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Sample records for cultural incompatibility perspective

  1. Sociocultural Theories, Academic Achievement, and African American Adolescents in a Multicultural Context: A Review of the Cultural Incompatibility Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Noel, La

    2011-01-01

    Some theories have posited that African American youth are academic underachievers because of sociocultural factors. We label this point of view the cultural incompatibility perspective. Ogbu's oppositional culture theory and Steele's stereotype threat theory are selected as popular examples of this viewpoint. A critical review of the literature…

  2. Culture perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locsin, Rozzano C

    2002-10-01

    All cultures have had means and techniques that express their immediate aims. The thing that interests me is that today, painters do not have to go to a subject matter outside of themselves. They work from a different source. They work from within. It seems to me that the modern artist cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old form of the Renaissance or of any of the old cultures.

  3. Truth-telling in cancer: examining the cultural incompatibility argument in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Tolga

    2010-03-01

    This article aims to examine critically the 'cultural incompatibility' argument, which asserts that disclosure of cancer-related information to patients is incompatible with Turkey's cultural context. For this purpose, a brief overview of the approach to truth-telling in Turkey will first be provided, followed by the claims of two different Turkish authors on the issue and a critical analysis of their approach. It will be contended that this argument has actually been formulated with paternalistic concerns and it may be playing an important role in shaping the approach of Turkish health care professionals to the issue. The article will then examine, in the light of study findings and case reports from Turkey, the concept of patient autonomy as it applies to truth-telling issues. It will be concluded that truth-telling can be compatible with Turkey's cultural context, provided that health care professionals place more emphasis on good communication with their patients.

  4. Complement Interception Across Humoral Incompatibility in Solid Organ Transplantation: A Clinical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Nilsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The humoral barrier in transplant biology is the result of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs), directed either against human leukocyte antigens (HLA) or non-HLA antigens such as blood group (ABO) molecules. The term "sensitization" applies to patients carrying these antibodies. Transplantation is widely accepted as a life-saving opportunity for patients with terminal end-organ disease. However, in sensitized patients, transplant outcome is hampered by antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) as a consequence of DSA exposure. Furthermore, sensitized patients have limited access to "matched" organs from the both living and deceased donor pool.Considering the crucial role of the complement system in the pathophysiology of AMR and the availability of complement intervention therapeutics, there is a growing interest in complement-targeting strategies. This review highlights the emerging importance of monitoring and modulation of the complement system in the context of enabling transplantation across humoral incompatibility in sensitized recipients with preformed anti-HLA or natural anti-ABO antibodies. It also discusses the significance of the complement system in the induction of accommodation and further emphasizes current and future perspectives of novel complement therapeutics.

  5. Supervisee Incompatibility and Its Influence on Triadic Supervision: An Examination of Doctoral Student Supervisors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Serge F.; Lawson, Gerard; Rodriguez, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to explore supervisors' experiences of supervisee incompatibility in triadic supervision. In-depth interviews were completed with 9 doctoral student supervisors in a counselor education program, and a whole-text analysis generated 3 categories. Supervisee incompatibility took a wide variety of forms and negatively…

  6. Sociocultural Theories, Academic Achievement, and African American Adolescents in a Multicultural Context: A Review of the Cultural Compatibility Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Noel, La Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Several theories suggest that African American culture facilitates academic achievement, but others suggest that identifying with Black culture contributes to the achievement gap by undermining the academic performance among youth. These opposing perspectives are labeled "cultural compatibility theories" and "cultural incompatibility theories,"…

  7. ABO incompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incompatible blood. Symptoms The following are symptoms of ABO incompatible transfusion reactions: Back pain Blood in urine Chills Feeling of "impending doom" Fever Yellow skin and whites of the eyes ( jaundice ) Exams and Tests The health care provider will perform a physical ...

  8. Does Identity Incompatibility Lead to Disidentification? Internal Motivation to Be a Group Member Acts As Buffer for Sojourners from Independent Cultures, Whereas External Motivation Acts As Buffer for Sojourners from Interdependent Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matschke, Christina; Fehr, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Most individuals possess more than one relevant social identity, but these social identities can be more or less incompatible. Research has demonstrated that incompatibility between an established social identity and a potential new social identity impedes the integration into the new group. We argue that incompatibility is a strong risk factor for disidentification, i.e., a negative self-defining relation to a relevant group. The current research investigates the impact of incompatibilities on disidentification in the acculturation context. We propose that incompatibility between one’s cultural identities increases the disidentification with the receiving society. It has, however, been shown that the motivation to be a group member serves as a buffer against negative integration experiences. Moreover, research from the intercultural domain has shown that intrinsic and extrinsic motivation has specific effects for members of cultures that differ in self-construal. In a European sample of High school exchange students (Study 1, N = 378), it was found that incompatibility was positively related to disidentification, but only for less (but not more) intrinsically motivated newcomers. In an Asian sample of international university students (Study 2, N = 74), it was found that incompatibility was also positively related to disidentification, but only for less (but not more) extrinsically motivated newcomers. Thus, the findings demonstrate that the effect of incompatibility between social identities on disidentification can be buffered by motivation. The results suggest that, depending on cultural self-construal, individuals have different resources to buffer the negative effect of incompatibility on the social identity. PMID:28326055

  9. Cultured Meat in Islamic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Mohammad Naqib; Post, Mark J; Ramli, Mohd Anuar; Mustafa, Amin Rukaini

    2017-04-29

    Cultured meat is a promising product that is derived through biotechnology that partially circumvents animal physiology, thereby being potentially more sustainable, environmentally friendly and animal friendly than traditional livestock meat. Such a novel technology that can impact many consumers evokes ethical, philosophical and religious discussions. For the Islamic community, the crucial question is whether cultured meat is halal, meaning compliant with Islamic laws. Since the culturing of meat is a new discovery, invention and innovation by scientists that has never been discussed by classical jurists (fuqaha'), an ijtihad by contemporary jurists must look for and provide answers for every technology introduced, whether it comply the requirements of Islamic law or not. So, this article will discuss an Islamic perspective on cultured meat based on the original scripture in the Qur'an and interpretations by authoritative Islamic jurists. The halal status of cultured meat can be resolve through identifying the source cell and culture medium used in culturing the meat. The halal cultured meat can be obtained if the stem cell is extracted from a (Halal) slaughtered animal, and no blood or serum is used in the process. The impact of this innovation will give positive results in the environmental and sustain the livestock industry.

  10. Iranian Parents' Resistance to Incompatible Aspects of Western Culture: Implications for ELT Material Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaian, Seyed Ahmad; Subbakrishna, Rangaswamy

    2011-01-01

    The British and US varieties of English have now come under suspicion of promoting American and British ways of life and marginalizing the local identities of their learners. Prompted by these suspicions, many scholars and policy makers have voiced doubts about the cultural adequacy of the native speaker-controlled ELT programs. In a recent survey…

  11. Culture from the Perspective of Realistic Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Daszkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article underlines the moments that define the metaphysical understanding of culture. According to this conception, culture in its most basic meaning is rationalization (intellectualization of nature. The article is focused on the following areas: genetic-exemplarist analysis of cultural works and definition of culture from the perspective of realistic philosophy.

  12. Cultural Perspectives on Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhoro, Peter; Cochran, Geraldine; Gonzalez, Victor; Rockward, Willie; Sunda-Meya, Anderson; Incera, Vivian

    2012-02-01

    Populations that are underrepresented in physics generally are even more severely underrepresented among US physics teachers. Based on national data from the American Institute of Physics (AIP), 95% of physics teachers are White/non-Hispanic, about 1.5% are Hispanic, and approximately another 1.5% African-American. While 25% of our nation's African-American and Hispanic students now take physics in high school, they are very unlikely to have a role model, of similar race and ethnicity, teaching their physics classes. PhysTEC is making an effort to find and disseminate successful models for attracting more underrepresented minority students to high school physics teaching. This panel discussion, focusing on cultural perspectives on teacher education, will feature faculty from Minority Serving Institutions, which educate almost 60% of underrepresented minorities who get college degrees in the US, and individuals who have taught high school physics in areas with a dense minority population.

  13. Oxidative stress and senescence-like status of pear calli co-cultured on suspensions of incompatible quince microcalli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocito, Fabio F; Espen, Luca; Fedeli, Chiara; Lancilli, Clarissa; Musacchi, Stefano; Serra, Sara; Sansavini, Silviero; Cocucci, Maurizio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio

    2010-04-01

    This work presents a simple in vitro system to study physiological, biochemical and molecular changes occurring in a pear callus (Pyrus communis L., cv. Beurré Bosc) grown in close proximity to spatially separated undifferentiated homologous (pear) or heterologous (quince; Cydonia oblonga Mill., East Malling clone C) cells in its neighboring environment. After a 7-day co-culture period, the presence of heterologous cells produced negative effects on the pear callus, whose relative weight increase and adenylate energy charge decreased by 30 and 24%, respectively. Such behavior was associated with a higher O(2) consumption rate (+125%) which did not seem to be coupled to adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Analyses of alternative oxidase and enzymatic activities involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification strongly suggested that the higher O(2) consumption rate, measured in the pear callus grown in the heterologous combination, may probably be ascribed to extra-respiratory activities. These, in turn, might contribute to generate metabolic scenarios where ROS-induced oxidative stresses may have the upper hand. The increase in the levels of 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive metabolites, considered as diagnostic indicators of ROS-induced lipid peroxidation, seemed to confirm this hypothesis. Moreover, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the expression levels of a few senescence-associated genes were higher in the pear callus grown in the heterologous combination than in the homologous one. Taken as a whole, physiological and molecular data strongly suggest that undifferentiated cells belonging to a pear graft-incompatible quince clone may induce an early senescence-like status in a closely co-cultured pear callus.

  14. A Cultural Perspective on Chinese Politeness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Xiaofang

    2011-01-01

    Politeness is a universal phenomenon, but its actual manifestations and the standards for judgment are culturally different. This paper analyzes the characteristics of Chinese politeness from a cultural perspective. It aims to improve our understanding of Chinese politeness and our knowledge of Chinese traditional culture and undertake interpersonal communication successfully.

  15. Language and Culture: A Social Semiotic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire

    2002-01-01

    Examines the contribution that applied linguistics can make to the way we conceive of language, literature, and culture in foreign language departments from a social semiotic perspective. (Author/VWL)

  16. Dual Perspectives on Theory in Clinical Practice: Practice Makes Perfect: The Incompatibility of Practicing Speech and Meaningful Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a case study to suggest that some children view speech-language therapy as a separate situation for learning practicing new sounds and language forms whereas the purpose of talking outside of therapy is meaningful communication. Clinical implications of this potential incompatibility between practicing speech and communicating…

  17. Perspectives on culture and concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ojalehto, Bethany l; Medin, Douglas L

    2015-01-03

    The well-respected tradition of research on concepts uses cross-cultural comparisons to explore which aspects of conceptual behavior are universal versus culturally variable. This work continues, but it is being supplemented by intensified efforts to study how conceptual systems and cultural systems interact to modify and support each other. For example, cultural studies within the framework of domain specificity (e.g., folkphysics, folkpsychology, folkbiology) are beginning to query the domains themselves and offer alternative organizing principles (e.g., folksociology, folkecology). Findings highlight the multifaceted nature of both concepts and culture: Individuals adopt distinct conceptual construals in accordance with culturally infused systems such as language and discourse, knowledge and beliefs, and epistemological orientations. This picture complicates questions about cognitive universality or variability, suggesting that researchers may productively adopt a systems-level approach to conceptual organization and cultural epistemologies. Related implications for diversity in cognitive science are discussed.

  18. Cultural psychiatry: a general perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Renato D

    2013-01-01

    The current scene in the field of cultural psychiatry shows a vigorous growth, multifaceted conceptual and research developments and more relevant clinical presence. After a pertinent definition of the discipline, this chapter examines the contribution of cultural psychiatry to the etiopathogenesis of mental disorders, to the variations of clinical presentations in numerous entities, to psychiatric diagnosis and treatment and to the relatively unexplored rubric of preventive psychiatry. Advanced concepts of neurosciences and technology-based research can find a place in the realm of biocultural correlates. The role of culture in the definition of mental illness, the renewed notions of the old 'culture-bound syndromes', hope, cognition and culture in psychiatric treatments (including the so-called 'cultural therapies'), and resiliency are areas duly examined and discussed. Cultural psychiatry has re-emerged as a reliable body of knowledge aimed at a comprehensive assessment of human beings as patients.

  19. Cultural Perspective on African American Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.

  20. Language and Culture: Nigerian Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    The power of language to reflect culture and influence thinking was first proposed by .... spoken to. Children will grow up learning only to speak when an adult addresses .... Implications for Language Teaching and Language Policy in Nigeria.

  1. Cyberbullying: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jieun; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies conducted in different countries have focused on empirical research and literature reviews on prevalence, consequences, and strategies relative to cyberbullying; however, there is a lack of research regarding cyberbullying from a cross-cultural perspective. This article reviews recent research on cyberbullying and presents…

  2. Cyberbullying: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jieun; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies conducted in different countries have focused on empirical research and literature reviews on prevalence, consequences, and strategies relative to cyberbullying; however, there is a lack of research regarding cyberbullying from a cross-cultural perspective. This article reviews recent research on cyberbullying and presents…

  3. Perspectives in geography of culture and civilizations

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    Grčić Мirko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of relevant methodological essence of "traditional" and "new" cultural geography. In the introduction is given an explanation of philosophic concepts of space, environment, place and the region in cultural geography. In second section is analyzed the meaning of civilization and the genesis of geography of civilization (géographie de civilisation. Special attention is on features of geographical posibilism as methodological paradigm, and the concept of cultural landscape as the essence of classical geography of culture and civilization. After this part are researched specific characteristics of certain academic schools and methodological perspectives in cultural geography. Postmodern paradigm and essence of "new" cultural geography are in the main focus. Postmodernism is changing the meaning of the basic concepts in cultural geography, which are analyzed in the introduction, such as space, culture, cultural region, cultural landscape and others. "New" cultural geography reassessed social and moral issues associated with the characteristics of the postmodern era. In this regard, methodological paradigm must be changed. This ascertainment is based on the interpretation of humanistic geography, where the emphasis is on the interpretation of cultural symbols, causal link and the "spirit of place" (Spiritus Loci. In accordance with modern conceptions of human in psychological notion, there are at least three theoretical directions, which find resonance in the appropriate cultural geography: behaviorism, psychoanalytic concept and cognitive concept - gestaltism and geography of perception. In conclusion is emphasized the need of finding a dialectical unity in "classical" and "new" cultural geography. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176017

  4. Rh Incompatibility (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Rh Incompatibility KidsHealth > For Parents > Rh Incompatibility Print A ... this information early in your pregnancy. About the Rh Factor People with different blood types have proteins ...

  5. On English Culture from the Perspective of English Names

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    索微微

    2013-01-01

    Personal names reflect splendid cultures from different perspectives and culture is also restricted the choice of names. English personal names are studied in this paper in order to reveal the culture information reflected in names.

  6. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ziman, Mario, E-mail: ziman@savba.sk [RCQI, Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanická 68a, 60200 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  7. Organisational culture: A contemporary management perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weeks

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the concept "organisational culture from a traditional and a more contemporary management perspective. Problem investigated: The concept organizational culture has assumed a very prominent place within the management literature and has been analysed from diverse multidisciplinary perspectives. Central to the importance attributed to the concept is the fact that it acts as a perceptual and behavioural determinant, which implies that it will have a significant impact on all human related institutional activities and thus the interest in the concept and its management. Researchers and management practitioners have come to assume that while the concept is difficult to manage in practice, it is possible to determine the prevailing culture of an institution, identify what is termed to be a desired culture for an institution and then analyse the cultural gap that exists. Based on the analysis conducted, it is further frequently assumed that the transition from the prevailing to a desired culture can be managed. A more contemporary management perspective, based on complexity theory, would appear to challenge the assumption of being able to actively manage the organisation's culture transformation process to ensure that a desired culture is manifest within the institution. The traditional and more contemporary approaches for dealing with the concept "organisational culture" are the focus of discussion and analysis in this paper. Methodology: A multidisciplinary literature review and analysis is undertaken to gain an insight of traditional and contemporary management theory and practice, as it relates to the concept "organisational culture" and its management. Findings: An important conclusion drawn from the study is that traditional paradigms of organisational culture management, that evolved within a more mechanistic manufacturing economy, is no longer effective for dealing with the unpredictable and

  8. Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Thomas R.; Hayes, Lauren J.; Applin, Rebecca C.; Weatherly, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward prediction from attention restoration theory is that the level of incompatibility in a person's life should be positively correlated with that person's level of mental (or directed attention) fatigue. The authors tested this prediction by developing a new self-report measure of incompatibility in which they attempted to isolate…

  9. Living with Rh Incompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living With Rh Incompatibility If you have Rh-negative blood, injections of Rh immune globulin can reduce your ... baby or come in contact with Rh-positive blood. If you're Rh-negative, your risk of problems from Rh incompatibility is ...

  10. Danish Cultural Policy in a European and Global Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    of national identity and cultural heritage. The role of art in society has been changed and are challenged. The essay analyzes based on critical theory and recent cultural study theory the cultural changes and the potentials impacts on art and culture in a global and European perspective....

  11. Family Perspectives: Using a Cultural Prism to Understand Families from Asian Cultural Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk-Hyang; Turnbull, Ann P.; Zan, Fei

    2009-01-01

    Educators can better serve students who come from diverse cultural backgrounds by understanding the differing cultural values of these students and their families. This article explores different cultural perspectives using a cultural prism approach, focused most specifically on the Korean and Chinese cultures. (Contains 2 tables.)

  12. Culture and Career Psychology: A Social Constructionist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Graham B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reflects on the need to re-examine cultural and cross-cultural psychology with a view to re-invigorating them and placing them at the center of discourse in career psychology. One perspective that can be employed to achieve these goals is social constructionism in that it questions the centrality of post-positivism in cultural and…

  13. Individualism and the field viewpoint: cultural influences on memory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maryanne; Jones, Gregory V

    2012-09-01

    Two perspectives from which memories can be retrieved have been distinguished: field resembles the view from the first-person vantage point of original experience, whereas observer resembles the view from the third-person vantage point of a spectator. There is evidence that the incidences of the two types of perspective differ between at least two different cultural groups. It is hypothesised here that this is a special case of a more general relation between memory perspective and cultural individualism, such that field and observer perspectives are more prevalent among people from, respectively, relatively individualist and relatively collectivist societies. Memory perspectives adopted by participants from a range of different countries were recorded, and were found to vary in the predicted manner. Regression analysis showed that the potential effects of three other cultural variables - uncertainty avoidance, masculinity and, to a lesser extent, power distance - were eclipsed by the influence of individualism, and the implications are discussed.

  14. Transculturality as a Perspective: Researching Media Cultures Comparatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hepp

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the research on media cultures operates in a "national-territorial" frame. Media cultures are considered as national cultures and other forms of media culture (for example professional journalism cultures, diasporas, celebrity cultures etc. are not investigated in their "deterritorial" character. But it is exactly such deterritorial forms of media culture that are gaining relevance with the ongoing pace of media globalization: they therefore have to be placed in the focus of comparative media and communication research. Starting with this consideration, the article develops a transcultural perspective on researching media cultures. Within this perspective it becomes possible to conduct comparative research on (territorial national media cultures as well as on other (deterritorial forms of present media cultures, as this approach moves the processes of cultural construction and articulation into the focus of analysis. To arrive at a better understanding of this approach, "media cultures" are defined as translocal phenomena in their territorial as well as their deterritorial relations. Based on this, the "semantics" of a transcultural research perspective are outlined, which then makes it possible to formulate practical principles for carrying out comparative qualitative research within this framework. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901267

  15. Outdoor education in New Zealand: a comparative and cultural perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2009-01-01

      This presentation takes general view of understanding outdoor education in New Zealand.  This is seen from an outsider's perspective and is compared with "friluftsliv" in Denmark and the Nordic countries. Analysing and understanding one's culture is never easy, and the main challenge is to focus...... on and question everyday phenomena which seem natural and that reproduce one's own perspective. Cultural analysis and the analysis of social configurations together with a comparative cultural perspective form the research approach.  . The presentation is based on a comparative and qualitative case study (Ragin......, 1992) of friluftsliv in Denmark and outdoor education in New Zealand. Friluftsliv and outdoor education are understood as socio-cultural constructs which develop and differ in time and space. The theoretical framework is based on ethnological cultural analysis (Ehn & Lofgren, 1982, 2008) combined...

  16. Culture and Social Psychology: Converging Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimaggio, Paul; Markus, Hazel Rose

    2010-01-01

    Views of culture in psychology and sociology have converged markedly in the past two decades. Both have rejected what Adams and Markus (2004) refer to as the "entity" conception of culture--the view that culture is coherent, stable, and located in the heads of collectivities' members--in favor of more supple and dynamic constructs. Culture, in…

  17. Disability Policy Implementation from a Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Miguel A.; Jenaro, Cristina; Calvo, Isabel; Navas, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Implementation of disability policy is influenced by social, political, and cultural factors. Based on published work, this article discusses four guidelines considered critical for successful policy implementation from a cross-cultural perspective. These guidelines are to: (a) base policy implementation on a contextual analysis, (b) employ a…

  18. Cultural hegemony? Educators’ perspectives on facilitating cross-cultural dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zareen; Verstegen, Daniëlle; Vyas, Rashmi; Hamed, Omayma; Dornan, Tim; Morahan, Page

    2016-01-01

    Background We live in an age when education is being internationalized. This can confront students with ‘cultural hegemony’ that can result from the unequal distribution of power and privilege in global society. The name that is given to awareness of social inequality is ‘critical consciousness’. Cross-cultural dialogue provides an opportunity for learners to develop critical consciousness to counter cultural hegemony. The purpose of this research was to understand how learners engage with cross-cultural dialogue, so we can help them do so more effectively in the future. Method The setting for this research was an online discussion in an international health professions educator fellowship program. We introduced scenarios with cultural references to study the reaction of participants to cultural conversation cues. We used an inductive thematic analysis to explore power and hegemony issues. Results Participants reflected that personally they were more likely to take part in cross-cultural discussions if they recognized the context discussed or had prior exposure to educational settings with cultural diversity. They identified barriers as lack of skills in facilitating cross-cultural discussions and fear of offending others. They suggested deliberately introducing cultural issues throughout the curriculum. Conclusion Our results indicate that developing critical consciousness and cross-cultural competency will require instructional design to identify longitudinal opportunities to bring up cross-cultural issues, and training facilitators to foster cross-cultural discussions by asking clarifying questions and navigating crucial/sensitive conversations. PMID:27890048

  19. Cultural hegemony? Educators’ perspectives on facilitating cross-cultural dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareen Zaidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We live in an age when education is being internationalized. This can confront students with ‘cultural hegemony’ that can result from the unequal distribution of power and privilege in global society. The name that is given to awareness of social inequality is ‘critical consciousness’. Cross-cultural dialogue provides an opportunity for learners to develop critical consciousness to counter cultural hegemony. The purpose of this research was to understand how learners engage with cross-cultural dialogue, so we can help them do so more effectively in the future. Method: The setting for this research was an online discussion in an international health professions educator fellowship program. We introduced scenarios with cultural references to study the reaction of participants to cultural conversation cues. We used an inductive thematic analysis to explore power and hegemony issues. Results: Participants reflected that personally they were more likely to take part in cross-cultural discussions if they recognized the context discussed or had prior exposure to educational settings with cultural diversity. They identified barriers as lack of skills in facilitating cross-cultural discussions and fear of offending others. They suggested deliberately introducing cultural issues throughout the curriculum. Conclusion: Our results indicate that developing critical consciousness and cross-cultural competency will require instructional design to identify longitudinal opportunities to bring up cross-cultural issues, and training facilitators to foster cross-cultural discussions by asking clarifying questions and navigating crucial/sensitive conversations.

  20. An Evolutionary Psychological Perspective on Cultures of Honor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd K. Shackelford

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A key element of cultures of honor is that men in these cultures are prepared to protect with violence the reputation for strength and toughness. Such cultures are likely to develop where (1 a man's resources can be thieved in full by other men and (2 the governing body is weak and thus cannot prevent or punish theft. Historically a herding culture operating outside of formal government, the southern United States has a rich culture of honor. In this article, I briefly review research conducted by Nisbett, Cohen, and colleagues on the southern culture of honor. I then present several important but unanswered questions about the development and maintenance of the southern culture of honor. I next argue that current models of the development and maintenance of cultures of honor and violence can be informed by an evolutionary psychological perspective. I conclude with a tentative evolutionary psychological analysis of the development and maintenance of the southern culture of honor.

  1. Live feed culture - Problems and perspectives

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Royan, J.P.

    The importance of live feed in aquaculture is stressed. Organisms currently cultured as live feed are microalgae, turbellarians, tanaidaceans, annelids, brine shrimps, fairy shrimps, rotifers, cladocerans and copepods. Their culture methods...

  2. Viewing Translator as the Cultural Mediator from a Sociological Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Di

    2016-01-01

    Cultural differences, are different in their languages, their behaviour patterns, and values, therefore, an attempt to try to convey shared assumptions and responses using another language are unlikely to work. However, translator, being as the central role in the process of translation, functions as the cultural mediator through communicating and acting. The paper will mainly discuss translator as the cultural mediator incertain social context and explain it from a sociological perspective.

  3. Personalizing Culture Through Anthropological and Educational Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    This report is written primarily for teachers and teacher educators who, in their teaching, curricula, and relationships with students, are struggling with fundamental cultural questions: Who are my students? What kinds of cultural influences shape their lives? How do they — and I, as their teacher — shape and construct this culture on an ongoing basis? What are my own cultural assumptions and how do they influence my teaching? Much has been written about how schools should respond t...

  4. On Affective Communication-From Perspective of Cultural Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨佩佩

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, cross-cultural study is turning to pragmatic fields concerning communication, such as business negotiation, overseas life and language teaching, etc. This paper reviews previous studies of culture and communication, attempting to reveal how to have affective communication from perspective of cultural context by case studies. As a result, theoretical foundation and case studies prove that although we have cooperative principles as general guidelines for communication, cultural awareness, espe⁃cially awareness of High Context (HC) and Low Context (LC), still plays a key role in cross-cultural communication by making up for the lost of meaning while transmission.

  5. [Perspectives of a cultural history of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Hans-Georg; Sauerteig, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses current issues of a cultural history of medicine. Based on selected examples from the history of bodies, gender and experience, and visual cultures, the paper invites historians of medicine to become more deeply engaged with cultural historical approaches.

  6. Culturally Competent Counseling Psychology Students: Developmental Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Monique L.; Bronson, M. Kristine

    Four steps are critical in developing cultural competence in students: (1) a supportive training program; (2) a significant number or "critical mass" of culturally diverse students and allies; (3) opportunities to learn about diversity; and (4) development of racial identity. An appreciation of cultural diversity lies at the heart of any…

  7. Culture in ELT: A probe into Iranian EFL teachers' perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jalali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed at delving into EFL teachers' perspectives towards culture and the different sources and procedures of teaching it in the classroom with a focus on the qualifications of the teachers. The participants consisted of 95 Iranian language teachers. For the purposes of this study, the participants were divided into three qualification groups: MA in English, English Students of MA and Other. To explore the participants' perspectives on the issue of culture in ELT, the researchers used a questionnaire. One-way ANOVA indicated: a significant differences between the groups of MA holders and other groups with regard to the teachers' use of various materials in teaching culture; b no significant differences among the participant groups regarding the importance of integrating culture in language pedagogy, the frequency of discussing culture in EFL classes, the teachers' perceptions of the effect of culture on the learners' motivation, and the aspects emphasized by teachers in teaching culture; and c significant differences among MA holders and other groups in their emphasis on the United States as their focus of attention when teaching culture. The results indicated that the teachers' qualifications might not be an influential factor in determining their perspectives on the issue of culture in language teaching.

  8. CULTURAL TOURISM: BANGLADESH TRIBAL AREAS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad SHAMSUDDOHA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the world's largest industry which is linked with thousands of associated business. Though Bangladesh is a small country in terms of its size it contains huge prospect in its tourism including culture. Bangladesh culture is very rich which initiated long ago with different dimensions. Chittagong hill tracts of Bangladesh are a place of tribal. Tribal are having their own rich culture which is very attractive and nice looking. This study focused on tribal culture and its tourists. This paper also seeks about problems of cultural tourism in Bangladesh.

  9. Factors affecting patient education from cultural perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD REZA HEIDARI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient education is influenced by cultural factors. This study aims to find out the role of culture in patient education. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted on 23 Iranian nurses. Inclusion criteria were minimum 5 years of working experience in clinical nursing. Semistructured face to face interviews were used to collect the data. Interviews were taped, transcribed and analyzed using content analysis method. Results: The main theme of ‘cultural sensitivity’ was extracted from the interviews. Sub-themes were cultural divergence, cultural connection literacybased instruction. Conclusion: A dynamic process of patient education is influenced by various cultural factors. Nurses must be aware of the cultural norms in patient education to meet their expectations in a respectful manner.

  10. Organisational Culture in Construction: An Employee Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raufdeen Rameezdeen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of stakeholders in construction projects makes the construction industry prone to disputes. The historical separation between design and construction add to this phenomenon by having a consultant for design and a contractor for construction. Communication breakdown, frequently, is the first sign of problems, notably in the relationship between the Contractor and the Consultant. Therefore, it appears that the split between design and construction has given rise to two separate cultures in the construction industry. This paper attempts to identify whether there is a difference in organisational culture between Consultants and Contractors taken as two groups and determine whether a specific attribute was related to the cultural differences between the two entities. Based on case studies it was found that consultants are biased towards Clan culture while contractors are biased towards Market culture. However, both groups show similar affinity to Adhocracy and Hierarchy cultures.

  11. Describing Speech Acts from Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kusevska, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the appearance of Austin’s How to Do Things with Words (1962) and Searle’s Speech Acts (1969), speech acts have attracted great attention and have been subject to research from different perspectives. In this paper we refer to research of speech acts from cross-cultural and interlanguage perspective. First, we discuss some aspects that speech act research is based on, including: 1. variability (power of the speaker and hearer, social distance, degree of imposition, gender, etc.), a...

  12. Film Cross-culture Research under the Perspective of Language and Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗淞译

    2015-01-01

    Language as an important tool of cultural transmission, it can achieve the cross-culture development of film. With the strength of globalization, film cross-culture communication are increasing, and how to enhance the communication of film through language and culture and let more people enjoy the thought expressed in film is one of the most important content for cross-culture development of mant films. Different cultural backgrounds will produce large diversities in watching a same film, so it is helpful for the cross-culture development of film when making good use of culture and language, on the contrary, it will become a hindrance. This article do research on cross-culture development of film under the perspective of language and culture to find out the existing problems in present cross-culture development of film and put forward effective resolution strategy in order to promote certain reference for the internationalization of China’s film industry.

  13. Psychology of religion: perspectives from cultural psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    After a brief introduction, this paper tries to establish what type of psychology the psychology of religion is. Having introduced cultural psychology in general, some theories applicable in research on religion are presented, and some examples of cultural psychological research of religious

  14. Law and Popular Culture : International Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, K.J.; Asimow, Michael; Papke, David Ray

    2014-01-01

    Commentators have noted the extraordinary impact of popular culture on legal practice, courtroom proceedings, police departments, and government as a whole, and it is no exaggeration to say that most people derive their basic understanding of law from cultural products. Movies, television programs,

  15. Planning Without History or Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    that planning assumptions 49 Robert N. St. Clair, “Institute for Intercultural Communication ...Institute for Intercultural Communication : The Social Construction of Culture.” Commcourses.com. Last modified 2014. Accessed December 2, 2014... communication set the stage for international disappointment due to oversimplifying the poly-ethnic cultural interest of the people of Iraq and other actors in

  16. Law and Popular Culture : International Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, K.J.; Asimow, Michael; Papke, David Ray

    Commentators have noted the extraordinary impact of popular culture on legal practice, courtroom proceedings, police departments, and government as a whole, and it is no exaggeration to say that most people derive their basic understanding of law from cultural products. Movies, television programs,

  17. Human cumulative culture: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lewis G; Vale, Gill L; Laland, Kevin N; Flynn, Emma; Kendal, Rachel L

    2014-05-01

    Many animals exhibit social learning and behavioural traditions, but human culture exhibits unparalleled complexity and diversity, and is unambiguously cumulative in character. These similarities and differences have spawned a debate over whether animal traditions and human culture are reliant on homologous or analogous psychological processes. Human cumulative culture combines high-fidelity transmission of cultural knowledge with beneficial modifications to generate a 'ratcheting' in technological complexity, leading to the development of traits far more complex than one individual could invent alone. Claims have been made for cumulative culture in several species of animals, including chimpanzees, orangutans and New Caledonian crows, but these remain contentious. Whilst initial work on the topic of cumulative culture was largely theoretical, employing mathematical methods developed by population biologists, in recent years researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including psychology, biology, economics, biological anthropology, linguistics and archaeology, have turned their attention to the experimental investigation of cumulative culture. We review this literature, highlighting advances made in understanding the underlying processes of cumulative culture and emphasising areas of agreement and disagreement amongst investigators in separate fields.

  18. Future perspectives of in vitro culture and plant breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuligowska, Katarzyna; Lütken, Henrik Vlk; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark

    2015-01-01

    Conventional breeding and plant improvement increasingly become inadequate to keep up with progression and high quality demands. Thus biotechnological techniques are more and more adopted. Initially, biotechnological tools have supported conventional breeding by in vitro culture techniques......, comprising micropropagation, speeding up multiplication and improving uniformity. Also, crossing barriers of incompatible plants have been overcome using in vitro methods and embryo rescue techniques in wide hybridization approaches. Marker-assisted breeding is employed for targeted selection of DNA...... fragments from parental plants in respect to identification of desired characteristics in offspring or among hybrid plants. Phylogeny-assisted breeding and knowledge about genetic relationships support the ability to develop new hybrids. Finally, chemical and radiation induced mutagenesis are established...

  19. The concept of learning in cultural-historical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2015-01-01

    A cultural-historical perspective on learning is presented. The key idea is to conceptualise learning as self-mastery of action, using existing psychological functions. The main part of the chapter provides an overview of Vygotsky’s theory of higher psychological functions, and discusses their im......A cultural-historical perspective on learning is presented. The key idea is to conceptualise learning as self-mastery of action, using existing psychological functions. The main part of the chapter provides an overview of Vygotsky’s theory of higher psychological functions, and discusses...

  20. Cultural Tourism: Perspectives of the Kainuu Region

    OpenAIRE

    Kämäräinen, Mikko; Ofem, Daniel Ezak

    2011-01-01

    This thesis was written in order to study the Kainuu’s regions tourism business with an emphasis on cultural tourism, and to find out detailed information of its current situation and recent changes in its demand. Local tourism operators and researchers were approached to find out further information on Kainuu’s potential in the cultural tourism business as well as to try and map out the current mentality towards the viability and the future of cultural tourism in this region. The thesis was...

  1. The history of penal cultures – a culturally integrated perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Utrat-Milecki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article shows historical and cultural determinants of understanding punishment and the rules of criminal responsibility. In the first part the relations of these research with classical research on penal law and related science is shown. Their meaning to the modern law culture in Europe is also shown. In the second part the basis for the culturally integrated research done is explained. In the third part the cultural categories that shape our understanding of punishment, related with the legacy of European civilization are shown. In the final part issues important for interdisciplinary research on criminal punishment are shown as a part of a broad definition of criminal punishment. It is noticed that raising those issues is important in every society regardless of its history, because they refer to issues crucial for social order and entities’ rights.

  2. Cultural Self-confidence in the Perspective of Cross-cultural Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wenyuan

    2016-01-01

    In the process of economic development around the world, there are more and more cross-cultural interactions among people with different cultures. The key point is how to maintain our own excellent cultures and make communication effectively and success-fully. The paper will focus on the topic. The first part of the essay introduces the present cross-cultural situations in international communication and its threat that Chinese culture has in the process of economical development. Several points to be mentioned are in the following parts,such as culture, cultural consciousness, cultural confidence and the tactics of keeping self-confidence in the cross-cultural interactions. All in all,a series of problems will be dis-cussed in the perspective of culture.

  3. Technology Change And Working Conditions – A Cultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning

    2004-01-01

    When technology change improves working conditions, the success is often attributed to skilful change agents. When it is not, the blame is on “resistance to change” and “resilient cultures”. How can these failures be understood differently? A cultural perspective on technology change might be a way...... to facilitate technology change processes that lead to improved working conditions. The research based project described here has developed a special homepage that explains how this might be achieved. The homepage is targeted at working life professionals. The homepage presents theoretical explanations...... of the concept of organizational culture, a model for analysis and several practical case stories. This paper explains how the project tries to reach a broad spectrum of professionals in order to facilitate their use of a cultural perspective. It also discusses the ethical consequences of the cultural...

  4. On Relationship between Language and Culture from Pragmatic Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨佩佩

    2012-01-01

      The idea that language and culture are closely related is normally for most people. From pragmatic perspective, it’ s noteworthy to reveal a clearer and more detailed picture of the relationship between language and culture . Taking speech act, sociocultural pragmatics, contrastive pragmatics and interlanguage pragmatics as four aspects to study, the features and realiza⁃tion patterns of their relationship are elaborated. Besides, implications of this study lie in the usage of the relationship in second language teaching and learning.

  5. Contrasting Perspectives on Organizational Culture Change in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Michael; James, Chris; Beales, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The concept of organizational culture continues to be widely used for descriptive and explanatory purposes in academic, policy, and managerial debates in education and other contexts. The range of perspectives on its meaning, which are readily apparent in both educational and non-educational literature, is directly relevant to the analysis of…

  6. Managing a culturally diverse workforce : Diversity perspectives in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podsiadlowski, Astrid; Groeschke, Daniela; Kogler, Marina; Springer, Cornelia; van der Zee, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted two studies to analyze why and how organizations approach and manage cultural diversity in the Austrian workplace and to identify organizations' diversity perspectives. In Study 1, 29 interviews revealed insights into organizational approaches to diversity and how these perspec

  7. Contrasting Perspectives on Organizational Culture Change in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Michael; James, Chris; Beales, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The concept of organizational culture continues to be widely used for descriptive and explanatory purposes in academic, policy, and managerial debates in education and other contexts. The range of perspectives on its meaning, which are readily apparent in both educational and non-educational literature, is directly relevant to the analysis of…

  8. Towards a Culture of Quality. Perspectives on Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Badri N., Ed.; Kanwar, Asha, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This third publication on the theme of quality in the Commonwealth of Learning Perspectives on Distance Education series widens the discussion beyond external quality assurance processes to a more generic focus on a "culture of quality." It is an extension of the earlier two publications, which came out in 1994 and 1997 and drew…

  9. In Spirituality: A Perspective from a Traditionally Latin Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Zenita; Németh-Torres, Geovani

    2016-01-01

    The concept of spirituality is influenced by culture and the values and mores of Brazil, and though not directly linked to religion it actually grows from the same roots. This paper examines spirituality in education from the perspective of a humanistic psychology framework expressed as an ideal of the adequate personality or healthy personality.…

  10. Faculty Perspectives on Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices in Developmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the perspectives of developmental math faculty at a two-year technical college regarding culturally responsive beliefs and instructional practices. Thirteen faculty who taught the developmental class Elementary Algebra with Applications were surveyed. Nine of the 13 faculty responded. One section of Wisconsin's…

  11. Religion and self: notions from a cultural psychological perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Belzen

    2010-01-01

    After a brief introduction of a cultural psychological perspective, this paper turns to the concept of self. The paper proposes to conceive of that reality to which the concepts of self refer as a narrative, employing especially autobiographies and other ego-documents in empirical exploration. After

  12. Managing a culturally diverse workforce : Diversity perspectives in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podsiadlowski, Astrid; Groeschke, Daniela; Kogler, Marina; Springer, Cornelia; van der Zee, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted two studies to analyze why and how organizations approach and manage cultural diversity in the Austrian workplace and to identify organizations' diversity perspectives. In Study 1, 29 interviews revealed insights into organizational approaches to diversity and how these perspec

  13. Managing a culturally diverse workforce : Diversity perspectives in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podsiadlowski, Astrid; Groeschke, Daniela; Kogler, Marina; Springer, Cornelia; van der Zee, Karen

    The authors conducted two studies to analyze why and how organizations approach and manage cultural diversity in the Austrian workplace and to identify organizations' diversity perspectives. In Study 1, 29 interviews revealed insights into organizational approaches to diversity and how these

  14. Teachers from Five Nations Share Perspectives on Culture and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Christensen, Lois McFadyen; Shwery, Craig S.; Lovorn, Michael; Sunal, Dennis W.

    2010-01-01

    Online discussions enabled preK-12 teachers (n = 125) from five nations (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and the United States) to share their perspectives of culture and citizenship and the intersections of those concepts. Discussion moved between elements of personal and others' theory into effects of theory on practice. Teachers identified…

  15. Technology Change And Working Conditions – A Cultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning

    2004-01-01

    When technology change improves working conditions, the success is often attributed to skilful change agents. When it is not, the blame is on “resistance to change” and “resilient cultures”. How can these failures be understood differently? A cultural perspective on technology change might be a way...

  16. Nordic food culture – A historical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Amilien, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Henry Notaker is a well- known Norwegian historian, specialist of books and articles about food, culture and history. He has got awards for journalism on food history, he was responsible for TV series about food and history in the 1990’s, and he is currently teaching in food history at the universities in Bergen and Agder and at Akershus University College (courses on food culture). Henry Notaker is a member of the editorial board of the scientific journal Food & History. He has published alm...

  17. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Pitch Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E.; Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Nakata, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    We examined effects of age and culture on children's memory for the pitch level of familiar music. Canadian 9- and 10-year-olds distinguished the original pitch level of familiar television theme songs from foils that were pitch-shifted by one semitone, whereas 5- to 8-year-olds failed to do so (Experiment 1). In contrast, Japanese 5- and…

  18. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Pitch Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E.; Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Nakata, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    We examined effects of age and culture on children's memory for the pitch level of familiar music. Canadian 9- and 10-year-olds distinguished the original pitch level of familiar television theme songs from foils that were pitch-shifted by one semitone, whereas 5- to 8-year-olds failed to do so (Experiment 1). In contrast, Japanese 5- and…

  19. Teaching Culture: Questioning Perspectives on Our Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Met, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Despite years of training, teaching experience, reading professional literature, attending conferences, and learning from expert colleagues, when it comes to the teaching of culture, the author wishes she knew more answers to many critical questions. Her questions are framed by the basic questions that all curricula seek to answer: WHAT is the…

  20. ETHNOMATHEMATICS IN PERSPECTIVE OF SUNDANESE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atje Setiawan Abdullah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is an exploratory research aims to find and know about a phenomenon by exploration. Therefore, the approach used in this study is ethnographic approach, an empirical and theoretical approach to get description and deep analysis about a culture based on field study. From the sustainable interviews and confirmation about field research with some community leaders in Cipatujah district, Tasikmalaya regency and in Santolo Pameungpeuk beach, Garut regency; it is found that Ethnomathematics is still widely used by Sundanese people especially in rural areas: the use of measurement units, mathematical modeling, and the use of clock symbols. The results of this study can be useful for Sundanese people and the government of West Java in education, cultural services, and tourism. Keywords: Ethnomathematics, Unit Calculation, Modeling, Symbolic Time DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.8.1.3877.1-15

  1. Cross-cultural perspectives on critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sheryl Daun

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this cross-cultural study was to explore critical thinking among nurse scholars in Thailand and the United States. The study used qualitative methodology to examine how nurse scholars describe critical thinking in nursing. Nurse educators in Thailand and the United States were questioned concerning the following aspects of critical thinking: essential components; teaching and evaluation techniques; characteristics of critical thinkers; and the importance of a consensus definition for critical thinking in nursing. Their statements, which revealed both common and specific cultural aspects of critical thinking, were subjected to content analysis. Certain themes emerged that have not been widely discussed in the literature, including the link between staying calm and thinking critically, the assertion that happiness is an essential component of critical thinking, and the participants' nearly unanimous support for coming to a consensus definition of critical thinking for nursing.

  2. Sexual survey: a cross-cultural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Luiz Cardoso

    Full Text Available This is a comparative cross-cultural investigation and an analysis of the sexual life of presumably middle class college students of four countries: Israel, Colombia, Canada and Brazil. Post graduation-level students of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Human Sexuality (IASHS in San Francisco collected the data as a PhD requirement. The data analysis revealed that, even though members of various sample groups speak different languages and belong to distinct cultures, they exhibit some similar aspects in their sexual life. Additionally, comparisons were made with the data of the NHSLS Report (USA in a few selected topics and, again, more similarities were found among the international university students.

  3. Numbers at work a cultural perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Taschner , Rudolf

    2007-01-01

    Drawing primarily from historical examples, this book explains the tremendous role that numbers and, in particular, mathematics play in all aspects of our civilization and culture. The lively style and illustrative examples will engage the reader who wants to understand the many ways in which mathematics enables science, technology, art, music, politics, and rational foundations of human thought. Each chapter focuses on the influence of mathematics in a specific field and on a specific historical figure, such as ""Pythagoras: Numbers and Symbol""; ""Bach: Numbers and Music""; ""Descartes: Numb

  4. Scientific Culture Measures: Challenges and New Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Cerezo, J.L.; Muñoz van den Eynde, A

    2016-07-01

    Since mid-twentieth century, efforts to promote scientific and technological development and engage the public in R&D process are increasing. Among those efforts, since the 1970s first in United States and then in United Kingdom and Europe, governments have funded surveys aimed at understanding the public attitudes toward science, scientists, and science policy. The Science and Engineering Indicators series of the National Science Foundation, or the European Community through its Special Eurobarometer on Europeans, science and technology, have shaped the research, measures and indicators of public understanding of science surveys. Examples are, at international level, surveys like Scientific Culture in IberoAmerican Countries (2009, FECYT-OEI-RICYT), or the International Study on Scientific Culture (2012, BBVA Foundation); and at national level, surveys like Social Perception of Science and Technology (2002-2014) series, or the recent Perception, Interest, Knowledge, and Actions (PIKA) Survey (2014), both funded by Spanish Government through its Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT). (Author)

  5. H-2 incompatible chimera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzinger, P.; Mirkwood, G.

    1978-07-01

    Fully H-2 incompatible radiation chimeras were prepared using BALB congenic mice. Such chimeric mice were immunized in vivo against histocompatibility antigens of the C57BL/10Sn (B10) background in association with either the parental H-2 haplotypes, and their spleen cells subsequently boosted in vitro with the same minor antigens. Strong H-2-restricted cytotoxic activity against minor antigens was detected, and the specificity of the restriction could be to the H-2 haplotype of the donor or the host depending on the cells used for priming or boosting. Cross priming could also be demonstrated in these mice. The results show that fully allogenic radiation chimeras can produce H-2-restricted T-cell responses to minor histocompatibility (H) antigens, and are discussed in relation to contrasting results.

  6. Depression after traumatic brain injury: a biopsychosocial cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Durga; Jayaram, Geetha; Vassila, Alex; Keach, Shari; Rao, Vani

    2015-02-01

    There are several challenges in diagnosing and treating mental illness amongst South Asians. Often times, formulating a patient's case presentation cannot adequately be accomplished strictly using a biopsychosocial model. The cultural components play an imperative role in explaining certain psychiatric symptoms and can guide treatment. With the growing population of immigrants coming to the United States, many of which require treatment for mental illness, it is essential that clinicians be cognizant in incorporating cultural perspectives when treating such patients. The authors describe the case of a 24-year old South Asian male who suffered an exacerbation of a depressive syndrome after a traumatic brain injury. Using a biopsychosocial cultural approach, this case highlights how South Asian cultural values can contribute to and incite psychiatric symptoms while simultaneously providing protective drivers for treatment outcomes.

  7. Assessing the ERP-SAP implementation strategy from cultural perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gunawan; Syaiful, Bakhri; Sfenrianto; Nurul, Fajar Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Implementing ERP-SAP projects in Indonesian large enterprises frequently create headaches for the consultants, since there are always be a large gap between the outcomes of the SAP with the expected results. Indonesian enterprises have experience with a huge amount of investments and ended up with minor benefits. Despite its unprecedented benefits, the SAP strategy is still considered as a mandatory enterprise system for every enterprise to compete in the marketplaces. The article examines the SAP implementation from cultural perspectives to present new horizon that commonly ignored by major Indonesian enterprises. The article applies the multiple case studies with three large Indonesia enterprises, such as KS, the largest steel producer; GEM, a subsidiary of conglomerate enterprise operates in the mining industry, and HS, a subsidiary of the largest retailer in Asia with more than 700 stores in Indonesia. The outcome of the article is expected to provide a comprehensive analysis from cultural perspectives regarding to common problems faced by SAP consultants.

  8. Transactional Analysis - Cultural and Educational Perspectives of Negotiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lect. Ph. D. Oana Iucu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the negotiation topics from one modern perspective, as an managerial, cultural and protocol structure. The traditionally orientation, psycho-social and communicational, technically and instrumentally, has been extended with one dynamic and very actual approach to the protocol procedures. Here is also analyzed principals negotiation’s components, which are frequently mentioned in handbooks of management and negotiation, from the organizational and operational its consequences point of view.

  9. Vegetative incompatibility among monoconidial isolates of Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloni, A; Pessi, I S; Frazzon, A P G; Van Der Sand, S T

    2009-02-01

    Bipolaris sorokiniana is a phytopathogenic fungus that causes diseases of cereal crops, such as leaf-spot disease, common root rot, and black point of grain. Because of its great morphological, physiological, and genetic variability, this fungus is difficult to control. The aim of this investigation was to study the variability of isolates of B. sorokiniana by means of vegetative incompatibility. Thirty-five isolates of B. sorokiniana from different geographical regions in Brazil and other countries were used. The vegetative incompatibility between the isolates and the influences of different culture media on these reactions were evaluated. The total protein profile of the isolates was analyzed when the isolates were cultured separately, and in cultures of compatibility and incompatibility reactions. Eighteen of 31 confrontations showed vegetative incompatibility. The results obtained with different culture media for the vegetative compatibility/incompatibility genotypes suggested that the type of substratum influences these reactions. No differences in protein profiles among the isolates were observed. This result suggests that there is no induction of expression of different proteins in vegetative incompatibility reactions.

  10. Occupational therapy students' perspectives regarding international cross-cultural experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Tamera Keiter; Burket, Allison; Deveney, Rebecca; Kennedy, Katelyn

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspectives of occupational therapy students who have engaged in international, cross-cultural learning and service experiences. This study utilized a qualitative, phenomenological design. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with students who engaged in international learning opportunities. The interviews were coded and analyzed using a constant comparative analysis approach. Three central themes emerged from the data analysis. Connectedness is the process of forming relationships with others while engaging in cross-cultural experiences. Students formed relationships with faculty, other students, and people within the community. Cultural awareness is the recognition and understanding of a different culture and responding to those differences. Students attempted to understand the new culture in comparison to their own lived experiences. Complexity portrays cross-cultural opportunities as dynamic, multi-faceted and intricate. This was demonstrated as the students raised additional questions about the conflict between their own culture and the new culture they entered. Students also identified limited orientation, support and structure with such experiences and the conflicting roles between volunteer, student, and team member. The ability to connect with others when building relationships in diverse cultural contexts held meaning for the students; however, the students also expressed conflict in trying to make sense of the new culture as it often challenged personal beliefs and constructs. The complexity and challenges of engaging in these opportunities needs to be recognized and further explored to assess how curricula and faculty best supports culturally responsive care. © 2011 The Authors Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  11. Translation Strategies for Dealing with Cultural Vacancy from the Perspective of Cultural Schemata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章放维

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the role of cultural schemata in the proce ss of dealing with cultural vacancy in translation,and then,it points out the criterion for the translation of cultural vacancy is to see whether the correspo nding cultural schema is fully transformed. On the basis of the ideas discussed,the paper proposed six translating methods to deal with cultural vacancy in tra nslation: transliteration,literal translation or transliteration with notes,li teral translation or transliteration plus proper explanation,compensation,borr owing and free translation. It is proposed that all this translating methods sho uld proceed from the perspective of cultural schemata so as to excavate the cult ural meaning from a deeper level

  12. Beating of wives: a cross-cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J C

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports a more in-depth analysis of wife beating from a cross-cultural perspective. As background for the analysis, the methodological, operationalization, and measurement in previous cross-cultural research on wife beating is examined. Subsequently, a review of findings from these studies and the theoretical explanations from selected disciplines are presented as the basis of selection of variables expected to affect the presence and severity of wife abuse in a given culture. These variables are then examined with evidence from female perspective ethnographies on eleven different societies. This cross-cultural analysis of wife beating has illuminated more issues of methodology and variations of patterns than it has answered any questions about what may increase the frequency and severity of wife-beating in a given culture. It is possible that the beating of wives is a personal expression of hostility against women that may be expressed in addition to, or instead of, institutionalized aggression toward women in that culture. As such, wife beating can take many forms. It can be an indication of manhood, a means of personal control, a reflection of personal animosity, and an expression of sexual jealousy. These personal forms would be paralleled by societal expression such as gang rape, control of women by exclusion from the public sphere, general hostility between sexes, and the virtue of women becoming an issue of extended family and community honor. In conclusion, the importance of the variables is summarized and directions for future cross-cultural research on wife beating are suggested.

  13. A Socio-cultural Perspective on Patient Safety

    CERN Document Server

    Rowley, Emma

    2011-01-01

    This edited volume of original chapters brings together researchers from around the world who are exploring the facets of health care organization and delivery that are sometimes marginal to mainstream patient safety theories and methodologies but offer important insights into the socio-cultural and organizational context of patient safety. By examining these critical insights or perspectives and drawing upon theories and methodologies often neglected by mainstream safety researchers, this collection shows we can learn more about not only the barriers and drivers to implementing patient safety

  14. PERSPECTIVE OF THE CULTURAL SOCIOLOGY AND THE ANALYSIS OF THE CIVIC CULTURE IN BOGOTÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Alfonso Penilla Medina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the city of Bogotá, since 1995 the program of Civic Culture (Cultura Ciudadana has won a remarkable visibility as an articulator axis of development programs. According to UNDP, Bogotá’s experiment received the award for Local Governance projects in 2003, for its significant achievements on the issue of urban civic coexistence and security, which have become the basis of human development projects for the city’s inhabitants. Along with this international award, the program of Civic Culture has generated a literature that approaches -from various perspectives- the dimensions, scope and limitations of this kind of experience as an institutional initiative. However, this set of works does not delve into the symbolic dimension, for it does not explain how the cultural structures, interpretative practices and performative conditions have an impact on the actual implementation of public policy, nor on its aims at building a Civic Culture in Bogota. At this point, an analytic gap can be detected, carrying some negative implications for the possibility of transferring the experience of the Civic Culture project from Bogotá, to other different contexts. In short, from the approach of Cultural Sociology, a theoretical gap in the literature on Civic Culture has been identified, which must be fulfilled in order to enrich the scope with a dimension that may improve the effectiveness of policies on Civic Culture.

  15. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students’ language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of technology on teens, and scant literature is available that incorporates the perspective of urban and linguistically diverse students on the feasibility of applying new technologies in teaching and learning literacy in intact classrooms. This paper reports urban adolescents’ perspectives on the use of technology within teen culture, for learning in general and for literacy instruction in particular. Focus group interviews were conducted among linguistically diverse urban students in grades 6, 7 and 8 in a lower income neighborhood in the Northeastern region of the United States. The major findings of the study were that 1 urban teens primarily and almost exclusively used social media and technology devices for peer socializing, 2 they were interested in using technology to improve their literacy skills, but did not appear to voluntarily or independently integrate technology into learning, and 3 8th graders were considerably more sophisticated in their use of technology and their suggestions for application of technology to literacy learning than 6th and 7th graders. These findings lead to suggestions for developing effective literacy instruction using new technologies.

  16. ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Karoline; Titlestad, Kjell; Baudier, Francois

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO......-incompatible kidney transplantation. We used antigenspecific immunoadsorptions to remove blood group antibodies and anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) to inhibit the antibody production. The aim of introducing the ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH was to increase the rate of living donor kidney...... transplantation without increasing rejection or mortality rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective evaluation. Eleven patients received ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. The patients were followed for 3-26 months. RESULTS: One patient had an antibody-mediated rejection, one patient suffered T...

  17. Quantum Incompatibility in Collective Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Carmeli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the compatibility (or joint measurability of quantum observables in a setting where the experimenter has access to multiple copies of a given quantum system, rather than performing the experiments on each individual copy separately. We introduce the index of incompatibility as a quantifier of incompatibility in this multi-copy setting, as well as the notion of the compatibility stack representing various compatibility relations present in a given set of observables. We then prove a general structure theorem for multi-copy joint observables and use it to prove that all abstract compatibility stacks with three vertices have realizations in terms of quantum observables.

  18. Cultural Protective and Risk Factors: Professional Perspectives about Child Sexual Abuse in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Carol A.; Njuguna, Wambui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore perspectives on cultural risks and protective factors among professionals in Kenya. Method: An exploratory/descriptive survey of Kenyan professionals working to prevent or intervene with child sexual abuse was undertaken to determine their perspectives on how tribal culture impacts vulnerability to…

  19. Nation Branding in Romania After 1989: A Cultural Semiotic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Florentina Cheregi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses four nation branding post-communist campaigns initiated by the Romanian Government, from a cultural semiotic perspective, as developed by the Tartu-Moscow-Semiotic School. In so doing, it focuses on analyzing advertising and national identity discourses inside the semiospheres. Moreover, the paper investigates how elements of neoliberal ideology are addressed in the governmental campaigns, considering the “marketization of public discourse” (Fairclough, 1993. Nation branding in post-communist Romania is a distinctive phenomena, compared to other countries, especially from Western Europe. In transition countries, nation branding is often mentioned because of the constant need to reconfigure national identity by dissociating from the communist past (Kaneva, 2012. In Romania, nation branding is also a public issue discussed in the media, connected to the ways in which the international press portrays the country or to the migrants’ actions. In this context, Romania’s nation brand represents a cultural space and the campaigns mobilize cultural symbols as systems of signs necessary for the existence and functioning of advertising discourses. Using a semiotic analysis linked to the field of cultural semiotics (Lotman, 2005/1984, this article analyzes four nation branding campaigns initiated by the Romanian Government (Romania Simply Surprising – 2004, Romania Land of Choice – 2009, Explore the Carpathian Garden – 2010, and Discover the Place Where You Feel Reborn – 2014, considering elements such as semiotic borders, dual coding and symbols. The results show that the campaigns are part of four different semiospheres, integrating discursive practices both from advertising and public diplomacy when communicating the national image to the internal (citizens or external (international audiences.

  20. On Chinese-English Translation of Tourist Attraction in Cross-cultural Perspective--Taking Qi Culture as An Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张滕龙

    2014-01-01

    Tourist textsfeature vividness and distinctiveness and its translation is a typical cross-cultural activity.By applying cross-cultural consciousness to the tourist material's translation, foreigners can understand the cultural connotation easily. Therefore, cross-cultural consciousness plays an important role in the translation of tourist materials.This thesis, taking Qi culture as an exam-ple, explores some typical tourist attractions from perspectives of historical allusions and legend as well as traditional customs. The analysis of Qi cultural connotation concludes business culture, Pu culture and filial piety culture. So, in order to transmit the cul-tural information to foreign tourists accurately, it is necessary to apply inter-cultural consciousness to the translation of tourist texts.

  1. ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Karoline; Titlestad, Kjell; Baudier, Francois

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO-incompatible ......INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO......-incompatible kidney transplantation. We used antigenspecific immunoadsorptions to remove blood group antibodies and anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) to inhibit the antibody production. The aim of introducing the ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH was to increase the rate of living donor kidney...... transplantation without increasing rejection or mortality rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective evaluation. Eleven patients received ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. The patients were followed for 3-26 months. RESULTS: One patient had an antibody-mediated rejection, one patient suffered T...

  2. Computational chemistry meets cultural heritage: challenges and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantacci, Simona; Amat, Anna; Sgamellotti, Antonio

    2010-06-15

    Chemistry is central to addressing topics of interest in the cultural heritage field, offering particular insight into the nature and composition of the original materials, the degradation processes that have occurred over the years, and the attendant physical and chemical changes. On the one hand, the chemical characterization of the constituting materials allows researchers to unravel the rich information enclosed in a work of art, providing insight into the manufacturing techniques and revealing aspects of artistic, chronological, historical, and sociocultural significance. On the other hand, despite the recognized contribution of computational chemistry in many branches of materials science, this tool has only recently been applied to cultural heritage, largely because of the inherent complexity of art materials. In this Account, we present a brief overview of the available computational methods, classified on the basis of accuracy level and dimension of the system to be simulated. Among the discussed methodologies, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT represent a good compromise between accuracy and computational cost, allowing researchers to model the structural, electronic, and spectroscopic properties of complex extended systems in condensed phase. We then discuss the results of recent research devoted to the computer simulation of prototypical systems in cultural heritage, namely, indigo and Maya Blue, weld and weld lake, and the pigment minium (red lead). These studies provide insight into the basic interactions underlying the materials properties and, in some cases, permit the assignment of the material composition. We discuss properties of interest in the cultural heritage field, ranging from structural geometries and acid-base properties to IR-Raman vibrational spectra and UV-vis absorption-emission spectra (including excited-state deactivation pathways). We particularly highlight how computational chemistry applications in cultural

  3. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  4. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  5. Trainer Perceptions of Culture, Race and Ethnicity on Facilitation of Training Programs: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Mari Jo

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how trainers perceive and manage training programs with racially and ethnically diverse participants. Five themes emerged: global perspective, learning styles and culturally diverse participants, facilitation style, preparation for training with culturally diverse groups and, culturally sensitive training materials.…

  6. Cultural norm fulfillment, interpersonal belonging, or getting ahead? : A large-scale cross-cultural test of three perspectives on the function of self-esteem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebauer, J.E.; Sedikides, C.; Wagner, J.; Bleidorn, W.; Rentfrow, P.J.; Potter, J.; Gosling, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    What is the function of self-esteem? We classified relevant theoretical work into 3 perspectives. The cultural norm-fulfillment perspective regards self-esteem a result of adherence to cultural norms. The interpersonal-belonging perspective regards self-esteem as a sociometer of interpersonal

  7. Discussing group work in the EFL classroom from a Chinese cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊宇; 张冬瑜

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help the EFL teachers, particularly those western teachers, who are teaching in China, to obtain a better understanding of group work by exploring and discussing its use from a Chinese cultural perspective.

  8. The Voice of Silence in Communication-from cross-culture perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹琪雯

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes a study of silence from cross-culture perspective and holds that silence is an indispensable compo-nent of human communication without which the proper decoding of the information would be impossible.

  9. Globalization of Human Resource Management: A Cross-Cultural Perspective for the Public Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Suk

    1999-01-01

    Presents a framework for a global perspective in the education of human-resource-management professionals that includes negotiation skills, cross-cultural training based on social-learningl theory, and a mix of instrumental and experiential learning. (SK)

  10. The impact of culture and recipient perspective on direction giving in the service of wayfinding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hund, Alycia M.; Schmettow, Martin; Noordzij, Matthijs L.

    2012-01-01

    We examined how culture and recipient perspective affect direction giving during wayfinding. Participants from the United States and the Netherlands provided directions from starting locations to destinations for fictional recipients driving through a town (route perspective) or looking at a map of

  11. Teaching at the University Level: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from the United States and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Dennis G.; Hunt, Gilbert H.; Zhukov, Vassiliy I.; Mardahaev, Lev V.

    2007-01-01

    Interest in what constitutes effective teaching in Pre-K-12 and higher education is nearly universal. This important text explores this interest at the college and university level from a unique, international perspective. "Teaching at the University Level: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from the United States and Russia" brings to one…

  12. The Aalborg University PO-PBL Model from a Socio-cultural Learning Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Carola Hernández; Ravn, Ole; Valero, Paola

    2015-01-01

    of learning. One of the theoretical frameworks underpinning the understanding of learning is the socio-cultural perspective. This paper aims at exploring and analyzing the PO-PBL model from this theoretical perspective. In addition, this reading may also open a new viewpoint in science teaching for other...

  13. Cross-cultural perspectives of successful aging: Young Turks and Europeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cosco, T.D.; Brehme, D.; Grigoruta, N.; Kaufmann, L.K.; Lemsalu, L.; Meex, R.C.R.; Schuurmans, A.T.; Sener, N.; Stephan, B.C.M.; Brayne, C.

    2015-01-01

    Successful aging (SA) has been conceptualized in a number of ways. Despite increasing research into how laypersons define SA, few studies capturing lay perspectives of SA in younger cohorts and in non-English speaking countries have been undertaken. The current study examines cross-cultural perspect

  14. The impact of culture and recipient perspective on direction giving in the service of wayfinding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hund, Alycia M.; Schmettow, Martin; Noordzij, Matthijs Leendert

    2012-01-01

    We examined how culture and recipient perspective affect direction giving during wayfinding. Participants from the United States and the Netherlands provided directions from starting locations to destinations for fictional recipients driving through a town (route perspective) or looking at a map of

  15. On Cross-cultural Communication from the Perspective of Semiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇; 缑英俊

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural communication refers to the activities that people with different cultural backgrounds communicate with each other and have information disseminated and exchanged. Ways of cross-cultural communication can be verbal communica-tion and nonverbal communication. Language is a symbolic system used to record the culture, and culture is transmitted by sym-bols as the medium, thus, the meaning of signs is divergent from culture to culture. In cross-cultural communication, to learn the meaning theory of semiotics consciously helps improve the ability of cross-cultural communication by contrasting the differenc-es from the verbal symbols and nonverbal symbols.

  16. On Principles of Folk Culture Translation from the Perspective of Cognitive Linguistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    延宏; 郭妮; 胡娜

    2015-01-01

    Folklore is the "living fossil" of our unique culture and the "essence" of Chinese traditional culture for thousands of years,whose translation study is of great historical and practical significance.This paper,by taking northern Shaanxi folk culture translation as the examples,attempts to discuss three main principles that should be followed in the creation process from the new perspective of cognitive linguistics,aiming at achieving a better output in Chinese folk culture.

  17. A multicultural nursing work force and cultural perspectives in Saudi Arabia: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Almutairi AF, McCarthy A

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the cultural perspectives and practices in Saudi Arabia that could help expatriate health care providers to understand Saudi culture and enhance cultural competence. The healthcare system in Gulf countries, particularly, Saudi Arabia, is mainly staffed by expatriate nurses, who account for 67.7% of the total number of nurses. This gives rise to a multicultural environment in the hospital, where people of different cultures interact with each other and take c...

  18. INTERROGATING GLOBALIZATION AND CULTURE IN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE THE INDIAN EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Sekh

    2012-01-01

    The present article is an attempt to examine and highlight the issues of cultural globalization and globalization of cultures with particular reference to India. To deal with these, I will discuss and analyze the concepts of globalization, cultural globalization and the nature of interrelation between global and local cultures in general and of India in particular. How the non-Indian global cultural elements are spreading among the Indians and how the Indian cultural elements are diffusing ov...

  19. Exploratory study regarding how cultural perspectives can influence the perceptions of project success in Brazilian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Adelino Ramos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to globalization and dynamic business environment, teams in companies are multicultural; as a result, culture may become an important aspect to be considered. The majority of articles regarding projects include factors of success and failure, but only a few embrace cultural perspectives. To provide more insight into the effects of cultural perspectives, this paper presents findings from an exploratory study that investigated how Brazilian information technology companies perceive project success and failure, and then makes inferences regarding the cultural factors. Interviews and questionnaires were applied, and the results provide insights for understanding how cultural factors may influence the project success perceptions. As the primary results, contributions regarding cultural perceptions are offered and related to different dimensions with a view to exploring the cultural aspects as determinant factors of success in a project management environment.

  20. Child welfare employee recruitment and retention: an organizational culture perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbényiga, DeBrenna LaFa

    2009-01-01

    Drawing data from an organizational culture study, this cross-sectional study investigates the effect of organizational culture on child welfare employee recruitment and retention (N=92). Findings from quantitative analyses of the organizational culture inventory suggest that constructive culture style in child welfare organizations, especially humanistic-encouraging and self-actualizing culture norms, highly predict recruitment through employees' perception of "fit" and satisfaction as a member of the organization. Limitations, future research, and relevant implications are discussed.

  1. English as an International Language of Prestige: Conflicting Cultural Perspectives and Shifting Ethnolinguistic Loyalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Norbert; Ryan, Phyllis M.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the conflicting cultural perspectives associated with studying English, drawing on two studies of Mexican students. P. Ryan (1994) studied the perceptions of culture related to language learning for six college teachers and their urban students. N. Francis (1994) studied the perceptions of rural bilingual (Spanish/Nahuatl) elementary…

  2. Examining Massification Policies and Their Consequences for Equality in Chinese Higher Education: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    This study extends the theoretical perspectives in policy studies on the issue of educational equality by analyzing the influence of cultural values on policies and policy processes. The present paper first teases out the key cultural values regarding education and equality, and then explores how these values shape the institution and policy…

  3. English as an International Language of Prestige: Conflicting Cultural Perspectives and Shifting Ethnolinguistic Loyalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Norbert; Ryan, Phyllis M.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the conflicting cultural perspectives associated with studying English, drawing on two studies of Mexican students. P. Ryan (1994) studied the perceptions of culture related to language learning for six college teachers and their urban students. N. Francis (1994) studied the perceptions of rural bilingual (Spanish/Nahuatl) elementary…

  4. Strategic transparency between food chain and society: cultural perspective images on the future of farmed salmon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellema, S.; Loorbach, D.; Notten, van P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a participatory foresight method developed and tested by the authors. The method of cultural perspective images, rooted in grid-group of cultural theory, was used in an experimental dialogue among companies and a selection of other stakeholders directly or indirectly involved in

  5. Assessment Leaders' Perspectives of Institutional Cultures of Assessment: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Matthew; Henderson, Susan; Bustamante, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Institutional cultures of assessment are praised as beneficial to student learning. Yet, extant studies have not explored the theoretical foundations and pragmatic approaches to shaping cultures of assessment. The researchers used the Delphi method to explore 10 higher education assessment leaders' attitudes and theoretical perspectives regarding…

  6. Differences of metaphors in Chinese and English advertising slogans-from cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁; 王永祥

    2014-01-01

    Metaphor is not only a language phenomenon but also a tool of human cog-nition and thoughts. Metaphors are widely used in advertising slogans. Because of the differences between Chinese and western cultures, the metaphors are also different. In this paper, the author will apply concep-tual metaphor theory to analyze metaphors in both Chinese and English advertising slogans from cultural perspective.

  7. An Analysis of Ralph's Fate in Typical American from the Perspective of Cultural Adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晨

    2016-01-01

    Ralph, the hero of Typical American written by Gish Jen, is originally a Chinese man who goes to America for PhD but finally becomes a typical American after a series of cultural crisis and adaptation. This paper is intended to analyze the fate of Ralph from the perspective of Lysgaard's U-curve cultural adaptation theory.

  8. Strategic transparency between food chain and society: cultural perspective images on the future of farmed salmon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellema, S.; Loorbach, D.; Notten, van P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a participatory foresight method developed and tested by the authors. The method of cultural perspective images, rooted in grid-group of cultural theory, was used in an experimental dialogue among companies and a selection of other stakeholders directly or indirectly involved in

  9. Assessment Leaders' Perspectives of Institutional Cultures of Assessment: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Matthew; Henderson, Susan; Bustamante, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Institutional cultures of assessment are praised as beneficial to student learning. Yet, extant studies have not explored the theoretical foundations and pragmatic approaches to shaping cultures of assessment. The researchers used the Delphi method to explore 10 higher education assessment leaders' attitudes and theoretical perspectives regarding…

  10. Culture in Teaching EFL in Saudi Arabia from Learners’ Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nasir Uddin

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to study the attitude of Saudi Arabian undergraduate English students towards the American and British culture by studying their attitude to materials with relevant cultural contents in their textbook...

  11. A Contrastive Research on American-Chinese Cultural Identity from Perspective of Mass Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵欣

    2012-01-01

    The appearance and development of "Super Girl" accompanies with the rise of mass culture and it reflects the main features of mass culture.Meanwhile western mass cultural product especially the American mass cultural product "American Idol" influenced Chinese mass culture and it has produced massive impact on the identity of national cultural and cultural independence in China.The thesis can help to deepen and make up for the deficiency of mass culture theories,to enrich the applicational experience and the...

  12. Conflicting cultural perspectives: meanings and experiences of postnatal depression among women in Indian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anita; Levy, David

    2013-01-01

    A woman's cultural and social context affects her experience of postnatal depression. In this literature review, the authors explore questions regarding normal and abnormal postnatal experiences of Indian women with consideration to cross-cultural perspectives. Although postnatal distress or sadness is recognized among many cultures, it is constructed as a transient state in some cultures and as an illness in others. A major challenge for health care providers in Western countries like the United Kingdom and Australia is to develop culturally sensitive approaches to postnatal care for migrant mothers.

  13. International Comparative Study on Domestic and Foreign Films in the Perspective of Social Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗淞译

    2015-01-01

    The culture industry is a country’s important pillar industry, and films play an irreplaceable and important role in the culture industry. Nowadays, films have become a kind of world language which represents the image of a country. And the development of the film industry has also accelerated the improvement of international cultural competitiveness. In the perspective of contemporary social culture, we should have an international comparative study on domestic and foreign films and then make the best of the both to help Chinese film culture industry to go a good way of internationalization.

  14. Perspectives and Paradoxes in the sensory-cultural explorative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Pia

    The paper presents varieties of cultural science's investigation of human sensory experience in different cultures through history. One of the discoveries of the pioneering scientists exploring human sensoria was in fact the discovery of human sense being culturally different in matter rather tha...... of poverty....

  15. Characterization of European Management Perspective Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida CÎMPEANU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because Europe is characterized by the coexistence of several cultures whose characteristics have both similarities and differences but appreciable, the results of researchers in this regard are different from each other, this distinction is often made based on the prevailing values of that culture , which determines the orientation of the country for a certain system, management style or to a specific profile manager. A particularly important role in characterizing cultural factors play European management, each differing from the other culture as module in addressing various fundamental issues that characterize that society. These issues can be characterized by certain general cultural dimensions that Hofstede defines them as aspects of a culture that can be measured in relation to other cultures. The differences between management systems in European countries (mainly EU countries in the context of this article, the study is based on four cultural dimensions of Hofstede model (power distance, individualism vs. collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, femininity vs. masculinity and change scores recorded for these dimensions in each country. Dimensions considered primarily affect organizational culture which in turn significantly influence the development and performance of the organization and its members, management practices and policies.Data from Hofstede's study reinforce and support the claim that European countries can be grouped systematically cultural groups (Nordic countries, Latin, Germanic, Anglo-Saxon, Eastern Europe that allow significant interpretation in terms of management organization, and that can speak of a typical single European culture but you can see all dimensions of cultural differences taken into account.

  16. Singing and Cultural Understanding: A Music Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Beatriz; Chen-Hafteck, Lily; Crawford, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between singing and cultural understanding. Singing emerges in infancy and develops through processes of enculturation and socialization. When we sing songs from diverse cultures, we are granted with opportunities to learn about the cultures of others, and gain a better understanding of our own. Thus, singing…

  17. From Cultural Tourism to Creative Tourism : European Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, G.W.

    2002-01-01

    Cultural tourism is seen as a major growth market in Europe, although empirical evidence is still relatively sparse. An analysis is presented of the ATLAS survey data for 2002 as well as research conducted at the Rotterdam Cultural Capital Event in 2001. These data indicate that cultural tourism gro

  18. Perspectives on Cultural Geography in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher; Johnston-Anumonwo, Ibipo

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of selected current concerns in cultural geography and the way it is taught. It includes coverage of cultural convergence and divergence, race and gender as culturally defined topics, and best teaching practices, including those related to analyzing controversial issues. Two important geographical models are laid…

  19. Understanding English and Chinese Idioms from a Cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代礼胜

    2009-01-01

    Idioms are an important reflection of the culture of a language. English and Chinese are both rich in idioms. However, owing to different cultural factors, the cultural messages embodied in their respective idioms naturally display substantial differences as well as similarities. If we neglect such factors, we will make mistakes in idiom-interpretation. This paper mainly talks about the cultural differences embodied in English and Chinese idioms to remind English majors of the strong cultural characteristics of idioms for better understanding and smooth communication.

  20. Parenting and child mental health: a cross-cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H

    2013-10-01

    In its most general instrumental sense, parenting consists of care of the young in preparing them to manage the tasks of life. Parents provide childhood experiences and populate the environments that guide children's development and so contribute to child mental health. Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture. Every culture is characterized, and distinguished from other cultures, by deep-rooted and widely acknowledged ideas about how one needs to feel, think, and act as an adequately functioning member of the culture. Insofar as parents subscribe to particular conventions of a culture, they likely follow prevailing "cultural scripts" in childrearing. Broadening our definition, it is therefore the continuing task of parents also to enculturate children by preparing them for the physical, psychosocial, and educational situations that are characteristic of their specific culture. Cross-cultural comparisons show that virtually all aspects of parenting children are informed by culture: culture influences when and how parents care for children, what parents expect of children, and which behaviors parents appreciate, emphasize and reward or discourage and punish. Thus, cultural norms become manifest in the mental health of children through parenting. Furthermore, variations in what is normative in different cultures challenge our assumptions about what is universal and inform our understanding of how parent-child relationships unfold in ways both culturally universal and specific. This essay concerns the contributions of culture to parenting and child mental health. No study of a single society can address this broad issue. It is possible, however, to learn lessons about parenting and child mental health from the study of different societies.

  1. The Study of the Culture Infiltration From Perspective of Etymology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王子恒

    2013-01-01

    By analyzing Chinese and English loan words,this paper first points out that the extent of infiltration of both languages in terms of linguistics and culture.English loan words have great effect on Chinese culturally,linguistically and semantically.Many English words reflect in the latest technological and cultural development are borrowed by Chinese vocabulary.Tracing these words back in the Etymology way,we can find the influence brought by the English language culture to Chinese language culture.From another aspect,through analyzing words borrowed from Chinese in form in recent years,which are listed as new words in English dictionaries,and through exploring the Chinese tradition and cul-ture these loan words mainly based on,this paper reflects that Chinese culture has affected English culture to a certain degree.With the rapid development of cultural communication,words borrowed are increasing and will be gradually included within the given standards.Finally the pa-per presents a discussion on the mutual influence of loan words and culture infiltration.

  2. The Study of the Culture Infiltration From Perspective of Etymology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王子恒

    2013-01-01

    By analyzing Chinese and English loan words,this paper first points out that the extent of infiltration of both languages in terms of linguistics and culture.English loan words have great effect on Chinese culturally,linguistically and semantically.Many English words reflect in the latest technological and cultural development are borrowed by Chinese vocabulary.Tracing these words back in the Etymology way,we can find the influence brought by the English language culture to Chinese language culture.From another aspect,through analyzing words borrowed from Chinese in form in recent years,which are listed as new words in English dictionaries,and through exploring the Chinese tradition and culture these loan words mainly based on,this paper reflects that Chinese culture has affected English culture to a certain degree.With the rapid development of cultural communication,words borrowed are increasing and will be gradually included within the given standards.Finally the paper presents a discussion on the mutual influence of loan words and culture infiltration.

  3. Immobilization to prevent enzyme incompatibility with proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme incompatibility is a problem in multi-enzyme processes that involve a non-specific protease, such as Alcalase. An example is the one-pot enzymatic synthesis of peptides catalyzed by a lipase and a protease. The incompatibility between lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB) and Alcalase was

  4. Family and Cultural Capital. The perspective of familiness

    OpenAIRE

    Ortíz García, Pilar; Olaz Capitán, Ángel José; Monreal Martínez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the family on a business, its commitment to the company and the values it conveys form a capital capable of influencing the global development of a business. This research analyzes family capital and in particular its cultural components as a resource influencing the direction of the company. Corporate culture as a guiding philosophy for family business strategy is a key factor in its success. In short, the cultural capital of a family business is a capac...

  5. Reconsidering the Equivalence in Translation From Cultural Differences Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yinling

    2009-01-01

    Translation involves language as well as culture. Cultural similarities exist in languages; however cultural differences have an essential bearing upon translation. Even approximate equivalent and loan words have different implications and usages in English and Chinese. So, this challenges the traditional concept of equivalence as a constitutive feature of translation. To an author, there is no such thing as absolute equivalence in the context of E-C translation for the simple reason that Chinese and English belong to two entirely different cultural traditions. However, through careful comparative studies, relative equivalents can be achieved.

  6. Analysis of Culture Conflicts in The Joy Luck Club from the High-con-text and Low-context Culture Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Jiao

    2016-01-01

    As a work that reflects culture differences between China and America, the Joy Luck Club has drawn a wide attention from scholars whose researches are more of holistic analyses from a macro perspective of cross-cultural communication. In ac-cordance with the degree of dependence of semantic on dialogue context and dialogue language itself, Edward Hall divides cul-ture into high-context culture and low-context culture, and holds that Chinese culture is a high-context culture, while American culture is a low-context one. According to Hall’s theory, the Sino-US cultural conflicts reflected by the mother-daughter con-flicts in the Joy Luck Club can be analyzed from high-context and low-context culture perspective. And after conflicts, there fi-nally will be a harmonious trend of Sino-US culture development, changing from clash and conflict to convergence and integra-tion.

  7. Perspectives of Early Intervention Professionals about Culturally-Appropriate Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Bennett, Tess; Fowler, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 123 early intervention professionals found they considered recommendations for providing culturally appropriate services important. However, multiple barriers often hindered implementation. Lack of time was the most common barrier to providing culturally appropriate practices, followed by lack of training and lack of materials.…

  8. Perspectives of cultural tourism in the modern tourism market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilinčić Marina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decades of the XX century, which the United Nations declared the decade of cultural tourism in the world, have contributed to encouraging people to think about the question of how tourism can contribute to the development of heritage and culture, or how tourism the same may compromise. However, the cultural offer today, is an essential and important part of a modern tourist offer, without which it can no longer be imagined, as cultural tourism is becoming an increasingly important segment of the global tourism market. It had a great share in the expansion of a tourist demand and tourist offer and their profiling, leading to a whole series of specific forms of tourism in its embrace, and today more attention is paid to the industrial heritage, cultural routes, cultural landscapes and similar, as current forms of cultural tourism in the modern tourism market. In fact, theorists of tourism are now faced with a number of new types of tourist movements which have resulted in the creation of various forms of cultural tourism that were not even discussed in the last century, and the fact is that a change in tourist demand brings new habits and new needs that can be implemented only through special forms of tourism.

  9. The Limits of Cultural Competence: An Indigenous Studies Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Taking the Universities Australia report, "National best practice framework for Indigenous cultural competency in Australian universities" (2011) as the starting point for its discussion, this paper examines the applicability of cultural competence in the design and delivery of Australian Indigenous Studies. It argues that both the…

  10. Why Lesson Study Works in Japan: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaeguin, Marlon; Stephens, Max

    2014-01-01

    Japanese lesson study has attracted many international educators who have been impressed by its capacity to foster student learning and sustained professional growth of teachers. This paper reports a study on its cultural orientations that may explain why lesson study works seamlessly in Japan. Hofstede's dimensions of national culture are…

  11. Creativity and Giftedness in Culturally Diverse Students. Perspectives on Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Giselle B., Ed.; Houtz, John C., Ed.

    The 11 chapters in this text address issues concerned with identification and educational intervention with gifted students who are from culturally diverse backgrounds. Chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "The Culturally and Linguistically Diverse School Population in the United States" (Angela Reyes-Carrasquillo); (2) "Culturally…

  12. Taking Culture into Account: A Maori Perspective on Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Brown, Jill; Walker, Taingunguru

    2013-01-01

    The authors open this article by noting that there is substantial research evidence showing that ethnic culture affects how disability is perceived and managed, and that taking a person's culture into account maximizes the effectiveness of the person's education. Jill Bevan-Brown and Taingunguru Walker, address this gap in knowledge by…

  13. Researching Children's Musical Culture: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, M.

    2010-01-01

    When she was invited to present a keynote address at the Exeter Conference, the author was asked to offer "a particular perspective on a field of research within music education or a related domain". Given her interest in the related disciplines of sociology and ethnomusicology, and acknowledging the centrality of children's music making in the…

  14. Culture, Context, and Innovation: A Kiwi Canuck Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Dave; Shaver, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This commentary lends a global practitioner perspective on the utility of this volume to the efforts of mentors and mentees and mentoring program developers. Dave Marshall and Karen Shaver, of Big Brothers Big Sisters New Zealand and Canada, respectively, offer keen insights into the value of creating a shared language for discussing mentoring…

  15. Human nature and culture: an evolutionary psychological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, D M

    2001-12-01

    Personality psychology is the broadest of all psychological subdisciplines in that it seeks a conceptually integrated understanding of both human nature and important individual differences. Cultural differences pose a unique set of problems for any comprehensive theory of personality-how can they be reconciled with universals of human nature on the one hand and within-cultural variation on the other? Evolutionary psychology provides one set of conceptual tools by which this conceptual integration can be made. It requires jettisoning the false but still-pervasive dichotomy of culture versus biology, acknowledging a universal human nature, and recognizing that the human mind contains many complex psychological mechanisms that are selectively activated, depending on cultural contexts. Culture rests on a foundation of evolved psychological mechanisms and cannot be understood without those mechanisms.

  16. An Empirical Perspective on the Culture - Corporate Social Responsibility Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru ZAIȚ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Business competition and pressure of European directives put Romanian company in a position to find answers to issues related to long-term survival and development. In this context we believe it is necessary to analyze some of the most important components that should be taken into consideration at the strategic level: national and organizational culture. The results indicate that corporate social responsibility is supported by learning and change-oriented organizational culture, but also by a favorable cultural and national economic framework. Based on these theoretical considerations we intent to emphasize the relationships between national culture / corporate culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR, elaborating an empirical argument by analyzing the results provided by Global 100, an annual project initiated by Corporate Knights Inc. (Davos. Starting with 2005, it has the largest database in the world and an appropriate evaluation methodology that provides a ranking of the top 100 most responsible companies in the world.

  17. Translation of the Chinese Menu from the Perspective of Food Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪平心

    2015-01-01

    Chinese food culture is similar to a pearl shinning in this era of globalization.Due to a higher frequency of cross-cultural communication than ever before,people from western countries show increasing interests in Chinese cuisine.Therefore,a standardized translation of the Chinese menu plays a more indispensible role in grasping the precise understanding of Chinese food names for foreign diners.From a cultural perspective,this paper primarily discusses various differences between Chinese and Western food cultures,and provides major translation principles and tips of the Chinese menu so as to arrive at a standardized translation as clearly and accessibly as possible.

  18. ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morath, Christian; Zeier, Martin; Döhler, Bernd; Opelz, Gerhard; Süsal, Caner

    2017-01-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation has long been considered a contraindication to successful kidney transplantation. During the last 25 years, increasing organ shortage enforced the development of strategies to overcome the ABO antibody barrier. In the meantime, ABOi kidney transplantation has become a routine procedure with death-censored graft survival rates comparable to the rates in compatible transplantations. Desensitization is usually achieved by apheresis and B cell-depleting therapies that are accompanied by powerful immunosuppression. Anti-A/B antibodies are aimed to be below a certain threshold at the time of ABOi kidney transplantation and during the first 2 weeks after surgery. Thereafter, even a rebound of anti-A/B antibodies does not appear to harm the kidney transplant, a phenomenon that is called accommodation, but is poorly understood. There is still concern, however, that infectious complications such as viral disease, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and severe urinary tract infections are increased after ABOi transplantations. Recent data from the Collaborative Transplant Study show that during the first year after kidney transplantation, one additional patient death from an infectious complication occurs in 100 ABOi kidney transplant recipients. Herein, we review the recent evidence on ABOi kidney transplantation with a focus on desensitization strategies and respective outcomes. PMID:28321223

  19. Religious and Cultural Dress at School: A Comparative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E de Waal,

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates and compares the different approaches towards the dress code of learners1 in South Africa and the United States of America (US, as the US mainly base litigation concerning school dress code on their freedom of speech/expression clause, while similar South African court cases focus more on religious and cultural freedom. In South Africa, school principals and School Governing Bodies are in dire need of clear guidelines on how to respect and honour the constitutionally entrenched right to all of the different religions and cultures. The crisis of values in education arises from the disparity between the value system espoused by the school and the community, and that expressed in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, which guarantees learners' fundamental rights, including those of freedom of religion, culture, expression and human dignity. On the one hand, the South African Schools Act requires of School Governing Bodies to develop and implement a Code of Conduct for learners, and on the other, that they strictly adhere to the Constitution of the country when drawing up their dress codes. The right of a religious group to practise its religion or of a cultural group to respect and sustain its culture must be consistent with the provisions of the Bill of Rights (which is entrenched in the Constitution and this implies that other rights may not infringe on the right to freedom of religion and culture. In the US, although there is no legislation that protects learners' freedom of religion and culture at schools, their First Amendment guides the way. Their Supreme Court respects the religious values of all citizens provided that they are manifested off public school premises. While we acknowledge the existence of religious and cultural diversity at South African schools, this paper focuses on the tension among and on the existence of different approaches towards the human rights of learners from different

  20. IS CHC student surface learner A cross-cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佩绮

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, the "CH"(Confucian Heritage Culture)learner phenomenon had aroused the interest of sociologists, educators and psychologists. Examination orientation, achievement orientation, use of repetitive learning, synthesis of memorization and understanding, and the use of recitation to bring about sharp focus for better understanding were some of the themes of these researches. This paper will explain what the general paradox of CHC learners is and how cultural difference can affect students' motivation for learning according to Chen and Stevenson's model of cultural influence, and discuss the major misconception of CHC learners' study approach.

  1. Does culture or illness change a smoker's perspective on cessation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Iraj M; Shum, Jessica; Cheng, Natalie; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2014-09-01

    To explore cultural context for smoking cessation within Chinese communities in Vancouver, and identify opportunities to support development of culturally appropriate resources for cessation. Applied participatory approach involving community members, patients, and key-informants in the design and implementation of the research. Whereas many participants were motivated to quit, their perceptions of desire to do so were not supported by effective interventions and many attempts to quit were unsuccessful. Tobacco control clinics and care providers need to adopt culturally and linguistically relevant interventions to facilitate behavioral modifications and cessation in ethnic minority communities.

  2. Rumors of Our Demise Have Been Greatly Exaggerated: Archaeological Perspectives on Culture and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron B. Wesson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of the imminent demise of Indigenous cultures have circulated among Western intellectuals for more than two hundred years. Capitalism, Christianity, and Western civilization were thought by 19th century scholars to be on the verge of eradicating global cultural variation. Contemporary scholars have revived these views, suggesting that not only were Indigenous cultures about to succumb to Western hegemony, these forces were poised to bring about the end of history itself. What unites these perspectives are an ideology stressing asymmetrical power relations between the West and Indigenous cultures, and the proposition that only Western intervention is capable of rescuing Indigeneity. This paper examines the current crisis of Indigenous cultural sustainability, arguing that the epistemology informing many of these perspectives remain largely unchanged from their 19th century precursors. Citing case studies in archaeology and cultural heritage management, I suggest a ground-up approach to cultural sustainability in which Western institutions and individuals serve only the expressed desires and at the invitation of Indigenous peoples. Such restraint represents both recognition of Indigenous sovereignty regarding all cultural preservation efforts, as well as the dynamic, ever-changing nature of culture itself.

  3. Plant genetics: unlocking the secrets of self-incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, D

    2000-03-09

    At last, clear evidence has been obtained, from transformation of the pollen incompatibility reaction of Brassica, showing that angiosperm self-incompatibility involves separate genes for the pollen and pistil incompatibility recognition processes.

  4. Research Report: A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Practical Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jane R.

    1987-01-01

    Questions the extent to which practical intelligence can be measured in a reliable and valid fashion cross-culturally. Differentiates between the internal validity of our measure of practical intelligence and its external validity. (LHW)

  5. Parenting and child mental health: a cross‐cultural perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bornstein, Marc H

    2013-01-01

    .... Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture...

  6. Becoming Image : Perspectives on Digital Culture, Fashion and Technofeminism

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlin, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Departing from a technofeminist perspective, Becoming Image, places the digital image in a broader context of modern and postmodern technological discourses and fashion. In four articles, the compilation dissertation expands a contemporary and imagistic tech discourse by questioning the ideology of ”masculinity”―specifically the idea of it as a historically male domain. Through interviews, discourse analysis and feminist critique, as well as an interdisciplinary focus on digital media, the pr...

  7. Cultural Economy. The economic impact of the cultural sector from a European perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Colombo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Culture is playing an increasingly important role in the economic development of industrialised countries. Thus, the management of large cultural events and the relationship between cultural management and cultural policies will be key elements in the development of the so-called cultural economy. This article looks at the concept of cultural economy, in terms of the appearance of the idea and the different European methodological positions. The case of the Berlin International Film Festival is taken as an example to show the importance of cultural management with regard to economic development of the sector. This case study also allows for the analysis of the increasingly complex forms of cultural management adopted, as well as their effects on the regulation of the cultural market and their links to other basic economic sectors in urban development.

  8. A Cross-Cultural Perspective on the Privacy Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Trepte

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The “privacy calculus” approach to studying online privacy implies that willingness to engage in disclosures on social network sites (SNSs depends on evaluation of the resulting risks and benefits. In this article, we propose that cultural factors influence the perception of privacy risks and social gratifications. Based on survey data collected from participants from five countries (Germany [n = 740], the Netherlands [n = 89], the United Kingdom [n = 67], the United States [n = 489], and China [n = 165], we successfully replicated the privacy calculus. Furthermore, we found that culture plays an important role: As expected, people from cultures ranking high in individualism found it less important to generate social gratifications on SNSs as compared to people from collectivist-oriented countries. However, the latter placed greater emphasis on privacy risks—presumably to safeguard the collective. Furthermore, we identified uncertainty avoidance to be a cultural dimension crucially influencing the perception of SNS risks and benefits. As expected, people from cultures ranking high in uncertainty avoidance found privacy risks to be more important when making privacy-related disclosure decisions. At the same time, these participants ascribed lower importance to social gratifications—possibly because social encounters are perceived to be less controllable in the social media environment.

  9. Intercultural Communication as Viewed from the Perspective of Cross-cultural Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Ryoko

    The encounter with foreign nationals in everyday life calls for not only understanding of the other on the level of recognition but also the ability to cope with the whole spectrum of emotional reactions associated with direct experience of other cultures. Viewing the subject from the perspective of cross-cultural psychology, this paper outlines the course of human information processing that restricts cross-cultural personal acceptance and the psychological process involved in contact with other cultures. Building on this basis, it then discusses the significance of understanding other cultures and examines requirements for communication with people who have different cultural backgrounds. A particular focus is the approach to communication with international students in Japanese universities.

  10. Organizational Culture Perspective Ethnological Approach Reflected in the Work of Dimitrie Cantemir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoela Popescu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Culture is the foundation to explain nearly all phenomena and processes occurring withinorganizations, as well as performance differences between organizations. Similar national culture,organizational culture is at the same time, the premise and starting point for changing the organization'sperformance. In an uncertain environment, marked by profound structural and procedural changes required anorganizational culture and historical research in order to identify component elements relatively easy tochange. In this regard, an analysis of organizational culture in ethnological perspective permit to identify itscomponents and accumulated cultural elements reflected in the work of Dimitrie Cantemir. It explains, forexample, positive behavior of organizations with foreign partners (hospitality, and certain organizationalvalues: tolerance, intelligence, spirit of oratory, humor, corruption, works jumps, etc.

  11. Perspectives on Child Abuse and Labour: Global Ethical Ideals Versus African Cultural Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, A. O.; Torimiro, D. O.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the global and African postures on the issues of child abuse and child labour. The global ethical ideals of the issues are characterized within their various theoretical perspectives while the African cultural realities are explored through the use of focus group discussion sessions, which were organized in six rural…

  12. Gender Equality and Cultural Diversity from a Comparative Nordic and European Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    2005-01-01

    The paper looks at the relation between gender equality and cultural equality from a comparative persepctive focising on tensions and conflicts from a comporative Nordic and European perspective. It starts with a brief overview of key elements in integration strategies and philosophies in selected...

  13. Exploring Links between Empowerment and Community-Based Arts and Cultural Practices: Perspectives from Barcelona Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Ruben David Fernández; Monferrer, Moisés Carmona; Tarditi, Andrés Di Masso

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on the development of community-based arts and cultural (CBAC) practices to promote psychosocial, group/organisational and community changes from the perspective of empowerment. We draw on findings from an initial exploratory phase of an ongoing action-research project in Spain about creative tools that empower artists…

  14. Deaf Students as a Linguistic and Cultural Minority: Shifting Perspectives and Implications for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Michael; Lieberman, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children have traditionally been perceived and educated as a special needs population. Over the past several decades, many factors have converged to enable a shift in perspective to one in which deaf children are viewed as a cultural and linguistic minority, and the education of deaf children is approached from a bilingual framework. This…

  15. Cross-cultural perspectives of successful aging: Young Turks and Europeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cosco, T.D.; Brehme, D.; Grigoruta, N.; Kaufmann, L.K.; Lemsalu, L.; Meex, R.C.R.; Schuurmans, A.T.; Sener, N.; Stephan, B.C.M.; Brayne, C.

    2015-01-01

    Successful aging (SA) has been conceptualized in a number of ways. Despite increasing research into how laypersons define SA, few studies capturing lay perspectives of SA in younger cohorts and in non-English speaking countries have been undertaken. The current study examines cross-cultural

  16. Belief, Knowledge and Understanding: How to Deal with the Relations between Different Cultural Perspectives in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-dos-Santos, Frederik; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses how to deal with the relations between different cultural perspectives in classrooms, based on a proposal for considering understanding and knowledge as goals of science education, inspired by Dewey's naturalistic humanism. It thus combines educational and philosophical interests. In educational terms, our concerns relate to…

  17. Kuwaiti Female Leaders' Perspectives: The Influence of Culture on Their Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Suwaihel, Omaymah E.

    2010-01-01

    This research revealed the interactions between the Kuwaiti culture, gender, and leadership from the perspective of five Kuwaiti female leaders. Within a qualitative design approach and narrative inquiry methodology, the researcher interviewed five Kuwaiti females who shared their stories of their personal and professional experiences about the…

  18. Urban and Rural High School Students' Perspectives of Productive Peer Culture for Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Melva R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine students' perspectives about productive peer culture (PPC) in general and for mathematics learning. The urban and rural high school students in this study have participated for at least one year in either an Algebra Project Cohort Model (APCM) for daily mathematics instruction and/or worked as mathematics…

  19. Organisational Culture: An Exploratory Study Comparing Faculties' Perspectives within Public and Private Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sharimllah Devi; Chong, Siong Choy; Ismail, Hishamuddin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this paper to study the organisational culture (OC) in private and public higher education institutions (HEIs) from the perspective of faculty members in order to provide empirical insights on the differences and consequently pave an avenue for cross-learning. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 594…

  20. Shared Values and Socio-Cultural Norms: E-Learning Technologies from a Social Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Patti; Velan, Gary M.; Shulruf, Boaz

    2017-01-01

    From a perspective of social practice, learning is a socially constituted practice that is imbued with socio-culturally significant meanings and shaped by the values and norms shared within a community of learners. This focus group study examines the role of e-learning technologies in mediating the social practice of learning among coursework…

  1. Organisational Culture: An Exploratory Study Comparing Faculties' Perspectives within Public and Private Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Sharimllah Devi; Chong, Siong Choy; Ismail, Hishamuddin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this paper to study the organisational culture (OC) in private and public higher education institutions (HEIs) from the perspective of faculty members in order to provide empirical insights on the differences and consequently pave an avenue for cross-learning. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 594…

  2. Empire and Children's Literature: Changing Patterns of Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Don

    2010-01-01

    Robert Louis Stevenson's poem "Foreign Children," Rudyard Kipling's poem "We and They," and Frances Temple's youth novel "The Beduins' Gazelle" are the texts submitted to detailed analysis in this article, which examines cross-cultural perspectives in relation to imperial and post-imperial social contexts. Stevenson is shown to portray the basic…

  3. Analysis of the cultural tourism trends and perspectives in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela TIGU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tourism brings a number of benefits, including the enhancement of economic opportunities by creating more jobs for local residents or the increase in income by stimulating and creating local and regional markets. Tourism can also help to protect natural and cultural heritage, preserve the values through education and interpretation, and help to support research and development of good environmental practices. This paper’s purpose is to analyse the cultural tourism in Romania, taking into consideration the potential of Romania’s cultural heritage and the benefits that tourism industry can bring to the country and to the local communities. The originality of this study is highlighted by the combination and correlation of statistics, including correlation and regression methods, that have as main purpose the computation and conclusions’ simplification, knowing that it is very difficult to quantify the multitude of all the factors that influence a specific phenomenon.

  4. Globalization, differentiation and drinking cultures, an anthropological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wilson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available L’alcool et sa consommation ne renvoient pas simplement au domaine économique. L’alcool est devenu aujourd’hui une partie intégrale des relations sociales dans différentes cultures au point où son importance globale est souvent sous-estimée par ses plus ardents critiques. En dépit de ses conséquences directes sur la santé, sa consommation a pris une certaine ampleur dans le monde industriel développé. Certainement son rôle central dans la construction des identités individuelles explique sa position clé au sein des sociétés. Que nous dit le saké à propos du Japon ou le vin de Bourgogne sur la France? Que nous dit la consommation ou l’abstinence d’alcool sur les questions d’identité individuelle, d’ethnicité, de classe et de culture? Quelle place tient l’alcool dans la définition de soi et dans la notion de résistance? Répondre à ces questions et à d’autres est le but essentiel de cet article qui examine la consommation d’alcool à travers différentes cultures et ce que boire signifie pour ceux qui choisissent de consommer ou de s’abstenir. De l’Irlande à Hong-Kong, Mexico à l’Allemagne, l’alcool occupe un certain nombre de fonctions sociales, religieuses, politiques et familiales. Les cultures du boire définissent ces consommations dans le cadre plus large des pratiques sociales et montrent comment classes sociales, ethnicité et nationalisme peuvent s’exprimer à travers cette commodité. En partant d’approches de terrain, les contributeurs analysent l’interface entre culture et pouvoir dans les bars et pubs, la signification des images publicitaires, le rôle de ces boissons dans la vie quotidienne. Le résultat est la première publication comparative sur les questions de l’impact que la consommation d’alcool a sur l’identité nationale dans le monde aujourd’hui.Alcohol is not only big business, it has become an essential part of social relations in so many cultures that

  5. Cross Cultural Perspectives of Gender and Management in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K.; Riordan, S.; Ozkanli, O.; Neale, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This article presents preliminary results of a cross cultural study of gender and management in universities. Methodology: Qualitative interviews with senior managers in each country were analysed in relation to key concepts of career paths, support, gate keeping, management skills, disciplinary factors, gendered leadership styles and…

  6. The International Mobility of Chinese Students: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Anyone hoping to understand China and Chinese people's behaviour in the present day must examine China's long history and culture, as these often have crystallized into current behavioural patterns. This paper discusses one important push-out factor for Chinese students' outbound mobility, and an element that is ignored in many futuristic…

  7. Women and Slavery: A Cross-Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Dorothy C.

    A cross-cultural and historical survey of the relationship between slavery and the status of women focuses on Marxian theory, the position of free women, sexual division of labor, the threat of rape, and equivalents of slavery in the modern world. Throughout history, the majority of slaves have been women, many of whom held favored positions,…

  8. ICT-Based, Cross-Cultural Communication: A Methodological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Niels; Bruselius-Jensen, Maria; Danielsen, Dina; Nyamai, Rachael; Otiende, James; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses how cross-cultural communication based on information and communication technologies (ICT) may be used in participatory health promotion as well as in education in general. The analysis draws on experiences from a health education research project with grade 6 (approx. 12 years) pupils in Nairobi (Kenya) and Copenhagen…

  9. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  10. E-Learning Course Design from a Cross Cultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahmy, Sandra Safwat Youssef

    national, cultural and linguistic borders. The study attempts to shed a light on the differences in the learning practices of students in different countries, by using a mix between ethnography and grounded theory methodologies, to explore the different educational systems and learning practices...

  11. Exploring College Students' Cultural View from a Knowledge Creation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Guo-Tsai; Hong, Huang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate college students' cultural views. To this end, an exploratory study was implemented, and data mainly came from students' essay writing (via individual reflective activities) and focused group discussion (via collective reflective activities). The participants were 176 college students taking a…

  12. Adolescent Sexuality and Culture: South African Mothers` Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been a practice in African societies for adolescents to be educated about ... parents and children report that they do not talk to each other about sex (George & ... sought to investigate the influence of culture in mothers' expected role of ...

  13. Translating agency reform: rhetoric and culture in comparative perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smullen, A.

    2010-01-01

    Through comparative analysis this book examines and explains the official rhetoric of agency reform across consensus and adversarial political cultures. It traces the trajectory of talk about agency reform in The Netherlands, Sweden and Australia and identifies the national styles of speaking that m

  14. Review of The Joy Luck Club—From a Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易妹

    2016-01-01

    The Joy Luck Club is a must-read for people interested in intercultural communication and mother-daughter relationship. It consists of sixteen interwoven stories about conflicts between immigrant mothers and their American-raised daughters and between couples. The writer sets out to explore the clashes from a cross-cultural perspective, mainly discussing the Chinese and western cultural differences and similarities. She focuses on four topics—hope, individuality, equality and experience and finds out that the clashes are not only caused by culture differences but also by other factors, e.g. generation gap.

  15. Cross-cultural perspectives: implications for attachment theory and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuchin, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Cross-cultural perspectives have always been useful for understanding behavior. They clarify the distinction between aspects that are essentially part of the human condition and those that are the most responsive to variation. The interesting article by Rothbaum and his colleagues is in that tradition, contrasting the cultural values and family patterns in Japanese society with those of Western cultures, including our own, and suggesting that these differences shape the nature and course of attachment. It stimulates questions about what we have taken for granted in our theories and in our evaluations of dysfunctional behavior.

  16. Do Wolbachia-associated incompatibilities promote polyandry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion de Crespigny, Fleur E; Hurst, Laurence D; Wedell, Nina

    2008-01-01

    The genetic incompatibility avoidance hypothesis as an explanation for the polyandrous mating strategies (mating with more than one male) of females of many species has received significant attention in recent years. It has received support from both empirical studies and a meta-analysis, which concludes that polyandrous females enjoy increased reproductive success through improved offspring viability relative to monandrous females. In this study we investigate whether polyandrous female Drosophila simulans improve their fitness relative to monandrous females in the face of severe Wolbachia-associated reproductive incompatibilities. We use the results of this study to develop models that test the predictions that Wolbachia should promote polyandry, and that polyandry itself may constrain the spread of Wolbachia. Uniquely, our models allow biologically relevant rates of incompatibility to coevolve with a polyandry modifier allele, which allows us to evaluate the fate of the modifier and that of Wolbachia. Our empirical results reveal that polyandrous females significantly reduce the reproductive costs of Wolbachia, owing to infected males being poor sperm competitors. The models show that this disadvantage in sperm competition can inhibit or prevent the invasion of Wolbachia. However, despite the increased reproductive success obtained by polyandrous females, the spread of a polyandry modifier allele is constrained by any costs that might be associated with polyandry and the low frequency of incompatible matings when Wolbachia has reached a stable equilibrium. Therefore, although incompatibility avoidance may be a benefit of polyandry, our findings do not support the hypothesis that genetic incompatibilities caused by Wolbachia promote the evolution of polyandry.

  17. "Shattering culture": perspectives on cultural competence and evidence-based practice in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio; Hannah, Seth Donal

    2015-04-01

    The concept of culture as an analytic concept has increasingly been questioned by social scientists, just as health care institutions and clinicians have increasingly routinized concepts and uses of culture as means for improving the quality of care for racial and ethnic minorities. This paper examines this tension, asking whether it is possible to use cultural categories to develop evidenced-based practice guidelines in mental health services when these categories are challenged by the increasing hyperdiversity of patient populations and newer theories of culture that question direct connection between group-based social identities and cultural characteristics. Anthropologists have grown concerned about essentializing societies, yet unequal treatment on the basis of cultural, racial, or ethnic group membership is present in medicine and mental health care today. We argue that discussions of culture-patients' culture and the "culture of medicine"-should be sensitive to the risk of improper stereotypes, but should also be sensitive to the continuing significance of group-based discrimination and the myriad ways culture shapes clinical presentation, doctor-patient interactions, the illness experience, and the communication of symptoms. We recommend that mental health professionals consider the local contexts, with greater appreciation for the diversity of lived experience found among individual patients. This suggests a nuanced reliance on broad cultural categories of racial, ethnic, and national identities in evidence-based practice guidelines. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Philosophical and cultural perspectives on acoustics in Vedic Hinduism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, M. G.

    2001-05-01

    Acoustics plays a very important multi-faceted role in Vedic Hinduism. Vedas, that is an infinitely large collection of chants (mantras) in ancient Sanskrit language, form the foundational literature of Vedic Hinduism. The Vedic chants have specific acoustical qualities and intonations. The Vedic literature describes the various aspects of acoustics, namely, philosophical, spiritual, and cultural. The use of sounds from conch-shell, bells, cymbal in addition to the Vedic chants in rituals shows the spiritual aspects. Vedic literature discusses the role of sound in the philosophical understanding of our world. Music, both vocal and instrumental, plays an important role in the cultural aspects of Vedic Hinduism. It can be seen that certain musical instruments such as ``mridangam,'' a percussion drum, reflect scientific principles underlying in their design. This paper presents an overview of the various important and interesting roles of acoustics in Vedic Hinduism.

  19. Interdisciplinary and Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Explanatory Coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Busch, Justin T A; Legare, Cristine H

    2015-10-01

    Natural and supernatural explanations are used to interpret the same events in a number of predictable and universal ways. Yet little is known about how variation in diverse cultural ecologies influences how people integrate natural and supernatural explanations. Here, we examine explanatory coexistence in three existentially arousing domains of human thought: illness, death, and human origins using qualitative data from interviews conducted in Tanna, Vanuatu. Vanuatu, a Melanesian archipelago, provides a cultural context ideal for examining variation in explanatory coexistence due to the lack of industrialization and the relatively recent introduction of Christianity and Western education. We argue for the integration of interdisciplinary methodologies from cognitive science and anthropology to inform research on explanatory coexistence. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Philosophical and cultural perspectives on acoustics in Vedic Hinduism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, M. G.

    2004-05-01

    Acoustics plays a very important multi-faceted role in Vedic Hinduism. Vedas, that is an infinitely large collection of chants (mantras) in ancient Sanskrit language, form the foundational literature of Vedic Hinduism. The Vedic chants have specific acoustical qualities and intonations. The Vedic literature describes the various aspects of acoustics, namely, philosophical, spiritual, and cultural. The use of sounds from conch-shell, bells, cymbal in addition to the Vedic chants in rituals shows the spiritual aspects. Vedic literature discusses the role of sound in the philosophical understanding of our world. Music, both vocal and instrumental, plays an important role in the cultural aspects of Vedic Hinduism. It can be seen that certain musical instruments such as ``mridangam,'' a percussion drum, reflect scientific principles underlying in their design. This paper presents an overview of the various important and interesting roles of acoustics in Vedic Hinduism.

  1. Religious and Cultural Dress at School: A Comparative Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    E de Waal,; R Mestry; CJ Russo

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates and compares the different approaches towards the dress code of learners1 in South Africa and the United States of America (US), as the US mainly base litigation concerning school dress code on their freedom of speech/expression clause, while similar South African court cases focus more on religious and cultural freedom. In South Africa, school principals and School Governing Bodies are in dire need of clear guidelines on how to respect and honour the constitutionall...

  2. Religious and Cultural Dress at School: A Comparative Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    E de Waal,; Mestry, R; CJ Russo

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates and compares the different approaches towards the dress code of learners1 in South Africa and the United States of America (US), as the US mainly base litigation concerning school dress code on their freedom of speech/expression clause, while similar South African court cases focus more on religious and cultural freedom. In South Africa, school principals and School Governing Bodies are in dire need of clear guidelines on how to respect and honour the constitutionall...

  3. Religious and cultural dress as school: a comparative perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Waal, E. de; C.J. Russo; Mestry, R

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates and compares the different approaches towards the dress code of learners1 in South Africa and the United States of America (US), as the US mainly base litigation concerning school dress code on their freedom of speech/expression clause, while similar South African court cases focus more on religious and cultural freedom. In South Africa, school principals and School Governing Bodies are in dire need of clear guidelines on how to respect and honour t...

  4. The Quality of Outsourced Logistics Service: A Collectivist Culture Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmat, Abdul Khabir; Faisol, Nasruddin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore on the elements of outsourced logistics service quality and how the users’ satisfaction was formed within the Malaysian culture context. This qualitative study was based on five semi-structured interviews which were carried out with the executive officers and department managers of four logistics providers firms and one manufacturer. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis method. Rather than the organization’s performance-related ...

  5. Parenting and child mental health: a cross-cultural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    2013-01-01

    In its most general instrumental sense, parenting consists of care of the young in preparing them to manage the tasks of life. Parents provide childhood experiences and populate the environments that guide children's development and so contribute to child mental health. Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture. ...

  6. [Urban culture and mental health: an anthropological perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrès, Cédric

    2012-01-01

    This article is an anthropological reflection on the trans-cultural issues specific to large urban centers. The author questions how can a person develop and create an identity in this context. He then examines how proximity and isolation relative to urban settings contribute to the mental health of urban populations. Finally, he examines how characteristics of city life conditions assistance to people with mental disorders in urban settings.

  7. Cross-cultural perspectives on music and musicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E; Becker, Judith; Morley, Iain

    2015-03-19

    Musical behaviours are universal across human populations and, at the same time, highly diverse in their structures, roles and cultural interpretations. Although laboratory studies of isolated listeners and music-makers have yielded important insights into sensorimotor and cognitive skills and their neural underpinnings, they have revealed little about the broader significance of music for individuals, peer groups and communities. This review presents a sampling of musical forms and coordinated musical activity across cultures, with the aim of highlighting key similarities and differences. The focus is on scholarly and everyday ideas about music--what it is and where it originates--as well the antiquity of music and the contribution of musical behaviour to ritual activity, social organization, caregiving and group cohesion. Synchronous arousal, action synchrony and imitative behaviours are among the means by which music facilitates social bonding. The commonalities and differences in musical forms and functions across cultures suggest new directions for ethnomusicology, music cognition and neuroscience, and a pivot away from the predominant scientific focus on instrumental music in the Western European tradition.

  8. Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning: A Critical Perspective. Critical Perspectives on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Harry, Ed.; Lauder, Hugh, Ed.; Porter, Jill, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Educational Theories, Cultures and Learning" focuses on how education is understood in different cultures, the theories and related assumptions we make about learners and students and how we think about them, and how we can understand the principle actors in education--learners and teachers. Within this volume, internationally renowned…

  9. Mobile Learning in the Institution of Higher Learning for Malaysia students : Culture Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsul Arrieya Ariffin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile learning usage in a developing country like Malaysia can be considered new. This literature research  is a state of art overview to discuss current issues. The emerging issues come from: types of mobile learning and learning styles; implementation issues of mobile learning; culture dimensions; and user readiness to accept the mobile learning technology. Currently, there is a lack of research about culture aspects to improve mobile learning and university students’ engagement in Malaysia. The objective of this research is to find the gap from the culture perspectives of mobile learning in Malaysia at public institutions of higher learning. The discussions have found that the culture dimensions are not a suitable approach to tackle mobile learning. It is therefore suggested to use a more grounded and sensible cultural  approach for local context.

  10. Culture, gender, and self: a perspective from individualism-collectivism research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Y; Yamaguchi, S; Kim, U; Choi, S C; Gelfand, M J; Yuki, M

    1995-11-01

    Individualism and collectivism are often equated with independent vs. interdependent, agentic vs. communal, and separate vs. relational self-construals. Although these same concepts have been used to characterize both cultural and gender differences, a perspective of cultural evolution suggests it is unlikely. A division of labor within society may produce gender differences, but this cannot explain cultural differences. A study of self-construal involving 5 cultures (Australia, the United States, Hawaii, Japan, and Korea) shows that differences between these cultures are captured mostly by the extent to which people see themselves as acting as independent agents, whereas gender differences are best summarized by the extent to which people regard themselves as emotionally related to others.

  11. Comment: Affect Control Theory and Cultural Priming: A Perspective from Cultural Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornpattananangkul, Narun; Chiao, Joan Y

    2014-04-01

    Affect control theory posits that emotions are constructed by social and cultural forces. Rogers, Schröder, and von Scheve (2014) introduce affect control theory as a conceptual and methodological "hub," linking theories from different disciplines across levels of analysis. To illustrate this further, we apply their framework to cultural priming, an experimental technique in cultural psychology and neuroscience for testing how exposure to cultural symbols (e.g., words and pictures) changes people's behavior, cognition, and emotion. Our analysis supports the use of affect control theory in linking different levels of analysis while leaving some opening questions for improving such a framework in future research.

  12. Addressing cultural diversity: the hepatitis B clinical specialist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jack; Smith, Elizabeth; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Richmond, Jacqueline; Lucke, Jayne

    2017-08-31

    Hepatitis B is a viral infection primarily affecting people from culturally diverse communities in Australia. While vaccination prevents infection, there is increasing mortality resulting from liver damage associated with chronic infection. Deficits in the national policy and clinical response to hepatitis B result in a low diagnosis rate, inadequate testing and diagnosis processes, and poor access to hepatitis B treatment services. While research identifies inadequate hepatitis B knowledge among people with the virus and primary health care workers, this project sought to identify how specialist clinicians in Australia negotiate cultural diversity, and provide often complex clinical information to people with hepatitis B. A vignette was developed and presented to thirteen viral hepatitis specialist clinicians prior to an electronically recorded interview. Recruitment continued until saturation of themes was reached. Data were thematically coded into themes outlined in the interview schedule. Ethical approval for the research was provided by the La Trobe University Human Research Ethics Committee. Key messages provided to patients with hepatitis B by clinical specialists were identified. These messages were not consistently provided to all patients with hepatitis B, but were determined on perceptions of patient knowledge, age and highest educational level. While the vignette stated that English was not an issue for the patient, most specialists identified the need for an interpreter. Combating stigma related to hepatitis B was seen as important by the specialists and this was done through normalising the virus. Having an awareness of different cultural understandings about hepatitis B specifically, and health and well-being generally, was noted as a communication strategy. Key core competencies need to be developed to deliver educational messages to people with hepatitis B within clinical encounters. The provision of adequate resources to specialist clinics will

  13. Viewing Asking for Leave from a Cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪娟

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aims at investigating what the discourse patterns are in the asking-for-leave notes written by Chinese stu⁃dents and native English speakers respectively and what excuses are given by Chinese students and native English speakers. Role play and retrospective interview were employed as research methords. The results show that the Chinese students all use an induc⁃tive pattern, while all native English speakers write the note in a deductive way. Besides, the excuses presented by the two kinds of subjects are different due to their different cultural background.

  14. Ion beam analysis in cultural heritage studies: Milestones and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dran, Jean-Claude; Calligaro, Thomas [Centre for research and restoration of the museums of France, Palais du Louvre Paris (France)

    2013-07-18

    For three decades, ion beam analysis (IBA) in external mode was considered as the best choice for the characterisation of cultural heritage materials, as it combines excellent analytical performance and non-invasive character. However, in recent years, other analytical techniques arose as serious competitors, such as those based on synchrotron radiation (X-ray absorption, fluorescence or diffraction) or those using portable instruments (XRF, micro-Raman). It is shown that nevertheless IBA remains unmatched thanks to two unique features, namely the analysis of light elements and the high-resolution 3D chemical imaging.

  15. "The Two Cultures" and the Historical Perspective on Science as a Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocherberg, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    In the Rede lecture of 1959, C.P.Snow speaks in terms of two cultures, one of science, the other of literary intellectuals. Snow's discussion presupposes that science represents a culture of its own, independent of and superior to the arts and humanities, and unified within itself. At our present distance from this claim, Snow's point of view can…

  16. From Ought to Is: A Neo-Marxist Perspective on the Use and Misuse of the Culture Construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1998-01-01

    Presents a neo-Marxist perspective on morality, showing how it pertains to the use and misuse of the culture construct. Explains the standpoint concept, and identifies issues central to morality. Maintains that moral beliefs are grounded in cultural contexts, arguing that the dominant morality in a culture justifies ruling class interests, and…

  17. From Ought to Is: A Neo-Marxist Perspective on the Use and Misuse of the Culture Construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1998-01-01

    Presents a neo-Marxist perspective on morality, showing how it pertains to the use and misuse of the culture construct. Explains the standpoint concept, and identifies issues central to morality. Maintains that moral beliefs are grounded in cultural contexts, arguing that the dominant morality in a culture justifies ruling class interests, and…

  18. Cultural Practices and HIV in South Africa: A Legal Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mswela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has not escaped the rising prevalence and severe impact of HIV/AIDS in relation to women. From an economic and social vantage point, the HIV/AIDS epidemic effects women the hardest, with underprivileged black women the most susceptible to the virus. The theoretical framework of this paper focuses on the intersection between HIV/AIDS, gender inequality and gender violence, and more specifically on certain cultural practices and customs that contribute towards and exacerbate women’s subordination and inequality, which in turn increase women’s exposure to HIV infection. Relevant to this focus is inevitably an analysis of the perceived threats to specific fundamental human rights as a result of some of the entrenched practices that continue to reinforce women’s subordinate position in society, aggravated by the high incidence of gender violence.

  19. Romanian letter-writing: a cultural-rhetorical perspective (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela-Iuliana Morcov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article aims at revealing the features of Romanian letter-writing during its stages of formation and consolidation. The structural and the stylistic analysis of letters is carried out with regard to the composition of the documents written in Old Romanian according to the requirements imposed by the Slavonic template and with regard to the rhetorical division of the three styles: the simple style, the middle style and the grand style. The description of the Old Romanian epistolary style is based on a taxonomy inspired by Roman Jakobson’s functional communicative model (1964. Following the six factors identified by Jakobson, letters are classified according to the socio-cultural status and the communicative competence of the addresser and of the addressee and in line with the context, the channel and the linguistic code used to write them.

  20. A Participatory Perspective on Cross-Cultural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    Designers face a number of challenges in terms of when and how to design interactive systems with indigenous groups. Every layer of development faces obstacles from designing localized interfaces to facilitating prototype evaluations in the wild. This article argues for the importance of continuous...... user involvement and participatory design. This is highlighted through explaining ongoing research in the creation of a 3D visualization knowledge management system to support preservation of indigenous knowledge (IK) in Africa. Through the sharing of experiences from the field I underpin...... the importance of acknowledging users' expertise and knowledge about the design context. Through presentation of a selection of these challenges in localizing systems development I wish to raise awareness of an required sensitivity to cultural differences in IT....

  1. Poetry Translation in the Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵婷

    2013-01-01

    Poem or verse is a kind of literary genre, which is ruled by syllable, tune and rhythm scheme, uses concise words, plen⁃tiful emotions and rich phenomenon to highly give the picture of social life and spiritual world. In ancient China, musical poems were called songs, while poems without music verses. To translate poems is inevitable. This paper begins from poem translation and chooses theory of translation as bedding in order to discuss how to translate poems and various meanings of poems at different cultural background.It is divided into three parts. The first part tells theory to know more about translation. The second part ana⁃lyzes poems of three dynasties by way of exploring historical materials, making the foundation to go on. The third part researches features of poem translation.

  2. Resistance to Mobile Banking Adoption in Egypt: A Cultural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehaballah Elbadrawy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobile banking (m-banking faces various types of resistance that may hinder customers’ adoption inEgypt. This study identifies three groups of m-banking non-adopters, namely postponers, opponents andrejectors. The objective of the study is to explore the reasons for resisting m-banking services in Egypt andwhether it differs with regards to these customer groups. Accordingly, a questionnaire was distributed, Chisquare tests, Kruskal-Wallis H tests and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test. Frequencies andcross tabulations were used. The results indicate that the three non-adopter groups differ significantly withrespect to usage, value, and image barriers. On the other hand, risk and tradition barriers did not showany statistical significance; however, risk barrier received the highest overall mean. Significant relationsbetween usage, risk and image barriers with the gender and level of education were noted. Finally, findingsenabled a clear mapping between Hofstede’s cultural dimensions and the study’s results.

  3. Visual and Multimodal Metaphor in Advertising: Cultural Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Forceville

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is often claimed that a picture tells us more than a thousand words, but studying pictorial metaphors reveals how much background knowledge is needed to understand and evaluate visuals. Commercial print advertising and billboards make for good case studies, because their goal is unambiguous: to sell consumer products and services. In this chapter some of the pitfalls in analysing visual and multimodal metaphors are discussed, Consideration of a number of examples suggests how metaphors involving visuals may misfire when they are interpreted by members from another culture than the one for which they were designed. In the conclusion some ideas are put forward to make these insights productive in educational contexts.

  4. Educating About Global Climate Change With A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, C.; Fessenden, J.; Kanjorski, N.; Hall, M. K.

    2004-12-01

    Predominantly minority populated schools in Northern New Mexico are plagued by low standardized test scores and high drop-out rates. The school system is currently failing students, and success in science is reliant on self-motivation among students. In order for students to gain momentum in a system where exposure to science is not prevalent, it is important for them to get outside support that catalyzes their interest. Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Science Education Solutions (SES), and local schools has been established to identify student needs and provide them with the opportunity to engage in science through hands-on experience with world-class scientists. Students are being introduced to the prospects of a scientific career while getting the unique chance to explore different aspects of several LANL scientists' research. This initiative also incorporates cultural awareness efforts to promote parent and community involvement. In the past year, two pilot projects were carried out to test the concepts, goals, and methods of the collaboration. One pilot project used plant growth studies in predominantly Hispanic fifth-grade classrooms to stimulate student interest. Students explored tree ring cores and tested water-use efficiency with sponges. The other pilot project included a two-day workshop for Native American students from Jemez Pueblo focusing on global climate change. This project combined a class component and hands-on field research. Samples were taken from LANL research sites with in-field lessons from scientists who monitor the sites. In addition, Jemez Pueblo officials were able to tie the sites to the student's lives with a historical and cultural overview. The most successful elements from these pilot projects are being used to develop a long-term project that will pique student interest in the science disciplines. Field activities garnered the most enthusiastic response from students, while in-class lessons were less

  5. Cross-Cultural Perspectives After Participation in the YES Program: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa E. Fuentes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:  Guided by empowerment and ecological theories, the Youth Empowerment Solutions (YES program facilitates character development through activities based in cultural differences, team building, and social change. This pilot study consisted of two focus groups (n = 13 of middle school youth conducted after their participation in an abbreviated version of the YES program. Specifically, the present study examined youth’s cross-cultural perspectives after participation. The focus groups were transcribed and coded for emergent themes using Heaton’s (2005 supplementary data analysis framework. Qualitative analysis resulted in two emergent themes: 1 enhanced appreciation for similarities and differences in cultural and ethnic backgrounds, and 2 the role of respect in understanding differences and confronting stereotypes. Specifically, youth reported that engagement in this program fostered positive awareness of cultural differences and respect for inter-ethnic relationships. The findings provide support for the benefits of the YES program on moral development and promotion of healthy peer relationships.

  6. Why Borders of Culture do not Coincide with Those of Identity? Theoretical Perspectives from Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Grimson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The essay starts from a reassessment of the concepts of «culture» and «identity», of their entanglements as well as of their differences. While the concept of «identity» is analyzed through anthropological and ethnographic studies, the concept of «culture» is scrutinized thanks to the decisive contributions of the theories of «nation». If the metaphor of ethnicity has allowed indeed to think the logics of identity, the metaphor of an heterotopic and heterochronic nation can help to think the logics situated in the heterogeneity of culture. Lastly, the notion of «cultural configuration» is proposed as a new perspective through which it's possible to interpret political and social processes.

  7. Teaching and training for global engineering perspectives on culture and professional communication practices

    CERN Document Server

    Flammia, Madelyn

    2016-01-01

    Provides a foundation for understanding a range of linguistic, cultural, and technological factors to effectively practice international communication in a variety of professional communication arenas This book presents a range of perspectives, examples, and concepts for teaching international professional communication in different settings. Industry professionals and academic researchers alike have written entries for Teaching and Training for Global Engineering: Perspectives on Culture and Professional Communication Practices, which have been organized into four cohesive, context-based sections that examine central issues associated with offering effective instruction on communication in global settings. The first section presents approaches for teaching issues of language and visual design related to international communication. The second section reviews aspects of software use and ethical practices associated with communicating globally. The third ection discusses how educators can use information a...

  8. Cultural aspects of major mental disorders: a critical review from an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Biju; Chaturvedi, Santosh K

    2012-10-01

    Major mental disorders such as schizophrenia and affective disorders are highly disabling illnesses. The cultural factors that influence the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders are of paramount clinical significance. We attempted to critically review the cultural factors in relation to the epidemiology, phenomenology, treatment, and outcome of major mental disorders from an Indian perspective, and tried to compare these with the cultural factors identified in major international studies. The clinical expression of major mental disorders was noted to vary across cultures in the review. In addition, the outcome of major mental disorders is reported to be better in developing nations than in the developed countries. Transcultural variations are also noted to exist in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, traditional healing practices, and psychotherapeutic approaches. The role of cultural factors in severe mental illnesses needs adequate attention from mental health professionals. Continued research on the cultural aspects is required to understand the interplay of all social, cultural, and biological factors. It is important to consider other cultural, traditional, and folk methods for understanding and management of mental illnesses.

  9. Understanding of Out of Africa in the Direction of Cross-cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何羽晴

    2015-01-01

    Out of Africa is a memoir by the Danish female author Isak Dinesen.In this film,she presents that Africa is a pastoral landscape in which men exist in a truer form than they do in Europe.Without modernization,industry,and cities,Africa exists as a land where people lives close to nature.By analyzing the cross-cultural differences between the races,we could reexamine Out of Africa from the cross-cultural perspective,explore and get in touch with Dinesen’s inner self.

  10. Understanding of Out of Africa in the Direction of Cross-cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何羽晴

    2015-01-01

    Out of Africa is a memoir by the Danish female author Isak Dinesen.In this film,she presents that Africa is a pastoral landscape in which men exist in a truer form than they do in Europe.Without modernization,industry,and cities,Africa exists as a land where people lives close to nature.By analyzing the cross-cultural differences between the races,we could reexamine Out of Africa fromthe cross-cultural perspective,explore and get in touch with Dinesen’s inner self.

  11. Border Crossing in Contemporary Brazilian Culture: Global Perspectives from the Twenty-First Century Literary Scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimara Valim de Melo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper investigates the process of internationalisation of Brazilian literature in the twenty-first century from the perspective of the publishing market. For this, we analyse how Brazil has responded to globalisation and what effects of cultural globalisation can be seen in the Brazilian literary scene, focusing on the novel. Observing the movement of the novelists throughout the globe, the reception of Brazilian literature in the United Kingdom and the relations between art and the literary market in Brazil, we intend to provoke some reflections on Brazilian cultural history in the light of the twenty-first century.

  12. Border Crossing in Contemporary Brazilian Culture: Global Perspectives from the Twenty-First Century Literary Scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimara Valim de Melo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper investigates the process of internationalisation of Brazilian literature in the twenty-first century from the perspective of the publishing market. For this, we analyse how Brazil has responded to globalisation and what effects of cultural globalisation can be seen in the Brazilian literary scene, focusing on the novel. Observing the movement of the novelists throughout the globe, the reception of Brazilian literature in the United Kingdom and the relations between art and the literary market in Brazil, we intend to provoke some reflections on Brazilian cultural history in the light of the twenty-first century.

  13. Reciprocal Evolution of Opiate Science from Medical and Cultural Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Pilonis, Nastazja; Ptacek, Radek; Kream, Richard M

    2017-06-13

    Over the course of human history, it has been common to use plants for medicinal purposes, such as for providing relief from particular maladies and self-medication. Opium represents one longstanding remedy that has been used to address a range of medical conditions, alleviating discomfort often in ways that have proven pleasurable. Opium is a combination of compounds obtained from the mature fruit of opium poppy, papaver somniferum. Morphine and its biosynthetic precursors thebaine and codeine constitute the main bioactive opiate alkaloids contained in opium. Opium usage in ancient cultures is well documented, as is its major extract morphine. The presence of endogenous opiate alkaloids and opioid peptides in animals owe their discovery to their consistent actions at particular concentrations via stereo select receptors. In vitro expression of morphine within a microbiological industrial setting underscores the role it plays as a multi-purpose pharmacological agent, as well as reinforcing why it can also lead to long-term social dependence. Furthermore, it clearly establishes a reciprocal effect of human intelligence on modifying evolutionary processes in papaver somniferum and related plant species.

  14. Workplace learning from a socio-cultural perspective: creating developmental space during the general practice clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwet, J; Zwietering, P J; Teunissen, P W; van der Vleuten, C P M; Scherpbier, A J J A

    2011-08-01

    Workplace learning in undergraduate medical education has predominantly been studied from a cognitive perspective, despite its complex contextual characteristics, which influence medical students' learning experiences in such a way that explanation in terms of knowledge, skills, attitudes and single determinants of instructiveness is unlikely to suffice. There is also a paucity of research which, from a perspective other than the cognitive or descriptive one, investigates student learning in general practice settings, which are often characterised as powerful learning environments. In this study we took a socio-cultural perspective to clarify how students learn during a general practice clerkship and to construct a conceptual framework that captures this type of learning. Our analysis of group interviews with 44 fifth-year undergraduate medical students about their learning experiences in general practice showed that students needed developmental space to be able to learn and develop their professional identity. This space results from the intertwinement of workplace context, personal and professional interactions and emotions such as feeling respected and self-confident. These forces framed students' participation in patient consultations, conversations with supervisors about consultations and students' observation of supervisors, thereby determining the opportunities afforded to students to mind their learning. These findings resonate with other conceptual frameworks and learning theories. In order to refine our interpretation, we recommend that further research from a socio-cultural perspective should also explore other aspects of workplace learning in medical education.

  15. A Study on Brand Name Translation from the Perspective of Cultural Schema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The brand name which represents the image of a company needs to be effective in the market if the merchandisers attempt to harvest competitive advantages. With the development of modern cognitive psychology, the theory of schema has been widely applied to linguistics. The author attempts to study brand name translation from the perspective of cultural schema and expects to arouse certain enlightenment on the brand name translation.

  16. The Anthropological Perspective on Disaster and the Key Concept of Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanna Hoffman; Chen Mei; Peng Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Like Professor Anthony Oliver -Smith, I wish to speak to the theories and analyses of disaster from an anthropological perspective. While Professor Oliver -Smith's paper covers the history of the anthropological concern, the ecologi-cal paradigm, reconstruction, and other positions, the intent of mine is to zero in on what anthropolo-gists consider the foremost factor in the creation, the unfolding, prevention and mitigation of disas-ter, and that is culture.

  17. Consumers’ first impressions of consumption environments: a cultural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirjo Laaksonen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este trabajo es analizar las diferencias culturales entre los consumidores finlandeses y españoles en lo que respecta a los aspectos visuales de los entornos de consumo. El texto aborda estas cuestiones mediante la ampliación del análisis de la percepción de los consumidores de las claves del entorno al estudio de la experiencia de los entornos de consumo. El objeto de este artículo es, en primer lugar, analizar los generadores de las primeras impresiones visuales en el consumidor y, en segundo lugar, estudiar el mecanismo de aproximación-evitación al evocar la dimensión de los entornos visuales. Los datos se recogieron mediante entrevistas personales en Finlandia y España. Se mostraron seis fotos de interiores de cafés a 200 encuestados de Finlandia y a otros 200 encuestados de España. A los encuestados se les pidió que eligieran el café al que les gustaría y al que no les gustaría ir y después decir por qué lo habían elegido. En el artículo se explica la forma en que los generadores de las primeras impresiones visuales (rasgos distintivos, estilo, atmósfera, funcionalidad y accesibilidad se relacionan con los cuatro mecanismos de aproximación-evitación al evocar las dimensiones de los entornos visuales (percibir, pensar, sentir y actuar Los resultados iniciales indican cómo una misma dimensión evaluativa puede producir tanto conductas de aproximación como de evitación. En el documento se señalan y analizan las diferencias culturales en lo que se refiere a las estimaciones de los consumidores y a la interpretación de los entornos visuales.The purpose of this paper is to analyze cultural differences between Finnish and Spanish consumers with regard to the visual aspects of consumption environments. The paper approaches these issues by extending the analysis of consumers’ perception of environmental cues to the analysis of the experiencing of consumption environments. The objectives of this paper are

  18. Cultural norm fulfillment, interpersonal belonging, or getting ahead? A large-scale cross-cultural test of three perspectives on the function of self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Jochen E; Sedikides, Constantine; Wagner, Jenny; Bleidorn, Wiebke; Rentfrow, Peter J; Potter, Jeff; Gosling, Samuel D

    2015-09-01

    What is the function of self-esteem? We classified relevant theoretical work into 3 perspectives. The cultural norm-fulfillment perspective regards self-esteem a result of adherence to cultural norms. The interpersonal-belonging perspective regards self-esteem as a sociometer of interpersonal belonging. The getting-ahead perspective regards self-esteem as a sociometer of getting ahead in the social world, while regarding low anxiety/neuroticism as a sociometer of getting along with others. The 3 perspectives make contrasting predictions on the relation between the Big Five personality traits and self-esteem across cultures. We tested these predictions in a self-report study (2,718,838 participants from 106 countries) and an informant-report study (837,655 informants from 64 countries). We obtained some evidence for cultural norm fulfillment, but the effect size was small. Hence, this perspective does not satisfactorily account for self-esteem's function. We found a strong relation between Extraversion and higher self-esteem, but no such relation between Agreeableness and self-esteem. These 2 traits are pillars of interpersonal belonging. Hence, the results do not fit the interpersonal-belonging perspective either. However, the results closely fit the getting-ahead perspective. The relation between Extraversion and higher self-esteem is consistent with this perspective, because Extraversion is the Big Five driver for getting ahead in the social world. The relation between Agreeableness and lower neuroticism is also consistent with this perspective, because Agreeableness is the Big Five driver for getting along with others.

  19. Advance Directive from the Romanian Social Cultural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia DUMITRAS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Giving value to the wishes of the terminal patients regarding the treatment at the end of their life, the use of the advance directive, as an extension of their autonomy when the patients are incompetent, represents a mean to respect and promote their dignity. The authors present and discuss the results of their research that analysed the attitude of Romanians toward the use of the advance directive to identify the usefulness of implementing such a document in the Romanian social cultural context.The target group in this research is general population over 18 years old, speaking Romanian and without psychological illnesses. The representative random sample lot included 828 persons from Iasi County. The data were recorded based on a transversal descriptive study, using the method of questionnaire enquiryThe persons participating in the study admitted the importance of respecting the patient’s dignity and autonomy with reference to decisions concerning the treatment at the end of life. For the subjects agreeing with legalizing the advance directive, the main advantages of such a document are firstly the respect of the patient’s right to decide and secondly the improvement of the medical treatment.The study showed that young, healthy and better educated individuals are interested in the advance directive and are in favour of introducing it in the current medical practice. The results of our research suggest that educational and informative programmes are needed in Romania regarding the role and usefulness of the advance directive, as well as the way to implement it, in order to encourage the implication of all adult persons in planning their own medical treatment in general and in particular in the medical decisions concerning the end of life.

  20. CULTURAL TOURISM IN MALAYSIA IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF INDIAN TOURISTS: A STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. BABU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is one of the economic superpowers in South East Asia, prospering at a fast pace as tourism is becoming one of the most important sectors of its economy. Areas like entertainment; beach and island tourism has become some of the major determinants of Malaysia’s phenomenal progress in tourism in the last few years. Yet one area that seems to get less attention is its cultural resources. Recently, Malaysia has turned out as one of the major destinations for the Indian Outbound Tourism market. This study looks into the situation that prevails in the area of cultural tourism in Malaysia and how are cultural as well as historical attractions of Malaysia viewed from the perspective of international tourists from India. With the help of descriptive analysis the study probes into the significance of Malaysia’s historical tourism and the awareness and perception about it among Indian visitors. Based on the study it is revealed that Malaysia’s cultural tourism resources are not promoted to the extent to which it becomes a significant part of the nation’s destination image. Lack of promotion and information available makes international visitors unaware about the potential of Malaysia as a cultural tourism destination. However, most of the tourists were satisfied with the cultural sites/attractions and think Malaysia is a reasonably good cultural destination.

  1. CULTURAL TOURISM IN MALAYSIA IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF INDIAN TOURISTS: A STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Sarkar SUDIPTA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is one of the economic superpowers in South East Asia, prospering at a fast pace as tourism is becoming one of the most important sectors of its economy. Areas like entertainment; beach and island tourism has become some of the major determinants of Malaysia’s phenomenal progress in tourism in the last few years. Yet one area that seems to get less attention is its cultural resources. Recently, Malaysia has turned out as one of the major destinations for the Indian Outbound Tourism market. This study looks into the situation that prevails in the area of cultural tourism in Malaysia and how are cultural as well as historical attractions of Malaysia viewed from the perspective of international tourists from India. With the help of descriptive analysis the study probes into the significance of Malaysia’s historical tourism and the awareness and perception about it among Indian visitors. Based on the study it is revealed that Malaysia’s cultural tourism resources are not promoted to the extent to which it becomes a significant part of the nation’s destination image. Lack of promotion and information available makes international visitors unaware about the potential of Malaysia as a cultural tourism destination. However, most of the tourists were satisfied with the cultural sites/attractions and think Malaysia is a reasonably good cultural destination.

  2. Socio-cultural workshops with children and youth from the Social Occupational Therapy perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Bardi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occupational therapists, throughout the history, faced the need to offer actions pertaining to socio-cultural issues in different populations with whom they interact, being required to develop actions relevant to these contexts. In addition, interventions specifically within the scope of culture have also been understood as the scope of this work. Objective: To report the METUIA experience of the ‘Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo’, illustrating, from the perspective of social occupational therapy, cultural workshops and individual and territorial follow-ups during six months, in the cultural context of a suburb neighborhood in the city of Vitoria, ES, Brazil. Method: The activities collective development aimed at expanding the support of social networks, the empowerment of children and youth participants and the joint construction of processes of autonomy, social participation and life projects to their own cultural identities. Results: The cultural workshops provided the identification of different demands by the children, adolescents and young people, based on the articulation between different views and reflections that were placed in shock through the recognition of alterity between the groups and occupational therapists. Conclusion: It is hoped that the experiments described here can contribute to the consolidation of occupational therapists actions in culture, bringing elements that can promote reflections for a field that still needs to be systematized as a producer of professional practice and research, especially in the social area.

  3. Protoplasmic Incompatibility in PODOSPORA ANSERINA: a Possible Function for Incompatibility Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Boucherie, Hélian; Bernet, Jean

    1980-01-01

    The suppression of protoplasmic incompatibility resulting from nonallelic gene interactions has been obtained by the coupled effect of mutations in the modA and modB genes (Bernet 1971). Due to their female sterility, modA modB strains provide an experimental tool to determine whether or not the mod and incompatibility loci are involved in a function other than protoplasmic incompatibility. Present results show that modA modB female sterility is a nonautonomous trait since heterokaryotic myce...

  4. Culture Shock in Public-Private Partnerships: Examining P3 from a Cultural Perspective in Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeczi, David

    2004-01-01

    Ask for a definition of the word public-private partnership in a room filled with people from different cultures, and their answers may differ remarkably. The American of the group might refer to privatization and contracting out of traditional government services. A Dutch person might think of a ne

  5. Why developmental psychology is incomplete without comparative and cross-cultural perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mark; Haun, Daniel

    2016-01-19

    As a discipline, developmental psychology has a long history of relying on animal models and data collected among distinct cultural groups to enrich and inform theories of the ways social and cognitive processes unfold through the lifespan. However, approaches that draw together developmental, cross-cultural and comparative perspectives remain rare. The need for such an approach is reflected in the papers by Heyes (2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 371, 20150069. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0069)), Schmelz & Call (2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 371, 20150067. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0067)) and Keller (2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 371, 20150070. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0070)) in this theme issue. Here, we incorporate these papers into a review of recent research endeavours covering a range of core aspects of social cognition, including social learning, cooperation and collaboration, prosociality, and theory of mind. In so doing, we aim to highlight how input from comparative and cross-cultural empiricism has altered our perspectives of human development and, in particular, led to a deeper understanding of the evolution of the human cultural mind.

  6. Incompatible Sets of Gradients and Metastability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. M.; James, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    We give a mathematical analysis of a concept of metastability induced by incompatibility. The physical setting is a single parent phase, just about to undergo transformation to a product phase of lower energy density. Under certain conditions of incompatibility of the energy wells of this energy density, we show that the parent phase is metastable in a strong sense, namely it is a local minimizer of the free energy in an L 1 neighbourhood of its deformation. The reason behind this result is that, due to the incompatibility of the energy wells, a small nucleus of the product phase is necessarily accompanied by a stressed transition layer whose energetic cost exceeds the energy lowering capacity of the nucleus. We define and characterize incompatible sets of matrices, in terms of which the transition layer estimate at the heart of the proof of metastability is expressed. Finally we discuss connections with experiments and place this concept of metastability in the wider context of recent theoretical and experimental research on metastability and hysteresis.

  7. A Note on (In)Compatibility Relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sequoiah-Grayson, Sebastian; Pelis, M; Puncochar,

    2011-01-01

    Non-symmetric incompatibility relations, or non-symmetric compatibility relations, are a standard method for introducing a split negation pair on a frame. Another standard method is to reject commutation for the frame. The first task is to examine the relationship between non-symmetric incompatibili

  8. Widespread Genomic Incompatibilities in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, L.B.; Orbidans, H.E.; Stastna, J.; Aartse, A.; Rodriguez Sanchez, M.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Kammenga, J.E.; Harvey, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) model of speciation, incompatibilities emerge from the deleterious interactions between alleles that are neutral or advantageous in the original genetic backgrounds, i.e. negative epistatic effects. Within species such interactions are responsible for outbreedi

  9. Driving into danger: Perception and communication of flash flood risk from a cultural perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, A.; Hirschboeck, K. K.; Fryberg, S.

    2009-04-01

    Flood risk managers educate the public on the dangers of driving through flooded roadways, yet losses to life and property continue to occur. This study integrates cultural psychology and risk perception theory to explore how culture, psychological processes, and behavior influence one another. Flood risk managers in Tucson, Arizona collaborated in the development of a questionnaire mailed to local residents. Questions regarding levels of trust, self-efficacy, social autonomy, social incorporation, time perspective, and situational factors were analyzed with respect to whether respondents stated that they have or have not driven through a flooded roadway. Respondents' decisions are influenced by the presence of signs and barricades, passengers, risk of personal injury or damage to the vehicle, and the availability of flood-related information. The most influential factor is the prior successful crossing of other vehicles. The results illuminate complex interrelations among the cultural factors and provide considerations for future risk perception research.

  10. Balance and predominant perspectives in the history of written culture: an approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Daniel Moncada Patiño

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects about the authors that are and will be paradigms in the historical studies about written culture. However, this article doesn't pretend to do an extensive analysis about them or their works. Therefore, the interest is to emphasize on the theorical and methodological perspectives of some of them, which are predominant in the new studies about written culture. Studies that show the complexity of the written culture as research matter are a mandatory and necessary homework to historians, literates, sociologists, anthropologists, librarians, among others, which initiated the study about this topic in Latin American context and whose monographic works have started a new historical stream in the region.

  11. A cultural and comparative perspective on outdoor education in New Zealand and friluftsliv in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The paper is based on a comparative and qualitative case study of friluftsliv in Denmark and outdoor education in New Zealand. Cultural analysis with a comparative cultural perspective informed the research approach. Configurational analysis was used as an important supplement to focus on cultural...... functionalism and personal relationships linked to identity. Outdoor education in New Zealand can generally be understood as a reproduction of political ideas and values in western liberal societies. Friluftsliv in Denmark exhibits complexity of forms and settings within outdoor education, with simple life...... patterns linked to bodily movement. It is argued that outdoor education in New Zealand is focused on action, risk and challenge, with personal development as the central pedagogical goal. There seems to be a general search for effectiveness and a special relationship to land and nature with both...

  12. Communication and Cultural Memory in Contemporary Tourism Media Products: Culture-specific and Cross-cultural Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Salamurović

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Communication practices which are a part of the contemporary media-culture are intrinsically tied to the processes of (recreating collective identities. One of the possible strategies in the frame of the mediated communication practice is to connect traditional ele-ments of cultural memory with new ones, which are declared as preferable and acceptable. In that way the collective identity remains, on the one hand, “homoge-neous”, offering stability to the members of communica-tion community, on the other hand, it is subject to change and dynamics, always “ready” to be reshaped in order to achieve wider acceptance. The tourism media products, especially tourism promotion videos, are the best examples for this mediated communication prac-tice. The visual images, combined with text messages, i.e. slogans, are not only some of the most important narrative mechanisms in the presentation of certain tourist destination, they are also the key elements of the mediated collective cultural memory and identity of the respective country presented in the tourism promotion videos. The main goal of this article is to examine the represen-tation and composition forms of some of the tourism promotion videos both from the Balkan countries as well as from other regions worldwide related especially to the elements of the cultural memory in order to de-fine culture-specific and cross-cultural strategies rele-vant to the creation of the collective identity. The analy-sis is based on the Critical Discourse Analysis, respec-tively the analytical framework of the “Grammar of Vis-ual Design” by Kress/van Leeuwen.

  13. Distinction or Omnivorousness? -- An Analysis of Cultural Participation and Class Reproduction in Kaohsiung from the Perspective of Pierre Bourdieu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsien Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Focusing upon cultural politics of class relations, this study uses the case of Kaohsiung to explore into four major research questions: How do people participate in cultural activities? What are the possible factors that have influenced cultural taste? What are significant variables related to the quality and quantity of cultural participation? And to what extent there do exist distinction and class reproduction? Data have been collected through a citywide telephone random survey and analyzed from the perspective of Pierre Bourdieu to sort out the causes and consequences of cultural participation. Statistic results show that music, movie and animation are the most popular cultural activities and they are regarded as the very cultural industries that should be fully promoted by the government as well. Cultural capital, according to regression analyses, determines the quality and quantity of cultural participation, whereas cultural participation has further demarcated the difference of class identities, reproduced existing cultural advantage, and facilitated the exchange between cultural capital and social capital. Overall speaking, the composition and volume of cultural capital and economic capital are related to the quality of cultural participation. The volume of cultural capital has positive correlation with the quantity of cultural participation. Distinction, thus, works with cultural omnivorousness side by side, and the outcomes of cultural participation in return have led to certain kinds of class identification and class reproduction.

  14. Language Teacher Education in Finland and the Cultural Dimension of Foreign Language Teaching--A Student Teacher Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzen-Ostermark, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The increasing importance attributed to the cultural dimension of foreign language (FL) education has entailed new demands for teachers and teacher educators. This paper explores the cultural agenda in Finnish language teacher education from a student teacher perspective. The focus is on the students' perceptions regarding how effectively cultural…

  15. On the evolution of cytoplasmic incompatibility in haplodiploid species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egas, C.J.M.; de Freitas Vala Salvador, F.; Breeuwer, J.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The most enigmatic sexual manipulation by Wolbachia endosymbionts is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI): infected mates are reproductively incompatible with uninfected females. In this paper, we extend the theory on population dynamics and evolution of CI, with emphasis on haplodiploid species. First,

  16. Student perspectives on diversity and the cultural climate at a U.S. medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Robert; McClendon, Jennifer; Henderson, Anita; Evans, Yolanda; Colquitt, Rosa; Saha, Somnath

    2007-02-01

    To obtain the perspectives of medical students at one school on racial/ethnic campus diversity and cultural competence and to gain their perceptions of the institutional climate around diversity at their university and of reasons for minority underrepresentation at their medical school. A student-driven survey of all medical students (N = 398) at a single medical school in the spring of 2003, supplemented by four focus groups from all racial and ethnic groups on the campus. A large majority of the responding students (n = 216; 54%) endorsed the value of campus diversity and the importance of cultural competence to the process of becoming a clinician. Most students felt their university had achieved a positive cultural climate, characterized by openness to diverse perspectives and attention to equity. Most students also felt that the university's programs and policies reflected a commitment to diversity, but fewer students--those from underrepresented minorities (URMs) in particular--felt that the university truly valued having a diverse student body and faculty. Most students felt that the lack of diversity on campus was a barrier to recruiting and retaining minority candidates. Some minority students also blamed the medical school's limited social, academic, and financial support, as well as inadequate efforts to recruit minority students. Medical students generally place a high value on campus diversity and cultural competence. URM students in particular felt that their university could do more to implement its commitment to diversity, including making greater efforts to recruit and retain URM students. These views constitute a barometer for medical schools to gauge and track their efforts to enhance campus diversity, incorporate cultural competence education, and create an inclusive and welcoming climate for students of all backgrounds.

  17. Anthropological perspectives about socio-cultural dimensions of the body: A contribution to the debate Physical Education / Corporal Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sabrina Mora

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this paper is to present some concepts and perspectives from Anthropology and particularly from the Anthropology of the Body, focusing specifically on the concept of culture, on the articulation between nature and culture, and on the body as it is inseparable of socio-cultural contexts. Considering the perspectives of Corporal Education about the body and the practices around its education, we will explore the application of the analytical proposals of the Anthropology of the Body on the current debate between Physical Education and Corporal Education. It will be demonstrated that notions of culture and body are useful to comprehend the specificity of the Corporal Education perspective. As an example, we will refer to Marcel Maussï pioneer conception of "body techniques"

  18. Psyche and culture: Perspectives based on the contributions and limits of ethnopsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitou, Rajaa

    2016-12-01

    The unconscious often appears in the form of a question or answer to the difficult relationship between the psyche and culture, a difficulty that becomes exacerbated when we are dealing with cultural difference. This difficulty, evidenced for example by Freud's thoughts on Islam, reappears, albeit in a very different way, in ethnopsychiatric theory. The author discusses the blind spots of the binary logic of the unconscious present in the work of George Devereux, a logic that eventually leads him into the same trap he had himself criticized. This discussion allows us to open up other perspectives, by moving away from the analogies, confusions and splits between the psyche and culture towards what binds them together. This link is sustained by language and its dialectics, at the crossroads of individual singularity and cultural codifications. The author's approach is supported by two clinical vignettes: one from a case of a young Turkish woman, the other concerning a male Iraqi patient, a survivor of torture. This approach distances itself from any psychocentric view that would see the psyche as closed upon itself and thus ultimately exclude any object-relations and inter-subjective relationships; likewise, it rejects the ethnocentric conflation of the subject with his culture. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  19. European food cultures in a macro and micro perspective: Implications for the marketing of Asian food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, Søren; Ludvigsen, Hanne H.

    homogenoues export markets but ingeneral confirms the heterogeneity of the European fo cultures. Since these data did not contain specific information about our second question, the inclusion of Asian food products in European diets, we have investigated certain food consumption trends from a micro-perspective...... of being one of the most generally open food cultures of Europe with relatively many overlapping characteristicsw with other European food cultures....

  20. Maternity leave, women's employment, and marital incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, J S; Essex, M J; Clark, R; Klein, M H

    2001-09-01

    This research investigated the relationship between the length of women's maternity leave and marital incompatibility, in the context of other variables including the woman's employment, her dissatisfaction with the division of household labor, and her sense of role overload. Length of leave, work hours, and family salience were associated with several forms of dissatisfaction, which in turn predicted role overload. Role overload predicted increased marital incompatibility for experienced mothers but did not for first-time mothers, for whom discrepancies between preferred and actual child care were more important. Length of maternity leave showed significant interactions with other variables, supporting the hypothesis that a short leave is a risk factor that, when combined with another risk factor, contributes to personal and marital distress.

  1. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  2. A perspective on systems design in the digitisation of Intangible Cultural Heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    My ambition for this shorter article is to add to an earlier discussion (see Rodil and Rehm, 2015) about the interplay of digital systems and the digitisation of intangible heritage. In particular, I wish to sketch some conceptualisations of what and how we can look at the digital systems (I refer...... to these as artefacts) as having certain inscribed perspectives. Meanwhile, providing some related literature, I show one possible road out of the complexity (with a co-responsible design known as Participatory Design), which emerges when certain cultures design and build artifacts together with the purpose...

  3. Ethical considerations in disease management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a cross-cultural, worldwide perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J A

    1998-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is universally fatal. Technological advances have provided a means to impact upon, without radically improving, the natural history of the disease. In addition, we now have the capability of potentially identifying patients who are pre-symptomatic carriers of the rare heritable forms of the disease. These capabilities provide the basis for the numerous ethical dilemmas that face patients, physicians, and agencies responsible for health care expenditures; dilemmas that can only be amplified between cultures. This paper attempts to address some of the major ethical issues germane to the care of ALS patients. It discusses the emergence of autonomy as the reigning principle of medical ethics in the United States and its potential conflict with the ethical dilemma of limited resource allocation. Finally, it attempts to compare and contrast, in an admittedly anecdotal and fragmentary fashion, the perspective of other cultures regarding the care of ALS patients.

  4. Social reactions to Valium and Prozac: a cultural lag perspective of drug diffusion and adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kimball P; Georgievskava, Zhanna; Georgievsky, Igor

    2009-06-01

    In the sociological context, the concept of cultural lag holds that material technologies advance more rapidly than social guidelines for their use. The result can be social conflict including liability accusations and product stigmatization that have characterized several new drugs which were widely accepted initially but then publicly criticized in the lay and scientific press. The objective was to illustrate the utility of the concept of cultural lag to technology commercialization by applying cultural lag to the social and professional environments surrounding the diffusion of the "minor tranquilizers" Librium and Valium in the United States from the 1950s to the 1970s, and the antidepressant Prozac from 1987 to 2005. The intention is to develop a perspective from which to view patterns of social acceptance followed by critique that may occur when technological advances are introduced to the marketplace. This study systematically reviews academic, medical, and lay literature regarding the diffusion of the "minor tranquilizers" Librium and Valium in the United States from the 1950s to the 1970s, and the antidepressant Prozac from 1987 to 2005. The minor tranquilizers and Prozac both reveal similar patterns of initial widespread public endorsement, followed by growing public criticism and recommendations for more restrictive usage guidelines. Cultural lag provides a perspective from which to anticipate, view, and avoid controversies that develop from new technologies in general and pharmaceutical technologies in particular. Market demands for rapid introduction must be balanced by public education. This requires proactive encouragement of lay and professional discussions and the establishment of marketing guidelines that aid development of social consensus regarding appropriate usage.

  5. Belief, Knowledge and Understanding. How to Deal with the Relations Between Different Cultural Perspectives in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-dos-Santos, Frederik; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2017-05-01

    This article discusses how to deal with the relations between different cultural perspectives in classrooms, based on a proposal for considering understanding and knowledge as goals of science education, inspired by Dewey's naturalistic humanism. It thus combines educational and philosophical interests. In educational terms, our concerns relate to how science teachers position themselves in multicultural classrooms. In philosophical terms, we are interested in discussing the relations between belief, understanding, and knowledge under the light of Dewey's philosophy. We present a synthesis of Dewey's theory of inquiry through his naturalistic humanism and discuss its implications for the concepts of belief, understanding, and knowledge, as well as for the goals of science teaching. In particular, we highlight problems arising in the context of possible conflicts between scientific and religious claims in the school environment that result from totalitarian positions. We characterize an individual's position as totalitarian if he or she takes some way of thinking as the only one capable of expressing the truth about all that exists in the world, lacks open-mindedness to understand different interpretative perspectives, and attempts to impose her or his interpretation about the facts to others by violent means or not. From this stance, any other perspective is taken to be false a priori and, accordingly, as a putative target to be suppressed or adapted to the privileged way of thinking. We argue, instead, for a more fallibilist evaluation of our own beliefs and a more respectful appraisal of the diversity of students' beliefs by both students and teachers.

  6. Cytonuclear incompatibility contributes to the early stages of speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Kubow, Karen B; So, Nina; Galloway, Laura F

    2016-12-01

    Genetic incompatibility is a hallmark of speciation. Cytonuclear incompatibilities are proposed to be among the first genetic barriers to arise during speciation. Accordingly, reproductive isolation (RI) within species should be heavily influenced by interactions between the organelle and nuclear genomes. However, there are few clear examples of cytonuclear incompatibility within a species. Here, we show substantial postzygotic RI in first-generation hybrids between differentiated populations of an herbaceous plant (up to 92% reduction in fitness). RI was primarily due to germination and survival, with moderate RI for pollen viability. RI for survival was asymmetric and caused by cytonuclear incompatibility, with the strength of incompatibility linearly related to chloroplast genetic distance. This cytonuclear incompatibility may be the result of a rapidly evolving plastid genome. Substantial asymmetric RI was also found for germination, but was not associated with cytonuclear incompatibility, indicating endosperm or maternal-zygote incompatibilities. These results demonstrate that cytonuclear incompatibility contributes to RI within species, suggesting that initial rates of speciation could be influenced by rates of organelle evolution. However, other genetic incompatibilities are equally important, indicating that even at early stages, speciation can be a complex process involving multiple genes and incompatibilities.

  7. The culture of patient safety from the perspective of the pediatric emergency nursing team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taise Rocha Macedo

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the patient safety culture in pediatric emergencies from the perspective of the nursing team. METHOD A quantitative, cross-sectional survey research study with a sample composed of 75 professionals of the nursing team. Data was collected between September and November 2014 in three Pediatric Emergency units by applying the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument. Data were submitted to descriptive analysis. RESULTS Strong areas for patient safety were not found, with areas identified having potential being: Expectations and actions from supervisors/management to promote patient safety and teamwork. Areas identified as critical were: Non-punitive response to error and support from hospital management for patient safety. The study found a gap between the safety culture and pediatric emergencies, but it found possibilities of transformation that will contribute to the safety of pediatric patients. CONCLUSION Nursing professionals need to become protagonists in the process of replacing the current paradigm for a culture focused on safety. The replication of this study in other institutions is suggested in order to improve the current health care scenario.

  8. A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Challenges Facing Comparative Cancer Survivorship Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astri Syse

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survivorship research includes the study of physical, psychosocial, and economic consequences of cancer diagnosis and treatment among pediatric and adult cancer survivors. Historically, the majority of cancer survivorship studies were from the United States, but survivorship issues are increasingly being addressed in other developed countries. Cross-cultural studies remain, however, scarce. The degree to which knowledge attained may or may not be transferred across cultures, countries, or regions is not known. Some important challenges for comparative research are therefore discussed in a cross-cultural perspective. Several substantive and methodological challenges that complicate the execution of cross-cultural cancer survivorship research are presented with examples and discussed to facilitate comparative research efforts in the establishment of new survivorship cohorts and in the planning and implementation of survivorship studies. Comparative research is one key to understanding the nature of cancer survivorship, distinguishing modifiable from nonmodifiable factors at individual, hospital, societal, and system levels and may thus guide appropriate interventions. Lastly, suggested future courses of action within the field of comparative cancer survivorship research are provided.

  9. Social cultural and situative perspective of studying emotions in teaching and learning: characteristics, challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seng-Chee

    2013-09-01

    In this forum, I take a learning sciences perspective to examine the paper by Bellocchi, Ritchie, Tobin, Sandhu and Sandhu ( Cultural Studies of Science Education, doi: 10.1007/s11422-013-9526-3 , 2013) titled "Examining emotional climate of preservice science teacher education." I characterize their approach as a social cultural and situative perspective of studying emotions in teaching and learning. Such an approach overcomes the limitations of examining emotions as individual psychological constructs, but it also incurs other methodological challenges. I suggest an alternative approach of examining the individual's emotions, as well as their aggregates as a group measure. This approach allows us to study variations in emotional outcomes at an individual level or at a group level. I also suggest examining interplay of emotions with other aspects of learning outcomes, for example, cognitive learning outcomes. Finally, I suggest studying development of meta-emotional knowledge among teachers as another fertile area of research that could benefit the teachers in their classroom practices.

  10. Anatomy, technology, art, and culture: toward a realistic perspective of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Feindel, William; Goodrich, James T; Dagi, T Forcht; Prestigiacomo, Charles J; Preul, Mark C

    2009-09-01

    In the 15th century, brain illustration began to change from a schematic system that involved scant objective rendering of the brain, to accurate depictions based on anatomical dissections that demanded significant artistic talent. Notable examples of this innovation are the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci (1498-1504), Andreas Vesalius' association with the bottega of Titian to produce the drawings of Vesalius' De humani corporis fabrica (1543), and Christopher Wren's illustrations for Thomas Willis' Cerebri Anatome (1664). These works appeared during the Renaissance and Age of Enlightenment, when advances in brain imaging, or really brain rendering, reflected not only the abilities and dedications of the artists, but also the influences of important cultural and scientific factors. Anatomy and human dissection became popular social phenomena as well as scholarly pursuits, linked with the world of the fine arts. The working philosophy of these artists involved active participation in both anatomical study and illustration, and the belief that their discoveries of the natural world could best be communicated by rendering them in objective form (that is, with realistic perspective). From their studies emerged the beginning of contemporary brain imaging. In this article, the authors examine how the brain began to be imaged in realism within a cultural and scientific milieu that witnessed the emergence of anatomical dissection, the geometry of linear perspective, and the closer confluence of art and science.

  11. Human embryonic stem cell cultivation: historical perspective and evolution of xeno-free culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nina; Rambhia, Pooja; Gishto, Arsela

    2015-02-22

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have emerged as attractive candidates for cell-based therapies that are capable of restoring lost cell and tissue function. These unique cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and have the capacity to differentiate in to all three germ layers (ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm). Harnessing the power of these pluripotent stem cells could potentially offer new therapeutic treatment options for a variety of medical conditions. Since the initial derivation of hESC lines in 1998, tremendous headway has been made in better understanding stem cell biology and culture requirements for maintenance of pluripotency. The approval of the first clinical trials of hESC cells for treatment of spinal cord injury and macular degeneration in 2010 marked the beginning of a new era in regenerative medicine. Yet it was clearly recognized that the clinical utility of hESC transplantation was still limited by several challenges. One of the most immediate issues has been the exposure of stem cells to animal pathogens, during hESC derivation and during in vitro propagation. Initial culture protocols used co-culture with inactivated mouse fibroblast feeder (MEF) or human feeder layers with fetal bovine serum or alternatively serum replacement proteins to support stem cell proliferation. Most hESC lines currently in use have been exposed to animal products, thus carrying the risk of xeno-transmitted infections and immune reaction. This mini review provides a historic perspective on human embryonic stem cell culture and the evolution of new culture models. We highlight the challenges and advances being made towards the development of xeno-free culture systems suitable for therapeutic applications.

  12. Searching for social capital: historical perspectives on health, poverty and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welshman, John

    2006-11-01

    Social capital has been seen as having a positive effect on health, and the concept of social capital has been viewed as of central importance to debates about healthy, sustainable communities. More generally, behaviour and its relationship with health has become much more central to policy-making, as illustrated in the Choosing Health White Paper (2005), and the concept of social capital has been one influence on the concept of social exclusion. Robert Putnam's arguments, both those expressed in Making Democracy Work (1993) and the revised version seen in Bowling Alone (2000) have been taken up by numerous social scientists and policy-makers. But despite the explicitly historical perspective that Putnam employs in Bowling Alone in particular, the history of social capital remains rather neglected in the available literature. This article is concerned with providing a historical perspective on social capital, especially the ways in which social investigators have viewed the relationships between health, poverty and behaviour. The article puts social capital alongside that of 'underclass' concepts such as the culture of poverty thesis, and examines how the latter has been invented and reinvented in the U.K. and the U.S.A. over the last 120 years. It argues that there are important similarities between the culture of poverty and social capital, but also significant differences, and these have implications for current policy initiatives. One way of analysing concepts like social capital and social exclusion more rigorously is by locating them within this longer-term history of social investigation, in which debates about health, poverty, and culture have been of

  13. Yup'ik culture and context in Southwest Alaska: community member perspectives of tradition, social change, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayunerak, Paula; Alstrom, Deborah; Moses, Charles; Charlie, James; Rasmus, Stacy M

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides an introduction to key aspects of Yup'ik Inuit culture and context from both historical and contemporary community member perspectives. Its purpose is to provide a framework for understanding the development and implementation of a prevention initiative centered on youth in two communities in Southwest Alaska as part of collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the National Institutes of Health. This paper is written from the perspective of elders and local prevention workers from each of the two prevention communities. The co-authors discuss their culture and their community from their own perspectives, drawing from direct experience and from ancestral knowledge gained through learning and living the Yuuyaraq or the Yup'ik way of life. The authors of this paper identity key aspects of traditional Yup'ik culture that once contributed to the adaptability and survivability of their ancestors, particularly through times of hardship and social disruption. These key processes and practices represent dimensions of culture in a Yup'ik context that contribute to personal and collective growth, protection and wellbeing. Intervention development in Yup'ik communities requires bridging historical cultural frames with contemporary contexts and shifting focus from reviving cultural activities to repairing and revitalizing cultural systems that structure community.

  14. The Construal (In)compatibility Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ringberg, Torsten; Mao, Huifang

    2011-01-01

    This research examines how consumers with a creative mind-set are persuaded by advertising claims construed at different levels (i.e., abstract vs. concrete ad claims). Across four experiments, we show that consumers with a creative mindset are more persuaded by ad claims construed at a level...... incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind...

  15. Russia and Human Rights: Incompatible Opposites?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Bowring

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Article raises in his article “Russia and human rights: incompatible opposites?” the question, if the currently complicated relations between Russia and the CoE concerning Russia’s obligations under the ECHR are at breaking-point. In regard to this issue he gives a description of the history of law in Russia to prove the pre-existing tradition of argument about human rights.

  16. The Cultural Differences Between China and Western Countries——From the Perspective of Analyzing Advertising Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晨

    2009-01-01

    There exists close interrelationship between language and culture: Language reflects culture and culture influences language. Based on the comparision of different advertising languages in Chinese and western cultures, their cultural differences will be investigated from three perspectives: philosophical ideology, value orientation and cultural traditions, in hope of promoting cross-cultural communciation.%语言和文化密切相关,本文拟从哲学观念、价值取向、文化传统三个方面对中西方的广告语言作一对比分析,以期从语言中探寻中西文化差异,促进跨文化交流.

  17. Law, ethics and pandemic preparedness: the importance of cross-jurisdictional and cross-cultural perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Belinda; Carney, Terry

    2010-04-01

    To explore social equity, health planning, regulatory and ethical dilemmas in responding to a pandemic influenza (H5N1) outbreak, and the adequacy of protocols and standards such as the International Health Regulations (2005). This paper analyses the role of legal and ethical considerations for pandemic preparedness, including an exploration of the relevance of cross-jurisdictional and cross-cultural perspectives in assessing the validity of goals for harmonisation of laws and policies both within and between nations. Australian and international experience is reviewed in various areas, including distribution of vaccines during a pandemic, the distribution of authority between national and local levels of government, and global and regional equity issues for poorer countries. This paper finds that questions such as those of distributional justice (resource allocation) and regulatory frameworks raise important issues about the cultural and ethical acceptability of planning measures. Serious doubt is cast on a 'one size fits all' approach to international planning for managing a pandemic. It is concluded that a more nuanced approach than that contained in international guidelines may be required if an effective response is to be constructed internationally. The paper commends the wisdom of reliance on 'soft law', international guidance that leaves plenty of room for each nation to construct its response in conformity with its own cultural and value requirements. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia.

  18. A Cultural Perspective on the Structure of Student Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, Mary; Ainley, John

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the nature of interest in science as represented in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data. We discuss the interconnections between measures of knowledge, affect, and value as components of interest in science. Working from a perspective acknowledging that many of the models of motivation represented in the literature have been developed in Western countries, we investigated whether the ways that knowledge, affect, and value combine in the structure of students' interest in science might vary in line with historical and cultural traditions. Four countries were chosen to represent contrasting cultural values as defined in analyses of the World Values Surveys and the European Values Surveys-Colombia, Estonia, USA, and Sweden. Models are described showing variations in fit across the four countries. Efforts to increase the attractiveness of science to students should take heed of the fact that all models indicated a central role for enjoyment of science in the paths linking personal value, interest, and current science activities with intentions for future participation in science. Differences in the strength of the associations between science knowledge and interest in science support the proposition that the interconnections between knowledge, affect, and value need to be understood in relation to students' broader historical and cultural context.

  19. Tang-Song or Song-Ming: The Significance of a Perspective Shift in Chinese Cultural and Intellectual History

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Zhaoguang

    2006-01-01

    Discussions on the contrast between the Tang and Song dynasties are common in Chinese cultural and intellectual history.Will it make more sense if the continuity between Song and Ming are emphasized instead? This shift in research perspective will have multiple effects.Instead of paying exclusive attention to the elites and classics,we will focus on common knowledge,thoughts,and beliefs.As a result of this shift in the core of our research interests,the process by which ideas and cultural novelties are institutionalized,popularized,and "conventionalized" will become an important focus of historical research.Shifting our concern from the "original thinking" of the Tang and Song to the "compromise thinking" of the Song and Ming will cause an increase in the kinds of documents about cultural and intellectual history.Such changes in periodization and research perspective can stimulate fundamental changes in the study of Chinese cultural and intellectual history.

  20. Mechanisms of self-incompatibility and unilateral incompatibility in diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijlander, R.

    1998-01-01

    In chapter 1 an overview is given of the major mechanisms operating in Angiosperms that prevent or limit the degree of inbreeding. The two major systems that function on the basis of interaction between pollen and stigma/style, are the sporophytic and the gametophytic self-incompatibility

  1. Mechanisms of self-incompatibility and unilateral incompatibility in diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijlander, R.

    1998-01-01

    In chapter 1 an overview is given of the major mechanisms operating in Angiosperms that prevent or limit the degree of inbreeding. The two major systems that function on the basis of interaction between pollen and stigma/style, are the sporophytic and the gametophytic self-incompatibility systems (S

  2. The Incompatibility of Living Systems: Characterizing Growth-Induced Incompatibilities in Expanded Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepole, Adrian Buganza; Gart, Michael; Purnell, Chad A; Gosain, Arun K; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-05-01

    Skin expansion is a common surgical technique to correct large cutaneous defects. Selecting a successful expansion protocol is solely based on the experience and personal preference of the operating surgeon. Skin expansion could be improved by predictive computational simulations. Towards this goal, we model skin expansion using the continuum framework of finite growth. This approach crucially relies on the concept of incompatible configurations. However, aside from the classical opening angle experiment, our current understanding of growth-induced incompatibilities remains rather vague. Here we visualize and characterize incompatibilities in living systems using skin expansion in a porcine model: We implanted and inflated two expanders, crescent, and spherical, and filled them to 225 cc throughout a period of 21 days. To quantify the residual strains developed during this period, we excised the expanded skin patches and subdivided them into smaller pieces. Skin growth averaged 1.17 times the original area for the spherical and 1.10 for the crescent expander, and displayed significant regional variations. When subdivided into smaller pieces, the grown skin patches retracted heterogeneously and confirmed the existence of incompatibilities. Understanding skin growth through mechanical stretch will allow surgeons to improve-and ultimately personalize-preoperative treatment planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  3. Mechanisms of self-incompatibility and unilateral incompatibility in diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijlander, R.

    1998-01-01

    In chapter 1 an overview is given of the major mechanisms operating in Angiosperms that prevent or limit the degree of inbreeding. The two major systems that function on the basis of interaction between pollen and stigma/style, are the sporophytic and the gametophytic self-incompatibility s

  4. Cultural pathways and pitfalls in South Africa: a reflection on moral agency and leadership from a Christian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The nature and importance of moral agency for the transformation of persons and society, particularly from a Christian perspective, are discussed in this article. The focus is on cultural pathways and pitfalls with respect to the formation and exercise of moral agency on the part of individuals, leaders and communities. The six dimensions of cultural values as developed by Hampden-Turner and Trompenaars (2000) are used as a framework to describe and evaluate mainly western and African cultura...

  5. Cultural Collision and Collusion: Reflections on Hip-Hop Culture, Values, and Schools. Educational Psychology: Critical Pedagogical Perspectives. Volume 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachum, Floyd D.; McCray, Carlos R.

    2011-01-01

    "Cultural Collision and Collusion" addresses the complexity of problems that surround youth culture and school culture. By broadening the scholarly dialogue and examining and disseminating relevant research to practitioners, the book seeks to provide insight into youth culture and some manifestations of popular culture (e.g., hip-hop). In…

  6. LGBTQ Youth and Young Adult Perspectives on a Culturally Tailored Group Smoking Cessation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, Neill Bruce; Shuh, Alanna; Wong-Francq, Katy; Dash, Darly; Abramowicz, Aneta

    2017-01-25

    The prevalence of smoking among LGBTQ youth and young adults (YYAs) is much higher than that of non-LGBTQ young people. The current study explored LGBTQ YYA perceptions of a culturally tailored group smoking cessation counselling program, along with how the intervention could be improved. We conducted focus groups (n = 24) with 204 LGBTQ YYAs in Toronto and Ottawa, Canada. Open-ended questions focused on their feelings, likes and dislikes, concerns and additional ideas for a culturally tailored group cessation counselling intervention. Focus group transcripts were coded thematically and analyzed. Overall, YYAs were ambivalent towards the concept of a culturally tailored, group cessation counselling program. Although several participants were attracted to the LGBTQ friendly and social benefits of such a program (eg, good support system), many also had concerns. Particularly, the possibility that other group members might trigger them to smoke was a frequently stated issue. Focus group members also noted lack of motivation to attend the group, and that the group program may be inaccessible depending on where and when the program was offered. Several suggestions were made as to how to ameliorate the expressed issues related to inaccessibility or lack of attractiveness. This study is among the first to gain the perspectives of LGBTQ YYAs on culturally tailored group cessation strategies in Canada. We identified components of group cessation programs that are both favored and not favored among LGBTQ YYAs, as well as suggestions as to how to make group cessation programs more appealing. This study is particularly relevant as smoking cessation programs are one of the most commonly offered and published cessation interventions for the LGBTQ community, yet little is understood in terms of preferences of LGBTQ YYA smokers. Given the disparity in the prevalence of smoking among LGBTQ young people compared to their non-LGBTQ peers, research on effective intervention strategies

  7. Science education reform in Confucian learning cultures: teachers' perspectives on policy and practice in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Syuan; Asghar, Anila

    2016-10-01

    This empirical study investigates secondary science teachers' perspectives on science education reform in Taiwan and reflects how these teachers have been negotiating constructivist and learner-centered pedagogical approaches in contemporary science education. It also explores the challenges that teachers encounter while shifting their pedagogical focus from traditional approaches to teaching science to an active engagement in students' learning. Multiple sources of qualitative data were obtained, including individual interviews with science teachers and teachers' reflective journals about Confucianism in relation to their educational philosophies. Thematic analysis and constant comparative method were used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that Confucian traditions play a significant role in shaping educational practices in Taiwan and profoundly influence teachers' epistemological beliefs and their actual classroom practice. Indeed, science teachers' perspectives on Confucian learning traditions played a key role in supporting or obstructing their pedagogical commitments to inquiry-based and learner-centered approaches. This study draws on the literature concerning teachers' professional struggles and identity construction during educational reform. Specifically, we explore the ways in which teachers respond to educational changes and negotiate their professional identities. We employed various theories of identity construction to understand teachers' struggles and challenges while wrestling with competing traditional and reform-based pedagogical approaches. Attending to these struggles and the ways in which they inform the development of a teacher's professional identity is vital for sustaining current and future educational reform in Taiwan as well as in other Eastern cultures. These findings have important implications for teachers' professional development programs in East Asian cultures.

  8. Actualizing Notions of Perspective Transformation Using Web 2.0: Student Views on What Works for Language and Culture Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson Devall, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The framework of perspective transformation (Mezirow, 1994) provides a rich context for the conceptualization of technology use in language and culture learning. Although others have focused on the processes of becoming interculturally competent (Taylor, 1994) and changing language structures (Foster, 1997), more exploration of how technology aids…

  9. A Cultural Hybridization Perspective: Emerging Academic Subculture among International Students from East Asia in U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the emerging academic subculture of international students from East Asia in U.S. academics from the cultural hybridization perspective. In a knowledge-based economy, international education plays a pivotal role in the global educational environment. Advocacy of international student mobility is essential; international…

  10. Actualizing Notions of Perspective Transformation Using Web 2.0: Student Views on What Works for Language and Culture Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson Devall, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The framework of perspective transformation (Mezirow, 1994) provides a rich context for the conceptualization of technology use in language and culture learning. Although others have focused on the processes of becoming interculturally competent (Taylor, 1994) and changing language structures (Foster, 1997), more exploration of how technology aids…

  11. Education Across Cultures: Domestic and International Perspectives. Proceedings of the Annual Colloquium (7th, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 28, 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittsburgh Univ., PA. Council of Graduate Students in Education.

    The Council for Graduate Students in Education's Seventh Annual Colloquium was held on March 28, 1981, on the theme "Education Across Cultures: Domestic and International Perspectives." Papers presented include: "Symbolic Strategies in the Organization of Ethnic Study Programs" (Julian E. Abuso); "The Prospective…

  12. Encountering Challenges in Teacher Education: Developing Culturally Pluralist Pedagogy When Teaching Dance from Contextual Perspectives in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In 2000, teaching about culturally diverse dances from contextual perspectives became an expectation for New Zealand schools with the inaugural The Arts in the New Zealand Curriculum. Responding to the new curriculum the author, as dance lecturer for K-12 generalist teachers attending a seven day in-service dance and drama education course, faced…

  13. Cultural pathways and pitfalls in South Africa: a reflection on moral agency and leadership from a Christian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kretzschmar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The nature and importance of moral agency for the transformation of persons and society, particularly from a Christian perspective, are discussed in this article. The focus is on cultural pathways and pitfalls with respect to the formation and exercise of moral agency on the part of individuals, leaders and communities. The six dimensions of cultural values as developed by Hampden-Turner and Trompenaars (2000 are used as a framework to describe and evaluate mainly western and African cultural values in order to identify ways of developing moral responsibility and genuine social transformation.

  14. Analysing young children’s thinking about natural phenomena: A sociocultural/cultural historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JILL ROBBINS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vygotsky’s sociocultural/cultural historical theory emphasised the notion of semiotic mediation – or how thinking is transformed through signs (such as language and cultural tools (such as drawings from an intermental to an intramental plane. While the ideas of Vygotsky have become well-accepted within research in early childhood education in Australia, they are somewhat slower to be adopted within science education research. Yet they offer the potential for gaining new understandings of how young children’s thinking about the world develops. This article will demonstrate one way in which aspects of Vygotsky’s (1987-1999 work, particularly his ideas about semiotic mediation can inform analysis of children’s thinking about the world. Focusing on conversations with children about natural phenomena, and drawings they completed during those conversations, the analysis identifies a number of significant issues that are not normally revealed within the dominant forms of analysis which draw on constructivist perspectives. The findings, which reveal complex and dynamic aspects of children’s thinking, have implications for both teachers and researchers working with young children – especially within science education and science education research.

  15. Out-of-School Suspensions of Black Youths: Culture, Ability, Disability, Gender, and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Wendy; Kayama, Misa; Gibson, Priscilla Ann

    2016-07-01

    Racial disproportionality in out-of-school suspensions is a persistent social justice issue in public schools. This article examines out-of-school suspensions of four black youths from the perspectives of the youths, their caregivers, and educators. The case involving David, a 14-year-old African American with a learning disability, illustrates the challenges of students experiencing the intersection of disability and race. The case involving George, a 14-year-old Liberian immigrant, illustrates how parents and teachers may form alliances around shared goals and values despite profound cultural differences in understanding of youths' misbehavior. The case involving Nina, a 12-year-old African American, illustrates how educators' failure to consider the context of her misbehaviors as responses to sexual harassment, along with their subsequent harsh punishment and failure to protect her, led to her disengagement from school. The case involving Craig, a 16-year-old African American, provides a glimpse into how the use of criminal justice language to refer to youths' misbehaviors can support the development of a criminalized self- and social identity. These cases illustrate the diversity of black students--including ability, disability, culture, and gender--and how events surrounding suspensions are interpreted by students, caregivers, and educators. Understanding such diversity will undergird implementation of effective alternatives to suspensions.

  16. [Home care in a culturally sensitive environment: perspectives of caregivers of Haitian elderly patients and relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Francine; Paquet, Mario; Vissandjée, Bilkis; Carpentier, Normand; Lévesque, Louise; Trudeau, Denise

    2008-01-01

    In Canada, the care provided by families occurs in an increasingly multiethnic context. Against this backdrop, the present qualitative study aims to explore the needs/expectations and solutions not only of (female) natural caregivers of an elderly relative hailing from Haiti (presented in terms of tracking cases) but also of remunerated home care providers - all with a view to developing a culturally sensitive service offering. As such, this study works from a conceptual framework centring on the negotiation of a common area of agreement between the stakeholders involved (i.e., natural caregivers and home care providers). To this end, focus groups and individual interviews were conducted among 15 caregivers and 37 home care providers. The three recurrent themes emerging from the data analysis concern, in context, the needs/expectations and solutions surrounding the experience of service use, barriers to use, and the relationships between natural caregivers and home care providers. The statements of both groups evidenced a consistency of views and have thus provided a basis for developing some recommendations acceptable to all stakeholders from the perspective of making culturally-based adjustments to the service offering.

  17. Cross-incompatibility between maize and teosinte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermicle, J.L.; Allen, J.O. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1990-01-01

    Pollen of dent maize was unable to fertilize plants representing five of six accessions of Zea mays ssp. mexicana teosinte and the one accession of ssp. huehuetenangensis teosinte tested. Plants from all other teosinte taxa were successfully fertilized by dent maize. Factors governing cross-incompatibility from ssp. mexicana accessions Central Plateau 48703 and Chalco were incorporated into dent inbred W22 by backcrossing. The Chalco-derived strain behaves like cross-incompatible popcorns (Ga1-s Ga1-s) in that it does not allow fertilization by dent pollen (ga1), is reciprocally compatible with Ga1-carrying strains and distorts sugary-1 ratios when trans heterozygotes are self-pollinated. Its ability to pollinate Ga1-s Ga1-s plants segregates as an allele of Ga1. Pollen from the Central Plateau-derived stock also functions on Ga1-s Ga1-s silks, but the reciprocal cross, as well as pollination with ga1 ga1, fails. Hybrids of this stock with dent also do not set seed when pollinated with either ga1 or Ga1-s pollen. Compatibility is governed in this case by a complex of chromosome 4 factors designated TIC-CP. One component of the complex is a cross-neutral allele of Ga1, denoted Ga1-m:CPT, that permits pollen carrying it to function on Ga1-s Ga1-s silks. A second factor, located 4 map units distal to su1, permits pollen to function on silks carrying TIC-CP. Expression of the TIC-UP barrier in the style requires at least one other linked factor. Curiously, homozygous TIC-CP plants often fertilize themselves poorly.

  18. Plasmodial incompatibility in the myxomycetes: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haskins EF

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Two myxomycete phaneroplasmodia of the same species undergo somatic fusion only if they are phenotypically identical for a complex genetic incompatibility system. This system consists of a three tiered polygenic complex with dominant and recessive alleles. Thus, plasmodia must be phenotypically identical for approximately 16 loci in order to fuse (CC and Cc are phenotypically identical, but different from cc. The first level of the system (having a minimum of seven Fus loci controls membrane fusion, and it apparently prevents fusion unless the two plasmodia have identical membrane or slime sheath components. The second level (having a minimum of six Cz loci produces a rapid lysis of a small mixed region, of the two plasmodia, if membrane fusion has occurred. This lysis is directional in that it targets the recessive phenotype, and it is apparently triggered by some pre-formed substances when they come into contact with a different plasmodium. The third level (having a minimum of three Let loci comes into play if membrane fusion occurs and there is no rapid lysis of the mixed plasmodium. It produces a slow lethal reaction, which targets and degrades the nuclei of the recessive phenotype. This reaction occurs over a period of five to twenty hours and requires the synthesis of new RNA and proteins. Since, this complex system produces a minimum of 65,536 different incompatibility phenotypes, it is highly unlikely that any two phaneroplasmodia will undergo a successful fusion unless they are very closely related. Species with aphaneroplasmoida apparently have a similar system, but species with small protoplasmodia do not appear to undergo any type of plasmodial fusion.

  19. A Cross-Cultural Perspective:An Integration of Traditional Chinese Cul-ture into College English Textbooks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ni

    2014-01-01

    Teaching language is teaching culture. English is an international language with local and global significance.In“New Horizon College English”, Chinese culture elements are deficient, which is not conducive to our country ’s higher education and cross-cultural communication skills and to achieve the goal of innovation of Chinese culture. As an important part of world cul⁃ture, Chinese culture should be integrated into college English education. College English teaching materials should include not only western cultural elements but also fully present Chinese culture elements.

  20. Cultura Organizacional na Perspectiva Cultural Regional BrasileiraOrganizational Culture under the Perspective of the Brazilian Regional CultureCultura Organizacional en la Perspectiva Cultural Regional Brasileña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUZZIO, Henrique

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOEsse ensaio tem como objetivo analisar o contexto cultural brasileiro e a sua influência no universo organizacional a partir de uma perspectiva cultural regional que não se limite à visão funcionalista e avance por meio de conceitos contemporâneos como os fluxos culturais e os códigos culturais locais. Do ponto de vista internacional, os estudos comparativos que trabalham com a perspectiva de adaptação cultural já apresentam um volume significativo de pesquisas que enfatizam as distinções entre regiões ou nações. Mas, quando se trata dessa perspectiva dentro de países culturalmente diversos, parece ainda não haver no campo a mesma expressão. Em países em que é reconhecida a diversidade cultural, como o Brasil, análises que levem em conta as influências dessa variável podem contribuir para a eficiência das relações internas e externas da organização. Arguimos a necessidade das organizações contemplarem em suas ações o que chamamos de legitimidade cultural local, quando as organizações atuam em distintos contextos respeitando os valores e as práticas culturais locais. As diferentes culturas regionais encontradas no Brasil se refletem nos hábitos dos consumidores, no comportamento social e nas atitudes e desempenho das pessoas no trabalho, o que requer efetivamente diferentes e variadas práticas de gestão.ABSTRACTThis essay has the objective of analyzing the Brazilian cultural context and its influence on the organizations universe from a cultural regional perspective that goes beyond the functionalist paradigm and advances through contemporary concepts, like cultural flows and the local cultural codes. In an international perspective, in studies that consider the perspective of cultural adaptation, it is possible finding a significant volume of research that emphasizes the distinctions between regions or nations. On the other hand, when it these studies deal with this perspective inside each culturally

  1. The culture of patient safety from the perspective of the pediatric emergency nursing team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Taise Rocha; Rocha, Patricia Kuerten; Tomazoni, Andreia; Souza, Sabrina de; Anders, Jane Cristina; Davis, Karri

    2016-01-01

    To identify the patient safety culture in pediatric emergencies from the perspective of the nursing team. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey research study with a sample composed of 75 professionals of the nursing team. Data was collected between September and November 2014 in three Pediatric Emergency units by applying the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument. Data were submitted to descriptive analysis. Strong areas for patient safety were not found, with areas identified having potential being: Expectations and actions from supervisors/management to promote patient safety and teamwork. Areas identified as critical were: Non-punitive response to error and support from hospital management for patient safety. The study found a gap between the safety culture and pediatric emergencies, but it found possibilities of transformation that will contribute to the safety of pediatric patients. Nursing professionals need to become protagonists in the process of replacing the current paradigm for a culture focused on safety. The replication of this study in other institutions is suggested in order to improve the current health care scenario. Identificar a cultura de segurança do paciente em emergências pediátricas, na perspectiva da equipe de enfermagem. Pesquisa quantitativa, tipo survey transversal. Amostra composta por 75 profissionais da equipe de enfermagem. Dados coletados entre setembro e novembro de 2014, em três Emergências Pediátricas, aplicando o instrumento Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Dados submetidos à análise descritiva. Não foram encontradas áreas de força para a segurança do paciente, sendo identificadas áreas com potencial de assim se tornarem: Expectativas e ações do supervisor/chefia para promoção da segurança do paciente e Trabalho em equipe. Como área crítica identificaram-se: Resposta não punitiva ao erro e Apoio da gestão hospitalar para segurança do paciente. O estudo apontou distanciamento

  2. Comparative Study on Two English Versions of Hong Lou Meng from the Perspective of Cross-culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚青; 向凤雅; 侯方丽

    2015-01-01

    Hong Lou Meng is not only one of the four most famous ancient books in China,but also a classic masterpiece in the history of world literature.It presents the background and living statues in China feudal society as well as the language and culture of China.Two most completely and widely popular versions are that,one is translated by Yang Hsien-Yi and his wife Gladys Yang who are the famous translator couple (the Yang's version) and the other is translated by Oxford University's Sinologists David Hawks and John Minford,which refers to Hawks' version.In this paper,a comparative study on different translation methods in two versions are made to explore differences between China and western cultures,and thus discuss the influences on translation of different cultures,especially study how the factors of culture,thoughts,language habits and translation methods impact on translation from the perspective of cross-culture.

  3. 46 CFR 98.30-29 - Piping incompatible products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping incompatible products. 98.30-29 Section 98.30-29 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL... Piping incompatible products. No person may pipe a portable tank with another tank that contains...

  4. Genomic consequences of selection on self-incompatibility genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Vekemans, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Frequency-dependent selection at plant self-incompatibility systems is inherent and well understood theoretically. A self-incompatibility locus leads to a strong peak of diversity in the genome, to a unique distribution of diversity across the species and possibly to increased introgression between...

  5. The influence of culture on diabetes self-management: perspectives of Gujarati Muslim men who reside in northwest England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Elizabeth; Carter, Bernie; Pettigrew, Judith

    2008-03-01

    To present the findings of a study which explored the influence of culture on (type 2) diabetes self-management in Gujarati Muslim men who reside in northwest England. This study was informed by an embodied perspective of culture, in which culture is grounded in the body and self. This contrasts with some contemporary health research and policy which adopts an oversimplified perspective, portraying culture as static and deterministic and being responsible for non-adherent self-management behaviours. A case-study approach was used, which combined interview and participant observation methods. Data were collected from Gujarati Muslim men about their lived experiences of diabetes self-management. These accounts, along with further narrative data from 'significant other' participants, were analysed over several cycles. Two central concepts guide the results: embodied culture and dynamic culture. These concepts reflect the subjective and contextual nature of culture and are illustrated in the themes 'past experiences and socio-economic factors', 'social and gendered roles' and 'personal choice and contextual factors'. The findings highlight that the complexity of life means that culture never exists in isolation, but is one of the many factors that a man negotiates to inform his diabetes self-management. We draw attention to the dissonance between the way culture is presented in some government policy and research, and the way it is understood in an embodied approach. The National Service Framework for Diabetes advocates the provision of individualized culturally appropriate care, and in this paper, we make suggestions as to how an embodied approach can be incorporated within the framework. Nurses have an integral role in implementing the National Service Framework for Diabetes. This paper contributes to the debate about how nurses can best deliver this framework to a diverse patient population.

  6. Widespread genetic incompatibility in C. elegans maintained by balancing selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Hannah S; Rockman, Matthew V; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2008-02-01

    Natural selection is expected to eliminate genetic incompatibilities from interbreeding populations. We have discovered a globally distributed incompatibility in the primarily selfing species Caenorhabditis elegans that has been maintained despite its negative consequences for fitness. Embryos homozygous for a naturally occurring deletion of the zygotically acting gene zeel-1 arrest if their sperm parent carries an incompatible allele of a second, paternal-effect locus, peel-1. The two interacting loci are tightly linked, with incompatible alleles occurring in linkage disequilibrium in two common haplotypes. These haplotypes exhibit elevated sequence divergence, and population genetic analyses of this region indicate that natural selection is preserving both haplotypes in the population. Our data suggest that long-term maintenance of a balanced polymorphism has permitted the incompatibility to persist despite gene flow across the rest of the genome.

  7. From Cultural Knowledge to Intercultural Communicative Competence: Changing Perspectives on the Role of Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to the concept of culture and teaching cultural competence in a foreign language classroom have been changing over the last decades. The paper summarises, compares, contrasts and evaluates four major approaches to teaching cultural competence in foreign language teaching, that is, knowledge-based approach, contrastive approach,…

  8. From Cultural Knowledge to Intercultural Communicative Competence: Changing Perspectives on the Role of Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Approaches to the concept of culture and teaching cultural competence in a foreign language classroom have been changing over the last decades. The paper summarises, compares, contrasts and evaluates four major approaches to teaching cultural competence in foreign language teaching, that is, knowledge-based approach, contrastive approach,…

  9. Mechanisms of protein sequence divergence and incompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Wellner

    Full Text Available Alignments of orthologous protein sequences convey a complex picture. Some positions are utterly conserved whilst others have diverged to variable degrees. Amongst the latter, many are non-exchangeable between extant sequences. How do functionally critical and highly conserved residues diverge? Why and how did these exchanges become incompatible within contemporary sequences? Our model is phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK, where lysine 219 is an essential active-site residue completely conserved throughout Eukaryota and Bacteria, and serine is found only in archaeal PGKs. Contemporary sequences tested exhibited complete loss of function upon exchanges at 219. However, a directed evolution experiment revealed that two mutations were sufficient for human PGK to become functional with serine at position 219. These two mutations made position 219 permissive not only for serine and lysine, but also to a range of other amino acids seen in archaeal PGKs. The identified trajectories that enabled exchanges at 219 show marked sign epistasis - a relatively small loss of function with respect to one amino acid (lysine versus a large gain with another (serine, and other amino acids. Our findings support the view that, as theoretically described, the trajectories underlining the divergence of critical positions are dominated by sign epistatic interactions. Such trajectories are an outcome of rare mutational combinations. Nonetheless, as suggested by the laboratory enabled K219S exchange, given enough time and variability in selection levels, even utterly conserved and functionally essential residues may change.

  10. Cultural politics and masculinities: multiple-partners in historical perspective in KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Mark

    2005-05-01

    Drawing from ethnographic, archival and secondary research, this article examines multiple-sexual partners in historical perspective in KwaZulu-Natal, a South Africa province where one in three people are thought to be HIV positive. Research on masculinities, multiple partners, and AIDS has been predominantly directed towards the present day. This article stresses the importance of unraveling the antecedents of contemporary masculinities particularly the gendered cultural politics through which they have been produced. Arguing against dominant conceptions of African masculinity as being innate or static, it charts the rise and fall of the isoka, the Zulu man with multiple-sexual partners, over the last century. Showing how the isoka developed through changing conditions occasioned by capitalism, migrant labor and Christianity, it contends that an important turning point took place from the 1970s when high unemployment threatened previous expressions of manliness, notably marriage, settings up an independent household and becoming umnumzana (a household head). The high value placed on men seeking multiple-partners increasingly filled the void left by men's inability to become men through previous means. Turning to the contemporary period, the articles argues that, shaken by the huge AIDS deaths, men are betraying increasing doubts about the isoka masculinity.

  11. The Cultural Geography on the III Millennium: epistemic-methodological and educational perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Correia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article puts in evidence the Cultural and Humanistic Geography and its new shapes of working with the knowledge. For such thing, it reflects about the geographic knowledge on the third millennium and the new humanistic perspectives of this lore. So that it points out the feeling and the emotion starting from the subjectivism and from the relation people have with their own living and realized space. These reflections are treated as a general and a geographical knowledge, but more particularly in a geographical sight, pointing out in this last, the categories which envolve the daily life of the local citizens, the more evident and substantials to the grasp in the positioned geographical science, as well, for the teaching of this subject. Reflects also about the position of the contemporary knowledge, as well as pointing out the possible contribution Geography may bring to the efectiveness of those. For that reason, it points some metodologic and pedagogical questions of the actual geography, reaching fenomenological grounds of the social representations, for the elaboration of one more human lore, particularly inside the geographical science, which could contribute to the project of the society at all. For this, the fenomenological vision of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty it is put in evidence, like the Moscovici’s theory of social plays. These theories go towards one humanistic geography to be built and reflected in an academic, educational and pedagogical environment.

  12. THE ROLE PLAY AND THE CHILD WITH AUTISM IN THE HISTORICAL-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angélica da Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the play of make-believe for children with autism, focusing on the symbolic resources it uses in asserting roles. It is based on the theoretical contributions of the historical-cultural perspective, with Vygotsky as its main exponent. The research was carried out in a public school of Early Childhood Education, in Brasília. From the microgenetic analysis, the research had six children diagnosed with autism, at the ages of 4 and 6 years, included in Special Class, as participants. The play situations were videotaped and later transcribed in episode format. In the data analysis, we identified two axes, namely: 1 The construction of the role play and; 2 Assumption of roles by the child with autism: set design and imagery resources. The results reveal the role of the other (intentional participation in the constitution of play activity, especially the role of the adult. In addition, they demonstrate that pedagogical mediation, including the creation of 'scenarios', is fundamental for the extension of the symbolic experience of the child with autism.

  13. A cultural historical theoretical perspective of discourse and design in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan

    2015-06-01

    Flavio Azevedo, Peggy Martalock and Tugba Keser have initiated an important conversation in science education as they use sociocultural theory to introduce design based scenarios into the science classroom. This response seeks to expand Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article The discourse of design- based science classroom activities by using a specific perspective within a sociocultural framework. Through using a cultural historical (Vygotsky in The history and development of higher mental functions, Plenum Press, New York, 1987) reading of design based activity and discourse in the science classroom, it is proposed that learning should be an integral part of these processes. Therefore, everyday and scientific concepts are explained and expanded in relation to Inventing Graphing and discourse presented in Azevedo, Martalock and Keser's article. This response reports on the importance of teacher's being explicit in relation to connecting everyday and scientific concepts alongside design based activity and related science concepts when teaching students. It is argued that explicit teaching of concepts should be instigated prior to analysis of discourse in the science classroom as it is only with experience and understanding these processes that students have the resources to call upon to argue like practicing scientists.

  14. Altruism, gift giving and reciprocity in organ donation: a review of cultural perspectives and challenges of the concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, C; Randhawa, G

    2014-10-01

    Living and deceased organ donation are couched in altruism and gift discourse and this article reviews explores cultural views towards these concepts. Altruism and egoism theories and gift and reciprocity theories are outlined from a social exchange theory perspective to highlight the key differences between altruism and the gift and the wider implications of reciprocation. The notion of altruism as a selfless act without expectation or want for repayment juxtaposed with the Maussian gift where there are the obligations to give, receive and reciprocate. Lay perspectives of altruism and the gift in organ donation are outlined and illustrate that there are differences in motivations to donate in different programmes of living donation and for families who decide to donate their relative's organs. These motivations reflect cultural views of altruism and the gift and perceptions of the body and death.

  15. Internal stakeholders perspectives in a cultural event: The Case of Noc Noc, Guimarães - Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa R. Ferreira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Given the significant impact that cultural events may have in local communities and their inherent organization complexity, it is important to understand their specificities. Most of the times cultural events disregard marketing and often marketing is distant from art. Thus an analysis of an internal marketing perspective might bring significant returns to the organization of such an event. This paper considers the three editions (2011, 2012 and 2013 of a cultural event – Noc Noc – organized by a local association in the city of Guimarães, Portugal. Its format is based in analogous events, as Noc Noc intends to convert everyday spaces (homes, commercial outlets and a number of other buildings into cultural spaces, organized and transformed by artists, hosts and audiences. By interviewing a sample of people (20 who have hosted this cultural event, sometimes doubling as artists, and by experiencing the three editions of the event, this paper analyses how the internal stakeholders understand this particular cultural event, analyzing specifically their motivations, ways of acting and participating, as well as their relationship with the public, with the organization of the event and with art in general. Results support that the motivations of artists and hosts must be identified in a timely and appropriate moment, as well as their views of this particular cultural event, in order to keep them participating, since low budget cultural events such as this one may have a key role in small cities.

  16. European food cultures in a macro and micro perspective: Implications for the marketing of Asian food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, Søren; Ludvigsen, Hanne H.

    1996-01-01

    certain food consumption trends from a micro-perspective, using qualitative techniques to explore changes in eating beghaviour in general and the openness to new "ethnic" or "exotic" types of food in particular. 6. This micro-level analysis was carried out in Denmark, for convenience reasons as well...... as because Denmark in the macro-level analysis showed signs of being one of the most generally open food cultures in Europe with relatively many overlapping characteristics with other European food cultures. It consisted of five focus grou interviews and six auto-driven interviews with selected households. 7...

  17. What Accounts for the Popularity of Twilight Saga-From the Perspec-tive of Culture Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN Qin

    2016-01-01

    The huge success of Twilight series and its adapted films is a blockbuster in the field of literature and film industry, at-tracting a great amount of audience and creating a box-office marvel. The book series also receives a wide attention from literary critics with analysis of different perspectives. This study aims to explore what accounts for Twilight’s popularity with cultural studies, including aspects of teenage culture, masculinity, psychoanalysis, gender and sexuality. A comprehensive angel is pro-vided to look at Twilight and its transformation to a classic.

  18. Genetics of Hybrid Incompatibility Between Lycopersicon esculentum and L. hirsutum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Leonie C.; Graham, Elaine B.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the genetics of hybrid incompatibility between two closely related diploid hermaphroditic plant species. Using a set of near-isogenic lines (NILs) representing 85% of the genome of the wild species Lycopersicon hirsutum (Solanum habrochaites) in the genetic background of the cultivated tomato L. esculentum (S. lycopersicum), we found that hybrid pollen and seed infertility are each based on 5–11 QTL that individually reduce hybrid fitness by 36–90%. Seed infertility QTL act additively or recessively, consistent with findings in other systems where incompatibility loci have largely been recessive. Genetic lengths of introgressed chromosomal segments explain little of the variation for hybrid incompatibility among NILs, arguing against an infinitesimal model of hybrid incompatibility and reinforcing our inference of a limited number of discrete incompatibility factors between these species. In addition, male (pollen) and other (seed) incompatibility factors are roughly comparable in number. The latter two findings contrast strongly with data from Drosophila where hybrid incompatibility can be highly polygenic and complex, and male sterility evolves substantially faster than female sterility or hybrid inviability. The observed differences between Lycopersicon and Drosophila might be due to differences in sex determination system, reproductive and mating biology, and/or the prevalence of sexual interactions such as sexual selection. PMID:15466436

  19. [総説]Suicide in Okinawa from an international perspective : A consideration of socio-cultural factors

    OpenAIRE

    Naka, Koichi; Willcox, D. Craig; Todoriki, Hidemi; Kageyama, Takayuki; Department of Cli花ical Psychology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan; Department of Anthropology and Institute for Human Development, Life Course and Aging, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan; Urban Environment and Health Project, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan

    1998-01-01

    In studies of suicide, a common problem is an over-focus on psychopathology of individual suicidal acts. As a result, the social determinants of suicide are often obscured. In order to rectify this situation, in this paper, we took a Durkheimian approach and focused on social factors that may be linked to suicide. We reviewed research on suicide in Okinawa from an international perspective and reconsidered suicide as a socio-cultural phenomenon. We also compared suicide in Okinawa to trends i...

  20. Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities and adaptation to a shared environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, H. Allen

    2009-01-01

    Natural selection might drive the evolution of postzygotic reproductive isolation even when allopatric populations adapt to identical environments, an idea first suggested by Muller (1942). Here we analyze this scenario mathematically, focusing on the evolution of a Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility between populations. Our results identify a potential problem with Muller’s scenario: adaptation to identical environments can often involve substitution of the same alleles, precluding formation of a hybrid incompatibility. Our results show that the probability of evolving a Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility falls as selection coefficients among beneficial alleles become less similar. PMID:19142201

  1. Perspectives:The Strength of a People: Exploring the Impact of History and Culture on African American Families Who Are Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Tabitha; Diamond-Berry, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    The authors share their perspective on how the history of African American's in the U.S., and an awareness of the role of African cultural traditions, can provide insight on working effectively with African American families.

  2. Cultural Phenomena Seen from the Perspective of Language Issues (Globalisation, Multiculturalism, Interculturalism and Transculturalism): Preliminary Reflections for Cultural Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Tendera, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of developing methods of cultural research, the language of cultural studies is undergoing evolution and enrichment as well. This phenomenon obviously applies to all evolving academic fields, but in the area of the humanities a particular impact, consisting of the (sometimes deliberate) creation of successive cultural spaces, is manifested. For example, the introduction of a new concept may result in the initiation of a trend in the description and categorisation of reality. This ...

  3. Des loyautés incompatibles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bizeul

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Faire l’expérience directe des phénomènes, en participant aux activités des milieux concernés, représente un des moyens les plus naturels et les plus sûrs pour atteindre la complexité du monde social. C’est aussi un des moyens les plus perturbants pour le chercheur, souvent confronté aux interdits de contact entre des groupes dont les intérêts ou les principes de vie sont antagonistes. Établir des relations étroites avec des militants du Front national, certains d’entre eux « néo-nazis », certains vivant à quelques rues de chez soi, tout en étant « homo », avec pour proches amis des hommes de couleur, de plus entouré de personnes hostiles à ce parti, oblige ainsi à gérer des liens inconciliables. Un risque possible pour le chercheur est alors d’être soumis à des sentiments contradictoires et de mettre du temps pour aboutir à une analyse exempte de toute influence indue.Incompatible loyalties. Moral aspects of an immersion into the French National Front Party.Experiencing directly phenomenon while participating to activities of the concerned circles, represents one of the most natural and safer way to reach the complexity of the society. It is also one of the most disturbing means for the researcher, often confronted to interdicts of contacts between groups which interests or principles of life are antagonists. Creating close relationships with French National Front party activists, some of them “neo-nazis”, some of them living a few streets from your house, while being gay, with colored men as closed friends, surrounded by persons hostile to this party, thus forces to make opposed connections. A possible risk for the researcher can be to be divided between contradictory feelings and spending time finishing an analysis free of unwarranted influence.Lealtades incompatibles. Problemas morales derivados de los contactos con el « Frente nacional »Establecer un contacto directo con fenómenos de diferente

  4. 文化诗学视域中的非物质文化观念考辨%Intangible cultural studies from the perspective of cultural poetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进

    2014-01-01

    Cultural poetics as a critical paradigm has been influencing intangible cultural studies in China. As to research subjects, it advocates the return of cultural studies to social space of literary activities, and focuses on folk experiences of cultural productions;as to theoretical paradigms, it emphasizes social aspects and transmission structures of literary-artistic works, and explores social construction and historical transmission of intangible cultures;as to value systems, it stands for the transfer from cultural semiotics to literary sociology, and from historical traditions to cultural identification. Cultural poetics proposes both a theoretical perspective of live history, and a poetical space of folk experience.%文化诗学的理论视角渗透到当下中国的非物质文化思潮。在研究对象层面,它提倡非物质文化研究重新回到文艺传播的社会空间,关注文化生产的民间经验;在理论范式层面,它重视文艺作品的社会属性和传播结构,突出非物质文化的社会建构和历史传播;在价值体系层面,它主张从文化符号转向社会文化,从历史传统转向文化认同。文化诗学为非物质文化所提供的,不仅是活态历史的理论视角,而且是民间经验的诗学空间。

  5. Cultural perspectives of interventions for managing diabetes and asthma in children and adolescents from ethnic minority groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Manus, V; Savage, E

    2010-09-01

    Both diabetes and asthma are increasingly being recognized as health problems for ethnic groups. Because of cultural differences, ethnicity is reported to be a risk factor for poorer quality in health care, disease management and disease control. Ethnic groups are at risk for poorer quality of life and increased disease complications when compared with non-ethnic counterparts living in the same country. There is little known about how culture is addressed in interventions developed for ethnic groups. The aim of this paper is to systematically review the cultural perspectives of interventions for managing diabetes and asthma in children, adolescents and/or their families from ethnic minority groups. A total of 92 records were identified that were potentially relevant to this review following which, 61 papers were excluded. The full texts of remaining papers (n= 31) were then read independently by both authors, and agreement was reached to exclude a further 27 papers that did not meet inclusion criteria. A total of four papers were eligible for inclusion in this review. Findings indicate that despite growing concerns about health disparities between ethnic and non-ethnic groups in relation to both asthma and diabetes in childhood, there has been little effort to develop cultural specific interventions for ethnic groups. By systematically reviewing asthma and diabetes interventions we have highlighted that few interventions have been developed from a cultural perspective. There are a limited number of interventions published that add knowledge on the specific elements of intervention that is needed to effectively and sensitively educate other cultures. More work is required into identifying which strategies or components of cultural interventions are most effective in achieving positive health outcomes for children, adolescents and/or their families from ethnic groups.

  6. Reducing the culture clash in family-provider relationships: a bilateral perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, E; Meisel, M

    1998-01-01

    This chapter uses the concept of culture clash to take a fresh look at the slow progress toward family-provider collaboration. The authors discuss an intervention that targets both family culture and provider culture.

  7. Types of Generalization: Introduction to Special Section of Perspectives on Psychological Science on Cultural Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Cultural psychology represents one of the broadest types of generalization of psychological findings. We all need to pay attention to cultural findings because many of our most treasured "truisms" fail to generalize when looked at across cultural contexts.

  8. On Vocabulary Teaching from the Perspective of Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘航

    2013-01-01

    Language is the carrier of culture, and culture determines language application. Vocabulary is the essential element of a language, thus the cultivation of cross-culture communication ability should start from vocabulary.

  9. Evolution of a genetic incompatibility in the genus Xiphophorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpino, Samuel V; Hunt, Patrick J; Garcia-De-Leon, Francisco J; Juenger, Thomas E; Schartl, Manfred; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Genetic incompatibilities are commonly observed between hybridizing species. Although this type of isolating mechanism has received considerable attention, we have few examples describing how genetic incompatibilities evolve. We investigated the evolution of two loci involved in a classic example of a Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) incompatibility in Xiphophorus, a genus of freshwater fishes from northern Central America. Hybrids develop a lethal melanoma due to the interaction of two loci, an oncogene and its repressor. We cloned and sequenced the putative repressor locus in 25 Xiphophorus species and an outgroup species, and determined the status of the oncogene in those species from the literature. Using phylogenetic analyses, we find evidence that a repeat region in the proximal promoter of the repressor is coevolving with the oncogene. The data support a hypothesis that departs from the standard BDM model: it appears the alleles that cause the incompatibilities have coevolved simultaneously within lineages, rather than in allopatric or temporal isolation.

  10. Mobile Learning in the Institution of Higher Learning for Malaysia students : Culture Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shamsul Arrieya Ariffin

    2011-01-01

    ...; culture dimensions; and user readiness to accept the mobile learning technology. Currently, there is a lack of research about culture aspects to improve mobile learning and university students...

  11. Along Silk Road: Earth observation and ICT for Cultural Heritage from Italian and Chinese perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Nicola; Chen, Fulong; Feng, Dexian; Gabellone, Francesco; Lasaponara, Rosa; Yang, Ruixia

    2014-05-01

    in China founded in 68 AD. The last capital date back to 493 when the Northern Wei Dynasty moved its capital from Datong to Luoyang and started the construction of the rock-cut Longmen Grottoes. These grottoes are composed of more than 30,000 Buddhist statues sculptured in the rock which represent the second case study of the project. Finally, the third case study is the Silk road which is network of routes connecting the West and East and linking traders, merchants, pilgrims, monks, soldiers, from China to the Mediterranean Sea since the Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD). For the above mentioned case studies different approaches for the knowledge and conservation have been experiencing. For Luoyang case study the preliminary results of SAR interferometry aimed to assess subsidence phenomena will be presented. Structure for Motion has been applied to obtain 3d models of one of the famous Buddhas of Longmen. Finally, the processing of multiscale optical satellite imagery is bringing to light old routes of the Silk Road in the in Xinjiang region, nearby Kashgar, the westernmost city of China. Acknowledgement The authors thank the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs for supporting the project "Smart management of cultural heritage sites in Italy and China: Earth Observation and pilot projects. Reference F. Chen, F. Gabellone, R. Lasaponara, G. Leucci, E. Rizzo, Remote Sensing and ICT for Cultural heritage from European and Chinese perspectives, CNR-STES, Potenza, 2013. Lasaponara R., Masini N. 2013, Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar in Archaeology and Cultural Landscape: An Overview. Archaeological Prospection, 20, 71-78, doi: 10.1002/arp.1452 Lasaponara R., Masini N. 2011, Satellite Remote Sensing in Archaeology : past, present and future, Journal of Archaeological Science, 38(9), 1995-2002, doi:10.1016/j.jas.2011.02.002 Masini N., Lasaponara R. 2013. Airborne Lidar in Archaeology: Overview and a Case Study. In: Computational Science and Its Applications - ICCSA 2013

  12. NEWLY-PACKAGED BALI TOURIST PERFORMING ARTS IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF CULTURAL STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Ruastiti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This research is focused on the newly packaged tourist performing arts; they are anew concept and seem to be different from the general tourist performing arts. They arepackaged from various components of Balinese arts and managed as large scale-touristperforming arts in terms of materials, space, and time of their performances. The researchercalls them new types of Bali tourist performing arts because how they are presented isnew and different from the traditional tourist performing arts which are simply performed.In this research, the newly-packaged performing arts are analyzed in the perspective ofcultural studies.The research was carried out at three palaces in Bali; they are Mengwi Palace inBadung regency, Anyar Palace at Kerambitan, Tabanan regency, and Banyuning Palace atBongkasa, Badung regency. There are three main problems to be discussed: firstly, how dothe tourist performing arts emerge in all the palaces? Secondly, are they related to thetourist industry developed in the palaces?, thirdly, what is the impact and meaning of themfor the sake of the palaces, society, and Balinese culture? The researcher uses a qualitativemethod and an interdisciplinary approach as characteristics of cultural studies. The theoriesused are hegemony, deconstruction, and structuration.The result shows that the tourism development at all the palaces has made the localsociety become more critical. The money-oriented economy based on the spirit of gettingbenefit has made the emergence of comodification in all sectors of life. The emergence oftourist industry at the palaces has led to the idea of showing all of the useful art and culturalpotentials which at the palaces and their surroundings. Theoretically, the palaces can bestated to have deconstructed the concept of presenting the Bali tourist performing arts into anew one, that is, “the newly packaged Bali tourist performing arts”.It has been observed that all the palaces have developed t

  13. Cross-cultural comparison of perspectives on healthy eating among Chinese and American undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banna, Jinan C; Gilliland, Betsy; Keefe, Margaret; Zheng, Dongping

    2016-09-26

    Understanding views about what constitutes a healthy diet in diverse populations may inform design of culturally tailored behavior change interventions. The objective of this study was to describe perspectives on healthy eating among Chinese and American young adults and identify similarities and differences between these groups. Chinese (n = 55) and American (n = 57) undergraduate students in Changsha, Hunan, China and Honolulu, Hawai'i, U.S.A. composed one- to two-paragraph responses to the following prompt: "What does the phrase 'a healthy diet' mean to you?" Researchers used content analysis to identify predominant themes using Dedoose (version 5.2.0, SocioCultural Research Consultants, LLC, Los Angeles, CA, 2015). Three researchers independently coded essays and grouped codes with similar content. The team then identified themes and sorted them in discussion. Two researchers then deductively coded the entire data set using eight codes developed from the initial coding and calculated total code counts for each group of participants. Chinese students mentioned physical outcomes, such as maintaining immunity and digestive health. Timing of eating, with regular meals and greater intake during day than night, was emphasized. American students described balancing among food groups and balancing consumption with exercise, with physical activity considered essential. Students also stated that food components such as sugar, salt and fat should be avoided in large quantities. Similarities included principles such as moderation and fruits and vegetables as nutritious, and differences included foods to be restricted and meal timing. While both groups emphasized specific foods and guiding dietary principles, several distinctions in viewpoints emerged. The diverse views may reflect food-related messages to which participants are exposed both through the media and educational systems in their respective countries. Future studies may further examine themes that may

  14. Human reaction and risk perception to catastrophic events: a psycho-social and cultural perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthakur, M. [Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social Science and Technology Management, Trondheim (Norway)

    1998-07-01

    Catastrophes of various kinds occur worldwide inflicting major human suffering, more so in the less privileged regions of the world. Human beings react differently to different traumatic situations and to the threat of an event in spite of man common underlying factors. Psychological reactions to catastrophic natural events like flooding on the perception of risk of flooding across various communities thus becomes an interesting study. Economic situation, lack of knowledge and resources are assumed to give a totally different perspective to reactions and perception of risk and its interpretation specially in an underprivileged country like India, compared to other developed countries. For the proposed session, the results of a study carried out in India will be presented. This includes reactions and responses of individuals and general public affected by flooding and their perceptions of risk of flooding. The study also focuses on a comparison between the people affected and at risk of flooding. Socio-cultural values, religion and superstitions, common beliefs and expectations from authorities will be studied as underlying variables, to what extent they might have an impact on the behavioral pattern of an individual in a situation and the perception of oncoming risk. A sizeable number of the Indian population resides in areas, which are generally affected by flooding or highly prone to flooding. Could perceptions vary among individuals within the society or is it simply poverty and unaffordability that drive these people info such hazardous areas? Lack of consciousness may seem to be an important variable, but what really matters and needs to be looked into is how threatened they actually feel. (author)

  15. [The kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriaĭnov, V A; Kaabak, M M; Babenko, N N; Shishlo, L A; Morozova, M M; Ragimov, A A; Dashkova, N G; Salimov, É L

    2012-01-01

    The experience of 28 allotransplantations of ABO-incompatible kidneys was compared with the treatment results of 38 ABO-compatible renal transplantations. The transplanted kidney function, morphological changes of the transplanted kidney and the comparative analysis of actuary survival in both groups showed no significant difference. The results of the study prove the validity of the kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors.

  16. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Kiukas, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.kiukas@aber.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Aberystwyth University, Penglais, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols.

  17. Childen of Divorce and One-Parent Families: Cross-Culture Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Barbara; Kaufman, Gladis

    1983-01-01

    Reviews cross-cultural data on single-parent families, which in many cultures are not seen as pathological or inferior. Children become the shared responsibility of the cultural group or extended family. The adjustment of the single-parent household depends on material resources, supportive social networks, and cultural attitudes. (Author/JAC)

  18. The paradoxes of gerotranscendence: The theory of gerotranscendence in a cultural gerontological and post-modernist perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Thorsen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTThis article presents a theoretical analysis and discussion of the theory of gerotranscendence, formulatedby Lars Tornstam (University of Uppsala, Sweden. The theory is presented as a meta-theory ofageing, as a theory of universal and general ageing processes. Ageing is seen as an urge (a drivetowards a less engaged posititon in the wordly life, moving towards a higher degree of transcendence,with a more cosmic outlook and another definition of reality. In this article the theory is discussed fromanother theoretical position; Ageing seen in a cultural gerontological perspective, as a varied culturallyand historically situated phenomenon – differing in different times and different cultures. The theoreticalperspective underlines that ageing is complex dialectical processes, an intertwined interplay betweenindividual development and cultural change. The varied individual ageing processes are not seenas the result of «drives». In Western post-modern cultures the ageing processes are becoming manifold,often contradictory. Elderly present versions of the selves that are becoming complex, multiplied (multipleselves, acting at different scenes, stamped by varied cultural values, presenting mixed versions ofactivity and passivity, engagement and retractment, wordliness and transcendence.Key words:  Ageing theories; gerotranscendence; cultural gerontology; postmodernism

  19. Cultural validation of CQI-measurements measuring minority ethnic patients’ perspective on quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmoredjo, J.; Sixma, H.; Plass, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In improving quality of healthcare it is important to take patients’ perspective into account. In the Netherlands, the Consumer Quality Index (CQI) is used for this, though entirely based on a native Dutch perspective. Minority ethnic patients may have different needs. This study assesse

  20. The Pursuit of Sustainable Development Through Cultural Law and Governance Frameworks: A South African Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeoma Laura Owosuyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of including a cultural dimension in development policies has become the focus of international scholarly and policy debates. Analysing and conceptualising the role of culture in the sustainable development context was brought into focus by the World Commission on Culture and Development (WCCD, with the publication of the report Our Creative Diversity: Report of the World Commission on Culture and Development in 1995. The Report highlighted the cultural dimensions of a human-centered development paradigm and proposed placing culture at the center stage of development thinking. This argument was taken further at the International Conference on Cultural Policies for Development held in Stockholm in 1998, where it was proposed that cultural policies become key components of development strategies. This article will examine the infiltration of culture into the contemporary understanding of sustainable development and the relevance of international law developments to domestic (South African law and policy with regards to sustainable development and culture.

  1. Korean Social Studies Preservice Teachers' Cross-Cultural Learning and Global Perspective Development: Crossing Borders between Korea and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonjung; Choi, Minsik

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cross-cultural learning experiences on Korean preservice social studies teachers' global perspectives development. Social studies preservice teachers in a large woman's university in Korea participated in a cross-cultural learning course, which focused on critical understanding of globalization and global…

  2. Metacognitive Ability from a Theory-of-Mind Perspective: A Cross-Cultural Study of Students with and without Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.; Marchant, Gregory J.

    2002-01-01

    Third-graders with and without hearing loss in the United States and the United Arab Emirates (n=72) were compared on their perspectives on specific life situations. Students did not differ in their metacognitive interpretations of the experiences when they were from the same culture, but students from separate cultures differed. (Contains…

  3. Integration of Herbal Medicine in Primary Care in Israel: A Jewish-Arab Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Ben-Arye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is a prominent complementary and alternative medicine (CAM modality in Israel based on the country's natural diversity and impressive cultural mosaic. In this study, we compared cross-cultural perspectives of patients attending primary care clinics in northern Israel on herbal medicine specifically and CAM generally, and the possibility of integrating them within primary care. Research assistants administered a questionnaire to consecutive patients attending seven primary care clinics. About 2184 of 3713 respondents (59% defined themselves as Muslims, Christians or Druze (henceforth Arabs and 1529 (41% as Jews. Arab respondents reported more use of herbs during the previous year (35 versus 27.8% P = .004 and of more consultations with herbal practitioners (P < .0001. Druze reported the highest rate of herbal consultations (67.9% and Ashkenazi Jews the lowest rate (45.2%. About 27.5% of respondents supported adding a herbal practitioner to their clinic's medical team if CAM were to be integrated within primary care. Both Arabs and Jews report considerable usage of herbal medicine, with Arabs using it significantly more. Cross-cultural perspectives are warranted in the study of herbal medicine use in the Arab and Jewish societies.

  4. East meets West: cross-cultural perspective in end-of-life decision making from Indian and German viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Simon, Alfred

    2008-06-01

    Culture creates the context within which individuals experience life and comprehend moral meaning of illness, suffering and death. The ways the patient, family and the physician communicate and make decisions in the end-of-life care are profoundly influenced by culture. What is considered as right or wrong in the healthcare setting may depend on the socio-cultural context. The present article is intended to delve into the cross-cultural perspectives in ethical decision making in the end-of-life scenario. We attempt to address the dynamics of the roles of patient, family and physician therein across two countries from East and West, namely, India and Germany. In India, where illness is more a shared family affair than an individual incident, a physician is likely to respect the family's wishes and may withhold the [Symbol: see text]naked truth' about the diagnosis of a fatal disease to the patient. In Germany, a physician is legally required to inform the patient about the disease. In India, advance directive being virtually non-existent, the family acts as the locus of the decision-making process, taking into account the economic cost of available medical care. In Germany, advance directive is regarded as mandatory and healthcare is covered by insurance. Family and the physician appear to play larger roles in ethical decision making for patients in India than for those in Germany, who place greater emphasis on autonomy of the individual patient. Our study explicates how culture matters in ethical decision-making and why the bioethical discourse is necessary in the concrete realities of the socio-cultural context. To explore the possibility of finding a common ground of morality across different cultures while acknowledging and respecting cultural diversity, thus remains a formidable challenge for the bioethicists.

  5. Critical perspectives on cultural competence as a strategic opportunity for achieving high performance in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelitz, Philippa; Watson, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    * Cultural proficiency is a critical component of diversity competence. Diversity competency attends to issues of cultural proficiency and links cultural competence to issues of diverse representation and organizational inclusivity. * Developing and applying cultural competencies in diagnostic and invasive imaging services provides strategic opportunities to experience better patient cooperation, increase patient satisfaction, reduce medical errors, reduce patient complaints, and improve service recovery. * New Jersey recently passed legislation that requires 16 hours of cultural competency education as a condition of licensure to practice medicine. Four other states have similar legislation pending. The state of Washington passed legislation requiring all state accredited programs to include cultural competency education.

  6. Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarone, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this "Perspectives" column is "Requiring a Proficiency Level as a Requirement for U.S. K-12 Teacher Licensure." In 1998, the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) began to work with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which accredits teacher education programs…

  7. The Evaluation of Public Policies from the Perspective of the Agenda 21 of Culture: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Aracely Mendívil-Portillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available . This research shows the results of the implementation of a public cultural policy at the municipal level and has as a main objective to evaluate, from the perspective of the agenda 21 of culture, the program "Art for social development" by the Municipal Institute of Art and Culture developed in a secondary-level boarding school located at the Topolobampo community, in the municipality of Ahome, Mexico. A QUAN-QUAL methodology was used with instruments like questionnaires applied to the young participants and interviews with the workshop facilitators and administrative staff. Guitar, painting and theatre workshops were given, through which the development of new artistic expression skills was achieved, as well as contributing to the strengthening of social behaviors such as tolerance, patience and interpersonal communication, among others. It was found the constant need of having permanent programs of integral training, both in the field of artistic training and socio-emotional, giving priority to groups at risk, such as students of the boarding school that mostly come from families of scarce resources, some of the low performance academic and aggressive behavior. The conclusion is that public policies are required to promote greater articulation of education and culture in order to have a stronger impact on the social and cultural inclusion of young people.

  8. Comparative Study on Two English Versions of Hong Lou Meng from the Perspective of Cross-culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚青; 向凤雅; 侯方丽

    2015-01-01

    Hong Lou Meng is not only one of the four most famous ancient books in China,but also a classic masterpiece in the history of world literature.It presents the background and living statues in China feudal society as well as the language and culture of China.Two most completely and widely popular versions are that,one is translated by Yang Hsien-Yi and his wife Gladys Yang who are the famous translator couple(the Yang’s version) and the other is translated by Oxford University’s Sinologists David Hawks and John Minford,which refers to Hawks’ version.In this paper,a comparative study on different translation methods in two versions are made to explore differences between China and western cultures,and thus discuss the influences on translation of different cultures,especially study how the factors of culture,thoughts,language habits and translation methods impact on translation from the perspective of cross-culture.

  9. Globalization and support for national cultural protectionism from a cross-national perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekhuis, H.; Meuleman, R.; Lubbers, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study answers the question to what extent support for national cultural protectionism differs between countries, and to what extent differences between countries are related to levels of globalization. We propose that globalization processes affect people's support of cultural protectionism,

  10. Folkbiological Reasoning from a Cross-Cultural Developmental Perspective: Early Essentialist Notions Are Shaped by Cultural Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Sandra; Medin, Douglas; Ross, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    In 2 experiments, the authors examined the evolution of folkbiological reasoning in children (4 to 10 years of age) and adults from 4 distinct communities (rural Native American, rural majority culture, and suburban and urban North American communities). Using an adoption paradigm, they examined participants' intuitions regarding the inheritance…

  11. Perspective: the negativity bias, medical education, and the culture of academic medicine: why culture change is hard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haizlip, Julie; May, Natalie; Schorling, John; Williams, Anne; Plews-Ogan, Margaret

    2012-09-01

    Despite ongoing efforts to improve working conditions, address well-being of faculty and students, and promote professionalism, many still feel the culture of academic medicine is problematic. Depression and burnout persist among physicians and trainees. The authors propose that culture change is so challenging in part because of an evolutionary construct known as the negativity bias that is reinforced serially in medical education. The negativity bias drives people to attend to and be more greatly affected by the negative aspects of experience. Some common teaching methods such as simulations, pimping, and instruction in clinical reasoning inadvertently reinforce the negativity bias and thereby enhance physicians' focus on the negative. Here, the authors examine the concept of negativity bias in the context of academic medicine, arguing that culture is affected by serially emphasizing the inherent bias to recognize and remember the negative. They explore the potential role of practices rooted in positive psychology as powerful tools to counteract the negativity bias and aid in achieving desired culture change.

  12. Exploring the development of an organisational culture of control and dependency from a systems psychodynamic perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Eeden, René

    2010-01-01

    ...: The study focused on the management team at a specifc plant, but by applying the systems psychodynamic perspective it was possible to also explore the mutual effect of relationships with other...

  13. The Different Family Values between China and America---from a Cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Na

    2014-01-01

    With the development of globalization, intercultural contact is becoming increasingly axiomatic and pervasive;however, the values and behaviors of a particular culture may not be understandable and family values may not be acceptable in another culture. Therefore, communication among people from different cultures will become more complex. This paper aims at revealing some different family values possessed by Chinese and Americans and intends to introduce that different cultures have a strong impact on the family values.

  14. Transformative Power of Digital Citizenship: Critical Perspectives on Culture, New Media and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurubacak, Gulsun

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses culture, as a source of conflict than of synergy, how affects the use of new media to build digital citizenships. It also argues that the cultural dimensions of Geert Hofstede, who demonstrates that there are national and regional cultural groupings that affect the behavior of organizations, are very persistent across time.…

  15. Mathematics and Literature: Educators' Perspectives on Utilizing a Reformative Approach to Bridge Two Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesmith, Suzanne J.

    2008-01-01

    The existence of two distinct cultures within our society, the arts and the sciences, was introduced by physicist C. P. Snow in his 1959 Reed Lecture at Cambridge University and was further illuminated by Snow in "The Two Cultures, a Second Look" (1964). Lamenting the existence of the cultural chasm while also fearing a widening of the…

  16. Thinking about the Notion of "Cross-Cultural" from a Social Semiotic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    In this article the main question is: what might Social Semiotics offer to studies of the "cross-cultural"? Social Semiotics distinguishes between "society" and "culture". "The social" is the domain of "interaction" seen as semiotic work, organized in fields of power. "Culture" is the repository of semiotic resources, of material and non-material…

  17. Cultural Safety Circles and Indigenous Peoples' Perspectives: Inclusive Practices for Participation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseron, Johnnie; Greymorning, S. Neyooxet; Miller, Adrian; Wilde, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous experiences, as found within traditional ways and cultural practices, are an acknowledgement of traditional methods for sharing, learning, and collective knowledge development and maintenance. The application of Cultural Safety Circles can help provide a collective space where definitions for cultural and educational exchange can take…

  18. Christianity, Islam, and Political Culture: Lessons from Sub-Saharan Africa in Comparative Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Robert A.

    Many theorists have argued that western Christianity and Islam affect political culture in different ways, and that western Christianity is more conducive to the rise of a democratic culture than is Islam. This paper argues that the difference between Christianity and Islam in terms of the type of political culture they encourage, is largely…

  19. The Management Dimension of FDIs in a Culture and Learning Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Olav Jull

    The paper aims at integrating the theory of management with the theory of culture and learning. The concept of culture is discussed at three levels, macro, organisation and individual and it is advocated that culture in action at the individual level is useful in understanding how companies succe...

  20. Cultural Difference on College Oral English Teaching From the Perspective of EFL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张可

    2012-01-01

    New technology and information systems have created windows through which we may view other societies and cultures in the globe.It is in this.sense that people at times say,"The world seems to be shrinking?".The communication between people of different cultures,the greatest barrier lies not only in the differences of languages,but also in those of cultures,which permeate all aspects of human life.Cultural mistakes are even more serious and irritating than linguistic ones.Therefore,the importance of the target culture teaching has been drawing attention ever since.

  1. Translating Bourdieu: cultural capital and the English middle class in historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Simon

    2005-03-01

    This article examines the ways in which Pierre Bourdieu's work on culture and cultural capital can be applied to the study of the English middle class in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Drawing on a wide historical literature, the article argues for the significance of culture as a constitutive element of middle-class identities in England since 1800. It goes on to examine Bourdieu's ideas of 'objectivated', 'instutionalized' and 'incorporated' cultural capital, in the context of family, inheritance, education and the body. The article identifies changes in the historical forms which cultural capital has taken and emphasizes the importance of analysing family processes of intergenerational transmission.

  2. On the Historical and Cultural Elements Implied in The Last of the Mohi-cans from the Perspective of Cross-Cultural Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金辉

    2013-01-01

    The last of the Mohicans was written by American novelist James Fenimore Cooper in 1826, who is considered as the first long novelist of America. The work has no concentrate plots but the white people and the Indians ’friendship, communica⁃tion, and wars.The Last of the Mohicans was set in the mid-18th century when the French colonists and English colonists were fighting for Indian lands. English colonized America and were at loggerheads with France. It belongs to the frontier literature and creates a precedent for the American Frontier Fiction. The American western fiction has the most native feature.With the rise of multiculturalism trend at present,it is the best way for understanding the American local culture and history to study the American western fiction which is bred during the course of the frontier-running and Westward Movement.Cooper is a novelist who de⁃picted the real and pure American life. Based on the frontier theme, he created Leatherstocking Tales, which is a series of five nov⁃els, are his masterpieces representing his style. Among them, The Last of the Mohicans prominently reflects the Indian culture.This thesis mainly explores the historical and cultural elements embodied in The Last of the Mohicans from the perspective of cross-cul⁃tural communication.

  3. European food cultures in a macro and micro perspective: Implications for the marketing of Asian food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, Søren; Ludvigsen, Hanne H.

    This article origines as part of a Danish national food research program: Market-based Process and Product Innovation in the Food Sector (MAPP), presenting some of the results of a project concerning the cultural dimension of food consumption. Two questions of importance to Asian (with special...... attention to South East Asian) food producers and marketers are explored. First: To which extent can Asian food manufacturers consider Europe one single market? And second: Do change processes in the European food cultures faclitate adoption of more Asian food products in the coming years? Of course......-perspective, using qualitative tec to explore changes in eating behaviour in general and the openness to new "ethnic" or "exotic" types of food inparticular. This micro-level analysis was carried out in the country of Denmark, both for conveneince reasons but also because Denmark i macro-level analysis showed signs...

  4. Les mélanges de polymères incompatibles Incompatible Polymer Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpe G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les mélanges de polymères thermoplastiques font actuellement l'objet d'un effort considérable de recherche et de développement. Cette synthèse bibliographique concerne principalement les mélanges mécaniques de polymères incompatibles à l'état fondu. Ceux-ci ont une morphologie hétérogène qui dépend des conditions de mise en oeuvre autant que de la nature des constituants. De plus, pour ce type de matériaux, la nature de l'interface joue un rôle déterminant sur la formation de la morphologie hétérogène et donc sur les propriétés du produit final. D'autre part un problème important réside dans la stabilité des mélanges réalisés. L'ajout d'une faible quantité d'agent tensioactif de type copolymère séquencé, ou greffé, ou la modification chimique des constituants (greffage ou réticulation par exemple permet, dans certains cas d'améliorer très sensiblement les propriétés des mélanges en augmentant l'adhérence entre les phases immiscibles. L'ensemble de ces considérations permettent la réalisation industrielle de nouveaux matériaux polymères aux caractéristiques spécifiques. Thermoplastic polymer mixtures are currently the subject of considerable research and development efforts. This bibliographic synthesis deals mainly with melt blending process of incompatible polymers. These blends have a heterogeneous morphology that depends on the processing conditions as much as on the chemical structure of the componants. Likewise, for these materials the nature of the interface plays a decisive role on the formation of the heterogeneous morphology and hence on the properties on the end product. Furthermore, an important problem is to stabilize the morphology of the blends. Adding a small amount of surfactant of the sequenced of grafted copolymer type or, else, the chemical reaction of the constituents (e. g. grafting or branching during processing are ways in some cases of considerably improving the properties of

  5. Explanatory Pluralism and the (Dis)Unity of Science: The Argument from Incompatible Counterfactual Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Victor

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between different sciences or research approaches that deal with the same phenomena, for instance, with the phenomena of the human mind? Answers to this question range from a monist perspective according to which one of these approaches is privileged over the others, through an integrationist perspective according to which they must strive to form a unity greater than the sum of its parts, to an isolationist perspective according to which each of them has its own autonomous sphere of validity. In order to assess these perspectives in this article, I discuss the debates about the unity of science and about explanatory pluralism. The most pressing issue turns out to be the choice between the integrative and the isolationist perspective: the question is whether the integrative tendencies in science should be fully indulged in or whether they should be held in check by acknowledging that a certain amount of isolation is necessary. I argue that the issue can be further distilled into the question of whether two true explanations of the same fact can ever fail to be combinable into one single explanation. I show that this can indeed be the case, namely, when the explanations have incompatible counterfactual consequences, something that is often the case when we try to combine explanations from different sciences or research approaches. These approaches thus embody perspectives on the world that are to a certain extent autonomous. This leads to the conclusion that although interdisciplinarity may have many advantages, we should not take the project of integration too far. At the end of the day, the different research approaches with their different perspectives and insights must remain precisely that: different and somewhat disunified.

  6. Explanatory pluralism and the (disunity of science. The argument from incompatible counterfactual consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor eGijsbers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What is the relationship between different sciences or research approaches that deal with the same phenomena, for instance, with the phenomena of the human mind? Answers to this question range from a monist perspective according to which one of these approaches is privileged over the others, through an integrationist perspective according to which they must strive to form a unity greater than the sum of its parts, to an isolationist perspective according to which each of them has its own autonomous sphere of validity. In order to assess these perspectives in this article, I discuss the debates about the unity of science and about explanatory pluralism. The most pressing issue turns out to be the choice between the integrative and the isolationist perspective: the question is whether the integrative tendencies in science should be fully indulged in, or whether they should be held in check by acknowledging that a certain amount of isolation is necessary. I argue that the issue can be further distilled into the question of whether two true explanations of the same fact can ever fail to be combinable into one single explanation. I show that this can indeed be the case, namely when the explanations have incompatible counterfactual consequences, something that is often the case when we try to combine explanations from different sciences or research approaches. These approaches thus embody perspectives on the world that are to a certain extent autonomous. This leads to the conclusion that although interdisciplinarity may have many advantages, we should not take the project of integration too far. At the end of the day, the different research approaches with their different perspectives and insights must remain precisely that: different and somewhat disunified.

  7. 文化研究视角下的警察文化研究%Study of Police Culture from the Perspective of Culture Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶奕翔

    2011-01-01

    To observe contemporary Chinese police culture from the point view of Cultural Studies will benefit the localization of Cultural Studies and provide a new perspective for the study of police culture as well.As to the image crisis of policeman,Stuart Hall's theory of 'Encoding/decoding' is helpful.The audience studies to the police teleplays oriented by government show that the main part is negotiated code,while the oppositional code is also apparent in other media,especially on network.This fact requires us to review the concept of police culture.The identification of policeman can be Abstracted into four types,and the police dominant culture should emphasize the value of ideal type.As the subsystem of police culture,the police subculture originates from the basic policemen.It merits further studies,for it plays an important role in the construction of policemen's image and identity,and it is an important way to know police groups as well.%用文化研究的思路审视当代中国警察文化的研究,既有利于文化研究的本土化,也可以为警察文化研究提供一个新的视角。就警察的形象危机而言,借鉴霍尔的"编码/解码"理论,对官方主导的警察剧进行受众研究,发现协商模式占了主体,但在另一些媒体尤其是网络上,对立模式也是很明显的,这就要求我们重新审视警察文化的概念。警察的自我认同可以抽象为四个模型,警察主导文化应该重视理想型价值。警察亚文化起源于基层警察,是警察文化的亚系统,在构建警察的形象与自我认同中,发生了重要作用,是我们认识警察群体的重要途径,应深入研究。

  8. Curriculum Culture from Ontology Perspective%从本体论视角解读课程文化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈健

    2012-01-01

    对于课程文化的界定,历来侧重不同、说法不一。课程与文化两者之间的关系也多是从课程是文化的载体及课程本身所体现的文化特征两方面谈起,所以产生工具论和本体论两种课程文化观。显然,工具论课程文化观具有致命的弊端及局限,而本体论课程文化观以其体现的主体性、生命性、反思批判性、民族性与开放性等特征与品质,更适合当下的课程改革及人的生命主体的塑造。在本体论课程文化观下,课程目标文化、课程内容文化、课程实施文化及课程评价文化都被赋予更加丰富的内涵。%Different persons Wuxi have different versions for the definition of course culture.The relationship between course and culture is concerned from two aspects:course is the carrier of culture or course itself embodies cultural characteristic which produce two opinions about course culture——the tool theory and ontology.The tool theory of course culture,obviously,has fatal defects and limitations,whereas ontology of course culture reflects some features and qualities such as subjectivity,life,reflective critical,open and nationality,etc.Therefore,the later is more suitable for the present course reform and human life location.The goal culture,content culture,implementation culture and evaluation culture of course are endowed with more abundant implication from ontology perspective.

  9. [Kidney allotransplantation from the AB0-incompatible donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriaĭnov, V A; Kaabak, M M; Babenko, N N; Shishlo, L A; Morozova, M M; Ragimov, A A; Dazhkova, N G; Salimov, E L

    2013-01-01

    The experience of 28 kidney allotransplantations from the AB0-incompatible donors was analyzed. The comparative group consisted of 38 patients, who received the AB0-compatible organ. The results were assessed using the following parameters: renal function, morphology of the biopsy samples of the transplanted kidney and actuary survival of the recipients with functioning transplants in both groups. The comparative analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups, giving the right to consider the kidney allotransplantation from the AB0-incompatible donors safe and effective.

  10. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model...... action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles...

  11. Detention and incompatibility of HIV patients in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Dell'Isola

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, Law 231/99 and subsequent amendments standardize the conditions allowing or not a HIV positive inmate to remain in jail. Currently such clinical conditions are not automatically associated with the decline of preventive detention and the Court evaluates the incompatibility with detention on the basis of two additional and independent criteria. We have been observing the tendency by jailed HIV-positive patients to manipulate the disease state believing that the rules of incompatibility with the prison system are always applied. The management of HIV positive patients in jail involves significant sanitary and relational efforts, particularly for those suffering AIDS and/or with severe immunodeficiency.

  12. Enhancing Brand Image through Events and Cultural Festivals: the Perspective of the Stresa Festival’s Visitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Piva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultural events have become a significant component within the strategies of destination branding of a place. Territories are increasingly using events and cultural festivals to enhance their image and boost tourism development. Many destinations worldwide have built events portfolios as a strategic initiative to attract visitors and to develop their own brand. A destination brand represents a dynamic interaction between the destination’s core assets and the way in which potential visitors perceive them. Thus, the visitor perspective is considered as fundamental in triggering processes of destination branding. This paper investigates how the visitors assess the impact of cultural events and festivals in enhancing the image of a tourist destination. The Stresa Festival (Stresa, Lake Maggiore, Italy has been selected as a case study. Stresa Festival is undoubtedly one of the best-known European classical music festivals that every year offers performances by internationally famous artists to its audiences. Structured questionnaires have been used as the methodology to carry out the research. Online questionnaires have been handed out to residents and non-resident visitors to the Stresa Festival to extract the opinions and experience from the public on the image effects of this festival. Findings reveal that there is a positive relationship between this cultural event and the enhancement of the city image and its territory.

  13. A careful balance: multinational perspectives on culture, gender, and power in marriage and family therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Margaret L; Piercy, Fred P

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we examined how marriage and family therapists from various countries and diverse cultural backgrounds address the intersection of gender, power, and culture in therapy. Twenty participants from 15 countries responded to an Internet survey that included several hypothetical, clinical vignettes not associated with any one particular culture or nationality. Participants selected a vignette based on its similarity to clinical situations they face in practice within their cultural contexts, and provided information about their conceptualizations of gender, culture, and power, along with treatment recommendations. We analyzed data using analytic induction and constant comparison methods. Results indicate the careful balance with which the participants work to engage clients in therapy, respect cultural values and practices, and promote equitable gender relationships.

  14. A Study on the Chinese Zodiac Translation from thePerspective of Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向霞

    2015-01-01

    Chinese zodiac has a long history which involves every aspect of our social life and hence occupies an importantposition in Chinese culture. The need of international communication and cultural transmission made the research and translationof Chinese zodiac become inevitable. Since the modern times, with the increasing domestic scholars' researches, the translation ofChinese zodiac is becoming more rational and normalized as a whole. However, due to the cultural differences, translators are oftenfaced with a predicament where they can't fully convey the zodiac's culture connotation,which makes translation of some zodiacnames differ at present stage and lack of unity and standardization. In order to avoid cultural losses and conflicts, the writer exploresthe influences of English and Chinese culture on the translation of Chinese zodiac based on the study and comparison of its localmeanings and different versions of translation, and further concludes the principles and methods that should be followed in theprocess of the translation of Chinese zodiac.

  15. The impact of culture and gender on leadership behavior: Higher education and management perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran Qureshi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of culture, gender and leadership behavior has received much interest from researchers during the last three decades. This paper attempts to propose a conceptual framework consisting three human resource management (HRM practices (culture, gender and leadership styles and to explain the relationship among these variables. Culture plays an important role to adopt different leadership styles because it influences the way in which individuals, groups and teams interact with each other and cooperate to achieve organizational goals. The seven cultural elements are measured in the current study i.e., i member identity ii rewards criteria iii team emphasis iv means-end orientation v control vi unit integration and vii risk/ conflict tolerance. Results show that the culture has a significant influence on male leaders to adopt different leadership styles, but female leaders likely participative in their leadership positions and try to adopt democratic leadership in different cultures.

  16. A Comparison between China and America’s Political Cultures on the Perspective of Value Orientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋卓航

    2015-01-01

    <正>How do we define political culture and how do we understand Chinese political culture and American culture?Political culture is defined by the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences as"the set of attitudes,beliefs and sentiments that give order and meaning to a political process and which provide the underlying assumptions and rules that govern behavior in the political system".Such kind of attitudes,beliefs and sentiments can be seen as the reflection of culture.A political culture is the result of both the collective history of a political system and the life histories of the members of the system and thus it is rooted equally in public events and private

  17. Cultural Aspects when Implementing Lean Production and Lean Product Development – Experiences from a Swedish Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promporn Wangwacharakul

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lean principles and methods, originating in a Japanese cultural context, have spread to a large number of companies throughout the world. The aim of this case study research is to identify and compare national cultural aspects that influence Lean Production and Lean Product Development implementation in Swedish companies. Data were collected through questionnaires, interviews and an industrial workshop with Swedish Lean practitioners. The study shows that some sub-areas in Lean, such as value definition, control systems, leadership, team development, knowledge management, and strategies, are highly dependent on contextual factors related to human, cultural and organizational aspects. These are related to the national culture and should be considered to a higher extent for successful sustainable implementation of Lean in different cultural contexts. As for implementing Lean in Sweden, national cultural characteristics, such as individualism, autonomy and supportive management style fit well with Lean thinking.

  18. Integrating Cultural Heritage into Contemporary Life. The Perspective of Local Communities: The Case of Arcadia, Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Lappa; Evangelia Georgitsoyanni

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to highlight the importance of integrating cultural heritage into contemporary life as a means to contribute to the economic and tourism development of a historical area and as an asset to local development. The study focuses on the cultural goods of Arcadia in central Peloponnese, Greece, an area of great history and rich architectural heritage, which gives a distinct cultural identity to the region. The overall objective of the current research is to describe how the ...

  19. The construction of cultural environment in hospitals of TCM from the perspective of physicians’ quality education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-yan PENG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The hospitals of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM are the place to apply TCM to do clinical practice. The cultural environment of TCM hospitals should be constructed on the basis of TCM culture. The most important way of cultural environment construction is to cultivate and elevate the physicians’ quality education. The paper holds that the physicians in TCM hospitals should be benevolent, erudite, full of affinity, calm and equanimity.

  20. "A terror to their neighbors": beliefs about mental disorder and violence in historical and cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, J

    1992-01-01

    This tribute to the enduring legacy of Bernard Diamond explores public perceptions of a link between mental disorder and violent behavior. Research on contemporary American beliefs is summarized and compared both to historical accounts of public perceptions in Western cultures and to anthropological investigations of public perceptions in non-Western cultures. The conclusion of these reviews is that the belief that mental disorder bears some moderate association with violent behavior is both historically invariant and culturally universal.

  1. A Tentative Study of Cultural Translation from the Perspective of Memetic-adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO De-jin

    2013-01-01

    Memetics is the study about cultural evolution, meme is the basic unit of culture, with language as its main medium, when meme was transmitted across language and culture obstacles, the adaptation theory from pragmatics provides the mechanism and selection criteria for the successfully transmitted meme via the means of translation, thus a memetic-adaptation paradigm for translation studies will be proposed based on memetics and adaptation theory.

  2. China’s Strategic Culture: A Perspective for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-17

    behavior, and work ethic . In Confucianism , rules are spelled out for the social behavior of every individual, governing the entire range of human...Chinese Traditional Culture: The Influence of Confucian Thought The culture of China is one of the world’s oldest and most complex cultures. Chinese...Traditional Chinese social values are derived from Confucianism , Taoism and to a lesser degree, Buddhism. Confucianism is undisputedly the most influential

  3. Reflections on Differences of Sino-US Culture in the Perspective of Costume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢辉

    2009-01-01

    What makes clothing important? Clothing and acces sories is an important tool for studying popular culture and social history.The history of human costume can be seen,in a certain degree,as the development history of sensible human culture.These artifacts help tell the story of status difierences and class aspirations through the materials used and the cut of a garment.Clothing reflects cultural historical difierences and social mores that have changed over time.Clothing reflects behavior standards,manners,and the culture itself.Clothes provide examples of America's and Chinese shifting economy and clmnging producuon techmques.

  4. To Be or Not To Be Humorous? Cross Cultural Perspectives on Humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Yue

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Humor seems to manifest differently in Western and Eastern cultures, although little is known about how culture shapes humor perceptions. The authors suggest that Westerners regard humor as a common and positive disposition; the Chinese regard humor as a special disposition particular to humorists, with controversial aspects. In Study 1, Hong Kong participants primed with Western culture evaluate humor more positively than they do when primed with Chinese culture. In Study 2a, Canadians evaluate humor as being more important in comparison with Chinese participants. In Study 2b, Canadians expect ordinary people to possess humor, while Chinese expect specialized comedians to be humorous. The implications and limitations are discussed.

  5. To Be or Not To Be Humorous? Cross Cultural Perspectives on Humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiaodong; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Su; Hiranandani, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Humor seems to manifest differently in Western and Eastern cultures, although little is known about how culture shapes humor perceptions. The authors suggest that Westerners regard humor as a common and positive disposition; the Chinese regard humor as a special disposition particular to humorists, with controversial aspects. In Study 1, Hong Kong participants primed with Western culture evaluate humor more positively than they do when primed with Chinese culture. In Study 2a, Canadians evaluate humor as being more important in comparison with Chinese participants. In Study 2b, Canadians expect ordinary people to possess humor, while Chinese expect specialized comedians to be humorous. The implications and limitations are discussed.

  6. THE COLOMBIAN REALITY FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF BEHAIOVR ANALYSIS: PEACE AS A RESULT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BLANCA PATRICIA BALLESTEROS DE VALDERRAMA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the advantage of applying behavior analysis to cultural practices comprehension, considering cultural practices as group behaviors, selected and maintained by social reinforcement contingencies and metacontingencies. The three types of contingencies formulated by Skinner are described, and the principal existing data related to aggressive behavior. A proposal to analyze some relevant aspects to Colombian reality is formulated, and finally, an intent to analyze peace as a result of cultural practices is presented, emphasizing positive reciprocal social processes. Mattaini's (1996 suggestion to graphical representation of cultural practices analysis is applied.

  7. A Study of the Translation of Tai Chi Movement from the Perspective of Cultural Transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴寒

    2015-01-01

    Tai Chi is a part of traditional Chinese culture and a treasure of Chinese Wu Shu. Its excel ent value for health and elegant taste of culture have long been known by people of the world. As the intensified efforts made for the exchange of Chinese and western economic and culture and the world globalization of economic and culture, Tai Chi has been spreaded to the five continents in more than 150 countries and the area, is deeplyloved by people. The Tai Chi faces al kinds of learners from different cultural backgrounds. This paper intends to research the cultural background and historical origin of Tai Chi movements andto explore the translation of Tai Chi, the process of how to deal with its national culture problem.In the first two chapters, the author mainly introduces the definition and characteristics of the Tai Chi and the relationship between Tai Chi and the Chinese culture. The other two chapters focus on the general methods of the translation of Tai Chi movement, and also giving author’s ownsuggestion on how to translate the Tai Chi movement more effectively and transmit Chinese culture.

  8. To Be or Not To Be Humorous? Cross Cultural Perspectives on Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiaodong; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Su; Hiranandani, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Humor seems to manifest differently in Western and Eastern cultures, although little is known about how culture shapes humor perceptions. The authors suggest that Westerners regard humor as a common and positive disposition; the Chinese regard humor as a special disposition particular to humorists, with controversial aspects. In Study 1, Hong Kong participants primed with Western culture evaluate humor more positively than they do when primed with Chinese culture. In Study 2a, Canadians evaluate humor as being more important in comparison with Chinese participants. In Study 2b, Canadians expect ordinary people to possess humor, while Chinese expect specialized comedians to be humorous. The implications and limitations are discussed. PMID:27757091

  9. Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kussmann, Martin; Morine, Melissa J; Hager, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We review here the status of human type 2 diabetes studies from a genetic, epidemiological, and clinical (intervention) perspective. Most studies limit analyses to one or a few omic technologies providing data of components of physiological processes. Since all chronic diseases are multifactorial...... of the complexity of T2DM, we propose a systems biology approach to advance the understanding of origin, onset, development, prevention, and treatment of this complex disease. This systems-based strategy is based on new study design principles and the integrated application of omics technologies: we pursue...

  10. Investigating Heritage Language and Culture Links: An Indo-Canadian Hindu Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nootan; Trofimovich, Pavel; Gatbonton, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Although it is commonly believed that language and culture are inexorably linked, the precise nature of this relationship remains elusive. This study investigated the hypothesis that a loss in language signals a loss in culture if language is considered a central value. This hypothesis was investigated by rating the Hindi and English proficiency…

  11. The Impacts of Team Learning on the Development of a Learning Organisation: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Hua; Su, Kun-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Generalisability of a learning organisation (LO) for cross-cultural applications is doubtful. Some cultural values may be opposed to the nature in a LO which calls for voluntary participation in learning activities by all employees. The study reveals a dynamic analysis of a LO with the sense of the difficulties organisations typically face and how…

  12. The Concept of Person in American Anthroplogy : The Cultural Perspective of Clifford Geertz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Yme; Kippenberg, Hans G.; Kuiper, Yme B.; Sanders, Andy F.

    1990-01-01

    The 'meanings-and-symbols' anthropologist Clifford Geertz wrote one of the most influential articles in anthropology: 'Religion as a Cultural System'. Some years later he published his collection of essays 'The Interpretation of Culture', that had a great impact on the humanities in the late 20th ce

  13. Improving socially constructed cross-cultural communication in aged care homes: A critical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Willis, Eileen; Harrington, Ann; Gillham, David; De Bellis, Anita; Morey, Wendy; Jeffers, Lesley

    2017-06-14

    Cultural diversity between residents and staff is significant in aged care homes in many developed nations in the context of international migration. This diversity can be a challenge to achieving effective cross-cultural communication. The aim of this study was to critically examine how staff and residents initiated effective cross-cultural communication and social cohesion that enabled positive changes to occur. A critical hermeneutic analysis underpinned by Giddens' Structuration Theory was applied to the study. Data were collected by interviews with residents or their family and by focus groups with staff in four aged care homes in Australia. Findings reveal that residents and staff are capable of restructuring communication via a partnership approach. They can also work in collaboration to develop communication resources. When staff demonstrate cultural humility, they empower residents from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds to engage in effective communication. Findings also suggest that workforce interventions are required to improve residents' experiences in cross-cultural care. This study challenges aged care homes to establish policies, criteria and procedures in cross-cultural communication. There is also the challenge to provide ongoing education and training for staff to improve their cross-cultural communication capabilities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bruijne, M.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey conducte

  15. Coping Behaviour of Disabled Persons and Their Families: Cross-Cultural Perspectives from Norway and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingstad, Benedicte

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for analyzing the influence of culture on the coping behavior of families with disabled children, using examples from families in Norway and Botswana. The model considers culture's impact on the process of coping through emotional patterning, expectations of life and future, life experiences, and actual opportunities. (JDD)

  16. Using Literature to Teach Cross-Cultural Management: A German Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Brian

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of German literature in courses teaching cross-cultural management. The article argues that literature depicting society and culture promotes effective business interaction. It also attempts to clarify the benefits of using literary texts to supplement theoretical texts on international business. (26 references) (Author/CK)

  17. Critical Perspectives on Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood: Building an Inclusive Curriculum and Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the complexities that arise from addressing issues of cultural diversity in the early years context. It explores the challenges of developing an effective early years provision and pedagogy that values cultural difference within the framework of a mandated curriculum, "The Early Years Foundation Stage…

  18. Perspectives on the German "Energiewende": Culture and Ecology in German Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Bartell M.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses a dual desire for teaching units that (1) incorporate green issues into the language curriculum, (2) fulfill the need for comparative cultural studies in the language classroom, and (3) incorporate the ACTFL "Standards for Foreign Language Learning." Included are a review of recent approaches to teaching culture in…

  19. Merging experiences and perspectives in the complexity of cross-cultural design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Bidwell, Nicola; Blake, Edward

    2010-01-01

    While our cross-cultural IT research continuously strives to contribute towards the development of HCI appropriate cross-cultural models and best practices, we are aware of the specificity of each development context and the influence of each participant. Uncovering the complexity within our curr...

  20. Critical Perspectives on Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood: Building an Inclusive Curriculum and Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the complexities that arise from addressing issues of cultural diversity in the early years context. It explores the challenges of developing an effective early years provision and pedagogy that values cultural difference within the framework of a mandated curriculum, "The Early Years Foundation Stage…

  1. Perspectives on the Cultural Appropriacy of Hong Kong's Target-Oriented Curriculum (TOC) Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David Robert

    1999-01-01

    Explores the impact of Chinese culture on the school curriculum in Hong Kong. Argues that the Target-Oriented Curriculum (TOC) transplanted from western-based concepts is not commensurate with the local Chinese cultural context, and therefore leads to many problems when being implemented in schools. (Author/VWL)

  2. Training Child Welfare Workers from an Intersectional Cultural Humility Perspective: A Paradigm Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Robert M.; Faller, Kathleen Coulborn

    2011-01-01

    The increasing diversity of the populations encountered and served by child welfare workers challenges cultural competence models. Current concerns focus on the unintentional over-emphasis on shared group characteristics, undervaluing unique differences of individuals served, and privileging worker expertise about the client's culture, thereby…

  3. Perspectives on the German "Energiewende": Culture and Ecology in German Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Bartell M.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses a dual desire for teaching units that (1) incorporate green issues into the language curriculum, (2) fulfill the need for comparative cultural studies in the language classroom, and (3) incorporate the ACTFL "Standards for Foreign Language Learning." Included are a review of recent approaches to teaching culture in…

  4. Responding to Cultural Loss: Providing an Integral Indigenous Perspective of a "Kichwa Child"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maigua, Yolanda Terán; Gutierrez-Gomez, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    As Indigenous populations around the world migrate, urbanize, and come into contact with a variety of other cultures, they risk loss of their ancient languages and cultural practices. In 2007, the UN General Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. In addition to the broader human rights like employment, security, and…

  5. Influence of Culture on Secondary School Students' Understanding of Statistics: A Fijian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sashi

    2014-01-01

    Although we use statistical notions daily in making decisions, research in statistics education has focused mostly on formal statistics. Further, everyday culture may influence informal ideas of statistics. Yet, there appears to be minimal literature that deals with the educational implications of the role of culture. This paper will discuss the…

  6. Cultural Capital--A Shift in Perspective: An Analysis of PISA 2009 Data for Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzic, Saša; Gregurovic, Margareta; Košutic, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Using PISA 2009 data for Croatia, this paper addresses the relationship between socio-economic background, cultural capital and educational attainment. Following Bourdieu, we emphasized the importance of interpreting cultural capital effects as effects of family habitus. The results indicated that the material and the relational dimension of…

  7. Non-Native English Language Teachers' Perspective on Culture in English as a Foreign Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayyurt, Yasemin

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the importance of raising non-native English language teachers' awareness of different dimensions of culture in the teaching of English as an international language. The author believes that the more critical English language teachers become about the involvement of culture in their English language teaching, the more they…

  8. Ageism Across Cultures and in Perspective of Sociobiologic and Psychodynamic Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gordon D.; Oakley, Fredericka B.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews data on behavior and attitudes towards the aged in preliterate societies, indicating that the aged maintain meaningful roles and are not subject to the pervasive discrimination and negative stereotyping existent in America. Discusses theories providing a perspective on and understanding of biologic and psychosocial causes of ageism.…

  9. Postcolonial Models, Cultural Transfers and Transnational Perspectives in Latin America: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenbach, Gabriela; del Pozo, Maria del Mar

    2011-01-01

    In this article we wish to propose a debate on postcolonialism and its role in the history of Latin American education. Our starting point is the acknowledgement of the reality that postcolonial historiographic perspectives have yet to be applied in studies of one of history's great empires, namely, the Spanish Empire. This is surprising for…

  10. Culture Learning from a Constructivist Perspective: An Investigation of Spanish Foreign Language Teachers' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sercu, Lies; Garcia, Maria del Carmen Mendez; Prieto, Paloma Castro

    2005-01-01

    Today, teaching and learning tend to be viewed from a constructivist perspective. Learning is regarded as a self-directed process of constructing meaning, which takes place in interaction. The teacher supports the learning process by selecting input and approaches that can scaffold the learning process and guide learners towards independent…

  11. Culture, Learning, and Development and the Natural World: The Influences of Situative Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The study of human learning and development from situative or sociocultural perspectives has had significant impacts on a wide range of scholarship largely driven by the theoretical and methodological focus on understanding the role of "activity systems" in cognition and development. This article first explores how situative perspectives…

  12. The Culture of Deep Learning in eSports: An Insider's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Steven; Betrus, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    This article is written in the first-person, from the perspective of Steven Canning, a SUNY Potsdam instructor of educational technology and part-time professional gamer, with contributions from Anthony Betrus, Professor of Educational Technology at SUNY Potsdam. The author delves deeply into the world of professional online gaming, or eSports,…

  13. Elementary Teacher Education in Papua New Guinea: Towards a Culturally Connected Perspective of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahambu, Casper; Brownlee, Joanne M.; Petriwskyj, E. Anne

    2012-01-01

    Global and national agendas for quality education have led to reforms in Papua New Guinea's (PNG) elementary education, but criticism of the learner-centred Western pedagogies has emerged. One key influence on quality teacher education relates to perspectives of teaching. Existing research shows teachers' beliefs and perceptions of teaching…

  14. Commentary: Homicide-suicide in older adults--cultural and contextual perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Carl C; McBride, Dominica F

    2010-01-01

    The authors comment on "Domestic Homicide and Homicide-Suicide: The Older Offender" by Bourget et al., who learned that after a domestic homicide in Canada, the older offender frequently commits suicide. The authors comment on the ubiquity of single homicide-suicide across cultures, the incidence of single homicide-suicide in various cultures, the common patterns and differences in single homicide-suicides across cultures, ethnic and gender differences in single homicide-suicide within different cultures, characteristics of the phenomenon of mass murder followed by suicide and ethnic differences within this type of homicide-suicide, and differences in suicidal patterns in different cultures. Suicide and suicide preceded by homicide (single or multiple) are so rare, it is currently impossible to draw any substantive conclusions about the incidence of these phenomena in various contexts; however, ideas for consideration in addressing homicide-suicide are provided.

  15. Evolutionary dynamics of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1997-01-01

    The stationary frequency distribution and allelic dynamics in finite populations are analyzed through stochastic simulations in three models of single-locus, multi-allelic sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance relationships among alleles. In one model, alleles act c...

  16. EVOLUTION OF VEGETATIVE INCOMPATIBILITY IN FILAMENTOUS ASCOMYCETES .1. DETERMINISTIC MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NAUTA, MJ; HOEKSTRA, RF

    1994-01-01

    In ascomycetes vegetative incompatibility can prevent the somatic exchange of genetic material between conspecifics. It must occur frequently in natural populations, since in all species studied many vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) are found. Using a population-genetic approach, this paper ex

  17. 40 CFR 264.282 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.282 Section 264.282 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 264.282 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. The owner or...

  18. 40 CFR 264.257 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND... placed in the same pile, unless § 264.17(b) is complied with. (b) A pile of hazardous waste that is..., or other device. (c) Hazardous waste must not be piled on the same base where incompatible wastes or...

  19. SINGLE-CENTER EXPERIENCE OF ABO-INCOMPATIBLE LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gautier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2008 up to 2010 eight ABO-incompatible liver transplantations have been performed in our center: one of them was urgent liver transplantation to adult patient from deceased donor, other seven were transplantations of left lateral segment to children from living relative donors. Own experience, as well as world one, proves, that barrier of ABO-incompatibility can be overcome more successfully in liver transplantation, particularly in pediatric population, that in other solid organs transplantation. Good results can be achieved even with less ag- gressive immunosuppressive therapy. Recipient conditioning before operation can significantly improve results of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation, but as own experience has shown, often there’s no need to hold some special preparation of children, because their anti-ABO antibodies are very low or absent before transplantation and do not increase after it. Thereby ABO-incompatible liver transplantation is reasonable in urgent cases and in pediatric population because of the limited pull of living relative donors for children. 

  20. Genetic incompatibility drives mate choice in a parasitic wasp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiel, Andra; Weeda, Anne C.; de Boer, Jetske G.; Hoffmeister, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Allelic incompatibility between individuals of the same species should select for mate choice based on the genetic make-up of both partners at loci that influence offspring fitness. As a consequence, mate choice may be an important driver of allelic diversity. A complementary sex deter

  1. A simple genetic incompatibility causes hybrid male sterility in mimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweigart, Andrea L; Fishman, Lila; Willis, John H

    2006-04-01

    Much evidence has shown that postzygotic reproductive isolation (hybrid inviability or sterility) evolves by the accumulation of interlocus incompatibilities between diverging populations. Although in theory only a single pair of incompatible loci is needed to isolate species, empirical work in Drosophila has revealed that hybrid fertility problems often are highly polygenic and complex. In this article we investigate the genetic basis of hybrid sterility between two closely related species of monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus and M. nasutus. In striking contrast to Drosophila systems, we demonstrate that nearly complete hybrid male sterility in Mimulus results from a simple genetic incompatibility between a single pair of heterospecific loci. We have genetically mapped this sterility effect: the M. guttatus allele at the hybrid male sterility 1 (hms1) locus acts dominantly in combination with recessive M. nasutus alleles at the hybrid male sterility 2 (hms2) locus to cause nearly complete hybrid male sterility. In a preliminary screen to find additional small-effect male sterility factors, we identified one additional locus that also contributes to some of the variation in hybrid male fertility. Interestingly, hms1 and hms2 also cause a significant reduction in hybrid female fertility, suggesting that sex-specific hybrid defects might share a common genetic basis. This possibility is supported by our discovery that recombination is reduced dramatically in a cross involving a parent with the hms1-hms2 incompatibility.

  2. Integrating Cultural Heritage into Contemporary Life. The Perspective of Local Communities: The Case of Arcadia, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lappa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study aims to highlight the importance of integrating cultural heritage into contemporary life as a means to contribute to the economic and tourism development of a historical area and as an asset to local development. The study focuses on the cultural goods of Arcadia in central Peloponnese, Greece, an area of great history and rich architectural heritage, which gives a distinct cultural identity to the region. The overall objective of the current research is to describe how the different kinds of cultural benefits, derived by tourism, are perceived by the local community. A questionnaire based survey, conducted in Arcadia during the period 2012-2014, demonstrates that the locals strongly support the promotion of the architectural richness of the region in order to become an attraction for visitors, contributing both to the improvement of the quality of life, as well as the economic and tourism development of the area. The survey results confirm that cultural tourism is seen as an opportunity to contribute to the economic and cultural sustainability of the area and the local community. The implementation of a linear regression model shows that education is the key factor influencing the residents’ view regarding the promotion of cultural tourism in the region.

  3. The Cultural Industry and educational criticism in Latin America: A Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Soto Sandoval

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to study three authors from different academic fields who have contributed to the development of educational knowledge systems in Latin America in the areas of culture, media communication, and education. In order to do so, I will first explore a historical study about the importance of the Cultural Industry in Latin America, based on academic contributions by Andres Bello, who focused intellectually to give cohesion to national unity in the recently established XIX century Latin American states. Enlightened culture emerges from its written and spoken language, and with support of the media at the time, the “bellista project” would become the first media communication and educational strategy aimed at capturing the new and varied dimensions of a nascent South American Culture. Similarly and in the same vein, I will look into the stance of writers and journalists, José Martí and Rubén Darío, who had to face Modernity as it began to replace the Enlightenment for a Culture for the Masses. Their poems and writings in newspapers back then, established an academic standpoint, for the first time, linked to media analysis and education, such as questioning the cultural industry and media narratives that were operating towards the end of the XIX century, in different media outlets. Finally, I examine how media analysis in Latin America emerged in the face of processes of domination that came not only from the economic but the so called cultural industries that surfaced with so much power in the mid-twentieth century. These media outlets show cultural processes as a marketable product while diluting the true real dimensions of culture.

  4. Maritime Anthropology:A Cultural Ecology Perspective%海洋人类学的文化生态视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王利兵

    2014-01-01

    In the early development of maritime anthropology ,the paradigm of cultural ecology has dominated the research of maritime anthropology ,and still been a very important influence until today . Maritime anthropology from the perspective of cultural ecology holds the view that the marine ecosystem is responsible for producing special marine socio-culture .In other words ,the constraints and uncertainties of marine environment lead to people's particular approaches and adaptation strategy to life ,w hich result in a different type of social culture unlike that in the land society .But with the self-development of the disci-pline ,scholars have realized the defects of the paradigm of cultural ecology from the 1980s ,and gradually turned to other perspectives and themes in the research of maritime anthropology .%在海洋人类学发展的早期,文化生态范式一直主导着海洋人类学的研究,并且直到今天仍有很重要的影响。海洋人类学的文化生态视角认为,海洋生态系统是产生特殊的海洋社会文化的原因,换而言之,也就是说海洋环境的限制和不确定性会导致人们对于生活特定的应对方式和适应策略,从而产生一个不同于陆地社会的社会文化类型。但是随着海洋人类学自身的发展,从20世纪80年代开始,学者们开始意识到文化生态范式的缺陷,并逐渐转向其他视角和主题的海洋人类学研究。

  5. Cross-cultural human-computer interaction and user experience design a semiotic perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Brejcha, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes patterns of language and culture in human-computer interaction (HCI). Through numerous examples, it shows why these patterns matter and how to exploit them to design a better user experience (UX) with computer systems. It provides scientific information on the theoretical and practical areas of the interaction and communication design for research experts and industry practitioners and covers the latest research in semiotics and cultural studies, bringing a set of tools and methods to benefit the process of designing with the cultural background in mind.

  6. CULTURAL ISSUES IN WEBSITE DESIGN. A EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVE ON ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Asimionoaei

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Commerce and electronic business have gained momentum in recent years. Attracted by the mirage of global markets, most companies enter the virtual environment without taking into account thecultural implications of such a step. The major question that arises at this stage of development of global trade on the Internet is if companies understand the importance of cultural factors in their actions on the global market and if we have tools, theories and models with which to carry out cultural analysis for understanding cultural environments online.

  7. Management strategies to harness cultural diversity in Australian construction sites - a social identity perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Loosemore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Construction sites around the world employ large numbers of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. The effective management of this cultural diversity has important implications for the productivity, safety, health and welfare of construction workers and for the performance and reputation of firms which employ them. The findings of a three year, multi-staged study of cultural diversity management practices on construction sites are critiqued using social identity theory. This reveals that so called “best-practice” diversity management strategies may have an opposite effect to that intended. It is concluded that the management of diversity on construction projects would benefit from being informed by social identity research.

  8. Fairness is not validity or cultural bias in racial-group assessment: a quantitative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Janet E

    2006-11-01

    When test scores that differ by racial groups are used for assessment purposes, resulting decisions regarding members of the lower scoring group are potentially unfair. Fairness is defined as the removal from test scores of systematic variance attributable to experiences of racial or cultural socialization, and it is differentiated from test-score validity and cultural bias. Two fairness models for identifying, quantifying, and removing from test scores construct-irrelevant variance attributable to racial or cultural psychological attributes are presented. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. On the English Translation of Tourist Materials from the Perspective of Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王青; 蒲艳春

    2008-01-01

    1. Introduction With its more than 5000 years' long history, brilliant culture and wonderfully-preserved beautiful landscape, China attracts more and more tourists from abroad. Most of them are interested in myste-rious Chinese traditional culture and hope to experience it. Accord-ingly, the most important medium for tourists to be familiar with Chi-na before starting their journey is tourist guidebooks, advertisements or brochures - as called "tourist materials" (张宁, 2000). Most of tourist materials are rich in Chinese unique cultural characteristics.

  10. A developmental perspective on the cultural evolution of prosocial religious beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Kathleen H; Chen, Eva E

    2016-01-01

    Norenzayan et al. argue that prosocial religion develops through cultural evolution. Surprisingly, they give little attention to developmental accounts of prosocial religious beliefs. A consideration of the developmental literature supports some, but not all, of the authors' conclusions.

  11. Brazilian and German perspectives: a study on perception, interculturality and foreign language and culture teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mergenfel A. Vaz Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present a comparative study of the perception of multimodal texts, more specifically, advertisements printed in Brazilian and German magazines, by Brazilian learners of GFL(German as a Foreign Language and German learners of PFL (Portuguese as a Foreign Language , with special attention to the intercultural dimension involved in this process. Through the analysis developed in the study, it was possible to identify not only cultural aspects strictly related to language phenomena (as the use of personal pronouns and forms of treatment, for instance, but also more subjective cultural aspects (such as emotional states, the view about work, among others. This study also discusses the implications of the link between culture and language choices for the area of teaching and learning foreign languages / cultures.

  12. A Translocal Perspective: Mustang Images in the Cultural, Economic and Political Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dalke

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Translocal spaces are created out of the process of globalization whereby interventions such as electronic media and migration radically change social relations and breakdown the isomorphism of space, place, and culture [1]. This approach is useful in examining the controversy surrounding the mustang. This paper explores how different social constructions influence the management of mustangs as they move between the local and national level. At each cultural level, political, economic, and environmental issues converge encouraging the emphasis of some cultural constructions over others. These socially constructed images give insight into what the mustang means to a post-industrial culture and it may simultaneously contribute to the animal’s eventual demise.

  13. Cross-cultural analysis for conceptual understanding: English and Spanish perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, Keville; Rivas Acuña, Valentina; Whetsell, Martha; Tallier, Peggy

    2005-10-01

    Culture and primary language provides the context for understanding between the patient and the nurse and therefore is part of the foundation for nursing care. Knowledge development in nursing is predicated on mutual understanding and interpretation of language. Concept development has been identified as one of the approaches to the development of nursing knowledge. Since the process of concept analysis is based on understanding a phenomenon through language and experiences, this process is culture-bound and language-specific. The purpose of this column is to discuss the value of interviews with people from two different cultures resulting in an attempt to develop nursing knowledge with international relevance. An example of an analysis of a concept, worry, is provided, and the effects of culture and language on this nursing concept are discussed. The analysis was the result of collaboration among nurses from Mexico and the United States of America.

  14. Academic Globalization: Universality of Cross-Cultural And Cross-Disciplinary LMR Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szabo White

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of this paper suggests that previous research underscoring cross-cultural differences may be misleading, when in fact it is cross-professional rather than cross-cultural differences that should be emphasized. Employing the LMR framework, this paper concludes that business or non-business predisposition has a more direct impact on one's individual cultural profile than does nationality. Regardless of culture, persons involved in business are characterized primarily by linear-active modes of communication, and persons not involved in business typically employ less linear and more multi-active/hybrid modes of communication. The linkages among individual characteristics, communication styles, work behaviors, and the extent to which the LMR constructs can facilitate and predict leadership, negotiating styles, individual behaviors, etc. are central to academic globalization and preparing global business leaders.

  15. Religion, Belief and Medial Layering of Communication. Perspectives from Studies in Visual Culture and Artistic Productions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Schade

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the relationship between religious practices, belief and the media based on the medial layering of communication. The arguments are situated within the fields of studies in visual culture and cultural studies, reflecting on the role of art as a specific medium in the Western religious tradition. Vera Frenkel’s video This Is Your Messiah Speaking (1990 is reviewed as a critical inquiry into religious practices and the media structures of communication.

  16. Position and Development of Digital Film under the Perspective of Social Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗淞译

    2015-01-01

    Digital iflm starts late in our country,and there is a big gap between the existing digital iflm mode and that of developed countries. To blend social culture into the development of digital iflm can promote a new mode of iflm industry to develop and stimulate the transformation of modern science and technology of TV. Combining social culture elements,this paper analyses the position of digital iflm,summarizes its principles of market development and put forward feasible strategies.

  17. Mobile Learning in the Institution of Higher Learning for Malaysia students : Culture Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsul Arrieya Ariffin

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning usage in a developing country like Malaysia can be considered new. This literature research  is a state of art overview to discuss current issues. The emerging issues come from: types of mobile learning and learning styles; implementation issues of mobile learning; culture dimensions; and user readiness to accept the mobile learning technology. Currently, there is a lack of research about culture aspects to improve mobile learning and university students’ engagement in Malaysi...

  18. Cultural health beliefs in a rural family practice: a Malaysian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariff, Kamil M; Beng, Khoo S

    2006-02-01

    Understanding the sociocultural dimension of a patient's health beliefs is critical to a successful clinical encounter. Malaysia with its multi-ethnic population of Malay, Chinese and Indian still uses many forms of traditional health care in spite of a remarkably modern rural health service. The objective of this paper is discuss traditional health care in the context of some of the cultural aspects of health beliefs, perceptions and practices in the different ethnic groups of the author's rural family practices. This helps to promote communication and cooperation between doctors and patients, improves clinical diagnosis and management, avoids cultural blind spots and unnecessary medical testing and leads to better adherence to treatment by patients. Includes traditional practices of 'hot and cold', notions of Yin-Yang and Ayurveda, cultural healing, alternative medicine, cultural perception of body structures and cultural practices in the context of women's health. Modern and traditional medical systems are potentially complementary rather than antagonistic. Ethnic and cultural considerations can be integrated further into the modern health delivery system to improve care and health outcomes.

  19. PERSPECTIVES OF THE UNCERTAINTY AVOIDANCE CULTURAL DIMENSION IN GALATI COUNTY ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHE Gabriela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of cultural dimensions is an innovative idea, comparing the scores obtained on the basis of the cultural dimensions makes it possible to analyze the organizational culture level. Based on data collected as part of the COMOR Project for the analysis of organizational culture in the Romanian business environment, developed by The Scientific Society of Management from Romania, we have initiated, using Business Intelligence tools, a scan of the characteristics of organizational culture for Galati County. The study is based on the views of a representative sample of respondents from the business element from Galati in order to assess the current situation and the desired one. The administration of the questionnaires was conducted with the support of the project team of the University "Dunărea de Jos". The proposed aim is, from the analysis of the determined statistical indicators based on the questionnaires from the Galati county, leaving behind the classical linear thinking, to identify new relationships, connections that can be revealed by analyzing the database, obtaining information about organizational culture that highlights the evolution of environmental trends Business in Galati, the practical goal of the research being to provide useful results and conclusions necessary to the local organizational development process. An important topic of the research is to identify the factors that influence managerial behaviour at the level of the Romanian organizations in order to promote and to guide the change at the level of the microeconomic structures.

  20. The quest for a culture of learning: a South African schools perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F H Weeks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the media and the literature the need is often expressed for the establishment of a culture of learning within South African schools. The contrasting view tends to be one of dysfunctional schools that have come into being, giving rise to significant learner behaviour problems and poor pass rates being encountered in practice. This paper is directed at gaining conceptual clarity as to what is meant by a "culture of learning" and exploring two fundamentally different views as to how such a culture can be nurtured within South African schools. The study is based on a multidisciplinary literature review to gain an understanding of the concept and the theories advocated for bringing about a culture change. A key finding emanating from the study is that the traditional culture management approach advocated in the literature may not be all that effective in practice and that an alternative approach that views "culture of learning" as an emergent phenomenon that has its origins in the social interaction taking place within classrooms, schools and learning communities may be more effective.

  1. Factors limiting deceased organ donation: focus groups' perspective from culturally diverse community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, L P

    2010-06-01

    In-depth understanding of cultural and religious factors limiting organ donation of three ethnic populations (Malay, Chinese, and Indian) in Southeast Asia is lacking. Identification of factors limiting organ donation among these three ethnic groups will provide insights into culturally appropriate strategies to promote acceptance of organ donation in a multiethnic Asian community. A total of 17 focus group discussions (105 participants) were conducted between September and December 2008. Participants were members of the general public aged 18 to 60 years, recruited through convenient sampling around the Klang Valley area of Malaysia. Although the majority had favorable attitudes toward deceased organ donation and transplantation, a diversity of myths and misinformation were unearthed from the discussions across the ethnic groups. These include perceived religious prohibition, cultural myths and misperceptions, fear of disfigurement, fear of surgery, distrust of the medical system, and family disapproval. Culture and religious beliefs played important prohibitive roles among those opposed to organ donations. There were distinctive ethnic differences in cultural and religious concerns regarding organ donation. Less-educated and rural groups appeared to have more misconceptions than the well-educated and the urban groups. Our findings may assist organ donation and transplantation organizations to reach diverse sociodemographic and ethnic communities with culture-specific information about organ donation. The involvement of community and religious leaders is critical in organ donation requests.

  2. Christian ethical perspectives on marriage and family life in modern Western culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Vorster

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The past four decades witnessed a tremendous and wide-ranging change in family patterns in Western societies. Amongst these changes are phenomena such as growing number of divorces, births out-of-wedlock, and the absence of fathers because of globalisation, same-sex marriages and cohabitation of people without a marriage contract. Western societies are typified as “highdivorce societies”. Furthermore, in the United States the number of couples cohabiting has increased eightfold since 1970 and it is fair to conclude that the situation is similar in other Western societies. The purpose of the article is to deal with these patterns from a Reformed perspective. The central theoretical argument is that these developments can be perceived as a crisis in view of the Biblical perspectives on marriage and family life. However, the Biblical perspectives not only offer a clear indication of healthy marriage and family life entail, but also indicate that a Christian attitude in marriage and family life can serve as a remedy for the damage caused by the new trends.

  3. "Our culture is medicine": perspectives of Native healers on posttrauma recovery among American Indian and Alaska Native patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Deborah; Tsosie, Ursula; Nannauck, Sweetwater

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (Native) people experience more traumatic events and are at higher risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder compared with the general population. We conducted in-depth interviews with six Native healers about their perspectives on traumatic injury and healing. We analyzed the interviews using an inductive approach to identify common themes. We categorized these themes into four categories: causes and consequences of traumatic injury, risk factors, protective factors, and barriers to care. The implications of our study include a need for improving cultural competence among health care and social services personnel working with Native trauma patients. Additional cumulative analyses of Native healers and trauma patients would contribute to a much-needed body of knowledge on improving recovery and promoting healing among Native trauma patients.

  4. European food cultures in a macro and micro perspective: Implications for the marketing of Asian food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, Søren; Ludvigsen, Hanne H.

    1996-01-01

    to Asian food producers and marketing people". 2. Therefore two questions of importance to Asian (with special attention to South East Asian) food producers and marketers are explored in this paper. 3. First: To which extent can Asian food manufacturers consider Europe one single market? And second: Do any...... different European countries and regions to more homogeneous export markets but in general confir heterogeneity of the European food cultures. 5. Since these data did not contain specific information about our second question, the inclusion of Asian food products in European diets, we have investigated...... certain food consumption trends from a micro-perspective, using qualitative techniques to explore changes in eating beghaviour in general and the openness to new "ethnic" or "exotic" types of food in particular. 6. This micro-level analysis was carried out in Denmark, for convenience reasons as well...

  5. Urban high school students' perspectives about sexual health decision-making: the role of school culture and identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Jennie S.; Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2013-06-01

    Studies across fields such as science education, health education, health behavior, and curriculum studies identify a persistent gap between the aims of the school curriculum and its impact on students' thinking and acting about the real-life decisions that affect their lives. The present study presents a different story from this predominant pattern in the literature. Through a year-long ethnographic investigation of a health-focused New York City public high school's HIV/AIDS and sex education program, this study illustrates a case in which 20 12th grade students respond positively to their education on these topics and largely assert that school significantly influences their perspectives and actions related to sexual health decision-making. This paper presents the following interpretation of this positive influence: school culture influences these students' perspectives and decisions around sexual health by contributing to the formation of students' identities. This paper further shows how science learning in particular becomes important for students in relation to decision-making when it is linked to issues of identity. These findings suggest that, in addition to attending to the design of classroom curriculum, HIV/AIDS and sex education researchers and curriculum developers (as well as those in science education focusing on other controversial science topics) might also explore the kinds of relational and school-wide factors that potentially influence students' identities, decisions, and responses to school learning.

  6. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Tomazoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units.METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121.RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument.CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

  7. The Measurement of Organizational Culture: Cross-country Perspective. Organisatsioonikultuuri mõõtmine: kultuuriülene perspektiiv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Karma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the research on organizational culture (OC from a crosscountry perspective. From the economic point of view we see that society today has led us to increasing international cooperation and globalization. Despite the opening of economic borders there are still limits to consider when operating across national boundaries. One of those limits can be associated with culture – the way things are commonly understood and accepted in different national entities. This can be of special importance for small countries, as they need to adjust to their larger counterparts in order to be economically competitive. Research focuses on different aspects when studying OC, but it is generally agreed that task orientation and interpersonal relationships become important dimensions when we analyze this phenomenon. In order to understand OC and to measure it in cross cultural settings, a universal measurement tool is needed; however, drafting such a tool has for some time been a sticky task. In this paper the measurement invariance of the Organizational Culture Questionnaire (Vadi et al. 2002 is examined by comparing the data from seven countries representing Eastern and Western Europe, Russia, and China. This sample covers both small and large countries. A confirmative factor analysis was used as a means to test measurement invariance across the selected samples. In addition, Multidimensional Scaling technique was applied to provide a visual representation of the data. An analysis was carried out using the statistical software SPSS/AMOS 17.0. The results indicate that task orientation can be found as a common dimension whereas relationship orientation seems to hold a diverse meaning across countries. Instead of relationship orientation, a dimension reflecting negative employee emotions towards the organization was detected. It also turned out that the strength of the relationship between the obtained subscales shows interesting variation

  8. EXPLOITATION AND PROTECTION OF TURTLES AT SERANGAN AND TANJUNG BENOA VILLAGES SOUTH BALI IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF CULTURAL STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ngurah Sudiana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The people at Serangan and Tanjung Benoa Villages have a habit to kill turtles for sale,consumption, custom and religion. They were all restless when their habit was hegomonized bythe government by applying the Act concerning scarce animal conservation. The people urgedthat they be provided with freedom in killing turtles, but the government still intends to stopkilling turtles at the two villages. The two different interests have resulted in a controversy overthe exploitation of turtles making the Bali community as a whole called the killers of turtles.The title of this study is the Exploitation and Protection of Turtles at Serangan andTanjung Benoa Villages, South Bali: in the Perspective of Cultural Studies. The subjectsdiscussed are how the exploitation and protection of turtles implemented, what factorsmotivating their exploitation and protection, what meaningfulness is made to appear by theirexploitation and protection.Qualitative method was used. The data needed were collected by interview,observation, documentation of the secondary data. The data were descriptively and qualitativelyanalyzed using the theory of discourse, the theory of deconstruction, the theory of hegemony andthe perspective of cultural studies.The research findings show that before the Acts Number 7 and 8 of 1999 concerningconservation of scarce animals, exploitation of turtles was part of the people’s life in South Bali.However, after 2005, such constitution has changed from being done in an extractive way tobeing done in a non-extractive way. Meaningfulness to turtles has also changed, from beingexploited to being conserved. Such a conservation has been done by releasing tukiks ( turtles’babies to the sea. Since 2005, a change has also taken place with regard to the turtles killed forreligious and traditional ceremonies. Formerly, many big turtles were used for religious andtraditional ceremonies, but now only a few and small ones are used. If none is found, ducks

  9. CULTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Marilyn Monroe and America in the 1960s-The Photography of Lawrence Schiller One of the most significant photo exhibitions to document America in the turbulent 1960s, which also includes images of the American icon Marilyn Monroe, opens to the public on September 29, 2007. The exhibition is an unequaled historical perspective of the 1960s in America as captured by the legendary photographer, writer and director Lawrence Schiller, and will bring to the Chinese people a perspective of America never exhibited before in China.

  10. Examination of Chinese gambling problems through a socio-historical-cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Samson; Yu, Alex C H; Rossen, Fiona; Wang, Chong-Wen

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this review is to highlight emerging trends about Chinese people and gambling addiction over the last 15 years, and to provide a discourse on the potential link between gambling and Chinese culture and history. The authors reported on the phenomenon of gambling among Chinese people using relevant research studies and reports and traditional Chinese literature. Chinese people have elevated levels of gambling addiction compared to their Western counterparts. These elevated rates are coupled with the rapid expansion of gambling venues within the Pan-Pacific region. While there is an accumulated body of research on Chinese and gambling, a systematic cultural analysis of Chinese gambling is still under development. We undertook a brief comparison between two ancient civilizations, China and Rome, in order to gain better understanding about gambling among Chinese people. To effectively deal with gambling addictions among Chinese people, it is imperative to develop culturally responsive interventions.

  11. Cultural differences between Mexico and Japan: from the perspective of Japanese people in Guadalajara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Nakasone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the cultural differences between Mexico and Japan. First, a review is carried out at the three main theories of the world´s cultural values (Hofstede, Hofstede and Minkov, Inglehart and Welzel, and Schwartz focusing on the case to Mexico and Japan. After that, Berry´s technique is used to investigate the mode of acculturation of the Japanese both permanent and temporary residents in the Metropolitan Zone of Guadalajara in order to know the value of the differences that they perceive and also to find out at what level of acculturation they belong to. As a result, they maintain a strong Japanese identity and they are willing to integrate with Mexican cultural elements, which they consider positive; however, they disagree with a complete assimilation. Thus, it tends to be categorized as a "separation".

  12. Examination of Chinese Gambling Problems through a Socio-Historical-Cultural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson Tse

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to highlight emerging trends about Chinese people and gambling addiction over the last 15 years, and to provide a discourse on the potential link between gambling and Chinese culture and history. The authors reported on the phenomenon of gambling among Chinese people using relevant research studies and reports and traditional Chinese literature. Chinese people have elevated levels of gambling addiction compared to their Western counterparts. These elevated rates are coupled with the rapid expansion of gambling venues within the Pan-Pacific region. While there is an accumulated body of research on Chinese and gambling, a systematic cultural analysis of Chinese gambling is still under development. We undertook a brief comparison between two ancient civilizations, China and Rome, in order to gain better understanding about gambling among Chinese people. To effectively deal with gambling addictions among Chinese people, it is imperative to develop culturally responsive interventions.

  13. An interprofessional education Russian cultural competence course: Implementation and follow-up perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Health sciences educators are faced with creating meaningful, effective and satisfying experiences in interprofessional education (IPE) and cultural competence (CC) required of both students and professionals in practice. This study evaluated the experience and attitudes of the participants in a course combining IPE and CC. A novel, interprofessional course in the Russian language and culture was developed and delivered to a group of medical, nursing, and pharmacy students. One year after the completion of the course, an anonymous, online survey was sent to the participants. Attitudes, comfort, self-efficacy in working with other cultures/healthcare professionals, and comparison of the course to other IPE activities were assessed. The survey suggested that the course was a satisfying and effective combination of IPE and CC in a pre-professional health educational setting. Further work could be undertaken to evaluate the experiences of similar activities in the professional and continuing education arenas.

  14. An Investigation into EFL Learners’ Translations of Metaphors from Cognitive and Cultural Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-chen Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates how EFL learner-translators deal with metaphors and how cognitive factors and cultural background influence their choices. An English-to-Chinese translation task consisting of 20 English sentences was given to 70 Taiwanese university students; each sentence contains a figurative expression that falls into the categories in the cognitive cultural models (Kövecses, 2005. The students’ performances on the task were rated; quantitative analyses show that the students performed significantly better on translating metaphors whose conceptual metaphors exist in both languages than on metaphors whose conceptual metaphors are exclusive to English. Additionally, twenty students were selected for post-task interviews; qualitative analyses indicate that sentence context, concerns over style and register, and translators’ personal preferences affected their choices while translating. Communicative strategies, like providing neutral meanings to avoid uncertain translation, were adopted. The results contribute to the literature on and pedagogical applications for EFL learner translators from both cognitive and cultural aspects.

  15. How psychoactive drugs shape human culture: A multi-disciplinary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, Greg

    2016-09-01

    Psychoactive drug use occurs in essentially all human societies. A range of disciplines contribute to our understanding of the influence of drugs upon the human world. For example pharmacology and neuroscience analyse biological responses to drugs, sociology examines social influences upon people's decisions to use drugs, and anthropology provides rich accounts of use across a variety of cultural contexts. This article reviews work from multiple disciplines to illustrate that drugs influence aspects of culture from social life to religion, politics to trade, while acting as enablers of cultural change throughout human history. This broad view is valuable at a time when the influence not only of traditional drugs but a growing armoury of novel drugs is felt and debated.

  16. Management strategies to harness cultural diversity in Australian construction sites - a social identity perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Loosemore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available  Construction sites around the world employ large numbers of people from diverse cultural backgrounds. The effective management of this cultural diversity has important implications for the productivity, safety, health and welfare of construction workers and for the performance and reputation of firms which employ them. The findings of a three year, multi-staged study of cultural diversity management practices on construction sites are critiqued using social identity theory. This reveals that so called “best-practice” diversity management strategies may have an opposite effect to that intended. It is concluded that the management of diversity on construction projects would benefit from being informed by social identity research. 

  17. Role of Organization Culture on Kuwait’s Construction Industry Management: An Employee Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdullah Al-Hashemi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of stakeholders in construction projects make the construction industry prone to disputes. Communication breakdown, frequently, is the first sign of problems, notably in the relationship between the Contractor and the Consultant. Where, the construction industry in Kuwait is increasing due to market needs, large number of private and public construction projects. The high demands in the market have led to a competition in the construction market. Organization culture has become one of the construction strategies plan to enhance organization management performance and productivity. This present work investigated and analysed the role and impact of organization culture on Kuwaiti construction organization management. This paper represents the first research on this area and contributed to explore and identify cultural-chractersitics that play a role on construction management.

  18. Analysis on the Cultivation of Modern Chinese Farmers’ Values from the Perspective of Traditional Political Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwen; Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Farmers in traditional China have formed the cultural psychology of being reluctant to move from native land and hate to change during the long- term closed production and life. This has exerted negative effect on the values cultivation of farmers today,who possess weak democratic consciousness,low legal spirit and cultural quality as well as strong antagonistic psychology. Measures should be carried out to cultivate their modern values. Firstly,construction of villagers’ self-governance system should be stressed. Secondly,political socialization should be perfected to improve farmers’ political culture. Furthermore,channels of political participation should be widened in order to gradually promote the ordered political participation of farmers.

  19. CULTURAL EFFECT ON SYNERGY REALIZATION IN CROSSBORDER ACQUISITIONS: A CONTINGENCY PERSPECTIVE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Hain, Daniel; Dao, Li Thuy

    2017-01-01

    This study examines two levels of cultural differences - national and organizational on synergy realization simultaneously by considering two critical implementation factors as the moderators: pre-acquisition due diligence and post-acquisition coordination efforts. Meanwhile, we argue cultural...... impact and their moderating effect may differ in different synergy realization contexts (e.g., Type-1 vs Type-2 synergies as posed in this study). Four groups of hypotheses are derived from the literature and tested using regression analysis based on a sample of 103 international acquisitions performed...... by Nordic companies. Results show that both national and organizational cultural differences only exert negative impact on realization of Type-2 synergy which is more implicit/intangible, less predictable, usually tacit-knowledge intensive and/or complementary, but no impact on realization of Type-1 synergy...

  20. A cultural contracts perspective: examining American Indian identity negotiations in academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsam, Teresa Trumbly

    2014-01-01

    Education has played a central role in identity confusion, and to this day, it is used to assimilate American Indians. For those American Indians who persist through doctoral degrees and enter academe, resisting assimilation is especially risky and often tiresome. In this conceptual exploration of identity, Cultural Contracts theory serves to illuminate the path of the American Indian academic journey. Although never applied in an American Indian context, cultural contracts theory may provide a bridge between the seemingly disparate strains of identity research and leave us with a sense of scope and potential for the theory's application.

  1. A Cultural Perspective on Sexual Health: HIV Positive and Negative Monolingual Hispanic Women in South Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Loubet, Olga M; Vamos, Szonja; Jones, Deborah L; Lopez, Eliot; Weiss, Stephen M

    2011-06-01

    This study explored feelings and attitudes with regard to HIV and sexual health among 82 monolingual Spanish-speaking, HIV-positive (n = 30) and at-risk women (n = 52), participating in the NOW en Español Project-a cognitive behavioral sexual risk-reduction intervention in Miami, Florida. Hispanic cultural values and beliefs, such as machismo, marianismo, and sexual silence, emerged throughout the intervention as important determinants of sexual behavior. Recommendations for integrating these culture-specific issues in sexual health interventions for Hispanic women are provided.

  2. Patient Safety Culture Status From The Perspective Medical Staff Of Yasuj Hospitals In 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: One of the most important problems in the health sector, particularly in clinical centers, is the quality of healthcare. Patient safety is one of the most important elements in creating health care quality due to the fact that it is a critical component to the quality of health care and many errors are present in patient care and treatment practices..                                                               Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the status of the patient safety culture and its relationship with events reported in Yasuj hospitals. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 361 medical staff of Yasuj hospitals. The data were collected through a hospital survey on patient safety culture. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS statistics soft ware version 21, using Descriptive methods, Pearson Coefficient, ANOVA, and T-Test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the teamwork among hospital units (71/89percent, with expectations and management measures (66/38% in the case of safety obtained the most score and non-punitive response to errors (48/79% and manager support (55/88 percent obtained the least score. 73/7% of employees of three hospitals in the past 12 months did not report any event. In addition, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between the total score of safety culture and reporting the events. In this study, 15.5 % of respondents assess their safety culture in work as good, 44.3 % as acceptable and 30.5 percent reported poor. The overall safety culture among the three studied hospitals was 61.81 %. Results confirmed that the culture safety of patient in studied hospitals was average. Conclusions: The hospitals may rely on their strong points in terms of patient safety culture and try to remove their weak points to form a safe environment and appropriate

  3. Analysis of Hero’s English Subtitles--From a Cultural Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖小敏

    2014-01-01

    Translating film subtitles has been generally accepted as a burgeoning industry and is being ever closely concerned by the translators. This essay aims to analyse how the cultural differences are addressed in Hero’s English subtitles. Making a carefully study of Hero’s English subtitles, It is found that the translator mainly adopted domestication to address culture specific issues in order to meet the taste of the target audience. Techniques such as omission, paraphrasing, transposition are used to maintain fluen-cy and transparency in the subtitles.

  4. One health from a social-ecological systems perspective: enriching social and cultural dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Helen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter offers insights from the environmental management paradigm of 'social-ecological systems' and related bodies of theory on people-environment relationships to assist the evolution of the One Health interdisciplinary endeavour of health promotion across human-animal ecosystem relationships. It also seeks to expand thinking about the social and cultural dimensions that are likely to prove important in the development of thinking and practice in the One Health field. It advocates consideration of cultural and economic relationships affecting people's interactions with domesticated and wild animal species and ecosystems, and exploration of the cognitive and behavioural aspects of these interactions.

  5. Treatment of Cultural Default in Literary Translation from the Relevance-Theoretic Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡敏燕

    2016-01-01

    The present paper intends to argue that treatment of cultural default in literary translation can be accounted for within the relevance theory. An account of relevance theory is presented. Detailed analysis of some representative examples of transla-tion within the relevance-theoretic framework is made. The notions in Relevance Theory can effectively account for the opera-tion of different translation methods and techniques when tackling the cultural default. The purpose of using various translation skills is to obtain the optimal relevance between cognitive context in target readers'minds and communication intention of the original author.

  6. Modern Families in America and China:in a cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨荃

    2008-01-01

    Families are of great importance in people's life.They are the first place where we start and receive our life-long education.To certain degree,individual growth and development is determined by his/her family education.Meanwhile,families are the most basic social institutions which embrace many cultural factors.This paper displays some differences and similarities between American families and Chinese families in order to arouse people's awareness of the importance of families and emphasize their influence on inter-culture communication.

  7. Cytomechanical properties of papaver pollen tubes are altered after self-incompatibility challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitmann, A.; McConnaughey, W.; Lang-Pauluzzi, I.; Franklin-Tong, V.E.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) in Papaver rhoeas triggers a ligand-mediated signal transduction cascade, resulting in the inhibition of incompatible pollen tube growth. Using a cytomechanical approach we have demonstrated that dramatic changes to the mechanical properties of incompatible pollen tubes are

  8. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital online management system. A pharmaceutical intervention was performed using the guidelines on the preparation and administration of incompatible drugs. Adherence to those guidelines was subsequently assessed among the nursing staff. Results A total of 100 prescriptions were analyzed; 68 were incompatible with the intravenous drugs prescribed. A total of 271 drug incompatibilities were found, averaging 4.0 ± 3.3 incompatibilities per prescription. The most commonly found drug incompatibilities were between midazolam and hydrocortisone (8.9%), between cefepime and midazolam (5.2%), and between hydrocortisone and vancomycin (5.2%). The drugs most commonly involved in incompatibilities were midazolam, hydrocortisone, and vancomycin. The most common incompatibilities occurred when a drug was administered via continuous infusion and another was administered intermittently (50%). Of the 68 prescriptions that led to pharmaceutical guidelines, 45 (66.2%) were fully adhered to by the nursing staff. Conclusion Patients under intensive care were subjected to a high rate of incompatibilities. Drug incompatibilities can be identified and eliminated by the pharmacist on the multidisciplinary team, thereby reducing undesirable effects among patients. PMID:27410410

  9. Reflective Engagement in Cultural History: A Lacanian Perspective on Pasifika Teachers in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tony; Devine, Nesta; Leslie, Elsie; Paiti, Margaret; Sila'ila'i, Emilie; Umaki, Sandra; Williams, Jay

    2007-01-01

    How do we understand our own cultural histories and how do these understandings impact on our senses of self? This paper addresses the case of Pacific islander migration into New Zealand. It is based on a study fuelled by a group of Pacific island teachers exploring their own experiences of becoming teachers in New Zealand schools. The paper…

  10. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter…

  11. Firm Culture and Leadership as Firm Performance Predictors : a Resource-Based Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilderom, C.P.M.; van den Berg, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we tested part of the resource-based view of the firm by examining two 'soft' resources, firm culture and top leadership, as predictors of 'hard' or bottom-line firm performance.Transformational top leadership was found to predict firm performance directly while the link between firm

  12. Practitioners' Perspectives on Cultural Sensitivity in Latina/o Teen Pregnancy Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson-Lee, Ada M.; Russell, Stephen T.; Lee, Faye C. H.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined practitioners' understandings of cultural sensitivity in the context of pregnancy prevention programs for Latina teens. Fifty-eight practitioners from teen pregnancy prevention programs in California were interviewed in a guided conversation format. Three themes emerged in our analysis. First, practitioners' definitions of…

  13. Firm Culture and Leadership as Firm Performance Predictors : a Resource-Based Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilderom, C.P.M.; van den Berg, P.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we tested part of the resource-based view of the firm by examining two 'soft' resources, firm culture and top leadership, as predictors of 'hard' or bottom-line firm performance.Transformational top leadership was found to predict firm performance directly while the link between firm

  14. A Cultural Perspective of Conceptual Change: Re-Examining the Goal of Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, George

    2012-01-01

    The goal of science education is usually meant to develop students' basic knowledge, skills, and scientific attitudes as stated in many countries' curriculum documents, with little consideration of what backgrounds students bring into the classroom. A cultural approach to education has challenged this universal goal of science education. This…

  15. Local Organisation and Cultural Identity in Greenland in a National Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Susanne

    1991-01-01

    Important contributions have been made to understand the function of locality in the construction of cultural identity. Focus has variously been directed at the role of place and the role of aspects of social organisation in creating a symbolic bond between members of local communities. The article...

  16. A Conceptual Framework for the Cultural Integration of Cooperative Learning: A Thai Primary Mathematics Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yong; Nuntrakune, Tippawan

    2013-01-01

    The Thailand education reform adopted cooperative learning to improve the quality of education. However, it has been reported that the introduction and maintenance of cooperative learning has been difficult and uncertain because of the cultural differences. The study proposed a conceptual framework developed based on making a connection between…

  17. Celebrating the "Intellectual Heart": Emergent Meanings from a Post-Earthquake Organizational Communication Culture Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Catherine V.; And Others

    The Organizational Communication Culture (OCC) method, designed by Charles A. Bantz (1993) was utilized as the primary method for analyzing messages coming from the administration of California State University, Northridge, after the earthquake. Bantz feels that communication interactions in an organization bring meanings and expectations to that…

  18. Policies on and Practices of Cultural Inclusivity in Learning Management Systems: Perspectives of Indigenous Holistic Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreamson, Neal; Thomas, Gary; Lee Hong, Anita; Kim, Soyoung

    2017-01-01

    Online learning has become a conventional term and practice in Australian higher education, yet cultural inclusivity for Indigenous (Indigenous for the purposes of this paper refers to Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples) students is insufficiently reflected in learning management system (LMS) policies and design. This study…

  19. Similarity of Mothers' and Preschool Teachers' Evaluations of Socialization Goals in a Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döge, Paula; Keller, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the similarity of socialization goals of a group of mothers with different cultural backgrounds and their children's respective preschool teachers in Germany. Additionally, the researchers were interested in the relationship between the degree of mother-teacher similarity and maternal satisfaction with child care. Questionnaire…

  20. YouTube Acceptance by University Educators and Students: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Lee, Yekyung

    2015-01-01

    Despite the huge popularity of YouTube, there has been little research into the factors affecting educational applications of this social medium. This study attempts to predict and compare factors influencing YouTube acceptance among university students and educators in two very different cultures, Japan and the USA, applying the Unified Theory of…

  1. Contesting "Culture": The Perspectives of Hmong American Female Students on Early Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Bic

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the meaning of early marriage among Hmong American female college students. Interview and observation data attested to the complexity of the meaning of early marriage in the Hmong American community. Results refuted explanations of cultural difference as underlying early marriage and indicated that early marriage was an expression of…

  2. East Meets West: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Wisdom and Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-ying

    2011-01-01

    Wisdom enables people to lead a good life. The pursuit of wisdom is an important goal for adult education, and adult education is important for developing wisdom in individuals and communities. The good life for humankind is threatened by global warming, shortages of natural resources, cultural and religious conflicts, and financial crises, and…

  3. Distance Higher Education Experiences of Arab Gulf Students in the United States: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harthi, Aisha S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a phenomenological research study that was undertaken to provide cultural understanding about the nature of distance education experiences of Arab graduate students pursuing degree programs in the United States. As a theoretical framework, Hofstede's international difference dimensions and Hall's concept of low and high…

  4. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter…

  5. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter alia"…

  6. The Impact of Cultural Distance on Bilateral Arm's Length Exports An International Business Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, Arjen H. L.; Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd; Hennart, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies have argued and regularly found that cultural distance is negatively related to bilateral export flows, which are the sum of arm's length and intra-firm exports. However, these macro-level studies overlook the firm-level insights that arm's length exports are a substitute for arm's

  7. The Impact of Cultural Distance on Bilateral Arm's Length Exports An International Business Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, Arjen H. L.; Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd; Hennart, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies have argued and regularly found that cultural distance is negatively related to bilateral export flows, which are the sum of arm's length and intra-firm exports. However, these macro-level studies overlook the firm-level insights that arm's length exports are a substitute for arm's len

  8. YouTube Acceptance by University Educators and Students: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Lee, Yekyung

    2015-01-01

    Despite the huge popularity of YouTube, there has been little research into the factors affecting educational applications of this social medium. This study attempts to predict and compare factors influencing YouTube acceptance among university students and educators in two very different cultures, Japan and the USA, applying the Unified Theory of…

  9. Understanding and Dismantling Barriers for Partnerships for Inclusive Education: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitoller, Federico R.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, universities and school districts share responsibility for teacher and student learning. Sharing responsibility demands that both institutions work to develop closer relationships through ongoing engagement, dialogue and negotiation. Drawing from Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), we examined one school/university…

  10. Cross-Cultural Blunders in Professional Communication from a Semantic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pinfan

    2010-01-01

    Cross-cultural blunders caused by inappropriate use of language are a common problem in international professional communication. They cause misunderstanding, lead to business failures, and tend to be offensive at times. Such blunders may occur in business ads, slogans, products names, and instructions. Understanding their causes and finding…

  11. Analysis of Non-Equivalence in Translation and Strategies in the Perspective of Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭东晓

    2015-01-01

    The non-equivalence always happens in the languages’translation. In Chinese and English, apart from several special used terms and technical words, the rest hardly have the same corresponding ones. Here will analyze the vocabulary, grammatical, and cultural nonequivalence between Chinese and English translation, give examples and find the strategy to solve the problem.

  12. Gaming the System: Culture, Process, and Perspectives Supporting a Game and App Design Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herro, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Games and digital media experiences permeate the lives of youth. Researchers have argued the participatory attributes and cognitive benefits of gaming and media production for more than a decade, relying on socio-cultural theory to bolster their claims. Only recently have large-scale efforts ensued towards moving game play and design into formal…

  13. New cultural writing practices, new perspectives of Textual Criticism: towards HyperEditing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrício Nunes Barreiros

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent of computer technology and its developments in the second half of the twentieth century was responsible for a new paradigm for the writing culture, enabling, for the first time, the existence of the text outside a physical surface. It is, therefore, a new condition of texts which has changed the cultural practices, production, circulation and appropriation of the text (Chartier, 2001. Philology is not oblivious to this new socio-cultural context and philologists have taken advantage of the potentialities that information technology and digital media provide for the editing of texts, especially of those that have been written and disseminated within the manuscript and/or printed culture. Jerome McGann (1997 used the term HyperEditing to name the editing that philologists are producing in digital media. This type of editing is a hypermedia which makes it possible to put image, sound and movement together in a same space, and other specific characteristics of computer language. In this article, I intend to discuss how textual criticism is being adapted to this paradigm shift through new editing models. This study is part of the theoretical and methodological framework developed for the pamphlets hyperediting of Eulalio Motta, www.eulaliliomotta.com.br (Barreiros, 2013.

  14. Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Counseling: Mental Health Conceptions in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Othman

    The general societal pattern in Malaysia is reflected by the distinct multi-racial composition of the population, comprised of Malays, Chinese, and Indians. In Malaysia, ethnicity determines the varied differences in the socio-cultural and religious diversity of the population. Organized modern medical services have existed in Malaysia since…

  15. Self-Concept and Self-Esteem: A Cross-Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Describes issues of self-concept and self-esteem that arise when people find themselves living in a cross-cultural environment. Discusses Western definition of self-concept and other self-concept models. Discusses self-esteem and integration and adjustment as it relates to bicultural persons. (ABL)

  16. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  17. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  18. The Determinants of Student Effort at Learning ERP: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled A.; El-Masri, Mazen; Lane, Peggy L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model (UTAUT) and Hofstede's cultural dimensions to explore factors that influence student effort at learning Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. A Structural Equation Model (SEM) using LISREL was utilized to validate the proposed research…

  19. Chinese Cultural Values and Performance at Job Interviews: A Singapore Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Irene F. H.; Phooi-Ching, Lai

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes transcripts of job interviews involving nine English-speaking applicants from Chinese backgrounds and two experienced interviewers from Anglo-American MNCs (Multinational Corporations) in Singapore in order to reveal subtle clashes in culture. Finds that applicants from a Chinese background may be disadvantaged when being interviewed for…

  20. Mexican American Adolescent Couples Communicating about Conflict: An Integrated Developmental and Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Heidi Adams; Williams, Lela Rankin

    2016-01-01

    Using observational methods on a small sample of committed Mexican American couples (N = 10, ages 15-17, M length of relationship = 26.5 months), we describe and categorize developmental and cultural communication patterns concerning the negotiation of conflict issues. Videotaped dyadic interactions were transcribed and qualitatively coded using…