the history of nonfuel mineral resource appraisal from the late nineteenth to the mid twentieth century. It argues that earth sciences early on embraced social scientific knowledge, i.e. economic knowledge, in particular, when it came to determining or deposits and estimating the magnitude of mineral reserves. After 1900, assessing national and global mineral reserves and their "life span" or years of supply became ever more important, scaling up and complementing traditional appraisal practices on the level of individual mines or mining and trading companies. As a consequence, economic methods gained new weight for mineral resource estimation. Natural resource economics as an own field of research grew out of these efforts. By way of example, the mineral resource appraisal assigned to the U.S. Materials Policy Commission by President Harry S. Truman in 1951 is analyzed in more detail. Natural resource economics and environmental economics might be interpreted as a strategy to bring down the vast and holistically conceived object of geological and ecological research, the earth, to human scale, and assimilate it into social matters.

  9. Rs-Based Water Resources Inventory of the Philippines: Capacity Building Efforts for Nationwide Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, A. M. C.; De La Cruz, R. M.; Olfindo, N. T.; Borlongan, N. J. B.; Felicen, M. M.; Blanco, A. C.

    2016-06-01

    Considering that the Philippines is archipelagic in nature and is exposed to disasters accentuated by climate change, water resource monitoring and management has been an important concern in the country. The design and implementation of an effective management scheme relies heavily on accurate, complete, and updated water resource inventories, usually in the form of maps and geodatabases. With the aim of developing a detailed and comprehensive database of all water resources in the Philippines, a 3-year project entitled "Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset (PHD) for Watersheds from LiDAR Surveys", has been initiated by the University of the Philippines Diliman (UPD) and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). Various workflows has been developed to extract inland hydrologic features in the Philippines using accurate Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and LiDAR point cloud data obtained through other government-funded programs, supplemented with other remotely-sensed imageries and ancillary information. Since the project covers national-scale mapping and inventory, the implementation was structured to be a collaborative effort between fifteen (15) State Universities/Colleges (SUCs) and Higher Education Institutes (HEIs), along with multiple National Government Agencies (NGAs) and Local Government Units (LGUs). This paper presents the project's general structure, focusing mainly on its attempts and accomplishments in strengthening individual capacities of all involved SUCs, HEIs, and stakeholders utilizing hydrologic data for different applications.

  10. RS-BASED WATER RESOURCES INVENTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES: CAPACITY BUILDING EFFORTS FOR NATIONWIDE IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. C. Perez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the Philippines is archipelagic in nature and is exposed to disasters accentuated by climate change, water resource monitoring and management has been an important concern in the country. The design and implementation of an effective management scheme relies heavily on accurate, complete, and updated water resource inventories, usually in the form of maps and geodatabases. With the aim of developing a detailed and comprehensive database of all water resources in the Philippines, a 3-year project entitled “Development of the Philippine Hydrologic Dataset (PHD for Watersheds from LiDAR Surveys”, has been initiated by the University of the Philippines Diliman (UPD and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST. Various workflows has been developed to extract inland hydrologic features in the Philippines using accurate Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and LiDAR point cloud data obtained through other government-funded programs, supplemented with other remotely-sensed imageries and ancillary information. Since the project covers national-scale mapping and inventory, the implementation was structured to be a collaborative effort between fifteen (15 State Universities/Colleges (SUCs and Higher Education Institutes (HEIs, along with multiple National Government Agencies (NGAs and Local Government Units (LGUs. This paper presents the project’s general structure, focusing mainly on its attempts and accomplishments in strengthening individual capacities of all involved SUCs, HEIs, and stakeholders utilizing hydrologic data for different applications.

  11. A Resource Inventory of Selected Outcrops Along the White Clay Fault in Southwestern South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanovia, L.

    2012-12-01

    The White Clay Fault, located in southwestern South Dakota, formed after the Laramide orogeny (65mya) that resulted in the uplift of the Black Hills in western South Dakota and eastern Wyoming. Many of the outcrops along the White Clay Fault are part of the Eocene-Oligocene White River Group (37-26.9 mya), an accumulation of nonmarine sediments composed primarily of tuffaceous mudstones and silty claytones with lesser amounts of kaolinitic sandstones, lacustrine limestones and gypsum. (LaGarry, 1998; LaGarry and LaGarry, 1997). White River Group sediments also consist of volcanic ash from eruptions in the southwestern United States (Larson and Evanoff, 1998). The White Clay Fault lies at the outer boundary of the Black Hills uplift. After the fault formed, the eventual erosion of overlying White River Group materials exposed outcrops of Late Cretaceous Niobrara chalk that formed between 145.5-65.5 mya, at a time when this region was covered by the Western Interior Seaway. The Niobrara Formation consists of chalk and limestone interbedded with marls and shale (Locklear and Sageman, 2008). This poster records a geological and paleontological resource inventory for two selected outcrops that are within a short walking distance of each other along the White Clay Fault. Outcrops on the downside of the fault belongs to the Peanut Peak member of the White River Group, while the outcrops on the upside of the fault belong to the Niobrara Formation; a difference of 60 million years. The selected outcrops are on sensitive land on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that has never been inventories before due to sovereignty issues. As such, this resource inventory represents one of many initial steps being taken by students and faculty at Oglala Lakota College to determine the geological resources of the Reservation.

  12. Inventory and case studies of Louisiana, non-electric industrial applications of geopressured geothermal resources. Quarterly progress report, March 1-May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnadelbach, T.W. Jr.

    1977-06-01

    An inventory is provided of geopressured geothermal resources in Louisiana. The Louisiana industries; classified as Food and Kindred Products were cataloged and inventoried to determine potential and specific uses of the known energy resources. The possibility of relocating industries to the available resources is explored. Individual case studies are presented for near term industrial conversion for resource application. (MHR)

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    INL Cultural Resource Management Office

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2010 (FY 2010). Throughout the year, thirty-three cultural resource localities were revisited, including somethat were visited more than once, including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is a cave, two additional caves, twenty-six prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. The resources that were monitored included seventeen that are routinely visited and sixteen that are located in INL project areas. Although impacts were documented at a few locations and one trespassing incident (albeit sans formal charges) was discovered, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resources were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that several INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources.

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie B. Williams; Brenda Pace

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during 2013. Throughout the year, thirty-eight cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations with Native American human remains, one of which is also a cave; fourteen additional caves; seven prehistoric archaeological sites ; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; one nuclear resource (Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a designated National Historic Landmark); and nine historic structures located at the Central Facilities Area. Of the monitored resources, thirty-three were routinely monitored, and five were monitored to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations along with the effects of ongoing project activities. On six occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. In addition, two resources were visited more than once as part of the routine monitoring schedule or to monitor for additional damage. Throughout the year, most of the cultural resources monitored had no visual adverse changes resulting in Type 1determinations. However, Type 2 impacts were noted at eight sites, indicating that although impacts were noted or that a project was operating outside of culturally cleared limitations, cultural resources retained integrity and noted impacts did not threaten National Register eligibility. No new Type 3 or any Type 4 impacts that adversely impacted cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were observed at cultural resources monitored in 2013.

  15. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for Fiscal Year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA), the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks to be undertaken to keep the RL in compliance with federal statutes, regulations and guidelines. For fiscal year 1991 these tasks were to (1) ensure compliance with NHPA Section 106, (2) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (3) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (4) educate the public about cultural resources, (5) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (6) gather ethnohistorical data from Indian elders. Research conducted as a spinoff from these tasks is also reported. The archaeological site monitoring program is designed to determine whether the RL's cultural resource management and protection policies are effective; results are used in planning for cultural resource site management and protection. Forty-one sites were monitored during this fiscal year.

  16. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for Fiscal Year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA), the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks to be undertaken to keep the RL in compliance with federal statutes, regulations and guidelines. For fiscal year 1991 these tasks were to (1) ensure compliance with NHPA Section 106, (2) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (3) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (4) educate the public about cultural resources, (5) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (6) gather ethnohistorical data from Indian elders. Research conducted as a spinoff from these tasks is also reported. The archaeological site monitoring program is designed to determine whether the RL`s cultural resource management and protection policies are effective; results are used in planning for cultural resource site management and protection. Forty-one sites were monitored during this fiscal year.

  17. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for Fiscal Year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA), the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks to be undertaken to keep the RL in compliance with federal statutes, regulations and guidelines. For fiscal year 1991 these tasks were to (1) ensure compliance with NHPA Section 106, (2) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (3) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (4) educate the public about cultural resources, (5) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (6) gather ethnohistorical data from Indian elders. Research conducted as a spinoff from these tasks is also reported. The archaeological site monitoring program is designed to determine whether the RL`s cultural resource management and protection policies are effective; results are used in planning for cultural resource site management and protection. Forty-one sites were monitored during this fiscal year.

  18. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for Fiscal Year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA), the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks to be undertaken to keep the RL in compliance with federal statutes, regulations and guidelines. For fiscal year 1991 these tasks were to (1) ensure compliance with NHPA Section 106, (2) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (3) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (4) educate the public about cultural resources, (5) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (6) gather ethnohistorical data from Indian elders. Research conducted as a spinoff from these tasks is also reported. The archaeological site monitoring program is designed to determine whether the RL's cultural resource management and protection policies are effective; results are used in planning for cultural resource site management and protection. Forty-one sites were monitored during this fiscal year.

  19. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

    1991-11-01

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with federal statutes and regulations. This report summarizes activities of the HCRL during fiscal year (FY) 1990. The HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks. The task list guided cultural resources management activities during FY 1990 and is the outline for this report. In order, these tasks were to (1) conduct cultural resource reviews, (2) develop an archaeological resources protection plan, (3) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (4) plan a curation system for artifacts and records, (5) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (6) educate the public about cultural resources, (7) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (8) gather ethnohistorical data from Native American elders.

  20. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

    1991-11-01

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with federal statutes and regulations. This report summarizes activities of the HCRL during fiscal year (FY) 1990. The HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan (HCRMP) as a prioritized list of tasks. The task list guided cultural resources management activities during FY 1990 and is the outline for this report. In order, these tasks were to (1) conduct cultural resource reviews, (2) develop an archaeological resources protection plan, (3) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (4) plan a curation system for artifacts and records, (5) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (6) educate the public about cultural resources, (7) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands, and (8) gather ethnohistorical data from Native American elders.

  1. The image of the city cultural cognitive resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋婉

    2015-01-01

    the city is the cradle of civilization, is the accelerator of social development, is the crystallization of cultural evolution, is the life style of furnishings. The status of a city in history and their own cultural heritage, is a city's image of one of the most precious, most authoritative, the most famous and the most development value of historical culture resources.

  2. National hydroelectric power resources study. Preliminary inventory of hydropower resources. Volume 2. Pacific Southwest region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    The estimates of existing, incremental, and the undeveloped hydropower potential for all states in the various regions of the country are presented. In the Pacific Southwest region, the maximum physical potential for all sites exceeds 33,000 MW of capacity with an estimated average annual energy greater than 85,000 GWH. By comparison, these values represent about 6% of the total potential capacity and hydroelectric energy generation estimated for the entire US. Of the total capacity estimated for the region, 9900 MW has been installed. The remainder (23,200 MW) is the maximum which could be developed by upgrading and expanding existing projects (6000 MW) and by installing new hydroelectric power capacity at all potentially feasible, undeveloped sites (17,200 MW). Small-scale facilities account for less than 4% of the region's total installed capacity, but another 600 MW could be added to these and other small water resource projects. In addition, 600 MW could be installed at potentially feasible, undeveloped small-scale sites. The small-scale resource varies considerably, with the states of California and Utah having the largest potential for incremental development at existing projects in the Pacific Southwest region. States comprising the Southwest are Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, and Utah.

  3. National hydroelectric power resources study. Preliminary inventory of hydropower resources. Volume 6. Northeast region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    In the Northeast region, the physical potential for all sites exceeds 33,000 MW of capacity with an estimated average annual energy of some 153,000 GWH. By comparison, the available data represent about 6% of the total capacity and 11% of the hydroelectric energy potential estimated for the entire US. Of the total capacity estimated for the region, 6100 MW has been installed. The remainder (27,200 MW, excluding the undeveloped capacity in the New England States) is the maximum which could be developed by upgrading and expanding existing projects (18,700 MW), and by installing new hydroelectric power capacity at all potentially feasible, undeveloped sites (8500 MW). Small-scale facilities account for about 15% of the region's total installed capacity, but another 1800 MW could be added to these and other small water-resource projects. In addition, 500 MW could be installed at potentially feasible, undeveloped small-scale sites. The small-scale resource varies considerably, with the states of New York, Maine, and New Hampshire having the largest potential for incremental development at existing projects in the Northeast region. West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine comprise the Northeast region.

  4. National hydroelectric power resources study. Preliminary inventory of hydropower resources. Volume 5. Southeast region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    In the Southeast region, the maximum physical potential for all sites exceeds 48,000 MW with an estimated average annual energy of more than 137,000 GWH. By comparison, these values represent about 9% of both the total potential capacity and hydroelectric energy estimated for the entire US. Of the total capacity estimated for the region, 11,800 MW has been installed. The remainder (36,200 MW) is the maximum which could be developed by upgrading and expanding existing projects (13,000 MW), and by installing new hydroelectric power capacity at all potentially feasible, undeveloped sites (23,200 MW). Small-scale facilities account for some 2% of the region's total installed capacity, but another 700 MW could be added to these and other small water-resource projects. In addition, 1100 MW could be installed at potentially feasible, undeveloped small-scale sites. The small-scale resource varies considerably, with the states of North Carolina and South Carolina having the largest potential for incremental development at existing projects in the Southeast region. The Southeast region is composed of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia.

  5. National hydroelectric power resources study. Preliminary inventory of hydropower resources. Volume 4. Lake Central region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    The estimates of existing, incremental and the undeveloped hydropower potential for all states in the various regions of the country are presented. In the Lake Central region, the maximum physical potential for all sites exceeds 26,000 MW with an estimated average annual energy of more than 75,000 GWH. By comparison, these values represent about 5% of both the total potential capacity and hydroelectric energy estimated for the entire US. Of the total capacity estimated for the region, 2600 MW has been installed. The remainder (23,600 MW) is the maximum which could be developed by upgrading and expanding existing projects (15,800 MW), and by installing new hydroelectric power capacity at all potentially feasible, undeveloped sites (7800 MW). Small-scale facilities account for some 24% of the region's total installed capacity, but another 900 MW could be added to these and other small water-resource projects. In addition, 900 MW could be installed at potentially feasible, undeveloped small-scale sites. The small-scale resource varies considerably, with the states of Michigan and Wisconsin having the largest potential for incremental development at existing projects in the Lake Central region. This Lake Central region is composed of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, and Iowa.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2008 (FY 2008). Throughout the year, 45 cultural resource localities were revisited including: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, one butte, twenty-eight prehistoric archaeological sites, three historic homesteads, two historic stage stations, one historic canal construction camp, three historic trails, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, which is a designated National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2008 to assess project compliance with cultural resource recommendations, confirm the locations of previously recorded cultural resources in relation to project activities, to assess the damage caused by fire-fighting efforts, and to watch for cultural materials during ground disturbing activities. Although impacts were documented at a few locations, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed. Monitoring also demonstrated that INL projects generally remain in compliance with recommendations to protect cultural resources

  7. Cultural Resources, RecreationAreasESRI-This data set represents the recreational areas found in Utah, including campgrounds, golf courses and ski resorts., Published in 2001, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at Smaller than 1:100000 scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2001. It is...

  8. Tombs, tunnels, and terraces a cultural resources survey of a former ammunition supply point in Okinawa, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaaren, B. T.; Levenson, J. B.; Komine, G.

    2000-02-09

    U.S. forces serving at military bases on foreign soil are obligated to act as good stewards of the cultural and natural resources under their control. However, cultural resources management presents special challenges at U.S. bases in other countries where cultural properties laws differ in emphasis and detail from those in the United States and issues of land ownership and occupancy are not always clear. Where status of forces agreements (SOFAs) exist, environmental governing standards bridge the gap between U.S. and host nation cultural priorities. In Japan, the Department of Defense Japan Environmental Governing Standards (JEGS) fill this function. Under Criteria 12-4.2 and 12-4.3 of the JEGS, U.S. Forces Japan commit themselves to inventory and protect cultural properties found on the lands they control or use. Cultural properties include archaeological sites, tombs, historic buildings, and shrines. Natural monuments, such as landscape features or plant and animal species, may also be designated as cultural properties. As part of this commitment, in February 1999 a cultural resources inventory was conducted in Area 1, part of Kadena Air Base (AB), Okinawa, Japan. Area 1, the former U.S. army Ammunition Supply Point 1, is currently used primarily for training exercises and recreational paint ball.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton F. Marler; Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Brenda Ringe Pace

    2007-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human occupation in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The INL Cultural Resource Management Office, staffed by BEA professionals, is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office staff during Fiscal Year 2006. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  10. Colorado cultural resource survey: Management data form [5JA784

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document includes the survey forms necessary to assess cultural resources in Colorado. This document assesses the Lewis children graves (site # 5JA1478) on...

  11. Colorado cultural resource survey: Management data form [5JA784

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document includes the survey forms necessary to assess cultural resources in Colorado. This document assesses the Allard Ranch (site # 5JA784, temporary #...

  12. Integrating Chinese and African Culture into Human Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrating Chinese and African Culture into Human Resource Management Practice to ... Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa ... both economically and politically in her endeavour to foster international relationships.

  13. Culture fishery resources of the tropical marine ecosystems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    the generation of marine living resources through culture fisheries or mariculture or seafarming. Marine tropical ecosystems, with uniformly high temperature regime, support fast growth, prolonged breeding period and faster turn-over rates. Accordingly...

  14. Drainage investment and wetland loss: an analysis of the national resources inventory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Aaron J.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Soil Conservation Service (SCS) conducts a survey for the purpose of establishing an agricultural land use database. This survey is called the National Resources Inventory (NRI) database. The complex NRI land classification system, in conjunction with the quantitative information gathered by the survey, has numerous applications. The current paper uses the wetland area data gathered by the NRI in 1982 and 1987 to examine empirically the factors that generate wetland loss in the United States. The cross-section regression models listed here use the quantity of wetlands, the stock of drainage capital, the realty value of farmland and drainage costs to explain most of the cross-state variation in wetland loss rates. Wetlands preservation efforts by federal agencies assume that pecuniary economic factors play a decisive role in wetland drainage. The empirical models tested in the present paper validate this assumption.

  15. LiDAR Sampling Density for Forest Resource Inventories in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Etheridge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades there has been an abundance of research demonstrating the utility of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR for predicting forest biophysical/inventory variables at the plot and stand levels. However, to date there has been little effort to develop a set of protocols for data acquisition and processing that would move governments or the forest industry towards cost-effective implementation of this technology for strategic and tactical (i.e., operational forest resource inventories. The goal of this paper is to initiate this process by examining the significance of LiDAR data acquisition (i.e., point density for modeling forest inventory variables for the range of species and stand conditions representing much of Ontario, Canada. Field data for approximately 200 plots, sampling a broad range of forest types and conditions across Ontario, were collected for three study sites. Airborne LiDAR data, characterized by a mean density of 3.2 pulses m−2 were systematically decimated to produce additional datasets with densities of approximately 1.6 and 0.5 pulses m−2. Stepwise regression models, incorporating LiDAR height and density metrics, were developed for each of the three LiDAR datasets across a range of forest types to estimate the following forest inventory variables: (1 average height (R2(adj = 0.75–0.95; (2 top height (R2(adj = 0.74–0.98; (3 quadratic mean diameter (R2(adj = 0.55–0.85; (4 basal area (R2(adj = 0.22–0.93; (5 gross total volume (R2(adj = 0.42–0.94; (6 gross merchantable volume (R2(adj = 0.35–0.93; (7 total aboveground biomass (R2(adj = 0.23–0.93; and (8 stem density (R2(adj = 0.17–0.86. Aside from a few cases (i.e., average height and density for some stand types, no decimation effect was observed with respect to the precision of the prediction of the majority of forest variables, which suggests that a mean density of 0.5 pulses m−2 is sufficient for plot and stand level

  16. CULTURAL DIMENSIONS IN GLOBAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As enterprise operations continue to be globalized through overseas expansions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions as well as strategic relationships and partnerships transnational organizations need to give attention to issues of culture in human resource management practices as a panacea for prosperity. The global organization is competent if only it is able to bridge the gap between management and culture so that personal relationships with other peoples in the organization and society become in harmony. This is critical because cultural relativity and reality in organizations influence operations. The study was designed to explore possible relationships between cultural dimensions and global human resource management. The survey research design was employed and data generated through primary and secondary sources. The participants comprised of 385 respondents from a cross-section of the population in Nigeria. By Chi-Square test, it was found that culture has a significant positive relationship with global human resource management.

  17. INEEL Cultural Resource Management Program Annual Report - 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton F. Marler

    2005-01-01

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site is located in southeastern Idaho, and is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,000-year span of human occupation in the region. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these resources with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory, while also cleaning up the waste left by past programs and processes. The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has administrative responsibility for most of the Site, excluding lands and resources managed by the Naval Reactors Facility and (in 2004) Argonne National Laboratory-West. The Department of Energy is committed to a cultural resource program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative requirements. This annual report is an overview of Cultural Resource Management Program activities conducted during Fiscal Year 2004 and is intended to be both informative to external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the Site.

  18. Cultural Landscapes as a Methodology for Understanding Natural Resource Management Impacts in the Western United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Toupal

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Multicultural demands on public lands in the United States continue to challenge federal land managers to address social and cultural concerns in their planning efforts. Specifically, they lack adequate knowledge of cultural concerns, as well as a consistent strategy for acquiring that knowledge for use in decision-making. Current federal approaches to understanding such issues as access, use, and control of resources include public participation, conservation partnerships, government-to-government consultations with American Indian tribes, cultural resource inventories, and landscape analysis. Given that cultural knowledge arises from human-nature relationships and shared perceptions of natural environments, and that landscapes are the ultimate expression of such knowledge, an exploratory methodology was developed to provide a different approach to understanding cultural concerns through landscape perceptions. Using cultural landscape theories and applications from the natural and social sciences, this study examines the landscape perceptions of four groups concerned with management planning of the Baboquivari Wilderness Area in southern Arizona: the Bureau of Land Management, the landowners of the Altar Valley, recreationists, and members of the Tohono O'odham Nation. The methodology is based on a human-nature relationship rather than cultural aspects or features. It takes a holistic approach that differs from other perception studies in that it includes: emic aspects of data collection and analysis; a spatial component (triangulation of data collection through narrative and graphic descriptions; ethnographic, on-site interviews; and cultural consensus analysis and small-sample theory. The results include: verification of four cultural groups; two levels of consensus (in the population of concern, and in each group that overlap in some aspects of landscape perception; descriptions of four cultural landscapes that illustrate similarities and

  19. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggy Robinson

    2005-07-01

    This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

  20. NATIONWIDE NATURAL RESOURCE INVENTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES USING LIDAR: STRATEGIES, PROGRESS, AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Blanco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Philippines has embarked on a detailed nationwide natural resource inventory using LiDAR through the Phil-LiDAR 2 Program. This 3-year program has developed and has been implementing mapping methodologies and protocols to produce high-resolution maps of agricultural, forest, coastal marine, hydrological features, and renewable energy resources. The Program has adopted strategies on system and process development, capacity building and enhancement, and expanding the network of collaborations. These strategies include training programs (on point cloud and image processing, GIS, and field surveys, workshops, forums, and colloquiums (program-wide, cluster-based, and project-based, and collaboration with partner national government agencies and other organizations. In place is a cycle of training, implementation, and feedback in order to continually improve the system and processes. To date, the Program has achieved progress in the development of workflows and in rolling out products such as resource maps and GIS data layers, which are indispensable in planning and decision-making. Challenges remains in speeding up output production (including quality checks and in ensuring sustainability considering the short duration of the program. Enhancements in the workflows and protocols have been incorporated to address data quality and data availability issues. More trainings have been conducted for project staff hired to address human resource gaps. Collaborative arrangements with more partners are being established. To attain sustainability, the Program is developing and instituting a system of training, data updating and sharing, information utilization, and feedback. This requires collaboration and cooperation of the government agencies, LGUs, universities, other organizations, and the communities.

  1. Nationwide Natural Resource Inventory of the Philippines Using Lidar: Strategies, Progress, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, A. C.; Tamondong, A.; Perez, A. M.; Ang, M. R. C.; Paringit, E.; Alberto, R.; Alibuyog, N.; Aquino, D.; Ballado, A.; Garcia, P.; Japitana, M.; Ignacio, M. T.; Macandog, D.; Novero, A.; Otadoy, R. E.; Regis, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Silapan, J.; Villar, R.

    2016-06-01

    The Philippines has embarked on a detailed nationwide natural resource inventory using LiDAR through the Phil-LiDAR 2 Program. This 3-year program has developed and has been implementing mapping methodologies and protocols to produce high-resolution maps of agricultural, forest, coastal marine, hydrological features, and renewable energy resources. The Program has adopted strategies on system and process development, capacity building and enhancement, and expanding the network of collaborations. These strategies include training programs (on point cloud and image processing, GIS, and field surveys), workshops, forums, and colloquiums (program-wide, cluster-based, and project-based), and collaboration with partner national government agencies and other organizations. In place is a cycle of training, implementation, and feedback in order to continually improve the system and processes. To date, the Program has achieved progress in the development of workflows and in rolling out products such as resource maps and GIS data layers, which are indispensable in planning and decision-making. Challenges remains in speeding up output production (including quality checks) and in ensuring sustainability considering the short duration of the program. Enhancements in the workflows and protocols have been incorporated to address data quality and data availability issues. More trainings have been conducted for project staff hired to address human resource gaps. Collaborative arrangements with more partners are being established. To attain sustainability, the Program is developing and instituting a system of training, data updating and sharing, information utilization, and feedback. This requires collaboration and cooperation of the government agencies, LGUs, universities, other organizations, and the communities.

  2. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C.; Cadoret, N.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

    1990-06-01

    This report summarizes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) during fiscal year 1989. The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site, Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978. A major task in FY 1989 was completion and publication of the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan, which prioritizes tasks to be undertaken to bring the US Department of Energy -- Richland Operations into compliance with federal statutes, relations, and guidelines. During FY 1989, six tasks were performed. In order of priority, these were conducting 107 cultural resource reviews, monitoring the condition of 40 known prehistoric archaeological sites, assessing the condition of artifact collections from the Hanford Site, evaluating three sites and nominating two of those to the National Register of Historic Places, developing an education program and presenting 11 lectures to public organizations, and surveying approximately 1 mi{sup 2} of the Hanford Site for cultural resources. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Wright, M.K.; Crist, M.E.; Longenecker, J.G.; O`Neil, T.K.; Dawson, M.V.

    1993-06-01

    The Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established by the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office (RL) in 1987 as part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The HCRL provides support for managing the archaeological, historical, and cultural resources of the Hanford Site located in southcentral Washington, in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act Amended 1992 (NBPA), the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 (ARPA), the Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 (NAGPRA), and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 (AIRFA). The HCRL responsibilities have been set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan as a prioritized list of tasks to be undertaken to keep the RL in compliance with federal statutes, regulations, and guidelines. For FY 1992, these tasks were to (1) ensure compliance with NBPA Section 106, (2) monitor the condition of known archaeological sites, (3) evaluate cultural resources for potential nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, (4) educate the public about cultural resources, and (5) conduct a sample archaeological survey of Hanford lands. Research was also conducted as a spin-off of these tasks and is also reported here.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Annual Report FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Braun; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Clayton Marler; Brenda Pace

    2008-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500-year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office has legal responsibility for the management and protection of those resources and has delegated these responsibilities to its primary contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting the resources’ importance in local, regional, and national history. This annual report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2007. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be both informative to internal and external stakeholders, and to serve as a planning tool for future cultural resource management work to be conducted on the INL.

  5. INVENTORY CONTROL OF A MULTIPRODUCT SYSTEM WITH A LIMITED PRODUCTION RESOURCE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    INVENTORY CONTROL , MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING), (*MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION), (*MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL, MATHEMATICAL MODELS), OPERATIONS RESEARCH, DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING, COSTS, EQUATIONS

  6. Timber resource statistics for the Willow block, Susitna River Basin multiresource inventory unit, Alaska, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore S. Setzer; Bert R. Mead; Gary L. Carroll

    1984-01-01

    A multiresource inventory of the Willow block, Susitna River basin inventory unit, was conducted in 1978. Statistics on forest area, timber volumes, and growth and mortality from this inventory are presented. Timberland area is estimated at 230,200 acres and net growing stock volume, mostly birch, at 231.9 million cubic feet. Net annual growth of growing stock is...

  7. Timber resource statistics for the Upper Susitna block, Susitna River basin multiresource inventory unit, Alaska, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert R. Mead; Theodore S. Setzer; Gary L. Carroll

    1985-01-01

    A multiresource inventory of the Upper Susitna block, Susitna River basin inventory unit, was conducted in 1980. Statistics on forest area, timber volumes, and annual growth from this inventory are presented. Timberland area is estimated at 112,130 acres, and net growing stock volume, mostly hardwood, is 84.6 million cubic feet. Net annual growth of growing stock is...

  8. Timber resource statistics for the Beluga block, Susitna River basin multiresource inventory unit, Alaska, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary L. Carroll; Theodore S. Setzer; Bert R. Mead

    1985-01-01

    A multiresource inventory of the Beluga block, Susitna River basin inventory unit, was conducted in 1980. Statistics on forest area, timber volumes, and growth and mortality from this inventory are presented. Timberland area is estimated at 131,740 acres and net growing stock volume, mostly hardwood, is 99.4 million cubic feet. Net annual growth of growing stock is...

  9. Timber resource statistics for the Talkeetna block, Susitna River basin multiresource inventory unit, Alaska, 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore S. Setzer; Gary L. Carroll; Bert R. Mead

    1984-01-01

    A multiresource inventory of the Talkeetna block, Susitna River basin inventory unit, was conducted in 1979. Statistics on forest area, timber volumes, and growth and mortality from this inventory are presented. Timberland area is estimated at 562,105 acres and net growing stock volume, mostly hardwood, at 574.7 million cubic feet. Net annual growth of growing stock is...

  10. Cross-cultural examination of measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Jessica; Watters, Carolyn A; Yu, Stephanie Chee-Min; Bagby, R Michael; Ryder, Andrew G; Harkness, Kate L

    2015-03-01

    Given substantial rates of major depressive disorder among college and university students, as well as the growing cultural diversity on many campuses, establishing the cross-cultural validity of relevant assessment tools is important. In the current investigation, we examined the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) among Chinese-heritage (n = 933) and European-heritage (n = 933) undergraduates in North America. The investigation integrated 3 distinct lines of inquiry: (a) the literature on cultural variation in depressive symptom reporting between people of Chinese and Western heritage; (b) recent developments regarding the factor structure of the BDI-II; and (c) the application of advanced statistical techniques to the issue of cross-cultural measurement invariance. A bifactor model was found to represent the optimal factor structure of the BDI-II. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that the BDI-II had strong measurement invariance across both culture and gender. In group comparisons with latent and observed variables, Chinese-heritage students scored higher than European-heritage students on cognitive symptoms of depression. This finding deviates from the commonly held view that those of Chinese heritage somatize depression. These findings hold implications for the study and use of the BDI-II, highlight the value of advanced statistical techniques such as multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, and offer methodological lessons for cross-cultural psychopathology research more broadly.

  11. Analysis of Integration Mode of Human Resources Development and Cultural Ecology in Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peihong; Zhang Shiqi

    2012-01-01

    People and culture coexist and human resources development and regional cultural ecology integrate, The present thesis for the first time puts forward the integration mode of human resources development and cultural ecology, argues that personnel innovation should be attracted by motive injection, open culture, resources integration, culture dilution, thinking blending and people-orientation and discusses the transmission mechanism for functions of integration mode of human resources development and cultural ecology from the aspects of cultural values, living styles and cultural industry.

  12. Documentation and Cultural Heritage Inventories - Case of the Historic City of Ahmadabad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, K.

    2015-08-01

    Located in the western Indian state of Gujarat, the historic city of Ahmadabad is renowned for the unparalleled richness of its monumental architecture, traditional house form, community based settlement patterns, city structure, crafts and mercantile culture. This paper describes the process followed for documentation and development of comprehensive Heritage Inventories for the historic city with an aim of illustrating the Outstanding Universal Values of its Architectural and Urban Heritage. The exercise undertaken between 2011 & 2014 as part of the preparation of world heritage nomination dossier included thorough archival research, field surveys, mapping and preparation of inventories using a combination of traditional data procurement and presentation tools as well as creation of advanced digital database using GIS. The major challenges encountered were: need to adapt documentation methodology and survey formats to field conditions, changing and ever widening scope of work, corresponding changes in time frame, management of large quantities of data generated during the process along with difficulties in correlating existing databases procured from the local authority in varying formats. While the end result satisfied the primary aim, the full potential of Heritage Inventory as a protection and management tool will only be realised after its acceptance as the statutory list and its integration within the larger urban development plan to guide conservation, development and management strategy for the city. The rather detailed description of evolution of documentation process and the complexities involved is presented to understand the relevance of methods used in Ahmadabad and guide similar future efforts in the field.

  13. Inventário e patrimônio cultural no Brasil Inventory and cultural patrimony in the Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gilberto Ramos Nogueira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A desmaterialização do patrimônio cultural recolocou a necessidade dos inventários como instrumentos de reconhecimento da diversidade cultural e ponto de partida para as políticas públicas de patrimônio. Assim, refazer a trajetória de Mário de Andrade na constituição do Inventário dos Sentidos é buscar as origens da formulação de uma noção de patrimônio e de uma concepção de preservação que coloque o inventário no centro da prática preservacionista (principalmente quando se trata de patrimônio não tangível legitimando-o como instrumento de preservação em si e não apenas como ferramenta de gestão para bens já tombados. Signo das narrativas modernistas de construção da brasilidade, está em sua gênese, articulada às "viagens de (redescoberta do Brasil" (1924, 1927 e 19281929 e posteriormente objetivada nas ações do Departamento de Cultura de São Paulo (1935-1938.The dematerialization of cultural patrimony has brought back the necessity of inventories as tools for the recognition of cultural diversity and the starting point for public policies of patrimony. Thus, retracing the trajectory of Mario de Andrade in the constitution of the Inventory of the Senses means searching for the origins of the formulation of a notion of patrimony and of a conception of preservation which puts the inventory in the center of a preservation practice (especially with regards to non-tangible patrimony legitimizing it as a tool for preservation itself and not only as a managing tool for assets already registered. Signal of the modernist narrative of the construction of a "Brazilianness", it is in its genesis, articulated to the "re-discovery travels to Brazil (1924, 1927, and 1928/1929 and, later on, objectified in the actions of the Culture Bureau of São Paulo (1935-1938.

  14. Resources to maintain the academic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, B J

    1991-01-01

    In summary, the recent attention to the research aspect of our professorial lives brings with it some challenges. The first, of course, is to keep our research agendas alive--to find the resources to nuture new investigators and to provide the support to sustain those who are funded. The second challenge is to rethink our ideas about teaching so that both sides of the coin are addressed: the need to have classroom teachers who are doing research and the need to keep investigators in the classroom.

  15. The Hispanic Stress Inventory--Adolescent Version: a culturally informed psychosocial assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C; Fisher, Dennis G; Córdova, David; Napper, Lucy E

    2012-03-01

    A 2-phase study was conducted to develop a culturally informed measure of psychosocial stress for adolescents: the Hispanic Stress Inventory--Adolescent Version (HSI-A). Phase 1 involved item development through the collection of open-ended focus group interview data (n = 170) from a heterogeneous sample of Hispanic youths residing in the southwest and northeast United States. In Phase 2, we examined the psychometric properties of the HSI-A (n = 1,651), which involved the use of factor analytic procedures to determine the underlying scale structure of the HSI-A for foreign-born and U.S.-born participants in an aggregated analytic approach. An 8-factor solution was established, with factors that include Family Economic Stress, Acculturation-Gap Stress, Culture and Educational Stress, Immigration-Related Stress, Discrimination Stress, Family Immigration Stress, Community and Gang-Related Stress, and Family and Drug-Related Stress. Concurrent, related validity estimates were calculated to determine relations between HSI-A and other measures of child psychopathology and behavioral and emotional disturbances. HSI-A total stress appraisal scores were significantly correlated with both the Children's Depression Inventory and the Youth Self Report (p stress appraisal score reliability alpha at .92.

  16. Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory annual report for fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickens, P.R.; Wright, M.K.; Cadoret, N.A.; Dawson, M.V.; Harvey, D.W.; Simpson, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    The Hanford Site occupies 560 sq. miles of land along the Columbia River in SE Washington. The Hanford Reach of the river is one of the most archaeologically rich areas in the western Columbia Plateau. To manage the Hanford Site`s archaeological, historical, and cultural resources, the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) was established in 1987. HCRL ensures DOE complies with federal statutes, regulations, and guidelines. In FY 1994, HCRL conducted cultural resource reviews, conducted programs to identify and monitor historic and archaeological sites, etc. HCRL staff conducted 511 reviews, 29 of which required archaeological surveys and 10 of which required building documentation. Six prehistoric sites, 23 historic sites, one paleontological site, and two sites with historic and prehistoric components were discovered.

  17. Cultural Diversity Awareness Inventory = Inventario Sobre el Reconocimiento de Diversas Culturas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Gertrude B.

    This booklet features a checklist designed to help persons who are involved in providing direct services to culturally diverse, young special needs children to assess their attitudes, beliefs, and behavior toward these children. The booklet also contains suggestions and lists of print, film, and filmstrip resources for developing a school program…

  18. Natural resource inventories and management applications in the Great Basin. [Nevada vegetation and wildlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tueller, P. T.; Lorain, G.; Halvorson, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 resolution capabilities and repetitive coverage have allowed the acquisition of several statewide inventories of natural resource features not previously completed or that could not be completed in any other way. Familiarity with landform, tone, pattern and other converging factors, along with multidate imagery, has been required. Nevada's vegetation has been mapped from ERTS-1. Dynamic characteristics of the landscape have been studied. Sequential ERTS-1 imagery has proved its usefulness for mapping vegetation, following vegetation phenology changes, monitoring changes in lakes and reservoirs (including water quality), determining changes in surface mining use, making fire fuel estimates and determining potential hazard, mapping the distribution of rain and snow events, making range readiness determinations, monitoring marshland management practices and other uses. Feasibility has been determined, but details of incorporating the data in management systems awaits further research and development. The need is to accurately define the steps necessary to extract required or usable information from ERTS imagery and fit it into on-going management programs.

  19. Forest inventory with LiDAR and stereo DSM on Washington department of natural resources lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob L. Strunk; Peter J. Gould

    2015-01-01

    DNR’s forest inventory group has completed its first version of a new remote-sensing based forest inventory system covering 1.4 million acres of DNR forest lands. We use a combination of field plots, lidar, NAIP, and a NAIP-derived canopy surface DSM. Given that height drives many key inventory variables (e.g. height, volume, biomass, carbon), remote-sensing derived...

  20. Cultural dimensions in global human resource management: implications for Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-01-01

    As enterprise operations continue to be globalized through overseas expansions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions as well as strategic relationships and partnerships transnational organizations need to give attention to issues of culture in human resource management practices as a panacea for prosperity. The global organization is competent if only it is able to bridge the gap between management and culture so that personal relationships with other peoples in the organization and socie...

  1. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trettin, L.D. [Univ. of Tennessee (United States); Petrich, C.H.; Saulsbury, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., respectively, supplement the descriptions of these two areas with new information collected specifically for this study. Less detailed descriptions of additional study areas on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and the island of Hawaii are based on existing archaeological surveys.

  2. Constructing a Cross-Domain Resource Inventory: Key Components and Results of the EarthCube CINERGI Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, I.; Richard, S. M.; Malik, T.; Hsu, L.; Gupta, A.; Grethe, J. S.; Valentine, D. W., Jr.; Lehnert, K. A.; Bermudez, L. E.; Ozyurt, I. B.; Whitenack, T.; Schachne, A.; Giliarini, A.

    2015-12-01

    While many geoscience-related repositories and data discovery portals exist, finding information about available resources remains a pervasive problem, especially when searching across multiple domains and catalogs. Inconsistent and incomplete metadata descriptions, disparate access protocols and semantic differences across domains, and troves of unstructured or poorly structured information which is hard to discover and use are major hindrances toward discovery, while metadata compilation and curation remain manual and time-consuming. We report on methodology, main results and lessons learned from an ongoing effort to develop a geoscience-wide catalog of information resources, with consistent metadata descriptions, traceable provenance, and automated metadata enhancement. Developing such a catalog is the central goal of CINERGI (Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geoscience Interoperability), an EarthCube building block project (earthcube.org/group/cinergi). The key novel technical contributions of the projects include: a) development of a metadata enhancement pipeline and a set of document enhancers to automatically improve various aspects of metadata descriptions, including keyword assignment and definition of spatial extents; b) Community Resource Viewers: online applications for crowdsourcing community resource registry development, curation and search, and channeling metadata to the unified CINERGI inventory, c) metadata provenance, validation and annotation services, d) user interfaces for advanced resource discovery; and e) geoscience-wide ontology and machine learning to support automated semantic tagging and faceted search across domains. We demonstrate these CINERGI components in three types of user scenarios: (1) improving existing metadata descriptions maintained by government and academic data facilities, (2) supporting work of several EarthCube Research Coordination Network projects in assembling information resources for their domains

  3. The Mentoring Profile Inventory: An Online Professional Development Resource for Cooperating Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Anthony; Collins, John; Triggs, Valerie; Nielsen, Wendy; Augustine, Ann; Coulter, Dianne; Cunningham, Joni; Grigoriadis, Tina; Hardman, Stephanie; Hunter, Lee; Kinegal, Jane; Li, Bianca; Mah, Jeff; Mastin, Karen; Partridge, David; Pawer, Leonard; Rasoda,Sandy; Salbuvik, Kathleen; Ward, Mitch; White, Janet; Weil, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    We report on the origins, development and refinement of an online inventory to help cooperating teachers focus on selected dimensions of their practice. The Mentoring Profile Inventory (MPI) helps quantify important features of both the motivating and challenging aspects of mentoring student teachers and provides results to respondents in a…

  4. Cultural Health Capital on the margins: Cultural resources for navigating healthcare in communities with limited access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Erin Fanning

    2015-05-01

    Communities struggling with access to healthcare in the U.S. are often considered to be disadvantaged and lacking in resources. Yet, these communities develop and nurture valuable strategies for healthcare access that are underrecognized by health scholars. Combining medical sociology and critical race theory perspectives on cultural capital, this paper examines the health-relevant cultural resources, or Cultural Health Capital, in South Texas Mexican American border communities. Ethnographic data collected during 2011-2013 in Cameron and Hidalgo counties on the U.S.-Mexico border provide empirical evidence for expanding existing notions of health-relevant cultural capital. These Mexican American communities use a range of cultural resources to manage healthcare exclusion and negotiate care in alternative healthcare spaces like community clinics, flea markets and Mexican pharmacies. Navigational, social, familial, and linguistic skills and knowledge are used to access doctors and prescription drugs in these spaces despite social barriers to mainstream healthcare (e.g. cost, English language skills, etc.). Cultural capital used in marginalized communities to navigate limited healthcare options may not always fully counteract healthcare exclusion. Nevertheless, recognizing the cultural resources used in Mexican American communities to facilitate healthcare challenges deficit views and yields important findings for policymakers, healthcare providers, and advocates seeking to capitalize on community resources to improve healthcare access. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  6. Teaching Geographic Field Methods to Cultural Resource Management Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mires, Peter B.

    2004-01-01

    There are perhaps 10,000 technicians in the United States who work in the field known as cultural resource management (CRM). The typical field technician possesses a bachelor's degree in anthropology, geography, or a closely allied discipline. The author's experience has been that few CRM field technicians receive adequate undergraduate training…

  7. Multilingual Cultural Resources in Child-Headed Families in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazzi, Elizabeth; Kendrick, Maureen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study focusing on the use of multilingual cultural resources in child-headed households (CHHs) in Uganda's Rakai District. Using funds of knowledge and sociocultural perspectives on children's learning, we documented through ethnographic observations and interviews how children in four CHHs used multilingual…

  8. Multi-Cultural Resource Center Materials Handbook, Grades K-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Mary F.; Barrientos, Anita

    This annotated bibliography cites multicultural materials whose themes correlate with basic concepts taught in the primary grades. The items are in the Multi-Cultural Resource Center of the Toledo, Ohio public schools. The purpose of the bibliography is to help teachers integrate materials into their classroom. Films, filmstrips, books, study…

  9. Development and validation of the geriatric depression inventory in Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhijuan; Lv, Xiaozhen; Hu, Yongdong; Ma, Wanxin; Xie, Hengge; Lin, Kai; Yu, Xin; Wang, Huali

    2015-09-01

    Depression among older adults is under-recognized either in the community or in general hospitals in Chinese culture. This study aimed to develop a culturally appropriate screening instrument for late-life depression in the non-psychiatric settings and to test its reliability and validity for a diagnosis of depression. Using a Delphi method, we developed a geriatric depression inventory (GDI), consisting of 12 core symptoms of depressive disorder in old age. We investigated its reliability and validity on 89 patients with late-life depression and 249 non-depression controls. Both self-report (GDI-SR) and physician-interview (GDI-RI) versions were assessed. Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.843 for GDI-SR and 0.880 for GDI-RI. Both GDI-SR and GDI-RI showed good concurrent validity with the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) (GDI-SR: r = 0.750, p depression versus non-depression. Using a cut-off of three items endorsed, sensitivity and specificity were 92.1% and 81.9% for GDI-SR, and 93.3% and 87.1% for GDI-RI. The GDI, either based on self-report or rater interview, is a reliable and valid instrument for the detection of depression among older adults in non-psychiatric medical settings in Chinese culture.

  10. Proceedings for the DoD Cultural Resources Workshop: Prioritizing Cultural Resources Needs in Support of a Sound Investment Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Proceedings Appendix B: Agenda DoD Cultural Resources Workshop Seattle Marriot SEA-TAC Hotel 3201 South 176th Street, Seattle...Group 3: Management (Evergreen Salon I) Group 4: Knowledge Management (Washington Salon E) 1200 Lunch 1300 Load Buses for Field Tour Lobby of Hotel

  11. Natural Resource Program Center Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the National Wildlife Refuge System I present vision and objectives for regional inventory and monitoring initiative, staffing, planned activities and...

  12. Cultural Validity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Empirical Correlates: Is This the Best We Can Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jill S.; Robbins, Rockey R.; Pace, Terry M.

    2012-01-01

    This article critically reviews empirical correlates of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989), based on several validation studies conducted with different racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. A major critique of the reviewed MMPI-2 studies was focused on the use of…

  13. INL Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, Brenda Ringe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Christina Liegh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gilbert, Hollie Kae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Holmer, Marie Pilkington [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year (FY) 2015. Throughout the year, 67 total monitoring visits were completed, with several especially sensitive resources visited on more than one occasion. Overall, FY 2015 monitoring included surveillance of the following 49 individual cultural resource localities: three locations with human remains, one of which is also a cave; nine additional caves; twenty prehistoric archaeological sites; five historic archaeological sites; two historic trails; Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I), a National Historic Landmark; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) objects located at EBR-I; and eight Arco Naval Proving Ground (NPG) property types. Several INL work processes and projects were also monitored to confirm compliance with original INL CRM recommendations and assess the effects of ongoing work. On two occasions, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Power Burst Facility/Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (PBF/CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. Finally, the current location housing INL Archives and Special Collections was evaluated once. Most of the cultural resources monitored in FY 2015 exhibited no adverse impacts, resulting in Type 1 impact assessments. However, Type 2 impacts were noted 13 times. In one case, a portion of a historic trail was graded without prior review or coordination with the INL CRM Office, resulting in impacts to the surface of the trail and one archaeological site. Evidence of unauthorized artifact collection/ looting was also documented at three archaeological sites located along INL powerlines. Federal agents concluded a FY 2012 investigation by filing civil charges and levying fine under the Archaeological Resource Protection Act against one INL employee for this kind

  14. Penerapan Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP pada Sistem Pembelian, Penjualan dan Inventory Barang di Mini Market 7 Putra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Nofriandi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 7 Putra is one of the mini market located on the Pasar Sungai Sariak. Purchasing, sales, and inventory of goods on this market mini is done without using a computer. It can be seen from the process of buying new goods, the receipt of goods, payment to suppliers, inventories in storage, movement of goods, sales of goods and payments from customers. ll of the above processes suffer from the financial constraints and poorly controlled. Application development Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP in a mini-market 7 Putra to assist and facilitate the process of purchase, sales and inventory items. Implementation of ERP in 7 Putra done through several stages of the business process analysis, analysis of ERP selection, ERP implementation and ERP testing. In filming the analysis of business processes, use BPMN (Business Process Modeling Notation. The module used in this research is the main module purchase, sales, as well as items and inventory. Before the implementation of ERP. ERP selection was done according to the 7th Round. The results of the election analysis showed FrontAccounting application is an application that is suitable for 7 Putra. ERP implementation is done by using the application FrontAccounting. System testing is done to check and make sure it is appropriate and ERP applications can run as expected. The test is based on existing business processes in 7 Putra. Results of testing ERP accordance with existing reporting and business processes in the 7th Round

  15. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (ONWRC) describes current hydrologic information,...

  16. Inventory of endangered species and wildlife resources at the US Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1988 (NODC Accession 0000631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An inventory of endangered species and the wildlife resources at the US Army Kwajelein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Island were conducted from 30 October 1998 to...

  17. Endangered Species and Wildlife Resources Inventory Kwajalein Atoll, U.S. Army , Republic of the Marshall Islands 1996 (NODC Accession 0000251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report summarizes the results of the first Environmental Standards and Procedures (UES) inventory of endangered species and wildlife resources at United States...

  18. Carbon emissions and resources use by Chinese economy 2007: A 135-sector inventory and input-output embodiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, Z. M.

    2010-11-01

    A 135-sector inventory and embodiment analysis for carbon emissions and resources use by Chinese economy 2007 is presented in this paper by an ecological input-output modeling based on the physical entry scheme. Included emissions and resources belong to six categories as: (1) greenhouse gas (GHG) in terms of CO 2, CH 4, and N 2O; (2) energy in terms of coal, crude oil, natural gas, hydropower, nuclear power, and firewood; (3) water in terms of freshwater; (4) exergy in terms of coal, crude oil, natural gas, grain, bean, tuber, cotton, peanut, rapeseed, sesame, jute, sugarcane, sugar beet, tobacco, silkworm feed, tea, fruits, vegetables, wood, bamboo, pulp, meat, egg, milk, wool, aquatic products, iron ore, copper ore, bauxite, lead ore, zinc ore, pyrite, phosphorite, gypsum, cement, nuclear fuel, and hydropower; (5) and (6) solar and cosmic emergies in terms of sunlight, wind power, deep earth heat, chemical power of rain, geopotential power of rain, chemical power of stream, geopotential power of stream, wave power, geothermal power, tide power, topsoil loss, coal, crude oil, natural gas, ferrous metal ore, non-ferrous metal ore, non-metal ore, cement, and nuclear fuel. Accounted based on the embodied intensities are carbon emissions and resources use embodied in the final use as rural consumption, urban consumption, government consumption, gross fixed capital formation, change in inventories, and export, as well as in the international trade balance. The resulted database is basic to environmental account of carbon emissions and resources use at various levels.

  19. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  20. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  1. Omaha District Final Cultural Resource Site Monitoring Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Game , Fish, Parks and Recreation FINAL CULTURAL RESOURCES SITE MONITORING PLAN U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, OMAHA DISTRICT JUNE 2014 Page | 2...to collect routine monitoring data, which is uploaded into CR-DMS. Pathfinder Office is utilized for pre and post processing of data. Detailed...collecting. The data dictionary is created in Pathfinder office and transferred to the unit. The data dictionary is utilized to collect information

  2. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Material at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Williams

    2013-11-01

    properties is consistent with original missions related to nuclear reactor testing and is expected to result in no adverse effects to their historic significance. Cultural resource investigations also involved communication with representatives from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to characterize cultural resources of potential tribal concern. This report provides a summary of the cultural resources inventoried and assessed within the defined areas of potential effect for the resumption of transient testing at the INL. Based on these analyses, proposed activities would have no adverse effects on historic properties within the APEs that have been defined. Other archaeological resources and cultural resources of potential concern to the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and others that are located near the APEs are also discussed with regard to potential indirect impacts. The report concludes with general recommendations for measures to reduce impacts to all identified resources.

  3. Factors in the Effective Utilization of a LANDSAT Related Inventory in West Africa. [resource management in onchocerciasis-free Benin, Upper Volta, and Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive LANDSAT related resource inventory was performed in parts of Ghana, Benin, and Upper Volta to determine resource development potential in areas freed of the disease onchocerciasis. The ultimate success of the project lies in the effective use of the data by host country personnel in resource development projects. This requires project follow-through, adequate training of regional counterparts, and integration of the data into an easily used framework. Present levels of support systems and technical expertise in West Africa indicate that an automated system for natural resource data is not currently appropriate. Suggestions for the greater implementation of such inventories are explored.

  4. Cultural Resources, Maryland Heritage Areas - This data set consists of discrete geographic areas or regions with a distinctive sense of place embodied in their historic buildings, neighborhoods, traditions, and natural features., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Maryland Department of Planning.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2007. It is described as...

  5. Cultural Resources, The Maryland Historical Trust has created a vector layer of the Maryland Heritage Areas which are discrete geographic areas or regions with a distinctive sense of place embodied in their historic buildings, neighborhoods, traditions, and natural features., Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Maryland Historical Trust (SHPO)/Maryland Department of Planning.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2009. It is described as...

  6. Cultural Resources, The Maryland Historical Trust has created a vector layer of Maryland Target Investment Zones which are eligible for special project grants, loan assistance and tax incentives for active tourism use that are within Maryland Certified Heritage Areas., Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Maryland Historical Trust (SHPO)/Maryland Department of Planning.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2009. It is described as...

  7. caBIG® Spotlight - Inventory of Digital Information Resources for Researchers —

    Science.gov (United States)

    A living inventory has been created to provide the scientific, biomedical informatics and health IT communities with access to data from clinical research, biospecimens, in vivo images, molecular signatures, and population studies of multiple cancer types, as well as nanotechnology applications and reference information.

  8. North American Science Symposium: Toward a unified framework for inventorying and monitoring forest ecosystem resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celedonio Aguirre-Bravo; Carlos Rodriguez Franco

    1999-01-01

    The general objective of this Symposium was to build on the best science and technology available to assure that the data and information produced in future inventory and monitoring programs are comparable, quality assured, available, and adequate for their intended purposes, thereby providing a reliable framework for characterization, assessment, and management of...

  9. Wildland inventory and resource modeling for Douglas and Carson City Counties, Nevada, using LANDSAT and digital terrain data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, J. A.; Likens, W. C.; Thornhill, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of using LANDSAT satellite imagery to map and inventory pinyon-juniper desert forest types in Douglas and Carson City Counties, Nevada was demonstrated. Specific map and statistical products produced include land cover, mechanical operations capability, big game winter range habitat, fire hazard, and forest harvestability. The Nevada Division of Forestry determined that LANDSAT can produce a reliable and low-cost resource data. Added benefits become apparent when the data are linked to a geographical information system (GIS) containing existing ownership, planning, elevation, slope, and aspect information.

  10. The irrational beliefs inventory: cross-cultural comparisons between South African and previously published Dutch and American samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Marilize; Möller, André T; Steel, Henry R

    2004-12-01

    The Irrational Beliefs Inventory gives a measure of irrational beliefs, as postulated by Ellis's Rational Emotive Behavior therapy. Given the increasing cross-cultural use of psychometric scales, it is important to assess whether the psychometric properties of the inventory are consistent across cultures. In the present study cross-cultural applicability, in terms of internal consistency and independence of subscales, was investigated for an ad hoc sample of White (n= 100, M age = 21.3 yr., SD=4.0) and Black (n=82, M age=19.8 yr., SD=2.2) undergraduate South African university students. Cronbach coefficients alpha for the subscales and Pearson correlations between subscales for American and Dutch students, as reported by Bridges and Sanderman, were compared with those indices for the South African students. The magnitude and rank order of Cronbach alpha, as well as the correlations between subscales for the three groups showed strong similarities. Values of alpha for the Black South African students were lower in magnitude on all subscales than those for American, Dutch, and White South African samples, but intercorrelations between subscale scores were consistent. Findings in the present study are supportive of the cross-cultural applicability of the Irrational Beliefs Inventory to White South African students but not to South African Black students.

  11. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin C. Ryan; Ann Trinkle Jones; Cassandra L. Koerner; Kristine M. Lee

    2012-01-01

    This state-of-knowledge review provides a synthesis of the effects of fire on cultural resources, which can be used by fire managers, cultural resource (CR) specialists, and archaeologists to more effectively manage wildland vegetation, fuels, and fire. The goal of the volume is twofold: (1) to provide cultural resource/archaeological professionals and policy makers...

  12. From soil map to digital database: land resources inventories, SOTER and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkshoorn, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Readily accessible information of up-to-data geo-referenced land resources is being requested with increasing frequency. This demand comes not only from the traditional group of researchers on land resources, but also from others such as the environmentalists using land resource data for their model

  13. The Irrational Beliefs Inventory : cross cultural comparisons between American and Dutch samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridges, K.Robert; Sanderman, Robbert

    2002-01-01

    The 50-item Irrational Beliefs Inventory (IBI) was developed in the Netherlands for the assessment of irrational thinking. The IBI was derived from the Rational Behavior Inventory (RBI) and the Irrational Beliefs Test (IBT). The present study was designed to assess the applicability of the IBI in a

  14. 77 FR 52057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Inventory Completion in the Federal Register (75 FR 58433-58435, September 24, 2010). A recent re-inventory... remains from Iceberg Canyon near Lake Powell, San Juan County, UT. In the Federal Register (75 FR 58433... wood. In the Federal Register (75 FR 58433-58435, September 24, 2010), paragraph 23, sentences one...

  15. An inventory of natural resources harvested from national parks in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. van Wilgen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resource harvesting is permissible within South African protected areas under certain conditions as part of benefit sharing that seeks to strengthen relationships with communities living adjacent to parks. However, not all resource use is authorised and little is currently known about what is harvested, or the extent and impacts of harvesting in parks. This limits capacity to monitor and set the boundaries for such use. This paper provides a checklist of resources harvested within each of 19 national parks managed by South African National Parks. Data were gathered by means of a question-based survey of park staff. A database detailing the parks from which each resource was harvested and its purpose(s was compiled, representing the most comprehensive list of resources harvested from parks to date. A total of 382 harvested biological and abiotic resources (284 terrestrial and 98 aquatic, used for a wide range of purposes, were identified across parks. Many of the resources, especially animals (96%, were harvested destructively. The strongest motivation for harvest was subsistence, although most resources were also used for financial gain through informal business. Although current data are not sufficient to determine harvest sustainability for most resources, better data and increased awareness of resource use activities will enable future research to this end.Conservation implications: The checklist of harvested resources provides critical baseline data for parks, which will facilitate assessment of park-specific priorities for research, monitoring and management action.

  16. Cultural Politics and Transboundary Resource Governance in the Salish Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma S. Norman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the cultural politics of water governance through the analysis of a new governing body created by indigenous leaders in the Pacific Northwest of North America – The Coast Salish Aboriginal Council. This paper investigates how the administrative structures and physical boundaries of water governance are both socially constructed and politically mobilised. The key moments explored in this article are closely linked to the power dynamics constituted through postcolonial constructions of space. Inclusion of cultural politics of scale will, arguably, provide a more nuanced approach to the study of transboundary environmental governance. This has important implications for the study of natural resource management for indigenous communities, whose traditional homelands are often bifurcated by contemporary border constructions.

  17. Interdisciplinary applications and interpretations of ERTS data within the Susquehanna River Basin (resource inventory, land use, and pollution)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An interdisciplinary group at Penn State University is analyzing ERTS-1 data. The geographical area of interest is that of the Susquehanna River Basin in Pennsylvania. The objectives of the work have been to ascertain the usefulness of ERTS-1 data in the areas of natural resources and land use inventory, geology and hydrology, and environmental quality. Specific results include a study of land use in the Harrisburg area, discrimination between types of forest resources and vegetation, detection of previously unknown geologic faults and correlation of these with known mineral deposits and ground water, mapping of mine spoils in the anthracite region of eastern Pennsylvania, and mapping of strip mines and acid mine drainage in central Pennsylvania. Both photointerpretive techniques and automatic computer processing methods have been developed and used, separately and in a combined approach.

  18. Inventory parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a detailed overview of various parameters/factors involved in inventory analysis. It especially focuses on the assessment and modeling of basic inventory parameters, namely demand, procurement cost, cycle time, ordering cost, inventory carrying cost, inventory stock, stock out level, and stock out cost. In the context of economic lot size, it provides equations related to the optimum values. It also discusses why the optimum lot size and optimum total relevant cost are considered to be key decision variables, and uses numerous examples to explain each of these inventory parameters separately. Lastly, it provides detailed information on parameter estimation for different sectors/products. Written in a simple and lucid style, it offers a valuable resource for a broad readership, especially Master of Business Administration (MBA) students.

  19. Assessing local resources and culture before instituting quality improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, C Matthew

    2014-12-01

    The planning phases of quality improvement projects are commonly overlooked. Disorganized planning and implementation can escalate chaos, intensify resistance to change, and increase the likelihood of failure. Two important steps in the planning phase are (1) assessing local resources available to aid in the quality improvement project and (2) evaluating the culture in which the desired change is to be implemented. Assessing local resources includes identifying and engaging key stakeholders and evaluating if appropriate expertise is available for the scope of the project. This process also involves engaging informaticists and gathering available IT tools to plan and automate (to the extent possible) the data-gathering, analysis, and feedback steps. Culture in a department is influenced by the ability and willingness to manage resistance to change, build consensus, span boundaries between stakeholders, and become a learning organization. Allotting appropriate time to perform these preparatory steps will increase the odds of successfully performing a quality improvement project and implementing change. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for estuarine, benthic, and pelagic fish in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  1. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: NESTS (Nest Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for alcids, shorebirds, waterfowl, diving birds, pelagic birds, gulls and terns in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska....

  2. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for sea otters and walrus in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of...

  3. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for alcids, shorebirds, waterfowl, diving birds, pelagic birds, gulls and terns in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska....

  4. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for crabs and bivalves in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of...

  5. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for seals and sea lions in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Points in this data set represent locations of haulout and...

  6. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for seagrasses in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of seagrass...

  7. Aleutian Islands Coastal Resources Inventory and Environmental Sensitivity Maps: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent locations of...

  8. 76 FR 36150 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... assistance from the C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory and Dr. John Krigbaum, University of Florida... with the Archaic and Glades cultures of the area. The human remains are believed to be from the...

  9. National Wetlands Inventory Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland area features mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National Wetlands Inventory is a national program sponsored by the US Fish and...

  10. HHS Enterprise Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Enterprise Data Inventory (EDI) is the comprehensive inventory listing of agency data resources including public, restricted public, and non-public datasets.

  11. Approaches to natural resource inventory and analysis on the Oak Ridge Environmental Research Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchings, J. T.; Mann, L. K.; Joslin, D. J.; Bunnell, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The principal effort of the Department of Energy's Environmental Research Park program on the Oak Ridge Reservation is directed at identification and preservation of a diverse assortment of natural communities representative of the Appalachian region of East Tennessee. Designation of natural areas provides a degree of protection for unique plant and animal species. Concommitantly, establishment of research reference areas provides sites which will be used to evaluate changes brought about in similar natural communities as a result of activities related to energy-producing technologies. Agglomerative cluster analysis of 184 continuous forest inventory (CFI) plots on the Reservation initially was used to objectively define forest types. Thus, types identified by cluster analysis formed a basis for determining what forest elements were present and which were representative of the Appalachian region. Subsequently, cluster analysis similarly was used within these research areas to define the overstory, understory, and shrub structure of the particular forest community.

  12. Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Alzheimer's - resources Anorexia nervosa - resources Arthritis - resources Asthma and allergy - resources Autism - resources Blindness - resources BPH - resources Breastfeeding - resources Bulimia - resources Burns - resources Cancer - resources Cerebral ...

  13. Penerapan Sistem Informasi Penjualan dan Inventori HANDPHONE serta Aksesorisnya Menggunakan Enterprise Resource Planning(ERP (Studi Kasus : Toko Nahda Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aries Munandar AM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Saat ini proses bisnis yang berjalan di Toko Handphone Nahda Cell belum terkomputerisasi. Semua transaksi masih menggunakan blangko faktur. Laporan Penjualan dan Stok barang masih menggunakan pencatatan secara manual dibuku. Hal ini tentu akan berakibat terhadap pelayanan dan pembukuan yang tidak baik pada toko tersebut. Untuk itu diperlukan solusi agar permasalahan itu dapat diatasi. Salah satunya dengan penerapan sistem informasi menggunakan aplikasi Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP. Aplikasi ERP ini dapat dirancang sendiri dan dapat juga menggunakan aplikasi yang open source. Penerapan ERP pada Toko Nahda Cell menggunakan ERP yang bersifat Open Source Software (OSS. Tahapan yang dilakukan dalam penerapannya dimulai dengan studi pendahuluan, selanjutnya studi literatur digunakan untuk mencari landasan teori dan penelitian terdahulu tentang penerapan sistem ERP, mengidentifikasi proses bisnis inventory dan penjualan barang yang sedang berjalan kemudian membuatkan usulan sistem secara terkomputerisasi, yang digambarkan dengan menggunakan Business Process Model Notation (BPMN, serta penggambaran model kerja sistem yang akan diterapkan menggunakan use case diagram. Kemudian tahapan selanjutnya adalah melakukan analisis pemilihan Aplikasi ERP OSS, penerapan aplikasi dan pengujian aplikasi. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa aplikasi ERP OSS yang dipilih dapat memberikan solusi terhadap permasalahan yang dihadapi toko Handphone Nahda Cell.Keyword: Sistem Informasi, ERP, Penjualan, Inventori, BPMN.

  14. Improving Crop Classification Techniques Using Optical Remote Sensing Imagery, High-Resolution Agriculture Resource Inventory Shapefiles and Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnychuk, A. L.; Berg, A. A.; Sweeney, S.

    2010-12-01

    Recognition of anthropogenic effects of land use management practices on bodies of water is important for remediating and preventing eutrophication. In the case of Lake Simcoe, Ontario the main surrounding landuse is agriculture. To better manage the nutrient flow into the lake, knowledge of the management of the agricultural land is important. For this basin, a comprehensive agricultural resource inventory is required for assessment of policy and for input into water quality management and assessment tools. Supervised decision tree classification schemes, used in many previous applications, have yielded reliable classifications in agricultural land-use systems. However, when using these classification techniques the user is confronted with numerous data sources. In this study we use a large inventory of optical satellite image products (Landsat, AWiFS, SPOT and MODIS) and ancillary data sources (temporal MODIS-NDVI product signatures, digital elevation models and soil maps) at various spatial and temporal resolutions in a decision tree classification scheme. The sensitivity of the classification accuracy to various products is assessed to identify optimal data sources for classifying crop systems.

  15. All things weird and scary: Nanotechnology, theology and cultural resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Kearnes, Matthew B.; Macnaghten, Phil M.

    2009-01-01

    -scale drivers behind the technology, we argue that the church-going group have a specific set of cultural resources with which to articulate responses to these. Using a language of spirituality and relationality these participants are able to express shared notions of what nanotechnology threatens (and promises......Nanotechnology is widely suggested to be fast becoming a defining technology of the twenty-first century. This 'science of the very small' has applications in areas from medicine to materials, and is predicted to have profound effects on social life. In this paper, we draw on a study of lay people......'s reflections on the ethics of nanotechnologies to focus on the talk of one group of participants, from a UK church. While we identify key themes which are common across all participants, including nanotechnology as a threat to the human, the importance of individual autonomy, and distrust of the large...

  16. NASA Remote Sensing Applications for Archaeology and Cultural Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Mission Directorate recently completed the deployment of the Earth Observation System (EOS) which is a coordinated series of polar-orbiting and low inclination satellites for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. One of the many applications derived from EOS is the advancement of archaeological research and applications. Using satellites, manned and unmanned airborne platform, NASA scientists and their partners have conducted archaeological research using both active and passive sensors. The NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) located in south Mississippi, near New Orleans, has been a leader in space archaeology since the mid-1970s. Remote sensing is useful in a wide range of archaeological research applications from landscape classification and predictive modeling to site discovery and mapping. Remote sensing technology and image analysis are currently undergoing a profound shift in emphasis from broad classification to detection, identification and condition of specific materials, both organic and inorganic. In the last few years, remote sensing platforms have grown increasingly capable and sophisticated. Sensors currently in use, including commercial instruments, offer significantly improved spatial and spectral resolutions. Paired with new techniques of image analysis, this technology provides for the direct detection of archaeological sites. As in all archaeological research, the application of remote sensing to archaeology requires a priori development of specific research designs and objectives. Initially targeted at broad archaeological issues, NASA space archaeology has progressed toward developing practical applications for cultural resources management (CRM). These efforts culminated with the Biloxi Workshop held by NASA and the University of Mississippi in 2002. The workshop and resulting publication specifically address the requirements of cultural resource managers through

  17. NASA Remote Sensing Applications for Archaeology and Cultural Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Mission Directorate recently completed the deployment of the Earth Observation System (EOS) which is a coordinated series of polar-orbiting and low inclination satellites for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. One of the many applications derived from EOS is the advancement of archaeological research and applications. Using satellites, manned and unmanned airborne platform, NASA scientists and their partners have conducted archaeological research using both active and passive sensors. The NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) located in south Mississippi, near New Orleans, has been a leader in space archaeology since the mid-1970s. Remote sensing is useful in a wide range of archaeological research applications from landscape classification and predictive modeling to site discovery and mapping. Remote sensing technology and image analysis are currently undergoing a profound shift in emphasis from broad classification to detection, identification and condition of specific materials, both organic and inorganic. In the last few years, remote sensing platforms have grown increasingly capable and sophisticated. Sensors currently in use, including commercial instruments, offer significantly improved spatial and spectral resolutions. Paired with new techniques of image analysis, this technology provides for the direct detection of archaeological sites. As in all archaeological research, the application of remote sensing to archaeology requires a priori development of specific research designs and objectives. Initially targeted at broad archaeological issues, NASA space archaeology has progressed toward developing practical applications for cultural resources management (CRM). These efforts culminated with the Biloxi Workshop held by NASA and the University of Mississippi in 2002. The workshop and resulting publication specifically address the requirements of cultural resource managers through

  18. Literature as cultural resource for outlining new touristic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Martino Alba

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The German poet writer, born in Prague, Rainer Maria Rilke, was an authentic homo viator throughout his life, always in search of propitious creative spaces. His long stays in Paris, his many journeys to Italy since his childhood, and his occasional residence in Spain to see in person the landscapes painted by El Greco, have left in his poetic and narrative work an imprint and a patina that, as readers and travelers, we can continue both through the pages and the urban and landscape environments written by Rilke. These literary routes constitute, at the same time, a relevant cultural resource for the creation of new tourist products supported in his poetic tracks. Consequently, in our article we defend the idea that the tourist manager, with a deep humanistic education, will be more imaginative and creative when launching new tourist products based on the resources offered by the perception of literary authors in their travels. We have focused our attention especially on the impressions and literary inspirations of the countries of southern Europe by a Central European author whose literary success is still alive ninety years after his death.

  19. 78 FR 56649 - Information Collection; Volunteer Application and Agreement for Natural and Cultural Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... Application and Agreement for Natural and Cultural Resources Agencies. This Information Collection Request... information is needed by participating natural resources agencies to manage agency volunteer programs... Forest Service Information Collection; Volunteer Application and Agreement for Natural and...

  20. Cross-Cultural Invariance of the Academic Expectations Stress Inventory: Adolescent Samples from Canada and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Rebecca P.; Klassen, Robert M.; Chong, Wan Har; Huan, Vivien S.; Wong, Isabella Y. F.; Yeo, Lay See; Krawchuk, Lindsey L.

    2009-01-01

    We provide further evidence for the two-factor structure of the 9-item Academic Expectations Stress Inventory (AESI) using confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of 289 Canadian adolescents and 310 Singaporean adolescents. Examination of measurement invariance tests the assumption that the model underlying a set of scores is directly comparable…

  1. An inventory of VHA emergency departments' resources and processes for caring for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Kristina M; Zephyrin, Laurie C; Kessler, Chad S; Mallard, Meri; Canelo, Ismelda; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2013-07-01

    More women are using Veterans' Health Administration (VHA) Emergency Departments (EDs), yet VHA ED capacities to meet the needs of women are unknown. We assessed VHA ED resources and processes for conditions specific to, or more common in, women Veterans. Cross-sectional questionnaire of the census of VHA ED directors Resources and processes in place for gynecologic, obstetric, sexual assault and mental health care, as well as patient privacy features, stratified by ED characteristics. All 120 VHA EDs completed the questionnaire. Approximately nine out of ten EDs reported having gynecologic examination tables within their EDs, 24/7 access to specula, and Gonorrhea/Chlamydia DNA probes. All EDs reported 24/7 access to pregnancy testing. Fewer than two-fifths of EDs reported having radiologist review of pelvic ultrasound images available 24/7; one-third reported having emergent consultations from gynecologists available 24/7. Written transfer policies specific to gynecologic and obstetric emergencies were reported as available in fewer than half of EDs. Most EDs reported having emergency contraception 24/7; however, only approximately half reported having Rho(D) Immunoglobulin available 24/7. Templated triage notes and standing orders relevant to gynecologic conditions were reported as uncommon. Consistent with VHA policy, most EDs reported obtaining care for victims of sexual assault by transferring them to another institution. Most EDs reported having some access to private medical and mental health rooms. Resources and processes were found to be more available in EDs with more encounters by women, more ED staffed beds, and that were located in more complex facilities in metropolitan areas. Although most VHA EDs have resources and processes needed for delivering emergency care to women Veterans, some gaps exist. Studies in non-VA EDs are required for comparison. Creative solutions are needed to ensure that women presenting to VHA EDs receive efficient, timely, and

  2. Cultural Reproduction, Cultural Mobility, Cultural Resources, or Trivial Effect? A Comparative Approach to Cultural Capital and Educational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Hampden-Thompson, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    We assess explanations for the associations between cultural capital (especially cultural activities and cultural possessions) and educational performance of schooled adolescents in 22 Western industrialized countries based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). We further ascertain variations in the effect of…

  3. An Empirical Study on the Impact of Cultural Types on Resources Integration Model

    OpenAIRE

    Solvang, Wei Deng; Zhan, Yan; Lu, Jiansha

    2012-01-01

    From the perspective of Resource-based Theory (RBT), organizational culture can be a source of sustained competitive advantage. And resources integration models, divided by property rights of resource, not firm boundary, as internal and external resources integration models, are presented as being specific in different cultural contexts. However, the litera- ture review shows the absences of an integrated framework, which can help to highlight the different role that con- text-specific facets...

  4. North Cascades National Park Service Complex Natural Resource Preservation Program Amphibian Inventory Big Beaver Watershed 1996 - Progress Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The 1996 amphibian inventory in North Cascades National Park Service Complex Big Beaver watershed is part of a four year program to inventory amphibians in Pacific...

  5. The Cross-Cultural Interaction Inventory: Development of Overseas Criterion Measures and Items That Differentiate Between Successful and Unsuccessful Adjusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    for field test implementation: (1) Bafa Bafa : A cross-cultural simulation, (2) Greek Language Games and Aids, (3) Japanese Contact and Communica- tion...of the Military Testing Association, in Press; (4) A Cross-Cultural Simulation, Ccumuni- que, December 1973, (5) BAFA BAJA, a communication exercise...lection decisions. It could also be used by Human Resource Management Centers as a personal feedback instrument. 161 REFERENCES Bafa Bafa , a

  6. Adaptação transcultural e consistência interna do Early Trauma Inventory (ETI Early Trauma Inventory (ETI: cross-cultural adaptation and internal consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Feijó de Mello

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As experiências traumáticas precoces são um fator de risco preditivo de problemas psicopatológicos futuros. O Early Trauma Inventory (ETI é um instrumento que avalia em indivíduos adultos experiências traumáticas ocorridas antes dos 18 anos de idade. Tal instrumento foi traduzido, transculturalmente adaptado e sua consistência interna foi avaliada. Vítimas de violência que preencheram os critérios de inclusão e exclusão foram submetidas a uma entrevista diagnóstica (SCID-I e ao ETI. Foram incluídos 91 pacientes com o transtorno do estresse pós-traumático (TEPT. O alfa de Cronbach nos diferentes domínios variou de 0,595-0,793, e o escore total foi de 0,878. A maior parte dos itens nos vários domínios, com exceção do abuso emocional, apresentou índices de correlação interitem entre 0,51-0,99. A versão adaptada foi útil tanto na clínica quanto na pesquisa. Apresentou boa consistência interna e na correlação interitem. O ETI é um instrumento válido, com boa consistência para se avaliar a presença de história de traumas precoces em indivíduos adultos.Early life stress is a strong predictor of future psychopathology during adulthood. The Early Trauma Inventory (ETI was developed to detect the presence and impact of traumatic experiences that occurred up to 18 years of age. The ETI was translated and cross-culturally adapted and had its consistency evaluated. Victims of violence that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were submitted to SCID-I and ETI. Ninety-one patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD were included. Cronbach's alpha in the different domains varied from 0.595 to 0.793, and the total score was 0.878. Except for emotional abuse, most of the various domains displayed inter-item correlation rates of 0.51 to 0.99. The adapted version was useful for clinical and research purposes and showed good internal consistency and inter-item correlation. The ETI is a valid instrument with good

  7. National Wetlands Inventory Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear wetland features (including selected streams, ditches, and narrow wetland bodies) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National...

  8. Testing the committee approach to translating measures across cultures: Translating primary communication inventory from English to Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Ryoko; Driessnack, Martha

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the initial translation process and follow-up psychometric evaluation of the Japanese version of the Primary Communication Inventory (J-PCI). The J-PCI was developed using the committee approach to translation and then used in a study exploring Japanese couples' communication satisfaction while separated during Satogaeri Bunben - a Japanese perinatal tradition. The committee approach attends to cultural nuance and context and is especially useful when languages have dissimilar linguistic roots and cultures, such as Japanese and English. The translation process and evaluation included five steps; (i) selection of the original PCI for research; (ii) selection of translators; (iii) development of the J-PCI using a committee approach; (iv) an initial small pilot study; and (v) a larger follow-up study. The J-PCI has good initial validity and reliability, although some nuances were observed in scoring.

  9. Summarising the National Inventory of South Africa for the Public and its Application in Heritage Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlungwana, N.; Jackson, C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper will focus on the national inventory of South Africa and application in heritage management. The South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) is mandated to compile and maintain an inventory of the national estate, defined as heritage resources of cultural and other significance as per Sections 3 and 39 of the National Heritage Resources Act. No.25 of 1999. This inventory is presented in a form of a database facilitated through the South African Heritage Resources Information System (SAHRIS). SAHRA is also mandated to produce a summary and analysis of this inventory of the national estate at regular intervals as per Section 39(7) of the NHRA. This inventory and its subsequent publication facilitate accountability for the institution, access to the data by the public as well as public awareness. The national inventory is populated through numerous digitisation projects by various heritage institutions namely museums, galleries, Provincial Heritage Resources Authorities (PHRA's) and the public at large.

  10. 75 FR 14461 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... funerary object in the possession of the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon... Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology professional staff in... Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology, it is likely that these are from...

  11. Strategizing for the Future: Evolving Cultural Resource Centers in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Yen Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cultural resource centers have been an ongoing and integral component to creating a more welcoming campus climate for Students of Color since its establishment in the 1960s. While the racial dynamics may have changed, many of the challenges Students of Color faced on predominantly White campuses have not. Interestingly, cultural resource centers…

  12. A Primary Exploration on the Systemization of Information of the Cultural Resources of Bulang Ethnic Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Caiwen; LIANG Rui

    2014-01-01

    In recent years , following the rap-id social and economic development and the impact of globalization , the traditional modes of production and lifestyle of the minorities on the border of Yun-nan have undergone unprecedented changes .Many non -renewable ethnic traditional cultural re-sources are decreasing or in danger of disappea-ring , especially among ethnic minorities with small populations .The situation of their traditional cul-ture is much more serious than other minorities . How to strengthen the protection and transmission of the cultures of ethnic minorities with small popu-lations has already become a hot topic in academic circles.Taking the Bulang as an example , a mi-nority with a small population in Yunnan , this arti-cle discusses the approaches and methods of pro-tection and transmission of the Bulang ’ s ethnic culture by using modern technology to systematize information resource management ” , so as to pro-vide a framework for the digitization of the ethnic minorities’ cultural resource . The Bulang are one of the 15 unique ethnic minorities in Yunnan , and are also a cross -border minority with a small population .The digital re-sources of Bulang ’ s cultural heritage can be di-vided into two categories:The first category is ma-terial culture and tangible cultural heritage .This mainly includes:1 ) historical sites;and 2 ) secu-lar architecture .The second category is oral and intangible cultural heritage .It mainly includes:1) language and words; 2 ) folk costume; 3 ) folk songs and dances;4 ) folk literature;5 ) religious culture;6 ) traditional technologies ; 7 ) folklore and festivals ;and 8) folk medicine. Different from “hard” resources, such as nat-ural resource and economic resource , ethnic cul-tural resources are a kind of “soft” resource which is difficult to quantify or assess .It depends on the people’ s subjective assessment .In addition, we should notice two issues related to the digitization of ethnic cultural

  13. The Resource Identification Initiative: A cultural shift in publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brush, Matthew; Grethe, Jeffery S; Haendel, Melissa A; Kennedy, David N; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R; Martone, Maryann E; Pols, Maaike; Tan, Serena S; Washington, Nicole; Zudilova-Seinstra, Elena; Vasilevsky, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to identify the exact resources that are reported or to answer basic questions such as “How did other studies use resource X?” To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and scientific reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25 biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (i.e. software and databases). RRIDs are assigned by an authoritative database, for example a model organism database, for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal (http://scicrunch.org/resources). RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40 with RRIDs appearing in 62 different journals to date. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are able to identify resources and are supportive of the goals of the project. Identifiability of the resources post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three resource types, suggesting that the project has had a significant

  14. The Phil-Lidar 2 Program: National Resource Inventory of the Philippines Using LIDAR and Other Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, A. C.; Tamondong, A. M.; Perez, A. M. C.; Ang, M. R. C. O.; Paringit, E. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Philippines embarked on a nationwide mapping endeavour through the Disaster Risk and Exposure Assessment for Mitigation (DREAM) Program of the University of the Philippines and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST). The derived accurate digital terrain models (DTMs) are used in flood models to generate risk maps and early warning system. With the availability of LiDAR data sets, the Phil-LiDAR 2 program was conceptualized as complementary to existing programs of various national government agencies and to assist local government units. Phil-LiDAR 2 aims to provide an updated natural resource inventory as detailed as possible using LiDAR point clouds, LiDAR derivative products, orthoimages and other RS data. The program assesses the following natural resources over a period of three years from July 2014: agricultural, forest, coastal, water, and renewable energy. To date, methodologies for extracting features from LiDAR data sets have been developed. The methodologies are based on a combination of object-based image analysis, pixel-based image analysis, optimization of feature selection and parameter values, and field surveys. One of the features of the Phil-LiDAR 2 program is the involvement of fifteen (15) universities throughout the country. Most of these do not have prior experience in remote sensing and mapping. With such, the program has embarked on a massive training and mentoring program. The program is producing more than 200 young RS specialists who are protecting the environment through RS and other geospatial technologies. This paper presents the program, the methodologies so far developed, and the sample outputs.

  15. Cultural Security: The Notion, Resources and the Instruments of Implimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Goloborod’ko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the description of some components for cognitive- methodological construct considered in the context of state culture policy tools as factor of strengthening of cultural security in the system of national security of the modern Russia. The construct presents the possibilities to accumulate through state cultural policytools a powerful protecting potential of culture in Russia in social formation and strengthening of the state viability. 

  16. THE INTEGRATION OF CULTURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN DISASTER MANAGEMENT AT SPECIAL REGION PROVINCE OF YOGYAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deffi Ayu Puspito Sari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Indonesia Law number 24 year 2007 on disaster emphasizes that the protection of national assets is in line with Law No. 11 year 2010 on the cultural heritage. Yogyakarta Province has 12 disaster hazards and has five complete archaeological cultural layers in Indonesia. In the event of a disaster, potential damage to the cultural heritage is exposed. The archaeological cultural layer consists of prehistoric, classical, Islamic and colonial. The lack of research related to cultural heritage in the province resulting in increasing vulnerability of cultural heritage and society. Using qualitative method with in-depth interview, the aim of this study is to analyse the management of cultural heritage from the perspective of disaster management. Archaeological cultural layers that embedded into the realm of cultural heritage is defined as a national asset that should be protected. The result shows that the management of cultural resources in the province is not yet integrated with disaster management. However, the results of the archaeological identification of cultural heritage in each cultural layer in Yogyakarta showed the development of community adaptation to the disaster. Utilization of cultural heritage as an element of the panca gatra has been impartial that affected the regional resilience and security in facing the disaster. Both of these problems can be overcome by integrating the cultural resources management and disaster management, the establishment of an emergency response team on cultural preservation, and disaster risk analysis on cultural heritage that annexed by BPBD and Cultural Office of Yogyakarta Province.

  17. MULTIFACETED APPROACH TO NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: ETHNOLOGY, GEOGRAPHY, CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Slipenchuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the issue of interaction between man and nature is one of the most pressing challenges. One of the aspects of this interaction, as well as one of the prior scientific directions and use of natural resources, is natural resource management. A limited amount of many resources and the limits of environmental capacity of nature raise questions of equity to the interests of different generations, which implies the need to decide on the optimal use of natural resource potential of territories currently and in the future. The complex nature of the relationships that form the structure of resources management as a complex system, dictates the need for a comprehensive approach to its study. System analysis is this type of approach. It allows holding studies of the functions of resources management and identifying problems to its development.

  18. A Cultural Resource Inventory of Portions of Lake Oahe, Corson County, South Dakota. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    wheatgrass, saltgrass (Distichlis spicata ) and foxtail barley (Hordeum jam) and some shrubs Include long-leaf sage (Artemisia longlifolia) and brush...Helianthus tuberosus), field mint ( Mentha arvensis), docks (Rumex spp.) and T1T ice (Gl crrhlza lepldota.-Wet meadows extend along tributary streams

  19. Archaeological and Historic Cultural Resources Inventory for a Flood Control Project at Halstad, Norman County, Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-21

    Each year the seven tribes gathered in council ( Woolworth , A. 1970; Keating 1959). By the end of the 17th century, a segment of the Mdewakanton were...Pembina) because of flooding ( Woolworth , N. 1975; Lee 1897). The St. Joseph/Pembina posts soon became important cogs in the Fort Garry to St. Paul...Smithsonian Contribution to Anthropology, #15. Washington, D.C. Woolworth , Alan R. 1970 Ethnohistorical Report on the Indian Occupancy of Royce

  20. Cultural Resources Inventory of the Montz Freshwater Diversion Project Corridor, St. Charles Parish, Louisiana. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-23

    Ulmus) , and pecan ( Carya illinoensis ) may occur at higher elevations, Predominant understory vegetation includes poison ivy, grape and trumpet...suggests that the trees surrounding the cemetery were not planted; all of the species identified, including pecan trees ( Carya illinoensis ), occur

  1. Cultural Resources Inventory of the Bonnet Carre’ Spillway, Saint Charles Parish, Louisiana. Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-17

    0es 73 ] 0 1 0 0 4" 0 A ug e r T1 7 0 ’ e e 𔃺 1 Item4o8tor 4n0," Figure 19. Plan view of item 4C, showing the location of Dutch auger test holes along...drainage. 73 TEST 3 TEST 6 TEST 18 0- - 1OYR 312 Very dark grayish brown silty IbYR /3 Dark loambrown lyy loam 2.Y 512 Grayish brown silty loam spoil... SONNET CARRE Koem 4, Area 0 Dutch auger test 03 Figure 22. Auger test profile, Item 4D, Test 3. 76 of the guide levee, downriver from Item 4D, Bayou

  2. Inventory and Evaluation of Cultural Resources, Bolsa Chica Mesa and Huntington Beach Mesa, Orange County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-30

    1615 Relacl6n de la Jornada que Hizo el General Sevastian Vizcayno al Descubrimiento de las Californias el Aho de 1602 por Mandado del Segor...California Press, Berkeley. Prosch, R. R. 1978 Catalog of Fossil Hominids of North America . Fischer. New York and Stu’tf-ar t.7 Ricketts, E. F., J

  3. Cultural Resource Inventory and Evaluation of Rock Island Arsenal, Rock Island, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    villages, which supplied us with strawberries, blackberries, gooseberries, plums, apples, and nuts of different kinds. . .4 (1882). After the War of...stone. SHORELINE SURVEY (Fig. 25) Materials from the Fort Armstrong area comprised two clear- glazed , white-pasted earthenware sherds, one lead- glazed ...color-pasted stoneware (crockery) sherd, one lead- glazed , color-pasted earthenware sherd, one machine-made glass bottle base, three miscellaneous

  4. A Cultural Resources Inventory of the Pearl River Basin, Louisiana and Mississippi. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    available. Small parties of women, young people, or adult men would spend 2 to 3 weeks at shellfish collecting, hunting, or gathering camps at various times...examples; that is, that the men were hunters and the gathering of plants could have been an activity of women, young chil-dren and aged persons. Most...illness (Ibid:335-336).. As his health improved, he began to explore Mr. Rumsey’s property. His decription of the island is presented below (Bartram

  5. A Cultural Resources Inventory of the Pearl River Basin, Louisiana and Mississippi. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    Frank (phone and correspondence) 2406 Norben Drive Lake Charles, LA 70601 Dr. Nollie W. Hickman (phone) Professor of History (Retired) 1304 Spencer Monroe...the 1820 Census of Pike County are included. This book is illustrated. COTTERILL, ROBERT SPENCER 1922 The Beginnings of Railroads in the Southwest...None of the information in this article is referenced. POUNCEY, BRENDA J. 1970 Ancient Earthwork Fortification in Hancock County Saved by Collective

  6. Cultural Resources Inventory of the Montz Freshwater Diversion Project Corridor, St. Charles Parish, Louisiana. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-23

    irdtrial ) vernmental ) gricultural )other Historic structures (dependencies) present on the m site: )store ( kitd ) quarters ) garcoierre ) office c...commercial ( ) indtrial ( ) governmental S ) gricultural ( ) other Historic structures (dependencies) present on the same site: ( ) store kitdcn ( ) quarters

  7. Cultural Resources Inventory of Lands Adjacent to Big Sandy Lake. Volume 1,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-18

    Bush honeysuckle JuneberryI Downy arrowwood q erbs: Wild sarsaparilla Pennsylvania sedge Columbine Early meadow-rue Large-leaved aster Star-flowered...valley Canada anemone Snakeroot Wild sarsaparilla " Northern bedstraw Br.-leaved goldenrod False Solomon’s seal Carrion flower Small-flowered Large

  8. Psychometric Evaluation and Cultural Correlates of the Mate Retention Inventory-Short Form (MRI-SF) in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atari, Mohammad; Barbaro, Nicole; Shackelford, Todd K; Chegeni, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated the psychometric properties of the Persian translation of the Mate Retention Inventory-Short Form (MRI-SF) in Iran. We also investigated sex differences in the use of mate retention tactics and investigated the relationships between mate retention behaviors and a number of related cultural constructs. Participants ( N = 308) ranged in age from 18 to 57 years. All participants were in a committed romantic relationship, with mean relationship length of 63.5 months ( SD = 73.8). Participants completed the Persian translation of the MRI-SF and measures of religiosity, relationship satisfaction, self-esteem, and socioeconomic status. Cultural measures specific to Iran were also included, such as Mahr (for married individuals), self-perceived Qeiratiness (for men), and self-perceived jealousy (for women). Mahr is a mandatory amount of money or possessions paid or promised to be paid by the groom to the bride at the time of the marriage contract. Qeirati is a male-specific adjective in Persian meaning protective against unwanted attention toward a man's romantic partner. Female jealousy is usually regarded the counterpart of male Qeiratiness in Iranian culture. The 19 mate retention tactics formed a two-component structure, consistent with previous research. Results demonstrate adequate internal consistency of 2-item assessments of mate retention tactics. Observed sex differences accorded with previous mate retention research and are discussed in reference to evolutionary perspectives on human mating. Several significant associations emerged between mate retention tactics and Iranian culture-specific variables and are discussed from a cross-cultural perspective.

  9. Mineral resource of the month: cultured quartz crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The article presents information on cultured quartz crystals, a mineral used in mobile phones, computers, clocks and other devices controlled by digital circuits. Cultured quartz, which is synthetically produced in large pressurized vessels known as autoclaves, is useful in electronic circuits for precise filtration, frequency control and timing for consumer and military use. Several ingredients are used in producing cultured quartz, including seed crystals, lascas, a solution of sodium hydroxide or sodium carbonate, lithium salts and deionized water.

  10. Cultural and language skills as resources for boundary spanning within the MNC

    OpenAIRE

    Wilhelm Barner-Rasmussen; Mats Ehrnrooth; Alexei Koveshnikov; Kristiina Mä;kelä

    2014-01-01

    We examine the role of cultural and language skills as resources for individuals’ boundary spanning ability in multinational corporations. Our combined qualitative and quantitative analysis shows that cultural and language skills influence the extent to which individual boundary spanners perform four functions: exchanging, linking, facilitating, and intervening. Boundary spanners with both cultural and language skills perform more functions than those with only cultural skills, and language s...

  11. An Intensive Cultural Resources Survey at Tuttle Creek Lake Pottawatomie and Riley Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Title (in progress): "The Early Horizon Olmec: "’ A Review of Their Style, Culture and Impact on *= Mesoamerica ." B.A. Fordham University, 1972...4 -- ~4 .4 . .*.*4 ~ .. - ... ~~-* ..-... .,**.**.~**.* P PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS: Archaeology of the Northeast United States and of Mesoamerica ...Development of Early Horizon Cultures in Mesoamerica Settlement and Subsistence Patterns Prehistoric Exchange Systems Cultural Ecology Cultural Resource

  12. Environmental guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Working draft for comment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    DOE has stewardship responsibilities for managing the cultural resources remaining on DOE-owned and other lands impacted by DOE programs. Goal of the DOE-wide Cultural Resource Management (CRM) program is to identify and consolidate compliance actions associated with statutory and regulatory requirements. This document is to provide guidelines to DOE field managers; its implementation is intended to assure that each DOE facility and program complies with executive orders, statutes, and regulations governing the management of cultural resources. It covers CRM goals, existing conditions, CRM methods, CRM procedures and administration, and plan attachments. Glossary, legislation, and documents are covered in appendices.

  13. Using Current Magazines as a Resource for Teaching Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    A slide/tape program, composed of photographs taken from Spanish magazines and a recorded commentary, was used to teach students of Spanish about the culture of Spain. The program also provided students with incentive and direction for exploring a wide range of cultural information in Spanish magazines. (CB)

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2011 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Braun Williams; Brenda R. Pace; Hollie K. Gilbert; Christina L. Olson

    2012-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report is intended as a stand-alone document that summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2011. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders, serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work, and meet an agreed upon legal requirement.

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2010 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Clayton F. Marler; Christina L. Olson; Brenda R. Pace; Julie Braun Williams

    2011-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2010. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work.

  16. Traditional Values, Socio-Cultural Factors and Human Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper assesses the effects of traditional values (collective conceptions of ... and arts) on human resource management (HRM) in public sector organizations in ... material, intellectual and emotional features that characterize a society or a ...

  17. Resource efficiency and culture--workplace training for small and medium-sized enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliesner, Anna; Liedtke, Christa; Rohn, Holger

    2014-05-15

    Although there are already some qualification offers available for enterprises to support resource efficiency innovations, the high potentials that can be identified especially for small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) have not been activated until now. As successful change lies in the hands of humans, the main aim of vocational education has to be the promotion of organisational and cultural changes in the enterprises. As there is already a small but increasing number of enterprises that perform very well in resource efficiency innovations one question arises: What are typical characteristics of those enterprises? Leaning on a good-practice approach, the project "ResourceCulture" is going to prove or falsify the hypothesis that enterprises being successful with resource efficiency innovations have a specific culture of trust, which substantially contributes to innovation processes, or even initially enables them. Detailed empirical field research will light up which correlations between resource efficiency, innovation and cultures of trust can be found and will offer important aspects for the improvement of management instruments and qualification concepts for workplace training. The project seizes qualification needs that were likewise mentioned by enterprises and consultants, regarding the implementation of resource efficiency. This article - based on first empirical field research results - derives preliminary indications for the design of the qualification module for the target groups resource efficiency consultants and managers. On this basis and in order to implement "ResourceCulture" conceptual and methodological starting points for workplace training are outlined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Objectively-assessed outcome measures: a translation and cross-cultural adaptation procedure applied to the Chedoke McMaster Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI)

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Standardised translation and cross-cultural adaptation (TCCA) procedures are vital to describe language translation, cultural adaptation, and to evaluate quality factors of transformed outcome measures. No TCCA procedure for objectively-assessed outcome (OAO) measures exists. Furthermore, no official German version of the Canadian Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI) is available. Methods An eight-step for TCCA procedure for OAO was developed (TCCA-OAO) based on...

  19. Cross-cultural validation of the child abuse potential inventory in Belgium (Flanders) : Relations with demographic characteristics and parenting problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grietens, Hans; De Haene, Lucia; Uyttebroek, Karolien

    This study examined the reliability and the validity of the Dutch CAP Inventory, a screening instrument that measures parents' potential for child physical abuse (Milner, The Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Manual (2nd ed.), Psytec, Webster, NC, 1986). The CAP Inventory and measures on parenting

  20. Cross-cultural validation of the child abuse potential inventory in Belgium (Flanders) : Relations with demographic characteristics and parenting problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grietens, Hans; De Haene, Lucia; Uyttebroek, Karolien

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and the validity of the Dutch CAP Inventory, a screening instrument that measures parents' potential for child physical abuse (Milner, The Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Manual (2nd ed.), Psytec, Webster, NC, 1986). The CAP Inventory and measures on parenting st

  1. Ohio River Environmental Assessment. Cultural Resources Reconnaissance Report, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    contain the unwritten documents of mankind’s cultural achieve- ments in technology , economy, esthetics, domestic and public archi- tecture, as well as...E 7. OHS, Evans (1975). 1. 355.9 2. West End Confectionary /Abraham Cornell Jewelry Store. 3. ca. 1865. High Victorian Italianate with arcaded cast...Place in Structural History. Technology and Culture. Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 1-23. Dickore, Marie 1959 Marriage Records, 1808-1820 and Wills (abstracts

  2. Cultural Resource Survey of Proposed Ditch Plugs Near Troublesome Creek in Marion County, Missouri

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A phase I cultural resource survey was conducted for the US Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, of three proposed ditch plugs to be constructed...

  3. Environmental guidelines for development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to the DOE field managements with responsibility for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program.

  4. Cultural Resources Survey for Additional Work at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A cultural resources survey was conducted at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, during the late summer of 1981. This work concentrated on the...

  5. Globalization of Human Resource Management: A Cross-Cultural Perspective for the Public Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Suk

    1999-01-01

    Presents a framework for a global perspective in the education of human-resource-management professionals that includes negotiation skills, cross-cultural training based on social-learningl theory, and a mix of instrumental and experiential learning. (SK)

  6. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  7. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  8. Salud de Corazon: Cultural Resources for Cardiovascular Health among Older Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adriana; Fleury, Julie; Shearer, Nelma

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hispanic women has been substantiated across studies. While many studies have focused on the impact of these risk factors, few qualitative studies have addressed cultural and contextual meanings of cardiovascular health promotion in this population. This research explored cultural resources for cardiovascular health promotion among older Hispanic women. A qualitative descriptive methodological design using focus groups with 7 Hispanic women was used. Culture provided an overarching perspective, guiding identification and choice of resources and supports in order to promote cardiovascular health. Themes included Living Tradition, Caring for Family, Connecting with Friends, Having Faith, and Moving as Life. Data provide an initial step toward generating a more complete understanding of perceived cultural resources for cardiovascular health in older Hispanic women. Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing that individuals, families and communities uniquely define cultural and contextual meaning of cardiovascular health promotion.

  9. Cultural Resource Protection Plan for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, Brenda Ringe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gilbert, Hollie Kae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This plan addresses cultural resource protection procedures to be implemented during construction of the Remote Handled Low Level Waste project at the Idaho National Laboratory. The plan proposes pre-construction review of proposed ground disturbing activities to confirm avoidance of cultural resources. Depending on the final project footprint, cultural resource protection strategies might also include additional survey, protective fencing, cultural resource mapping and relocation of surface artifacts, collection of surface artifacts for permanent curation, confirmation of undisturbed historic canal segments outside the area of potential effects for construction, and/or archaeological test excavations to assess potential subsurface cultural deposits at known cultural resource locations. Additionally, all initial ground disturbing activities will be monitored for subsurface cultural resource finds, cultural resource sensitivity training will be conducted for all construction field personnel, and a stop work procedure will be implemented to guide assessment and protection of any unanticipated discoveries after initial monitoring of ground disturbance.

  10. 36 CFR 2.1 - Preservation of natural, cultural and archeological resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preservation of natural... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.1 Preservation of natural, cultural and archeological resources. (a) Except as otherwise provided in this chapter, the...

  11. Firm Culture and Leadership as Firm Performance Predictors : a Resource-Based Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilderom, C.P.M.; van den Berg, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we tested part of the resource-based view of the firm by examining two 'soft' resources, firm culture and top leadership, as predictors of 'hard' or bottom-line firm performance.Transformational top leadership was found to predict firm performance directly while the link between firm

  12. Firm Culture and Leadership as Firm Performance Predictors : a Resource-Based Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilderom, C.P.M.; van den Berg, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we tested part of the resource-based view of the firm by examining two 'soft' resources, firm culture and top leadership, as predictors of 'hard' or bottom-line firm performance.Transformational top leadership was found to predict firm performance directly while the link between firm

  13. A Spot of Our Own: The Cultural Relevancy, Anti-Bias Resource Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, Cory

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Cultural Relevancy, Anti-Bias Resource Room at conference of the Washington State Association for the Education of Young Children. Discusses how the exhibit was structured and evaluated; suggests ways to organize a similar resource. Maintains that providing hands-on materials is key to the exhibit's effectiveness and that the exhibit…

  14. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Jansma, E.P.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012.

  15. On Dittmer's "Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity" as a Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzeck, Reecia; Craine, James; Dando, Christina; Somdahl-Sands, Katrinka

    2014-01-01

    In this intervention, four geographers, all of whom have used Jason Dittmer's book, "Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity", in their classes, assess its status as a teaching resource. All have had considerable success using Dittmer's book, alongside other resources, to cultivate critical thinking and critical knowledge…

  16. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Jansma, E.P.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012.

  17. On Dittmer's "Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity" as a Classroom Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzeck, Reecia; Craine, James; Dando, Christina; Somdahl-Sands, Katrinka

    2014-01-01

    In this intervention, four geographers, all of whom have used Jason Dittmer's book, "Popular Culture, Geopolitics, and Identity", in their classes, assess its status as a teaching resource. All have had considerable success using Dittmer's book, alongside other resources, to cultivate critical thinking and critical knowledge…

  18. Organizational culture and human resources management in multinational companies under the conditions of intercultural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetráková Milota

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the opinion and experiences of professionals on specifics of human resources management and organizational culture forming in multinational companies. The theoretical knowledge is in confrontation with the results of sociological questioning in the form of structured interviews with managers of multinational companies branches in Slovakia. The starting point of the research was hypothesis about respecting national culture specifics in culture of multinational company culture. We can proof this hypothesis by research; the majority of companies apply transnational and polycentric approach to create local branch culture.

  19. 36 CFR 13.1404 - Preservation of natural, cultural, and archaeological resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preservation of natural, cultural, and archaeological resources. 13.1404 Section 13.1404 Parks, Forests, and Public Property...-Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park § 13.1404 Preservation of natural, cultural, and archaeological...

  20. From an Ancient Tradition to the Present. Chinese Cultural Heritage Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching Fang; Lee, Amy

    This cultural heritage resource guide has been prepared as a tool for teachers to help promote better understanding of Chinese students in the New York City public schools. China has an ancient history and a rich cultural tradition, and people all over the world have recognized China as one of the world's greatest civilizations. The earliest…

  1. Sharing Ideas. Southeast Alaska Cultures: Teaching Ideas and Resource Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckley, Kay, Comp.; Kleinert, Jean, Comp.

    The product of two 1975 workshops held in Southeastern Alaska (Fairbanks and Sitka), this publication presents the following: (1) papers (written by the educators in attendance at the workshops) which address education methods and concepts relevant to the culture of Southeastern Alaska ("Tlingit Sea Lion Parable"; "Using Local…

  2. Conclusion : Culture, resources and development in the Kenya Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Foeken, D.W.J.; Obudho, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Despite its economic and cultural potential, the Kenya Coast finds itself in a marginal position. This collective volume traces the causes behind this situation and analyses it from different angles: political, economic and social. Most of the papers included in this volume were first presented at a

  3. Conclusion : Culture, resources and development in the Kenya Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Foeken, D.W.J.; Obudho, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Despite its economic and cultural potential, the Kenya Coast finds itself in a marginal position. This collective volume traces the causes behind this situation and analyses it from different angles: political, economic and social. Most of the papers included in this volume were first presented at a

  4. Folklore and Culture as Literacy Resources for National Emancipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajide, Stephen Billy

    2010-01-01

    Literacy counts a lot for development and progress. Efficient literacy induces and sustains good governance. Hence, all nations strive to attain balanced literacy. However any literacy programme that ignores the context of operation is not likely to be very successful. This paper canvasses that folklore and culture are essential ingredients for…

  5. Business Planning for Cultural Heritage Institutions. A Framework and Resource Guide to Assist Cultural Heritage Institutions with Business Planning for Sustainability of Digital Asset Management Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishoff, Liz; Allen, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a framework and resource guide to help cultural heritage institutions plan sustainable access to their digital cultural assets and to do so by means that link their missions to planning modes and models. To aid cultural heritage organizations in the business-planning process, this resource will do the…

  6. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek-van Noord, Inge; de Bruijne, Martine C; Zwijnenberg, Nicolien C; Jansma, Elise P; van Dyck, Cathy; Wagner, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012. The Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews was used to assess the risk of bias in the individual studies. In total, 22 manuscripts were included for review. Training settings, study designs, and evaluation methods varied widely. Most studies reporting only a selection of culture dimensions found mainly positive results, whereas studies reporting all safety culture dimensions of the particular survey found mixed results. On average, studies were at moderate risk of bias. Evidence of the effectiveness of Crew Resource Management training in health care on safety culture is scarce and the validity of most studies is limited. The results underline the necessity of more valid study designs, preferably using triangulation methods.

  7. Religion as dialogical resource: a socio-cultural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucal, Aleksandar; Zittoun, Tania

    2013-06-01

    William James proposed a psychological study of religion examining people's religious experiences, and to see in what sense these were good for them. The recent developments of psychology of religion moved far from that initial proposition. In this paper, we propose a sociocultural perspective to religion that renews with that initial stance. After recalling Vygtotsky's core ideas, we suggest that religion, as cultural and symbolic system, participates to the orchestration of human activities and sense-making. Such orchestration works both from within the person, through internalized values and ideas, and from without, through the person's interactions with others, discourses, cultural objects etc. This leads us to consider religions as supporting various forms of dialogical dynamics-intra-psychological dialogues, interpersonal with present, absent or imaginary others, as well as inter-group dialogues-which we illustrate with empirical vignettes. The example of religious tensions in the Balkans in the 90's highlights how much the historical-cultural embeddedness of these dynamics can also lead to the end of dialogicality, and therefore, sense-making.

  8. Managing the inventory control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C E

    1985-02-01

    The four functions of management--planning, organizing, directing, and controlling--are described in relation to the hospital pharmacy inventory control system. Planning includes the development of inventory system objectives and identification of the resources needed to complete them. Organizing requires the manager to decide on the best method of grouping system activities and resources to complete the objectives in order of priority. Directing is a continual activity that involves obtaining optimal performance from the inventory system resources available. Controlling consists of regulation and verification of inventory system activities. The effective inventory system manager integrates planning, organizing, directing, and controlling in a continuous cycle.

  9. Natural resource inventory and monitoring for Ulaan Taiga Specially Protected Areas—An assessment of needs and opportunities in northern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Peggy E.; Meyer, Joseph B.; Chow, Leslie S.

    2017-03-10

    Between 1997 and 2011, Mongolia established three specially protected areas in the north-central part of the country to protect various high-value resources. These areas are jointly referred to as the Ulaan Taiga Specially Protected Areas. In accordance with the goals of the draft general management plan, this report identifies options for initiating an inventory and monitoring program for the three protected areas. Together, the three areas comprise over 1.5 million hectares of mountainous terrain west of Lake Hovsgol and bordering the Darkhad Valley. The area supports numerous rare ungulates, endangered fish, and over 40 species of threatened plants. Illegal mining, illegal logging, and poaching pose the most immediate threats to resources. As a first step, a review of published literature would inform natural resource management at the Ulaan Taiga Specially Protected Areas because it would inform other inventories.Vegetation classification and mapping also would inform other inventory efforts because the process incorporates geographic analysis to identify environmental gradients, fine-scale sampling that captures species composition and structure, and landscape-scale results that represent the variety and extent of habitats for various organisms. Mapping using satellite imagery reduces the cost per hectare.Following a determination of existing knowledge, field surveys of vertebrates and vascular plants would serve to build species lists and fill in gaps in existing knowledge. For abiotic resources, a focus on monitoring air quality, evaluating and monitoring water quality, and assembling and storing weather data would provide information for correlating resource response status with changing environmental conditions.Finally, we identify datasets that, if incorporated into a geographic information system, would inform resource management. They include political boundaries, infrastructure, topography, surficial geology, hydrology, fire history, and soils.In terms

  10. Analysis Of Usefulness Of Satellite Image Processing Methods For Investigations Of Cultural Heritage Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osińska-Skotak, Katarzyna; Zapłata, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the analysis of usefulness of WorldView-2 satellite image processing, which enhance information concerning the cultural heritage objects. WorldView-2 images are characterised by the very high spatial resolution and high spectral resolution; that is why they create new possibilities for many applications, including investigations of the cultural heritage. The vicinities of Iłża have been selected as the test site for presented investigations. The presented results of works are the effect of research works, which were performed in the frames of the scientific project "Utilisation of laser scanning and remote sensing in protection, investigations and inventory of the cultural heritage. Development of non-invasive, digital methods of documenting and recognising the architectural and archaeological heritage", as the part of "The National Programme for the Development of Humanities" of the Minister of Science and Higher Education in the period of 2012-2015.

  11. Forest inventories generate scientifically sound information on the forest resource, but do our data and information really matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph Keinn; Goran Stahl

    2009-01-01

    Current research in forest inventory focuses very much on technical-statistical problems geared mainly to the optimization of data collection and information generation. The basic assumption is that better information leads to better decisions and, therefore, to better forest management and forest policy. Not many studies, however, strive to explicitly establish the...

  12. [How therapists view the contribution of cultural resources for community-based integrative therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Danielle Samara Tavares; Ferreira Filha, Maria de Oliveira

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the contribution of cultural resources to Community-Based Integrative Care (CBIC), to consolidate it as a model of community-based mental health and a political strategy for local health, and to identify the cultural strategies most used in CBIC sessions. This is a qualitative study, conducted in the city of João Pessoa, state of Paraíba, Brazil, with ten therapists. We used semi-structured interviews and afield diary, from September, 2008, to March, 2009, then proceeded to the interpretive analysis of the data. It was evident that the inclusion of cultural resources contributes to the consolidation of CBIC, for it reclaims and strengthen values, and it underscores the personal and social identity of individuals, encouraging effective participation. The main cultural resources used were music, dynamics and prayers. The conclusion was that cultural resources are an important resource for the work of the therapist, for it strengthens bonds and helps people to give a new meaning to their suffering.

  13. The influence of culture on human resource management processes and practices: The propositions for Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogićević-Milikić Biljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to address the influence of national culture on HRM practices and processes in order to draw conclusions for Serbian HR practitioners, multinational corporations operating in Serbia, and any other country or organizational context that has similar cultural characteristics. To achieve this we first review the relevant literature to identify the interdependencies between Hofstede's cultural dimensions and HRM practices and processes. On the basis of recognized relationships we put forward 11 propositions about likely appropriate HRM practices (such as job analysis, recruitment and selection, human resource planning and career management for the Serbian cultural context, characterized by high Uncertainty Avoidance, high Power Distance, Collectivism and Femininity.

  14. Protection of Geographical Indication and Intangible Cultural Heritage of the Chinese Food Product Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-guo; WANG Shu-ting; XIONG Wan-zhen; HUANG Li-min

    2012-01-01

    The geographical Indications intellectual property and intangible cultural heritage are the general focus of attention of the world today. In the Chinese food product resources, there are 44 kinds of national geographical indication products, 41 national geographical indication trademarks, 9 kinds of national and 212 kinds of provincial-level intangible cultural heritage. This article introduces the geographical indication protection and geographical indication trademark registration of the Chinese food products, the protection of intangible cultural heritage of traditional craftsmanship; discusses the countermeasures for the protection of geographical indication intellectual property and intangible cultural heritage; finally puts forth several recommendations.

  15. A Cultural Resources LIterature Search, Record Review and Cultural Resources Survey of the Belle Fountain Ditch Enlargement Project within Pemiscot and Dunklin Counties, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    iffrentlated Alluvium braided St~ream Terrace 2 (Late wlcosinl*f) 2 braded Stroan Terraece I Figutr. 1. Projoct st-.. location PROJECT LOCATION The BFD project...Archeologist 8 (2). Anderson David G. 1976 A Preliminary Report of the Zebree Proeect: New ApDroaches in Contract Archeology in Arkansas. Assembled and...00402. Bennett, Jayne and David Higginbotham 1984 Cultural Resources Mitiaation along Ditch 19. Site 23DU227. Dunklin County, Missouri. Prepared by AR

  16. Public Waters Inventory Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme is a scanned and rectified version of the Minnesota DNR - Division of Waters "Public Waters Inventory" (PWI) maps. DNR Waters utilizes a small scale...

  17. National Wetlands Inventory Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland point features (typically wetlands that are too small to be as area features at the data scale) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The...

  18. Sources of work motivation of business leaders in the USA and South Africa: a cross-cultural comparison using the Motivational Sources Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuto, John E; Gifford, Gregory T

    2007-10-01

    Motivational differences in response to the Motivation Sources Inventory were tested between U.S. (n = 138) and South-African (n = 114) work samples. Analysis indicated that American managers scored significantly higher on intrinsic process (fun), while South-African managers scored significantly higher on self-concept external and goal internalization when measured using ratio analysis. Replication and extension with large groups representative of populations of interest in conjunction with Hofstede's cultural dimensions could allow generalization.

  19. Culture as a Resource in Nation-Building. The Case of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaveski, Stojan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Together with history, culture represents one of the most basic aspects of the fabric of everyday life. It gives us a sense of identity and tells us who we are, where we come from and where we are going. Cultural policy broadly defines the meaning of social practice, and deals with subjectivity and identity, thereby playing a central role in the building of a sense of self. In the era of globalization, culture transcends borders between countries and can play the role of the connective tissue of the "imagined nation". It is used in the voluntary and organic approach to defining the nation. While the organic approach emphasizes the role of culture in highlighting the specificity of the nation, voluntary discourse focuses on the culture's universal value. This paper will analyze how culture is being used as a resource in the construction of the contemporary Macedonian nation.

  20. Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project, Phase 2: coal, hydroelectric, and energy alternatives. Volume III. Alaska's alternative energies and regional assessment inventory update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project is presented in three volumes. This volume, Vol. III, considers alternative energies and the regional assessment inventory update. The introductory chapter, Chapter 12, examines the historical background, current technological status, environmental impact, applicability to Alaska, and siting considerations for a number of alternative systems. All of the systems considered use or could use renewable energy resources. The chapters that follow are entitled: Very Small Hydropower (about 12 kW or less for rural and remote villages); Low-Temperature Geothermal Space Heating; Wind; Fuel Cells; Siting Criteria and Preliminary Screening of Communities for Alternate Energy Use; Wood Residues; Waste Heat; and Regional Assessment Invntory Update. (MCW)

  1. A Cross-Cultural Approach to Human Resource Management in Finnish Hospitality Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Niemi, Miika

    2012-01-01

    This thesis explores a cross-cultural approach to human resource management and its processes in Finnish hospitality companies. In the hospitality sector, the personnel is considered as an important resource of the company, executing important work when creating the service experience and providing quality service for the customers. Globalization and the overall international character of hospitality business are placing challenges for the companies when providing service to the customers and...

  2. Use of Signs as a Protective Measure for Cultural Resources Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    concerns that may have to be considered in the project. Chapter 6 Guidance for Effective Signing Projects 89 References Ajzen , Icek . (1992). "Persuasive...natural resources management. Michael J. Manfredo, ed., Sagamore Publishing Company, Champaign, IL, 1-28. Ajzen , Icek , and Fishbein, Martin. (1980...of media and messages to influence attitudes and behavior ( Ajzen and Fishbein 1980), cultural resource managers need to examine this literature and

  3. Aesthetic resources of social survival and sustainable development: The Beauty in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ionesov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is study of the phenomenon of beauty in culture and aesthetic resources of social survival in changing world. In the broadest sense, beauty is a category indicating complete harmony in an object, based on an ideal correspondence of form and concept. Liberated by beauty, man recovers his lost link with nature and extends the boundaries of his existence. Aesthetic manifestations are very important resource of overcoming of crisis and social trials. Focusing on the charac...

  4. A clash of human resource management cultures : a micro-state case study

    OpenAIRE

    Baldacchino, Godfrey

    1997-01-01

    When resorting to Greek divine mythology to purchase original insights on management styles, Handy (1991) identifies Apollo and Dionysius as representative of two ideal types which can be developed and fine-tuned to highlight one relatively under explored area of inter-cultural human resource management. This concerns the cultural interface between alien, imported management styles and local, home-grown practices in the context of small and island states. This paper argues that indigenous b...

  5. Cultural resource applications for a GIS: Stone conservation at Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Kyle; Donald, Tony; Comer, Douglas

    1998-01-01

    Geographical information systems are rapidly becoming essential tools for land management. They provide a way to link landscape features to the wide variety of information that managers must consider when formulating plans for a site, designing site improvement and restoration projects, determining maintenance projects and protocols, and even interpreting the site. At the same time, they can be valuable research tools.Standing structures offer a different sort of geography, even though a humanly contrived one. Therefore, the capability of a geographical information system (GIS) to link geographical units to the information pertinent to the site and resource management can be employed in the management of standing structures. This was the idea that inspired the use of a GIS software, ArcView, to link computer aided design CAD) drawings of the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials with inventories of the stones in the memorials. Both the CAD drawings and the inventory were in existence; what remained to be done was to modify the CAD files and place the inventory in an appropriately designed computerized database, and then to link the two in a GIS project. This work was carried out at the NPS Denver Service Center, Resource Planning Group, Applied Archaeology Center (DSC-RPG-AAC), in Silver Spring, Maryland, with the assistance of US/ICOMOS summer interns Katja Marasovic (Croatia) and Rastislav Gromnica (Slovakia), under the supervision of AAC office manager Douglas Comer. Project guidance was provided by Tony Donald, the Denver Service Center (DSC) project architect for the restoration of the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials, and GIS consultation services by Kyle Joly.

  6. Advance care planning, culture and religion: an environmental scan of Australian-based online resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Salgado, Amanda; Mader, Patrick; Boyd, Leanne M

    2017-04-20

    Objectives Culture and religion are important in advance care planning (ACP), yet it is not well understood how this is represented in ACP online resources. The aim of the present study was to identify the availability of Australian-based ACP websites and online informational booklets containing cultural and religious information.Methods An environmental scanning framework was used with a Google search conducted from 30 June 2015 to 5 July 2015. Eligible Australian-based ACP websites and online informational booklets were reviewed by two analysts (APS & PM) for information pertaining to at least one culture or religion. Common characteristics were agreed upon and tabulated with narrative description.Results Seven Australian-based ACP websites were identified with varying degrees of cultural and religious information. Seven Australian-based ACP informational booklets were identified addressing culture or religion, namely of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (n=5), Sikh (n=1) and Italian (n=1) communities. Twenty-one other online resources with cultural and religious information were identified, developed within the context of health and palliative care.Conclusions There is no comprehensive Australian-based ACP website or informational booklet supporting ACP across several cultural and religious contexts. Considering Australia's multicultural and multifaith population, such a resource may be beneficial in increasing awareness and uptake of ACP.What is known about the topic? Health professionals and consumers frequently use the Internet to find information. Non-regulation has resulted in the proliferation of ACP online resources (i.e. ACP websites and online informational booklets). Although this has contributed to raising awareness of ACP, the availability of Australian-based ACP online resources with cultural and religious information is not well known.What does this paper add? This paper is the first to use an environmental scanning methodology to identify

  7. Validation of a provider self-report inventory for measuring patient-centered cultural sensitivity in health care using a sample of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsu-Paun, Anca; Tucker, Carolyn M; Herman, Keith C; Hernandez, Caridad A

    2010-04-01

    The paper describes the construction and initial evaluation of the new Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Inventory (T-CSHCI) Provider Form, which was developed to address the shortcomings of existing similar measures. Two hundred seventeen (217) 3rd and 4th year medical students completed the T-CSHCI-Provider Form. Factor analysis was used to identify non-overlapping items. The final solution produced five factors: patient-centeredness, interpersonal skills, disrespect/disempowerment, competence, and cultural knowledge/responsiveness. The five T-CSHCI-Provider Form factors/subscales proved to be reliable and were associated with related constructs as hypothesized. This study provides initial evidence that the T-CSHCI-Provider Form measures independent dimensions of patient-centered culturally sensitive health care as perceived by medical students. Recommendations for ways in which the T-CSHCI Provider Form can be used to guide culturally sensitive health care training are provided.

  8. Separation of allelopathy from resource competition using rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hai Bin; Wang, Hai Bin; Fang, Chang Xun; Lin, Zhi Hua; Yu, Zheng Ming; Lin, Wen Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Plant-plant interference is the combined effect of allelopathy, resource competition, and many other factors. Separating allelopathy from resource competition is almost impossible in natural systems but it is important to evaluate the relative contribution of each of the two mechanisms on plant interference. Research on allelopathy in natural and cultivated plant communities has been hindered in the absence of a reliable method that can separate allelopathic effect from resource competition. In this paper, the interactions between allelopathic rice accession PI312777, non-allelopathic rice accession Lemont and barnyardgrass were explored respectively by using a target (rice)-neighbor (barnyardgrass) mixed-culture in hydroponic system. The relative competitive intensity (RCI), the relative neighbor effect (RNE) and the competitive ratio (CR) were used to quantify the intensity of competition between each of the two different potentially allelopathic rice accessions and barnyardgrass. Use of hydroponic culture system enabled us to exclude any uncontrolled factors that might operate in the soil and we were able to separate allelopathy from resource competition between each rice accession and barnyardgrass. The RCI and RNE values showed that the plant-plant interaction was positive (facilitation) for PI312777 but that was negative (competition) for Lemont and barnyardgrass in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The CR values showed that one PI312777 plant was more competitive than 2 barnyardgrass plants. The allelopathic effects of PI312777 were much more intense than the resource competition in rice/barnyardgrass mixed cultures. The reverse was true for Lemont. These results demonstrate that the allelopathic effect of PI312777 was predominant in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The most significant result of our study is the discovery of an experimental design, target-neighbor mixed-culture in combination with competition indices, can successfully separate

  9. Separation of allelopathy from resource competition using rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Bin He

    Full Text Available Plant-plant interference is the combined effect of allelopathy, resource competition, and many other factors. Separating allelopathy from resource competition is almost impossible in natural systems but it is important to evaluate the relative contribution of each of the two mechanisms on plant interference. Research on allelopathy in natural and cultivated plant communities has been hindered in the absence of a reliable method that can separate allelopathic effect from resource competition. In this paper, the interactions between allelopathic rice accession PI312777, non-allelopathic rice accession Lemont and barnyardgrass were explored respectively by using a target (rice-neighbor (barnyardgrass mixed-culture in hydroponic system. The relative competitive intensity (RCI, the relative neighbor effect (RNE and the competitive ratio (CR were used to quantify the intensity of competition between each of the two different potentially allelopathic rice accessions and barnyardgrass. Use of hydroponic culture system enabled us to exclude any uncontrolled factors that might operate in the soil and we were able to separate allelopathy from resource competition between each rice accession and barnyardgrass. The RCI and RNE values showed that the plant-plant interaction was positive (facilitation for PI312777 but that was negative (competition for Lemont and barnyardgrass in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The CR values showed that one PI312777 plant was more competitive than 2 barnyardgrass plants. The allelopathic effects of PI312777 were much more intense than the resource competition in rice/barnyardgrass mixed cultures. The reverse was true for Lemont. These results demonstrate that the allelopathic effect of PI312777 was predominant in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The most significant result of our study is the discovery of an experimental design, target-neighbor mixed-culture in combination with competition indices, can successfully

  10. Latin American culture and reading: text commentary and analysis of teaching as a resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mondaca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This present article develops an active learning pedagogical approach to enhance the process of reading comprehension in the XXI century classroom, through the incorporation of the Latin American culture in the use of educational resource of text analysis, which allows learners to generate a sense of belonging and cultural identity from elements such as literature, history, poetry, music, art, among others elements that make up the latinoamerican realm. This sense of cultural belonging involves learners in topics that are familiar to their contexts, recreating appreciation for reading.

  11. Obsessive-compulsive inventory and obsessive-compulsive inventory-revised scales: translation into brazilian portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation Tradução e adaptação transcultural para o português (do Brasil das escalas: obsessive-compulsive inventoryeobsessive-compulsive inventory-revised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pasquoto de Souza

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study describes the process of translation into Brazilian Portuguese and the cross-cultural adaptation of the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory and the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised scales. The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory was developed with the purpose of measuring the intensity of the various symptoms that characterize the obsessive-compulsive disorder, assessing their frequency and the distress they caused during the previous month, as well as estimating the overall severity of the disorder. Thus, different levels of severity among different obsessions and compulsions can be assessed and compared. METHOD: The scales were initially translated into Brazilian Portuguese by two bilingual psychiatrists and then independently back-translated by other two bilingual psychiatrists. The scales were then applied to 15 obsessive-compulsive disorder patients, deliberately chosen from different educational levels, to make language adjustments. The author accepted the final version of the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory and the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised scales after their back translation. RESULTS: The scales were easily understood and filled in by individuals and may be used with obsessive-compulsive disorder patients of different socioeconomic levels. CONCLUSION: The Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory and the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised scales, in their Brazilian Portuguese version, can help health professionals to screen potential obsessive-compulsive disorder patients, assess the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and reduce these symptoms using different treatments.OBJETIVO: Este artigo apresenta o processo de tradução e adaptação das escalas Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory e do Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revisado versão em português do Brasil. O Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de mensurar os diversos sintomas que caracterizam o transtorno obsessivo

  12. COOPERATION BETWEEN ACTORS FOR TOURISM DEVELOPMENT: THE APRECIATION OF HERITAGE AND CULTURAL RESOURCES IN RURAL TERRITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Amaral

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Framed by the theoretical context concerning cooperation between tourism agents, the present paper aims to contribute for better understanding South Alentejo tourism agents’ perceptions on the areas in which they can cooperate for promoting development and competitiveness in the region. Furthermore, the paper also looks at the tourist agents’ perception on role that the dynamics of cultural resources play in promotion of development and competitiveness in the region. This paper reports results from a case study conducted in the frame of the thesis developed as requirement to get the PhD in Tourism. Data was gathered by a questionnaire developed for the study from a sample of tourism agents working in the public, private business and associative (non lucrative sectors. The study results has indicated that valuation of the existing culture, integrated development of tourism resources and products and organization of promotional activities are the areas considered more relevant for the tourism agents to cooperate among them. In particular, leaders of different sectors agree with the need to cooperate focusing on the valorisation of local and regional cultural resources. This is important because the South Alentejo region has excellent cultural resources that, if strategically used, can provide a major differentiating factor.

  13. 36 CFR 34.8 - Preservation of natural, cultural and archeological resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preservation of natural... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.8 Preservation of natural, cultural and archeological resources. In addition to the provisions of § 2.1 of this chapter, the...

  14. 36 CFR 1002.1 - Preservation of natural, cultural and archeological resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preservation of natural... TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 1002.1 Preservation of natural, cultural and...) Possessing, destroying, injuring, defacing, removing, digging, or disturbing from its natural state: (i...

  15. Popular Literacy and the Resources of Print Culture: The South African Committee for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimbur, John

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how the South African Committee for Higher Education used the resources of print culture to design forms of writing and delivery systems that provided students and post-literate adults in the anti-apartheid struggle of the 1980s with the means to recognize and represent themselves as rhetorical agents, for whom reading and…

  16. Turning Russian specialized microbial culture collections into resource centers for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivshina, Irena B; Kuyukina, Maria S

    2013-11-01

    Specialized nonmedical microbial culture collections contain unique bioresources that could be useful for biotechnology companies. Cooperation between collections and companies has suffered from shortcomings in infrastructure and legislation, hindering access to holdings. These challenges may be overcome by the transformation of collections into national bioresource centers and integration into international microbial resource networks.

  17. Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-24

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Another Dimension, Zombies—A Pop Culture Resource for Public Health Awareness.  Created: 4/24/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/24/2013.

  18. Supporting Identity Development in Cross-Cultural Children and Young People: Resources, Vulnerability, Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildegunn Schuff

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Children and young people with cross-cultural backgrounds are significantly influenced by multiple cultures during their upbringing. They face the ambivalence and challenges of regularly dealing with multiple cultural frames of reference, norms and expectations, and often experience particular identity challenges. One might say that much of the ambivalence of modern intercultural societies may show up as internalized ambivalence in these “children of migration”. This article explores cross-cultural identity development. The aim is to further our understanding of how the identities of cross-cultural children and young people can be supported and their resources activated. This can both strengthen their resilience and well- being, and be of great value to society at large. Psychosocial/cultural interventions and creative projects in cross-cultural settings are potential arenas for this type of cultural health promotion. One example is the multicultural music project Fargespill (‘Kaleidoscope’. In a case study of Kaleidoscope, I describe and discuss how these participatory creative activities work, and ask how they may foster the development of constructive cross-cultural identities. Participant observation was conducted in Kaleidoscope throughout a year. In the light of theoretical perspectives from social and cultural psychology, the article analyzes identity issues and possibilities within this empirical context. Supporting cross-cultural identity development in a constructive manner is here operationalized as allowing, increasing and acknowledging identity complexity. The findings are categorized under the headings of resources, vulnerability and creativity. The project leaders make an effort to establish trust and a safe, supportive space. They apply a participatory method, in which the participants are seen as resources and their strengths and contributions are emphasized. In some situations, the vulnerability that may be caused by

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Hollie Kae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Holmer, Marie Pilkington [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Christina Liegh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pace, Brenda Ringe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year (FY) 2016. Overall monitoring included surveillance of the following 23 individual cultural resource localities: two locations with human remains, one of which is also a cave; seven additional caves; six prehistoric archaeological sites; four historic archaeological sites; one historic trail; Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I), a National Historic Landmark; Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) objects located at EBR-I; and one Arco Naval Proving Ground (NPG) property, CF-633 and related objects and structures. Several INL work processes and projects were also monitored to confirm compliance with original INL CRM recommendations and assess the effects of ongoing work. On one occasion, ground disturbing activities within the boundaries of the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC) were observed by INL CRM staff prepared to respond to any additional finds of Native American human remains. Additionally, the CRM office was notified during two Trespass Investigations conducted by INL Security. Most of the cultural resources monitored in FY 2016 exhibited no adverse impacts, resulting in Type 1 impact assessments. However, Type 2 impacts were noted five times. Three previously reported Type 2 impacts were once again documented at the EBR-I National Historic Landmark, including spalling and deterioration of bricks due to inadequate drainage, minimal maintenance, and rodent infestation. The ANP engines and locomotive on display at the EBR-I Visitors Center also exhibited impacts related to long term exposure. Finally, most of the Arco NPG properties monitored at Central Facilities Area exhibited problems with lack of timely and appropriate maintenance as well as inadequate drainage. No new Type 3 or Type 4 impacts that adversely affected significant cultural resources and threatened National

  20. 77 FR 11572 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI AGENCY: National Park..., Vice President, Cultural Collections, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice St., Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone..., Vice-President, Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice St., Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone...

  1. 75 FR 58433 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ..., artifact typology and cultural components at each of the above-mentioned sites supports the determination... are reasonably determined to be linked to modern Puebloan cultures through geography, culture history...

  2. Cultural Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Historian Kristin.Leahy@us.army.mil 210-466-1784 Karl Kleinbach AEC Archaeologist Karl.Kleinbach@us.army.mil 210-466-1788 http://aec.army.mil/usaec...Responsibilities 4. Loss of CRM Positions/Delegation of Duties 5. Section 110 v Section 106 6. Renovation v New Construction Challenges – ATFP, etc. 7

  3. Inventory of forest resources (including water) by multi-level sampling. [nine northern Virginia coastal plain counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, R. C.; Dana, R. W.; Roberts, E. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A stratified random sample using LANDSAT band 5 and 7 panchromatic prints resulted in estimates of water in counties with sampling errors less than + or - 9% (67% probability level). A forest inventory using a four band LANDSAT color composite resulted in estimates of forest area by counties that were within + or - 6.7% and + or - 3.7% respectively (67% probability level). Estimates of forest area for counties by computer assisted techniques were within + or - 21% of operational forest survey figures and for all counties the difference was only one percent. Correlations of airborne terrain reflectance measurements with LANDSAT radiance verified a linear atmospheric model with an additive (path radiance) term and multiplicative (transmittance) term. Coefficients of determination for 28 of the 32 modeling attempts, not adverseley affected by rain shower occurring between the times of LANDSAT passage and aircraft overflights, exceeded 0.83.

  4. A Resource for Eliciting Student Alternative Conceptions: Examining the Adaptability of a Concept Inventory for Natural Selection at the Secondary School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Margaret M.; Petrosino, Anthony J.

    2017-08-01

    The Conceptual Inventory of Natural Selection (CINS) is an example of a research-based instrument that assesses conceptual understanding in an area that contains well-documented alternative conceptions. Much of the CINS's use and original validation has been relegated to undergraduate settings, but the information learned from student responses on the CINS can also potentially be a useful resource for teachers at the secondary level. Because of its structure, the CINS can have a role in eliciting alternative conceptions and induce deeper conceptual understanding by having student ideas leveraged during instruction. In a first step toward this goal, the present study further investigated the CINS's internal properties by having it administered to a group ( n = 339) of students among four different biology teachers at a predominantly Latino, economically disadvantaged high school. In addition, incidences of the concept inventory's use among the teachers' practices were collected for support of its adaptability at the secondary level. Despite the teachers' initial enthusiasm for the CINS's use as an assessment tool in the present study, results from a principal components analysis demonstrate inconsistencies between the original and present validations. Results also reveal how the teachers think CINS items may be revised for future use among secondary student populations.

  5. A Resource for Eliciting Student Alternative Conceptions: Examining the Adaptability of a Concept Inventory for Natural Selection at the Secondary School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Margaret M.; Petrosino, Anthony J.

    2016-07-01

    The Conceptual Inventory of Natural Selection (CINS) is an example of a research-based instrument that assesses conceptual understanding in an area that contains well-documented alternative conceptions. Much of the CINS's use and original validation has been relegated to undergraduate settings, but the information learned from student responses on the CINS can also potentially be a useful resource for teachers at the secondary level. Because of its structure, the CINS can have a role in eliciting alternative conceptions and induce deeper conceptual understanding by having student ideas leveraged during instruction. In a first step toward this goal, the present study further investigated the CINS's internal properties by having it administered to a group (n = 339) of students among four different biology teachers at a predominantly Latino, economically disadvantaged high school. In addition, incidences of the concept inventory's use among the teachers' practices were collected for support of its adaptability at the secondary level. Despite the teachers' initial enthusiasm for the CINS's use as an assessment tool in the present study, results from a principal components analysis demonstrate inconsistencies between the original and present validations. Results also reveal how the teachers think CINS items may be revised for future use among secondary student populations.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale’s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor –I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex – CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location.

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Cultural Resources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes.

  8. Suitability of Local Resource Management Practices Based on Supernatural Enforcement Mechanisms in the Local Social-cultural Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Sasaoka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental anthropological studies on natural resource management have widely demonstrated and thematized local resource management practices based on the interactions between local people and supernatural agencies and their role in maintaining natural resources. In Indonesia, even though the legal status of local people's right to the forest and forest resources is still weak, the recent transition toward decentralization presents a growing opportunity for local people to collaborate with outsiders such as governmental agencies and environmental nongovernmental organizations in natural resource management. In such situations, in-depth understanding of the value of local resource management practices is needed to promote self-directed and effective resource management. Here, we focus on local forest resource management and its suitability in the local social-cultural context in central Seram, east Indonesia. Local resource management appears to be embedded in the wider social-cultural context of the local communities. However, few intensive case studies in Indonesia have addressed the relationship between the Indigenous resource management practices closely related to a people's belief in supernatural agents and the social-cultural context. We illustrate how the well-structured use of forest resources is established and maintained through these interactions. We then investigate how local resource management practices relate to the social-cultural and natural resources context of an upland community in central Seram and discuss the possible future applications for achieving conservation.

  9. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Verbeek-van Noord

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Methods: Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012. The Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews was used to assess the risk of bias in the individual studies. Results: In total, 22 manuscripts were included for review. Training settings, study designs, and evaluation methods varied widely. Most studies reporting only a selection of culture dimensions found mainly positive results, whereas studies reporting all safety culture dimensions of the particular survey found mixed results. On average, studies were at moderate risk of bias. Conclusion: Evidence of the effectiveness of Crew Resource Management training in health care on safety culture is scarce and the validity of most studies is limited. The results underline the necessity of more valid study designs, preferably using triangulation methods.

  10. Cultural Transformation After Implementation of Crew Resource Management: Is It Really Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jennifer L; Hilligoss, Brian; Knupp, Amy; Bournique, Judy; Sullivan, John; Adkins, Eric; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D

    2016-07-15

    Crew resource management (CRM) has the potential to improve safety culture and reduce patient safety errors across different hospitals and inherent cultures, but hospital-wide implementations have not been studied. The authors examined the impact of a systematic CRM implementation across 8 departments spanning 3 hospitals and 2 campuses. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) was administered electronically to all employees before CRM implementation and about 2 years after; changes in percent positive composite scores were compared in pre-post analyses. Across all respondents, there was a statistically significant increase in composite score for 10 of the 12 HSOPS dimensions (P dimensions reveals that the teamwork and communication dimensions of patient safety culture may be more highly influenced by CRM training than supervisor and management dimensions.

  11. Protection of Geographical Indication and Intangible Cultural Heritage of the Chrysanthemum Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai; HU; Zhiguo; SUN; Wanzhen; XIONG; Limin; HUANG; Shuting; WANG

    2013-01-01

    We conduct an analysis on the current protection of geographical indication intellectual property and intangible cultural heritage of chrysanthemum resources. The following recommendations are explored and set forth: ( i) Collecting and sorting the intangible cultural heritage related to chrysanthemum,and declaring the provincial and national list; ( ii) Establishing the productive protection demonstration bases of intangible cultural heritage related to chrysanthemum; ( iii) Strengthening the declaration of geographical indication intellectual property protection of chrysanthemum; ( iv) Encouraging the use of special marks of geographical indication,and cultivating chrysanthemum brand; ( v) Establishing various kinds of national quality standards of geographical indication of chrysanthemum; ( vi) Implementing the double protection of intangible cultural heritage and geographical indication of traditional chrysanthemum.

  12. Cultural challenges to biotechnology: Native American genetic resources and the concept of cultural harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsosie, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the intercultural context of issues related to genetic research on Native peoples. In particular, the article probes the disconnect between Western and indigenous concepts of property, ownership, and privacy, and examines the harms to Native peoples that may arise from unauthorized uses of blood and tissue samples or the information derived from such samples. The article concludes that existing legal and ethical frameworks are inadequate to address Native peoples' rights to their genetic resources and suggests an intercultural framework for accommodation based on theories of intergroup equality and fundamental human rights.

  13. An online spatial database of Australian Indigenous Biocultural Knowledge for contemporary natural and cultural resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pert, Petina L; Ens, Emilie J; Locke, John; Clarke, Philip A; Packer, Joanne M; Turpin, Gerry

    2015-11-15

    With growing international calls for the enhanced involvement of Indigenous peoples and their biocultural knowledge in managing conservation and the sustainable use of physical environment, it is timely to review the available literature and develop cross-cultural approaches to the management of biocultural resources. Online spatial databases are becoming common tools for educating land managers about Indigenous Biocultural Knowledge (IBK), specifically to raise a broad awareness of issues, identify knowledge gaps and opportunities, and to promote collaboration. Here we describe a novel approach to the application of internet and spatial analysis tools that provide an overview of publically available documented Australian IBK (AIBK) and outline the processes used to develop the online resource. By funding an AIBK working group, the Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (ACEAS) provided a unique opportunity to bring together cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary and trans-organizational contributors who developed these resources. Without such an intentionally collaborative process, this unique tool would not have been developed. The tool developed through this process is derived from a spatial and temporal literature review, case studies and a compilation of methods, as well as other relevant AIBK papers. The online resource illustrates the depth and breadth of documented IBK and identifies opportunities for further work, partnerships and investment for the benefit of not only Indigenous Australians, but all Australians. The database currently includes links to over 1500 publically available IBK documents, of which 568 are geo-referenced and were mapped. It is anticipated that as awareness of the online resource grows, more documents will be provided through the website to build the database. It is envisaged that this will become a well-used tool, integral to future natural and cultural resource management and maintenance.

  14. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Hollie Gilbert; Julie Braun Williams; Clayton Marler; Dino Lowrey; Cameron Brizzee

    2010-06-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a facility for disposal of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) generated remote-handled low-level waste. Initial screening has resulted in the identification of two recommended alternative locations for this new facility: one near the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex and one near the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility (ICDF). In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, intensive archaeological field surveys, and initial coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by new construction within either one of these candidate locations. This investigation showed that construction within the location near the ATR Complex may impact one historic homestead and several historic canals and ditches that are potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No resources judged to be of National Register significance were identified in the candidate location near the ICDF. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both locations. This report outlines recommendations for protective measures to help ensure that the impacts of construction on the identified resources are not adverse.

  15. Platinum-group elements in southern Africa: mineral inventory and an assessment of undiscovered mineral resources: Chapter Q in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Causey, J. Douglas; Parks, Heather L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The platinum-group elements, platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium, possess unique physical and chemical characteristics that make them indispensable to modern technology and industry. However, mineral deposits that are the main sources of these elements occur only in three countries in the world, raising concerns about potential disruption in mineral supply. Using information in the public domain, mineral resource and reserve information has been compiled for mafic and ultramafic rocks in South Africa and Zimbabwe that host most of the world’s platinum-group element resources.

  16. Cross-Cultural Validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II across U.S. and Turkish Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canel-Cinarbas, Deniz; Cui, Ying; Lauridsen, Erica

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) for factorial invariance across Turkish and U.S. college student samples. The results indicated that (a) a two-factor model has an adequate fit for both samples, thus providing evidence of configural invariance, and (b) there is a metric invariance but "no" sufficient…

  17. Measurement Invariance of the Counselor Burnout Inventory across Cultures: A Comparison of U.S. and Korean Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrola, Paul A.; Yu, Kumlan; Sass, Daniel A.; Lee, Sang Min

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed scores from the Counselor Burnout Inventory for factorial validity, convergent and discriminant validity, internal consistency reliability, and measurement invariance across U.S. and Korean counselors. Although evidence existed for factorial validity across both groups, mixed results emerged for the other forms of validity and…

  18. Inventory of forest and rangeland resources, including forest stress. [Atlanta, Georgia, Black Hills, and Manitou, Colorado test sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R. C.; Aldrich, R. C.; Weber, F. P.; Driscoll, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Some current beetle-killed ponderosa pine can be detected on S190-B photography imaged over the Bear Lodge mountains in the Black Hills National Forest. Detections were made on SL-3 imagery (September 13, 1973) using a zoom lens microscope to view the photography. At this time correlations have not been made to all of the known infestation spots in the Bear Lodge mountains; rather, known infestations have been located on the SL-3 imagery. It was determined that the beetle-killed trees were current kills by stereo viewing of SL-3 imagery on one side and SL-2 on the other. A successful technique was developed for mapping current beetle-killed pine using MSS imagery from mission 247 flown by the C-130 over the Black Hills test site in September 1973. Color enhancement processing on the NASA/JSC, DAS system using three MSS channels produced an excellent quality detection map for current kill pine. More importantly it provides a way to inventory the dead trees by relating PCM counts to actual numbers of dead trees.

  19. Spatial Integration Analysis of Provincial Historical and Cultural Heritage Resources Based on Geographic Information System (gis) — a Case Study of Spatial Integration Analysis of Historical and Cultural Heritage Resources in Zhejiang Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W.; Zhang, J.; Wu, Q.; Chen, J.; Huo, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, T.

    2017-08-01

    In China historical and cultural heritage resources include historically and culturally famous cities, towns, villages, blocks, immovable cultural relics and the scenic spots with cultural connotation. The spatial distribution laws of these resources are always directly connected to the regional physical geography, historical development and historical traffic geography and have high research values. Meanwhile, the exhibition and use of these resources are greatly influenced by traffic and tourism and other plans at the provincial level, and it is of great realistic significance to offer proposals on traffic and so on that are beneficial to the exhibition of heritage resources based on the research of province distribution laws. This paper takes the spatial analysis of Geographic Information System (GIS) as the basic technological means and all historical and cultural resources in China's Zhejiang Province as research objects, and finds out in the space the accumulation areas and accumulation belts of Zhejiang Province's historic cities and cultural resources through overlay analysis and density analysis, etc. It then discusses the reasons of the formation of these accumulation areas and accumulation belts by combining with the analysis of physical geography and historical geography and so on, and in the end, linking the tourism planning and traffic planning at the provincial level, it provides suggestions on the exhibition and use of accumulation areas and accumulation belts of historic cities and cultural resources.

  20. A Cultural Resources Survey of the St. Charles Parish Hurricane Protection Levee, St. Charles Parish, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Destrehan, daughter of Jean-Noel Destrehan and Marie-Claude Elenore de Longy (Conrad 1981:87). 69 .... .. mu muuuu m umuum 0n By 1944 the plantation was in...National Historic Park . Southwest Cultural Resources Center, Santa Fe. Holmes, Jack D. 1967 Indigo in Colonial Louisiana and the Floridas; Louisiana HiSt...Report submitted to the National Park Service, Tallahassee. 79 Neuman, Robert W. 1977 An Archaeological Assessment of Coastal Louisiana. Melanges, No

  1. Cultural Resources Literature Search and Records Review - Upper Mississippi River Basin. Volume 12. Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Minnesota Archaeology Symposium - 1976. A. R. Woolworth and M. A. Hall, eds. Minnesota His-torical Society, St. Paul. 1979 The Mississippian occupation of... WOOLWORTH , ALAN n.d. An Historical Study and a Cultural Resources Survey ot Indian Mounds Park (21 RA 10) Ramsey County, Minnon;ota. Listed in Minnesota...Survey File. -50- WOOLWORTH , ALAN and DOUGLAS GEORGE 1975 Archaeological Survey at Winona, Minnesota. Minnesota State Historical Society. WOOLWORTH

  2. Seabirds as a subsistence and cultural resource in two remote Alaskan communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C. Young

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Small rural Alaskan communities face many challenges surrounding rapid social and ecological change. The role of local subsistence resources may change over time because of changes in social perception, economic need, and cultural patterns of use. We look at the Bering Sea's Pribilof Islands, comprising two very small communities, and investigate the relationship between the local residents and seabirds as a natural resource. Seabirds may strengthen ties to older ways of life and have potential for future economic opportunities, or modernization may direct interest away from seabirds as a cultural and economic resource. We conducted a survey and interviews of residents of the two Pribilof Island communities, St. Paul and St. George, to assess opinions toward seabirds and harvest levels. Seabirds were generally regarded as important both to individuals and the wider community. However, current levels of subsistence harvest are low, and few people continue to actively harvest or visit seabird colonies. Respondents expressed desire for greater knowledge about seabirds and also concerns about the current economy of the islands and a lack of future development prospects. Despite the challenging economic conditions, the villages retain a strong sense of community and place value on their environment and on seabirds. Surveys indicated an interest in developing eco-tourism based around local resources, including seabirds, as a way to improve the economy.

  3. Inventory Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Known as MRO for Maintenance, Repair and Operating supplies, Tropicana Products, Inc.'s automated inventory management system is an adaptation of the Shuttle Inventory Management System (SIMS) developed by NASA to assure adequate supply of every item used in support of the Space Shuttle. The Tropicana version monitors inventory control, purchasing receiving and departmental costs for eight major areas of the company's operation.

  4. "Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Evaluation of the Turkish Version of the Cancer Behavior Inventory-Brief Version".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyigun, Emine; Tastan, Sevinc; Gezginci, Elif; Korkmaz, Serap; Demiral, Selcuk; Beyzadeoglu, Murat

    2017-08-11

    Cancer Behavior Inventory-Brief Version is a simple and non-burdensome tool used to evaluate the self-efficacy of the cancer patients. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the Cancer Behavior Inventory-Brief Version. This methodological study was conducted on 143 cancer patients who received radiotherapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology at a Training and Research Hospital in Turkey. Data were collected using Medical and Demographic Information Form, Cancer Behavior Inventory-Brief Version (CBI-B), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and EORTC QLQ-C30. Descriptive statistics, Exploratory Factor Analysis, correlation coefficients were used for the analysis of data. Exploratory Factor Analysis confirmed four-factor structure explaining 74.7% of the total variance: (1) Maintaining Independence and Positive Attitude; (2) Participating in Medical Care; (3) Coping and Stress Management; and (4) Managing Affect. The CBI-B had acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's α= 0.87) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient= 0.961) and concurrent validity with SWLS and EORTC QLQ-C30 scores. The measures of life satisfaction and quality of life were positively correlated with CBI-B whereas the symptom levels and the functions (with the exception of the role function) were negatively correlated. The CBI-B was found to be a valid and reliable inventory for assessing the self-efficacy of Turkish cancer patients. The CBI-B, is a simple and brief measure of self-efficacy for coping with cancer, could be easily used in clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Survey on Agricultural Biological Resources and Traditional Cultural Knowledge of Hani People in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqin; ZHANG; Hong; LUO; Wenjie; LONG; Yongtao; LEI; Qing; CAI; Mei; LAN; Li; ZHONG

    2015-01-01

    In 2007- 2008,a systematic survey,collection and arrangement was carried out for agricultural biological resources and traditional cultural knowledge of Hani People in 8 counties,15 towns,and 23 village committees of Yunnan Province. A total of 299 samples were obtained about agricultural biological resources related to production and living of Hani People. According to purpose of utilization,samples were divided into grain crops,medicinal plants,vegetables,fruit trees,and oil crops,taking up 48. 2%,21. 7%,18. 4%,7. 7%,and 2. 0% of the samples respectively. The survey indicated that planting industry and breeding industry take up the dominant role in rural social economy of Hani People,so agricultural biological resources are the fundamental means of production maintaining rural social development of Hani People.The current situation of agricultural biological resources of Hani People in Yunnan,reasons for growth and decline were analyzed,and the utilization,protection and development of agricultural biological resources were discussed.

  6. Use and management of forest resources in the Colombian Amazon: cultural particularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Landínez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the main cultural particularities: worldviews and ways of knowing that are associated with the use and management practices of forest resources in the Colombian Amazon. The theoretical cutting proposal contrasts, cultural level, the forms of appropriation of forest resources in indigenous and urban contexts in light of the importance that such activity involves the establishment of management strategies biodiversity in Colombia. Thus, offers an integrated perspective that will address environmental situations considering conflicting factors not only biological but cultural in various scenarios, to give substance to the decisions made and provide a reasonable treatment that enables the implementation of environmental regulatory mechanisms in strategic special biological areas as the Colombian Amazon. Finally, reflect on the importance of facilitating the functional analysis of the connections and interrelationships of ecosystem components, including human communities, to sketch involving both biological and social guidelines for sustainable use of biodiversity.

  7. Refugia Research Coalition: A regional-scale approach for connecting refugia science to natural and cultural resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background / question / methods Warmer air and water temperatures, changing precipitation patterns, and altered fire regimes associated with climate change threaten many important natural and cultural resources. Climate change refugia are areas relatively buffered from contempora...

  8. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

  9. Cultural resources of minority and marginalised students should be included in the school science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigeza, Philemon

    2011-06-01

    This paper responds to Schademan's "What does playing cards have to do with science? A resource—rich view of African American young men", and takes a resource-rich view to explore the notion of agency and elements of cultural resources that minority and marginalised students bring to the classroom. The paper examines the deficit model, the need to adopt capacity building perspective, and a classroom study, which sought to contextualise capacity building with a group of Australian indigenous students in a science class. As science educators, we need to reject the deficit model by developing capacity building pedagogies that affirm minority and marginalised students' lived languages, experiences and knowledge in their learning.

  10. High-resolution marine magnetic surveys for searching underwater cultural resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Monti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently two marine magnetic surveys, combined with the use of a multi-beam sonar (Kongsberg Marittime EM 300 multibeam: 30 KHz frequency echosounder for hydrographic purposes; acoustic lobe composed of 128 beams able to cover a 150° sector a side-scan sonar (Simrad MS 992 dual-frequency sidescan sonar with echo sounder transducers 150 Hz and 330 KHz and a Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV – a mobile tools used in environments which are too dangerous for humans, were executed in two sites respectively in the Ligurian Sea and the Asinara Gulf. The aim of these investigations was to test modern instrumentations and set new working procedures for searching underwater cultural resources. The collected and processed magnetic data yielded very satisfactory results: we detected submerged and buried features of cultural interest at both sites, at depths of 40 m and 400 m respectively.

  11. Open-access databases as unprecedented resources and drivers of cultural change in fisheries science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Utz, Ryan [National Ecological Observatory Network

    2014-01-01

    Open-access databases with utility in fisheries science have grown exponentially in quantity and scope over the past decade, with profound impacts to our discipline. The management, distillation, and sharing of an exponentially growing stream of open-access data represents several fundamental challenges in fisheries science. Many of the currently available open-access resources may not be universally known among fisheries scientists. We therefore introduce many national- and global-scale open-access databases with applications in fisheries science and provide an example of how they can be harnessed to perform valuable analyses without additional field efforts. We also discuss how the development, maintenance, and utilization of open-access data are likely to pose technical, financial, and educational challenges to fisheries scientists. Such cultural implications that will coincide with the rapidly increasing availability of free data should compel the American Fisheries Society to actively address these problems now to help ease the forthcoming cultural transition.

  12. LanDPro: Landscape Dynamics Program in Support of Natural and Cultural Resources Management and Range Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Mediterranean Division, California Coastal Chaparral Province 322 – Tropical-Subtropical Desert Division, American Semi-Desert Province 341 – Temperate...areas: natural resources, cultural resources, and range management. 1. INTRODUCTION Successful military training to meet readiness and...Recent DRI research in the southern California coastal region has identified discrete landscape responses to apparent climate change events

  13. Cultural Diversity: Resources for Music Educators in Selected Works of Three Contemporary African-American Classical Composers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunjung; Keith, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary African-American classical composers Cedric Adderley, John Lane, and Trevor Weston intertwine strands of culture and individual experience to produce musical works whose distinct designs offer cultural resources that music educators can use to integrate diversity into instructional settings. Of special interest is their ability to…

  14. Cultures in the North: Aleut; Athabascan Indian; Eskimo; Haida Indian; Tlingit Indian; Tsimpshian Indian. Multi-Media Resource List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isto, Sarah A., Comp.

    The wide variety of books and informational resources presently available about the American Indian people of Alaska reflect their cultural diversity. Intended to assist the teacher in identifying, collecting, and assessing useful materials on the Alaska Native cultures, this publication cites approximately 406 books, periodicals, films,…

  15. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, M.J.; Brooks, R.D.; Sassaman, K.E.; Crass, D.C. [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) continued through FY95 with the United States Department of Energy to fulfill a threefold mission of cultural resource management, research, and public education at the Savannah River Site. Over 2,300 acres of land on the SRS came under cultural resources review in FY95. This activity entailed 30 field surveys, resulting in the recording of 86 new sites. Twenty-two existing sites within survey tract boundaries were revisited to update site file records. Research conducted by SRARP was reported in 11 papers and monographs published during FY95. SRARP staff also presented research results in 18 papers at professional meetings. Field research included several testing programs, excavations, and remote sensing at area sites, as well as data collection abroad. Seven grants were acquired by SRARP staff to support off-site research. In the area of heritage education, the SRARP expanded its activities in FY95 with a full schedule of classroom education, public outreach, and on-site tours. Volunteer excavations at the Tinker Creek site were continued with the Augusta Archaeological Society and other avocational groups, and other off-site excavations provided a variety of opportunities for field experience. Some 80 presentations, displays and tours were provided for schools, historical societies, civic groups, and environmental and historical awareness day celebrations. Additionally, SRARP staff taught four anthropology courses at area colleges.

  16. Endangered species and cultural resources program Naval petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    In FY96, Enterprise Advisory Services, Inc. (EASI) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on federal properties. Population monitoring activities were conducted for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. Kit fox abundance and distribution was assessed by live-trapping over a 329-km{sup 2} area. Kit fox reproduction and mortality were assessed by radiocollaring and monitoring 22 adults and two pups. Reproductive success and litter size were determined through live-trapping and den observations. Rates and sources of kit fox mortality were assessed by recovering dead radiocollared kit foxes and conducting necropsies to determine cause of death. Abundance of coyotes and bobcats, which compete with kit foxes, was determined by conducting scent station surveys. Kit fox diet was assessed through analysis of fecal samples collected from live-trapped foxes. Abundance of potential prey for kit foxes was determined by conducting transect surveys for lagornorphs and live-trapping small mammals.

  17. Archeological and Historic Cultural Resources Inventory for a Proposed Flood Control Project at Devils Lake, Ramsey County, North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    vegetation. Vegetation (mainly at water depths of 2 m or less) includes pond weeds, naiads, wild celery, coontail, water mifoils [sic], musk qrasses...annuals as Canadian thistle , cocklebur and stinging nettle (Joraanstad et al. 1977). 25 . . .. .. . . . I I I I I II I | 1 I I I...heavily on ethnohistorical documentation to develop this identification (Hayden 1862; Riggs 1863 in Wood 1971). Archeolo- gical evidence was found at

  18. A Cultural Resources Inventory of Eastern Portions of Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota (Mercer and McLean Counties).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-15

    Basin Sur- veys, and reports of these investigations were produced by Smith (1960); and Woolworth and Wood (1960). Local county histories are also...The only major excavations were those conducted by Alan R. Woolworth with a small party from the State Historical Society of North Dakota at the...Grandmother’s Lodge site (32ME59) (Metcalf 1963a:7). In 1954 Woolworth finished the excavation of Grandmother’s Lodge and began work at Fort Kipp (32MN1

  19. A Class III Cultural Resource Inventory of a Portion of the Upper Souris River Valley, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    Sperry 1968; Wood and Woolworth 1964; Lovic and Abler 1982; Lpe 1980) were studied, as well as collections from Plains Village norifestatior.s in...variants of the Middle Mis- souri Tradition (Wood and Woolworth 1964; Wood 1962; Sperry 1968) and to the Scattered Village complex (Lovick and Abler...Terminal variants of the Middle Missouri Tradition (Wood and Woolworth 1964; Wood 1967; Sperry 1968) and to the ScatteredVillage Complex (Lovick and

  20. A Cultural Resource Inventory of the Right Bank of Lake Oahe in Morton and Sioux Counties, North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    32M011; Wood 1967), the Paul Brave site (32SI4; Wood and Woolworth 1964), the Robert Zahn site (32SI3; Wood and Woolworth 1964), the Battle-Porcupine Creek...Ahler (1977), Wood (1967), Woolworth and Wood (1964) and Neuman (1975). Only rim sherds and body sherds containing distinctive decorative elements were...area include Meadow (32S177) and Demery (39C01). Both sites have been excavated (Scheans 1957 and Woolworth and Wood 1964 respectively). Meadow has

  1. A Cultural Resources Inventory of Proposed Recreation Areas, Lake Oahe: Emmons, Morton, and Sioux Counties, North Dakota. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Woodland Wood 1960 MBP Neuman 1960 Neuman 1975 32S12 Fire Heart SHSND Lehmer 1964 EMM,DC Lehmer 1966 32S13 Robert Zahn SHSND Woolworth 1955 EMM Wood... Woolworth 1964 32S14 Paul Brave SHSND Woolworth 1955 EMM Wood, Woolworth 1964 32S16 Porcupine Creek SHSNO Scheans 1957 Woodland, Scheans 1957 Historic...Meadow SHSND Scheans 1957 EC Scheans 1957 32S1200 Alkire Mound SHSND Lehmer 1964 Woodland Henning 1965 39C01 Demery SHSND Woolworth 1956 EC Woolworth and

  2. A Cultural Resource Inventory of the Left Bank of Lake Oahe: Burleigh and Emmons Counties, North Dakota. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    Prehistoric Hunters of the High Plains. Academic Press, New York. C 142 ’■ %»i)W«W-A>8aaM3««w,«i«iii<^ 1 ■ T"’ ■.. "£’"-.■ Fristad, Palma 1970...Major Grassland Types in Western North Dakota. Ecological Monographs 8:57-114. Hennessy, William B. 1910 History of North Dakota...Missouri River Flood Plain in North Dakota. Ecological Monographs 46: 59-84. Kazeck, Melvin E. 1956 North Dakota: A Human and Economic

  3. A Report on the Intensive Cultural Resources Inventory of the Proposed Flood Control Project at Argusville, North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    performed artifact collection, plane table mapping, lithic analysis , and report preparation. Salt River Project-assisted in development of research design...for lithic analysis . Performed extensive lithic analysis . 1977-1976 U.S.D.A. Coconino National Forest, Arizona. Archeological Assistant. Performed...archeoloaical survey, excavation, ceramic and lithic analysis , report preparation. 18 1976 Museum of Northern Arizona, work-study student. Assisted in

  4. The 1986 Cultural Resource Inventory of Portions of Lake Oahe, Corson and Dewey Counties, South Dakota. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    three partial limb elements) and the single partial cranium recovered during the present investigation represent a single individual. Further, the...bedrock or, alternately, the result of downslope movement. In either case no clear temporal association is evident. Evaluation of the partial cranium is...the beach. This displacement has also resulted in an artificially enlarged site area which presently measures approximately 140 m east-west by 100 m

  5. Portuguese version of the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI among assembly workers: Cultural adaptation, reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Reliable and valid instruments are essential for understanding fatigue in occupational settings. This study analyzed the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 218 workers from an automotive industry involved in assembly tasks for fabrication of mechanical cables. Convergent and discriminant validity, internal consistency reliability and confirmatory factor analysis were performed. Results: Results showed adequate fit to data, yielding a 20-item, 5-factor structure (all intercorrelated: Chi2/df (ratio Chi2 and degrees of freedom = 2.530, confirmatory fit index (CFI = 0.919, goodness of fit index (GFI = 0.845, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA = 0.084. The SOFI presented an adequate internal consistency, with the sub-scales and total scale presenting good reliability values (Cronbach’s α values from 0.742 to 0.903 and 0.943 respectively. Conclusions: Findings suggest that the Portuguese version of the SOFI may be a useful tool to assess fatigue and prevent work-related injuries. In future research, other instruments should be used as an external criterion to correlate with the SOFI dimensions. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(3:407–417

  6. 30 CFR 220.032 - Inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inventories. 220.032 Section 220.032 Mineral... Inventories. (a) The lessee is responsible for NPSL materiel and shall make proper and timely cost and credit... operations. The accumulation of surplus stocks shall be avoided by proper materiel control, inventory...

  7. Queensland coal inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-04-01

    Australia's black coal resources rank in the top five globally, around 50% of which are located in the sedimentary basins of Queensland. The Bowen Basin is the most prolific coal repository, hosting over 60% of the currently established resource inventory. Large volumes of thermal coal are present in the Surat and Galilee basins as well as small extensional and pull apart basins such as Blair Athol and Tarong. The article examines Queensland's coal industry from a government perspective. It first discusses the current coal market, then introduces the concept of inventory coal and explains the Australia Joint Ore Reserves Committee (JORC) code - a resource evaluation system. The stratigraphy of each of Queensland's coal basins is then discussed in sections headed Permian coals, Triassic coals, Jurassic and Cretaceous coals, and Tertiary coals. 3 figs.

  8. Effectiveness of psychological capital on mistake management culture as a resource for learning in organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Amini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mistake management is rapidly emerging as an important, and can be overlooked, resource for learning in organization. Learning from workplace terminates ways directed to enhancement of skills and capabilities by workaday activities. Since current works almost are very complex that mistakes may not be eluded, organization should see these mistakes as an opportunity for learning that broadcast mistake management culture (MMC.Psychological Capital (PsyCap is one of construct contributes to the formation and dissemination of MMC. Thus this study investigates the effect of PsyCap on MMC. In this regards, it has been paid to how PsyCap factors such as self-efficacy, optimism, hope, and resiliency impact on MMC. A test based upon a sample of 207 nurses of four hospitals reveals that PsyCap has positive impacts on MMC.

  9. Riparian Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a digital representation of the 1:24,000 Land Use Riparian Areas Inventory for the state of Kansas. The dataset includes a 100 foot buffer around all...

  10. New version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI-CAT: translation, cultural adaptation to Brazil and analyses of psychometric properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa C. Mancini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test (PEDI-CAT, developed with innovative measurement methodologies, evaluates functioning of children and youth, from 0 to 21 years, with different health conditions. It is a revision of an earlier instrument (PEDI that has been used in national and international clinical practice and research. It was felt to be necessary to make this new version (PEDI-CAT available in Brazil. Objectives Translate and culturally adapt the PEDI-CAT to the Brazilian-Portuguese language and test its psychometric properties. Method This methodological study was developed through the following stages: (1 translation, (2 synthesis, (3 back-translation, (4 revision by an expert committee, (5 testing of the pre-final version, and (6 evaluation of the psychometric properties. The 276 translated PEDI-CAT items were divided into three age groups (0-7, 8-14, and 15-21 years. Results The PEDI-CAT translation followed all six stages. The adaptations incorporated cultural and socioeconomic class specificities. The PEDI-CAT/Brazil showed good indices of inter-examiner (intraclass correlation coefficient-ICC=0.83-0.89 and test-retest (ICC=0.96-0.97 reliability, good internal consistency (0.99 and small standard error of measurement in all three age groups (0.12-0.17. Factor analyses grouped the items from the three functional skills domains into one factor, and items from the responsibility scale into three factors, supporting the adequacy of these factor solutions to the conceptual structure of the instrument and the developmental model. Conclusion The PEDI-CAT/Brazil is a theoretically consistent, culturally appropriate, and reliable instrument. Its availability in Brazil will contribute to the evaluation and measurement of functional outcomes from clinical interventions, longitudinal follow-up, and rehabilitation research.

  11. 1998 Inventory of Endangered Species and Wildlife Resources at the US Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (NODC Accession 0000631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report summarizes the results of the second United States Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Activities in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (UES) inventory of...

  12. 1996 Inventory of Endangered Species and Wildlife Resources on US Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (NODC Accession 0000251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report summarizes the results of the first United States Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Activities in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (UES) inventory of...

  13. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggy Robinson

    2004-07-01

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the first six months of 2004 (January 1, 2004-June 30, 2004) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Azotea Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Azote Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico.

  14. Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2003-07-01

    The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

  15. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggy Robinson

    2004-01-01

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

  16. European Capitals of Culture: A “soft power” resource for the European Union?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Sianos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Using English-language newspaper articles retrieved from digital repositories, this paper examines the cultural asymmetrical encounter between Western and Eastern Europe after 1989. It argues that due to the rise of the Iron Curtain after 1948 and the post-war progress of the Western European integration project after 1950, the idea of “Europe” was confined to the West until 1989. After 1989, however, the Eastern European nations were free to “return to Europe”, and in order to do so they followed the “reference model” of the West. The paper takes the institution of the European Capital of Culture (ECOC as a case study and demonstrates how both Western and Eastern European cities used the ECOC title as a gateway to modernity, why it acquired an extra functionality in the East as a stage where they could showcase their “European” credentials, and how it gradually developed into one of the E.U.’s “soft power” resources.

  17. Cultural Resources - MUSEUMS_IGS_IN: Museums in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — MUSEUMS_IGS_IN is a point shapefile showing the locations of 118 museums in Indiana. Using street addresses obtained from Web pages, a shapefile was created using...

  18. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  19. Methods of inventory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, C; Mackowiak, J

    1985-01-01

    Various methods for controlling inventory are described, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. The open-to-buy (OTB) budget method limits purchases to a specific amount of funds available for purchasing pharmaceuticals during a specified period. The emphasis of the OTB method is financial control of the pharmacy inventory. Although it is useful in monitoring and adjusting the dollar value of the inventory, it should be combined with other methods for a total inventory control system. The primary emphasis of the short-list method is to provide accurate and timely inventory information to the person responsible for order placement. The short list identifies the items that are in short supply. It is the most common feedback and control mechanism in use, but it is best suited for settings where duplicate or reserve stock is maintained and monitored by more rigorous methods. The main objective of the minimum and maximum method is to determine when and how much to order of each item. It also provides limited dollar control. The major disadvantage of this method is the time it requires to establish the minimum and maximum levels and to update them regularly to reflect changes in demand. The stock record card method is used to record information on the movement of goods in and out of the storage area. Stock cards can also be used to monitor inventory levels and facilitate order initiation. It is probably the optimum method to be used alone. The most effective system of inventory control is one employing a combination of these methods tailored to meet the institution's needs and available resources.

  20. Cross cultural comparison of JTCI inventory of temperament and character scores of 11-13 year olds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukanac Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study compares characteristics of Serbian and American children on the dimensions of temperament and character on the Junior TCI (JTCI for assessment of 9 to 13 year olds - based on Robert Cloninger’s Psychobiological model of temperament and character. Given the lack of assessment tools for this age group, the goal of the present study was to test the factor structure and main psychometric characteristics of the JTCI in order to determine the applicability of this questionnaire on Serbian children. The sample consisted of 222 boys and girls from the normal population, ages 11 to 13 and who attended grades 6 to 8. The results showed significant differences between Serbian and American sample. Namely, Serbian children had higher scores on the Novelty seeking and Harm Avoidance and lower scores on Reward Dependence and Persistency. As to the Character Dimensions, Serbian children had lower scores on Reward dependence and persistency, and significantly lower on Self-directedness and Cooperativeness. Scores on the Self-transcendence were higher among the Serbian children. The differences on Character dimensions between children from different cultures suppose to be primarily a result of the socialization process. They reflect a lower level of maturity, cooperation and probably compensatory reliance on the religion. Although it is a temperament dimension, being prone to negative emotions (higher scores on Danger avoidance may also be a result of a situational sensitivity. This result could be interpreted as a reflection of the negative effects that the general socio cultural milieu had on the children who grew up during the social crisis and transitional periods of our society. The result did not confirm a seven factor personality structure of children in this age group. It is likely that at the age of 11 to 13, dimensions of character and temperament did not yet clearly differentiate. Finally, poor reliability of the JTCI scales imposes

  1. A cross-cultural validation of the Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) in Turkey and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Anita G.; Cakir, Mustafa; Peterson, Claudette M.; Ray, Chris M.

    2012-04-01

    Background . Studies exploring the relationship between students' achievement and the quality of the classroom learning environments have shown that there is a strong relationship between these two concepts. Learning environment instruments are constantly being revised and updated, including for use in different cultures, which requires continued validation efforts. Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish cross-cultural reliability and validity of the Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) in both Turkey and the USA. Sample Approximately 980 students attending grades 9-12 in Turkey and 130 students attending grades 9-12 in the USA participated in the study. Design and method Scale reliability analyses and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed separately for Turkish and US participants for both actual and preferred responses to each scale to confirm the structure of the TROFLEI across these two distinct samples. Results Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients, ranging from α = 0.820 to 0.931 for Turkish participants and from α = 0.778 to 0.939 for US participants, indicated that all scales have satisfactory internal consistency for both samples. Confirmatory factor analyses resulted in evidence of adequate model fit across both samples for both actual and preferred responses, with the root mean square error of approximation ranging from 0.052 to 0.057 and the comparative fit index ranging from 0.920 to 0.982. Conclusions This study provides initial evidence that the TROFLEI is valid for use in both the Turkish and US high-school populations (grades 9-12). However, the psychometric properties should be examined further with different populations, such as middle-school students (grades 6-8).

  2. Objectively-assessed outcome measures: a translation and cross-cultural adaptation procedure applied to the Chedoke McMaster Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn Sabine

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardised translation and cross-cultural adaptation (TCCA procedures are vital to describe language translation, cultural adaptation, and to evaluate quality factors of transformed outcome measures. No TCCA procedure for objectively-assessed outcome (OAO measures exists. Furthermore, no official German version of the Canadian Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI is available. Methods An eight-step for TCCA procedure for OAO was developed (TCCA-OAO based on the existing TCCA procedure for patient-reported outcomes. The TCCA-OAO procedure was applied to develop a German version of the CAHAI (CAHAI-G. Inter-rater reliability of the CAHAI-G was determined through video rating of CAHAI-G. Validity evaluation of the CAHAI-G was assessed using the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA. All ratings were performed by trained, independent raters. In a cross-sectional study, patients were tested within 31 hours after the initial CAHAI-G scoring, for their motor function level using the subscales for arm and hand of the CMSA. Inpatients and outpatients of the occupational therapy department who experienced a cerebrovascular accident or an intracerebral haemorrhage were included. Results Performance of 23 patients (mean age 69.4, SD 12.9; six females; mean time since stroke onset: 1.5 years, SD 2.5 years have been assessed. A high inter-rater reliability was calculated with ICCs for 4 CAHAI-G versions (13, 9, 8, 7 items ranging between r = 0.96 and r = 0.99 (p Conclusions The TCCA-OAO procedure was validated regarding its feasibility and applicability for objectively-assessed outcome measures. The resulting German CAHAI can be used as a valid and reliable assessment for bilateral upper limb performance in ADL in patients after stroke.

  3. Three papers in natural resource valuation: Accounting for cross-cultural contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton MacDonald, Darla Anne

    1998-12-01

    This is a three paper thesis concerned with environmental valuation in cross cultural contexts. The first paper tests some of the hypotheses outlined in Adamowicz et al (1998) concerning potential sources of bias and other problems that might enter the contingent valuation process. In particular, the potential for satiation and cultural differences in willingness to pay are explored. The paper concludes that there are differences in how Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal people in northern Canada place values on natural resources such as the fishery. No strong tendencies to refuse to consider monetary - resource trade-offs were observed in either group. In general, satiation was found to be a negative influence on willingness to pay. Satiation with one's own use of a resource was a significant factor with the Non-Aboriginal population. Non-use values were isolated for the group of satiated respondents. The non-use values reflect the existence values, bequest values, altruism, etc. The second paper examines how the random utility model could be adapted to model household firewood collection. Collecting fuelwood is first and foremost a resource allocation issue for the household. There are real opportunity costs in choosing one site for fuelwood collection over another. In the study areas of north-eastern Zimbabwe, households were observed to choose a variety of sites. The choice of any particular site was hypothesised to involve a trade-off of the various attributes of the sites which includes time, effort or calories as well as characteristics such as the availability of certain types of fuelwood at a site, whether the site passes by the garden or by the homestead of a friend. The closure of any particular site might represent a minor loss on average of 10 to 25 calories but for some households, the loss may be as high as 200 calories. This brings a spatial dimension to the analysis as the closure of a site will be borne differently by households depending on their

  4. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future

  5. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, annual report FY97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are oil fields administered by the DOE in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Four federally endangered animal species and one federally threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus), giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides), and Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri). All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. The DOE/NPRC is obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The primary objective of the Endangered Species and Cultural Resources Program is to provide NPRC with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the ESA, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress, results, and accomplishments of the program during fiscal year 1997 (FY97).

  6. A Cross-­Cultural Validation of the Music® Model of Academic Motivation Inventory: Evidence from Chinese-­ and Spanish- Speaking University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brett D.; Li, Ming; Cruz, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which Chinese and Spanish translations of the College Student version of the MUSIC® Model of Academic Motivation Inventory (MUSIC Inventory; Jones, 2012) demonstrate acceptable psychometric properties. We surveyed 300 students at a university in China and 201 students at a university in…

  7. Cultural Resources Investigation: Survey of Portions of the State Road Coulee Project, La Crosse, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    Dorchester, Clark County, Wis. ETC Engineering Inc. An archaeological survey of Copeland Park. City of La Crosse. An archaeological inspection of the Gillett...Evaluation of Weston , Unit 3 Power Plant, - Marathon County, Wisconsin. -Archaeological Inventory of the Sanitary Sewer Collection System and Waste Disposal

  8. Desalination as Groundwater Conservation: The Cost of Protecting Cultural and Environmental Resources in Chile's Region II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, E. C.; Cristi, O.; Libecap, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    There is a substantial body of evidence that groundwater overdraft is occurring worldwide. Economists argue that the cause of this overdraft is the open-access nature of the resource, which results in a "tragedy of the commons." Sustainable water management requires that some institution control the resource to limit this overdraft by reducing water extraction. This reduction creates scarcity and requires a method of rationing. The economically efficient outcome occurs when the lowest value uses of water are eliminated. This allocation, though, may have undesirable social consequences, such as the loss of small-scale farming, and political ramifications that make such an allocation unpopular to implement. This paper explores the economic cost of leaving water in low-value uses. The policy we explore is a moratorium on voluntary water sales to mining firms to protect the groundwater resource in northern Chile. This policy has accelerated the use of expensive desalinated water, whose cost is primarily driven by its heavy use of carbon-based electricity. Chile has a strong system of water property rights that economists argue ration water in a way that leads to the efficient allocation through water markets. This paper first explores the potential inefficiency of a water market when groundwater and surface water are linked, as well as when different users vary in their intensity of use. This theoretical background provides a framework for determining the economically efficient allocation of water and the losses associated with the moratorium in northern Chile. The policy does protect some environmental and cultural public goods, which potentially offset some or all of this cost. We provide a perspective on the magnitude of these public goods but do not attempt to value them explicitly. Instead, we demonstrate what their value must be so that the moratorium policy has a cost-to-benefit ratio of one. While the estimate of lost income from inefficiency is the main focus

  9. Identifying Socio-Cultural Factors That Impact the Use of Open Educational Resources in Local Public Administrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Stoffregen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to define relevant barriers to the exchange of Open Educational Resources in local public administrations. Building upon a cultural model, eleven experts were interviewed and asked to evaluate several factors, such as openness in discourse, learning at the workplace, and superior support, among others. The result is a set of socio-cultural factors that shape the use of Open Educational Resources in public administrations. Significant factors are, in this respect, the independent choice of learning resources, the spirit of the platform, the range of available formats and access to technologies. Practitioners use these factors to elaborate on the readiness of public administrations towards the use of open e-Learning systems. To academic debates on culture in e-Learning, the results provide an alternative model that is contextualized to meet the demands of public sector contexts. Overall, the paper contributes to the lack of research about open e-Learning systems in the public sector, as well as regarding culture in the management of learning and knowledge exchange.

  10. Car windshield fragments as cheap alternative glass beads for homogenization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Afu Ochang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a global health problem which has been compounded by the emergence and rapid spread of drug resistant strains. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis usually requires homogenization of cultures using 3–5 mm glass beads. In resource limited settings, these important material may either not be readily available in the country as in our case requiring that one orders them from abroad or they may be too expensive. In both situations, this would impact on the usually lean budget. In our centre were we recently introduced tuberculosis culture and drug susceptibility testing using the Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS technique, we successfully used glass fragments from a broken car windshield obtained from a mechanic workshop to homogenize solid cultures to prepare positive controls. All cultures homogenized with these local beads gave consistent MODS results. The challenge of the limited availability of resources for research in resource limited settings can be met by adapting available materials to achieve results.

  11. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume III. Cultural resource assessment socioeconomic background data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macfarlane, Heather; Janzen, Donald E.

    1980-11-26

    This report has been prepared in conjunction with an environmental baseline study for a commercial coal conversion facility being conducted by Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI) and Airco Energy Company (AECO). This report represents a cultural resource assessment for the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. This assessment presents data collected by Dames and Moore during a recent archaeological reconnaissance of the unsurveyed southeastern portion of the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. Also, results of two previous surveys on the northern and southwestern portion of the plant site for American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO) and Kentucky Utilities are included. The Dames and Moore survey of the southeastern portion of the plant site identified one archaeological site, three standing structures and one historic cemetery. In addition 47 archaeological sites and six standing structures are known from two previous surveys of the remainder of the plant site (Cowan 1975 and Turnbow et al 1980). Eleven of the previously recorded archaeological sites were recommended for further assessment to evaluate their potential for inclusion within the Holt Bottoms Archaeological District currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. None of the archaeological sites or standing structures located within the plant site during the Dames and Moore survey were recommended for further assessment. A total of eight archaeological sites were located during the Dames and Moore survey of the two potential solid waste disposal areas. Of this total only two sites were recommended for further assessment. Also, one previously unknown historic cemetry was located in the southernmost potential waste disposal area.

  12. The Resource Identification Initiative: A cultural shift in publishing [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Bandrowski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to allow humans and algorithms to identify the exact resources that are reported or answer basic questions such as “What other studies used resource X?” To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25 biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (including software and databases. RRIDs represent accession numbers assigned by an authoritative database, e.g., the model organism databases, for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal (www.scicrunch.org/resources. RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are generally accurate in performing the task of identifying resources and supportive of the goals of the project. We also show that identifiability of the resources pre- and post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three

  13. Social and cultural resources for the setting up and functioning of family enterprises in a small Bulgarian town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova Ivanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a field of culture, the family enterprise shows that in the current European societies the economic operation does not proceed only from a purely rational point of view and that notwithstanding the common speaking of globalization, the local may be a prerequisite for successful economic development. My objective has been to show, proceeding from an example from a small Bulgarian town, that the family enterprise is a field of culture in which the observed phenomena are strongly influenced by the social inclusion of the enterprise and by its tie-up with the context of the urban environment. I shall investigate in what way local social and cultural resources are intensively used in the process of setting up and functioning of a family enterprise from the sphere of hoteldom and tourism in the town of Belogradchik. I intend to study whether these resources are conducive to the economic prosperity of the firm. Another research objective is to establish the manner of identification of the enterprise with the town, with the region and the local culture by way of the services provided (tourist and restaurant. I shall look for an answer to the question of how the enterprise’ working realm fits in the concrete cultural, historical and social context of the town.

  14. A Review of International Cross-Cultural Mixed Messages and Their Implications for Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on the concept of international cross-cultural mixed messages. Although there is limited literature on this topic, the review suggests that messages from one's home culture and a second culture can result in conflicting expectations for one's own behavior and for the behavior of others. Double bind theory is…

  15. A Review of International Cross-Cultural Mixed Messages and Their Implications for Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on the concept of international cross-cultural mixed messages. Although there is limited literature on this topic, the review suggests that messages from one's home culture and a second culture can result in conflicting expectations for one's own behavior and for the behavior of others. Double bind theory is…

  16. Cultural, Sociofamilial, and Psychological Resources that Inhibit Psychological Distress in African Americans Exposed to Stressful Life Events and Race-Related Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsey, Shawn O.; Giesbrecht, Norman; Hook, Joshua; Stanard, Pia M.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested a sociocultural model of stress and coping in a sample of 215 African Americans. Psychological resources (optimism, ego resilience) were modeled as a "nested self" (S. E. Hobfoll, 2001), supported by social resources (family adaptability and cohesion) and cultural resources (racial pride, religiosity). Race-related stress was a…

  17. Investment into the future of microbial resources: culture collection funding models and BRC business plans for biological resource centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; McCluskey, Kevin; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2014-01-01

    Through their long history of public service, diverse microbial Biological Resource Centres (mBRCs) have made myriad contributions to society and science. They have enabled the maintenance of specimens isolated before antibiotics, made available strains showing the development and change of pathogenicity toward animals, humans and plants, and have maintained and provided reference strains to ensure quality and reproducibility of science. However, this has not been achieved without considerable financial commitment. Different collections have unique histories and their support is often tied to their origins. However many collections have grown to serve large constituencies and need to develop novel funding mechanisms. Moreover, several international initiatives have described mBRCs as a factor in economic development and have led to the increased professionalism among mBRCs.

  18. Oldenburg Burnout Inventory - student version: cultural adaptation and validation into Portuguese Inventário de Oldenburg para estudantes: adaptação cultural e validação para o português

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Alvares Duarte Bonini Campos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Oldenburg Burnout Inventory for college students (OLBI-S was adapted to Brazilian Portuguese and its reliability and validity were measured in a sample of both Brazilian (n=958 and Portuguese (n=602 college students. The confirmatory factor analysis of the OLBI-S showed good fit but two items were removed since they lacked individual reliability (λRealizou-se adaptação cultural do Inventário de Oldenburg para estudantes (OLBI-S em português e estimou-se sua confiabilidade e validade. O OLBI-S foi preenchido por 958 estudantes universitários brasileiros e 602 portugueses. O modelo fatorial original apresentou ajustamento adequado mas foram removidos dois itens com confiabilidade individual baixa (λ<0,5. A nova estrutura apresentou bom ajustamento a 2/3 da amostra total sendo invariante no 1/3 restante da amostra. Verificou-se baixa consistência interna e validade convergente, confiabilidade compósita aceitável, boa validade discriminante, concorrente e divergente. O OLBI-S não foi invariante nas amostras de Brasil e Portugal. O OLBI-S apresentou limitações e ausência de validade transcultural nas amostras estudadas.

  19. Skills Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Application to assist in 1) determining effects of retirement on IT workforce, 2) resource planning, and 3) understanding training needs. Also attempts to satisfy...

  20. Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

    2005-12-30

    In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

  1. Cultural Resources Sample Survey of the Bayou Cocodrie and Tributaries Project, St. Landry, Evangeline and Avoyelles Parishes, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-06

    construction of networks of underground pipelines and above ground pumping facilities. While most of the construction activities are finished, these activities...Pipeline Company’s pipeline right-of-way from East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, to Orange County, Texas; Neitzel’s (1976) survey of an underground waterline...Louisiana. Gagliano, Sherwood M., Richard A. Weinstein, Bert Rader , Benjamin A. Small, and Kathleen McCloskey 1978 Cultural Resources Survey of the

  2. Mobile phones as cultural resources for learning – an analysis of mobile expertise, structures and emerging cultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Bachmair

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available If it is the case that mobile devices, with their specific social and technological structures and attendant cultural practices, have become an integral part of everyday life, then the educational field has to react. But how and who? Fact is that mobile devices have reached and become fully integrated in everyday life, worldwide and across social milieus. This development is «ubiquitous» (e.g. Haythornthwaite, 2008, Beale 2007, Nyiri 2002 and is accompanied by an increase in individualisation enabled and necessitated by a variety of mobile devices characterised by media convergence. Education must ask questions about the impact of these irreversible trends on the personal development of young people and about its role in mediating them as well as about their impact on individual agency of young people in the context of emerging socio-cultural structures (see Stald 2007.

  3. The cultural and historical heritage of towns Trebinje and Jajce: A resource for the growth of tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzijan Jasna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the possibility of including cultural heritage in cultural and tourist development policies. The tourist potential of historically and artistically significant urban entities will be described and assessed in the paper, with a focus on the cases of Trebinje and Jajce two Bosnian and Herzegovinian towns with preserved historical town cores. The two towns were both founded in the Middle Ages and have developed to this day, with their urban areas continuously expanding and being built up. Their spatial and cultural historical complexes are diverse and multilayered, with various natural and man-made structures dating back to different epochs. They are the greatest cultural monuments and a testimony of the past, of the physical and spiritual development of these communities. Trebinje is an old town located at the intersection of various influences and interests, with a rich and long history which has altered not only the appearance and contents of its town core, but also its significance and its functional impact on the broader surroundings. The Old Town, a surviving historical complex, which originated in the Middle Ages and developed considerably under Turkish rule is one of Trebinje's tourist resources. Nowadays, tourism is becoming one of the world's most important industries, its appeal coming from the natural cultural and historical values of towns and cities. Due to that, the natural cultural and historical values of Trebinje and Jajce can be preserved only if their economic potential is also taken into account.

  4. Inventory Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Leigh

    2000-11-03

    The purpose of the inventory abstraction as directed by the development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999b) is to: (1) Interpret the results of a series of relative dose calculations (CRWMS M&O 1999c, 1999d). (2) Recommend, including a basis thereof, a set of radionuclides that should be modeled in the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (TSPA-FEIS). (3) Provide initial radionuclide inventories for the TSPA-SR and TSPA-FEIS models. (4) Answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)'s Issue Resolution Status Report ''Key Technical Issue: Container Life and Source Term'' (CLST IRSR) (NRC 1999) key technical issue (KTI): ''The rate at which radionuclides in SNF [Spent Nuclear Fuel] are released from the EBS [Engineered Barrier System] through the oxidation and dissolution of spent fuel'' (Subissue 3). The scope of the radionuclide screening analysis encompasses the period from 100 years to 10,000 years after the potential repository at Yucca Mountain is sealed for scenarios involving the breach of a waste package and subsequent degradation of the waste form as required for the TSPA-SR calculations. By extending the time period considered to one million years after repository closure, recommendations are made for the TSPA-FEIS. The waste forms included in the inventory abstraction are Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel (CSNF), DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel (DSNF), High-Level Waste (HLW), naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plutonium waste. The intended use of this analysis is in TSPA-SR and TSPA-FEIS. Based on the recommendations made here, models for release, transport, and possibly exposure will be developed for the isotopes that would be the highest contributors to the dose given a release to the accessible environment. The inventory abstraction is important in

  5. INVENTORY ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ragan

    2001-12-19

    The purpose of the inventory abstraction, which has been prepared in accordance with a technical work plan (CRWMS M&O 2000e for ICN 02 of the present analysis, and BSC 2001e for ICN 03 of the present analysis), is to: (1) Interpret the results of a series of relative dose calculations (CRWMS M&O 2000c, 2000f). (2) Recommend, including a basis thereof, a set of radionuclides that should be modeled in the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (TSPA-FEIS). (3) Provide initial radionuclide inventories for the TSPA-SR and TSPA-FEIS models. (4) Answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)'s Issue Resolution Status Report ''Key Technical Issue: Container Life and Source Term'' (CLST IRSR) key technical issue (KTI): ''The rate at which radionuclides in SNF [spent nuclear fuel] are released from the EBS [engineered barrier system] through the oxidation and dissolution of spent fuel'' (NRC 1999, Subissue 3). The scope of the radionuclide screening analysis encompasses the period from 100 years to 10,000 years after the potential repository at Yucca Mountain is sealed for scenarios involving the breach of a waste package and subsequent degradation of the waste form as required for the TSPA-SR calculations. By extending the time period considered to one million years after repository closure, recommendations are made for the TSPA-FEIS. The waste forms included in the inventory abstraction are Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel (CSNF), DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel (DSNF), High-Level Waste (HLW), naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plutonium waste. The intended use of this analysis is in TSPA-SR and TSPA-FEIS. Based on the recommendations made here, models for release, transport, and possibly exposure will be developed for the isotopes that would be the highest

  6. Cultural Resources and Cognitive Frames: Keys to an Anthropological Approach to Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrie, Ian

    In this chapter, I suggest a methodological and theoretical framework for preliminary investigations designed to gauge the potential societal response to the discovery of either microbial or intelligent extraterrestrial life. The uncritical use of analogies to the ethnographic record of contact between societies and the discovery of extraterrestrial life has been, rightfully, the target of sharp criticism since the earliest days of the scientific search for this life. However, I argue that by approaching this record with different epistemological premises, and shifting the focus from the material to the symbolic and cognitive dimensions of this contact, one can avoid many of the pitfalls of the analogical mode of argumentation, and provide a solid conceptual basis for the development of an adequate heuristic. Specifically, I draw upon the germinal debate between Sahlins and Obeyesekere over the nature of human meaning-making in the face of radically other societies and their meanings to treat the discovery of an intelligent civilization. In parallel, I draw upon Sharp's discussion of the relationship between the changes in the symbolic order and the material organization of society to suggest that much of this analysis also applies to the discovery of extraterrestrial microbial life. In both cases, I do not argue for a one-to-one correspondence between the historical and the contemporary, but rather use these arguments as illustrations of what I see as particularly profitable modes of conceptualizing the universal human processes of making sense out of novel objects and phenomena. Finally, this chapter argues for a mixed-methods quantitative-qualitative investigation into the character and distribution of societal resources for understanding life and intelligence, rather than the extraterrestrial as such. The qualitative is advanced as a necessary adjunct to the quantitative, as the best method for gaining access to the repertoire of cultural frames upon which

  7. Engaging cultural resources to promote mental health in Dutch LSES neighborhoods: study of a community-based participatory media project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, Mare; de Vries, Marten; Horstman, Klasien

    2015-09-28

    Community-based participatory media projects form a promising new strategy for mental health promotion that can help address the mental health-gap identified by the World Health Organization. (2008b) mhGAP, Mental Health Gap Action Programme: Scaling Up Care for Mental, Neurological and Substance Use Disorders. World Health Organization, Geneva. In this article we present an ethnographic study about a participatory media project that was developed to promote mental health in selected Dutch low socio-economic status neighborhoods. Through narrowcastings (group film viewings), participant observation and interviews we mapped the ways in which the media project effected and facilitated the collective sense-making process of the audience with regard to sources of stress impacting mental health and opportunities for action. These determinants of mental health are shaped by cultural dimensions, since the cultural context shapes everyday experiences of stress as well as the resources and skills to manage them. Our analysis shows that the media project engaged cultural resources to challenge stressful social scripts. We conclude that more attention should be paid to cultural narratives in a community to understand how health promotion strategies can support social resilience.

  8. More than 25 Million Acres? DoD as a Federal, Natural, and Cultural Resource Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    when the land seemed like an endless resource. 50Memorandum from Holloman Air Force Base Deputy Base Civil Engineer to BLM Area Manager, Caballo ...Range installations." More recently (January 23, 1995), Fort Bragg sent a memorandum to the BLM’s Caballo Resource Area requesting "land maneuver rights

  9. Design and Research of Service Platform for Protection and Dissemination of Cultural Heritage Resources of The Silk Road in the Territory of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Zeng, S. J.; Na, W.; Yang, H.; Huang, J.; Tan, X. D.; Sun, Z. J.

    2015-08-01

    The Silk Road, a major traffic route across the Eurasia continent, has been a convergence for the exchange, communication and dissemination of various cultures such as nations, materials, religions and arts for more than two thousand years. And the cultural heritage along the long and complicate route has been also attractive. In recent years, the Silk Road - the Road Network along the Chang'an-Tianshan Mountain has been listed in the Directory of World Cultural Heritage. The rare and rich cultural resources along the Silk Road, especially those in the territory of China, have attracted attentions of the world. This article describes the research ideas, methods, processes and results of the planning design on the internet-based dissemination services platform system for cultural heritage resources. First of all, it has defined the targeting for dissemination services and the research methods applied for the Silk Road heritage resources, based on scientific and objective spatial measurement and research on history and geography, to carry on the excavation of values of cultural resource for the target users. Then, with the front-end art exhibit by means of innovative IT, time and space maps of cultural heritage resources, interactive graphics display, panoramic three-dimensional virtual tour, and the Silk Road topics as the main features, a comprehensive and multi-angle cultural resources dissemination services platform is built. The research core of the platform is a demand-oriented system design on the basis of cultural resources and features as the fundamental, the value of contemporary manifestation as the foundation, and cultural dissemination and service as a starting point. This platform has achieved, temporal context generalization, interest profiles extension, online and offline adaptation, and other prominent innovations. On the basis of routes heritage resource protection and dissemination services with complex relationship between time and space, and the

  10. Development of a decision aid for energy resource management for the Navajo Nation incorporating environmental cultural values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necefer, Len Edward

    Decision-making surrounding pathways of future energy resource management are complexity and requires balancing tradeoffs of multiple environmental, social, economic, and technical outcomes. Technical decision aid can provide a framework for informed decision making, allowing individuals to better understand the tradeoff between resources, technology, energy services, and prices. While technical decision aid have made significant advances in evaluating these quantitative aspects of energy planning and performance, they have not been designed to incorporate human factors, such as preferences and behavior that are informed by cultural values. Incorporating cultural values into decision tools can provide not only an improved decision framework for the Navajo Nation, but also generate new insights on how these perspective can improve decision making on energy resources. Ensuring these aids are a cultural fit for each context has the potential to increase trust and promote understanding of the tradeoffs involved in energy resource management. In this dissertation I present the development of a technical tool that explicitly addresses cultural and spiritual values and experimentally assesses their influence on the preferences and decision making of Navajo citizens. Chapter 2 describes the results of a public elicitation effort to gather information about stakeholder views and concerns related to energy development in the Navajo Nation in order to develop a larger sample survey and a decision-support tool that links techno-economic energy models with sociocultural attributes. Chapter 3 details the methods of developing the energy decision aid and its underlying assumptions for alternative energy projects and their impacts. This tool also provides an alternative to economic valuation of cultural impacts based upon an ordinal index tied to environmental impacts. Chapter 4 details the the influence of various cultural, environmental, and economic outcome information provided

  11. Texas, 2010 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bentley

    2012-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the statewide annual inventory conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas Forest Service of the forest resource attributes in Texas. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units – southeast (unit 1), northeast (unit 2), north central (unit 3...

  12. Texas, 2008 forest inventory and analysis factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Bentley

    2011-01-01

    This science update summarizes the findings of the first statewide annual inventory conducted by the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program in cooperation with the Texas Forest Service of the forest resource attributes in Texas. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—southeast (unit 1), the northeast (unit 2), the north...

  13. Intangible Cultural Heritage and Geographical Indication of Specialty Resources: A Case Study of Shiyan City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai; HU; Wanzhen; XIONG; Zhiguo; SUN; Shuting; WANG; Limin; HUANG

    2013-01-01

    The protection of intangible cultural heritage and geographical indications of the specialty in Shiyan City was analyzed,and then related suggestions were proposed,for example,to collect and organize the intangible cultural heritage related to traditional specialty;to enhance the application of those intangible cultural heritage projects related to traditional industry and agriculture;to establish some demonstration bases for the productive protection of intangible cultural heritages;to strengthen the application of geographical indications of traditional specialty;to build national quality standards for various specialty with geographical indications;to integrate and cultivate the famous specialty brands with geographical indication;to implement the double protection of the geographical indications and intangible cultural heritages;to improve the poverty alleviation through developing the specialty industry with geographical indications.

  14. An inventory of Geothermal Resources in Nebraska: State-Coupled Program between US Department of Energy and The University of Nebraska. Final report, June 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnold, William D.; Eversoll, Duane, A.; Messenger, Karen A.; Carlson, Marvin P.

    1983-06-30

    The goal of the State Coupled Resource Assessment Program is to identify and evaluate geothermal resources in the state, particularly low-temperature potential. Eight tasks were identified and documented in this report as follows: (1) Bottom-hole Temperature Survey; (2) Heat Flow and Temperature Gradient Survey; (3) Data Translation studies; (4) Gravity Data; (5) Substate Regions; (6) Information Dissemination; (7) State Geothermal Map; (8) Reports. The project had three major products: (1) a map ''Geothermal Resources of Nebraska''; (2) a significant amount of thermal data collected and documented within the state; and (3) a series of publications, presentations and meetings.

  15. An inventory of Geothermal Resources in Nebraska: State-Coupled Program between US Department of Energy and The University of Nebraska. Final report, June 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnold, William D.; Eversoll, Duane, A.; Messenger, Karen A.; Carlson, Marvin P.

    1983-06-30

    The goal of the State Coupled Resource Assessment Program is to identify and evaluate geothermal resources in the state, particularly low-temperature potential. Eight tasks were identified and documented in this report as follows: (1) Bottom-hole Temperature Survey; (2) Heat Flow and Temperature Gradient Survey; (3) Data Translation studies; (4) Gravity Data; (5) Substate Regions; (6) Information Dissemination; (7) State Geothermal Map; (8) Reports. The project had three major products: (1) a map ''Geothermal Resources of Nebraska''; (2) a significant amount of thermal data collected and documented within the state; and (3) a series of publications, presentations and meetings.

  16. Inventory non-conventional gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muntendam-Bos, A.G.; Wassing, B.B.T.; Ter Heege, J.H.; Van Bergen, F.; Schavemaker, Y.A.; Van Gessel, S.F.; De Jong, M.L.; Nelskamp, S.; Van Thienen-Visser, K.; Guasti, E.; Van den Belt; Marges, V.C. [TNO Built Environment and Geosciences, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    This report describes the results of the inventory for each non-conventional gas resource expected to be present in the Netherlands, which are: Tight Gas, Shallow gas, Coal bed Methane (CBM), Shale gas, Basin Centered Gas, Aquifer Gas and Stratigraphic traps.

  17. Cultural adaptation and health literacy refinement of a brief depression intervention for Latinos in a low-resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Zorangelí; Alegría, Margarita

    2014-04-01

    Few studies addressing the mental health needs of Latinos describe how interventions are tailored or culturally adapted to address the needs of their target population. Without reference to this process, efforts to replicate results and provide working models of the adaptation process for other researchers are thwarted. The purpose of this article is to describe the process of a cultural adaptation that included accommodations for health literacy of a brief telephone cognitive-behavioral depression intervention for Latinos in low-resource settings. We followed a five-stage approach (i.e., information gathering, preliminary adaptation, preliminary testing, adaptation, and refinement) as described by Barrera, Castro, Strycker, and Toobert (2013) to structure our process. Cultural adaptations included condensation of the sessions, review, and modifications of materials presented to participants including the addition of visual aids, culturally relevant metaphors, values, and proverbs. Feedback from key stakeholders, including clinician and study participants, was fundamental to the adaptation process. Areas for further inquiry and adaptation identified in our process include revisions to the presentation of "cognitive restructuring" to participants and the inclusion of participant beliefs about the cause of their depression. Cultural adaptation is a dynamic process, requiring numerous refinements to ensure that an intervention is tailored and relevant to the target population.

  18. Hydrography - Water Resources

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Water Resource is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Use Planning Program. The sub-facility types related to Water Resources that are included are:...

  19. Hydrography - Water Resources

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Water Resource is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Use Planning Program. The sub-facility types related to Water Resources that are included are:...

  20. Minnesota DNR Forest Stand Inventory Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer is a digital inventory of individual forest stands. The data is collected by DNR Foresters in each DNR Forestry Administrative Area, and is updated on a...

  1. Cultural Resources Survey and Testing for Davis Pond Freshwater Diversion, St. Charles Parish, Louisiana. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    samples analyzed. Cyperaceae ( sedge family) cone-shape forms were also 0 identified in the 16SC27 samples. Although morphologically similar forms may be...ethnobotanical resources. For example, both grass (Poaceae) and sedge ( Cyperaceae ) phytolith types represent potential botanical resources. However, the...produced by other plants, these conical forms on flat, polygonal bases are most commonly produced by sedges . These forms occur in all but one sample

  2. Cultural Resources Management in the United States Air Force: Development of a Planning Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    1991a:11-5). The 1870’s and 1880’s saw significant efforts to preserve battlefields from the Civil War and also the Revolutionary War. The Casa Grande...directive requires each Air Force insallation to prelpe and adopt a Cultura Resources Management Plan. This plan will incude an inventoy of all cultual...geophysical components of the Legacy program. Specific to cultura resources, the task areas were developed as a general program for improving management of all

  3. 以瓶颈资源为基础的生产与库存控制系统的构建%Construction of production and inventory control system based on bottleneck resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐学军

    2001-01-01

    当前较为成熟的生产与库存控制系统中, MRP( II)强调生产能力的平衡与利用,而忽视了物流效率; JIT重视物流效率,而以生产能力的闲置为代价。本文依据约束管理的理论,构建以瓶颈资源为基础的生产与库存控制系统,使得在有效利用生产资源的同时,提高物流的效率。%As one of prevailing production and inventory control systems, MRP( II) attaches importance to utilizing and balancing of production capability, but ignoring efficiency of material flow. Also, JIT pinpoints efficiency of material flow,but leading to lower utilizing of production capability. In order to both raise efficiency of material flow and improve utilizing of production capability, this paper probes into construction of production and inventory control system on bottleneck resources according to theory of constrains management.

  4. Merced County Streams Project, Burns Reservoir, California Intensive Cultural Resources Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Kroeber 1925; Levy 1978). Regardless of cultural affinities at the time of white contact, the subsis- tence base and material culture were markedly similar...Department of Prehistory, San Francisco State University. 63 Kroeber , Alfred L. 1925 Handbook of the Indians of California. Bureau of American Ethnology...County Streams Project Area. No named villages are located within the Area ( Kroeber 1925 Plate 37; Latta 1977 Endsheet; Levy 1978:400; Wallace 1978:462

  5. A Cultural Resource Reconnaissance for the Lower Rock River Flood Protection Study,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    milkweed , red clover, and ragweeds (Rennie 1978b:70-71). Visibility in these areas was gener- ally very poor (0-15%) owing to heavy ground cover. WOODED...cultural affiliation and site function are unknown. Material recovered by this survey includes one heat-treated secondary thinning flake of blue Moline...was poor, approximately 15 percent. This survey collected no diagnostic materials; thus, cultural affiliation and site function are unknown. Materi

  6. Assessing callous-unemotional traits across different groups of youths: Further cross-cultural validation of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feilhauer, J.; Cima, M.; Arntz, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    The Inventory of Callous-Unemotional (CU) Traits (ICU) is a self-report questionnaire which was developed to measure the affective features of psychopathy in children and adolescents. Previous studies reported both support and difficulties with this promising new measure. The present study investiga

  7. The Effects of Institutional Culture on Study Strategies of Hispanic Students as Measured by the "Inventario de Comportamiento de Estudio": The Spanish Version of the "Study Behavior Inventory."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Leonard B.; Sandiford, Janice R.

    The study behaviors of Spanish-speaking students at a large two-year public college in the United States were studied using the Inventario de Comportamiento de Estudio (ECI) (L. Bliss, D. Vinay, and F. Koenigner), the Spanish version of the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (C. Weinstein, 1987). Behaviors of these students were compared with…

  8. Dynamic of Zhejiang Forest Resources based on the Continuous Inventory System%基于连续清查体系的浙江森林资源动态变化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金祖达; 方国景

    2015-01-01

    根据森林资源连续清查成果,从资源数量、结构、质量、分布等方面对浙江森林资源动态变化及原因进行了分析。结果表明,浙江省森林资源总量(林地面积、活立木总蓄积、森林面积、森林蓄积和竹林资源)呈持续增长态势;林地利用率、森林覆盖率均已达高位;中幼林始终是浙江省森林资源的主体,林种结构中公益林面积蓄积持续增加,树种结构中阔叶林面积蓄积持续快速增长。%According to the results of the continuous forest inventory , the dynamic of Zhejiang forest resource and its causes were analyzed and studied from the aspects of the quantity , structure , quality and distribution of Zhe-jiang forest resources .The results showed that , the total amount of Zhejiang forest resources ( forestland area , total growing stock , forest area , forest accumulation and bamboo resources ) have showed a sustained growth .The for-est utilization and forest coverage rate have reached a high average .Young and middle-aged forest have s been the main part of Zhejiang forest resources , while the area and accumulation of public welfare forest have been continu-ally increasing.In terms of forest structure , broadleaf forest was also increasing rapidly .

  9. Cultural Resource Investigations for a Multipurpose Haul Road on the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Cameron Brizzee; Hollie Gilbert; Clayton Marler; Julie Braun Williams

    2010-08-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a multipurpose haul road to transport materials and wastes between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and other Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site facilities. The proposed road will be closed to the public and designed for limited year-round use. Two primary options are under consideration: a new route south of the existing T-25 power line road and an upgrade to road T-24. In the Spring of 2010, archaeological field surveys and initial coordination and field reconnaissance with representatives from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes were completed to identify any resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed road construction and to develop recommendations to protect any listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The investigations showed that 24 archaeological resources and one historic marker are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation south of the T-25 powerline road and 27archaeological resources are located in the area of potential effects for road construction and operation along road T-24. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both road corridors. This report outlines recommendations for additional investigations and protective measures that can be implemented to minimize adverse impacts to the identified resources.

  10. 30 CFR 72.520 - Diesel equipment inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel equipment inventory. 72.520 Section 72... Mines § 72.520 Diesel equipment inventory. (a) The operator of each mine that utilizes diesel equipment underground, shall prepare and submit in writing to the District Manager, an inventory of diesel...

  11. Opening up the solar box: Cultural resource management and actor network theory in solar energy projects in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrie, Bryan F.

    This project considers the ways that Actor-Network Theory (ANT) can be brought to bear upon Cultural Resource Management (CRM) practices on renewable energy projects. ANT is a way of making inquiry into scientific knowledge practices and as CRM is intended to preserve environmental, historic, and prehistoric resources, it necessarily involves certain kinds of knowledge generation about regions in which projects are being developed. Because the practice of CRM is complex, involving a range of actors from developers to biologists, native peoples to academics, private landholders to environmental and cultural activists, it is imperative to account for the interests of all stakeholders and to resist devolving into the polemical relations of winners and losers, good and bad participants, or simple situations of right and wrong. This project intends to account for the "matters of concern" of various actors, both primary and secondary, by examining the case study of a single solar installation project in the Mojave Desert. A theoretical description of ANT is provided at the beginning and the concerns of this theory are brought to bear upon the case study project through describing the project, discussing the laws governing CRM on federal lands and in the state of California, and providing the points of view of various interviewees who worked directly or indirectly on various aspects of CRM for the solar project. The creators of ANT claim that it is not a methodology but it does speak to ethnomethodologies in that it insists that there is always something more to learn from inquiring into and describing any given situation. These descriptions avoid generalizations, providing instead various points of entry, from diverse perspectives to the project. There is an invitation to avoid assuming that one knows all there is to know about a given situation and to choose instead to continue investigating and thus give voice to the more obscure, often marginalized, voices in the

  12. Attentional Resource Allocation and Cultural Modulation in a Computational Model of Ritualized Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard; Sørensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    ritualized behaviors are perceptually similar across a range of behavioral domains, symbolically mediated experience-dependent information (so-called cultural priors) modulate perception such that communal ceremonies appear coherent and culturally meaningful, while compulsive behaviors remain incoherent and......How do cultural and religious rituals influence human perception and cognition, and what separates the highly patterned behaviors of communal ceremonies from perceptually similar precautionary and compulsive behaviors? These are some of the questions that recent theoretical models and empirical......, in some cases, pathological. In this study, we extend a qualitative model of human action perception and understanding to include ritualized behavior. Based on previous experimental and computational studies, the model was simulated using instrumental and ritualized representations of realistic motor...

  13. Attentional Resource Allocation and Cultural Modulation in a Computational Model of Ritualized Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard; Sørensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    ritualized behaviors are perceptually similar across a range of behavioral domains, symbolically mediated experience-dependent information (so-called cultural priors) modulate perception such that communal ceremonies appear coherent and culturally meaningful, while compulsive behaviors remain incoherent and......How do cultural and religious rituals influence human perception and cognition, and what separates the highly patterned behaviors of communal ceremonies from perceptually similar precautionary and compulsive behaviors? These are some of the questions that recent theoretical models and empirical......, in some cases, pathological. In this study, we extend a qualitative model of human action perception and understanding to include ritualized behavior. Based on previous experimental and computational studies, the model was simulated using instrumental and ritualized representations of realistic motor...

  14. Towards the Development of a Cultural Competence Framework for Human Resource Development Professionals in International Business: A Study of Best Practice Learning and Diversity Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeyune, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In a global environment, growing business corporations have recognized the role diversity plays in business development. However, the human resource development (HRD) profession charged with the responsibility for developing any organization's human resources, has not defined what cultural competence is and its role in improving the…

  15. A Comparative Analysis of the Availability of Information Resources on Ibibio Culture in the University of Uyo and Akwa Ibom State Public Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Henry Itohowo; Simon, Jehu S.; Akai, Iniobong

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the results of a survey of the available holdings of information resources on Ibibio culture in the University of Uyo Library and Akwa Ibom State Library. The specific objectives of the study were to determine the different size of information resources on funeral, fattening (Mbobo), taboos, myths as well as dissemination in the…

  16. Towards the Development of a Cultural Competence Framework for Human Resource Development Professionals in International Business: A Study of Best Practice Learning and Diversity Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeyune, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In a global environment, growing business corporations have recognized the role diversity plays in business development. However, the human resource development (HRD) profession charged with the responsibility for developing any organization's human resources, has not defined what cultural competence is and its role in improving the…

  17. Cultural Resource Predictive Model Literature and Records Search for Conesus Lake N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    inhabitants subsisted upon mastodon, caribou, moose-elk and other large game. One must also consider that they foraged as *.’ well, utilizing such edible...evidence of maize agri- culture which is associated with Hopewell culture in Ohio. infor- mation in general is limited as present evidence cares...34 " . " - ,;L . i \\ \\\\ ,+-.;" Is "!"---v \\ .o.°, 0f Z7%-._. I WA e a IJ ev An 1909). 0^ 14 THIS PAGE IS BEST QUALITY PRACICABLE Le.dhry C r _ _ I SD T O D I

  18. Cockpit design and cross-cultural issues underlying failures in crew resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Don; Li, Wen-Chin

    2008-05-01

    High power-distance has been implicated in many aircraft accidents involving Southeast Asian carriers where crew resource management (CRM) has been identified as a root cause. However, this commentary argues that the design of modern flight decks and their standard operating procedures have an inherent Western (low power-distance) bias within them which exacerbates these CRM issues.

  19. SEAsite: Web-based Interactive Learning Resources for Southeast Asian Languages and Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, George; Zerwekh, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Discusses SEAsite, a Web-based interactive learning resource site for Southeast Asian Languages (Indonesian, Tagalog, Thai., Khmer, Lao, Burmese, and Vietnamese). Its language learning materials feature second language script support, streaming audio, pictures, and interactive exercise types that allow learners to test their understanding.…

  20. The value of cultural theory for participatory processes in natural resource management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstra, M.A.; Permadi, D.B.; Yasmi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Participation is viewed as an important means for promoting the sustainable management of natural resources. However, participation is not always successful. Conflicting values and power inequalities are all factors that can severely undermine participatory processes. Where so far the main focus of

  1. Foreign Language Folio. A Guide to Cultural Resources and Field Trip Opportunities in the San Francisco Bay Area for Teachers and Students of Foreign Languages, 1983-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Tony, Ed.; O'Connor, Roger, Ed.

    A listing of San Francisco area cultural resources and opportunities of use to foreign language teachers is presented. Included are the following: museums and galleries, schools, art sources, churches, clubs, cultural centers and organizations, publications and publishing companies, restaurants, food stores and markets, travel and tourism,…

  2. International strategy in the management of human resources are they valid cultural models; La estrategia internacional en la gestion de recursos humanos. Son validos los modelos culturales?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lertxundi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Managing people with different cultural backgrounds that will make up the new foreign subsidiaries of multinational enterprises is not being easy. Management presents cultural models as instruments that can be used as a basis for the human resource strategy definition in multinational enterprises. However, its validity is being increasingly questioned due to the methodological limitations that are attributed to them. (Author)

  3. Cross- cultural validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN: study of the items and internal consistency Validação transcultural da versão para o português do Brasil do Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN: estudo dos itens e da consistência interna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia de Lima Osório

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to carry out the cross- cultural validation for Brazilian Portuguese of the Social Phobia Inventory, an instrument for the evaluation of fear, avoidance and physiological symptoms associated with social anxiety disorder. METHOD: The process of translation and adaptation involved four bilingual professionals, appreciation and approval of the back- translation by the authors of the original scale, a pilot study with 30 Brazilian university students, and appreciation by raters who confirmed the face validity of the Portuguese version, which was named " Inventário de Fobia Social" . As part of the psychometric study of the Social Phobia Inventory, analysis of the items and evaluation of the internal consistency of the instrument were performed in a study conducted on 2314 university students. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that item 11, related to the fear of public speaking, was the most frequently scored item. The correlation of the items with the total score was quite adequate, ranging from 0.44 to 0.71, as was the internal consistency, which ranged from 0.71 to 0.90. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Social Phobia Inventory proved to be adequate regarding the psychometric properties initially studied, with qualities quite close to those of the original study. Studies that will evaluate the remaining indicators of validity of the Social Phobia Inventory in clinical and non-clinical samples are considered to be opportune and necessary.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar a validação transcultural para o português do Brasil do Social Phobia Inventory, um instrumento para avaliação e mensuração dos sintomas de medo, evitação e sintomas fisiológicos associados ao transtorno de ansiedade social. MÉTODO: O processo de tradução e adaptação envolveu quatro profissionais bilingües, apreciação e aprovação da back

  4. Finding, Managing, and Studying Prehistoric Cultural Resources at El Dorado Lake, Kansas. Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    and some charred seeds. The only identified fauna reported is box turtle; some of the flora were tentatively identified as maize kernels. Two...speed up the work only culturally or chronologically diagnostic artifacts and features were plotted in three dimensions. The strategy was to peel off the

  5. Serving culturally diverse visitors to forests in California: a resource guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina S. Roberts; Deborah J. Chavez; Benjamin M. Lara; Emilyn A. Sheffield

    2009-01-01

    The national forests of California are experiencing an increase in new visitors yet, in some areas, a continued lack of ethnic diversity persists. In addition, changing demographics has led to a need for keeping up with trends while also being aware of constraints to visitor use. Knowing how to serve culturally diverse visitors in ways that are innovative and inclusive...

  6. The Effects of Cultural Video Resources on Teaching and Learning Korean Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jaemin

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation sought to evaluate the potential of a customized, video-based instructional method, the Cultural Video Project (CVP), which was designed to meet the needs of both heritage and non-heritage students learning Korean as a second language in a university setting. The goal of this study was to design and create the CVP, document the…

  7. "Tranfronterizos"' Socialization into Mathematical Discourse: Capitalizing on Language and Cultural Resources or Caught between Conflicting Ideologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquinca, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Studies of "transfronterizos" have highlighted the potential ways in which these students might draw on their linguistic, cultural, or knowledge capital on both sides of the border. However, because "transfronterizos" may cross borders to participate in institutional contexts, such as schooling, they can find themselves in the interstices of…

  8. The Archaeology and History of Lake Ray Roberts. Volume 1. Cultural Resources Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    in the Tehuacan Valley of Mexico and speculations about the cultural processes. In Man, settlement and urbanism. Ucko, Tringham and Dimbleby...The prehistory of the Tehuacan Valley, Volume 5: Excavations and reconnaissance. The University of Texas Press. Mattson, Richard 1980 The bungalow

  9. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL AND GAS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggy Robinson

    2003-07-25

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five sub-contractors that have taken place during the first six months (January 1, 2003--June 30, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Gnomon, Inc. and all five (5) subcontractors have agreed on a process for the framework of this two-year project. They have also started gathering geomorphological information and entering cultural resource data into databases that will be used to create models later in the project. This data is being gathered in both the Power River Basin of Wyoming, and the Southeastern region of New Mexico. Several meetings were held with key players in this project to explain the purpose of the research, to obtain feedback and to gain support. All activities have been accomplished on time and within budget with no major setbacks.

  10. EVALUATION OF STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT FIELDS CULTURE, CAPABILITY, INFORMATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES OF YOUTH AND SPORT OFFICES OF WEST AZERBAIJAN PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roba Yadollahzadeh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Management has a significant importance in sport organizations, specially, if it is accompanied with a strategic and program-oriented approach. Now in this progressing and developing world sport is not an exception, and many sport organizations are in rapid progress and in most cases the strategic approach of these organizations is the top priority. This study aims at evaluating the fields of strategic management in West Azarbaijan province offices of sport and youth. The subjects of the study are 47 managers and their assistants of W.Azarbaijan youth and sport offices. The tool of gathering data is a standard questionnaire which is made by Vic Gilgeous (improving strategic concerns.The method of descriptive research is a kind of analysis that, it is performed in a field study. For data analyzing, some parameters of descriptive and inferential statistics such as standard deviation, mean, frequency and some other like one sample t-test were used. The results show that the amount of realization of the culture, information and the strategic management resources in offices of youth and sports of W. Azerbaijan, are not in an appropriate condition (p < 0.05.So according to the results of the study we can deduce that the culture, information and strategic management resources in W. Azerbaijan offices of youth and sports, are significantly different with the society average and these fields need to be improved and strengthened.

  11. 50 years of physical growth and impressive technological advances unmatched by health human resources reform and cultural change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham W S

    2012-01-01

    The year 1962 was pre-medicare. The public was concerned about access and individual affordability of care. Funding involved public or private responsibility and the role of government. Physicians, the most influential providers, were concerned that government funding would result in the loss of their independence and their becoming state employees. The retrospective analysis "Looking Back 50 Years in Hospital Administration" by Graham and Sibbald is arresting as it underlines just how much progress we have made in what could be termed "hardware" in support of healthcare policy and hospital administration. From this perspective, the progress has been eye opening, given the advent of universal healthcare, the advancement in our physical facilities, the development of high-quality diagnostic equipment, the explosion of new research centres and new and complex clinical procedures. The development of this hardware has given our providers better weapons and contributed to a remarkable improvement in life expectancy. But progress in health administration and policy management involves more than hardware. If the hardware constitutes the tools, then the "software" of the healthcare system involves the human resources and the culture change that must be positioned to make maximum use of the hardware. In 2062, looking back at the 2012 experience, the legacy test may be whether we dealt with health human resources and culture change at a rate that matched our progress in hardware.

  12. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program: Fiscal year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Mark J.; Brooks, Richard D.; Sassaman, Kenneth E.; Crass, David C.; Stephenson, D. Keith; Green, William; Rinehart, Charles J.; Lewis, George S.; Fuglseth, Ty; Krawczynski, Keith; Warnock, D. Mark

    1991-10-01

    A cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy provides the necessary funding for the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, to render services required under federal law for the protection and management of archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because the significance of archaeological resources is usually determined by research potential, the SRARP is guided by research objectives. An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. In accordance with the spirit of the law, the SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1991.

  13. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program: Fiscal year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    A cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy provides the necessary funding for the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, to render services required under federal law for the protection and management of archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because the significance of archaeological resources is usually determined by research potential, the SRARP is guided by research objectives. An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. In accordance with the spirit of the law, the SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1991.

  14. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program, fiscal year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, is funded through a direct contract with the United States Department of Energy to provide services required under federal law for the protection and management of archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because the significance of most archaeological resources is dependent upon research potential, the SRARP is guided by research objectives. An on-going research program provides the problems, methods and means of assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. In addition, the SRARP maintains an active program of public education to disseminate knowledge about prehistory and history, and to enhance public awareness about historic preservation. The following report summarizes the management, research and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1990.

  15. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    A cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy provides the necessary funding for the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, to render services required under federal law for the protection and management of archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because the significance of archaeological resources is usually determined by research potential, the SRARP is guided by research objectives. An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological, and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. In accordance with the spirit of the law, the SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research, and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1993.

  16. Cultural Resources, Studies, Eastern North Carolina Above Cape Lookout, Literature Review and Preliminary Research Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    inhabitants and activities of New Bern in the years im- mediately following the War of 1812. Most enlightening ; usually reliable. Mobley 1981 is an...Virginia upon the development of the [- Albemarle would be highly enlightening . 2-67 1 CHAPTER 3 ARCHITECTURAL RESOURCES OF THE EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA...trends. Georgian, Federal, Greek Revival, Gothic Revival, and Italianate styles, though sometimes retarditaire in nature, predominated. Builders and

  17. A review and an outlook of the National Cultural Information Resources Sharing Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Yanbo

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the Project’s organization system,technical system,creation of digital resources and service mode.It also summarizes achievements gained since the commencement of the Project,and also analyzes some of the more important issues during implementation stage and gives a few suggestions of the future development during the next stage of the 11thFive-Year Plan.

  18. Communication as a strategic resource to promote Italian Institutes of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziano Serragiotto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the ways in which Italy presents itself to the world is through the Italian Institute of Culture (IIC, an institution that aims at offering a cross-section of the Italian world and at the same time disseminating the rationale for its own existence. The IIC acknowledges and embraces the historical, political, and linguistic evolution of Italy and regards these as constitutional factors of its identity. In this article, we first provide background information about the Institute and display the key principles that determine how communication with outside communities takes place. Next, we adopt a theoretical model of communication in order to show how communication in and of itself has the potential to lead individuals on a path of cultural appreciation, as well as towards an appreciation for and acquisition of the Italian language.

  19. 基于VRS技术的GPS-PDA在森林资源调查监测中的应用%Application of GPS-PDA in Inventory and Monitoring of Forest Resources Based on VRS Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宁辉

    2012-01-01

    介绍GPS - PDA软硬件组成及在外业建标、建模、数据验证、GCP采集、面积求算、专项调查等有关森林资源调查监测方面的应用.详细阐述Trimble Geo - XT移动站在森林监测中的应用实例和步骤,认为基于VRS技术的GPS - PDA在森林资源调查监测中具有定位精度高,定位方式灵活、可灵活定制调查表格、提高外业数据采集效率、数据兼容性好等优点.%This paper introduced the application of GPS-PDA in setting up standard, modeling, dala validation, GCP acquisition, area calculated, special survey on forest resources inventory and monitoring, and hardware and software building. Elaborated the application examples and steps of Trimble Ceo-XT mobile station in the forest monitoring. Believed that on the base of VRS technology, GPS-PDA has advantages in the investigation and monitoring of forest resources with high positioning accuracy, positioning flexible, and data compatibility, can be flexibly customized survey form, to improve data collection efficiency.

  20. Cultural Resources Overview of the Proposed Black Cypress and Marshall Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-21

    maize , leather products, lumber, hides, beef and tallow. During the Civil War, the Confederacy operated a meat packing house and the State operated a...temporal period, and a cultural tradition (see Shafer 1976). Today, it is most often used to refer to "a foraging or hunting and gathering adaptation...either proposed reservoir. Two sites of National Register quality , the "Old Barnes homeplace" and the "Barnes cotton mill" were examined during field

  1. Cultural Resources Investigations in the Terrebonne Marsh, South-Central Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    cannot be procured except in the City; hogs lard is made its substitute in all culinary purposes, the land everywhere is rich alluvion, capable of...and Associates, Inc. Submitted to Division of Archaeology, Louisiana Department of Culture Recreation and Tourism , Baton Rouge. Griffin, James. B...and Tourism , Baton Rouge. Hutchins, Thomas 1968 An Historical Narrative and Topographical Description of Louisiana, and West- Florida. Reprinted

  2. Cultural Resources Survey of the Burnside Revetment Item, Ascension and St. James Parishes, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-27

    Louisiana’s archeological and architectural heritage from destruction by channel migration. Although no surface or subsurface cultural remains were found...National Register of Historic Places criteria. Archival research focused on historic land use and on historic architectural improvements to each of...Bringier, Tulane). In about 1800, Bringier built the mansion from which the plantation name "White Hall" derived. The residence was a French Gothic

  3. Cultural Resources Reconnaissance for Proposed Flood Control Measures at Cramerton, Gaston County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-28

    6,000 Stanley Lecroy Kirk 17,000 E Palmer 1 8,000 - - - - L Hardaway 9,000 c E Clovis 10,000 Figure . Western Piedmont Cultural Sequence (after Coe:120-4...of i-ost.oid O’. Cultura aate’rial density in the s=r2eJ and deflated sample area is 0.35 piecei1.0 szuare meter. Anite quartz ncdules w€ere eroded

  4. The Effects of Partner Relationship, Resource Availability, Culture, and Collectivist Tendency on Reward Allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Cultural Differences Equity research has been conducted in both Europe (e.g., Mikula, 1981; Pepitone, Faucheux, Moscovici , Cesa-Bianchi, Magistretti... Moscovici (1972) is correct in observing the geographical limitation of equity theory, although his prediction that equity is particular to capital...n i n i l _ i . . . . i . ... .. . . . . 32 Moscovici , S. (1972). Society and theory in social psychology. In J. Israel & H. Tajfel (Eds.), The

  5. Peak Politics: Resource Scarcity and Libertarian Political Culture in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mayerson, Matthew

    My dissertation uses the "peak oil" movement as a lens to analyze the convergence of apocalyptic environmental thinking and libertarian political culture in the recent United States. The "peak oil" movement was a twenty-first century American social movement of Americans who came to believe that oil depletion and other environmental problems would lead to the imminent collapse of global industrial society. Dedicated adherents developed a rich subculture, primarily online, and prepared themselves for the "post-carbon" future by conserving energy, changing occupations, and even purchasing land. Drawing on surveys of over 1,500 participants, ethnographic research, discourse analysis of peak oil websites and literary analysis of subcultural fiction, my research reveals a group of mostly white, male, liberal Americans struggling with the perceived threat of economic, environmental and geopolitical decline while the country undergoes a broad shift in political culture: the continued rise of libertarian ideals, accelerated by the influence of Internet technology. I view this apocalyptic subculture in the context of petroleum dependence, eco-apocalyptic discourses, the environmental discourse of "limits to growth," white masculinity, climate change, and the influence of conservative individualism on American political culture.

  6. Hospital cultural construction and human resource management%医院文化建设与人力资源管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞秀英

    2013-01-01

    随着医药卫生体制改革的不断深入,医院的管理理念也在发生着变化,医院文化已成为现代医院管理的重要内容,它是医院发展的价值取向;而人力资源管理作为医院可持续发展的源泉,离不开医院文化,二者相互影响、相互促进;只有把医院文化建设做实,做好,才能提升医院的核心竞争力.%With the deepening of medical and health system reform, the concept of hospital management is surely changing. Hospital culture has become an important part of modern hospital management, and it is the value orientation of hospital development. Human resource management, which is the source of hospital sustainable development, canf be separated from hospital culture, and they influence and promote each other. Only by constructing hard in hospital culture can the core competitiveness of hospital be promoted.

  7. Public Willingness to Pay for Transforming Jogyesa Buddhist Temple in Seoul, Korea into a Cultural Tourism Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seul-Ye Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Jogyesa Buddhist Temple (JBT, located in Seoul, Korea, is the chief temple of the Jogye Order, which represents Korean Buddhism. The Seoul government plans to transform the JBT into a cultural tourism resource and a historical site. This study attempts to analyze the willingness to pay (WTP for implementing the transformation, which includes building a new shopping arcade for Buddhist culture and tourism, constructing a museum for the teaching of history and an experience center for Korean traditional culture in the precincts of JBT, and making an open space for domestic and/or foreign visitors. To this end, the study looks into the WTP for the implementation, reporting on a contingent valuation (CV survey that was conducted with 500 Seoul households. The single-bounded dichotomous choice CV model and a spike model were applied to derive the WTP responses and analyze the WTP data with zero observations, respectively. The mean yearly WTP was computed to be KRW 7129 (USD 6.30 per household for the next five years, with the estimate being statistically significant at the 1% level. Expanding the value to the Seoul population gives us KRW 25.4 billion (USD 22.5 million per year. The present value of the total WTP amounts to KRW 114.6 billion (USD 101.3 million using a social discount rate of 5.5%. We can conclude that Seoul households are ready to shoulder some of the financial burden of implementing the transformation.

  8. A Cultural Resources Evaluation of the Pammel Creek Site (47Lc61): An Oneota Occupation at La Crosse, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    County, Wis. ETC Engineering Inc. An archaeological survey of Copeland Park. City of La Crosse. * An archaeological inspection of the Gillett St...Inventory and Evaluation of Weston , Unit 3 Power Plant, Marathon County, Wisconsin. -Archaeological Inventory of the Sanitary Sewer Collection System and

  9. Inventory of armourstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Turdu Valéry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural armourstone is widely used for hydraulic works, both in the coastal domain and in border of rivers and torrents, especially to protect against flood and the effects of waves and currents. To meet the expectations associated with this resource, an inventory of armourstone quarries was realized on a national scale in France. This inventory informs not only about the localization of quarries but also about the quality and the availability of materials. To fully optimize this inventory in a dynamic format, the association of all actors of the sector was preferred to archival research. This partnership approach led to project deliverables that can constitute durably a shared reference. The database can indeed be updated regularly thanks to the contacts established with the professionals of quarries. The access to this database is offered to a wide public: maritime and fluvial ports, local authorities in charge of planning and managing structures that protect against flood and other hydraulic hazards. This new database was organized considering its importance on the operational plan. This led to a hierarchical organization at two levels for each quarry face: first level, a synthesis sheet brings the essential information to realize choices upstream to the operational phases. Second level, a detailed specification sheet presents the technical characteristics observed in the past on the considered face. The atlas has two information broadcasting formats: a pdf file with browsing functions and a geographical information system that allows remote request of the database. These two media have their own updating rhythms, annual for the first and continue for the second.

  10. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, manages archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological, and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. The SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research, and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1994.

  11. Energy Education Materials Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    The two volumes of the Energy Education Materials Inventory (EEMI) comprise an annotated bibliography of widely available energy education materials and reference sources. This systematic listing is designed to provide a source book which will facilitate access to these educational resources and hasten the inclusion of energy-focused learning experiences in kindergarten through grade twelve. EEMI Volume II expands Volume I and contains items that have become available since its completion in May, 1976. The inventory consists of three major parts. A core section entitled Media contains titles and descriptive information on educational materials, categorized according to medium. The other two major sections - Grade Level and Subject - are cross indexes of the items for which citations appear in the Media Section. These contain titles categorized according to grade level and subject and show the page numbers of the full citations. The general subject area covered includes the following: alternative energy sources (wood, fuel from organic wastes, geothermal energy, nuclear power, solar energy, tidal power, wind energy); energy conservation, consumption, and utilization; energy policy and legislation, environmental/social aspects of energy technology; and fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, petroleum). (RWR)

  12. [The Lancisiana library as a resource for the transmission of medical culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Maria; Fiorilla, Marco

    2002-01-01

    The Lancisiana Library was founded in the years 1711-1714 by Giovanni Maria Lancisi. Housed in the S. Spirito Hospital in Rome, its very structure and organization mirrors the scientific and medical culture of its founder. Lancisi meant to offer to the young apprentice, either physician or surgeon, the means foa a rational medical education, based on "plenty of patients" and a good choice of books. The comparison between the Library and some of Lancisi's works show his ideas about the relationship between the sciences - chemistry, natural history, mathematics and mechanics - and medicine, as well as the close relationship between medicine and surgery.

  13. Voluntary Activities and Online Education for Digital Heritage Inventory Development after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y.; Uozu, T.; Seino, Y.; Ako, T.; Goda, Y.; Fujimoto, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2013-07-01

    Consortium for Earthquake-Damaged Cultural Heritage (CEDACH) is a voluntary initiative launched just after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. The consortium is developing a social network between local cultural resource managers restoring disaster-damaged cultural heritage on one side and remote researchers including historians, archaeologists and specialists of cultural information studies on the other side, in order to facilitate collaborative projects. This paper presents three projects in which CEDACH contributed to the development of a digital inventory for disaster-damaged heritage management through web-based collaborations by self-motivated workers. The first project, CEDACH GIS, developed an online archaeological site inventory for the disaster area. Although a number of individuals voluntarily participated in the project at the beginning, it gradually stagnated due to limited need for local rescue archaeology. However, the experience of online-based collaborations worked well for the second project proposed by local specialists, in which CEDACH restored the book catalogue of a tsunami-devastated research library. This experience highlighted the need for online education to improve information and communication technologies (ICT) skills of data builders. Therefore, in the third project called CEDACHeLi, an e-Learning management system was developed to facilitate learning the fundamental knowledge and techniques required for information processing in rescue operations of disaster-damaged cultural heritage. This system will contribute to improved skills and motivation of potential workers for further developments in digital heritage inventory.

  14. Annual inventory report for Pennsylvania's forests: results from the first two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; Carol A. Alerich; Daniel A. Devlin; Tonya W. Lister; Stephen L. Sterner; James A. Westfall

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program implemented a new system for inventory and monitoring Pennsylvania?s forest resources. The most salient benefit of the new inventory process will be a nearly threefold improvement in timeliness. This report summarizes the results of the first 2 years of annual inventory measurements...

  15. Forest resources of the Gila National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Shaw

    2008-01-01

    The Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis (IWFIA) program of the USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, as part of its national Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) duties, conducted forest resource inventories of the Southwestern Region (Region 3) National Forests. This report presents highlights of the Gila National Forest 1994 inventory including...

  16. [Remote sensing analysis of forest resources characteristics in main ecological restoration counties in the Three-gorge area based on the 2nd-class inventory data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao-Ping; Shao, Jing-An; Huang, Zhi-Lin; Su, Wei-Ci; Liao, Ming-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Based on high-resolution SPOT-5 images, combined with topographic (1:10000) calculating terrain-bit index, the distribution characteristics of woodlands in different terrain niches, and the buffer radii of different roads, water bodies and settlements were identified by using ArcGIS space overlay and buffer analysis function. Results showed that woodland resources were abundant, and arbor woodland and shrub land were the main species, which mainly distributed in two mountain areas (Fangdou Mountain, Qiyao Mountain) affected by topographic restriction and woodland natural basis. The woodland terrain niche distribution index showed an overall upward trend with increasing terrain niche gradient, especially for the arbor woodland and shrub land, while the other woodland types presented an opposite trend. The percentage of woodland area occupying the corresponding buffer radius around the roads, waterbodies and settlements had a strong similarity with the woodland terrain niche distribution index. Only around the settlements, bamboo forest, sparse woodland and immature woodland occupied higher percentages of the woodland area of the corresponding buffer radius than that of arbor woodland and shrub land. Woodland distribution was mainly controlled by large landform patterns of mountain features, while the distribution of woodlands in the different terrain niches and the different buffer radii of roads, waterbodies and settlements were driven mainly by duress of human activities under the auspices of the large landform patterns.

  17. The transition to medication adoption in publicly funded substance use disorder treatment programs: organizational structure, culture, and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    Medications for the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) are not widely available in publicly funded SUD treatment programs. Few studies have drawn on longitudinal data to examine the organizational characteristics associated with programs transitioning from not delivering any pharmacotherapy to adopting at least one SUD medication. Using two waves of panel longitudinal data collected over a 5-year period, we measured the transition to medication adoption in a cohort of 190 publicly funded treatment organizations that offered no SUD medications at baseline. Independent variables included organizational characteristics, medical resources, funding, treatment culture, and detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies. Of 190 programs not offering SUD pharmacotherapy at baseline, 22.6% transitioned to offering at least one SUD medication at follow-up approximately 5 years later. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that the employment of at least one physician at baseline, having a greater proportion of Medicaid clients, and pharmaceutical detailing were positively associated with medication adoption. Adoption of pharmacotherapy was more likely in programs that had greater medical resources, Medicaid funding, and contact with pharmaceutical companies. Given the potential expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, patients served by publicly funded programs may gain greater access to such treatments, but research is needed to document health reform's impact on this sector of the treatment system.

  18. Characterization of the Culturable Subpopulations of Lactobacillus in the Chicken Intestinal Tract as a Resource for Probiotic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Adhikari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To gain better understanding of the distributions of the culturable Lactobacillus species in the chicken intestinal tract, we collected ceca, and distal ileum from 10 3-weeks-old broiler chickens. Lactobacillus strains from cecal lumen contents (M-CL, and those associated with mucosa of ceca (M-CM and ileum (M-IM were recovered on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS agar plates, and used for microbiota analysis. The total cecal content (T-CL was also used directly for microbiota analysis. We purposefully focused on MRS-recovered populations to gain understanding of the culturable subpopulations of Lactobacillus, since the culturability is an important phenotype in order to exploit the chicken gut microbiota as a resource for development of probiotics. The V1–V3 regions of 16S rRNA gene was amplified from genomic DNA samples, and the pooled amplicons were analyzed by MiSeq sequencing with paired-end read 300 cycle option. Among MRS groups, Firmicutes were significantly higher in M-IM and M-CL as compared to M-CM, whereas Proteobacteria were significantly higher in M-CM as compared to M-IM and M-CL at p < 0.05. Among Lactobacillus, L. salivarius (36% and L. johnsonii (21% were higher in M-IM as compared to M-CL (L. salivarius, 28%; L. johnsonii, 15%, and M-CM (L. salivarius, 20%; L. johnsonii, 11%. L. crispatus was found significantly higher in M-CL as compared to M-IM (p < 0.01 whereas L. gasseri was found significantly higher in M-IM as compared to M-CM (p < 0.05. L. aviarius, and L. fornicalis were only observed in T-CL. In summary, Lactobacillus populations recovered on MRS vary with different regions and locations in chicken GIT, which might indicate their distinct functional roles in different gastrointestinal tract (GIT niches, and some species of Lactobacillus are not culturable on MRS agar media. This study is the first attempt to define culturable Lactobacillus subpopulations in the chicken intestinal tract comprehensively using 16S r

  19. Cross-Cultural Understanding of Health Assessments for People with Intellectual Disability: An Australian resource in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Brolan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities has resulted in the involvement of high income countries in international development assistance to people with disabilities in low and middle income countries.  Healthcare tools designed in high income countries and delivered in low and middle income countries may not be appropriate to the context of the lives of people with disabilities.  We undertook a short qualitative study of participants’ views of an Australian-designed comprehensive health assessment tool, with participation from a WHO-Collaborating non-government organisation in regional Philippines. We also examined the participants’ perceptions of the barriers to healthcare for Filipinos with intellectual disabilities.  Responses to the comprehensive health assessment tool were positive although participants agreed that both linguistic and cultural translation would enhance wider use of the tool. The barriers identified included poverty, family isolation, stigma and communication issues as preventing appropriate healthcare delivery to Filipinos with intellectual disability. Consideration must be given to the complexities of transference of healthcare resources to a low and middle income country context, as well as the systemic and cultural barriers to appropriate healthcare provision to people with disabilities.

  20. Connecting World Heritage Nominations and Monitoring with the Support of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vileikis, O.; Dumont, B.; Serruys, E.; Van Balen, K.; Tigny, V.; De Maeyer, P.

    2013-07-01

    Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are challenging the way cultural heritage has been managed and evaluated in the past. Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are unique in that they consist of multiple sites listed as one property, distributed in different countries, involving a large diversity of stakeholders in the process. As a result, there is a need for precise baseline information for monitoring, reporting and decision making. This type of nomination requires different methodologies and tools to improve the monitoring cycle from the beginning of the nomination towards the periodic reporting. The case study of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System (CHRIS) illustrates the use of a Geographical Content Management System (Geo-CMS) supporting the serial transnational World Heritage nomination and the monitoring of the Silk Roads in the five Central Asian countries. The Silk Roads CHRIS is an initiative supported by UNESCO World Heritage Centre (WHC) and the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), and developed by a consortium headed by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation (RLICC) at the KULeuven. The Silk Roads CHRIS has been successfully assisting in the preparation of the nomination dossiers of the Republics of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan and will be used as a tool for monitoring tool in the Central Asian countries.