WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural practices language

  1. Popular Culture in Transglossic Language Practices of Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shaila; Dovchin, Sender

    2017-01-01

    Based on virtual conversations drawn from two separate intensive ethnographic studies in Bangladesh and Mongolia, we show that popular cultural texts play a significant role in young adults' heteroglossic language practices. On the one hand, they borrow voices from cultural texts and cross the boundaries of language, i.e., codes, modes, and…

  2. Literacy of deaf people: language social practices between two languages/cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Balieiro Lodi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper, written in the light of Bakhtin's work, aims to discuss some specificities of literacy practices for deaf people, since they are constituted on the basis of social practices involving the two languages - Brazilian Sign Language (LIBRAS and Portuguese. These languages share the same space/time in different spheres of activities and have asymmetric social-cultural and ideological forces. This linguistic-discursive feature relates literacy practices in both languages by establishing, within them, a dialogue (not always peaceful between languages/cultures. Based on these assumptions, an educational proposal will be presented in which students have developed literacy practices in both languages using their experience in Libras in its discursive/generic dimension. Although still in an early stage, this process might (resignify and change the historical relationship that has been constituting the dialogue that deaf communities have established with Portuguese.

  3. The Language-Culture Connection in ELT : Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Paul; Paul, ROSS

    2004-01-01

    Defining the nature of the language-culture connection and proposing how that connection should be addressed in the language classroom have long been major issues in the ELT field, and these issues remain contested and largely unresolved to this day. This paper attempts to clarify some of the major ways that the language-culture connection is conceived of in the field, and it will also outline the influences that those conceptions may be having on both course content and language pedagogy. Th...

  4. 25 tips for working through language and cultural barriers in your medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2009-01-01

    The language and cultural barriers facing medical patients with limited English language proficiency pose tremendous challenges and risks. Moreover, medical practices today are more likely than ever to employ individuals whose first language is not English or who do not possess native-like knowledge of American culture. Knowing how to work through the language and cultural barriers you are likely to encounter in your medical practice has become increasingly more important. This article is written by a practice management consultant who has graduate-level linguistics training and second-language teaching credentials and experience. It offers 25 practical tips to help you communicate more effectively with individuals who are outside of your native culture and language. These include easy-to-implement tips about English language pronunciation, grammar, and word choice. This article also suggests what you can do personally to bridge the cultural divide with your patients and co-workers. Finally, this article includes a case study of one Virginia practice in which cultural differences interfered with the practice's smooth operation. It explains how the practice eventually worked through and overcame this cultural obstacle.

  5. Daisaku Ikeda's Philosophy of Soka Education in Practice: A Narrative Analysis of Culturally Specific Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Julie T.

    2012-01-01

    The author analyzes two teachers' narratives of their understanding and practice of Daisaku Ikeda's (1928-) philosophy of Soka (value-creating) education in relation to narratives of their experiences as students at the Soka schools he founded. These narratives both triangulate an implicit though culturally specific language used to articulate…

  6. Daisaku Ikeda's Philosophy of Soka Education in Practice: A Narrative Analysis of Culturally Specific Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Julie T.

    2012-01-01

    The author analyzes two teachers' narratives of their understanding and practice of Daisaku Ikeda's (1928-) philosophy of Soka (value-creating) education in relation to narratives of their experiences as students at the Soka schools he founded. These narratives both triangulate an implicit though culturally specific language used to articulate…

  7. Trans-Cultural, Trans-Language Practices: Potentialities for Rethinking Doctoral Education Pedagogies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarojni Choy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in doctoral enrolments of Asian international students in Australian universities. While policies have been developed to meet the needs of these students, there seems to be some confusion around the terms internationalisation, globalisation, bi-cultural, inter-cultural, multi-cultural, and trans-cultural within these policies. In this paper, we define these terms and advocate for a policy position which orients to a futurist definition of culture. We then review the work of Michael Singh and his research team at Western Sydney University who have responded to this rapid increase in Asian international student doctoral enrolments in Australian universities by developing pedagogic principles around notions of trans-language and trans-cultural practices. In the final section of the paper, we then draw on our own experiences of doctoral supervision in Australian universities to reflect on our positioning within the pedagogic principles around trans-language and trans-cultural practices.

  8. Language and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Harry

    2011-04-01

    What are the relative contributions of language and physical practice to practical understanding? The resolution of a series of puzzles depends upon the answer. I argue that language is, and must be, more central than physical practice in individual acquisition of practical understanding. Only this makes it possible for there to be a sociology of scientific knowledge, for there to be scientific specialities, for there to be a division of labour in society and for there to be a society that is more than a set of narrow and isolated worlds. Physical practice remains central to human culture but its influence is at the collective level at which languages are formed, rather than the individual level at which practical abilities are acquired. Domain languages 'contain' practices, and it is from these that individuals draw much, usually most, of their practical understanding. Because the individual level and the domain level have not previously been distinguished, certain philosophical problems have been wrongly cast and mistakes have been made. Domains of practice/language are embedded within one another in fractal-like relationships, and this is how we can make sense of higher levels of coordinated action. The ideas of 'special interactional expert', 'practice language' and 'methodological interactionalism' are introduced.

  9. Converging Recommendations for Culturally Responsive Literacy Practices: Students with Learning Disabilities, English Language Learners, and Socioculturally Diverse Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Susan V.; Rao, Shaila; Protacio, Maria Selena

    2015-01-01

    This study examines culturally responsive pedagogy across the fields of special education, multicultural literacy education, and teaching English language learners. A systematic review of recommendations identified culturally responsive practices in five key areas: dialogue, collaboration, visual representation, explicit instruction, and inquiry.…

  10. Translating language policy into practice: Language and culture policy at a Dutch university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haines, Kevin; Dijk, Anje

    2016-01-01

    The CEFR will only achieve its potential in higher education if it is embedded in a meaningful way in the wider processes of the university. One means of embedding the CEFR is through policy, and in this article we report the development of a language policy in the broader context of internationaliz

  11. Teaching Languages, Teaching Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J., Ed.; Crozet, Chantal, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines what it means to teach culture as an integrated part of language from both the language learner's and the language teacher's perspectives. The 11 papers include the following: "Teaching Cultures as an Integrated Part of Language: Implications for the Aims, Approaches and Pedagogies of Language Teaching"…

  12. Language, Perception, Culture & Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Man-li

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the prospect of introducing language, perception, culture and communication. Starting with some definitions of language, perception, culture and communication, the paper argues for the internal connection among them. It pro⁃vides better understanding of these factors in foreign language learning and encourages learners to achieve the better learning re⁃sult to communicate effectively through language, culture etc.

  13. Teaching Language, Teaching Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J., Ed.; Crozet, Chantal, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Essays and research reports on the relationship between teaching second languages and teaching culture include: "Teaching Culture as an Integrated Part of Language Teaching: An Introduction" (Chantal Crozet, Anthony J. Liddicoat); "Primary Socialization and Cultural Factors in Second Language Learning: Wending Our Way through Semi-Charted…

  14. Understanding the Interconnectedness between Language Choices, Cultural Identity Construction and School Practices in the Life of a Latina Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Sandra Patricia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative research looks at the effects that language choices and cultural practices have on identity development in the education of minority students in the United States. It examines the educational journey of Irma, a Latina educator. Through the analysis of interviews with the participant, this paper intends to show the effects of…

  15. Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Practices in Psychoeducational Reports for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bryn; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Oades-Sese, Geraldine V.; Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Past researchers suggested there are a number of shortcomings in the psychoeducational evaluation process and practices used with English language learners (ELLs). In the present exploratory study, the authors descriptively examined the assessment practices used in the special education eligibility determination process for ELLs as documented in…

  16. Language and Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐君

    2011-01-01

    As the carrier of culture,language is considered as the main expressional form of culture which develops with nation,country and society’s development.Language is a part of a nation’s culture.The different nations own their unique cultures,his-tory,manners and customs and so on.However,various cultural characteristics can be displayed in the form of language.This ar-ticle,by analyzing the influence and the difference of historical culture,regional culture and custom culture,mainly reveals the relationship between language and culture which is interdependent and interactive.What’s more,a better comprehension of this relationship prevents us from misunderstanding in cross-culture communication.

  17. A Sociocultural Analysis of Language Learning: New Forms of Literacy Practices in a Language and Culture Awareness Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming-Potvin, Wendy; Renshaw, Peter; van Kraayenoord, Christa

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a sociocultural study conducted in a Catholic primary school in the Australian outback and provides insights into how policy related to Languages Other Than English (LOTE) programmes is implemented in a specific location and interwoven within the literacy practices of children, parents and teachers. A case study that tracked…

  18. Supporting the Persuasive Writing Practices of English Language Learners through Culturally Responsive Systemic Functional Linguistic Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the potential of Systemic Functional Linguistic (SFL) pedagogy to support English language learners (ELLs) in enhancing their meaning making potential as they engage in persuasive writing practices within academic contexts. The dissertation results from a teacher action research project in which the…

  19. Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the research methods and approaches used in the multidisciplinary field of applied language studies or language education over the last fourty years. Drawing on insights gained in psycho- and sociolinguistics, educational linguistics and linguistic anthropology with regard to language and culture, it is organized around five…

  20. Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the research methods and approaches used in the multidisciplinary field of applied language studies or language education over the last fourty years. Drawing on insights gained in psycho- and sociolinguistics, educational linguistics and linguistic anthropology with regard to language and culture, it is organized around five…

  1. Culture Transmission in Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li-qun

    2003-01-01

    Culture and language have close relation and are combined together . So teaching language is a process of teaching cultural knowledge . And teaching language is not perfect without teaching the factors of culture.

  2. Language, Thought, and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henle, Paul, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of essays intended for an integrated study of language by anthropologists, literary critics, philosophers, psychologists, sociologists, and linguists. There is first a discussion of theories concerning the interrelationship of language, thought, and culture. This is followed by a discussion of the development of…

  3. Asymmetry in Dual Language Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Amrein

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity for dual-language programs to deliver specific benefits to students with different primary and secondary language skills continues to be debated. Individuals favoring dual language assert that as it relies upon a reciprocal approach, dual language students acquire dual language proficiency without the need for teachers to translate from one language to another. By utilizing and conserving the language skills that students bring, dual language students also gain cross-cultural understandings and an expanded opportunity to realize academic success in the future. Research that explores whether these programs meet the needs of monolingual and bilingual students is limited. The intent of this study is not to criticize dual language practice. Instead, it is to describe a newly implemented dual language immersion program that exists and operates in Phoenix, Arizona. In particular, this study examines the practices of dual language teachers at Leigh Elementary School and the challenges encountered as school personnel worked to provide students with different primary and secondary language skills increased opportunities to learn.

  4. Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2013-01-01

    In foreign language education, the teaching of culture remains a hotly debated issue. What is culture? What is its relation to language? Which and whose culture should be taught? What role should the learners' culture play in the acquisition of knowledge of the target culture? How can we avoid essentializing cultures and teaching stereotypes? And…

  5. Language and Culture: Nigerian Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    The power of language to reflect culture and influence thinking was first proposed by .... spoken to. Children will grow up learning only to speak when an adult addresses .... Implications for Language Teaching and Language Policy in Nigeria.

  6. Assessing and changing medical practice culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Your medical practice has an existing culture that manifests itself daily in literally hundreds of ways. Some aspects of your culture likely support your practice's growth; others may be impeding your progress. This article describes the characteristics of medical practice culture and provides numerous examples of how culture influences behavior. It describes how culture is expressed in a medical practice through objects and artifacts, language, emotions, interactions, practice management systems, and daily work habits. It offers three techniques for assessing an existing medical practice culture and a checklist for conducting culture observations. This article also provides guidelines for identifying a desired medical practice culture and explores why changing culture is so difficult. It describes five reasons employees are likely to resist culture change and provides 12 fundamental changes that will enable a practice to improve its culture. Finally, this article explores how medical practice cultures are formed and perpetuated and provides more than a dozen questions to ask employees in a culture survey.

  7. Culture Teaching in English Language Classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Qixuan; Zhao Shuncai

    2007-01-01

    Language is closely related to culture. Language expresses and embodies cultural reality, in the meantime, culture exerts enormous influences on language. Therefore, language learning is often culture learning. The author, based on the negligence of culture teaching in English language classes, illustrates the influences of cultural knowledge on reading, translating and intercultural communicating, and proposes suggestions on culture teaching in English language teaching (ELT).

  8. Trans-Cultural, Trans-Language Practices: Potentialities for Rethinking Doctoral Education Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Sarojni; Singh, Parlo; Li, Minglin

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in doctoral enrolments of Asian international students in Australian universities. While policies have been developed to meet the needs of these students, there seems to be some confusion around the terms internationalisation, globalisation, bi-cultural, inter-cultural, multi-cultural, and…

  9. Integrating Foreign Languages and Cultures into U.S. International Business Programs: Best Practices and Future Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of foreign languages and cultures and their integration into U.S. international business programs. The author juxtaposes globalization strategies of European and American business schools and highlights pre-university foreign language study in Europe and the U.S. The paper goes on to describe model U.S.…

  10. Integrating Foreign Languages and Cultures into U.S. International Business Programs: Best Practices and Future Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of foreign languages and cultures and their integration into U.S. international business programs. The author juxtaposes globalization strategies of European and American business schools and highlights pre-university foreign language study in Europe and the U.S. The paper goes on to describe model U.S.…

  11. Culture and Foreign Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Xuhong

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that cross -cultural communication between Chinese and Foreigners often runs into trouble. Some factors which block communication lie in culture - governed structures of language. In view of the fact that the cultural messages are reflected in people' s daily use of language, culture dements should not be overlooked in FLT. This paper attempts to explore the ways of including culture teaching in the language classroom.

  12. Chinese Cultural Education in Post-Colonial Hong Kong: Primary School Chinese Language Teachers' Belief and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Ming Kai Marko

    2010-01-01

    Before 1997, no formal curriculum on Chinese cultural education for primary schools was developed in Hong Kong although the education authority had started to introduce some items of Chinese cultural learning into the Chinese language syllabus when the Target Oriented Curriculum was implemented in 1996. However, such items were incorporated into…

  13. Europe: so many languages, so many cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Steinhauer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The number of different languages in Europe by far exceeds the number of countries. All European countries have national languages, and in nearly all of them there are minority languages as well, whereas all major languages have dialects. National borders rarely coincide with linguistic borders, but the latter (including dialect borders mark by their nature also more or less distinct cultural areas. This paper presents a survey of the different language families represented in Europe: Indo-European, Uralic, Altaic, and the four Caucasian language families, each with their sub-branches and individual languages. Some information is given on characteristic structural phenomena and on the status and history of these languages or language families and on some of their extinct predecessors. The paper ends with a short discussion on the language policy and practices of the institutions of the European Union. Europe lacks a language with the status and power comparable to Indonesian in Indonesia. The policy is therefore based on equal status of all national languages and on respect for all languages, including national minority ones. The practice, however, is unavoidably practical: “the more languages, the more English”.

  14. World Languages and Cultures Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklarz, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to conduct a comprehensive review of the research and best practices of exemplary elementary school World Language and Culture Programs. Specifically, (1) to assess the degree to which various program designs had most closely met the measurable goals of the American Council of Teachers of a Foreign Language, commonly…

  15. Second Language Acquisition: Cultural, Cognitive, and Clinical Considerations for Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Nathaniel N.; Ivers, John J., Sr.; Duffey, Thelma

    2013-01-01

    The non-English-speaking population of the United States has increased by 140% since 1980 (Shin & Kominski, 2010). To serve this growing population, it is important that counselors increase their multicultural and multilingual competence. Through the lens of multicultural theory and relational-cultural theory, we analyze potential benefits of…

  16. Second Language Acquisition: Cultural, Cognitive, and Clinical Considerations for Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Nathaniel N.; Ivers, John J., Sr.; Duffey, Thelma

    2013-01-01

    The non-English-speaking population of the United States has increased by 140% since 1980 (Shin & Kominski, 2010). To serve this growing population, it is important that counselors increase their multicultural and multilingual competence. Through the lens of multicultural theory and relational-cultural theory, we analyze potential benefits of…

  17. Cultural Contexts and Language Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong-mei

    2014-01-01

    According to cognitive linguistics, human language is a process of cognition. Because of the different culture in Eastern and Western, the translation form must adapt to the cultural contexts. This article mainly deals with the differences in intercultural, and discusses the relationship between cultural contexts and language translation.

  18. Culture and Foreign Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程欣

    2008-01-01

    Culture teaching has been considered to be a very important element in foreign language teaching.Since English has become an international language,this paper mainly talks about the relationship between culture and English teaching.There are three parts in this paper: I. The role of culture in English teaching;Ⅱ.Culture teaching methods in the English classroom;Ⅲ.A danger in teaching cultures in English class.

  19. Two languages in the air : a cross-cultural comparison of preschool teachers’ reflections on their flexible bilingual practices

    OpenAIRE

    Palviainen, Åsa; Protassova, Ekaterina; Mård-Miettinen, Karita; Schwartz, Mila

    2016-01-01

    Bilingual preschool education is under researched compared with bilingual school education. There is also a lack of research on bilingual preschool teachers’ agency and how they negotiate between two languages in the classroom. We examined the language practices of five bilingual preschool teachers working within three different socio-linguistic settings, in Finland (Finnish–Swedish and Russian–Finnish contexts) and Israel (an Arabic–Hebrew context) and interviewed the teachers about their us...

  20. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  1. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  2. Culture in Second Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qing-yu

    2004-01-01

    @@ The linguist Robert Lado defines the goal of learning a foreign language as " the ability to use it, understanding its meanings and connotations in terms of the target language and culture, and the ability to understand the speech and writing of natives of the target culture in terms of their meanings as well as their great ideas and achievements" (Lado, 1964: 25).

  3. Making Culture Happen in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakup, Doganay; Ashirimbetova, Madina; Davis, Brent

    2013-01-01

    The issue of introducing the target culture into language classroom practice has long been an object of debates as well as the opinions of the learners towards it. Eventually, modern practitioners found a way of having the language learners acquainted with the target culture and introducing culture through culture-based textbook activities.…

  4. Culture, Attributions, and Language Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hye-Yeon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to move beyond the more traditional focus on individual characteristics as they relate to anxiety in the use of a foreign language. In order to do this, cultural characteristics, perceptions of the cause of successful learning, and foreign (English) language use anxiety were included as the major variables. Three…

  5. Cultural Diversity in English Language Teaching: Learners' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinh, Nguyen Duc

    2013-01-01

    The focus of culture in English language teaching (ELT) has traditionally been on the target culture of English speaking countries. However, the new status of English as international language (EIL) has led to significant changes in the practice of teaching and learning culture in ELT. Rather than relying on the paradigm of native speaker…

  6. Culture in foreign language teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Kramsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In foreign language education, the teaching of culture remains a hotly debated issue. What is culture? What is its relation to language? Which and whose culture should be taught? What role should the learners’ culture play in the acquisition of knowledge of the target culture? How can we avoid essentializing cultures and teaching stereotypes? And how can we develop in the learners an intercultural competence that would shortchange neither their own culture nor the target culture, but would make them into cultural mediators in a globalized world? This paper explores these issues from the perspective of the large body of research done in Australia, Europe and the U.S. in the last twenty years. It links the study of culture to the study of discourse (see, e.g., Kramsch 1993, 1998, 2004 and to the concept of translingual and transcultural competence proposed by the Modern Language Association (e.g., Kramsch, 2010. Special attention will be given to the unique role that the age-old Persian culture can play in fostering the cultural mediators of tomorrow.

  7. Doing Culture, Doing Race: Everyday Discourses of "Culture" and "Cultural Difference" in the English as a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ena

    2015-01-01

    While current conceptualisations of the inextricable connection between language and culture in English language education are largely informed by complex sociocultural theories that view culture as constructed in and through social practices among people, classroom practices continue to be influenced by mainstream discourses of culture that…

  8. Doing Culture, Doing Race: Everyday Discourses of "Culture" and "Cultural Difference" in the English as a Second Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ena

    2015-01-01

    While current conceptualisations of the inextricable connection between language and culture in English language education are largely informed by complex sociocultural theories that view culture as constructed in and through social practices among people, classroom practices continue to be influenced by mainstream discourses of culture that…

  9. Practice Theory in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard F.; Astarita, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Ortega (2011) has argued that second language acquisition is stronger and better after the social turn. Of the post-cognitive approaches she reviews, several focus on the social context of language learning rather than on language as the central phenomenon. In this article, we present Practice Theory not as yet another approach to language…

  10. Practice Theory in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard F.; Astarita, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Ortega (2011) has argued that second language acquisition is stronger and better after the social turn. Of the post-cognitive approaches she reviews, several focus on the social context of language learning rather than on language as the central phenomenon. In this article, we present Practice Theory not as yet another approach to language…

  11. CORE CULTURE IN LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jane Orton

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the essential role of culture in the creation of meaning of language-inuse, showing it to be the source of both the contextual shaping of a particular text and the fundamental core of beliefs and values from which contemporary contextual features derive. As a result of this essential relationship, it is argued, modern language learners need to master the cultural system as well as the linguistic system of their new language if they are to be able to use it competently in real life, as mo st intend today. Samples of texts are examined to show how the meanings of both context and core culture are naturally embedded in ordinary language and suggestions are provided for how these might be successfully brought to students' attention and mastery in a classroom.

  12. Culture and Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳

    2008-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ.What Is Culture In 1871,in his classic book Primitive Culture,British anthropologist Edward Tylor first gave the definition of culture which is widely quoted: "Culture…is that complex whole which includes knowledge,beliefs,arts,morals,law,custom and any other capacities and habits acquired by man as a member of society".

  13. Language and Culture Training: Separate Paths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Culture and Language Center Website, <www.culture.af.edu/> (21 November 2008). 9. Claire Kramsch , Language and Culture (New York: Oxford University Press...New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004). 12. Claire Kramsch , ed., Language Acquisition and Language Socialization (London: Continuum Books, 2002

  14. Integrating Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-26

    of nonresident programs such as Mobile Training Teams (MTTs) and Video Tele-Training ( VTT ).68 In 1973, United States Army Training and Doctrine...location for resident foreign language acquisition training and for a variety of nonresident programs such as MTTs and VTT . (AR 350-16) 47 DLPT IV...Analysis Center ( TRAC ). Future Combat Systems Mission Needs Analysis (FCS MNA), Final Report. Fort Leavenworth, KS: Government Printing Office, 2002

  15. Cultural Awareness in Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王延

    2004-01-01

    语言是文化的载体,是文化的一面镜子,二者是相互依存的关系,学习语言离不开文化环境.许多教师在英语教学中,没有充分意识到不同的语言代表不同的文化,在很多情况下,只重视语言技能的训练,而忽略了文化意识的渗透.实际上,学习一门语言,不仅仅是掌握一套语法规则,积累大量词汇,通过各种级别的考试,而是以语言为桥梁,获得交际能力,以吸取不同文化背景的知识及信息.这样才能实现以提高学生交际能力为最终目的的教学;所以作为高校英语教师,我们应该提高文化意识,同时利用多样的教学手段和方法培养学生的文化意识,使其获得跨文化交际的语言能力.%Language is a part of culture and plays a very important role in it. On the other hand, language is influenced and shaped by culture; it reflects culture. Language learning can't be separated from cultural situation. In language teaching, a lot of teachers can't realize that different languages stand for different cultures, they often focus on the"usage"of language and ignore the"use"of language. In fact, their teaching has become a kind of training of linguistic skills. Thus the cross-cultural communication ability as the ultimate teaching objective will be difficult to be realized. As foreign language teachers, we should raise cultural awareness and as well facilitate students' cultural awareness by various strategies and methods and improve their communicative ability.

  16. Teaching and Learning Language as Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘朝晖

    2007-01-01

    It's important to master a foreign language, English in particular.But the problem is how students should learn in order to communicate well with the native speakers and even become members of the target language community.The author narrates two incidents related to the Chinese study and English study experiences, pointing out that language study can't be separated from culture study.In line with the research results by some language experts about culture, language is the carrier of culture as literature is accomplished through languages,therefore language learning and teaching in isolation from culture is impossible.The author argues that language should be taught and learnt in a cultural approach.But as a sword with double blades, cultural approach may lead to culture invasion, culture inequality and the loss of culture diversity.

  17. Cultural Language Study: Grade 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Betty L.; Tappenden, Jacqueline W.

    This course guide, the first in a two-year sequence, is designed to give students an overview of Greek and Roman culture and language from the era of the early Aegean civilizations in Greece and Asia Minor to the Augustan Age in Rome. Six units of study are concerned with the growth and development of Greece and with the metamorphosis of Rome from…

  18. Science, culture, and the emergence of language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lawless, Daniel

    2002-05-01

    A major achievement in the sociology and philosophy of science over the past two decades has been the recognition that science is a form of culture with its own creeds, language, material practices, perceptions, theories, and beliefs. Learning science then amounts to participation (from more peripheral to central ways) in the particular practices of this culture. We argue here that there are some fundamental, heretofore neglected, ways in which newcomers come to perceive and talk about natural phenomena. Beginning with muddled talk and supported by deictic and iconic gestures, learners isolate salient objects and events which are, in increasing ways, represented in linguistic forms. More abstract forms of communication (writing, abstract symbols) are competently used only later in the emerging communicative patterns. As such, there lies tremendous potential in science activities that focus on observational and theoretical language in the presence of the relevant phenomena.

  19. Context and Culture in Language Teaching and Learning. Languages for Intercultural Communication and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byram, Michael, Ed.; Grundy, Peter, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines how the contexts in which language teaching occurs impact the aims and methods of language teaching. Ten papers focus on the following: "Introduction: Context and Culture in Language Teaching and Learning" (Mike Byram and Peter Grundy); "From Practice to Theory and Back Again" (Claire…

  20. Culture Input in Foreign Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晶

    2009-01-01

    Language and culture are highly interrelated, that is to say, language is not only the carrier of culture but it is also restricted by culture. Therefore, foreign language teaching aiming at cultivate students' intercultural communication should take culture differences into consideration. In this paper, the relationship between language and culture will be discussed. Then I will illustrate the importance of intercultural communication. Finally, according to the present situation of foreign language teaching in China, several strategies for cultural input in and out of class will be suggested.

  1. Culture Influences on English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-wei; Yan, Ying-jun

    2006-01-01

    It's obvious that the teaching situation and teaching methods used in English Language Teaching (ELT) in China need to be changed to involve culture instead of language knowledge only. To further explain the importance of culture teaching, teachers need to know to what extent cultural background knowledge influences language learning and teaching,…

  2. Addressing Cultural and Native Language Interference in Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Daniele; Bourdeau, Jacqueline; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of cultural and native language interference in second/foreign language acquisition. More specifically, it examines issues of interference that can be traced to a student's native language and that also have a cultural component. To this effect, an understanding of what actually comprises both interference and…

  3. Addressing Cultural and Native Language Interference in Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Daniele; Bourdeau, Jacqueline; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of cultural and native language interference in second/foreign language acquisition. More specifically, it examines issues of interference that can be traced to a student's native language and that also have a cultural component. To this effect, an understanding of what actually comprises both interference and…

  4. A Thorough Study between Language and Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于莹

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, language skill has already become an essential skill for modern people in this increasingly competitive en-vironment. Some of those training institutions and schools may only focus on teaching the language without introduction of the culture behind it. So such language education is a long-term and profitable teaching process for the students? This essay will ex-plore the relationship between language and culture and gives advice on how to learn the language.

  5. Language and Culture in International Legal Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Kocbek

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary business world, partners belonging to different nations, and hence different cultures, conduct business operations in either the language of one of the parties involved or in a third, neutral language, serving as lingua franca. Thus, language skills, as an essential component of the communicative competence, imply a certain extent of implicit or explicit translating and interpreting. The functionalist approaches in translation science, and most of all the Skopos theory by J. H. Vermeer, view translation as an intercultural transfer, which inevitably entails taking into account intercultural differences. As intercultural business communication is directly affected by the legal systems of the cultures involved, the communicating parties need to be acquainted with both the source and target legal systems. This is especially the case with English, as the Anglo-American legal system, based essentially on common law, differs substantially from continental law, to which most of the European countries belong. English as the world’s most commonly used lingua franca will have to be adapted to its new function by adopting terms and concepts from other cultures and, within the EU, take into consideration the existing discrepancies between the continental and the Anglo-American legal systems. In this paper, cases of non-equivalence regarding legal terms are illustrated with examples from company law. In conclusion, some linguistic and cultural implications of the use of English as lingua franca, as well as their impact on teaching and learning practices are presented.

  6. Cross-Cultural Differences in Beliefs and Practices that Affect the Language Spoken to Children: Mothers with Indian and Western Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Noreen; Johnston, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Background: Speech-language pathologists often advise families about interaction patterns that will facilitate language learning. This advice is typically based on research with North American families of European heritage and may not be culturally suited for non-Western families. Aims: The goal of the project was to identify differences in the…

  7. Integrating Indigenous Cultures into English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Susan C.; Uzarski, Joelle

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important components of a culture is its language. With language, people not only expeditiously communicate; they also express their values, beliefs, and world views. When a language becomes extinct, a part of the cultural patrimony of humanity is lost. For linguists, this also means the loss of an opportunity for a better…

  8. Culture and Language Teaching through Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, Belgin; Apak, Ozlem

    2008-01-01

    The topic of teaching and learning culture has been a matter of considerable interest to language educators and much has been written about the role of culture in foreign language instruction over the past two decades. ESL students whose success in a new environment is conditioned not only by their mastery of the new language, but also, and…

  9. Context and Culture in Language Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byram, Mike; Grundy, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Introduces this special issue of the journal on context and culture in language teaching and learning, as well as each of the articles, most of which were contributions to a conference. The origins of this topic lie partly within theory and practice of language teaching and partly in response to the recognition of the social and political…

  10. On Culture Teaching in the English Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢飞翔

    2011-01-01

    @@ Language is a part of culture and plays a very important role in it.Some social scientists consider it the keystone of culture.Language and culture evolved together and have been mutually development through their history.The rise of civilization and the development of writing exhibit the same kind of mutual dependenee.Much of the recent work has revealed that language is related to cognition,and cognition in turn is related tO the cultural setting.1 would like to put forwards three principles to teach culture in English language teaching.Now I gladly have the opportunity to exchange my view with you.

  11. "Impressing Heaven": Creative Non-Fiction as Reflective Practice in Foreign Language Teaching and Cross Cultural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldern, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    "Impressing Heaven" is the title of my collection of short stories about career decisions and experience interacting in English on the part of actual young adult learners of English as a foreign language in South Korea. (See "Impressing Heaven" by Barbara Waldern, July 2012 Smashwords ISBN: 9781476467023). While I was first…

  12. Au Courant: Teaching French Vocabulary and Culture Using the Mass Media. Language in Education: Theory and Practice 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwald, Jean-Pierre

    This volume outlines potential uses of many of the topics associated with daily newspapers, music, film, theater, and sports for vocabulary development and grammar review in French language instruction. The emphasis is on the advantage of using authentic, current materials prepared for the general public but somewhat familiar to students. The…

  13. Psychology of Language Classroom Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁志超

    2005-01-01

    This paper is based on my personal observation and context, as well as some implications inspired trom theones, First, I shall give an evaluation of traditional language classroom practice I am familiar to. Second, relating to some implications in the theories of socialcultural psychology, I shall discuss some principled ways in which the classroom practices I have described and evaluated might be modified in order that we could enhance the effective opportunities for social and individual learning processes. I shall also provide my suggested structure of a lesson, in which some practices are implemented in this language classroom. Last but not the least, I shall give my reflection on how my own psychology of learning has been developed since I arrived at the university to begin my English teaching.

  14. Language and Culture: A Social Semiotic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2002-01-01

    Examines the contribution that applied linguistics can make to the way we conceive of language, literature, and culture in foreign language departments from a social semiotic perspective. (Author/VWL)

  15. Tasks for Integrating Language and Culture Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Peter; Rucynski, John, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of culture in language teaching and provides activities for introducing culture in the classroom, focusing on teaching context and methodology to integrate culture. The authors outline five activities that can be adapted to the language level and interests of students. Instructions for each activity include language…

  16. Developing Cultural Awareness in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemshadsara, Zahra Ghorbani

    2012-01-01

    Culture awareness has become an important focus of modern language education, a shift that reflects a greater awareness of the inseparability of language and culture, and the need to prepare students for intercultural communication. The paper reports on an ongoing study into the presence and status of cultural understanding in EFL teaching. In…

  17. Foreign Language Teaching and Cultural Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Raja T., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of works on the role of cultural identity in second language learning and teaching includes: "Linguas estrangeiras e ideologia" (Roberto Ballalai); "Cultural Identity and Bilinguality" (Josiane F. Hamers, Michel Blanc); "Foreign Language Teaching and Cultural Identity" (Lakshmie K. Cumaranatunge);…

  18. Language Choice on soc.culture.punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolillo, John C.

    1996-01-01

    Examines factors influencing language choice on the newsgroup soc.culture.punjab, a forum discussing the culture of the Punjab region of India and Pakistan. Finds that Punjabi is used only with interlocutors who are Punjabi community members. Accounts for limited usage in terms of intergenerational language shift, cultural ambivalence among…

  19. Cultural Differences and English Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴卞

    2011-01-01

    With the development of the cross-cultural communication,more and more people have recognized the interaction between language and culture.Each culture has its own characteristic and is different from one another.Because of cultural differences,difficulties often arise in communication between different people.In China,English is taught as a foreign language.Both teachers and students should be aware of the differences between eastern and western culture in their teaching and study.

  20. Developing Cultural Awareness In Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail CAKIR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of different points of view, culture has taken an important place in foreign language teaching and learning studies. It has been widely recognized that culture and language is used as a main medium through which culture is expressed. However, “pure information” is useful but does not necessarily lead learners’ insight; whereas the development of people’s cultural awareness leads them to more critical thinking. Most frequently confronted that students to a great extend know the rules of language, but are not always able to use the language adequately as it requires since they are not knowledgeable enough about the target culture. Bearing all this in mind, the aim of this article has been to provide necessary information for the foreign language teachers and learners so that they can establish a good connection with the target language and its culture.

  1. Cultural Isolation and Cultural Integration: A Communicative Language Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, John

    2002-01-01

    Provides a theoretical grounding to an activity that follows a communicative language teaching approach to teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. The activity, cultural isolation and cultural integration, motivates learners to relate their experiences and feelings in regard to diverse cultures. (Author/VWL)

  2. Teacher Cultural Competency and Long-Term English Language Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jannis

    2015-01-01

    Students that have been designated English Language Learners for five or more years are Long-Term English Learners. The literature review addresses some typical characteristics and experiences of students that are Long- Term English Language Learners, and the need for culturally responsive practices to meet their needs. Teacher attitudes, perceptions about English Language Learners, positionality, and opportunities to learn are integrated into the review. The author discusses linguistic aware...

  3. Persuasive argumentation as a cultural practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Gałkowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article author traces relation between argumentation and cultural practice. The first part focuses on definition of argumentation in informal logic tradition. In particular, it discusses argument in terms of verbal and social activity involving the use of everyday language. Author claims that there is no argumentation beyond language. The second part explains persuasive argumentation as a form of cultural practice. The persuasive arguments found in “social practice” can be understood as a social activity, analysable within the context of a given cultural system. Author refers to an approach taking the argumentative expression as a certain type of communicative practice, directed towards respecting, recognising or accepting specific actions. The inclusion of persuasive argumentation in the “circuit of cultural activities” to be studied makes it possible to compare this type of argumentation with other social practices, and to posit a clear historical dimension in the study of argumentation. It also makes it possible to view persuasive argumentation as one of many cultural activities aimed at changing or perpetuating behaviours, attitudes, thinking, etc. The third part of the paper concerns the problem of humanistic interpretation of persuasive argumentation. Author attempts to develop this intuition, at the same time demonstrating the problems that arise from this approach. In conclusion, author tries to analyze argumentation in terms of culture theory and humanistic interpretation.

  4. School Culture: Teachers' Beliefs, Behaviors, and Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongboontri, Chantarath; Keawkhong, Natheeporn

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods research project documents the school culture of Hope University's Language Institute and reveals the reciprocal relationship between the school culture and the instructional practices of the English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in this particular institute. Altogether, 62 EFL teachers agreed to complete a questionnaire.…

  5. Europe: so many languages, so many cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Hein Steinhauer

    2011-01-01

    The number of different languages in Europe by far exceeds the number of countries. All European countries have national languages, and in nearly all of them there are minority languages as well, whereas all major languages have dialects. National borders rarely coincide with linguistic borders, but the latter (including dialect borders) mark by their nature also more or less distinct cultural areas. This paper presents a survey of the different language families represented in Europe: Indo-E...

  6. Rethinking Culture Teaching in English Language Programmes in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodin, Navaporn S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on perceptions and practices in relation to integrating culture into EFL teaching and how course material was designed within the Thai curriculum framework. Thai teachers' understanding of what constitutes culture, the role it plays in language learning and how such understanding is being translated into pedagogical practices…

  7. Developing Cultural Awareness In Foreign Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Regardless of different points of view, culture has taken an important place in foreign language teaching and learning studies. It has been widely recognized that culture and language is used as a main medium through which culture is expressed. However, “pure information” is useful but does not necessarily lead learners’ insight; whereas the development of people’s cultural awareness leads them to more critical thinking. Most frequently confronted that students to a great extend know the rul...

  8. Cultural Education in English Language teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易虹

    2008-01-01

    The cultural education has various influences for the English language teaching, Therefore, the teachers should pay much attention to the dissemination of cultural knowledge to the students. This thesis starts with the definition of culture. And then it analyzes the cause from the cultural education. We can have a thorough understanding of the cultural education from different angles to interpret the cultural education. The conclusion part of the paper, it illustrates explicitly the relationship between English. It starts with the function of English on the science technology, at last, the paper has a general conclusion of the content, focusing on the cultural education in English language teaching.

  9. Emergent Processes of Language Acquisition: Japanese Language Learning and the Consumption of Japanese Cultural Products in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Toyoshima

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Motivation for learning a second language varies among individuals: some people enjoy the process of learning languages, while others learn a second language for practical reasons. Previous fieldwork research in Thailand has shown that many consumers of Japanese cultural products are also learners of the Japanese language. This suggests that Japanese cultural products motivate consumers to start studying Japanese and to continue learning it. In this study, two hypotheses will be posed in order to reveal the relationship between the consumption of Japanese cultural products and Japanese language learning: (1 exposure to Japanese cultural products induces Japanese language learning, and (2 Japanese language learning induces the consumption of other Japanese cultural products. Through questionnaire research conducted on university students in Thailand and through ethnographic data, this study attempts to examine the hypotheses and to demonstrate a continuous cycle model of Japanese language learning and the consumption of Japanese cultural ­products.

  10. Cultural influence of foreign language in language learning

    OpenAIRE

    Golandam, А.

    2013-01-01

    This article is devoted to the formation of intercultural competence of students in classes in a foreign language. It raised a number of issues related to the formation of cross-cultural competence in learning foreign language communication across cultural and mental differences of speakers, which is a prerequisite for a successful dialogue of cultures. The process of globalization, developing at present, resulting in the expansion of the interactions of different countries, peoples and their...

  11. Study of the Relationship between Cultural differences and Language teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆瑜

    2014-01-01

    Language is an important part of culture,each language belong to a certain culture.Language and culture are interdependent from each other.So,language teaching must be concerned with teaching the culture which it belongs to.Language teaching should pay more attention to the cultural differences.

  12. CULTURE LEARNING IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ⅰ. Introduction Foreign language teachers in China nowadays are well aware that language learning cannot be separated from cultural learning. They start to deal with intercultural communication in the classroom and have undergone significant progress in the past two decades. A lot of excellent work has been done (see Hu Wenzhong 1990, 1997) on raising cultural awareness and pragmatic insights.

  13. The Relationship between Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Wendy; Lorenzo-Hubert, Isabella

    2008-01-01

    This article was adapted from the chapter "Culture and Parental Expectations for Child Development: Concerns for Language Development and Early Learning" in "Learning to Read the World: Language and Literacy in the First Three Years" (see ED493629), published by "ZERO TO THREE." The authors describe how cultural expectations for children's…

  14. The Relationship between Language and Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皮丽莉

    2013-01-01

    The strong version of Sapir-Whorf's hypothesis emphasizes the definite control of language over our thoughts or cul-ture. While the weak one argues language can influence but the influence is relative. This thesis is to give a view on the relation-ship between these two concepts, hoping to give some help to the research of language and culture, and the understanding of their relationship.

  15. Emergent Processes of Language Acquisition: Japanese Language Leaning and the Consumption of Japanese Cultural Products in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Motivation for learning a second language varies among individuals: some people enjoy the process of learning languages, while others learn a second language for practical reasons. Previous fieldwork research in Thailand has shown that many consumers of Japanese cultural products are also learners of the Japanese language. This suggests that Japanese cultural products motivate consumers to start studying Japanese and to continue learning it. In this study, two hypotheses will be posed in orde...

  16. An Exploration of Differences in Cultural Values in Teacher Education Pedagogy: Chinese English Language Teacher Trainees' Perceptions of Effective Teaching Practice Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Barbara; Abbott, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the impact of different cultural values on the teacher education of Chinese teacher trainees. By examining their perceptions of the effectiveness of teaching practice feedback, the study uses Hofstede's dimension of "individualism" (IDV) to explore the "culture bumps" which may occur between teacher educators…

  17. Culture, language, pedagogy : the place of culture in language teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The principles of many international language teacher education programmes are grounded in a relatively homogenous set of ‘Western’ cultural values, even though their participants come from a wide range of different cultural backgrounds. This paper addresses some of the issues surrounding the role of culture in language teacher education and discusses the ways in which cultural phenomena are defined and recognised on such programmes. It argues that language teacher education should acknowledg...

  18. The spanish language alongside other cultures, other colors, other languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Quintero Corzo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available To teach and learn Spanish language as a foreign language involves understanding the concepto of interculturality, which asks for an investigative look to appraise social, geographical, political, cultural, pedagogical and linguistic differences among countries that, even though they speak different languages, wish to communicate each other. This paper makes part of a research project intitled “Pedagogical university narrative”. In it, a trainee who is about to get her degree as a Bachelor in Modern Languages from Universidad de Caldas (Colombia and her advisor, as principal investigator, show how in New Delhi Spanish language acquisition is permeated by cultural factors that, if not adequately addressed, become barriers hindering the integration of language to contents, feelings and expectations related to the everyday context Spanish students live in —different from their mother language— in a foreign speaking country

  19. Cultural influences for college student language brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskirch, Robert S; Kim, Su Yeong; Zamboanga, Byron L; Schwartz, Seth J; Bersamin, Melina; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Children from immigrant families often translate communication for parents, a process known as language brokering (LB). LB begins in childhood, but may continue through emerging adulthood, even when individuals are in college. We surveyed 1,222 university students with two immigrant parents and compared non-language brokers, infrequent language brokers, and frequent language brokers on a variety of ethnic, cultural, and identity measures. Significant differences emerged for cultural heritage value orientation, ethnic identity, and dimensions of acculturation with frequent language brokers scoring highest, infrequent language brokers scoring in the middle, and non-language brokers scoring the lowest on these measures. There were no significant differences on acculturative stress among these three groups. These results suggest that LB experiences may contribute to the development of psychological assets for ethnic minority, emerging adults from immigrant families.

  20. The spanish language alongside other cultures, other colors, other languages

    OpenAIRE

    Josefina Quintero Corzo; Natalia Mejía Delgado

    2010-01-01

    To teach and learn Spanish language as a foreign language involves understanding the concepto of interculturality, which asks for an investigative look to appraise social, geographical, political, cultural, pedagogical and linguistic differences among countries that, even though they speak different languages, wish to communicate each other. This paper makes part of a research project intitled “Pedagogical university narrative”. In it, a trainee who is about to get her degree as a Bachelor i...

  1. Teaching Chinese Culture and Language with Postage Stamps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.C. Leung

    2000-01-01

    @@ While several articles have long been published on using stamps to teach French,German, and Spanish, I have yet to see one relating to the teaching of Chinese. As a vehicle for communicating a country's current and past values (cultural, political, social, economic,linguistic), stamps can play an important role in the culture and language class -- if only because they stimulate interest and heighten motivation by projecting images of a country's culture,politics, and language. But there is much more: stamps could serve as focal points for a class discussion; they could shed light on government priorities; they could be the subject of cultural quizzes and exercises for language practice; they could be assigned as research subjects. They are, after all, official documents and authentic cultural artifacts themselves. This paper examines the ways in which stamps can serve the teaching of various aspects of culture and language. For the purpose of teaching Chinese, one could use stamps from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau. Together, these stamps cover the full range of cultural domains: geography, archaeology,history and politics, language and literature, arts and architecture, science, patterns for daily living,symbolism, myths and culture heroes, etc. I will use these headings in my discussion. Unless otherwise stated, the stamps referred to below were issued in the People's Republic of China (with dates or official serial numbers in brackets).

  2. We Say "Culture" and Students Say What? University Students' Definitions of Foreign Language Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Monika

    2002-01-01

    Definitions of culture of 212 first-, second-, and third-year German students are presented and discussed. Results sow that--in terms of the national standards--students overall prefer practices and perspectives over products. Students views on the teachability of culture and its appropriate place in the foreign language classroom are explored.…

  3. Preschool Teachers' Language and Literacy Practices with Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Brook E.; Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Cycyk, Lauren M.; López, Lisa; Blair, Clancy; Sandilos, Lia; Komaroff, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) examine the degree to which teachers used linguistically responsive practices to support the language and literacy development of Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLL) and (b) to investigate the associations between these practices and select teacher-level factors. The sample consisted of 72 preschool…

  4. Cultural Practices, Oppression, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot

    1998-01-01

    Argues that contested meanings, multiple judgments, and conflicts are part of cultures and the individual's thoughts and actions. Contends that people make moral judgments that may affirm or contradict cultural norms and practices, and sometimes invoke concepts of welfare, justice, and rights. Notes that some key aspects of Baumrind's neo-Marxist…

  5. Cultural Practices, Oppression, and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, Elliot

    1998-01-01

    Argues that contested meanings, multiple judgments, and conflicts are part of cultures and the individual's thoughts and actions. Contends that people make moral judgments that may affirm or contradict cultural norms and practices, and sometimes invoke concepts of welfare, justice, and rights. Notes that some key aspects of Baumrind's neo-Marxist…

  6. Games culture and media practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Alsina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this article is to explore the relationship between videogames and other practices related to audiovisual media in everyday life; we are specifically interested in examining how far videogames, as a cultural form that combines audiovisual narrative with the fun of a game, may be useful in understanding broader cultural transformations in relation to cultural production in the new media context opened up by information and communication technologies.

  7. Culture, Language, Pedagogy: The Place of Culture in Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Richard; MacDonald, Malcolm N.

    2007-01-01

    The principles of many international language teacher education programmes are grounded in a relatively homogenous set of "Western" cultural values, even though their participants come from a wide range of different cultural backgrounds. This paper addresses some of the issues surrounding the role of culture in language teacher education and…

  8. Culture and the Language Classroom. Challenging Expectations of Cultural Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Culture is generally considered to be a necessary part of language teaching. The term embraces not only the way we present background information about native speakers of the foreign language, but also the methodology we employ and our concept of who is best qualified to teach the language. lt also has pragmatic implications for the functions and behavior we emphasize when we teach. lt is part of a whole ideology of language teaching. As long as we consider languages to be associated with the...

  9. The Cultural Component of Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    1995-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical framework for teaching culture through language that suspends the traditional dichotomy between the universal and the particular in language teaching and embraces the particular as a platform for dialogue and as a common struggle to realign differences. (30 references) (Author/CK)

  10. Global health language and culture competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadling, Charles; Maza, John; Nakano, Gregg; Mahmood, Maysaa; Jawad, Shakir; Al-Ameri, Ali; Zuerlein, Scott; Anderson, Warner

    2012-01-01

    This article presents findings from a survey conducted to examine the availability of foreign language and culture training to Civil Affairs health personnel and the relevance of that training to the tasks they perform. Civil Affairs forces recognize the value of cross-cultural communication competence because their missions involve a significant level of interaction with foreign governments? officials, military, and civilians. Members of the 95th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne) who had a health-related military occupational specialty code were invited to participate in the survey. More than 45% of those surveyed were foreign language qualified. Many also received predeployment language and culture training specific to the area of deployment. Significantly more respondents reported receiving cultural training and training on how to work effectively with interpreters than having received foreign language training. Respondents perceived interpreters as important assets and were generally satisfied with their performance. Findings from the survey highlight a need to identify standard requirements for predeployment language training that focuses on medical and health terminology and to determine the best delivery platform(s). Civil Affairs health personnel would benefit from additional cultural training that focuses on health and healthcare in the country or region of deployment. Investing in the development of distance learning capabilities as a platform for delivering health-specific language and culture training may help ease the time and resources constraints that limit the ability of Civil Affairs health personnel to access the training they need.

  11. Language in the Academy: Cultural Reflexivity and Intercultural Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This book takes a critical look at why issues of language in higher education are routinely marginalized, despite the growing internationalization of universities. It examines the norms of academic writing in the context of wider cultural practices and power relations and suggests the transformative potential of the intercultural dynamic in the contemporary academy.

  12. Culture, Diversity, and Language: What Is Culturally Competent Translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Antonio P.

    2009-01-01

    As the cultural and ethnic diversity of the student population rises within school districts across the nation, the matter of translating materials in a language that is understandable and meaningful to the target population becomes more pressing. There are multitude of problems inherent in translation of materials from one language to another. To…

  13. Language and Culture: Nigerian Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    Children will grow up learning only to speak when an adult addresses them directly and ... For this reason, many children have difficulties in the classroom when asked to orally ... if this language has both oral and written forms of transmission. ... and taming the English language to fit or suit the Nigerian environment. It is.

  14. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE INTERFERENCE IN PLURILINGUAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackett-Jones, A.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with interlingual phenomena that occur in the process of multiple language acquisition in a learning environment. The notions of language interference and transfer put forward by the theories of bilingualism, give useful insights when applied to the modern day educational trends. Language and culture interference is an important aspect to be considered with regard to teaching of plurilingual learners, whose communicative competence is formed on the basis of several linguistic and cultural systems that interact with each other and exert mutual influence.

  15. Language, Culture, and Early Childhood Education in Catalonia and the Basque Region of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrow, Norma

    1990-01-01

    Discusses policies, legislation, educational practices, and innovative early childhood programs designed to revitalize the languages and cultures of Catalonia and the Basque Autonomous Region. Opposition to these practices and programs is also discussed. (BG)

  16. Integrating Culture into Language Teaching and Learning: Learner Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thuy

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the issue of learner outcomes in learning culture as part of their language learning. First, some brief discussion on the role of culture in language teaching and learning, as well as on culture contents in language lessons is presented. Based on a detailed review of previous literature related to culture in language teaching…

  17. Practice Output in College Language Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岩

    2010-01-01

    <正>Practice output constitutes an indispensable part in second language learning.Relevant theories like"Interface Position"and"Comprehensible Output"are discussed in order to analyze in detail how this practice can actually facilitate acquisition and finally pave the way for communicative output—a goal all language learners are striving for.

  18. Relationship between Language,Culture and Thought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹红梅

    2015-01-01

    It has long been realized that language is of great importance to culture and that the impact of culture upon a given language is indispensible.One claim about the relationship between language and culture is that the structure of a particular language influences the habitual thought of its speakers.Today,the claim is referred to as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis,which is composed of two versions.The strong version,also known as linguistic determinism,states that language patterns determine speaker’s thinking.The weak version,also known as linguistic relativity,implies that language do really influence thought but doesn’t determine it completely.This paper tries to give a brief introduction to the hypothesis,illustrate some experiments used to test the theory and state some arguments against the strong version of the hypothesis.Although the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis doesn’t offer the most reasonable explanation of the nature of the relationship between language,culture and thought,it is still influential in the development of linguistic science.

  19. Cultural Consciousness in a Language Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Haimanti

    1997-01-01

    Acknowledging that the Suggestopedia approach is not very popular, this paper focuses on the use of Suggestopedia's distinctive features to promote awareness of the linguistic and cultural features of the target culture in a language class. The role of the classroom environment in this approach is also examined. The context considered here is a…

  20. Foreign Language Teachers' Language Proficiency and Their Language Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Heather; Conway, Clare; Roskvist, Annelies; Harvey, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Teachers' subject knowledge is recognized as an essential component of effective teaching. In the foreign language context, teachers' subject knowledge includes language proficiency. In New Zealand high schools, foreign languages (e.g. Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish) have recently been offered to learners earlier in their schooling,…

  1. Educational Environment and Cultural Transmission in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memis, Muhammet Rasit

    2016-01-01

    Foreign language teaching is not to teach grammar and vocabulary of the target language and to gain basic language skills only. Foreign language teaching is teaching of the language's culture at the same time. Because of language and community develop and shape together, learning, understanding and speaking a foreign language literally requires…

  2. Language, Culture and Symbolic Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Theis, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    As Ernst Cassierer introduced in his “Philosophie der symbolischen Formen” in 1923, he specifically mentioned “language” as well as a way of symbolic forms. In 1991, the self declared “researcher on human sciences”, Norbert Elias, published his work called “The Symbol Theory” where he mainly writes about language as an application of symbolic forms and symbols. Elias does not make any reference to Cassirer at all, but states that languages are a part of a civilization process and part of cult...

  3. Authenticity, Culture and Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Malcolm N.; Badger, Richard; Dasli, Maria

    2006-01-01

    In philosophy, authenticity has been used with two meanings: one entails the notion of correspondence; the other entails the notion of genesis (Cooper, 1983: 15). As in certain branches of philosophy, language teaching has perhaps clung too long to the first of these notions of authenticity at the expense of the other. This paper reviews four key…

  4. Rethinking Community-Based Indigenous Language Revitalization Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Man-Chiu Amay; Yudaw, Bowtung

    2013-01-01

    This article suggests a theoretical framework for re-examining the complex relationship of language, literacy, and cultural practices, across multiple generations in the context of community-based Indigenous language revitalization. In the scholarship of Indigenous language revitalization and education, researchers have shifted from viewing…

  5. Rethinking Community-Based Indigenous Language Revitalization Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Man-Chiu Amay; Yudaw, Bowtung

    2013-01-01

    This article suggests a theoretical framework for re-examining the complex relationship of language, literacy, and cultural practices, across multiple generations in the context of community-based Indigenous language revitalization. In the scholarship of Indigenous language revitalization and education, researchers have shifted from viewing…

  6. MODERN BUSINESS COMMUNICATION, SPEECH CULTURAL TRADITIONS AND INTERNATIONAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Butorina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal to simplify the Russian language for its practical use and the extension of Russian cultural influence was set in Peter the Great’s period. In his language policy Peter the Great preferred a functional criterion, insisting on the use of the Russian language variety, which would be understandable not by the elite only, so the Russian language regulation for business purposes has had a long-standing tradition. The article discusses the European practice of various languages standardization in modern business communication. To compare Russian business texts in Russia and abroad urban sites of Moscow, New York and Tallinn are analyzed. The data obtained suggest some hypotheses about peculiarities of business texts in modern Russian language space.

  7. Language Technology for Cultural Heritage

    CERN Document Server

    Sporleder, Caroline; Zervanou, Kalliopi

    2011-01-01

    The digital age has had a profound effect on our cultural heritage and the academic research that studies it. Staggering amounts of objects, many of them of a textual nature, are being digitised to make them more readily accessible to both experts and laypersons. Besides a vast potential for more effective and efficient preservation, management, and presentation, digitisation offers opportunities to work with cultural heritage data in ways that were never feasible or even imagined. To explore and exploit these possibilities, an interdisciplinary approach is needed, bringing together experts fr

  8. The Correlations between Language, Culture and Thought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹忠凯

    2015-01-01

    With the purpose of having a better understanding,this article discusses the correlations between language, culture and thought as well their interactions. They not only correlate but also are different social phenomena. They are dependent and mutu⁃ally influenced with Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis as its main points.

  9. Studies in Philippine Languages and Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Sherri, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This issue of Studies in Philippine Languages and Cultures contains the following articles: "Functions of Locatives in Northern Subanen Expository and Hortatory Discourse" (Josephine Sanicas-Daguman); "Functions of Demonstratives in Sama Bangingi' Expository Discourse" (John Blakely); "A Brief Look at Sinama Basic Verbs…

  10. American Holidays: Culture and Language Learning Combined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Grace Scott

    Suggestions for combining cultural exposure and language instruction through class activities geared to American holidays are outlined. General information about gathering holiday-related realia and instructional materials from local newspapers and magazines is provided, and four specific holidays are highlighted. For each holiday, sources of…

  11. Language and culture modulate online semantic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ceri; Kuipers, Jan R; Thierry, Guillaume; Lovett, Victoria; Turnbull, Oliver; Jones, Manon W

    2015-10-01

    Language has been shown to influence non-linguistic cognitive operations such as colour perception, object categorization and motion event perception. Here, we show that language also modulates higher level processing, such as semantic knowledge. Using event-related brain potentials, we show that highly fluent Welsh-English bilinguals require significantly less processing effort when reading sentences in Welsh which contain factually correct information about Wales, than when reading sentences containing the same information presented in English. Crucially, culturally irrelevant information was processed similarly in both Welsh and English. Our findings show that even in highly proficient bilinguals, language interacts with factors associated with personal identity, such as culture, to modulate online semantic processing.

  12. Language Practices in the Ci-Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Prelingually deafened children are nowadays likely to receive a cochlear implant (ci). As these children do their language acquisition with a cochlear implant they require a constant rehabilitation and support. Educational staff is instructed on how to work with children with ci in form...... of guidelines and workshops. This paper discusses language practices used in the setting of a school for cochlear-implanted children. These children encounter language and pronunciation problems that accompany prelingual deafness and hearing with a cochlear implant. I examine two practices, which are used...

  13. Between the Lines: When Culture, Language and Poetry Meet in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Teaching poetry in second language (L2) classrooms raises theoretical and practical questions about how best to treat literature when target language and culture is also being negotiated. Current pedagogy derives from disparate sources, including the experientially-driven practices of individual teachers, the quantitative and qualitative research…

  14. Living Language and Culture: Concordia Language Villages--One Example of Learning outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippe, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    At Concordia Language Villages, language and culture are inextricably intertwined, as they are in life. Participants "live" and "do" language and culture 16 hours per day. The experiential, residential setting immerses the participants in the culture of the country or countries where the target language is spoken through food, music, sports,…

  15. Othering: Towards a Critical Cultural Awareness in the Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthephanny Moncada Linares

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the need of decentering language learners’ conceptions and practices of “othering” against the target culture, it has become necessary to help them grow in critical cultural understanding and positive appreciation towards the richness of difference and plurality, as a transversal dimension of their intercultural competence. Thus, this paper seeks to summarize the literature on the notion of othering and its pedagogical possibilities to promote critical cultural awareness raising in the language classroom. It initially presents some theoretical contributions on the concepts of the “Other” and the “Self” and its dialectical relation, and later, it proposes four pedagogical tools that could enable learners to achieve the already mentioned objective.

  16. Language Shift and Local Choice: On Practicing Linguistics in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwatchka, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    To successfully maintain endangered Native American languages, Native communities must collectively recognize their language's vulnerability and commit to its continuity. Linguists need more experience with fieldwork and pragmatics, knowledge of various language transmission practices in cultures other than their own, an understanding of cultural…

  17. Static and Dynamic Views of Culture and Intercultural Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching culture in the second language classroom. Examines the difference between teaching the static or dynamic view of culture. Focuses on intercultural language teaching and developing intercultural competence. (Author/VWL)

  18. Beijing Language and Cultural Center for Diplomatic Missions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As an educational institution with nearly 50 years of history, Beijing Language and Cultural Center for Diplomatic Missions (LCC) specializes in teaching Mandarin and offering Chinese cultural lessons.

  19. Heritage-culture images disrupt immigrants' second-language processing through triggering first-language interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Morris, Michael W; Cheng, Chi-Ying; Yap, Andy J

    2013-07-09

    For bicultural individuals, visual cues of a setting's cultural expectations can activate associated representations, switching the frames that guide their judgments. Research suggests that cultural cues may affect judgments through automatic priming, but has yet to investigate consequences for linguistic performance. The present studies investigate the proposal that heritage-culture cues hinder immigrants' second-language processing by priming first-language structures. For Chinese immigrants in the United States, speaking to a Chinese (vs. Caucasian) face reduced their English fluency, but at the same time increased their social comfort, effects that did not occur for a comparison group of European Americans (study 1). Similarly, exposure to iconic symbols of Chinese (vs. American) culture hindered Chinese immigrants' English fluency, when speaking about both culture-laden and culture-neutral topics (study 2). Finally, in both recognition (study 3) and naming tasks (study 4), Chinese icon priming increased accessibility of anomalous literal translations, indicating the intrusion of Chinese lexical structures into English processing. We discuss conceptual implications for the automaticity and adaptiveness of cultural priming and practical implications for immigrant acculturation and second-language learning.

  20. Cross-Cultural Language Learning and Web Design Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yong

    2015-01-01

    Accepting the fact that culture and language are interrelated in second language learning (SLL), the web sites should be designed to integrate with the cultural aspects. Yet many SLL web sites fail to integrate with the cultural aspects and/or focus on language acquisition only. This study identified three issues: (1) anthropologists'…

  1. Destruction of a Language and Culture: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearsky, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    The extinction of language and culture in Canadian Aboriginal communities is closely linked to the historical experiences of families under past assimilation policies. Families must recover the language and culture to ward off the possibility of extinction. The revival of culture and languages, in effort not to lose our identity as First Nation…

  2. The Effects of Cultural Instruction on Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Wenli

    2005-01-01

    Many elementary EFL teachers in Taiwan have concerns in integrating target culture teaching into their language classrooms for reasons such as teachers' limited knowledge of the target culture, lack of time, lack of methods and materials. In order to persuade more language teachers to teach target language culture, guidelines about designing an…

  3. Cross-Cultural Language Learning and Web Design Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yong

    2015-01-01

    Accepting the fact that culture and language are interrelated in second language learning (SLL), the web sites should be designed to integrate with the cultural aspects. Yet many SLL web sites fail to integrate with the cultural aspects and/or focus on language acquisition only. This study identified three issues: (1) anthropologists'…

  4. The Interrelation between Language and Culture in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄珊珊

    2012-01-01

    In daily communication,language differences significantly reflect the nature of cultural difference.To improve students' ability of cross-cultural communication,teachers are not only supposed to make students master language itself,but also should help them to understand cultural differences between their mother language and English.

  5. A Brief Analysis on the Relationship of Language, Culture and Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become a hot topic for researchers to explore the relationships between language and culture, lan⁃guage and translation, or culture and translation. Indeed, the three aspects are inseparable. Language is the carrier of culture and al⁃so restricted by culture. Translation mostly takes place between languages and it is a kind of cross-linguistic and intercultural com⁃municative activity. While translating, it is necessary to understand thoroughly the two languages,but also two cultures and cultur⁃al differences between them. In this paper, I firstly give a general review on both the conception of language, culture and transla⁃tion and their relationship and then discussed the interaction and blending separately from the two phenomena of culture-orienta⁃tion in translation and translation under culture context. Since culture is transmitted mostly by language, cultural elements and fac⁃tors should be taken into consideration in translation practices. To achieve the goal of translation in a real sense, translation prac⁃tices should be based on the principle of processing the discourse of source language and target language under the perspective of its cultural context.

  6. Teaching Social Studies for Newcomer English Language Learners: Toward Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonjung

    2013-01-01

    Through this case study the author explores how an exemplary teacher utilized social studies curriculum and pedagogy to engage English language learners (ELLs) in learning in a culturally relevant and meaningful way and discusses practical implications for teaching and learning.

  7. Teaching Social Studies for Newcomer English Language Learners: Toward Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonjung

    2013-01-01

    Through this case study the author explores how an exemplary teacher utilized social studies curriculum and pedagogy to engage English language learners (ELLs) in learning in a culturally relevant and meaningful way and discusses practical implications for teaching and learning.

  8. Culture in Language Learning: Background, Issues and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Pourkalhor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at presenting the historical background of the emergence of culture in language learning and how it can be correlated with the language learners. In fact, by providing various definitions of culture and the role it might play in the process of language learning, whether directly or indirectly, this research provides a clear-cut overview of culture and its application among the people as well as their communication in the society. Moreover, the relationship between culture and language learning is also taken into account. To this end, basic definitions of culture in different research studies are investigated moving toward finding a path to make a connection between language and culture. Therefore, a review of studies on the relationship between language learning and culture is provided to account for the possible effectiveness of benefiting from culture in the language learning process in that the learning context (i.e. foreign or second language can be affected by the culture of the teachers as well as the learners. This demands that both teachers and learners should be aware of cultural issues surrounding the language and the fact that it can be beneficial for the process of language learning. If learner are consciously involved in the culture of the language they are learning, they certainly can have better performance and understand the language more tangibly.

  9. Reflections: Using a Second Language to Build a Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    The US Census Bureau reports that 20.7% of Americans speak a language other than English. This is an opportunity of otolaryngologists to build their practice on a second language. This Reflections piece reviews my personal experiences of using my language fluency in Chinese to build a practice in Philadelphia. Through translating office documents, networking with Chinese-speaking physicians, and volunteering at the free clinic in Chinatown, I was able to serve this non-English-speaking community. Although there are translator services in the hospital, there are terms that get lost in translation and cultural norms that outsiders may not understand. I encourage the otolaryngology community to celebrate its diversity and increase access to our specialty for non-English-speaking patients.

  10. Beyond Tradition: Culture, Symbolism, and Practicality in American Indian Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous people have always created what colonial language labels art. Yet there is no Native word for "art" as defined in a Euro-American sense. Art, as the dominant culture envisions, is mostly ornamental. This is in sharp juxtaposition to a Native perspective, which sees art as integrative, inclusive, practical, and constantly…

  11. ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHINGIN CROSS-CULTURAL CONTEXTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JinWenhua

    2004-01-01

    Improving learners' intercultural communicativecompetence has been acknowledged to be the major goal ofcurrent English Language Teaching (ELT) in China. Yet, noconsensus has been reached even today on the definition ofIntercultural Communicative Competence (ICC). The author ofthis paper proposes her understanding of ICC and points out tha tthe key element of fostering our learners' ICC lies in improvingtheir social-cultural competence, towards which three feasiblesteps are further illustrated : getting an inside view of the targetculture; getting an outside view of the native culture; seeking athird perspective. Improving learners' intercultural communicativecompetence has been acknowledged to be the major goal ofcurrent English Language Teaching in China. Whatintercultural communicative competence is and how this may beachieved by our English learners have become issues of majorconcern. Addressing these issues, this paper proposes possiblesolutions to the problem.

  12. Strangers in Stranger Lands: Language, Learning, Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates international students’ perceptions of the issues they face using English as a second language while attending American higher education institutions. In order to fully understand those challenges involved in learning English as a Second Language, it is necessary to know the extent to which international students have mastered the English language before they start their study in America. Most international students experience an overload of English language input upon arrival in the United States. Cultural differences influence international students’ learning of English in other ways, including international students’ isolation within their communities and America’s lack of teaching listening skills to its own students. Other factors also affect international students’ learning of English, such as the many forms of informal English spoken in the USA, as well as a variety of dialects. Moreover, since most international students have learned English in an environment that precluded much contact with spoken English, they often speak English with an accent that reveals their own language. This study offers informed insight into the complicated process of simultaneously learning the language and culture of another country. Readers will find three main voices in addition to the international students who “speak” (in quotation marks throughout this article. Hong Li, a Chinese doctoral student in English Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia, authored the “regular” text. Second, Roy F. Fox’s voice appears in italics. Fox is Professor of English Education and Chair of the Department of Learning, Teaching, and Curriculum at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Third, Dario J. Almarza’s voice appears in boldface. Almarza, a native of Venezuela, is an Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at the same institution.

  13. Reaching a Culturally Diverse Immigrant Population of Adult English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joan; Owen, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) is a framework to help adult English as a second language (ESL) educators renovate their practices into effective, culturally responsive programs, readily accessible to adult learners. Four CRT strategies that can be used include (a) validation through caring, (b) valuing cultural experiences, (c) creating a…

  14. Genes, language, cognition, and culture: towards productive inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2011-04-01

    The Queen Mary conference on “Integrating Genetic and Cultural Evolutionary Approaches to Language,” and the papers in this special issue, clearly illustrate the excitement and potential of trans-disciplinary approaches to language as an evolved biological capacity (phylogeny) and an evolving cultural entity (glossogeny). Excepting the present author, the presenters/authors are mostly young rising stars in their respective fields, and include scientists with backgrounds in linguistics, animal communication, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, anthropology, and computer science. On display was a clear willingness to engage with different approaches and terminology and a commitment to shared standards of scientific rigor, empirically driven theory, and logical argument. Because the papers assembled here, together with the introduction, speak for themselves, I will focus in this “extro-duction” on some of the terminological and conceptual difficulties which threaten to block this exciting wave of scientific progress in understanding language evolution, in both senses of that term. In particular I will first argue against the regrettably widespread practice of opposing cultural and genetic explanations of human cognition as if they were dichotomous. Second, I will unpack the debate concerning “general-purpose” and “domain-specific” mechanisms, which masquerades as a debate about nativism but is nothing of the sort. I believe that framing discussions of language in these terms has generated more heat than light, and that a modern molecular understanding of genes, development, behavior, and evolution renders many of the assumptions underlying this debate invalid.

  15. Culture in the Elementary School Foreign Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Carol Ann

    1991-01-01

    Explores ways in which elementary school foreign language programs can fully integrate cultural insights, skills, and understanding through an examination of instructional models and developmental factors in the teaching of culture, goal setting for teaching culture, and culture and curriculum in the foreign language classroom and in other areas.…

  16. Culture for Language Learning in Australian Language-in-Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    Australia's language-in-education policy documents have consistently included references to the place of "culture" in language teaching. This paper seeks to examine how the major national policies conceptualise culture and interculturality in relationship to languages education. For each policy, this study will analyse the language focus, the…

  17. Non-Native English Language Teachers' Perspective on Culture in English as a Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the importance of raising non-native English language teachers' awareness of different dimensions of culture in the teaching of English as an international language. The author believes that the more critical English language teachers become about the involvement of culture in their English language teaching, the more they…

  18. Legal Language – a Cultural Ambassador. A Language for Various Purposes, not only a Language for Specific Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancino, Rita

    KONFERENCE SINGAPORE Culture-related competence Courses in comparative Spanish -Danish legal language: A cultural Kinder egg? Learning comparative legal language is not only a question of linguistic competence, but it is also cultural training in which the students achieve culture-related compete......KONFERENCE SINGAPORE Culture-related competence Courses in comparative Spanish -Danish legal language: A cultural Kinder egg? Learning comparative legal language is not only a question of linguistic competence, but it is also cultural training in which the students achieve culture...

  19. Miscommunication and Discourse Practices in Occupational Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlyk, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the contrasting discourse practices and occupational cultures of engineers and marketing representatives. The article argues that strong occupational cultures have different value systems and discourse practices. The article stresses the need for an interdisciplinary approach combining linguistic and cultural analyses to reduce…

  20. Method and Practice of Cultural Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang; Hui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,translation theorists begin to take translation as an activity of cultural exchange,that is,it is not only a linguistic transformation,but essentially a cultural communication.Language and culture are interactive.Language,as the carrier of the culture,can break through the limitation of time and space and carry all the aspects of the culture information.As a main means of cross-cultural communication,translation is connected with the culture tightly.However,in cross-cultural translation,especially between those cultures with great difference like Chinese and English,many cultural elements surface from the confrontation of cultural deposits,making it impossible to capture the relationship of the source text to the source culture in the target text.Thus,problems in translating cultural elements arise.Different approaches shall be adopted to solve this culture barrier.They are omission,transliteration,alienation and domestication.Using what kind of solutions is determined by many complicated factors.Under the circumstance of cultural globalization,these solutions are supposed to complement each other.Thus the translation action can become more scientific.

  1. Method and Practice of Cultural Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years,translation theorists begin to take translation as an activity of cultural exchange,that is,it is not only a linguistic transformation,but essentially a cultural communication.Language and culture are interactive.Language,as the carrier of the culture,can break through the limitation of time and space and carry all the aspects of the culture information. As a main meansof cross-cultural communication,translation is connected with the culture tightly.However,in cross-cultural translation,especially between those cultures with great difference like Chinese and English,many cultural elements surface from the confrontation of cultural deposits,making it impossible to capture the relationship of the source text to the source culture in the target text.Thus,problems in translating cultural elements arise. Different approaches shall be adopted to solve this culture barrier. They are omission,transliteration,alienation and domestication. Using what kind of solutions is determined by many complicated factors.Under the circumstance of cultural globalization,these solutions are supposed to complement each other.Thus the translation action can become more scientific.

  2. Culturally-Sensitive Learning Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2010-01-01

    In today's global world, to provide meaningful education, teacher-librarians and their students need to become culturally competent: open to learning about other cultures and sharing one's own culture, able to change personal perspectives, and able to communicate effectively across cultures. Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions provides a…

  3. Practical Knowledge Growth in Communicative Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Communicative language teaching (CLT) is promoted in teacher education programmes around the world, although the appropriateness of this methodology in contexts outside the English-speaking West has been questioned, often from a theoretical perspective. In fact, very little empirical research has been conducted into the practical knowledge of CLT…

  4. The Practice of English Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Jeremy

    Theoretical insights into teaching English as a second language developed in recent years are brought together in a broad methodological approach called the balanced activities approach. The book aims at providing a theoretical background to the approach as well as detailing practical instructional techniques. The first of the three parts of the…

  5. Raising Cultural Awareness in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jerrold

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers can incorporate cultural knowledge into English language classes, exploring elements of culture, intercultural phenomena, and high-context and low-context cultures. Activities offered by the author to raise cultural awareness include web quests, role plays, cultural observations, and culture journals.

  6. Teaching culture in the Japanese language classroom: A NSW case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Mahoney

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines, through a qualitative case study approach, how non-native- speaking (NNS Japanese language teachers in New South Wales (NSW teach culture and why. The study seeks to understand the pedagogy used to teach culture, teachers’ attitudes and beliefs on teaching culture and how these attitudes and beliefs have been influenced by past experiences. This study also explores how the NSW K-10 Japanese syllabus and concepts of Intercultural Language Learning (IcLL are being implemented in teachers’ classrooms. Two non-native-speaking (NNS Japanese language teachers from a selective secondary school in NSW were interviewed and their classes observed over three days. Analysis of interview and observation data shows that these teachers teach culture as determined by language content, integrate language and culture teaching and teach culture as observable and factual. The study shows that both teachers view culture teaching as easier than language teaching, however their views on the influence of the syllabus differ. The study explores the teachers’ past experiences and how these affect how they feel towards, and teach culture. Finally, this study looks at how the teachers’ practices reflect concepts of IcLL such as integrating language and culture, student-centered learning and how their status as NNS teachers affects their culture teaching.

  7. Developing Cross-Cultural Awareness in Foreign Language Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen jiliang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the view that linguistic competence isn’t equal to communicative competence.language and culture are closely related to each other.Language learning is not only the process of improving the learners’ linguistic ability, but also the process of developing the learners’ awareness of the target culture.Based on the above view, this paper analyzes the different levels of cross—cultural awareness that the foreign language learners should achieve and provides some methods to develop the foreign language learners’ cross—cultural awareness in the process of foreign language learning and teaching.

  8. Developing Cross——Cultural Awareness in Foreign Language Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen; jiliang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the view that linguistic competence isn’t equal to communicative competence.language and culture are closely related to each other.Language learning is not only the process of improving the learners’ linguistic ability,but also the process of developing the learners’ awareness of the target culture.Based on the above view, this paper analyzes the different levels of cross—cultural awareness that the foreign language learners should achieve and provides some methods to develop the foreign language learners’ cross—cultural awareness in the process of foreign language learning and teaching.

  9. Language and Culture in Literacy Instruction: Where Have They Gone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupley, William H.; Nichols, William Dee; Blair, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    An important, yet either often missing or under emphasized realization in both federal and state standards for literacy is that literacy is primarily a language process and culture is a reflection of language. As such, language and culture must be retained as essential components upon which reading instruction is based. Our nation and our states…

  10. Bridging the Language and Cultural Gaps: The Use of Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Soraya; Rojas-Lizana, Sol

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to demonstrate how the use of an online journal, a bilingual blog, can contribute to filling in the language and cultural gaps of foreign language learners. This case study focuses on the participation, interaction, motivation, language acquisition, feedback and cultural input improved by students of Spanish as a Foreign Language…

  11. Language, culture, and adaptation in immigrant children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppelberg, Claudio O; Collins, Brian A

    2010-10-01

    In this article the authors discuss first why it is crucial, from a clinical and public health perspective, to better understand the development as well as risk and protection processes for the mental health of immigrant children. The authors then shift focus to the main tenet of this article, namely, that specific aspects of the dual language development of immigrant children are highly relevant to their mental health and adaptation. This argument is illustrated with empirical studies on Latino immigrant children, as they represent the majority of immigrant children in America and as a way of exemplifying the risks and circumstances that are potentially shared by other immigrant groups. Finally, the authors conceptually differentiate dual language development and its mental health impact from the dual-culture (bicultural) development and circumstance of immigrant children and their mental health impact.

  12. Can a Successful ESL Teacher Hold Deficit Beliefs of Her Students' Home Languages and Cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author explores the seeming contradictions between the successful teaching practices of an English as a Second Language teacher and the deficit beliefs she expressed toward her students' home languages and cultures. This teacher believed her students were smart and capable, and she held herself accountable for her students…

  13. Communication Skills, Cultural Sensitivity, and Collaboration in an Experiential Language Village Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Allen; Minami, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses five college students' experiences in a simulated full-immersion, Arabic-speaking language village and the impact of that experience on learners' beliefs about the power of collaborative learning, the critical importance of cultural awareness, the efficacy of learning languages within a functioning community of practice, and…

  14. Teaching French Culture. Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Ross; Suozzo, Andrew

    In today's global village, the choice of languages and cultures offered to the high school and college student in constantly increasing. Several reasons are offered for choosing the more traditional option of French/Francophone culture: internationalism, political contributions, intellectual achievements, France's role in Europe and in technology,…

  15. Linguistic Imperialism and Chinese Language and Culture Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾杰

    2014-01-01

    Influenced by the English imperialism theory proposed by Danish linguist Robert Philipson,the rapid development and popularity of English in the whole world have aroused debates among English hegemony.Some scholars in China are much concerned about the hegemony’s threat to Chinese language and culture and raised the concept of language and culture protection.Nevertheless,the author maintain that while caring about the adverse impact caused by English hegemony,the Chinese language and culture need to be protected,meanwhile,al-inclusive attitude shal be adopted towards English and western culture to enhance the communication and interaction between Chinese and English languages and cultures.

  16. The Teaching of Culture in English Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴月娥

    2012-01-01

      Language is not only part of culture, but also the carrier. The relationship between them decides the important role of culture teaching in language teaching. However, some problems still exist in college English teaching. For example, classroom English teaching time is not enough for culture teaching; English learners’native language thinking has negative transfer in the target language learning, etc.. In order to solve these problems, this paper tends to discuss whether English teaching should put an emphasis on Big-C Culture or Little-c Culture.

  17. Language and Culture:in View of Linguistic Memetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄丽雯

    2014-01-01

    Memetics is originally a theory for interpreting cultural evolution. Memes, coined to disclose a strong analogy with genes, are ideas that spread through human cultures and across the generation. As cultural replicators, memes are propagated and transmitted through imitation;language, as part of culture, produces under the influence of memes. This paper discusses the rela-tionship between language and culture and that between language and memes. In addition, the classification of linguistic memes and the survival law residing in the memes are also expounded. The next research will focus on the impact of linguistic memes on translation and language teaching.

  18. Some Aspects of Culture Teaching in Foreign Language and ESP Classes: Cultural Scripts and Small Talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Baranovskaja

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the problem of teaching culture in the foreign language classes at all levels of education. Cultural studies should not be separated from the language syllabus and foreign language learning should not be limited to formal learning of systems of sounds, words, and syntactic structures, but should also include learning the culture of the target language. Success in intercultural communication depends greatly on the understanding of a number of cultural features. The article emphasizes the importance of teaching and learning target culture, as well as introduces the analysis of cultural scripts and small talk in English, Russian and Polish languages. Understanding the cultural differences will benefit and facilitate cross-cultural communication under diverse circumstances. Thereby, this issue is relevant to foreign language and ESP classes focusing on the improvement of both students’ language and cultural skills.

  19. Language, Emotions, and Cultures: Emotional Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis

    CERN Document Server

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    An emotional version of Sapir-Whorf hypothesis suggests that differences in language emotionalities influence differences among cultures no less than conceptual differences. Conceptual contents of languages and cultures to significant extent are determined by words and their semantic differences; these could be borrowed among languages and exchanged among cultures. Emotional differences, as suggested in the paper, are related to grammar and mostly cannot be borrowed. Conceptual and emotional mechanisms of languages are considered here along with their functions in the mind and cultural evolution. A fundamental contradiction in human mind is considered: language evolution requires reduced emotionality, but "too low" emotionality makes language "irrelevant to life," disconnected from sensory-motor experience. Neural mechanisms of these processes are suggested as well as their mathematical models: the knowledge instinct, the language instinct, the dual model connecting language and cognition, dynamic logic, neur...

  20. Language, cultural brokerage and informed consent – will ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... of the public health system speak isiZulu with English as a second language, but ..... now use digital imaging with images moved electronically for .... Levin M. The importance of language and culture in pediatric asthma care:.

  1. The Language and Culture of Deaf People: Implications for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Categories of deafness are defined not in terms of degree of hearing loss but of consequences for the deaf person. The culture and language, British Sign Language, of a largely hidden population are discussed. (40 references) (LB)

  2. The Culture Acquisition in the Second Language Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王抒飞

    2011-01-01

    In the second language learning,some people only put their focus on grammar,words,sentence etc. The paper aims to tell the people not forget the culture acquisition plays a very important role in the second language learning.

  3. Language Planning as an Element of Religious Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Language is central to the practice of religion and decisions about language use characterise the ways in which religious practice is constructed. In the religious domain, language is often viewed as having more than a communicative function and languages themselves may have the status of holy artefacts. This attribution of holiness plays a…

  4. Trading Culture: Practical Background for Azerbaijani-English Poetry Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandaville A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Where translation theory often argues the difficulties of translation—whether or not and under what conditions translation is possible—the authors take a more practical approach. Examining the translation of poetry from Azerbaijani to English, two very different languages and poetic traditions, the authors discuss key linguistic, political, cultural considerations and demonstrate some effective practical strategies. They approach translation as a fundamentally human endeavor and the work of a translator as cultural and linguistic exchange and enrichment, even commerce.

  5. Special Operations Forces Language and Culture Needs Assessment Project: Training Emphasis: Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    AUDIENCE.  It is essential for deploying operators to understand the current and past political/cultural enviroments of deployment location.  It...rapport in pretty much the same way - by smoking and joking about typical soldier issues. This vocabulary need was never addressed in my language

  6. Learning a Foreign Language Is Learning Another Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜宜阳

    2011-01-01

    @@ Language and culture envolved together and have been mutually dependent through their history.Much of recent work has shown that language is related to the cultural setting.Then what is culture?To put it simple, culture means the total way of life of a people.This simply definition implies that culture refers to the patterns of customs, tradition,social habit, values beliefs and language of a society.A culture is so inclusive that it permeates virtually every aspect of human life, and it conditions and determines all man's behaviour, including linguistic behaviour.

  7. NORWEGIAN CONVERSATIONAL POLITENESS. BETWEEN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Horbowicz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the concept of politeness in the context of Norwegian everyday conversation. Instead of following the widely accepted concept of universality of politeness structures, it refers the theoretical background for considering politeness as realising culturally preconditioned communication patterns. Such patterns consist both of adequate face work, and of obligations connected to speaker/listener role, the latter realised through the system of adjacency pairs. The basic rules prevailing in Norwegian conversations are discussed, such as maintaining a clear and harmonious fl ow of talk or non-imposing on one’s conversational partner. These rules are exemplified on extracts from interethnic dialogues between Poles using Norwegian as a second language, and native speakers of Norwegian. The conclusions of the paper are twofold; it calls for the concept of politeness to be considered on the broader level of discourse rather than the level of single speech acts. Additionally, it stresses the role of ethnic communication pattern in second/foreign language teaching. The realisation of communication patterns allows for a legitimate participation in conversation, which in turn is vital for a successful construction of identity in second/foreign language.

  8. Exploring How Korean Teacher's Attitudes and Self-Efficacy for Using Inquiry and Language Based Teaching Practices Impacts Learning for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students: Implications for Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jennifer; Chu, Hye-Eun; Martin, Sonya N.

    2016-01-01

    Demographic trends in Korea indicate that the student population is becoming more diverse with regards to culture, ethnicity and language. These changes have implications for science classrooms where inquiry-based, student-centered activities require culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students to connect with their peers and successfully…

  9. Exploring How Korean Teacher's Attitudes and Self-Efficacy for Using Inquiry and Language Based Teaching Practices Impacts Learning for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students: Implications for Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jennifer; Chu, Hye-Eun; Martin, Sonya N.

    2016-01-01

    Demographic trends in Korea indicate that the student population is becoming more diverse with regards to culture, ethnicity and language. These changes have implications for science classrooms where inquiry-based, student-centered activities require culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students to connect with their peers and successfully…

  10. Practice and Evaluation of Blended Learning with Cross-Cultural Distance Learning in a Foreign Language Class: Using Mix Methods Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugie, Satoko; Mitsugi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) utilization in Chinese as a "second" foreign language has mainly been focused on Learning Management System (LMS), digital material development, and quantitative analysis of learners' grammatical knowledge. There has been little research that has analyzed the effectiveness of…

  11. Culture for Language Learning in Australian Language-in-Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    Australia's language-in-education policy documents have consistently included references to the place of "culture" in language teaching. This paper seeks to examine how the major national policies conceptualise culture and interculturality in relationship to languages education. For each policy, this study will analyse the language…

  12. Family Treasures: A Dual-Language Book Project for Negotiating Language, Literacy, Culture, and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessingh, Hetty

    2011-01-01

    This article advances a framework for early language and literacy development among young English language learners (ELLs). A dual-language book project undertaken in partnership with a local elementary school provides a context within which to address children's need to negotiate language, culture, and identity as they transition and make meaning…

  13. LANGUAGE AND SOCIO-CULTURAL CHANGE IN EJAGHAM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    organisation, the complex of cultural traits which governs the relation of individu- als and ..... habits that this need takes precedence and consequently modifies the speech habits ... Culture, Language and Personality (Los Angels: University of.

  14. INFLUENCE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ON FORMING OF LOGICAL CULTURE OF THE FUTURE FOREIGN LANGUAGES TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryta V. Lopatych

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The “logical culture” phenomenon that is considered as a required component of practical training for the future foreign languages teachers is defined in the article; the influence of information technologies on the process of logical culture formation is studied as well. The levels of logical culture formation of future foreign languages teachers are specified as well as logical culture components are described for each level. It has been found that the rate of logical culture competence can be improved by implementation of educational information technologies.

  15. when language,social and cultural difference face economic development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    study and research in language,society and cultural difference field is very interesting and meaningful.knowing the diversity of different culture we could get to know people from different cultural background easier and better and we could contribute a better understanding and relationship between each other.educators could make the process of teaching and facilitating much more efficient when the target learners are coming from different cultural or language background.

  16. Cross-cultural Pragmatic Failures and Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟倩

    2012-01-01

      In cross-cultural communication, it is found that many communicational aims could not be successful y achieved, even if the speaker is good at using the target language. The problem may lie in the insufficient awareness of the cultural differences. This paper aims to point out the importance of cross-cultural communication in language teaching by discussing the different types of the cross-cultural prag-matic failures.

  17. The Conceptualisation of the Cultural Component of Language Teaching in Australian Language-in-Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    Culture is recognised as an important part of languages teaching in Australia and has been increasingly integrated into policy and curriculum documents and the general rhetoric of languages education. The result is that policies include statements about aspects of cultural competence. However, the nature and scope of the cultural component in…

  18. Increasing Compatibility Between Educational Practices and the Educational Needs of Pupils Who are Asian With Emphasis on Their Language and Cultural Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Lydia R.; Ponce, Corazon A.

    The contents of this document are organized in eight parts, as follows. Part One, "Speech of Dr. Esther M. T. Sato," the consultant, Associate Professor at the College of Education, University of Hawaii, discusses the following topics: in the background of Filipinos in Hawaii, their social problems, Filipino cultural values, guidelines…

  19. The Study of Language and Communication in Cross Cultural Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁爽

    2016-01-01

    Language plays an important role in the contemporary business communication. Regarding to the businesspersons' choices of language, jargon, jokes and their applications in cross cultural business, suggests that language is in fact a part of a strategic discourse between diverse groups within the organization and the business scope.

  20. The Language-Culture Interface in German Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramberg, Anne-Katrin

    A comparison of German and American advertising reveals differences in technique and structures. Persuasion is central in both, but the grammatical structures and illocutionary devices available in each language vary. The culture is also reflected in the type and degree to which each language uses techniques of persuasive language. The findings…

  1. Culturally Relevant Texts and Reading Assessment for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebe, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study that explored the relationship between reading proficiency and cultural relevance of text for third-grade English Language Learners (ELLs). The author presents the Cultural Relevance Rubric that helps define and determine cultural relevance of texts. Participants used the rubric to rate the cultural relevance of two…

  2. Herder and Modernity: From Lesser-Taught Languages to Lesser-Taught Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Votruba

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The typical North American curriculum of a lesser-taught Slavic language implicitly relies on the legacy of Johann Gottfried von Herder’s interpretation that language in and of itself contains national (ethnic culture. At the same time, enrolments are dwindling even in courses in the most commonly taught Slavic languages. Millennials’ understandable focus on the practicality of the courses they take make it unlikely for the lesser-taught languages to survive the slump. On the other hand, foreign culture courses are appearing to hold their ground more successfully. Slavic departments may reconsider Herder’s dictum as they try to maintain or establish programs in lesser-taught languages and cultures.

  3. Film Cross-culture Research under the Perspective of Language and Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗淞译

    2015-01-01

    Language as an important tool of cultural transmission, it can achieve the cross-culture development of film. With the strength of globalization, film cross-culture communication are increasing, and how to enhance the communication of film through language and culture and let more people enjoy the thought expressed in film is one of the most important content for cross-culture development of mant films. Different cultural backgrounds will produce large diversities in watching a same film, so it is helpful for the cross-culture development of film when making good use of culture and language, on the contrary, it will become a hindrance. This article do research on cross-culture development of film under the perspective of language and culture to find out the existing problems in present cross-culture development of film and put forward effective resolution strategy in order to promote certain reference for the internationalization of China’s film industry.

  4. The Cultivation of Critical Thinking in English Elective Course of Language & Culture%The Cultivation of Critical Thinking in English Elective Course of Language&Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭迎春

    2016-01-01

    From the practical need of current college English elective course construction and on the basis of the theory of critical thinking, this article put forward a series of constructive discussion, targeting on college English elective course in language & culture courses in the autonomous learning ability, teaching model design and curriculum evaluation method.

  5. A Model of Instruction for Integrating Culture and Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony

    An integrated model of instruction in language and culture uses a sequential method of discovering sensation, perception, concept, and principle to develop self-analysis skills in students. When planning activities for learning a language and developing cultural understanding, teachers might follow a sequence such as the following: introduce…

  6. Intensive Language and Culture Orientation Program for Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setliff, Rebecca J.; Taft, Lori A.

    The Language and Culture Institute of the University of Pittsburgh has developed a 13-week program of pre-assignment training for engineers given corporate assignments in Japan. The Institute offers the corporations three components in this intensive seminar: program administration, language training, and culture training. The program…

  7. Portal: Your Door to World Languages and Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Don; Lawton, Rachele

    2009-01-01

    Portal: Your Door to World Languages and Cultures was a series of public cultural events, in a variety of formats, created through a new partnership between the credit and continuing education (noncredit) foreign language programs at the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC). Portal was designed to cultivate interest in foreign languages…

  8. What Teachers Say about Addressing Culture in Their EFL Teaching Practices: The Vietnamese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Long; Harvey, Sharon; Grant, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Vietnamese EFL teachers' beliefs about the role of culture in language teaching. It also considers how they address culture in their teaching practices in a Vietnamese university. Ethnographic data collected from semi-structured interviews indicated that opportunities for culture to find its way into EFL classroom activities…

  9. What Teachers Say about Addressing Culture in Their EFL Teaching Practices: The Vietnamese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Long; Harvey, Sharon; Grant, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Vietnamese EFL teachers' beliefs about the role of culture in language teaching. It also considers how they address culture in their teaching practices in a Vietnamese university. Ethnographic data collected from semi-structured interviews indicated that opportunities for culture to find its way into EFL classroom activities…

  10. CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN VOCABULARY AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuanJialing

    2004-01-01

    From illustrating the significance of cultural elements in vocabulary teaching, and the ctmtparison of some major differences between English and Chinese words, this paper emphasizes the indivisible relationship between vocabulary and culture. International cultural exchange occurring more and more often, this paper attempts to guide students to better understand the cultural connotation of vocabulary, enhance their awareness towards the target culture, improve their comtprehensive language skills, and, develop their cross-cultural communicative ctmtpetence.

  11. Language and Literacy in Social Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybin, Janet, Ed.

    Readings on language and literacy within their social context include: "The Problem of Meaning in Primitive Languages" (Bronislaw Malinowski); "Toward Ethnographies of Communication" (Dell Hymes); "Language as Social Semiotic" (M. A. K. Halliday); "Language and Ideology" (V. N. Volosinov); "Family…

  12. On Relationship between Language and Culture from Pragmatic Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨佩佩

    2012-01-01

      The idea that language and culture are closely related is normally for most people. From pragmatic perspective, it’ s noteworthy to reveal a clearer and more detailed picture of the relationship between language and culture . Taking speech act, sociocultural pragmatics, contrastive pragmatics and interlanguage pragmatics as four aspects to study, the features and realiza⁃tion patterns of their relationship are elaborated. Besides, implications of this study lie in the usage of the relationship in second language teaching and learning.

  13. Pedagogy and Practice for Online English Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawan, Faridah; Wiechart, Kelly A.; Warren, Amber N.; Park, Jaehan

    2016-01-01

    Pedagogy--not technology--drives effective online instruction. The authors of "Pedagogy and Practice for Online English Language Teacher Education" discuss foundational theories of pedagogy and link those theories with their own practices in online courses for language teacher education and language teaching. This book discusses and…

  14. Assessment and Intervention for English Language Learners with Primary Language Impairment: Research-Based Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieretti, Robert A.; Roseberry-McKibbin, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are experiencing the exciting challenge of serving increasing numbers of English Language Learners (ELLs) in U.S. schools. When ELLs struggle in school, they may be overreferred for speech-language services. SLPs are routinely expected to differentiate a language difference based on cultural, linguistic, and…

  15. Assessment and Intervention for English Language Learners with Primary Language Impairment: Research-Based Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieretti, Robert A.; Roseberry-McKibbin, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are experiencing the exciting challenge of serving increasing numbers of English Language Learners (ELLs) in U.S. schools. When ELLs struggle in school, they may be overreferred for speech-language services. SLPs are routinely expected to differentiate a language difference based on cultural, linguistic, and…

  16. Language Practices on Internet Game Fora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Wach

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Online discussion fora form important venues for promoting language change across the boundaries of time, space, and formal organization. The aim in this paper is to discuss the processes by which participants of online communities develop a sense of common identity. The analysis involves several popular game discussion fora, from quite formal World of Warcraft to unrestrained Tibia. The reported analysis is based on language practices which are found during participation in online game fora. One can note that processes which could be considered as central to community formation are often different manner than the ones found in the literature regarding traditional discussion fora. Examples of such practices along with activities included in a particular category are provided based on selected examples. However, the results which emerge from the analysis indicate that the relationships tend to be constantly realigned under the influence of changing virtual circumstances, such as changing player roles in a group. In addition, language rules are typically not explicit and it appears that they are established and maintained as players imitate and react to each other’s roles. Moreover, there is very little evidence of formal establishing a code of conduct or netiquette for our group, as it is completely thought to be implied. However, the practices which are found to be central are the ones in the category of developing a consistent linguistic style, as they show a great diversity. It is indicated how this category seems to serve certain roles, such as forming a distinct code and with examples of forms of abbreviations and acronyms. It is shown that more traditional roles are played by the very fact of the formation of a distinct code.

  17. Introduction: integrating genetic and cultural evolutionary approaches to language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; McElligott, Alan G; Adger, David

    2011-04-01

    The papers in this special issue of Human Biology address recent research in the field of language evolution, both the genetic evolution of the language faculty and the cultural evolution of specific languages. While both of these areas have received increasing interest in recent years, there is also a need to integrate these somewhat separate efforts and explore the relevant gene-culture coevolutionary interactions. Here we summarize the individual contributions, set them in the context of the wider literature, and identify outstanding future research questions. The first set of papers concerns the comparative study of nonhuman communication in primates and birds from both a behavioral and neurobiological perspective, revealing evidence for several common language-related traits in various nonhuman species and providing clues as to the evolutionary origin and function of the human language faculty. The second set of papers discusses the consequences of viewing language as a culturally evolving system in its own right, including claims that this removes the need for strong genetic biases for language acquisition, and that phylogenetic evolutionary methods can be used to reconstruct language histories. We conclude by highlighting outstanding areas for future research, including identifying the precise selection pressures that gave rise to the language faculty in ancestral hominin species, and determining the strength, domain specificity, and origin of the cultural transmission biases that shape languages as they pass along successive generations of language learners.

  18. Languages in a global world learning for better cultural understanding

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Jessica; Hinton, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The rise of globalisation makes language competencies more valuable, both at individual and societal levels. This book examines the links between globalisation and the way we teach and learn languages. It begins by asking why some individuals are more successful than others at learning non-native languages, and why some education systems, or countries, are more successful than others at teaching languages. The book comprises chapters by different authors on the subject of language learning. There are chapters on the role of motivation; the way that languages, cultures and identities are interc

  19. Language Practices in the Ci-Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Prelingually deafened children are nowadays likely to receive a cochlear implant (ci). As these children do their language acquisition with a cochlear implant they require a constant rehabilitation and support. Educational staff is instructed on how to work with children with ci in form...... during the storytelling activity: repeat requests and questions. Whereas repeat requests are used in ci-therapy, questions have been shown to be instrumentalized for educational purposes in the setting of a school. I will reveal the educational/rehabilitational issues that are linked to these practices....

  20. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  1. Best practices in cell culture: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baust, John M; Buehring, Gertrude Case; Campbell, Lia; Elmore, Eugene; Harbell, John W; Nims, Raymond W; Price, Paul; Reid, Yvonne A; Simione, Frank

    2017-08-14

    This overview describes a series of articles to provide an unmet need for information on best practices in animal cell culture. The target audience primarily consists of entry-level scientists with minimal experience in cell culture. It also include scientists, journalists, and educators with some experience in cell culture, but in need of a refresher in best practices. The articles will be published in this journal over a six-month period and will emphasize best practices in: (1) media selection; (2) use and evaluation of animal serum as a component of cell culture medium; (3) receipt of new cells into the laboratory; (4) naming cell lines; (5) authenticating cell line identity; (6) detecting and mitigating risk of cell culture contamination; (7) cryopreservation and thawing of cells; and (8) storing and shipping viable cells.

  2. Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Marie Paz E.

    2015-12-01

    The study critically explored how culture and language sensitive curriculum materials in physics improve Pangasinan learners' attitude towards science. Their cultural dimensions, epistemological beliefs, and views on integration of culture and language in the teaching and learning process determined their cultural preference or profile. Design and development of culture and language sensitive curriculum materials in physics were heavily influenced by these learners' cultural preference or profile. Pilot-study using interviews and focus group discussions with natives of Pangasinan and document analysis were conducted to identify the culture, practices, and traditions integrated in the lesson development. Comparison of experimental participants' pretest and posttest results on science attitude measure showed significant statistical difference. Appraisal of science attitude enhancement favored the experimental group over the control group. Qualitative data deduced from post implementation interviews, focus group discussions, and journal log entries showed the same trend in favor of the experimental participants. The study revealed that culture and language integration in the teaching and learning process of physics concepts enabled students to develop positive attitude to science, their culture, and native language.

  3. Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice | Nkurunziza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice. ... In 2012, Human Resources for Health (HRH) Rwanda brought together international nursing ... providers in a globalized world and requires intellectual, attitudinal and behavioral flexibility.

  4. Learning bias, cultural evolution of language, and the biological evolution of the language faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenny

    2011-04-01

    The biases of individual language learners act to determine the learnability and cultural stability of languages: learners come to the language learning task with biases which make certain linguistic systems easier to acquire than others. These biases are repeatedly applied during the process of language transmission, and consequently should effect the types of languages we see in human populations. Understanding the cultural evolutionary consequences of particular learning biases is therefore central to understanding the link between language learning in individuals and language universals, common structural properties shared by all the world’s languages. This paper reviews a range of models and experimental studies which show that weak biases in individual learners can have strong effects on the structure of socially learned systems such as language, suggesting that strong universal tendencies in language structure do not require us to postulate strong underlying biases or constraints on language learning. Furthermore, understanding the relationship between learner biases and language design has implications for theories of the evolution of those learning biases: models of gene-culture coevolution suggest that, in situations where a cultural dynamic mediates between properties of individual learners and properties of language in this way, biological evolution is unlikely to lead to the emergence of strong constraints on learning.

  5. Crossroads: Literature and Language in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Carole; Boyd-Batstone, Paul

    This book is an exploration of the crossroads of reader-response and second language acquisition theories and research as a foundation for practice. It provides a model for teaching with literature that supports language and literacy development for students learning English as a first or second language. The book is organized in three parts. Part…

  6. Challenges in Teaching Culture along with Language in the Foreign Lan-guage (FL) Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-qi

    2014-01-01

    Teaching culture along with language in the foreign language classroom is not an easy job. The definition of culture varies from different context, and non-native speakers do not share the same background with native speakers, thus it brings many difficulties to those who want to learn or teach culture along with a foreign language. Challenges in teaching culture along with English will be discussed as an exemplar in this essay. Meanwhile, suggestion on how to teach culture in the English class-room will be proposed at the end of this work.

  7. Theory and Practice in Language Policy: The Case of Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theory and Practice in Language Policy: The Case of Uganda. ... Then English as a medium of instruction would be gradually extended to Science, Geography, Art, ... The role of the other 'minority' indigenous languages must also not be ...

  8. The Importance of Culture Learning for Language Learners%The Importance of Culture Learning for Language Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹锋娟

    2012-01-01

    Language is affected by culture. When one is learning a new language, the learner should pay special attention to the differences and similarities between native language and foreign language.%语言是受到文化影响的。当我们学习一种新的语言时,学习者要特别注意母语和外语的区别和联系。

  9. In the right words: addressing language and culture in providing health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    As part of its continuing mission to serve trustees, executives, and staff of health foundations and corporate giving programs, Grantmakers In Health (GIH) convened a group of experts from philanthropy, research, health care practice, and policy on April 4, 2003, to discuss the roles of language and culture in providing effective health care. During this Issue Dialogue, In the Right Words: Addressing Language and Culture in Providing Health Care, health grantmakers and experts from policy and practice participated in an open exchange of ideas and perspectives on language access and heard from fellow grantmakers who are funding innovative programs in this area. Together they explored ways to effectively support comprehensive language services, including the use of interpreters and translation of written materials. This Issue Brief synthesizes key points from the day's discussion with a background paper previously prepared for Issue Dialogue participants. It focuses on the challenges and opportunities involved with ensuring language access for the growing number of people who require it. Sections include: recent immigration trends and demographic changes; the effect of language barriers on health outcomes and health care processes; laws and policies regarding the provision of language services to patients, including an overview of public financing mechanisms; strategies for improving language access, including enhancing access in delivery settings, promoting advocacy and policy change, improving interpreter training, and advancing research; and roles for foundations in supporting improved language access, including examples of current activities. The Issue Dialogue focused mainly on activities and programs that ensure linguistic access to health care for all patients. Although language and culture are clearly inseparable, a full exploration of the field of cultural competence and initiatives that promote its application to the health care setting are beyond the scope

  10. Legal Language – a Cultural Ambassador. A Language for Various Purposes, not only a Language for Specific Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancino, Rita

    /culture to another. It means also overcoming the typical blindness to one’s own culture. The Spanish-Danish Legal Language course introduces Danish language students to a new world of cultural knowledge, as they generally have insignificant knowledge of Danish law and the Danish legal system. Furthermore, they have...... no knowledge of Spanish law and the Spanish legal system. In this paper I will discuss some of the problems/possibilities the students meet when trying to ‘translate’ from one legal language/culture to another also in the case of culture-bound terms with little or no equivalence. The examples are taken from my...

  11. Relationship between Language Learners' Attitudes toward Cultural Instruction and Pragmatic Comprehension and Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieyan, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Development of target language pragmatic competence in language learners requires not only provision of cultural features of target language community in language classes but also language learner's willingness to learn and use those cultural features. To investigate the relationship between language learners' attitudes toward cultural instruction…

  12. EXPLORATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CULTURE AND LANGUAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper discuses the inseparability of culture and language,presents three new metaphors regardingculture and language,and explores cultural content in specific language items through a survey ofword associations.The survey has been designed for both Chinese English speakers(CES)and nativeEnglish speakers(NES)(See Appendix).The associated words and expressions are language forms:the free,natural associations involve thinking.Both the language forms and the thinking process con-vey culture.The words and expressions associated by CES and NES are partly similar and partly dif-ferent,because people are by nature alike an d CES and NES have different cultures.

  13. Review of: Legal practice and cultural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Niels Valdemar

    2010-01-01

    that arose after the speech by the Archbishop: whether or to what extent cultural difference should be recognized by legal systems. Legal practice and cultural diversity, edited by Ralph Grillo, Roger Ballard, Alessandro Ferrari, Andre´ J. Hoekema, Marcel Maussen, and Prakash Shah, Farnham, UK, Ashgate, 2009......This anthology comprises contributions from a conference on legal practice and cultural diversity held in London in July 2007, but the editors take their cue from the speech made in February 2008 by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams. The questions central to the book are the same...

  14. Computers and Languages: Theory and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    A global introduction to language technology and the areas of computer science where language technology plays a role. Surveyed in this volume are issueas related to the parsing problem in the fields of natural languages, programming languages, and formal languages. Throughout the book attention is

  15. Heritage Language Education: Valuing the Languages, Literacies, and Cultural Competencies of Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Corinne A.; Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    2017-01-01

    This article argues for the value of heritage language programs and the micro-level language policies that support them, focusing on a case study of a program in the USA to make this argument. We also argue for the importance of recognizing students' heritage languages, cultures, and individual goals and identities in mainstream school programs.…

  16. Effects of Community Service-Learning on Heritage Language Learners' Attitudes toward Their Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual y Cabo, Diego; Prada, Josh; Lowther Pereira, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of participation in a community service-learning experience on Spanish heritage language learners' attitudes toward their heritage language and culture. Quantitative and qualitative data from heritage language learners demonstrated that engagement in community service-learning activities as part of the Spanish…

  17. language as a culture and biodiversity conservation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest

    large contributions of traditional farmers to the global stock of plant crop varieties and ... homogenization leading to the extinction of minority languages around the world (Xiulan ...... Atlas of the world languages in danger of disappearing, 2 nd.

  18. Cultural Factors And Foreign Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟成新

    2010-01-01

    Foreign language teaching has many purposes,one of the important purposes of the foreign language teaching lies in training students tO develop the ability of communication in foreign language.In recent years,several syllabuses put emphasis on training communication ability.However,during the foreign language teaching,we often only focus on the basic skills,such as reading,speaking,listening and writing.

  19. Cultural awareness in veterinary practice: student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jennifer N; Volet, Simone; Fozdar, Farida

    2011-01-01

    Australian veterinary classrooms are increasingly diverse and their growing internal diversity is a result of migration and large numbers of international students. Graduates interact with other students and increasingly with clients whose attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors differ from their own. An understanding and respect for these differences has an impact on client communication and health care outcomes. The present study explored how students understand and are likely to deal with issues of cultural diversity in veterinary professional practice as well as the educational needs that students feel should be met in regard to preparation to engage productively with diversity in professional practice. The present study also explored the extent to which the rich diversity of the undergraduate student population constitutes an educational resource. A class of final-year veterinary students was invited to participate in a workshop exploring intercultural confidence in veterinary consultation. Twelve groups of six to eight students discussed a fictitious scenario involving a challenging clinical encounter with a client from a different culture. Students were reticent to see the scenario in terms of cultural difference, although they generally recognized that awareness of cultural issues in veterinary practice was important. They also tended to not see their own ethnicity as relevant to their practice. While some felt that veterinary practice should be culture blind, most recognized a need to orient to cultural difference and to respond sensitively. Their suggestions for curricular improvements to address these issues are also included.

  20. An Exploratory Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices for Students Who Are ELLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Sushama

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether teacher characteristics such as teacher quality, skills in teaching English language learners (ELLs), knowledge of second language acquisition, and attitudes towards ELLs impacted teachers' perceived importance and reported use of culturally responsive practices within their classrooms. The numbers…

  1. Innateness and culture in the evolution of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Simon; Dowman, Mike; Griffiths, Thomas L

    2007-03-20

    Human language arises from biological evolution, individual learning, and cultural transmission, but the interaction of these three processes has not been widely studied. We set out a formal framework for analyzing cultural transmission, which allows us to investigate how innate learning biases are related to universal properties of language. We show that cultural transmission can magnify weak biases into strong linguistic universals, undermining one of the arguments for strong innate constraints on language learning. As a consequence, the strength of innate biases can be shielded from natural selection, allowing these genes to drift. Furthermore, even when there is no natural selection, cultural transmission can produce apparent adaptations. Cultural transmission thus provides an alternative to traditional nativist and adaptationist explanations for the properties of human languages.

  2. Cultural Diversity and Information and Communication Impacts on Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Hung; Chu, Ying-Chien

    2011-01-01

    Cultural diversity doesn't just entail differences in dress and language. It also encompasses different ways of thinking, managing, and communicating. The relationship between communication and culture is a very complex and intimate one. Cultures are created through communication; that is, communication is the means of human interaction through…

  3. The Effects of Cultural Context on Foreign Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王清华

    2013-01-01

      As is known, Language is an integral component of culture. This paper attempts to explain the importance and necessity of cultural context and suggest a frame work on integrating cultural context into English teaching so as to cultivate students ’cul⁃ture awareness and improve the quality of English teaching and learning.

  4. Common culture practices for cyprinids in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T

    1997-01-01

    Cyprinids are the largest group of cultured freshwater fish and thus the most important from the aspect of fish-borne parasitic zoonoses. The common practices employed in the culture of this group are described to provide background information which may be used in the formulation of strategies for the control of these zoonoses. Only the common carp is cultured in monoculture: all the rest of the carp species are usually cultured in polyculture systems incorporating several species. Polyculture of cyprinids may be carried out in ponds, cages or in free range culture in natural or man-made water bodies, Polyculture of cyprinids is often integrated with agriculture, such as livestock, poultry or crop farming, utilizing byproducts of the agriculture activity, especially manure, as a source of nutrient for the fish pond. If precautions are not taken, this practice may provide an avenue for the transmission of fish borne parasites to man.

  5. The Influence of Geographic Culture on Language Generation and Literature Appreciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周先军

    2014-01-01

    The scope of culture is extremely wide-ranging, which is not measurable. A lot of study has been made on the relationship between language and culture. There is a view that language is part of culture. The two are inseparable. But people seldom study language from the perspective of geographic culture. Geographic culture is also a part of culture, which imposes great influence on language. This thesis explains the influence of geographic culture on language generation and literature appreciation.

  6. A Spanish language and culture initiative for a doctor of pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTyle, W Kent; Kennedy, Gala; Vance, Michael A; Hancock, Bruce

    2011-02-10

    To implement a Spanish language and culture initiative in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum that would improve students' Spanish language skills and cultural competence so that graduates could provide competent pharmaceutical care to Spanish-speaking patients. Five elective courses were created and introduced to the curriculum including 2 medical Spanish courses; a medical Spanish service-learning course; a 2-week Spanish language and cultural immersion trip to Mexico; and an advanced practice pharmacy experience (APPE) at a medical care clinic serving a high percentage of Spanish-speaking patients. Advisors placed increased emphasis on encouraging pharmacy students to complete a major or minor in Spanish. Enrollment in the Spanish language courses and the cultural immersion trip has been strong. Twenty-three students have completed the APPE at a Spanish-speaking clinic. Eleven percent of 2010 Butler University pharmacy graduates completed a major or minor in Spanish compared to approximately 1% in 2004 when the initiative began. A Spanish language and culture initiative started in 2004 has resulted in increased Spanish language and cultural competence among pharmacy students and recent graduates.

  7. Speech-language pathologists' assessment and intervention practices with multilingual children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Corinne J; McLeod, Sharynne

    2012-06-01

    Within predominantly English-speaking countries such as the US, UK, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia, there are a significant number of people who speak languages other than English. This study aimed to examine Australian speech-language pathologists' (SLPs) perspectives and experiences of multilingualism, including their assessment and intervention practices, and service delivery methods when working with children who speak languages other than English. A questionnaire was completed by 128 SLPs who attended an SLP seminar about cultural and linguistic diversity. Approximately one half of the SLPs (48.4%) reported that they had at least minimal competence in a language(s) other than English; but only 12 (9.4%) reported that they were proficient in another language. The SLPs spoke a total of 28 languages other than English, the most common being French, Italian, German, Spanish, Mandarin, and Auslan (Australian sign language). Participants reported that they had, in the past 12 months, worked with a mean of 59.2 (range 1-100) children from multilingual backgrounds. These children were reported to speak between two and five languages each; the most common being: Vietnamese, Arabic, Cantonese, Mandarin, Australian Indigenous languages, Tagalog, Greek, and other Chinese languages. There was limited overlap between the languages spoken by the SLPs and the children on the SLPs' caseloads. Many of the SLPs assessed children's speech (50.5%) and/or language (34.2%) without assistance from others (including interpreters). English was the primary language used during assessments and intervention. The majority of SLPs always used informal speech (76.7%) and language (78.2%) assessments and, if standardized tests were used, typically they were in English. The SLPs sought additional information about the children's languages and cultural backgrounds, but indicated that they had limited resources to discriminate between speech and language difference vs disorder.

  8. Teaching Additional Languages. Educational Practices Series 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Elliot L.; Tan, Lihua; Walberg, Herbert J.

    This booklet describes key principles of and research on teaching additional languages. The 10 chapters focus on the following: (1) "Comprehensible Input" (learners need exposure to meaningful, understandable language); (2) "Language Opportunities" (classroom activities should let students use natural and meaningful language with their…

  9. Computers and languages theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Nijholt, A

    1988-01-01

    A global introduction to language technology and the areas of computer science where language technology plays a role. Surveyed in this volume are issues related to the parsing problem in the fields of natural languages, programming languages, and formal languages.Throughout the book attention is paid to the social forces which influenced the development of the various topics. Also illustrated are the development of the theory of language analysis, its role in compiler construction, and its role in computer applications with a natural language interface between men and machine. Parts of the ma

  10. Incorporating organisational safety culture within ergonomics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim; Tappin, David

    2010-10-01

    This paper conceptualises organisational safety culture and considers its relevance to ergonomics practice. Issues discussed in the paper include the modest contribution that ergonomists and ergonomics as a discipline have made to this burgeoning field of study and the significance of safety culture to a systems approach. The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics work with regard to the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process, and implications for participatory ergonomics approaches, are also discussed. A potential user-friendly, qualitative approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented, based on a recently published conceptual framework that recognises the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of safety culture. The paper concludes by considering the use of such an approach, where an understanding of different aspects of safety culture within an organisation is seen as important to the success of ergonomics projects. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics practice is a key focus of this paper, including its relationship with the systems approach, participatory ergonomics and the ergonomics analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process. An approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented.

  11. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  12. Organizing Construction Practices in Different Cultural Contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Rasmussen, Christian K. S.

    2013-01-01

    participating in the construction management on site working for three different contractors in different cultural contexts: (1) Construir Futuro S.A. in Quito, Ecuador; (2) Anker Hansen & co. A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark; and (3) E. Pihl & Soen A/S in Stockholm, Sweden. Based on these explorative case studies......This paper presents in-depth case studies of construction practices with a specific focus on understanding the emergent and dynamic nature of construction management in different cultural contexts. The cases are based on actual working-experiences by the author as an assistant project manager...... a number of characteristics and challenges related to the cultural context have been identified highlighting a central issue in existing and future construction practices due to the globalization and thereby increasing importance of cultural understanding in project-based organizing. The empirical findings...

  13. The Importance of Culture in Second and Foreign Language Learning

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    English has been designated as a source of intercultural communication among the people from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. A range of linguistic and cultural theories contribute meaningful insights on the development of competence in intercultural communication. The speculations suggest the use of communicative strategies focusing on the development of learners’ efficiency in communicating language through cultural context. However, the teaching of culture in communication has ...

  14. Language, Culture, and the Mathematics Concept of American Indian Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Duane E.; Davison, David M.

    1985-01-01

    Recognizes two critical factors in cross-cultural mathematics teaching: the perceived utility of mathematics and the direct relationship of mathematics learning to language development. Reviews current literature and reports the results of their study of perceived utility of mathematics and technical language development in the Crow Indian…

  15. Inquiring into a Second Language and the Culture of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataray-Ching, Jann; Kitt-Hinrichs, Brooke; Nguyen, Van

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a story of Han, a Vietnamese kindergartner, during her first year at East Elementary School. A classroom environment that supports learner-generated inquiries gives her the self-confidence to inquire freely into a second language and culture. Her inquiries enable her to develop her oral and written English language as she…

  16. Gestures and Language: Fair and Foul in Other Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Joanne

    1994-01-01

    Discusses social gaffes that North Americans can make when using inappropriate gestures and body language in other cultures, focusing on the meaning of common gestures in Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. Includes a whimsical 10-question gesture and body language quiz. (MDM)

  17. The Importance of Culture in Second and Foreign Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeraz Ali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available English has been designated as a source of intercultural communication among the people from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. A range of linguistic and cultural theories contribute meaningful insights on the development of competence in intercultural communication. The speculations suggest the use of communicative strategies focusing on the development of learners’ efficiency in communicating language through cultural context. However, the teaching of culture in communication has not been paid due importance in a number of academic and language settings of Pakistan and Iran. This assignment study indicates problems in view of teaching English as a medium of instruction in public sector colleges of interior Sindh, Pakistan and prescribed textbooks in Iranian schools. It also aims to identify drawbacks and shortcoming in prescribed textbooks for intermediate students at college level and schools. Therefore, the assignment study recommends integration of cultural awareness into a language teaching programme for an overall achievement of competence in intercultural communication.

  18. Supporting culturally and linguistically diverse children with speech, language and communication needs: Overarching principles, individual approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Sarah; McLeod, Sharynne; Wong, Sandie

    2015-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are working with an increasing number of families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds as the world's population continues to become more internationally mobile. The heterogeneity of these diverse populations makes it impossible to identify and document a one size fits all strategy for working with culturally and linguistically diverse families. This paper explores approaches to practice by SLPs identified as specialising in multilingual and multicultural practice in culturally and linguistically diverse contexts from around the world. Data were obtained from ethnographic observation of 14 sites in 5 countries on 4 continents. The sites included hospital settings, university clinics, school-based settings, private practices and Indigenous community-based services. There were 652 individual artefacts collected from the sites which included interview transcripts, photographs, videos, narrative reflections, informal and formal field notes. The data were analysed using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (Engeström, 1987). From the analysis six overarching Principles of Culturally Competent Practice (PCCP) were identified. These were: (1) identification of culturally appropriate and mutually motivating therapy goals, (2) knowledge of languages and culture, (3) use of culturally appropriate resources, (4) consideration of the cultural, social and political context, (5) consultation with families and communities, and (6) collaboration between professionals. These overarching principles align with the six position statements developed by the International Expert Panel on Multilingual Children's Speech (2012) which aim to enhance the cultural competence of speech pathologists and their practice. The international examples provided in the current study demonstrate the individualised ways that these overarching principles are enacted in a range of different organisational, social, cultural and political contexts

  19. Exploring cultural tensions in cross-cultural social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Miu Chung

    2008-10-01

    Discussion of cultural tension in the social work literature is piecemeal. As part of a grounded theory study, this article reports some major findings on cultural tensions experienced by 30 frontline social workers. Cultural tensions caused by cultural similarities and differences among social workers, clients, organizations, and society are multifaceted. Social workers, however, are always at the center of the tensions. Findings indicate that the social work profession may need to consider the neutrality claim of the profession, the different experience of ethnic minority social workers, and the need of critical reflexivity for reflective practitioners. Implications for social work practice, social work education for ethnic minority social workers, and social work research are discussed.

  20. The Cultural Dimensions of Language Teaching and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Language teaching and learning has many different cultural dimensions, and over the years more and more of these have been the subject of research. The first dimension to be explored was that of content: the images of target language countries and the world that were offered in textbooks...... and presented in class. The next dimension was that of the learner: the (inter)cultural learning, competence and identity of the learner or subject. The next dimension was context: the situation and role of language teaching and learning in society and in the world....

  1. Localisation - When Language, Culture and Technology Join Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody Byrne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available When you switch on your computer and type up a letter, what language do you see? What about when you visit a website or play a computer game? Does your mobile phone speak your language? Chances are that each of these technological marvels of the modern age communicates with you in your own language. For many of us, this is so commonplace and seamless that we hardly give it a moment's thought but behind the scenes there is a whole industry dedicated to making sure that technology bridges the gap between language and culture without you even noticing.

  2. Secondary Teachers' Language Usage: Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlas, Anne Cummings

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, much research has shown that the first language (L1) is being used in the majority of foreign language classrooms. However, these findings have often failed to include secondary foreign language teachers and their teaching context. The current mixed-methods study explores Spanish teachers' use of and beliefs about first and target…

  3. Heritage Language Maintenance and Cultural Identity Formation: The Case of Korean Immigrant Parents and Their Children in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boh Young

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the beliefs and attitudes that Korean immigrant parents and their children in the USA hold about their heritage language. Data were collected through interviews. This study addresses how parents' perspectives and their actual heritage language practices with their children influence their children's cultural identity…

  4. Heritage Language Maintenance and Cultural Identity Formation: The Case of Korean Immigrant Parents and Their Children in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boh Young

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the beliefs and attitudes that Korean immigrant parents and their children in the USA hold about their heritage language. Data were collected through interviews. This study addresses how parents' perspectives and their actual heritage language practices with their children influence their children's cultural identity and…

  5. Heritage Language Maintenance and Cultural Identity Formation: The Case of Korean Immigrant Parents and Their Children in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boh Young

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the beliefs and attitudes that Korean immigrant parents and their children in the USA hold about their heritage language. Data were collected through interviews. This study addresses how parents' perspectives and their actual heritage language practices with their children influence their children's cultural identity and…

  6. Pond Fish Culture Practices in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Akankali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pond fish culture practices in Nigeria was reviewed to refresh the minds of fish and other interested stake holders on some basic principles involved in pond fish culture. Fish pond system is the commonest agricultural techniques in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Profit making, job creation, provision of raw materials for several industries and increase in foreign exchange earnings are some benefits. However, loss of land and introduction some water borne diseases are some disadvantages in pond fish culture. This articles reviews the fish pond management processes, stocking of ponds, feeding of fish, types of culture, fish farming combined with other branches of agriculture, rearing of fish for purposes other than food, other fish culture, types of fish used for fish culture in central east Africa, general biology of the species of value in fish culture and suitable combinations of fish for stocking to reawaken the minds of individuals, companies and government on the need to develop pond fish culture in Nigeria.

  7. Culture and English Language Teaching in the Arab World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Montasser Mohamed AbdelWahab

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between culture and English language teaching (ELT) in the Arab World. A critical question arises in terms of ELT, that is, whether to teach culture along with English. To answer such a bewildering question, this article presents related literature and studies and discusses a theoretical frame based on…

  8. Teaching Culture in the Classroom to Arabic Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldin, Ahmad Abdel Tawwab Sharaf

    2015-01-01

    Arabic language learning comprises of certain elements, including syntactic ability, oral capability, dialect proficiency, and a change in state of mind towards different culture or society. For teachers and laymen alike, cultural competence, i.e., the knowledge of the customs, beliefs, and systems of another country, is indisputably an integral…

  9. Cooperating or competing in three languages : Cultural accommodation or alienation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gargalianou, Vasiliki; Urbig, D.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of using foreign languages on cooperative behavior in a prisoner’s dilemma setting. The cultural accommodation hypothesis suggests that people are less cooperative in English, associated with the Anglophone cultural cluster, than in French, wh

  10. Negotiating Languages and Cultures: Enacting Translingualism through a Translation Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Julia; Meier, Joyce; Wang, Xiqiao

    2016-01-01

    This collaborative project explores the affordances of a translation assignment in the context of a learner-centered pedagogy that places composition students' movement among languages and cultures as both a site for inquiry and subject of analysis. The translation assignment asks students to translate scholarly articles or culture stories from…

  11. Tandem Language Learning through a Cross-Cultural Keypal Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabata, Kaori; Edasawa, Yasuyo

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of students' language learning were examined through an asynchronous cross-cultural bilingual communication project conducted between Japanese university students learning English and Canadian university students learning Japanese. Previous studies on cross-cultural communication projects have reported positive outcomes in providing…

  12. Culture and English Language Teaching in the Arab World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Montasser Mohamed AbdelWahab

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between culture and English language teaching (ELT) in the Arab World. A critical question arises in terms of ELT, that is, whether to teach culture along with English. To answer such a bewildering question, this article presents related literature and studies and discusses a theoretical frame based on…

  13. Cultural Cross-Currents in Second Language Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodycott, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of "cultural cross-currents," their implicit nature and the potential they have to effect second language literacy learning, teaching and curriculum reform in Hong Kong primary classrooms. Despite the substantive implications for learning, the exploration of cultural influences upon teacher and student thinking and…

  14. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  15. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  16. Interdisciplinary German-Language Cultural-Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Meriam M.

    1974-01-01

    The suggested themes, activities and projects presented here evolved from the interdisciplinary advanced German-language-mini-courses at Ridgefield (Connecticut) High School. Many of the activities can be adapted for use at earlier levels. (PP)

  17. Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methologies for World Language Teachers. Research in Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, David, Ed.; Petron, Mary, Ed.; Luke, Christopher, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methodologies for World Language Educators" is an edited volume that focuses on innovative, nontraditional methods of teaching and learning world languages. Using teacher-research projects, each author in the volume guides readers through their own personal…

  18. High School Teacher Perspectives and Practices: Second Language Writing and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' understandings of second language learning influence their practices in the classroom. This paper analyzes interview and classroom data collected during a year-long ethnographic study of two high school English language development classes to identify (1) what the teachers understood about second language (L2) development and L2 academic…

  19. Cultural Adaptation of Second Language Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-05

    them. Interview #72 Mr. Art Reyna, Chief, Resident Training Branch, Defense Language Instiute, San Antonio, TX, 22 Jun 81. A-80 NARRATIVE Mr. Reyna...Interview #80 LTC C. Urbano (USAF), Commandant of Troops; MSG Pete Pedersen (USA), Drill Sergeant and SFC Ryan (USA), Platoon Sergeant, Defense Language...In a normal training situation, he says, such time is often not available. LTC Urbano and the Sergeants state that they had shoplifting problems with

  20. The Influence of Target Culture on Language Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Sarıçoban

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at investigating the types of cultural activities students at Çankaya University wanted to have during their study of the target language and the level at which students preferred to see those cultural components in language classrooms. A questionnaire was used by the researcher for the purpose of collecting data. The questionnaire that was adapted for the study included 13 multiple choice questions. Each question had the option of “other” to enable further comments on the part of the students. The first part of the questionnaire elicited demographic information of the students. The data-gathering instrument was implemented on 95 preparatory school intermediate students and the results were analyzed statistically in terms of frequency, percentage and average. The findings of the research clearly showed the types of cultural activities students would enjoy in language classrooms, at which level they would like to do them, their attitudes towards the target culture, the level of importance students attach to the target culture and their understanding of “culture”. From the results it can be seen that most of the students who took part in the study had positive attitudes towards the inclusion of cultural components during their study of the English language. The study revealed very important data for the language teachers as well. The outcomes of the study are important not only for teachers but also for textbook publishers. This study presents them with valuable suggestions.

  1. Prospective English Language Teachers' Perceptions of the Target Language and Culture in Relation to Their Socioeconomic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Arda

    2011-01-01

    Prospective foreign language teachers need to have an accurate knowledge and a positive perception of the target language and target culture so that they can help their students gain further insight on culture by and large. Hence, by means of a questionnaire, prospective English language teachers' (n= 412) perceptions of the target language and…

  2. Sociolinguistic approaches to identity negotiation and language learning: A circumstantiality perspective on communities of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jou, Yu Shiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of growing globalization, the learning experience of second/foreign (L2/FL language learners has been inextricably linked to complex social structures and networks. Through a sociolinguistic lens, this paper provides a critical review of L2/FL learning, identity negotiation, and community of practice in the face of incremental changes in linguistic systems and norms concomitant with gradual transformations in politics, society, and economics. In different social structures, identity emerges and is formed in complex social, cultural, and interactional phenomena. Due to the complicity of identity work, methods employed in identity and language learning entail both qualitative and quantitative approaches, including micro and macro analysis of language use, and ethnographic study on social and cultural practices. It is examined in this paper how identity has been conceptualized in sociocultural theories of language learning. Moreover, I probe into the context in which language learning takes place and discuss to what extent L2 and FL communities overlap and exchange. I argue for a perspective on the “circumstantiality” of language learning and communities of practice. At the end of this paper, reflections on identity work are offered and implications for language learning are discussed in the hope of relevant issues to be further explored.

  3. Language evolution as cultural evolution: how language is shaped by the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chater, Nick; Christiansen, Morten H

    2010-09-01

    This paper reviews arguments against the evolutionary plausibility of a traditional genetically specified universal grammar. We argue that no such universal grammar could have evolved, either by a process of natural selection or by other evolutionary mechanisms. Instead, we propose that the close fit between languages and language learners, which make language acquisition possible, arises not because humans possess a specialized biological adaptation for language, but because language has been shaped to fit the brain, a process of cultural evolution. On this account, many aspects of the structure of human languages may be explained as cultural adaptations to the human brain. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  4. Culture, language, and patient safety: Making the link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2006-10-01

    It has been well recognized internationally that hospitals are not as safe as they should be. In order to redress this situation, health care services around the world have turned their attention to strategically implementing robust patient safety and quality care programmes to identify circumstances that put patients at risk of harm and then acting to prevent or control those risks. Despite the progress that has been made in improving hospital safety in recent years, there is emerging evidence that patients of minority cultural and language backgrounds are disproportionately at risk of experiencing preventable adverse events while in hospital compared with mainstream patient groups. One reason for this is that patient safety programmes have tended to underestimate and understate the critical relationship that exists between culture, language, and the safety and quality of care of patients from minority racial, ethno-cultural, and language backgrounds. This article suggests that the failure to recognize the critical link between culture and language (of both the providers and recipients of health care) and patient safety stands as a 'resident pathogen' within the health care system that, if not addressed, unacceptably exposes patients from minority ethno-cultural and language backgrounds to preventable adverse events in hospital contexts. It is further suggested that in order to ensure that minority as well as majority patient interests in receiving safe and quality care are properly protected, the culture-language-patient-safety link needs to be formally recognized and the vulnerabilities of patients from minority cultural and language backgrounds explicitly identified and actively addressed in patient safety systems and processes.

  5. Person-first and identity-first language: Developing psychologists' cultural competence using disability language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Dana S; Andrews, Erin E

    2015-04-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) advocates the use of person-first language (e.g., people with disabilities) to refer to individuals with disabilities in daily discourse and to reduce bias in psychological writing. Disability culture advocates and disability studies scholars have challenged the rationale for and implications of exclusive person-first language use, promoting use of identity-first language (e.g., disabled people). We argue that psychologists should adopt identity-first language alongside person-first constructions to address the concerns of disability groups while promoting human dignity and maintaining scientific and professional rigor. We review the evolution of disability language and then discuss the major models used to characterize disability and people with disabilities. The rationale for person-first language and the emergence of identity-first language, respectively, are linked to particular models. We then discuss some language challenges posed by identity-first language and the current intent of person-first language, suggesting that psychologists make judicious use of the former when it is possible to do so. We conclude by offering five observations of ways that use of both person-first and identity-first language could enhance psychologists' cultural competence regarding disability issues in personal and scientific communications. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. AWARENESS AND MOTIVATION IN CROSS-CULTURAL LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena SAVU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus in language education in the twenty-first century does no longer fall on grammar, memorization and learning from rote, but rather on using language alongside with cultural knowledge as a means to communicate and connect to other people all over the world. Our learners are going to become part of today’s intercultural communication network and they will need to use both their language and cultural skills for real life communication. Therefore, teachers themselves should be ready to assume the responsibility of teaching their learners how to become culturally competent. To do this properly and successfully, practitioners need to build and develop their own awareness of and motivation for an intercultural approach. The current paper will present and analyze some recent research findings on higher education practitioners’ motivation to adopt a cross-cultural approach in their classrooms.

  7. From language classroom to clinical context: the role of language and culture in communication for nurses using English as a second language: a thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Fiona

    2011-09-01

    This study explores the experiences of internationally educated nurses using English as a second language, recruited by advanced economies to supplement diminishing local workforces, as they progress from language learning programs to clinical settings. Understanding the journey these nurses experience as language learners and professionals highlights ways in which they could be better supported in their adaptation and integration into the Australian workforce. By means of semi-structured interviews, the nurses' narratives were explored and documented. Thematic analysis was used to interpret their experiences as they move from the English language classroom to the clinical setting. The participants had all completed studies in English as a second language in Australia and had experienced working in Australian as part of a competency based assessment program. At the time of the study, conducted in South Australia, six of the nurses had met the English language requirements of the Nurses Board of South Australia and had started working as Registered Nurses in Australia. Four participants were still to reach the mandatory English requirements, among whom three were to return to their home countries due to visa restrictions, and continue their efforts to attain the English language proficiency requirement. There were six female participants and four male. Five participants were Indian, four Chinese, and one, Nepalese. In exploring their experiences, themes of identity and belonging, safety and competence and adapting to new roles and ways of communicating are revealed. In their own words, these nurses reveal the challenges they face as they concurrently manage the roles of language learners and professionals. The journey from language classroom to clinical setting is a process that goes beyond the notions of language proficiency; these nurses are constructing new cultural and professional identities. Bridging the gap between preparation and practice involves making

  8. Rorty on Language and Social Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marsonet

    2014-07-01

    The question to be asked is, obviously, the following: What does this mean? Wittgenstein is right when he says that some questions cannot be asked because they do not even make sense, but in my view we may interpret him in a way different from the traditional ones that have been thus far put forward. We may accept Wittgenstein’s statement that the existence of the world, for instance, cannot meaningfully be questioned. But this means, in turn, that the linguistic games cannot go on forever. Sooner or later we run into a “hard rock” which is ultimately non-linguistic and whose existence is the original fact from which everything else stems, including language, linguistic games, conceptual schemes, social practices, etc. Everything, in sum, can be questioned, but nature. And when someone does question it, like the pupil mentioned in On Certainty, who will not let anything be explained to him by his teacher, for he continuously interrupts him with doubts concerning the existence of things, we are somehow forced to answer his questions as Wittgenstein’s teacher does: “Stop interrupting me and do as I tell you. So far your doubts don’t make sense at all”.

  9. FORMATION OF STUDENTS’ FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCE IN THE INFORMATIONAL FIELD OF CROSS CULTURAL INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Vyacheslavovich Tomin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of foreign languages is becoming an integral feature of competitive persona-lity, ability to engage in cross-cultural communication and productive cross-cultural inte-raction, characterized by an adequate degree of tolerance and multi-ethnic competence, the ability for cross-cultural adaptation, critical thinking and creativity. However, the concept of foreign language competence has so far no clear, unambiguous definitions, thereby indicating the complexity and diversity of the phenomenon, which is an integrative, practice-oriented outcome of the wish and ability for intercultural communication. There have been mentioned a variety of requirements, conditions, principles, objectives, means and forms of foreign language competence forming, among which special attention is paid to non-traditional forms of practical training and information field in a cross-cultural interaction. There have been explained the feasibility of their application, which allows solving a complex of series of educational and teaching tasks more efficiently. There have been clarified the term «information field» in cross-cultural interaction, which is a cross-section of internally inherent in every individual «sections» of knowledge, skills, and experience, arising in certain given educational frameworks and forming a communication channel. The resultative indicators of the formation of foreign language competence and ways to improve its effectiveness are presented.

  10. Language and Culture Exchange in Foreign Language Learning: An Experiment and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Thomas; Yoshida, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to build on the little work that has been done so far on empirically and systematically researching what language and culture exchange (LCE) in the classroom between students of different foreign languages means to those students. It describes the context and method used to build such an exchange and after reviewing relevant…

  11. Greek Immigrants in Australia: Implications for Culturally Sensitive Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Savvas Daniel

    2015-10-01

    This exploratory research examined adjustment challenges, resiliencies, attitudes, emotional health, economic stability, criminal involvement, victimization and service experiences, and some cultural propensities of Greek Immigrants (GIs) in Australia using a convenient multi-generational sample (n = 123; response rate = .5). Data were collected via surveys, telephone, and personal-interviews in four major Australian cities. Among other things, the study revealed that Greek identity and cultural customs are often significant to first generation GIs. Adjustment challenges upon entry include primarily language, housing, and transportation difficulties, nostalgia for relatives and the motherland, unfamiliarity with socio-cultural systems, unemployment, money challenges, and lack of friendships. Christian faith, the extended family, family values and traditions, cultural pride for ancient Greek achievements, and a hard 'work ethic' are notable resiliencies that support GIs in their struggles and solidify their pursuit for happiness and success. Financial concerns, aging, and nostalgia for relatives and the motherland were the primary causes of socio-emotional instability. Attitudinal differences in the respondents based on age, gender, and socio-economic status, cross-cultural comparisons, and recommendations for culturally-sensitive practice with GIs are analyzed and methodological limitations illuminated. Future research needs in the field are also highlighted.

  12. Pronunciation and phonetics a practical guide for English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adam

    2014-01-01

    This engaging, succinct text is an introduction to both phonetics and phonology as applied to the teaching of pronunciation to English language learners. Section 1 selectively covers the main areas of phonetics and phonology, without going into any area in more depth than the average English language teacher requires or that the average English language teacher trainee can handle. Section 2 focuses on practical issues related to learners and how they learn languages, and what represents good practice in terms of classroom activities for pronunciation—including aspects such as targets, motiva

  13. Unsupervised Language Acquisition: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis I present various algorithms for the unsupervised machine learning of aspects of natural languages using a variety of statistical models. The scientific object of the work is to examine the validity of the so-called Argument from the Poverty of the Stimulus advanced in favour of the proposition that humans have language-specific innate knowledge. I start by examining an a priori argument based on Gold's theorem, that purports to prove that natural languages cannot be learned, a...

  14. Unsupervised Language Acquisition: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis I present various algorithms for the unsupervised machine learning of aspects of natural languages using a variety of statistical models. The scientific object of the work is to examine the validity of the so-called Argument from the Poverty of the Stimulus advanced in favour of the proposition that humans have language-specific innate knowledge. I start by examining an a priori argument based on Gold's theorem, that purports to prove that natural languages cannot be learned, a...

  15. Translation of interviews from a source language to a target language: examining issues in cross-cultural health care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amer, Rasmieh; Ramjan, Lucie; Glew, Paul; Darwish, Maram; Salamonson, Yenna

    2015-05-01

    To illuminate translation practice in cross-language interview in health care research and its impact on the construction of the data. Globalisation and changing patterns of migration have created changes to the world's demography; this has presented challenges for overarching social domains, specifically, in the health sector. Providing ethno-cultural health services is a timely and central facet in an ever-increasingly diverse world. Nursing and other health sectors employ cross-language research to provide knowledge and understanding of the needs of minority groups, which underpins cultural-sensitive care services. However, when cultural and linguistic differences exist, they pose unique complexities for cross-cultural health care research; particularly in qualitative research where narrative data are central for communication as most participants prefer to tell their story in their native language. Consequently, translation is often unavoidable in order to make a respondent's narrative vivid and comprehensible, yet, there is no consensus about how researchers should address this vital issue. An integrative literature review. PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched for relevant studies published before January 2014, and hand searched reference lists of studies were selected. This review of cross-language health care studies highlighted three major themes, which identify factors often reported to affect the translation and production of data in cross-language research: (1) translation style; (2) translators; and (3) trustworthiness of the data. A plan detailing the translation process and analysis of health care data must be determined from the study outset to ensure credibility is maintained. A transparent and systematic approach in reporting the translation process not only enhances the integrity of the findings but also provides overall rigour and auditability. It is important that minority groups have a voice in health care research which, if accurately

  16. MOVING BEYOND LANGUAGE: AWARENESS OF EFL LEARNERS IN TARGET LANGUAGE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devrim Hol

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available What students in EFL classes think and feel about the target language culture has always been in a great domain for all teachers and other stakeholders. It is always a great concern, whether or not learners accept and absorb the target language. They may find it useless or unnecessary, even though the course books or classroom activities exposed them to it. This study reports on the measures on the perceptions of Turkish EFL Learners toward the target language culture. It examines the meaning of culture; whether it is important to have knowledge and information on the target language culture; and the advantages and drawbacks of learning the target language culture to make the questions in the minds clear. The study involved 20 EFL learners at a university in Turkey. It used in-depth interviews with the participants, and attempted to identify the learner’s perceptions concerning the target culture. The research results show that the participants’ perceptions on the target culture vary greatly.

  17. Language, Culture, Class, Gender, and Class Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrick, Stephanie

    This paper explores reasons why some students with English as a Second Language (ESL) feel less entitled to speak out in class than others, discussing ways in which teachers can widen the definition of participation. The first section explains how student background can affect participation. For students who are non-native English speakers and who…

  18. Teacher Voices: Immigration, Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Writing Project (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents stories of six teachers who believe in the power and promise of immigrant students and English language learners. Their stories begin to help readers understand the assets these groups of students bring to classrooms, the challenges they--both students and teachers--face, and the role that teachers and schools play in their…

  19. An Analysis of Body Language between China and Western Countries in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雁

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of the global economy,cross-cultural communication has become increasingly frequent.In human communication,people use nonverbal language to communicate as well as verbal language.Body language,like verbal language,is also part of culture which exerts significant influence on cross-culture communication.However,body language varies due to different regions,race and culture customs and it is restricted by different cultural connotations.Therefore,in order to e nsure the cross-cultural communication goes smoothly,understanding body language connotation in different culture backgrounds is desperately necessary.

  20. An Analysis of Body Language between China and Western Countries in Cross-cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雁

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of the global economy,cross-cultural communication has become increasingly frequent.In human communication,people use nonverbal language to communicate as well as verbal language.Body language,like verbal language,is also part of culture which exerts significant influence on cross-culture communication.However,body language varies due to different regions,race and culture customs and it is restricted by different cultural connotations.Therefore,in order to ensure the cross-cultural communication goes smoothly,understanding body language connotation in different culture backgrounds is desperately necessary.

  1. Best Practices: The Power of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafumo, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Language defines leaders. Martin Luther King, Jr., President Franklin Roosevelt, and President John Kennedy are perfect examples of leaders who knew how to use language to inspire others. Teachers are classroom leaders. What they say and how they say it speaks volumes about their professionalism. The article discusses 10 things that teachers can…

  2. Iceland's Language Technology: Policy versus Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmarsson-Dunn, Amanda M.; Kristinsson, Ari P.

    2009-01-01

    Iceland's language policies are purist and protectionist, aiming to maintain the grammatical system and basic vocabulary of Icelandic as it has been for a thousand years and to keep the language free of foreign (English) borrowings. In order to use Icelandic in the domain of information technology, there has been a major investment in language…

  3. Everyday Child Language Learning Early Intervention Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Raab, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    The language intervention model developed and evaluated at the Center on Everyday Child Language Learning (CECLL) is described. The model includes 4 components: interest-based child learning opportunities, the everyday family and community activities that are sources of interest-based child learning, the methods for increasing child participation…

  4. THE WEB IS THE LIMIT: LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND MOOCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia FLOREA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available MOOCs remain the buzzwords of the current landscape of higher education (HE provision. In the context of the ever growing use of technology through e - Learning and OpenCourseWare and of the new generation of tablet - toting, hyper - connected youth, the university will continue to extend its reach to students around the world, unbounded by geography and time zones, at a fast pace and at a fraction of the cost of a traditional college education. In this context, “To Mooc or not to Mooc” remains a question that several universities are beginning to con sider against more pressing critical reflections on issues pertaining to their language and culture. Our paper aims to examine the role of language and culture in online learning, particularly the hegemony of English and Western cultures against the rising “politics of marginality” that other languages are forced to adopt in a dominant, non - negotiable, disruptive online competition space.

  5. Harvest managements and cultural practices in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Gustavo Quassi de Castro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of trash from the mechanical harvest of green cane on sugarcane plantations promotes changes in the agricultural management, for example, in the mechanical cultural practices of ratoon cane in-between the rows and nitrogen (N fertilization. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of sugarcane in different harvest systems, associated to the mechanical cultural practices in interrows and N rates. The study was carried out on a sugarcane plantation in Sales Oliveira, São Paulo, Brazil, with the sugarcane variety SP81-3250, on soil classified as Acrudox, in a randomized block design with split-split plots and four replications. The main treatments consisted of harvest systems (harvesting green cane or burnt cane, the secondary treatment consisted of the mechanical cultural practices in the interrows and the tertiary treatments were N rates (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 160 kg ha-1, using ammonium nitrate (33 % N as N source. The harvest systems did not differ in sugarcane yield (tons of cane per hectare - TCH, but in burnt cane, the pol percent and total sugar recovery (TSR were higher. This could be explained by the higher quantity of plant impurities in the harvested raw material in the system without burning, which reduces the processing quality. Mechanical cultural practices in the interrows after harvest had no effect on cane yield and sugar quality, indicating that this operation can be omitted in areas with mechanical harvesting. The application of N fertilizer at rates of 88 and 144 kg ha-1 N, respectively, increased stalk height and TCH quadratically to the highest values for these variables. For the sugar yield per hectare (in pol %, N fertilization induced a linear increase.

  6. Dermatoses Due to Indian Cultural Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Divya Gupta; Devinder Mohan Thappa

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ′Henna′ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ′Kumkum′ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ′bindis′ and ′alta′ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing ...

  7. Programming languages for MIS concepts and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Computers Computer Programming Languages     Role of Computer Programming Language      Software Systems     Taxonomies of Computer Programming LanguagesComputing Architecture in the Internet Environment Key Characteristics Shared by All Procedural Programming Languages      Syntax, Sentence, and Word     Variable     Arithmetic Operation     Execution Sequence      If-Then-Else Logic      Loop      Module C++ Introduction to Function-Oriented and Object-Oriented Programming A Tour of C Language      C and C++ Keyword and User-Defined Word      Comment Statements      Preprocessor

  8. The Role of Culture in Second or Foreign Language Teaching: Moving Beyond the Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    Second Language (L2) and Foreign Language (FL) curricula have a cultural component intricately woven into the fabric of the language syllabus. To teach language, one must also teach the culture inherent in the language, including the verbal as well as the non-verbal aspects. A review of the literature will show that studying the target culture…

  9. What School You Went? Local Culture, Local Identity, and Local Language: Stories of Schooling in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Darrell H. Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author explores local culture and local cultural practices in an attempt to understand the forces and influences that have affected the development of a local identity as well as the persistence of Pidgin (Hawai'i Creole) as its language. The author begins with an introductory discussion of themes that emerge in two short…

  10. The Employment of Pop Culture in Middle School English Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨才英

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays,culture teaching is more emphasized in language teaching. But less attention is paid to the influence of pop culture in language teaching. The important role of pop culture in middle school English language teaching will be discussed in this thesis through its correlation with some factors in English language teaching.

  11. An Exploration of English Language Teachers' Perceptions of Culture Teaching and Its Effects on Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil, Seyma; Demiröz, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    As the seamless connection between language and culture is commensurate with related research carried on language and culture; language is greatly affected and structured by cultural values, attitudes and beliefs. The goal of the present study is to investigate and analyse English language teachers' perceptions and opinions about the integration…

  12. GENDER GENEALOGY OF READING AS CULTURAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Kryvda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is devoted to the cultural aspect of texts using in European culture. The paper found out methodological basis of correctly interpreting the term "practice" in the philosophical and sociological discourses. In the first case the concept reveals human nature; appealing to the field of ethics and intersubjective interactions. In sociological approach the term practice is contrasted to institutional life. It seems to be an organic; vital relevance of actions for contrast to the mechanically regulated community life. Methodology. The paper considered the typology of human intellectual conditions according to Kant’s divided into pure and practical reason. The last one directs action-willed individual efforts so as to meet the universal relevance and ethical coherence. Gottlieb Fichte interpreted practice reason as the way to combine intellectual intentions and material conditions of human being. G. W. F. Hegel enriched the concept with terms of "objectification" and "alienation” of labour. Karl Marx formulated the main features of activity approach to the human nature exploring. In sociological discourse the term practice is opposed to mechanically done actions (according to institutional normativity. Given the philosophical and sociological methodological contexts the reading is studied as activity that aimed emotional and volitional contact with sense. Originality. The paper analysed the genealogy of reading practices. There were selected two types of text perception – rapid "masculine" and prudent "women's" reading. Women salon environment of the XVIII-th century capitalistic Europe was the main condition for the forming of literary-aware public. The authors analysed the process of reading of the text-as-satisfaction and text-as-pleasure (R. Barthes. The work presents the overview of classical studies of sociocultural field: Thorstein Veblen; Vladimir Toporov; Rolan Barthes and contemporary researchers such as T. Markova

  13. CULTURAL CAPSULES AND READING TEXTS: TRIGGERS TO CROSS-CULTURAL LANGUAGE AWARENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Khemlani David

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of English in the international setting is based on cultural presuppositions about the kinds of language performance that are appropriate for specific situations. Culture capsules are useful teaching techniques to teach English, as learners would be able to bring in their own cultural insights into learning the pragmatics of English through the various combinations of word choice, prosodic and paralinguistic features. This paper will provide examples of capsules which focus on a range of speech acts (greetings, directives, requests, etc and demonstrate how they can be used as a stimulus to cross-cultural language awareness.

  14. Managing Self-Access Language Learning: Principles and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, David; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project looking at the management of self-access language learning (SALL) from the perspective of the managers of self-access centres. It looks at the factors which influence the practice of seven managers of self-access language learning in tertiary institutions in Hong Kong. The discussion centres around five…

  15. Intercultural Communicative Competence: Exploring English Language Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tony Johnstone; Sachdev, Itesh

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the beliefs and practices of experienced teachers in the USA, UK and France relating to the application of a model of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) to English language programmes. Broadly, "intercultural" approaches to language learning and teaching are strongly advocated in both the…

  16. Ideologies, norms, and practices in youth poly-languaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ag, Astrid; Jørgensen, J. Normann

    2013-01-01

    The theme of this paper is the relationship of language ideologies as they may be uncovered in public discourse and as they are mediated through language users, for instance in minority families, to linguistic practices as observed among young speakers in a superdiverse environment in Copenhagen....

  17. Second Language Teacher Education: Review of Recent Research on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tony

    2010-01-01

    Second language teacher education (SLTE) has undergone considerable change over the past 25 years. The question of how language teaching is learnt and how programmes of professional preparation can contribute to this process now elicits quite different answers. A new agenda of theory and practice has emerged as SLTE has incorporated many of the…

  18. Bilingual School Psychologists' Assessment Practices with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored bilingual school psychologists' assessment practices with students identified as English language learners (ELL). One thousand bilingual National Association of School Psychologist members were recruited nationwide, and 276 participated. Among those conducting language proficiency assessments of ELLs, many (58%) use…

  19. Language Ideologies in Practice: Repair and Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razfar, Aria

    2005-01-01

    This article seeks to explore the practice of repair in classroom discourse from an ideological perspective of language and literacy. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in an urban high school with a predominant English Language Learner (ELL) population, this paper outlines the theoretical foundations of repair from a "conversation…

  20. Managing Self-Access Language Learning: Principles and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, David; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project looking at the management of self-access language learning (SALL) from the perspective of the managers of self-access centres. It looks at the factors which influence the practice of seven managers of self-access language learning in tertiary institutions in Hong Kong. The discussion centres around five…

  1. Good cell culture practices &in vitro toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Chantra; Boström, Ann-Charlotte; Bowe, Gerhard; Coecke, Sandra; Hartung, Thomas; Hendriks, Giel; Pamies, David; Piton, Alain; Rovida, Costanza

    2017-04-25

    Good Cell Culture Practices (GCCP) is of high relevance to in vitro toxicology. The European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV), the Center for Alternatives for Animal Testing (CAAT) and the In Vitro Toxicology Industrial Platform (IVTIP) joined forces to address by means of an ESTIV 2016 pre-congress session the different aspects and applications of GCCP. The covered aspects comprised the current status of the OECD guidance document on Good In Vitro Method Practices, the importance of quality assurance for new technological advances in in vitro toxicology including stem cells, and the optimized implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices for regulatory testing purposes. General discussions raised the duality related to the difficulties in implementing GCCP in an academic innovative research framework on one hand, and on the other hand, the need for such GCCP principles in order to ensure reproducibility and robustness of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing. Indeed, if good cell culture principles are critical to take into consideration for all uses of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing, the level of application of such principles may depend on the stage of development of the test method as well as on the applications of the test methods, i.e., academic innovative research vs. regulatory standardized test method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING AND ITS MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT THE PRACTICE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING (ELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Diana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Communicative Language Teaching (CLT has been accepted as one of the teaching methods by numerous language teachers due to its major focus on developing learners’ communicative competence. This paper aims to describe communicative language teaching, misinterpretations about its practice and the factors leading to teachers’ misconceptions. It shows four misinterpreted beliefs of the implementation of communicative language teaching: communicative skills, teacher’s role in communicative activities, fluency and accuracy as the main goals and teaching techniques. It then presents three reasons that might lead to teachers’ misinterpretations concerning the practice of CLT. Teachers do not have enough training and  adequate resources.

  3. On techniques to integrate cultural learning within English language teaching classrooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹邱

    2015-01-01

    Culture is inseparable from language teaching and learning. Learning the target culture may arouse students’cultural awareness and avoid cultural misunderstanding in cross-cultural communications. It is important to integrate cultural learning within English language classrooms. This essay discusses the techniques of achieving this integration.

  4. A Cultural Analysis of the Achievement Gap Discourse: Challenging the Language and Labels Used in the Work of School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Roderick L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I critique the labels and terms used to frame practices aimed at closing the achievement gap. I examine how an unacknowledged "achievement gap Discourse" has emerged from the language that informs practices and policies of contemporary school reform. I use Gee's uppercase "Discourse" and a cultural analytic…

  5. The language of cheese-ripening cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gori, Klaus; Jespersen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    Microbial interactions are of importance for the establishment and growth of cheese ripening cultures. An interesting aspect of microbial interactions is cell-cell communication, often referred to as quorum sensing; the process in which micro-organisms communicate with signalling molecules and co......-based and ammonia signalling in the dairy-relevant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii. Furthermore, the influence of cheese matrices on quorum sensing systems is briefly mentioned. Finally, we discuss how knowledge on quorum sensing systems in cheese ripening cultures may be used for optimisation of the ripening processes....... be of importance is surface ripened cheeses. The present review focuses on our findings on quorum sensing systems in cheese ripening cultures. The main focus is on the group of bacterial non-species-specific signalling molecules referred to as autoinducer-2 (AI-2) in smear bacteria as well as alcohol...

  6. The role of culture in the foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Küçükönal, Hatice

    1989-01-01

    Ankara : The Faculty of Letters and The Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent Univ., 1989. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1989. Includes bibliographical references leaves 37-40. Communication like many human activities is constrained by individual and cultural factors- It is not enough to learn only the form of a language to communicate. Moreover, many commun ica t ion faiJures are the result of lack of cross-cultural understanding rather than a lack of ling...

  7. Minority students in the science classroom: Issues of language, class, race, culture and pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Aldrin Edward

    A considerable proportion of the educationally at-risk students in the K-12 public education system is composed of minority students, either in terms of cultural background, linguistic background, and frequently, both. In particular, satisfactory levels of achievement in science are not being attained by these students. The concerns of this study center on examining and understanding the reasons underlying this situation, with a view to suggesting how these problems of underachievement in science might be addressed. Previous and ongoing educational research concerning these issues suggest that such underachievement may be due to current pedagogical practices which seem to actively discourage these students from achieving any significant measure of academic, educational or professional success. The purpose of this study is thus to explore the beliefs and pedagogical practices of science teachers as they relate to minority students, especially those minority students for whom English is not a first language and who have limited English proficiency (LEP). In the course of this study, the terminology 'minority students' will refer to and be inclusive of cultural and/or language minorities, i.e. those students who differ from the mainstream white American student in terms of cultural background and a native language other than English. Culturally derived usages of non-standard forms of English (e.g. Black English Vernacular) also will be subsumed within this definition of cultural and language minority students. Particular attention will be given to emergent issues relating to current pedagogical practices, also to the science teacher beliefs and epistemological rationales underlying such practices. In exploring these beliefs and pedagogical practices, the study also will seek to delineate and to understand the various problems which are being encountered in the teaching of science to minority students. As the result of exploring the beliefs and pedagogical practices of

  8. Perspective-Taking and Meaning-Making through Engagement with Cultural Narratives: Bringing History to Life in a Foreign Language Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The MLA Report (2007) accords considerable weight to the role of culture in a transformed approach to language education in the U.S. and outlines “one possible model” for developing transculturalunderstanding that involves the interpretation of the “cultural narratives” inherent in all forms of cultural representation (p. 238). How exactly students might be engaged in interpreting cultural narratives in the foreign language classroom, though, remains to be further specified, imagined, practic...

  9. The Language of Mathematics Utilizing Math in Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Baber, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    A new and unique way of understanding the translation of concepts and natural language into mathematical expressions Transforming a body of text into corresponding mathematical expressions and models is traditionally viewed and taught as a mathematical problem; it is also a task that most find difficult. The Language of Mathematics: Utilizing Math in Practice reveals a new way to view this process-not as a mathematical problem, but as a translation, or language, problem. By presenting the language of mathematics explicitly and systematically, this book helps readers to learn mathematics¿and i

  10. Communicative Language Teaching: Exploring Theoretical Foundations and Practical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kustiwan Syarief

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The genesis of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT can be traced back to the 1970s when researchers and language practitioners began reflecting and discussing the notion of communicative competence. In practical terms, however, there has been such a gap between theoretical foundations of CLT on the one hand and its implementation in classroom environments on the other hand. This article explores and discusses the theoretical foundations of CLT based on the existing models of communicative competence and continues with identifying CLT's practical challenges commonly persisting in second/foreign language teaching and learning contexts.

  11. Culturally responsive instruction for english language learners with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Michael John; O'Connor, Rollanda

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes the culturally responsive instruction of one special education teacher with Latino English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities in an urban elementary school setting. This study was situated in a social constructivist research based framework. In investigating this instruction with ELLs, this study focused on how one teacher's knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy affected her special education instruction. Findings resulted in three major themes that were aligned with the current literature in this area: Cultural Aspects of Teaching Reading, Culturally Relevant Skills-Based Instruction, and Collaborative Agency Time. The results indicated that the success of special education with ELLs at the elementary education level might be dependent on how well the special education teacher integrates culturally responsive instruction with ELLs' cultural and linguistic needs. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  12. An Armenian English Language Teacher's Practical Theory of Communicative Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feryok, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that teacher cognitions and practices can be inconsistent, particularly with claims about communicative teaching practices. This article describes the practical theory of a state school EFL teacher in Armenia who claimed to be using a communicative approach to language teaching by considering her stated cognitions and…

  13. Negotiating Language, Culture and Pupil Agency in Complementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytra, Vally

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the teaching of language and culture and in particular the use of songs as curriculum in two London Turkish complementary schools. Drawing on a series of interconnected classroom vignettes, I look at how children weave together their semiotic resources to negotiate and transform two songs and the talk and action around…

  14. The Implications of Culture for Dictionaries of the African Languages*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Nkabinde

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: This article attempts to show how culture or aspects thereof can be used to comple-ment linguistic and other information in the compilation of dictionaries of African languages. Some obstacles in the way of achieving this goal are identified and proposals made on how to deal with them. Although only some cultural aspects of a single language are examined, the conclusions are valid for cultural aspects of all African languages.

    Keywords: CONTEXT, CULTURE, CORPUS, EUPHEMISM, FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE, HLONIPHA, KINSHIP TERMS, LEXICAL BORROWING, MULTILINGUALISM, SPEECH COM-MUNITY, STANDARD ZULU, TABOO

    Opsomming: Die implikasies van kultuur vir woordeboeke van die Afri-katale. Hierdie artikel probeer om aan te toon hoe kultuur of aspekte daarvan gebruik kan word om taalkundige en ander inligting aan te vul by die samestelling van woordeboeke van die Afrika-tale. 'n Aantal struikelblokke op die weg om hierdie doel te bereik, word geïdentifiseer en voor-stelle gemaak oor hoe om hulle te hanteer. Alhoewel slegs sommige kulturele aspekte van 'n enkele taal ondersoek word, is die gevolgtrekkings geldig vir kulturele aspekte van alle Afrikatale.

    Sleutelwoorde: EUFEMISME, FIGUURLIKE TAAL, HLONIPHA, KONTEKS, KORPUS, KULTUUR, LEKSIKALE ONTLENING, TAALGEMEENSKAP, TABOE, STANDAARDZOELOE, VEELTALIGHEID, VERWANTSKAPSTERME

  15. PRODUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING FOREGN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladimirovna Sannikova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to looking for productive educational technologies in learning a foreign language and culture with the use of ICT-based on the student-centered strategy that implements the method of projects.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-47

  16. Dimensions of variability in Northern Khoekhoe language and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapold, C.J.; Widlok, T.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes an interdisciplinary route towards explaining the complex history of Haillom culture and language. We begin this article with a short review of ideas relating to 'origins' and historical reconstructions as they are currently played out among Khoekhoe groups in Namibia, in

  17. Interactions between cultural, social and biological explanations for language evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steels, Luc

    2012-03-01

    This is a reply to commentaries on a target article in this volume reviewing models for the cultural evolution of language. Many commentaries amplify positions taken in this article but they also cover novel issues in social evolution and biological evolution, which are briefly addressed here.

  18. Blending Borders of Language and Culture: Schooling in La Villita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Irma M.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the efforts of a school in a Mexican community in Chicago to help children and parents capitalize on the language and culture of their 2 worlds. It builds on the concepts of border crossings and hybridity, metaphors used to describe the sociocultural and linguistic reality of people living transnationally. Some US communities…

  19. Teaching Culture and Identifying Language Interference Errors through Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argynbayev, Arman; Kabylbekova, Dana; Yaylaci, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    This study reflects intermediate level learners' opinion about employing films in the EFL classroom for teaching culture and avoiding negative language transfer. A total of 63 participants, aged 21-23, took part in the experiment in the Faculty of Philology at Suleyman Demirel University in Almaty, Kazakhstan. During the experiment the subjects…

  20. Sign Language Culture as Part of Multiculturalism in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarolta, Simigne Fenyo

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate sign language culture as part of multiculturalism in Hungary. The study consists of two parts. Referring to the 13 national and linguistic minorities living in the territory of Hungary, the first part gives a short account of the narrower interpretation of multiculturalism according to which it…

  1. Creole Practices as Prescriptive Guidelines for Language Didactics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    . In the following section, the author introduces different sociolinguistic studies of language practices in Martinique and the Caribbean giving a particular attention to the school system. The section ends with a brief discussion of how didactics in language teaching intersects with Glissant’s thinking......This article presents some of Glissant’s thoughts about the status and usage of the Creole language in relation to French and the consequences for the social imaginary in Martinique and in the Caribbean. The author formulates three thematic focal points: Archipelagic thinking, creolisation...... and dynamic changes of language forms in a context of power and resistance and, as a third point, the right to remain ‘opaque’ and the distinction between language form and ‘langage’. The author argues that we may detect a descriptive and a prescriptive dimension in Glissant’s thinking about language...

  2. Creole Practices as Prescriptive Guidelines for Language Didactics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    This article presents some of Glissant’s thoughts about the status and usage of the Creole language in relation to French and the consequences for the social imaginary in Martinique and in the Caribbean. The author formulates three thematic focal points: Archipelagic thinking, creolisation...... and dynamic changes of language forms in a context of power and resistance and, as a third point, the right to remain ‘opaque’ and the distinction between language form and ‘langage’. The author argues that we may detect a descriptive and a prescriptive dimension in Glissant’s thinking about language....... In the following section, the author introduces different sociolinguistic studies of language practices in Martinique and the Caribbean giving a particular attention to the school system. The section ends with a brief discussion of how didactics in language teaching intersects with Glissant’s thinking...

  3. Aboriginal Education as Cultural Brokerage: New Aboriginal Teachers Reflect on Language and Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Julian; Cherubini, Lorenzo; Trudeau, Lyn; Hodson, Janie M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a Talking Circle of six beginning Aboriginal teachers who discussed their roles as teachers. Participants criticized teacher education programs for not preparing them to teach in ways that are respectful of Aboriginal languages and culture. They discussed the importance of coming to know themselves and their culture. The…

  4. Dialogismo, lenguas extranjeras e identidad cultural (Dialogism, Foreign Languages, and Cultural Identity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    Foreign Language education will play an important role in the broadening and globalization of higher education for the 21st century. Where else will educators find the tools to "dialog" with--to engage--the "other" as part of the enriching process that accompanies cultural exchange, cultural broadening? This paper sheds light on these issues, and…

  5. Saudi Arabic Language and Culture Familiarization Course: Arab Cultural Assimilator, Books 1-5. Reprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Fred E.; And Others

    A five-book programed course in Arab culture is offered for professionals who are about to be stationed in the Middle East. This material is designed to supplement the Defense Language Institute's course in Saudi Arabic. In order to impart awareness of Saudi cultural characteristics, 66 hypothetical situations that might be encountered in…

  6. The language of cheese-ripening cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gori, Klaus; Jespersen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    Microbial interactions are of importance for the establishment and growth of cheese ripening cultures. An interesting aspect of microbial interactions is cell-cell communication, often referred to as quorum sensing; the process in which micro-organisms communicate with signalling molecules and co......-ordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. Little is known about quorum sensing in foods. However, as quorum sensing is expected to be a general phenomenon in micro-organisms, it is likely to be of importance for micro-organisms in foods. An example of a food product where quorum sensing could...... be of importance is surface ripened cheeses. The present review focuses on our findings on quorum sensing systems in cheese ripening cultures. The main focus is on the group of bacterial non-species-specific signalling molecules referred to as autoinducer-2 (AI-2) in smear bacteria as well as alcohol...

  7. Language and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Practice Paper-Literature Review and Case Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satwant Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the impact of language on cognitive behavioural therapy. Language is emotive and studies carried out in the linguistic field have shown second language is less emotive when describing events occuring in the first language. This paper has been written based on the experiences of a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT service providing therapy to patients from a diverse cultural and ethnic population. Patients whose first language is not English often receive therapy in their second language. Global migration is a common phenomenon and mainly occurs for economic reasons or threat of violence. This paper has been drawn from the results of a literature review on first and second languages and therapy. Despite being an area that is extremely relevant to therapy, there is an apparent lack of literature in relation to cognitive behavioural therapy for depression and other disorders. CBT is one of the recommended therapies by National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Findings from the linguistic field highlight the potential short comings providing therapy in a patient’s second language. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance that therapists working in this field have an understanding of how first and second languages function and the role they play in maintaining patients’ psychological problems. This practice paper discusses measures that can be used in cognitive behavioural therapy to deal with this using a case example.

  8. The Differences between Chinese and American Language and Culture and Its Implications for College Language Teaching and Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌花

    2013-01-01

    Chinese and American language and culture differ from each other in five ways as Hypotactic language vs. Paratactic language, Analytical thinking vs. Synthetic thinking, Direct thinking vs. Indirect thinking, Individualism vs. Collectivism and Eth-ics-based vs. Legislation-based. Their implications for college language teaching and learning are worth our attention.

  9. Language, Culture and Cognition: A Collection of Studies in First and Second Language Acquisition. Multilingual Matters 69.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malave, Lilliam M., Ed.; Duquette, Georges, Ed.

    Papers on language processing, culture, and language learning and teaching include: "A Theory of Intelligence as Semiosis: With a Couple of Comments on Interlanguage Development" (John W. Oller, Jr.); "Along the Way: Interlanguage Systems in Second Language Acquisition" (Larry Selinker); "Strategy and Tactics in Second Language Acquisition"…

  10. Affirming Students' Right to Their Own Language: Bridging Language Policies and Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jerrie Cobb, Ed.; Straker, Dolores Y., Ed.; Katz, Laurie, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    How can teachers make sound pedagogical decisions and advocate for educational policies that best serve the needs of students in today's diverse classrooms? What is the pedagogical value of providing culturally and linguistically diverse students greater access to their own language and cultural orientations? This landmark volume responds to the…

  11. Affirming Students' Right to Their Own Language: Bridging Language Policies and Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jerrie Cobb, Ed.; Straker, Dolores Y., Ed.; Katz, Laurie, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    How can teachers make sound pedagogical decisions and advocate for educational policies that best serve the needs of students in today's diverse classrooms? What is the pedagogical value of providing culturally and linguistically diverse students greater access to their own language and cultural orientations? This landmark volume responds to the…

  12. Academic Language, English Language Learners, and Systemic Functional Linguistics: Connecting Theory and Practice in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Teacher educators need linguistic tools to help preservice teachers develop a deeper understanding of the academic language demands of the literacy practices required by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Systemic functional linguistics (SFL) serves as a tool for developing teachers' knowledge of content-area language. Teachers' increased…

  13. Language and Power: Korean-Chinese Students' Language Attitude and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.

    2009-01-01

    Language is not only a method of communication, but also a mechanism of power. The ethnographic research reported in this article documents how a group of Korean students, who are participating in a bilingual Korean school in Northeast China, construct their language attitude and practice. Research findings indicate that the Korean students value…

  14. East meets West: The influence of language and culture in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyshewsky, Richard

    1996-01-01

    The marketing of education in South East Asia has become big business for Australian Universities. Physiotherapy programs are not exempt from this marketing push, with increases in foreign student enrollment becoming commonplace. This raises numerous opportunities and dilemmas for those involved in physiotherapy clinical education. This action research project investigated the influence of language and culture on clinical education practices. Nine South East Asian undergraduate physiotherapy students and 11 clinical instructors were involved in this qualitative research project. A variety of issues were identified which have important ramifications for academics and clinical instructors. Cultural membership, issues of authority and respect, and language proficiency were identified as having a direct influence on the clinical education process. Strategies for dealing with these cross cultural teaching and learning challenges are discussed.

  15. French, English or Kanak Languages? Can Traditional Languages and Cultures Be Sustained in New Caledonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Bissoonauth

    2017-10-01

    Preliminary results from the study show a difference in the language habits between older and younger generations on New Caledonians of Melanesian descent. Although French is perceived as the lingua franca by all, English is more valued than ancestral Melanesian languages by the younger generations. In terms of cultural representations and links with family history, there seems to be a discrepancy between the younger and the older generations. Whilst the older generations perceive the Centre Culturel Tjibaou as a traditional space for Melanesian art and culture their younger counterparts on the contrary view it as a place associated with contemporary art and music performances.

  16. Different Features between English and Chinese Language and Translation Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗胜华

    2014-01-01

    The different nature of the two languages-English and Chinese which directly affects the factual Chinese-to-English translation, leads to their basic characteristics by sending messages and exchanging information in the two languages. Most domes-tic scholars generally revolve around research on the discussion of“xinghe”and“yihe”which is indeed important research theme. In this article, the author focuses on the five characteristics under the study atmosphere, guiding students especially non-English majors to understand and grasp the differences between English and Chinese, and helping students acquire the basic lan-guage and culture for the translation competence development.

  17. Variations in Beliefs and Practices: Teaching English in Cross-Cultural Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing

    2010-01-01

    This article examines variations in beliefs and practices between British English language teaching (ELT) specialists and their Chinese colleagues in a cross-cultural educational development project which used interviews and a questionnaire survey to gather the perceptions and retrospective experiences of Chinese tertiary teachers and expatriate…

  18. World Language Students' Ethnographic Investigations of Culture through Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry G.; Tuttle, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    World language teachers can transform how their students learn culture through the use of mobile devices. When world language students use their mobile devices to access authentic current culture, they go from being passive receivers of culture to active cultural investigators. These students go from learning thin surface culture to exploring…

  19. Is it culture or is it language? Examination of language effects in cross-cultural research on categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li-Jun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Nisbett, Richard E

    2004-07-01

    Differences in reasoning styles between Chinese and European Americans held even when controlling for the language of testing. Bilingual Chinese organized objects in a more relational and less categorical way than European Americans, whether tested in English or in Chinese. Thus, culture affects categorization independent of the testing language. Nevertheless, language affected some Chinese bilinguals' categorization. The responses of Chinese from the Mainland and Taiwan were more relational when tested in Chinese than when tested in English. Responses of Chinese from Hong Kong and Singapore were equally relational when tested in Chinese and in English. Age and context of learning English are discussed to explain the differential language effects among different Chinese groups. Theoretical and methodological implications are discussed.

  20. Foreign Language and Culture: Some Background and Some Ideas on Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorito, Concetta

    2000-01-01

    Educators should combine foreign language study with discovery of another culture. Several postsecondary institutions are adopting Language Across the Curriculum, which allows students to apply their second-language knowledge in various courses or integrate other disciplines into language courses. James Hammers' culture/geography pedagogy is…

  1. Cultural and language skills as resources for boundary spanning within the MNC

    OpenAIRE

    Wilhelm Barner-Rasmussen; Mats Ehrnrooth; Alexei Koveshnikov; Kristiina Mä;kelä

    2014-01-01

    We examine the role of cultural and language skills as resources for individuals’ boundary spanning ability in multinational corporations. Our combined qualitative and quantitative analysis shows that cultural and language skills influence the extent to which individual boundary spanners perform four functions: exchanging, linking, facilitating, and intervening. Boundary spanners with both cultural and language skills perform more functions than those with only cultural skills, and language s...

  2. Beliefs and Practices about Writing in a Foreign Language among Economists Working in Two Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Margrethe; Shaw, Philip

    fields of economics and business studies by means of a questionnaire, and then interviewed a proportion of the respondents to get a richer sense of their practices, the intertextuality that lies behind them, the factors that lead to differential language choice and success, and the academics´ attitude...... or publishability. Simultaneously language-policy scholars have problematised the predominance of English in many academic fields. There is of course a great deal of individual variation in terms of language choice and publication success. We investigated the writing practices of some 75 Danish academics in various...

  3. The Interesting Teaching and Learning of Malay Language to Foreign Speakers: Language through Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazlina Baharudin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The interesting teaching and learning of Malay languages is a challenging effort and need a relevant plan to the students’ needs especially for the foreign students who already have the basic Indonesian Malay language variation that they have learned for four semesters in their own country, Germany. Therefore, the variety of teaching and learning strategies should be considered by the teachers to make teaching and learning become interesting, effective and not boring. Basic effectiveness of a language program was the factors of socio-culture, the style of teaching and learning, the students, and the characteristics of the program. This paper however focused on the socio-cultural factors (learning of cultures and the activities program that enable to generate excitement and effectiveness in the teaching and learning of Malay language as a foreign language. In the teaching and learning process found that the more we gave the activities to the students, the more the students acquired the meaning of the lessons. In this study, the selected respondents were the two groups of students from TWG, Konstanz, Germany who have followed the Malay Language and Culture Program in the Languages, Literacies and Translation Center, University of Sains Malaysia, Penang, in 2011. The first group was started in March to June, and the second group in September to November. The research was based on formal and informal observations and interviews. This paper also discussed about the outdoor activities program used as curriculum in the teaching and learning process that gives an interesting environment to foreign students

  4. Relationship between Attitude toward Target Language Culture Instruction and Pragmatic Comprehension Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieyan, Vahid; Majid, Norazman Bin Abdul; Eng, Lin Siew

    2013-01-01

    Familiarity with the cultural features of the target language society and interest in learning those cultural features are the key factors to determine language learners' level of pragmatic comprehension. To investigate this issue, this study attempted to assess the relationship between attitude toward incorporating target language culture into…

  5. Cultural Effects on Language in Use——A Comparison between Chinese and English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张珍珍

    2008-01-01

    Language is the presentation of culture,and culture is expressed through the actual use of language."This paper analyses the differences between Chinese and English language from a pragmatic perspective resulted from the cultural differences between China and the Western countries.

  6. Dermatoses due to Indian cultural practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. 'Henna' use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. 'Kumkum' application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker 'bindis' and 'alta' induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with 'Holi' colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. 'Mudichood' represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device "kangri" is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause.

  7. Dermatoses Due to Indian Cultural Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ‘Henna’ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ‘Kumkum’ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ‘bindis’ and ‘alta’ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with ‘Holi’ colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. ‘Mudichood’ represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device “kangri” is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause. PMID:25657390

  8. Dermatoses due to indian cultural practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide prevalence of socio-religious and cultural practices in the Asian subcontinent often leads to multitude of skin diseases which may be missed by the dermatologists because of a lack of awareness. ′Henna′ use causes IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and contact dermatitis. ′Kumkum′ application can result in pigmented contact dermatitis and lichen planus pigmentosus. Sticker ′bindis′ and ′alta′ induce contact leukoderma. Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis occurs after playing with ′Holi′ colors. Threading and drawstring dermatitis lead to koebnerization of pre-existing dermatoses, infections and even squamous cell carcinoma of skin. Mild irritant reactions and contact sensitization occur secondary to balm and hair oil use. ′Mudichood′ represents the comedogenic effect of hair oils combined with occlusion and humidity. Aromatherapy oils can cause contact dermatitis and photosensitive reactions. Heavy metal and steroid toxicity along with severe cutaneous adverse effects like erythroderma can occur as a consequent to the use of alternative medicines. Squamous cell carcinoma due to chronic heat exposure from the heating device "kangri" is seen in Kashmiris. Prayer nodules in Muslims and traction alopecia in Sikhs illustrate how religious practices can negatively affect the skin. With increasing globalization and migration, the practice of indigenous customs and traditions is no longer limited to regional territories, making it imperative for the dermatologists to be acquainted with the cutaneous side effects they can cause.

  9. A systematic scoping review of speech and language therapists' public health practice for early language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clare; Williams, Emma; Bryan, Karen

    2017-07-01

    There have been calls for speech and language therapists (SLTs) to work within a public-health framework to support language development. Innovative practice is reported, but the range of services remains unknown. Furthermore, the potential impact of public health practice in speech and language therapy on early child development is also currently unknown. A new method in SLT research, systematic scoping reviews enable greater breadth of focus than traditional systematic reviews when identifying innovative practice. To report scope and critically appraise evidence of family-focused health-promotion practice for early language development in this area. Using the Cochrane Public Health Group scoping review framework, data from reports of health-promotion practice with families of children aged 0-3 years were extracted and critically appraised on service delivery, information, reach and evaluation. Group-based service delivery was the most popular form of service delivery. There were limited reports on the information given in services and on their reach. Questionnaires were the most popular reported evaluation method. Quality of evaluations was poor due to lack of replicability and experimental control in the studies reported. This method of systematic review has highlighted the scope of health-promotion practice in speech and language therapy and also demonstrated the lack of evidence for its effectiveness on child language development. It is argued that systematic scoping reviews are valuable for scoping innovative practice in areas where either there is a lack of robust evidence or there is a high level of heterogeneity in practice or evaluation. To support clinician appraisal of available evidence, recommendations are given for development of questionnaire appraisal and for categorization of evidence levels on summary databases. © 2016 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  10. English language teaching: linguistic and cultural imperialism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Duncan Hunter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho examina a posição do Inglês como língua internacional em termos de forças políticas e econômicas que contribuíram para a posição dominante do inglês na arena mundial. O trabalho examina a acusação de que o ensino de inglês como segunda língua ou língua estrangeira contribui para o imperialismo lingüístico e cultural e desafia o pressuposto de que os falantes nativos de inglês são necessariamente os melhores professores. Recomenda- se aos profissionais de língua inglesa a adoção de uma filosofia de relativismo pragmático na sua avaliação das necessidades do aprendiz de forma a evitar tendências etnocêntricas em seus currículos.

  11. Principles and Practices for Teaching English as an International Language

    CERN Document Server

    Alsagoff, Lubna; Hu, Guangwei; Renandya, Willy A

    2012-01-01

    What general principles should inform a socioculturally sensitive pedagogy for teaching English as an International Language and what practices would be consistent with these principles? This text explores the pedagogical implications of the continuing spread of English and its role as an international language, highlighting the importance of socially sensitive pedagogy in contexts outside inner circle English-speaking countries. It provides comprehensive coverage of topics traditionally included in second language methodology courses (such as the teaching of oral skills and grammar), as well

  12. Reconnecting Proficiency, Literacy, and Culture: From Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warford, Mark K.; White, William L.

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to capably communicate across languages? This article introduces two theoretical models and a lesson plan format designed to facilitate the integration of proficiency, literacy, and culture teaching in foreign language teaching. The Second Symbolic Competencies Model configures proficiency and literacy as subordinate clusters of…

  13. The Cultural Politics of Language in Sudan: Against the Racialising Logic of Language Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhay, Ashraf; Eljak, Nada; Mugaddam, AbdelRahim; Makoni, Sinfree

    2017-01-01

    The sociolinguistic repertoires of individuals in Sudan are products of institutionalised orders of normalisation. The visibility of language in popular and official discourses in Sudan is always linked with wider cultural and political projects. This paper intends to engage with and explicate this observation by, first, examining how the dominant…

  14. Educating globally conscious speech-language pathologists for collaborative professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeilly, Lemmietta G

    2014-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practicing in the US are facing significant changes in reimbursement, billing and practice in both health care and educational settings. Health care professionals need to convey and demonstrate the value of their services, measure functional patient outcomes and assess patient satisfaction. Documentation procedures for patient and student progress are changing, becoming more abbreviated and electronic. The content of curricula in accredited graduate programs and professional development programs for maintenance of certification for SLPs will need modifications to address the myriad of changes in clinical practice. University programs that design interprofessional education opportunities for students in speech-language pathology programs and educate students in other health professional programs, e.g. physical therapy, occupational therapy, nursing and pharmacy, will help practitioners who are prepared to engage in collaborative practice with other health care professionals in hospitals, schools and community-based environments. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is actively engaged in several initiatives to facilitate interprofessional education for graduate students, faculties and practicing professionals. Individuals and families with communication disorders in the US represent an array of cultures, and SLPs need to be prepared to work effectively with individuals from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Principles and Practices of Teaching English as an International Language. New Perspectives on Language and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Aya, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book critically examines current ELT practices vis-a-vis the use of English as an international lingua franca. It bridges the gap between theoretical discussion and the practical concerns of teaching English as an international language (EIL), and presents diverse approaches for preparing competent users of English in international contexts.…

  16. Ethnic Identity and Culture in Foreign Language Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khudgir Agha, Taha Hammad Ameen

    in Sulaymaniyah university (Kurdistan Region-Northern Iraq) and Arabic students in AL-Mustansiriya university (Baghdad city) on their motivation to learn English as a foreign language in Iraq; secondly to determine their motivational orientation (instrumental and/or integrative orientation); and finally to get......) to learn English in the Iraqi context. Participants´ attitudes towards learning English as a foreign language and the way they conceive of themselves and their obligations as learners of English emerged as the strongest contributors to their reported learning efforts. Both quantitative and qualitative data...... and culture) play a significant role in determining and changing the students’ perception and beliefs towards learning a foreign language. As a consequence, in further studies it is recommended that local contextual factors are being taken into consideration already at the outset of the study....

  17. Language Education Policy and Practice in East and Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Andy; Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    East and Southeast Asia represents a linguistically and culturally diverse region. For example, more than 700 languages are spoken in Indonesia alone. It is against this backdrop of diversity that the ten countries that comprise Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) have recently signed the ASEAN Charter which, while calling for respect…

  18. From Cultural Knowledge to Intercultural Communicative Competence: Changing Perspectives on the Role of Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to the concept of culture and teaching cultural competence in a foreign language classroom have been changing over the last decades. The paper summarises, compares, contrasts and evaluates four major approaches to teaching cultural competence in foreign language teaching, that is, knowledge-based approach, contrastive approach,…

  19. From Cultural Knowledge to Intercultural Communicative Competence: Changing Perspectives on the Role of Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to the concept of culture and teaching cultural competence in a foreign language classroom have been changing over the last decades. The paper summarises, compares, contrasts and evaluates four major approaches to teaching cultural competence in foreign language teaching, that is, knowledge-based approach, contrastive approach,…

  20. A practical approach to language complexity: a Wikipedia case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasseri, Taha; Kornai, András; Kertész, János

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present statistical analysis of English texts from Wikipedia. We try to address the issue of language complexity empirically by comparing the simple English Wikipedia (Simple) to comparable samples of the main English Wikipedia (Main). Simple is supposed to use a more simplified language with a limited vocabulary, and editors are explicitly requested to follow this guideline, yet in practice the vocabulary richness of both samples are at the same level. Detailed analysis of longer units (n-grams of words and part of speech tags) shows that the language of Simple is less complex than that of Main primarily due to the use of shorter sentences, as opposed to drastically simplified syntax or vocabulary. Comparing the two language varieties by the Gunning readability index supports this conclusion. We also report on the topical dependence of language complexity, that is, that the language is more advanced in conceptual articles compared to person-based (biographical) and object-based articles. Finally, we investigate the relation between conflict and language complexity by analyzing the content of the talk pages associated to controversial and peacefully developing articles, concluding that controversy has the effect of reducing language complexity.

  1. Survey of the Culture Influence on Second Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫剑英

    2012-01-01

    Since the reform and the open policy in China, English teaching has become more and more important. Even in primary schools, we have opened English courses. The modem foreign language teaching emphasizes the development of student's cross-cultural social intercourse ability. For English teaching, it involves the history, geography of English nation, local customs, traditional custom, life style, literature art, religious philosophy and concept of value etc. Each aspect has very abundant of the contents

  2. Language Features and Culture Features on Short Message

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone is regarded as“the fifth media”after newspaper,radio,TV and the Internet.The mobile phone short message further highlights the importance of written signs in communication.“The thumb revolution”is eagerly anticipating one kind of trend by the hand replace of mouth,sound substitute for the quiet around us. My paper will analyze the language features and the culture features of mobile phone short messages which are written in Chinese and English.

  3. The psychiatric cultural formulation: translating medical anthropology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews proposed revisions to the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation for clinical practice. The author begins by exploring the theoretical development of and assumptions involved in the Cultural Formulation. A case presentation is then used to demonstrate shortcomings in the current implementation of the Cultural Formulation based on older definitions of culture. Finally, the author recommends practical questions based on the growing anthropological literature concerning the interpersonal elements of culture and the social course of illness. A simple clear format that clinically translates social science concepts has the potential to increase use of the Cultural Formulation by all psychiatrists, not just those specializing in cultural psychiatry.

  4. Promoting Science Among English Language Learners: Professional Development for Today's Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Cory; Lee, Okhee; Santau, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    We describe a model professional development intervention currently being implemented to support 3rd- through 5th-grade teachers’ science instruction in 9 urban elementary schools with high numbers of English language learners. The intervention consists of curriculum materials for students and teachers, as well as teacher workshops throughout the school year. The curriculum materials and workshops are designed to complement and reinforce each other in improving teachers’ knowledge, beliefs, and practices in science instruction and English language development for ELL students. In addition to these primary goals, secondary goals of the intervention included supporting mathematical understanding, improving scientific reasoning, capitalizing on students’ home language and culture, and preparing students for high-stakes science testing and accountability through hands-on, inquiry-based learning experiences.

  5. Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Marie Paz E.

    2015-01-01

    The study critically explored how culture and language sensitive curriculum materials in physics improve Pangasinan learners' attitude towards science. Their cultural dimensions, epistemological beliefs, and views on integration of culture and language in the teaching and learning process determined their cultural preference or profile. Design and…

  6. Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Marie Paz E.

    2015-01-01

    The study critically explored how culture and language sensitive curriculum materials in physics improve Pangasinan learners' attitude towards science. Their cultural dimensions, epistemological beliefs, and views on integration of culture and language in the teaching and learning process determined their cultural preference or profile. Design and…

  7. The Influence of Culture Difference in English Teaching Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨娜

    2012-01-01

    Because of different geographical environment, historical story, and psychic conditions, there exists distinct culture differences between china and western countries among varified nations. Therefore, we acknowledge that concrete understanding of the culture difference mkes the very basis of the acquisition of English language for students, and thus they are likely to have an enhancement in interpersonal ability.

  8. Cultural Shifts: Putting Critical Information Literacy into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses the example of foreign languages to explore the integration of critical information literacy into the curriculum of various disciplines. By closely examining the practices and values inherent in the foreign language information environment, the paper suggests that a critical vision of information literacy provides the most…

  9. A practical approach to language complexity: a Wikipedia case study

    CERN Document Server

    Yasseri, Taha; Kertész, János

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present statistical analysis of English texts from Wikipedia (WP). We try to address the issue of language complexity empirically by comparing samples of the main English WP (Main) and the simple English WP (Simple). Simple is supposed to use a more simplified language with a limited vocabulary, and editors are explicitly requested to follow this guideline, yet in practice the vocabulary richness of both samples are at the same level. However, detailed analysis of longer units (n-grams rather than words alone) shows that the language of Simple is indeed less complex than that of Main. Comparing the two language varieties by the Gunning readability index supports this conclusion. We also report on the topical dependence of language complexity, e.g. that the language is more advanced in conceptual articles compared to person-based (biographical) and object-based articles. Finally, we investigate the relation between conflict and language complexity by analysing the content of the talk pages ass...

  10. Socio-Cultural Factors in Second Language Learning: A Case Study of Adventurous Adult Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozfidan, Burhan; Machtmes, Krisanna L.; Demir, Husamettin

    2014-01-01

    Sociocultural theories consider language learning as a social practice examines students as active participants in the construction of learning processes. This study investigates sociocultural theories' central concepts, which includes peer interaction and feedback, private speech, and self-efficacy. The present study is a case study of twenty…

  11. English Language Teaching Curriculum in Iran: Planning and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atai, Mahmood Reza; Mazlum, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates English language teaching (ELT) curriculum planning in Iran's Ministry of Education and its implementation by teachers. We studied programme evaluation; needs analysis; the ELT-specific documents; communication channels between planning and practice levels; teacher evaluation and student assessment;…

  12. English Language Learners: Effective Teaching Strategies, Practices for FCS Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Barbara N.; Rehm, Marsha L.

    2011-01-01

    English language learners represent the fastest growing segment of the U.S. school-age population, raising the question of how best to teach this new and challenging group of students. The research and scholarly literature has identified a number of instructional strategies and classroom practices that have been shown to be effective in teaching…

  13. Learners' Attitudes toward Foreign Language Practice on Social Network Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, Jhonny; Romero, Asier

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to study learners' attitudes towards practicing English Language on Social Networks Sites (SNS). The sample involved 110 students from the University Laica Eloy Alfaro de Manabi in Ecuador, and the University of the Basque Country in Spain. The instrument applied was a Likert scale questionnaire designed Ad hoc by the researchers,…

  14. English Language Learners: Effective Teaching Strategies, Practices for FCS Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Barbara N.; Rehm, Marsha L.

    2011-01-01

    English language learners represent the fastest growing segment of the U.S. school-age population, raising the question of how best to teach this new and challenging group of students. The research and scholarly literature has identified a number of instructional strategies and classroom practices that have been shown to be effective in teaching…

  15. Improving Clinical Practices for Children with Language and Learning Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This lead article of the Clinical Forum addresses some of the gaps that exist between clinical practice and current knowledge about instructional factors that influence learning and language development. Method: Topics reviewed and discussed include principles of learning, generalization, treatment intensity, processing interventions,…

  16. English Language Teaching Curriculum in Iran: Planning and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atai, Mahmood Reza; Mazlum, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates English language teaching (ELT) curriculum planning in Iran's Ministry of Education and its implementation by teachers. We studied programme evaluation; needs analysis; the ELT-specific documents; communication channels between planning and practice levels; teacher evaluation and student assessment; interpretation…

  17. Beliefs and Practices about Writing in a Foreign Language among Economists Working in Two Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Margrethe; Shaw, Philip

    or publishability. Simultaneously language-policy scholars have problematised the predominance of English in many academic fields. There is of course a great deal of individual variation in terms of language choice and publication success. We investigated the writing practices of some 75 Danish academics in various...... fields of economics and business studies by means of a questionnaire, and then interviewed a proportion of the respondents to get a richer sense of their practices, the intertextuality that lies behind them, the factors that lead to differential language choice and success, and the academics´ attitude...... to the predominance of English. We identified : a wide range of attitudes to the difficulty of writing in L2; practices associated with successful writing; fields in which international publication was more or less important; and a general reliance on implicit knowledge and intuitive learning, in contrast...

  18. Language Teacher Education in Finland and the Cultural Dimension of Foreign Language Teaching--A Student Teacher Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzen-Ostermark, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The increasing importance attributed to the cultural dimension of foreign language (FL) education has entailed new demands for teachers and teacher educators. This paper explores the cultural agenda in Finnish language teacher education from a student teacher perspective. The focus is on the students' perceptions regarding how effectively cultural…

  19. Arab American High School Teachers' Perceptions of Developing Cultural Awareness of First-Level Arabic Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada-Hammami, Nabila

    2012-01-01

    National standards for learning foreign languages describe five area goals which are intertwined and interconnected in the K-12 learning environment; yet, absent from the literature are investigations on how K-12 teachers are able to implement and incorporate the "practices, products, and perspectives" of culture into world language…

  20. Research Report: A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Practical Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jane R.

    1987-01-01

    Questions the extent to which practical intelligence can be measured in a reliable and valid fashion cross-culturally. Differentiates between the internal validity of our measure of practical intelligence and its external validity. (LHW)

  1. Impact on quality culture of total quality management practices factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faihan Mosaad Saud Alotaibi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated total quality management practices and quality culture of Saudi Arabian contractors. Improving the quality can be achieved through implementation of total quality management although studies and researches work regarding this improvement is still lacking. A quantitative approach using the survey method was employed. With assistance from the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs, survey questionnaires were distributed to selected contractors in Saudi Arabia. The collected data were analysed using correlation, and multiple regression analyses. The key findings were the confirmation of significant relationships between all total quality management practices and quality culture and a positive relationship between quality management practices and quality culture. Furthermore, total quality management practices were found to be able to explain 68.1% of the variance in quality culture, while quality culture explained 12.5% of the variance in competitiveness. Quality culture was found to only partially mediate the relationship between total quality management practices and competitiveness.

  2. Language and Cross-Culture Understanding—Through Cross-Culture Study of the Word'Dragon'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玲

    2016-01-01

    This essay contributes to the analysis of the significance of cross-culture understanding in connection with language. It is important and necessary to promote cross-cultural understanding in order to communicate with people from various cultural backgrounds with the development of globalization. This essay also gives the example of the word'dragon'to illustrate that the cross-culture understanding of language will make us communicate with each other more effectively.

  3. Investigating Heritage Language and Culture Links: An Indo-Canadian Hindu Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nootan; Trofimovich, Pavel; Gatbonton, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Although it is commonly believed that language and culture are inexorably linked, the precise nature of this relationship remains elusive. This study investigated the hypothesis that a loss in language signals a loss in culture if language is considered a central value. This hypothesis was investigated by rating the Hindi and English proficiency…

  4. 125 The Fading Phase of Igbo Language and Culture: Path to its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    the Igbo language and culture which critics and observers have warned are ... enchantment with foreign cultures. The paper then ... As a result language learning in children is a process of ... enjoy the competence of adult speakers and are still being transmitted ... endangerment, two factors to assess language attitudes and.

  5. Cultural accommodation and language priming : Competitive versus cooperative behavior in a prisoner's dilemma game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, D.H.M.; Harzing, A.W.; van Witteloostuijn, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores three arguments. First, cultural accommodation by living in another culture for a while may have a long-lasting but partially dormant influence on behavior. Second, foreign language is a prime, activating behavior associated with this language. Third, a foreign language is expect

  6. Teaching speech and language therapists in Sri Lanka: issues in curriculum, culture and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenden, Mary; Hartley, Sally; Kariyakaranawa, Sunil; Kodikara, Somadasa

    2003-01-01

    This paper draws on the experiences of the authors in designing and teaching a new course to educate speech and language therapists in Sri Lanka. This was the first speech and language therapist course in the country and was the result of collaboration between two universities, one in the UK and one in Sri Lanka. Rather than replicating established programmes elsewhere it was more appropriate to design a new course, suited to providing a comprehensive model of service, encompassing both social and medical approaches to rehabilitation. Issues about developing teaching and learning approaches to match pre-existing knowledge and experience of both staff and students are addressed. The particular ways of designing the programme to take account of cultural and language aspects of the Sri Lankan context are discussed.

  7. Exchange students crossing language boundaries in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, K

    2011-12-01

    This article examines challenges and learning outcomes for nursing students from a Central European university of applied sciences who completed 3 months of clinical practice in Norway. The clinical practice was supervised in English by Norwegian nurses and nursing teachers. English is not the primary language in any of the countries. Increases in global migration have contributed to the need for an international dimension in nursing education. Personal mobility is a crucial part of the European Union's goal of becoming a knowledge society. Clinically based experiences pose challenges that are additional to and often more complex than traditional course-based experiences. Students who come from a non-English-speaking country for clinical practice in Norway face challenges regarding language. Accepting incoming students is a way of achieving higher quality and more relevant education in nursing. The study shows that clinical practice in a foreign country gives added value compared with clinical practice at home. Greater self-confidence and understanding of core concepts in nursing is described by the participants. Language differences are not regarded as a problem but as a way of developing personal and professional competence. The ability to compare healthcare systems in the two counties is important in developing competencies in nursing. © 2011 The Author. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Research into practice: planning intercultural moments in the additional language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeová Araújo Rosa Filho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With the socio-cultural turn in Applied Linguistics, the last few decades have seen a growing interest in the intercultural dimension of language pedagogy exemplified on seminal writings, such as Kramsch (1993, 1998, Byran (1997, and lately Liddicoat and Scarino (2013. Due to that, a vast range of research has been theorizing on how language and culture should be dealt in the classroom. However, despite the relevant theoretical framework developed so far, the influence these studies have had on teaching practices is still debatable (Baker, 2015, p. 130. Bearing that in mind, a research group – REAL-LCI – was created with the aim to promote empirical research about the relationship between language and culture on English teaching practices from different educational contexts in Brazil. This article aims mainly at discussing how interculturality can be constructed through planned activities in the classroom. In order to do so, we will briefly discuss some concepts related to interculturality, review some contributions from empirical research conducted by the research group, and propose some methodological movements for the design and implementation of intercultural activities. Finally, the windows of a real classroom will be opened to show how the insights and possibilities presented here can actually be enacted.

  9. The regional component of university courses of “Russian language and culture of speech” at the national branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhmutova A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the formation of linguistic, communicative and cultural competence among students bilinguals in teaching Russian language and speech culture. The authors put forward the thesis that the training of specialists in the conditions of bilingualism re quires not only a higher level of learning a second language, but also a qualitatively different level of comprehension. It is proved that the discipline “Russian and the culture of speech” assumes formation of communicative and culturological competence of the higher education institutions, which are trained on two-profile offices taking into account a regional component. Relevance of research in this area is increasing each year since the treatment of the person as the center of all systems of cognition highlights in the pedagogical University the formation of the modern language personality, capable of effective professional activity. The functional approach provides detection of features of functioning of language units in different spheres of public work. The communicative principle means that acquisition of Russian as a means of communication happens in the course of speech practice most approached to process of communication in Russian. The detection of similarity and distinctions between languages, interlingual comparison promotes establishment and a lexical interference. The linguistic-cultural principle provides understanding of language as the phenomena of culture and is connected with ability to define national-cultural components of linguistic units - words, phraseological combinations, grammatical categories of the text. Involvement of regional component as a basis in practice of teaching Russian and culture of speech increases efficiency of all process of training of students of national branch.

  10. Ethnic Identity and Culture in Foreign Language Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khudgir Agha, Taha Hammad Ameen

    ) to learn English in the Iraqi context. Participants´ attitudes towards learning English as a foreign language and the way they conceive of themselves and their obligations as learners of English emerged as the strongest contributors to their reported learning efforts. Both quantitative and qualitative data...... (e.g. ethnic identity and culture plus the present political situation in Iraq). Different groups of students will be compared. Thus, this study has three primary aims: firstly to analyze the influence of a set of demographic factors (year of study, field of study and gender) of the Kurdish students...... in Sulaymaniyah university (Kurdistan Region-Northern Iraq) and Arabic students in AL-Mustansiriya university (Baghdad city) on their motivation to learn English as a foreign language in Iraq; secondly to determine their motivational orientation (instrumental and/or integrative orientation); and finally to get...

  11. Differences between Chinese and American Language Cultures from the Aspect of Food Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐桂真

    2012-01-01

    IntroductionFood culture is the sum of human dietary behavior,conception,technology and its products.It shows human natural choiceand dietary way of life that is suited to special geographical environment and humane environment through common practice.Cultural differences between

  12. Gender in identification practices of mass culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Sinkevych

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of the images of masculinity and femininity in popular culture depends on shared cultural paradigm. However, these images not only reflect, but also construct social and cultural reality. Gender representation in popular culture activates the process of selecting, structuring and formation of values of a stereotype, its communicative refinement, giving it new meaning. It promotes innovative images, which play the role of landmarks gender identity.

  13. The role of metrology in mediating and mobilizing the language and culture of scientific facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, W. P., Jr.; Stenner, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    The self-conscious awareness of language and its use is arguably nowhere more intense than in metrology. The careful and deliberate coordination and alignment of shared metrological frames of reference for theory, experiment, and practical application have been characteristics of scientific culture at least since the origins of the SI units in revolutionary France. Though close attention has been focused on the logical and analytical aspects of language use in science, little concern has been shown for understanding how the social and historical aspects of everyday language may have foreshadowed and influenced the development and character of metrological language, especially relative to the inevitably partial knowledge possessed by any given stakeholder participating in the scientific enterprise. Insight in this regard may be helpful in discerning how and if an analogous role for metrology might be created in psychology and the social sciences. It may be that the success of psychology as a science will depend less on taking physics as the relevant model than on attending to the interplay of concepts, models, and social organization that make any culture effective.

  14. English Language Teaching in Indonesia: A Continuous Challenge in Education and Cultural Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcellino

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The linguistic situations and conditions in Indonesia are quite complex by their own natures as more than seven hundred vernaculars with their various dialects from a great number of ethnic groups have been used as media of communication in the country. Accordingly, the success of English teaching in Indonesia cannot be freed from the students’ cultural backgrounds, values, customs, and beliefs as well as the political standpoint of the government regarding this foreign language. English language teaching has then undergone more than four changes in its curriculum since the country’s independence and brought no significant impact upon the learning outcomes. This study reveals the substantial unconstructive influence of the students’ cultures and the non-conducive language environment affecting their language acquisition. Other aspects related to the teachers’ performance and class preparations equally contribute to the ineffective classroom interactions. This study offers some practical suggestions to cope with those problems.

  15. A Discussion-Based Online Approach to Fostering Deep Cultural Inquiry in an Introductory Language Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett-Rucks, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Fostering and assessing language learners' cultural understanding is a daunting task, particularly at the early stages of language learning with target language instruction. The purpose of this study was to explore the development of beginning French language learners' intercultural understanding in a computer-mediated environment where…

  16. Language-Games: Practice of Rule Following and Philosophical Reflexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorij Gutner

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problem of rule following which is a traditional problem of the philosophy of language. Language communication is represented as a rule submitted activity. Two strategies of rule following are described. One of them is considered as habitual. It is strictly correlated with a system of social institutions and practices. The concept of habitus, developed by P. Bourdieu, is used for fuller investigation of this strategy. The other strategy is based on reflection. Reflective act implies alternative rules of communicative action and is correlated with responsible choice. 

  17. Cultural Connections in Leadership Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmoyer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    "Culture Currents" presents the books, essays, poetry, performances, music, websites and other cultural media influencing educational leaders. "Culture Currents" is a snapshot, a peek behind the scenes. It reveals what people are reading or seeing that may not be normally mentioned or cited in their academic work. In this issue's contribution, two…

  18. Cultural safety and its importance for Australian midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiri, Jasten; Dietsch, Elaine; Bonner, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Cultural safety is an important concept in health care that originated in Aotearoa (New Zealand) to address Maori consumer dissatisfaction with health care. In Australia and internationally, midwives are now expected to provide culturally safe midwifery care to all women. Historically, Australia has received large numbers of immigrants from the United Kingdom, European countries and the Middle East. There have also been refugees and immigrants from South-East Asia, and most recently, from Africa. Australia continues to become more culturally diverse and yet to date no studies have explored the application of cultural safety in Australian midwifery practice. This paper explores how cultural safety has evolved from cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity. It examines the importance of cultural safety in nursing and midwifery practice. Finally, it explores the literature to determine how midwives can apply the concept of cultural safety to ensure safe and woman centred care.

  19. Adopting a Cultural Portfolio Project in Teaching German as a Foreign Language: Language Teacher Cognition as a Dynamic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feryok, Anne; Oranje, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Intercultural language teaching and learning has increasingly been adopted in state school systems, yet studies have shown that language teachers struggle to include it in their practice. The aim of this study is to use dynamic systems theory to examine how a German as a foreign language teacher in a New Zealand secondary school adopted a project…

  20. Adopting a Cultural Portfolio Project in Teaching German as a Foreign Language: Language Teacher Cognition as a Dynamic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feryok, Anne; Oranje, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Intercultural language teaching and learning has increasingly been adopted in state school systems, yet studies have shown that language teachers struggle to include it in their practice. The aim of this study is to use dynamic systems theory to examine how a German as a foreign language teacher in a New Zealand secondary school adopted a project…

  1. Teacher change in beliefs and practices in science and literacy instruction with English language learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee

    2004-01-01

    This study examined patterns of change in beliefs and practices as elementary teachers learned to establish instructional congruence, a process of mediating academic disciplines with linguistic and cultural experiences of diverse student groups. The study focused on six bilingual Hispanic teachers working with fourth-grade, mostly Hispanic students. The results indicated that teacher learning and change occurred in different ways in the areas of science instruction, students' language and culture, English language and literacy instruction, and integration of these areas in establishing instructional congruence. The results also indicated that establishing instructional congruence was a gradual and demanding process requiring teacher reflection and insight, formal training, and extensive support and sharing. Implications for further research in promoting achievement for all students are discussed.

  2. The Role of Cultural Competence in the Teaching of Hungarian as a Foreign Language and in Cultural Diplomacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Sólyom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, I aim to shed light on the importance of cultural competence from three perspectives. First, in my capacity as a sociolinguist, I will talk about how Hungarian culture is incorporated in the textbook "Colloquial Hungarian" (Rounds and Sólyom 2011, providing particular examples from various dialogues and cultural notes from the book. I believe that linguistic competence, communicative competence, and cultural competence are equally important parts of foreign language teaching and foreign language learning. Second, as a foreign language instructor at U.S. study abroad programs, I plan to discuss the importance of cultural norms of the speakers of the local language in the host country. Third, as a director of an American cultural and resource center in Budapest, I will talk about the importance of building bridges between two cultures, describing the goals and missions of the center as well as giving specific examples of the activities of the American Corner Budapest.

  3. Mapping practice onto theory: the speech and language practitioner's construction of receptive language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, J; Campbell, C; Roulstone, S; Adams, C; Boyle, J

    2008-01-01

    Receptive language impairment (RLI) is one of the most significant indicators of negative sequelae for children with speech and language disorders. Despite this, relatively little is known about the most effective treatments for these children in the primary school period. To explore the relationship between the reported practice of speech and language practitioners and the underlying rationales for the therapy that they provide. A phenomenological approach was adopted, drawing on the experiences of speech and language practitioners. Practitioners completed a questionnaire relating to their practice for a single child with receptive language impairment within the 5-11 age range, providing details and rationales for three recent therapy activities. The responses of 56 participants were coded. All the children described experienced marked receptive language impairments, in the main associated with expressive language difficulties and/or social communication problems. The relative homogeneity of the presenting symptoms in terms of test performance was not reflected in the highly differentiated descriptions of intervention. One of the key determinants of how therapists described their practice was the child's age. As the child develops the therapists appeared to shift from a 'skills acquisition' orientation to a 'meta-cognitive' orientation, that is they move away from teaching specific linguistic behaviours towards teaching children strategies for thinking and using their language. A third of rationales refer to explicit theories but only half of these refer to the work of specific authors. Many of these were theories of practice rather than theories of deficit, and of those that do cite specific theories, no less than 29 different authors were cited many of whom might best be described as translators of existing theories rather than generators of novel theories. While theories of the deficit dominate the literature they appear to play a relatively small part in the

  4. Soil residual nitrogen under various crop rotations and cultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop rotation and cultural practice may influence soil residual N available for environmental loss due to crop N uptake and N immobilization. We evaluated the effects of stacked vs. alternate-year crop rotations and cultural practices on soil residual N (NH4-N and NO3-N contents) at the 0-125 cm dep...

  5. Culturally competent social work research: methodological considerations for research with language minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Banghwa Lee; Negi, Nalini Junko; Hong, Michin

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing number of language minorities, foreign-born individuals with limited English proficiency, this population has been largely left out of social work research, often due to methodological challenges involved in conducting research with this population. Whereas the professional standard calls for cultural competence, a discussion of how to implement strategies for culturally competent research with language minorities is regrettably limited in the social work literature. This article is, to the authors' knowledge, one of the first within the field of social work to tie together unique methodological issues that may arise throughout the research conceptualization, development, and implementation process with this population. Strategies for how to overcome such issues are provided by adapting and expanding on a conceptual framework by Meleis. The incorporation of such research practices with language minorities has the potential to enhance trust and, thus, improve the recruitment and retention of this hard-to-reach population. More important, studies that aim to include such culturally responsive criteria may produce results that have improved validity and, thus, contribute to the advancement of knowledge regarding this population.

  6. An Initial Framework for the Language of Higher-Order Thinking Mathematics Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Megan E.; Truxaw, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an examination of the language demands of cognitively demanding tasks and proposes an initial framework for the language demands of higher-order mathematics thinking practices. We articulate four categories for this framework: "language of generalisation," "language of comparison," "language of proportional reasoning," and…

  7. Communication and cognition: the social beyond language, interaction and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascareño, Aldo

    2008-06-01

    Cognition theories describe the social with terms like language, interaction or culture, whose theoretical status has also been discussed in modern sociology. These concepts are not well-positioned to understand the emergence and autonomy of social orders. Sociological theory of self-referential systems can be useful to reconstruct the bottom-up process which contributes to the emergence of the social as communication as well as to describe the way in which society exerts downward causation upon cognitive phenomena. The core of this theory is the systemic category of meaning as a shared horizon for psychic and social systems.

  8. Assortative mating for cultural identification as indicated by language use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, C T; Johnson, R C; Danko, G P

    1990-01-01

    Persons of Japanese ancestry from Hawaii who marry within their own racial/ethnic group show a significant degree of homogamous assortative mating for "pidgin" and for standard English usage, variables reflective of important cultural differences in Hawaii. Persons of Japanese ancestry who married persons of other racial/ethnic groups had less exposure to pidgin in their parental homes and were less likely to speak this dialect of English. Sibling-spouse analyses suggested that assortment for such language use is entirely due to social homogamy rather than active phenotypic assortment.

  9. English Language Assessment in Malaysia: Teachers’ Practices in Test Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubakeavathi Rethinasamy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of English language teaching, many studies that claimed to investigate teachers’ assessment practices were actually exploring their perceptions and belief with little reference to what they were practising in schools. The need to address such a limitation has prompted this study to examine the current formal assessment practices of English language teachers in lower secondary schools. Specifically, this paper reports how the teachers prepare the formal assessments. Extensive structured interviews were conducted with 72 teachers from 24 schools in Kuching division, Sarawak. Relevant documents such as test papers and assessment guidelines were also collected for further analysis. The findings from this study revealed that a majority of the teachers conducted formal assessments mainly due to the requirements of the school and ministry while following pre-determined steps in preparing a test. Furthermore, the findings also revealed teachers’ reliance on commercial reference books in constructing exam questions and sample answers. The outcome of the study provides an insight on the nature of English language teachers’ assessment practices in relation to the classroom teaching and learning at the secondary level.This could help inform the Ministry of Education in providing necessary support for the teachers particularly assessment practices in ESL context as well as in formulating a better assessment policy for schools.

  10. Enhancing Reflective Practice in Multicultural Counseling through Cultural Auditing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra; Arthur, Nancy; Wong-Wylie, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Counselors work in an increasingly complex cultural milieu where every encounter with a client must be considered multicultural in nature. Reflective practice is a central component of professional competence and necessarily involves attention to culture. The cultural auditing model provides an effective and flexible reflective process for…

  11. Educating Emergent Bilinguals: Policies, Programs, and Practices for English Language Learners. Language & Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ofelia; Kleifgen, Jo Anne

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive and insightful book shows how present educational policies and practices to educate language minority students in the United States ignore an essential characteristic--their emergent bilingualism. In one accessible guide, the authors compile the most up-to-date research findings to demonstrate how ignoring children's…

  12. Quantitative and qualitative research across cultures and languages: cultural metrics and their application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Hansen, Karolina; Kronberger, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    Growing globalisation of the world draws attention to cultural differences between people from different countries or from different cultures within the countries. Notwithstanding the diversity of people's worldviews, current cross-cultural research still faces the challenge of how to avoid ethnocentrism; comparing Western-driven phenomena with like variables across countries without checking their conceptual equivalence clearly is highly problematic. In the present article we argue that simple comparison of measurements (in the quantitative domain) or of semantic interpretations (in the qualitative domain) across cultures easily leads to inadequate results. Questionnaire items or text produced in interviews or via open-ended questions have culturally laden meanings and cannot be mapped onto the same semantic metric. We call the culture-specific space and relationship between variables or meanings a 'cultural metric', that is a set of notions that are inter-related and that mutually specify each other's meaning. We illustrate the problems and their possible solutions with examples from quantitative and qualitative research. The suggested methods allow to respect the semantic space of notions in cultures and language groups and the resulting similarities or differences between cultures can be better understood and interpreted.

  13. Religious culture and health promotion: care, practice, object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Timm

    2015-06-01

    s congratulatory homage to homo sapiens’s scientific progress with the invocation of an artist’s rendition of the precarious place occupied by modern medicine in the larger historical panorama, namely Gustav Klimt’s now lost depiction of the ancient goddess Hygieia flanked by the allegorical figures of Sickness and Death. The intuitive artist interpretation not only reinstates the reality to which the medical sciences are called to perform their duties, namely finitude and suffering, but also places the two distinct -- regrettably still irreconcilable – origins of modern medicine side by side: Greco-Roman rationality and scriptural-sacramental culture rooted in the Christian notion of caritas, which organized the procedural space of the modern hospital and the modern orphanage, the two key historical developments that gave birth to contemporary health welfare and health promotion systems. The traditions of votive practice, especially the sacred rite of delivering an ex-voto as payment for healing and fulfillment of a promise contracted and carried out in the “metaphysical” realm of language and representational media, are not so much prototypical ideas or proto-phenomena of welfare and promotion, but of the linguistic performative act of ontologization supporting the existence, of what was termed Fuersorge(6 (German for welfare, but also care as in Arendt’s caritas, and the organization of the future. Promotional activity falls under the paradigm of Fuersorge as main ontological principle structuring the social reality of the welfare system of values and of scientific thought, but Fuersorge was irreducible to political principle and state governance(6. In this oeuvre, it is a much richer term referring to the cultural-poetic birth of the future(6. Likewise, the reality of Catholic language, practice, and artifacts, though it gave birth to the scientific-technological complex of modern industry, medicine, and state-juridical bureaucracies, differs from the rational

  14. Cultural Collision: The Interference of First Language Cultural Identity on Pragmatic Competence of the Target Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Fen Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    This reflective study explores a different perspective of intercultural communicative competency (ICC) by focusing on the speech acts that nonnative speakers of Spanish from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds find difficult to perform competently in various contexts in Colombia. This article covers a qualitative case study using…

  15. Effects of Teaching Literature on Culture Learning in the Language Classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chittra Muthusamy; Rasaya Marimuthu; Elangkeeran Sabapathy

    2011-01-01

    .... It is argued that the interface of language, literature and culture are at the forefront of present-day language and literature learning and this facilitates inter-racial, intra-racial and global understanding. Approach...

  16. Cultural evolution: implications for understanding the human language faculty and its evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenny; Kirby, Simon

    2008-11-12

    Human language is unique among the communication systems of the natural world: it is socially learned and, as a consequence of its recursively compositional structure, offers open-ended communicative potential. The structure of this communication system can be explained as a consequence of the evolution of the human biological capacity for language or the cultural evolution of language itself. We argue, supported by a formal model, that an explanatory account that involves some role for cultural evolution has profound implications for our understanding of the biological evolution of the language faculty: under a number of reasonable scenarios, cultural evolution can shield the language faculty from selection, such that strongly constraining language-specific learning biases are unlikely to evolve. We therefore argue that language is best seen as a consequence of cultural evolution in populations with a weak and/or domain-general language faculty.

  17. The Effect of Cultural Background Knowledge on Learning English Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ibrahim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the effect of cultural background knowledge on learning English Language. It also aims to investigate if there are significant differences between subjects' performance in reading comprehension according to sex and general ability in English (GAE. The study aims at answering the following questions: 1 . To what extent is the effect of cultural background knowledge on subjects' performance in reading comprehension? 2 . What is the difference in performance in reading comprehension between male and female subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge? 3. What is the differenc e between subjects' performance in reading comprehension texts which are loaded with American culture and their general ability in English. ? The population of th is study consisted of all first - year students majoring in English at Hebron University in th e first semester of the academic year 2011/2012. They were 600. The sample of the study consisted of 60 subjects, males and females divided into four groups, two experimental and two controlled. The researcher followed the experimental method. Means, stand ard deviations and Pearson Product Moment Correlation were calculated by using SPSS program. The study revealed the following results: 1. There are statistically significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between subjects who have cu ltural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge . 2 . There are no statistically significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between male and female subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge. 3. Subjects' GAE revealed that there are significant differences in performance in reading comprehension between subjects who have cultural background knowledge and those who do not have any knowledge. In the light of the results of th e study, the researcher recommends the

  18. The Treatment of Culture in the Foreign Language Curriculum: An Analysis of National Curriculum Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrenteva, Evgenia; Orland-Barak, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Teaching culture in the foreign language classroom has been widely debated ever since its importance was recognized. Current research suggests that centralized "top down" curricular policies can become potential constraints to teaching culture and points to the need for adapting curricula for culture-integrated language learning. This…

  19. Integrating Culture into the Russian Language Curriculum at Argonne Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teper, Mila

    2010-01-01

    One cannot teach language without teaching culture; culture is the context for language learning. Cultural instruction must be integrated into all lessons throughout the year, not just taught as mini-lessons in order. Teachers cannot expect their students to gain intercultural competencies through activities that are not embedded in cultural…

  20. The Treatment of Culture in the Foreign Language Curriculum: An Analysis of National Curriculum Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrenteva, Evgenia; Orland-Barak, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Teaching culture in the foreign language classroom has been widely debated ever since its importance was recognized. Current research suggests that centralized "top down" curricular policies can become potential constraints to teaching culture and points to the need for adapting curricula for culture-integrated language learning. This…

  1. What pediatricians should know about normal language development: ensuring cultural differences are not diagnosed as disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Amy L; Van Haren, Melissa S

    2003-07-01

    The roles and responsibilities of speech-language pathologists and pediatricians have become greater with the changing population demographics in the United States. In some states, the majority of the population belongs to a national cultural minority, eg, New Mexico. Even a state such as Iowa, with only a 5% nonmajority population, has a school-aged population that is almost 10% nonmajority. This growth of diversity is likely to continue. Rather than viewing sensitivity to the influence of culture on language learning and other developmental areas as an "add-on" to a practice, it may be wiser to recognize that approaching all clients with as few assumptions about their behaviors as possible will guarantee nonbiased service delivery for all. Without nonbiased service delivery, incorrect diagnoses and provision of inappropriate therapy become more likely. Fortunately, many resources are available to assist pediatricians and speech-language pathologists in learning about various cultures. Institutional review boards have become more vigilant about the inclusion of a cross-section of subject populations as participants in research studies in addition to protecting the rights of all participants. Funding agencies also have expressed as a priority the inclusion of research subjects from minority populations to add to the information available about the incidence and prevalence of disorders across the range of our potential patients. In a society in which cultural differences are not just defined by race or ethnicity, but by gender, sexual orientation, age, geographic region, and religion, belief systems about disease, disability, and treatment are dynamic entities for health professionals to take into consideration. It is a challenge that speech-language pathologists and pediatricians must meet if they are to provide the best and most appropriate services for their patients.

  2. Detection of Blood Culture Bacterial Contamination using Natural Language Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Michael E.; FitzHenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J.; Brown, Steven H.; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Dittus, Robert S.; Elkin, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%. PMID:20351890

  3. Detection of blood culture bacterial contamination using natural language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Michael E; Fitzhenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J; Brown, Steven H; Fielstein, Elliot M; Dittus, Robert S; Elkin, Peter L

    2009-11-14

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%.

  4. Teaching and Learning Culture in Language Class: An Integration of Business Etiquette and Spoken English Practice%论商务英语口语课堂中的语言文化融合——以商务礼仪实践教学为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶妙

    2011-01-01

    整合课程内容,在商务英语口语课堂中导入国际商务礼仪文化的教学。可以实现商务英语语言课堂中的语言文化融合,达到全面提高学生跨文化交际能力的目的。教学实践结果证明,本改革不仅是可行的,而且是有效的。%An integration of business etiquette training and spoken English practice is designed into business English speaking classroom. The objective of this integration is to explore effective method to teach culture in language classroom and business classroom to improve students' intercultural communicative competence. It was proved that the integration is quite effective.

  5. KYOTO: A Wiki for Establishing Semantic Interoperability for Knowledge Sharing Across Languages and Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Andrea; Ronzano, Francesco; Tesconi, Maurizio; Vossen, Piek; Agirre, Eneko; Bond, Francis; Bosma, Wauter; Herold, Axel; Hicks, Amanda; Hsieh, Shu-Kai; Isahara, Hitoshi; Huang, Chu-Ren; Kanzaki, Kyoko; Rigau, German; Segers, Roxane

    2010-01-01

    KYOTO is an Asian-European project developing a community platform for modeling knowledge and finding facts across languages and cultures. The platform operates as a Wiki system that multilingual and multi-cultural communities can use to agree on the meaning of terms in specific domains. The Wiki is fed with terms that are automatically extracted from documents in different languages. The users can modify these terms and relate them across languages. The system generates complex, language-neu...

  6. Technology uses in education and learning indigenous languages and cultures: the multimedia about Huastecan Nahuatl

    OpenAIRE

    Van´t Hooft, Anuschka; Manuel F. AGUILAR TAMAYO

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a Multimedia on Huastecan Nahuatl Language and Culture, a didactic resource developed originally for a course on Huastecan Nahuatl language and culture. It provides a description and explanation of the multimedia, as well as a series of reflections on the role of the new technologies in the learning process at a graduate level, particularly regarding indigenous languages as a second language. It also discusses the theoretical perspectives that guided the design of the mul...

  7. Scientific psychology within the Chinese language and cultural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Heyong

    2006-01-01

    The Scientific Psychology that was founded by Wilhelm Wundt appeared in China in the late nineteenth century. The scholars translated the name of psychology into Chinese as Xin-Li-Xue, for which the meaning of the words looks like "heartology," i.e., "the study of the heart." In Chinese, the same core structure related to "heart" (Xin) is found in most of the terms of psychology, such as emotion, thinking, will, forgetting, and memory. By translating Xin as "heart" instead of "mind," we maintain an embodied approach to understanding the "principles of the heart." Through a historical approach to the influence of Western psychology, a cultural analysis of the meaning of the term psychology in Chinese, and a focus on the meeting of Eastern and Western psychology, we can witness the significance of psychology in the Chinese language and cultural context. I will use three parts to present psychology in the Chinese cultural context: the origins of Chinese psychology, from a historical approach; the meaning of "psychology" in Chinese, using a cultural analysis; and the meeting of Eastern and Western psychology, focusing on the development and future.

  8. Community health center provider and staff's Spanish language ability and cultural awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Arshiya A; Benitez, Amanda; Locklin, Cara A; Campbell, Amanda; Schaefer, Cynthia T; Heuer, Loretta J; Lee, Sang Mee; Solomon, Marla C; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L; Chin, Marshall H

    2014-05-01

    Many community health center providers and staff care for Latinos with diabetes, but their Spanish language ability and awareness of Latino culture are unknown. We surveyed 512 Midwestern health center providers and staff who managed Latino patients with diabetes. Few respondents had high Spanish language (13%) or cultural awareness scores (22%). Of respondents who self-reported 76-100% of their patients were Latino, 48% had moderate/low Spanish language and 49% had moderate/low cultural competency scores. Among these respondents, 3% lacked access to interpreters and 27% had neither received cultural competency training nor had access to training. Among all respondents, Spanish skills and Latino cultural awareness were low. Respondents who saw a significant number of Latinos had good access to interpretation services but not cultural competency training. Improved Spanish-language skills and increased access to cultural competency training and Latino cultural knowledge are needed to provide linguistically and culturally tailored care to Latino patients.

  9. Speech-language pathology practices with Indigenous Australians with acquired communication disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Deborah; Armstrong, Elizabeth; Panak, Vanessa; Coombes, Jacqui

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about the needs of Indigenous Australian adults with acquired communication disorders (ACD) following stroke or brain injury and how these needs are met by speech-language pathology (SLP) services. In order for the profession to respond to the challenges of providing culturally appropriate, well-tailored and accessible services, more information on current practice and SLPs' concerns and attitudes is required. This paper reports on a national survey with completed responses from 112 SLPs, who worked with adult neurological populations, about their levels of contact with Indigenous clients, cultural competency training and potential sources of support. RESULT. Of the total respondents, 63 SLPs reported clinical contact with Indigenous clients and :they also answered questions on their assessment, intervention and discharge practices; liaison with family; and involvement with Aboriginal Health Professionals and interpreters. This group reported insufficient knowledge about Indigenous culture, lack of support and lower levels of confidence overall in working with these clients as compared to non-Indigenous clients. They wanted more flexible services for their Indigenous clients, good access to interpreters and culturally appropriate assessments and treatments delivered in culturally appropriate settings. This research provides a useful starting point towards understanding SLPs' perspectives and practice at a national level.

  10. Cultural Factors in High School Student Motivation to Study Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nunn

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning less commonly taught languages (LCTLs such as Japanese can be challenging for American students. Due to the difficulty of learning LCTLs, more effort is required of the learners to become proficient as compared to European languages. Motivation contributes to the learners’ academic success. In the socio-cultural perspective, the learners’ cultural background mediates their cognitive process. This study examines the motivational differences and similarities among two culturally diverse groups of high school learners of Japanese: Asians excluding Japanese-Americans and non-Asians. One hundred forty two students completed a survey. Factor analysis yielded six factors: integrative motivation, instrumental motivation, intrinsic motivation (doing activities for enjoyment, self-efficacy (a belief in one’s ability to succeed, goal specificity, and goal strategy. The motivational differences were confirmed in intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy. Implications of these findings for LCTL teachers suggest practical steps that can be taken on motivational factors that influence students from different cultural backgrounds.

  11. A language based on analogy to communicate cultural concepts in SETI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Paolo

    2011-02-01

    The present paper is a synthesis of three presentation given by myself at the Toulouse IAC 2001 ( Analogy as a tool to communicate abstract concepts in SETI), the Bremen IAC 2003 ( From maths to culture: towards an effective message), and the Vancouver IAC 2004 ( Philosophical and religious implications of extraterrestrial intelligent life). Its aim is to find a way to make our cultural concepts understandable to hypothetical extraterrestrials (ETs) in a SETI communication. First of all, I expose the reasons why I think that analogy could be a good tool for this purpose. Then, I try to show that this is possible only in the context of an integrated language, using both abstract symbols and pictures, also sketching two practical examples about some basic concepts of our moral and religious tradition. Further studies are required to determine whether this method could be extended to the higher-level abstract concepts in the other fields of our culture. Finally, I discuss the possible role of mathematics, logic and natural science in the construction of an analogy-based language for interstellar messages with a cultural content and a possible way of managing this matter from a social point of view.

  12. Machinima Filmmaking as Culture in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    The topic of game and player culture is addressed herein as individual and socio-cultural processes of authorship in relation to machinima filmmaking. The terms machinima (from machine, cinema and anime) and machinimators (referring to filmmakers) were coined by gamers in the late 1990s. Machinima...

  13. A Language Exchange Program: Sustainability Innovation in Language and Culture Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinidad Fernández

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Spanish Educational Laws over the past years have been promoting the widespread use of English as the vehicle for teaching and learning in most curricular subjects. This trend is evincing new needs especially among higher education students. Consequently, Spanish Universities are looking for ways to provide international training involving global partnerships. The Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain (UPM, and the University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Canada (UBCO have come together to offer opportunities for international collaboration and learning, thus facilitating virtual encounters among Spanish and Canadian students. The Language Exchange Program between the UPM and UBCO acts as a model for sustainability innovation in language and culture engagement as the students can interact with native speakers in communication tasks. This interdisciplinary initiative supports the latest methodological principles observed in the Common European Framework for Languages [1], such as autonomous and life-long learning, self-assessment and peer-assessment as well as the incorporation of new technologies to the learning process. Additionally the 'virtual' mobility is provided at no extra cost. This article presents the preliminary results of two virtual exchange programs that have been offering varied forms of study which are venue-independent, promoting collaborative work and cultural exchange.

  14. Practical Life: The Keystone of Life, Culture, and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Uma Ramani's characterization of practical life is philosophical and anthropological, suggesting that "human history is the story of the evolution of our practical life activities." Practical life is a collaborative activity that creates community and culture. One's adaptation to life through the daily work of ordering our environment…

  15. Preparing Science Teachers for Culturally Diverse Students: Developing Cultural Literacy Through Cultural Immersion, Cultural Translators and Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Pauline W. U.

    2006-09-01

    This three year study of P-12 professional development is grounded in sociocultural theories that hold that building knowledge and relationships among individuals from different cultural backgrounds entails joint activity toward common goals and cultural dialogues mediated by cultural translators. Sixty P-12 pre and in-service teachers in a year long interdisciplinary science curriculum course shared the goal of developing culturally relevant, standards-based science curricula for Native Hawai'ian students. Teachers and Native Hawai'ian instructors lived and worked together during a five day culture-science immersion in rural school and community sites and met several times at school, university, and community sites to build knowledge and share programs. Teachers were deeply moved by immersion experiences, learned to connect cultural understandings, e.g., a Hawai'ian sense of place and curriculum development, and highly valued collaborating with peers on curriculum development and implementation. The study finds that long term professional development providing situated learning through cultural immersion, cultural translators, and interdisciplinary instruction supports the establishment of communities of practice in which participants develop the cross-cultural knowledge and literacy needed for the development of locally relevant, place and standards-based curricula and pedagogy.

  16. Spanish language content on reproductive endocrinology and infertility practice websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londra, Laura C; Tobler, Kyle J; Omurtag, Kenan R; Donohue, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the use of Spanish language translation on the websites of reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) practices in the context of evidence of underuse of infertility services by minority populations. Cross-sectional survey of websites from REI practices. Not applicable. None. None. Assessment of the relationship between having a Spanish-translated website and REI practice characteristics. Variables included concurrent use of social media, size of the practice, Spanish-speaking practitioner in the practice, being a private or a university-based practice, being in a mandated insurance state, and being in an area with different levels of percentage of Hispanic population, adjusted for annual income levels of the population. Of the 376 REI practice websites analyzed, 101 (27%) offered at least some information in Spanish. We identified 97 Spanish-speaking practitioners at 71 REI practices. Having a Spanish-translated website was significantly associated with the practice's use of social media, having an international/out-of-town web page, and having a Spanish-speaking physician in the practice. The size of the practice, as measured in number of cycles reported per year, was not associated with having a translated website. In practices located in the top 60 metropolitan areas by Hispanic population, the odds of having a Spanish-translated website were only related to the percentage of Hispanic population after adjusting for state-mandated insurance and average annual income level of the Hispanic population. Sixty-six of the websites with Spanish-translated content had been automatically translated. An additional eight websites were partially translated automatically. REI practices in metropolitan areas with a higher percentage of Hispanics were more likely to reach out to this minority population by translating their website content into Spanish. These practices were also more likely to use social media. Future studies are needed to determine whether

  17. Culture and Language as Factors Related in the Process of Learning and Education

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Papa

    2015-01-01

    Communicative language teaching has become a familiar part of the landscape of language teaching in the last three or four decades. Teachers who perceive the objectives of teaching foreign languages associated with learning intercultural competence will be more inclined to make the process of teaching foreign languages more intercultural than teachers who perceive objectives as related to the acquisition of communicative competence. In this paper the relationship between culture and language ...

  18. Living the border: Social and cultural practices from the sidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Winikor Wagner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Migrants, while in a position of subordination and vulnerability in the host society, can be defined as subjects of analysis of cultural studies. It is from this theoretical framework, which will investigate the social and cultural practices of Brazilian migrants settled in the northeast of the province of Misiones, Argentina. We focus our attention on analyzing whether these practices are truly ways to resist the dominant culture or simply constitute forms of reproduction and naturalization of them. Through four concrete practices (portuñol, el brique, the buying and selling of improvements and spontaneous occupation of private land will reach the conclusion that the same evidence loans, grants, amalgams, conflicts, subordination and yet interstices creativity with the dominant culture. It shows the relational character that owns the popular culture with the dominant culture and its position of subordination and domination.

  19. "We Communicated That Way for a Reason": Language Practices and Language Ideologies among Hearing Adults Whose Parents Are Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizer, Ginger; Walters, Keith; Meier, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Families with deaf parents and hearing children are often bilingual and bimodal, with both a spoken language and a signed one in regular use among family members. When interviewed, 13 American hearing adults with deaf parents reported widely varying language practices, sign language abilities, and social affiliations with Deaf and Hearing…

  20. Redrawing the Boundaries on Theory, Research, and Practice Concerning Language Teachers' Philosophies and Language Teacher Cognition: Toward a Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Graham V.

    2015-01-01

    Two areas of investigation and professional practice--language teachers' philosophies and language teacher cognition--can be considered as related, perhaps overlapping, insofar as they are both the result of thought. The concept of a philosophy of teaching may hold together sets of language teacher cognitions, or guide specific investigations of…

  1. Redrawing the Boundaries on Theory, Research, and Practice Concerning Language Teachers' Philosophies and Language Teacher Cognition: Toward a Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Graham V.

    2015-01-01

    Two areas of investigation and professional practice--language teachers' philosophies and language teacher cognition--can be considered as related, perhaps overlapping, insofar as they are both the result of thought. The concept of a philosophy of teaching may hold together sets of language teacher cognitions, or guide specific investigations of…

  2. Perceptions about Representative English-Language Accents from Prospective and Practicing Providers of Business-Related Language Services in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James Calvert; Green, Diana J.; Rosewarne, David D.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of the study were (a) to identify perceptions about representative English-language accents from prospective and practicing providers of business-related language services residing in Argentina and (b) to examine the differences in their perceptions of these English-language accents. The respondents ranked the accents in this order:…

  3. Do Instructors’ Perceptions on Teaching Culture in Foreign Language Classroom Make a Difference: Lessons from a Qualitative Study of Language Instructors and Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xinxiao; Chen, Dianbing

    2016-01-01

    The Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century (1996; 2006) listed culture as one of five goals of learning a foreign language. However, the perceptions of foreign language instructors towards the teaching of culture and their effects on students’ foreign language learning remain unclear. This study involved six instructors from five different foreign language programs and four undergraduate students who are enrolled in the current language programs. Documents, classroom obse...

  4. "A Tale of Two Programs": Interrogating "Open(closed)ness" and "Cultural Diversity" through Critical Observations of Two Japanese University English Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Japan is known to be a country that manicures its socio-cultural borders. In this article I will examine discourses regarding openness, closedness and cultural diversity in relation to policies and practices that draw heavily on mythologies of English language as an inroad to greater openness and diversity. To do this I will examine two English…

  5. "A Tale of Two Programs": Interrogating "Open(closed)ness" and "Cultural Diversity" through Critical Observations of Two Japanese University English Language Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Japan is known to be a country that manicures its socio-cultural borders. In this article I will examine discourses regarding openness, closedness and cultural diversity in relation to policies and practices that draw heavily on mythologies of English language as an inroad to greater openness and diversity. To do this I will examine two English…

  6. Cultural Competence in Child Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Michael S.; Henderson, Schuyler W.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. faces a changing demographic landscape that is increasingly multiracial. The application of a cultural competence model for assessing and treating the psychiatric disorders of minority youths in light of this demographic change is discussed.

  7. MORALITY IN CULTURAL ELEMENTS IN FAIRYTALE AND ITS IMPLICATION IN LEARNING FRENCH AS FOREIGN LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninuk Lustyantie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The culture of a society is closely related to the language used by the speakers. Moreover, there are opinions saying that in a language there will be patterns of behavior, materials, ideas (beliefs and knowledge, and sentiments (attitudes and norms of a society that are formed and exposed. This fact is in accordance with the opinion that a language is more than just a communion; it is the relation between individual and sociocultural values. Among all characteristics of culture, language is the most prominent distinguishing feature, since each social group feel themselves as a different entity from other groups. For certain social groups, language is used as the social identity/symbol. Close relation between language and culture is reflected in words used by the society. A concept or way of life in a society can be supported by words and language. Someone’s language behavior generally follows the culture of a society where he/she lives, including how the cultural elements appear in the equipment of human life, livelihood, social system, language (and literature system either written or oral, various of arts, knowledge system, and religious system. Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis states that there is a close relation between the language used by people and how they understand the world and behave in it. Based on 17th Century French fairytales, this article will review the moral values contained in the cultural elements and the implications in learning French as a foreign language.

  8. How to Cultivate the Student's Cultural Awareness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    tian xiu ying

    2008-01-01

    Language and culture are inseparable and cultural awareness must be integrated with language teaching. How to cultivate the learners' cultural awareness is an important issue that we have to carry out in teaching practice in China.

  9. Cultural Competence in the Treatment of Addictions: Theory, Practice and Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsbury, Sally M

    2017-07-01

    Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) populations often have high rates of addictive disorders, but lower rates of treatment seeking and completion than the mainstream population. A significant barrier to treatment is the lack of culturally relevant and appropriate treatment. A literature review was conducted to identify relevant literature related to cultural competence in mental health services delivery and specifically treatment for addictive disorders. Several theoretical models of cultural competence in therapy have been developed, but the lack of rigorous research limits the empirical evidence available. Research indicates that culturally competent treatment practices including providing therapy and materials in the client's language, knowledge, understanding and appreciation for cultural perspectives and nuances, involving the wider family and community and training therapists can enhance client engagement, retention and treatment outcomes for substance use and gambling. Further methodologically rigorous research is needed to isolate the impact of cultural competence for the treatment of addictions and guide research to determine treatment efficacy within specific CALD populations. Training therapists and recruiting therapists and researchers from CALD communities is important to ensure an ongoing focus and improved outcomes for CALD populations due to the importance of engaging these populations with addiction treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Key Practitioner Message: The treatment needs of culturally diverse individuals with addictions are often not met. Theoretical models can guide therapists in incorporating cultural competence. Culturally targeted treatments increase recruitment, retention and treatment outcomes. Cultural competence includes matching clinicians and clients on linguistic and cultural backgrounds as well as being mindful of the impact of culture on client's experience of addiction problems. Few methodologically

  10. Micro Language Planning and Cultural Renaissance in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Modupe M.

    2016-01-01

    Many African countries exhibit complex patterns of language use because of linguistic pluralism. The situation is often compounded by the presence of at least one foreign language that is either the official or second language. The language situation in Botswana depicts this complex pattern. Out of the 26 languages spoken in the country, including…

  11. Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Initial Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Beth; Kear, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety culture has been studied in many practice settings, but there is a dearth of information on the culture of safety in nephrology nurse practice settings. This research study employed the use of an online survey to assess patient safety cultures in nephrology nurse practice settings. The survey was created using items from two Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) survey assessment tools--the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Select items from these tools were combined to address the safety of care delivered in hospital and outpatient nephrology nurse practice settings. Almost 1,000 nephrology nurses responded to the survey. Analysis of results and comparison with AHRQ comparative data found high ratings for teamwork, but indicted a continued needfor additional education and attention related to hand hygiene, medication administration safety, communication, and prioritization in nephrology practice settings. Nurses in all nephrology nurse practice settings need to routinely assess and positively contribute to the culture of patient safety in their practice settings, and lead and engage in efforts to ensure that patients are safe.

  12. Pharmacy students' perceptions of cultural competence encounters during practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Loren-Ashley; Vellurattil, Rosalyn Padiyara; Quiñones-Boex, Ana

    2014-03-12

    To determine pharmacy students' perceptions regarding cultural competence training, cross-cultural experiences during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), and perceived comfort levels with various cultural encounters. Fourth-year pharmacy (P4) students were asked to complete a questionnaire at the end of their fourth APPE. Fifty-two of 124 respondents (31.9%) reported having 1 or more cultural competence events during their APPEs, the most common of which was caring for a patient with limited English proficiency. Students reported high levels of comfort with specific types of cultural encounters (disabilities, sexuality, financial barriers, mental health), but reported to be less comfortable in other situations.

  13. The impact of workplace factors on evidence-based speech-language pathology practice for children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Gladys; Trembath, David; Arciuli, Joanne; Togher, Leanne

    2013-08-01

    Although researchers have examined barriers to implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) at the level of the individual, little is known about the effects workplaces have on speech-language pathologists' implementation of EBP. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of workplace factors on the use of EBP amongst speech-language pathologists who work with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This study sought to (a) explore views about EBP amongst speech-language pathologists who work with children with ASD, (b) identify workplace factors which, in the participants' opinions, acted as barriers or enablers to their provision of evidence-based speech-language pathology services, and (c) examine whether or not speech-language pathologists' responses to workplace factors differed based on the type of workplace or their years of experience. A total of 105 speech-language pathologists from across Australia completed an anonymous online questionnaire. The results indicate that, although the majority of speech-language pathologists agreed that EBP is necessary, they experienced barriers to their implementation of EBP including workplace culture and support, lack of time, cost of EBP, and the availability and accessibility of EBP resources. The barriers reported by speech-language pathologists were similar, regardless of their workplace (private practice vs organization) and years of experience.

  14. Culture, cognition and language in the constitution of reading and writing practices in an adult literacy classroom Cultura, cognição e linguagem na constituição de práticas de leitura e escrita de adultos em processo de alfabetização

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Cardoso Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyze a discursive interaction between a researcher and an Youth and Adult Education student intending to show the meanings and uses of reading and writing taken by him. We take as our basis for discussion the theoretical-methodological contributions from Historical-Cultural Psychology and Paulo Freire's theories, which are combined with Bakhtin's concept of dialogue. This procedure allowed us, on one hand, getting into the other's perspective and, on the other hand, to make relations between cognition, language and culture to understand the adult students' metacognitive strategies, in the appropriation process of literacy practices of school culture. Thus, we could discuss the intimate relationship between doing and knowing and the importance of school in the transition from concrete thinking to the abstract thinking and vice-versa.Neste artigo analisamos uma interação discursiva entre uma pesquisadora e um estudante da Educação de Jovens e Adultos objetivando mostrar sentidos e usos da leitura e da escrita por ele mobilizados. Tomamos como base para nossa discussão os aportes teórico-metodológicos da Psicologia Histórico-Cultural e das teorizações de Paulo Freire, que conjugamos com a concepção de diálogo de Bakhtin. Tal procedimento nos possibilitou, por um lado, entrar na perspectiva do outro, e por outro, fazer relações entre cognição, linguagem e cultura para compreendermos as estratégias metacognitivas de alunos da EJA ao se apropriarem da cultura escolar. Pudemos também evidenciar a íntima relação entre fazer e saber e a importância da escola na transição do pensamento concreto para o abstrato e vice-versa.

  15. The Impact of Language and Culture Diversity in Occupational Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus-Rivas, Mayra; Conlon, Helen Acree; Burns, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing plays a critical part in improving the safety of foreign labor workers. The development and implementation of safety training programs do not always regularly take into account language barriers, low literacy levels, or cultural elements. This oversight can lead to more injuries and fatalities among this group. Despite established health and safety training programs, a significant number of non-native English speakers are injured or killed in preventable, occupation-related accidents. Introducing safety programs that use alternative teaching strategies such as pictograms, illustrations, and hands-on training opportunities will assist in addressing challenges for non-English laborers. Occupational health nursing has an opportunity to provide guidance on this subject and assist businesses in creating a safer and more productive work environment.

  16. ENCYCLOPEDIC DEFINITIONS IN LANGUAGE DICTIONARIES – A TREASURY OF CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentyna Skybina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses encyclopedic module of definitions in language dictionaries as a source of historical and cultural information. The main aim of the study is to reveal and compare the encyclopedic modules of definitions in early dictionaries of Australian and Indian English. The method applied consists in the analysis of the definitions and in the review of citation. The data was selected from two dictionaries on historical principles – Austral English (Morris, 1898 and Hobson-Jobson (Yule and Burnell, 1886. The corpus consists of 320 and 292 articles respectively. The study showed that in both dictionaries encyclopedic module of the definitions overshadows the linguistic one. At the same time, specificity of the nascent varieties of English and particularities of the linguistic situation in Australia and India determined the framework of these dictionaries, mainly the criteria of the entries’ selection and, as a consequence, the lexical domains covered by encyclopedic modules of the definitions.

  17. Teaching culture in Colombia Bilingüe: From theory to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamith José Fandiño Parra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of this paper is concerned with the incorporation of culture into foreign language learning (EFL classes within the context of “Colombia Bilingüe”. More specifically, some consideration will be given to what culture is, how it can be taught and what Colombian authors have maintained in terms of its practicality and implementation. It will be suggested that teaching culture is not tantamount to promoting an English sociocultural domination or adapting ethnocentric practices, but mainly approaching and reflecting on one’s and others’ beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors, which are intertwined with language itself. Furthermore, an attempt will be made to point out both the difficulties and complexities that Colombian EFL teachers need to be able to cope with when working with culture in their classes. The main premise of the paper is that effective teaching of culture can be achieved if the Colombian EFL community strives to construct a coherent discourse that allows developing teaching models and learning experiences within the theoretical framework of the postmethod condition, world Englishes, and critical multiculturalism.

  18. A Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Vocabulary Approach for Young Latino Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Lucia I.; Crais, Elizabeth R.; Castro, Dina C.; Kainz, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the role of the language of vocabulary instruction in promoting English vocabulary in preschool Latino dual language learners (DLLs). The authors compared the effectiveness of delivering a single evidence-informed vocabulary approach using English as the language of vocabulary instruction (English culturally responsive…

  19. Special Operations Forces Language and Culture Needs Assessment: Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    understand the grammer rules of a language in order to support continued, more advanced, training.” SOF Language and Culture Needs Assessment Project...the OPI.  “If this is how they are going to test then this is how they need to teach the info”  “I don not have time to do language training as it

  20. Transformative World Language Learning: An Approach for Environmental and Cultural Sustainability and Economic and Political Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulah, Jason

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author responds to the Modern Language Association's report, "Foreign Languages and Higher Education: New Structures for a Changed World" (2007) by arguing for an explicit and interdisciplinary transformative world language learning approach toward environmental and cultural sustainability and economic and political…

  1. Reflection on Teaching Language from Analysis of Interpersonal Func-tion in Cross-cultural Conversations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-rong

    2015-01-01

    The interpersonal function in Halliday’s system-functional grammar can instruct and apply to many-sided language communication.The article is aimed at analyzing language function reflected in the conversations between international students in different cultural background and native speakers,and then getting reflections on classroom teaching language.

  2. VOICE CULTURE AND THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHER, TOWARD A GREATER ALLIANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    REICHMANN, EBERHARD

    VOICE TRAINING SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN THE PREPARATION OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS, IF THEY ARE TO ACHIEVE THE GOAL OF APPROXIMATION OF NATIVE SPEECH. SINCE A FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHER'S MOST VALUABLE TOOL IS HIS OWN VOICE, A CULTURED VOICE IS DESIRABLE, IN BOTH THE NATIVE AND THE FOREIGN LANGUAGES. ONE OF THE REASONS THAT MANY TEACHER TRAINEES DO…

  3. Adult Learners' Perceptions of the Significance of Culture in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Lewis, Kimberly Anne

    2014-01-01

    Is learning about culture important when learning a foreign language? One would think that after its long history in the field of foreign language teaching this question had been answered with a resounding "yes". However, I saw little evidence of this in the classroom when I returned to the university to learn a foreign language or when…

  4. Away with Good Bantus: De-Linking African Language Literature from Culture, "Tribe" and Propriety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhize, Nomalanga

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that the "institutionalisation" model used by universities to spearhead the intellectualisation of African languages is a non-starter for taking African languages in new creative directions. The major constraint for African language literary culture is that written output has historically been heavily bent towards…

  5. Storytelling: A Means to Revitalize a Disappearing Language and Culture in Northeast Thailand (Isan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossa, Wajuppa

    2008-01-01

    Throughout much of northeast Thailand (Isan), Lao is the dominant local language. Today, however, central and official Thai is rapidly becoming the dominant language throughout Isan. It is feared that Thailand may become monocultured and its citizens may lose their diversity in languages and culture. In this article, the author describes a…

  6. Linguistic Minorities and the Multilingual Turn: Constructing Language Ownership through Affect in Cultural Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Mireille

    2016-01-01

    The "multilingual turn" brings questions of language ownership to the forefront of debates about linguistic minority governance. Acadian minority cultural producers construct language ownership using multiple languages and targeting multilingual publics, but use ideologies of monolingualism to situate Acadian authenticity in place and…

  7. Documentation and Revitalization of the Zhuang Language and Culture of Southwestern China through Linguistic Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodomo, Adams

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines innovative strategies, methods, and techniques for the documentation and revitalization of "Zhuang" language and culture through linguistic fieldwork. Zhuang, a Tai-Kadai language spoken mainly in the rural areas of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of southwestern China, is the largest minority language in…

  8. How National Foreign Language Week Promotes Cultural Awareness at a Historically Black University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan-Cobb, Irma; Lassiter, Linda E.

    2003-01-01

    Describes how celebrating National Foreign Language Week has increased cultural awareness and appreciation among students enrolled in foreign language courses at one of the largest historically Black universities in the United States. In addition, more students have expressed an interest in pursuing minors in foreign languages. (Author/VWL)

  9. The Impact of Cultural Background on the Choice of Language Learning Strategies in the JFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Language learning strategies have been researched for more than 30 years yet there remain many unanswered questions. Some of these questions relate to the target language being studied, specifically Japanese, and the influence of learner variables on the choice of language learning strategies, specifically cultural background. This study seeks to…

  10. The Role of First Language in Linguistic and Social-cultural Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王猛; 盛芊芊

    2016-01-01

    Since last century, it has long been universally acknowledged agreed that the influence imposed by first language (L1) on the learner's development of second language (L2) learning is greatly unstable. In this paper, literature review is firstly given adequate thoughts to before the learning process is explored in the linguistic and social-cultural dimensions in terms of target language development.

  11. Student Culture and Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Tilia

    2012-01-01

    Constructivism maintains that instruction is more meaningful when it is relevant, social and interactive. Formative assessment has been empirically demonstrated as being an effective form of instruction and assessment for learners (Black & Wiliam, 1998a, 1998b). Since assessment orients instruction and learning, combining student culture with…

  12. Teaching Culture: Questioning Perspectives on Our Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Met, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Despite years of training, teaching experience, reading professional literature, attending conferences, and learning from expert colleagues, when it comes to the teaching of culture, the author wishes she knew more answers to many critical questions. Her questions are framed by the basic questions that all curricula seek to answer: WHAT is the…

  13. Critical Thinking as Cultural-Historical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panofsky, Carolyn P.

    1999-01-01

    Explores critical thinking as it has been constructed in schooling and in dominant traditions of psychological theory, presenting a dialectical view of critical thinking suggested in the social and philosophical writings of critical theorists (e.g., Theodor Adorno and Herbert Marcuse) and supported by the sociohistorical or cultural-historical…

  14. Perspectives of Early Intervention Professionals about Culturally-Appropriate Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Bennett, Tess; Fowler, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 123 early intervention professionals found they considered recommendations for providing culturally appropriate services important. However, multiple barriers often hindered implementation. Lack of time was the most common barrier to providing culturally appropriate practices, followed by lack of training and lack of materials.…

  15. Organizational Training across Cultures: Variations in Practices and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassi, Abderrahman; Storti, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a synthesis based on a review of the existing literature with respect to the variations in training practices and attitudes across national cultures. Design/methodology/approach: A content analysis technique was adopted with a comparative cross-cultural management perspective as a backdrop to…

  16. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…

  17. Individualism and the cultural roots of management practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, Andre

    2014-01-01

    We study the cultural foundations of management practices, which are increasingly recognized as important determinants of firm performance. This research closes the loop on two developing literatures, one seeking cultural explanations for economic development and the other seeking to account for dif

  18. Individualism and the cultural roots of management practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, André van

    2012-01-01

    We study the cultural foundations of management practices, which are increasingly recognized as important determinants of firm performance. This research closes the loop on two developing literatures, one seeking cultural explanations for economic development and the other seeking to account for dif

  19. Celebrating Difference: Best Practices in Culturally Responsive Teaching Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Xeturah; Hernandez, Cecilia; Parra, Julia; Negash, Beyan

    2017-01-01

    Culturally responsive teaching and design practices flip the online classroom by creating an environment that acknowledges, celebrates, and builds upon the cultural capital that learners and teachers bring to the online classroom. Challenges exist in all phases of online course design, including the ability to create online courses that reflect…

  20. The Development of Novice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patish, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    While extensive research has been conducted on classroom management little research exists on culturally responsive classroom management. The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how four novice teachers developed their culturally responsive management practice (CRCM) to better meet the needs of their students. My analysis was…