WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural heritage conservation

  1. Integrated conservation of cultural built heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, Peter; Bizzarro, Francesca

    1996-01-01

    This paper will focus on integrated conservation of cultural built heritage starting from the analysis of related European policies in an economic perspective. Integrated conservation of cultural built heritage allows either a city or country to undertake socieconomic and cultural promotion and to i

  2. Integrated conservation of cultural built heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, Peter; Bizzarro, Francesca

    1996-01-01

    This paper will focus on integrated conservation of cultural built heritage starting from the analysis of related European policies in an economic perspective. Integrated conservation of cultural built heritage allows either a city or country to undertake socieconomic and cultural promotion and to

  3. Gels for the conservation of cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, Piero; Dei, Luigi; Carretti, Emiliano; Giorgi, Rodorico

    2009-08-04

    Gels are becoming one of the most important tools for the conservation of cultural heritage. They are very versatile systems and can be easily adapted to the cleaning and consolidation of works of art. This perspective reviews the major achievements in the field and suggests possible future developments.

  4. Conservation of Natural and Cultural Heritage in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Deisser, Anne-Marie; Njuguna, Mugwima

    2016-01-01

    In Kenya, cultural and natural heritage has a particular value. This book brings together essays by heritage experts from different backgrounds, including conservation, heritage management, museum studies, archaeology, environment and social sciences, architecture and landscape, geography, philosophy and economics to explore three key themes: the underlying ethics, practices and legal issues of heritage conservation; the exploration of architectural and urban heritage of Nairobi; and the natu...

  5. Wood Science for Conservation of Cultural Heritage – Florence 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Uzielli, Luca

    2010-01-01

    COST Action IE0601 "Wood Science for Conservation of Cultural Heritage" (www.woodculther.org) aims to improve the conservation (including study, preventive conservation and restoration) of European Wooden Cultural Heritage Objects (WCHOs), by fostering targeted research and multidisciplinary interaction between Researchers in various fields of Wood Science, Conservators of wooden artworks, other Scientists from related fields. This book of Proceedings contains most of the papers presented in ...

  6. Multispectral Imaging in Cultural Heritage Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo, S.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, P.; Sánchez-Aparicio, L. J.; Muñoz-Nieto, A.; Hernández-López, D.; Felipe-García, B.; González-Aguilera, D.

    2017-08-01

    This paper sums up the main contribution derived from the thesis entitled "Multispectral imaging for the analysis of materials and pathologies in civil engineering, constructions and natural spaces" awarded by CIPA-ICOMOS for its connection with the preservation of Cultural Heritage. This thesis is framed within close-range remote sensing approaches by the fusion of sensors operating in the optical domain (visible to shortwave infrared spectrum). In the field of heritage preservation, multispectral imaging is a suitable technique due to its non-destructive nature and its versatility. It combines imaging and spectroscopy to analyse materials and land covers and enables the use of a variety of different geomatic sensors for this purpose. These sensors collect both spatial and spectral information for a given scenario and a specific spectral range, so that, their smaller storage units save the spectral properties of the radiation reflected by the surface of interest. The main goal of this research work is to characterise different construction materials as well as the main pathologies of Cultural Heritage elements by combining active and passive sensors recording data in different ranges. Conclusions about the suitability of each type of sensor and spectral range are drawn in relation to each particular case study and damage. It should be emphasised that results are not limited to images, since 3D intensity data from laser scanners can be integrated with 2D data from passive sensors obtaining high quality products due to the added value that metric brings to multispectral images.

  7. MULTISPECTRAL IMAGING IN CULTURAL HERITAGE CONSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Del Pozo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper sums up the main contribution derived from the thesis entitled "Multispectral imaging for the analysis of materials and pathologies in civil engineering, constructions and natural spaces" awarded by CIPA-ICOMOS for its connection with the preservation of Cultural Heritage. This thesis is framed within close-range remote sensing approaches by the fusion of sensors operating in the optical domain (visible to shortwave infrared spectrum. In the field of heritage preservation, multispectral imaging is a suitable technique due to its non-destructive nature and its versatility. It combines imaging and spectroscopy to analyse materials and land covers and enables the use of a variety of different geomatic sensors for this purpose. These sensors collect both spatial and spectral information for a given scenario and a specific spectral range, so that, their smaller storage units save the spectral properties of the radiation reflected by the surface of interest. The main goal of this research work is to characterise different construction materials as well as the main pathologies of Cultural Heritage elements by combining active and passive sensors recording data in different ranges. Conclusions about the suitability of each type of sensor and spectral range are drawn in relation to each particular case study and damage. It should be emphasised that results are not limited to images, since 3D intensity data from laser scanners can be integrated with 2D data from passive sensors obtaining high quality products due to the added value that metric brings to multispectral images.

  8. Network on science and technology for the conservation of cultural heritage.

    OpenAIRE

    Sáiz-Jiménez, Cesáreo; Rogerio Candelera, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic Newsletter. CSIC Thematic Network on Cultural Heritage and Network on Science and Technology for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Sevilla, CSIC, Apartado de Correos 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

  9. VOLUNTEERING FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE CONSERVATION - TWO CASE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Maria VARODI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A voluntary action is the key for individual benefits in addition to social ones. The voluntary actions for cultural heritage conservation are meant to provide gains for longs terms and to raise public awareness on the importance of conservation-restoration activities. During the past 5 years different volunteering actions for cultural heritage conservation organized by our faculty alone or in cooperation with the ASTRA Museum from Sibiu were finalized with exhibitions and public events. The case study presented in this paper is referring to the conservation-restoration of two long benches with backrest, dating from the first half of XXth century. The benches restored make parts from a group of artefact that was restored in the restoration camps at ASTRA Museum in 2013 and 2014. The particularity of the benches was de finishing layer that imitates the wood texture known as flander technique. This type of finishing is common to the landler community who was deported from Austria to Transylvania at the end of 17th century. The approach of conservations – restorations process was different for the artistic painting parts and needs special and appropriate intervention and investigation. While minimum interventions were making in order to preserve the objects for the future, we want to ensure that the value of less known technique can be well understood by younger generations.

  10. Micelle, microemulsions, and gels for the conservation of cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, Piero; Berti, Debora; Bonini, Massimo; Carretti, Emiliano; Dei, Luigi; Fratini, Emiliano; Giorgi, Rodorico

    2014-03-01

    Past restorations performed with acrylic and vinyl polymers showed detrimental effects to wall paintings that lead to the complete disfiguration of the painted surfaces. The removal of these materials performed with the traditional solvent-based methodology represents a real challenge to conservators and usually achieves very poor results. This review reports on the new palette, nowadays available to restorers, based on microemulsions, micellar systems, physical and chemical gels specifically formulated for the cleaning of cultural heritage artefacts. These systems have been developed in the last twenty years within the cultural framework of colloids and surface science.

  11. Ladislav Benesch on His Work in Cultural Heritage Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Mahnič

    2011-12-01

    his own activity in preserving cultural heritage, and can be compared to the assessment of his work formulated by the profession. In his speech, Benesch described much more than only his stay at Auersperg Castle and how he copied the frescoes in its chapel. The title theme of the speech served him merely as a broad framework for presenting his own activity in cultural heritage. Benesch did not introduce himself to his audience only as a restoration specialist whose interest was focused merely on the physical side of conserving and preserving cultural heritage objects. As his own words attest, his desire was to also understand the objects that he occupied himself with. He was aware of the value of his findings and he wanted to share them with the widest general audience. The fact remains that Benesch had no formal education in any historical discipline. However, I believe that this mere fact should not be the decisive or even exclusive criterion for evaluating his eff orts in preserving cultural heritage. What should serve as a basis for assessing his activity in cultural heritage is his understanding of the subject itself and the methods he used.

  12. Remote photonic metrology in the conservation of cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornari, Vivi; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Photonic technologies play a leading innovative role of research in the fields of Cultural Heritage (CH) conservation, preservation and digitisation. In particular photonic technologies have introduced a new indispensable era of research in the conservation of cultural artefacts expanding from decorative objects, paintings, sculptures, monuments to archaeological sites and including fields of application as diverse as materials characterisation to restoration practices and from defect topography to 3d artwork reconstruction. Thus the last two decades photonic technologies have emerged as unique answer or most competitive alternative into many long-term standing disputes in conservation and restoration of Cultural Heritage. Despite the impressive advances on the state-of-the-art ranging from custom-made system development to new methods and practises, photonic research and technological developments remain incoherently scattered and fragmented with a significant amount of duplication of work and misuse of resources. In this context, further progress should aim to capitalise on the so far achieved milestones in any of the diverse applications flourished in the field of CH. Embedding of experimental facilities and conclusions seems the only way to secure the progress beyond the existing state of the art and its false use. The solution to this embedment seems possible through the new computing environments. Cloud computing environment and remote laboratory access hold the missing research objective to bring the leading research together and integrate the achievements. The cloud environment would allow experts from museums, galleries, historical sites, art historians, conservators, scientists and technologists, conservation and technical laboratories and SMEs to interact their research, communicate their achievements and share data and resources. The main instrument of this integration is the creation of a common research platform termed here Virtual Laboratory allowing

  13. Conservation of stone built cultural heritage and preservation of memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antônio

    2016-04-01

    Certainly, the main justification for the conservation of cultural heritage built, lies in the meanings that these buildings have, either to the history of nations, either as part of the cultural heritage of humanity. On the other hand, and taking into account the use of stone, it can be said that in addition to cultural and aesthetic values usually associated with these monuments or architectural ensembles that make up this heritage, the presence of stone materials gives another dimension to those constructions, which is the geo-memory. This means that, due to the presence of this material, where each has its own history, it is also possible to identify geo-memories for each of these monuments or architectural ensembles that make up this heritage, either the genesis point of view, involving environments and processes, either regarding the formation ages of these materials. At the same time and due to the use of these materials can be said that each monument or group of monuments is a reflection of the geo-diversity of a determined region or territory. In Brazil, due to its large territory, this geo-diversity includes a wide range of geological environments, phenomena and processes, giving rise to diverse stone materials, which can be observed in the monuments that are part of your built heritage. Thus in old buildings of historic sites located in particular in the southern and southeastern regions of Brazil, this geo-diversity is present because many types of rocks were used, igneous, metamorphic or sedimentary compositions and of very different ages. Of these types stands out, for example, granites and gneisses, which were used in the states of Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, where they are very common. In such cases, the rocks were formed, or end of the Paleoproterozoic, or at the end of the Neoproterozoic and have different textures, sometimes with predominance of biotite, among mica, sometimes amphibole, as hornblende, or with garnet. They were often used in

  14. Induced sputum evaluation in restorers and conservators of cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanceljak-Macan, Božica; Trošić, Ivančica; Varnai, Veda Marija; Pavičić, Ivan; Macan, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine induced sputum (IS) cells profile from restorers/conservators of cultural heritage (restorers) with no lower airway symptoms and normal ventilatory lung function. The study involved 22 restorers and 48 control workers. Medical interview, physical examination, spirometry, skin prick testing to inhalatory allergens, and IS collection were performed. Compared with control workers, restorers demonstrated higher percentage of neutrophils (34% vs 15.5%; p = .004). This pattern was found only in male workers. They had almost 9 times greater chance to have increased proportion of sputum neutrophils than male controls (odds ratio [OR] 8.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.98-40.7). The mobilization of eosinophils or macrophages into the airways was not established regardless of workers sex. Additional gender difference in sputum cells distribution was found for occupationally unexposed subjects, with higher proportion of sputum neutrophils in women.

  15. Integrated Conservation of the Cantonese Opera Art Museum and Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q.; Li, X.

    2015-08-01

    Cantonese Opera, as the sole cultural heritage of Guangdong Province of China so far, which was included in the World Intangible Cultural Heritage List by the UNESCO, bears the cultural memory of the Lingnan region and as well as the overseas Chinese worldwide. Located in the core historic urban area - Enning Road of Guangzhou, the Cantonese Opera Art Museum is designed in Lingnan traditional garden manner, through going deep into the Cantonese opera culture, Lingnan traditional garden culture and Lingnan cultural spirit. The design highlights the integrated conservation of tangible and intangible cultural heritage, to protect living history and build the historical environment and place spirit for the intangible cultural heritage. The Cantonese Opera Art Museum is not only a tangible space for exhibition, study, education and display of the Cantonese Opera art, but also a cultural space with the Lingnan cultural memory, gathering the Lingnan intangible heritage and closely linked with current life of successors and ordinary people.

  16. X-ray spectrometry for preventive conservation of cultural heritage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    René Van Grieken; Anna Worobiec

    2011-02-01

    Analytical chemistry does play a key role in the chemical characterization of the environment and it appears that X-ray spectrometry, in its many forms, is one of the most relevant analytical techniques in preventive conservation, as it is in cultural heritage research in general. X-ray spectrometry has indeed been the method of choice for the characterization of the inorganic composition of atmospheric aerosols, for a long time. We have, over the last decade, intensively used various forms of X-ray spectrometry, viz., mostly energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence, e.g. with polarized high-energy beam excitation, and automated electron probe X-ray microanalysis, together with other techniques, to identify particle types and their sources in indoor environments, including museums, while gaseous indoor pollutants were assessed using passive diffusion samplers. In each case, both bulk aerosols and individual aerosol particles were studied. For microanalysis of single particles, we have investigated a dozen techniques, but for wide, real-life applications, automated electron probe X-ray microanalysis is the most rewarding. We have first studied atmospheric aerosols in and around the Correr Museum in Venice, many other museums in Austria, Japan and England, and in the caves with prehistoric rock paintings in Altamira, Spain. Very recently, measurements were done in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Wawel Castle in Cracow, in Italian and Polish mountain churches, in a number of museums in Belgium and the Netherlands, and in cathedrals with medieval stained glass windows. In the Correr museum, it appeared that the particles most threatening for the Bellini paintings were released by the deteriorating plaster renderings, and this could be avoided by simply improving the rendering on the museum walls. In the Wawel Castle, outdoor pollution particles, like fine soot from diesel traffic, entering via leaks in the windows and doors, and also street

  17. Information Management Systems for Cultural Heritage and Conservation of World Heritage Sites. The Silk Roads Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ona Vileikis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of Information Management Systems (IMS in cultural heritage. IMS offer a set of tools for understanding, inventorying and documenting national, regional and World Heritage properties.  Information Management Systems can assist State Parties, stakeholders and heritage site managers involved in cultural heritage management and conservation by easily mining, sharing and exchanging information from multiple sources based on international standards. Moreover, they aim to record, manage, visualize, analyze and disseminate heritage information. In close collaboration with five Central Asian countries, namely, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan; a Belgian consortium headed by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation (RLICC, K.U.Leuven is developing the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System (CHRIS. This Web-based Information Management System supports the preparation of the Central Asia Silk Roads serial and transnational nominations on the UNESCO World Heritage list. The project has been set up thanks to the financial support of the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO and in collaboration with UNESCO World Heritage Centre in conjunction with the People’s Republic of China and the Japanese Funds-in-Trust UNESCO project. It provides a holistic approach for the recording, documenta tion, protection and monitoring tasks as part of the management of these potential World Heritage Properties. The Silk Roads CHRIS is easily accessible to the general user, presented in a bilingual English and Russian frame and interoperable, i.e. open for other applications to connect to. In this way, all information for the nomination dossiers is easily verified regarding consistency and quality and ready for managing, periodic reporting and monitoring processes in the respect to the property listed. Fina lly, this study provides a general framework to establish

  18. Challenges that Preventive Conservation poses to the Cultural Heritage documentation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Balen, K.

    2017-08-01

    This contribution examines the challenges posed to the cultural heritage documentation community (the CIPA community and others) in implementing a preventive conservation approach of the built heritage in today's society. The "DNA" of Preventive Conservation. Various authors so far support the argument that preventive conservation is an effective way to respond to the challenges society faces with the preservation of its Cultural Heritage (Van Balen, 2013). A few decades of experiences with the application of preventive conservation in the field of immovable heritage in the form of Monumentenwacht in The Netherland and in Flanders have shown that a good monitoring of the state of preservation with a strong push for maintenance activities contributes to more preservation of authenticity, to more cost-effective preservation and to empowering society in dealing with heritage preservation. (Cebron, 2008) An analysis of these and similar experiences demonstrates that these "Monumentenwacht" activities represent only a part of what could be named a preventive conservation system. Other fields in which prevention is advocated for its higher efficiency, show the importance of system thinking in the development of improved strategies. Applying this approach to the field of the immovable heritage, referring to the initial results shown by the Monumentenwacht practices, it becomes clear that different dimension are at stake simultaneously: the preservation of authenticity or integrity, the management of resources and the connection with society. It shows that the analysis of challenges in heritage preservation and the development of strategies is à priori multifaceted and therefor has a certain level of complexity. The sustainability of the preservation of cultural heritage buildings and sites can be measured according to its multiple economic, social, environmental and cultural support. The Cultural Heritage Counts for Europe report shows that the more diverse the support

  19. Robotic systems for architectural survey and conservation of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Cigola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HeritageBot is a project on technological andmarket development of robotic patents for culturalheritage (mainly archaeological and architecturaland the development of services foroperational applications (industrial, cultural,educational, etc. of the identified technologicalsolutions.The article focuses on hexapods robot designedto be applied to the analysis of architecture. Therobot must perform many of the operations neededin Architectural survey through automatedmanoeuvres. These manoeuvres could improveprocedures and results, both in terms of speedand accuracy of execution.An interdisciplinary research group of the Universityof Cassino has been working designing tworobots. The group built two prototypes. Currentlywe are developing validation test and solutionstests for general background and specific cases.

  20. Multispectral light metering system for cultural heritage diagnosis and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, Matteo; Melis, Marcello

    2013-05-01

    In the world of Cultural Heritage the first concern is all about Conservation of the works of art. A piece of art in bad shape is meant to deteriorate to an irreversible stage. To avoid this, quite often it's needed to go through one or more cycles of restoration to clean and consolidate the various elements of the piece. The very second concern, once the work of art is restored and in good and stable shape, is its fruition. At the end of the day why one should do all that restoration work if nobody then can access and view? Yet viewing and enjoying an artwork means that a visitor would be able to see it at its best, and this means, almost always, to have a good lighting system. Today, both restoration and fruition can greatly benefit of all the available technologies, and achieve very high level quality. The goal of this paper is the development of an exposimetric system suitable to be extremely useful as a tool for the the non invasive analysis, as well as for the lighting design and lighting systems monitoring. Many diagnosis techniques that are used before the restoration stage, require a suitable lighting system to allow to extract from the painting the maximum amount of information through the acquisition of images in the range of visible as well as UV and IR light. A standard exposimeter is for its own nature, sensitive only to the visible light, constrained by the standard photometric sensitivity curve V(lambda). A wide band exposimeter would be, on the other hand, an invaluable tool to get higher precision and to speed up multispectral wide band images acquisition, avoiding time wasting fail and try cycles to record the subject under wide spectrum conditions. The same equipment can be used to monitor the quality of the light in a expo lighting system at, for example, a museum or a gallery. The light hitting a piece of art has to allow the visitor to see and appreciate all the color shades, and to appreciate the contrast of dark and bright areas due only to

  1. “Approach” and “Threshold” Effects of Large-scale Urban Events on Heritage Conservation:A Study on Heritage Conservation from Standpoint of Cultural Anthropology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale urban events like the Olympic Games,the World Expo,etc.,have brought about an "approach" leading to renewed conservation measures for old city areas.While they make many heritages receive better protection,they also create new problem of "threshold" to heritage conservation;thus,ideas about the effects of large-scale urban events on cultural heritage preservation are polarized into two opposite directions.Using cultural anthropology as the basis of analysis,this article interprets how these conflicting concepts came to be.As large-scale urban events accelerate and strengthen urban development,they also often cause the abandonment of specific cultural elements during the process of heritage conservation for the oldest city areas.This leads to a general loss of direction in cultural protection efforts.A potential solution is to unearth the cultural spirit of the old cities and preserve it through practical technologies,in considering the specific function of large-scale urban events.In so doing,it is possible to explore new directions and approaches to conserve the heritages of the old city under the guide of urban cultural development strategies.

  2. Conflicts of Identity, Conservation, and Cultural Heritage Meaning Management: Reading through ICOMOS Charters

    OpenAIRE

    Kamel Ahmed, Ehab

    2010-01-01

    This book "Constructing Intangible Heritage" gathers a set of articles \\ud organised in four chapters, under the thematic of intangible heritage:\\ud - Towards the immateriality of heritage;\\ud - Conceptualizing intangible heritage;\\ud - Intangible heritage and cultural manifestations;\\ud - The museology of intangible heritage.

  3. SOME ASPECTS OF THE CONSERVATION OF THE CULTURAL HERITAGE OF DAGESTAN REPUBLIC UNDER GLOBALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. N. Nabieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Problems of preservation of cultural and natural heritage in the era of globalization, acquiring intensi-ty and penetration in various spheres of human activity in recent decades, are particularly relevant. Republic of Da-gestan is a multi-ethnic region located at the crossroads of world cultures and passed a difficult path of political, so-cio-economic and cultural development. The loss of the heritage can be attributed to one of social disasters, and in its consequences can be compared to the natural disasters on the planet. In this connection, the main aim is to develop proposals for the preservation and use of cultural and natural heritage of the Republic of Dagestan under globalization, a problem that sounds very relevant today. Methods. We used an analytical method to study the problem, based on the study of the scientific sources on heritage conservation in the context of globalization. In addition, we followed the methodology developed by the Russian Research Institute for Cultural and Natural Heritage. Results. In the article we make suggestions that will contribute to the conservation and utilization of cultural and natural heritage of the Republic of Dagestan in the context of globalization. The main task today is to develop the following: 1 long-term strategic policy document for justification of national policies in the field of protection and use of cultural and natural heritage; 2 draft law on measures of state support for the preservation of cultural heritage and heritage man-agement; 3 the priority list of the most endangered and valuable objects of cultural, historical and natural heritage. Conclusions. At the state level, a concept should be developed of preservation of the natural and historical envi-ronment of ethnic groups, ways of life and traditional forms of management, including the creation of socio-cultural programs aimed at improving the living conditions of the indigenous population, the study of its language

  4. The surface of cultural heritage artefacts: physicochemical investigations for their knowledge and their conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucouturier, Marc; Darque-Ceretti, Evelyne

    2007-10-01

    This tutorial review intends to show, through demonstrative examples chosen from the recent literature, how surface characterisation conducted by modern investigation methods leads to very rich information on a cultural heritage artefact's history, fabrication techniques and conservation state. Application of surface science to conservation science is of great help for the definition of a conservation and restoration policy for museum and archaeological objects. A brief description of the investigation methods is given, together with relevant references for more detailed information.

  5. Challenges that Preventive Conservation poses to the Cultural Heritage documentation field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Van Balen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This contribution examines the challenges posed to the cultural heritage documentation community (the CIPA community and others in implementing a preventive conservation approach of the built heritage in today’s society. The “DNA” of Preventive Conservation. Various authors so far support the argument that preventive conservation is an effective way to respond to the challenges society faces with the preservation of its Cultural Heritage (Van Balen, 2013. A few decades of experiences with the application of preventive conservation in the field of immovable heritage in the form of Monumentenwacht in The Netherland and in Flanders have shown that a good monitoring of the state of preservation with a strong push for maintenance activities contributes to more preservation of authenticity, to more cost-effective preservation and to empowering society in dealing with heritage preservation. (Cebron, 2008 An analysis of these and similar experiences demonstrates that these “Monumentenwacht” activities represent only a part of what could be named a preventive conservation system. Other fields in which prevention is advocated for its higher efficiency, show the importance of system thinking in the development of improved strategies. Applying this approach to the field of the immovable heritage, referring to the initial results shown by the Monumentenwacht practices, it becomes clear that different dimension are at stake simultaneously: the preservation of authenticity or integrity, the management of resources and the connection with society. It shows that the analysis of challenges in heritage preservation and the development of strategies is à priori multifaceted and therefor has a certain level of complexity. The sustainability of the preservation of cultural heritage buildings and sites can be measured according to its multiple economic, social, environmental and cultural support. The Cultural Heritage Counts for Europe report shows that the

  6. Multi-cooperation of Cultural Heritage Conservation: The Cangdong Project of Guangdong Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, some workshops and research cases have arisen in China to seek for suitable ways for heritage conservation and development of historic villages. However, the issue of multi-cooperation has not been much mentioned in research works. The case of Cangdong Project in Guangdong Province is a social enterprise. It is a center focusing on heritage education. It organizes tailor-made workshops for interested people from all over China and Hong Kong, Macao and overseas, including university courses for credits, summer/winter camps for primary and middle school students, as well as common people who are interested in heritage conservation. The purpose of the education center is to enhance heritage/cultural interest of the younger generations and common people, and try to work with local villagers to build a wealthy community. Nowadays, more and more villagers moved out for work and the countryside population in China is decreasing, this project also aims to create work opportunities for villagers through heritage conservation projects, so that the villagers can be willing to stay. The project focuses more in a sustainable way for community development. It has been five years since the project was set up in Cangdong Village. The project team worked with villagers, city people, students, scholars, different levels of local governments, investors, Medias, charitable organizations, as well as the market of tourism. As such, a platform of multi-cooperation for the above parties has formed during the past five years. This paper takes the Project experience from 2010-2015 as the case to study multi-cooperation in the field of heritage conservation in China, as well as to discuss how to co-operate the subjective initiatives of different stokeholds.

  7. CONSERVATION PROCESS MODEL (CPM: A TWOFOLD SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH SCOPE IN THE INFORMATION MODELLING FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fiorani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to develop an instrument able to adequately support the conservation process by means of a twofold approach, based on both BIM environment and ontology formalisation. Although BIM has been successfully experimented within AEC (Architecture Engineering Construction field, it has showed many drawbacks for architectural heritage. To cope with unicity and more generally complexity of ancient buildings, applications so far developed have shown to poorly adapt BIM to conservation design with unsatisfactory results (Dore, Murphy 2013; Carrara 2014. In order to combine achievements reached within AEC through BIM environment (design control and management with an appropriate, semantically enriched and flexible The presented model has at its core a knowledge base developed through information ontologies and oriented around the formalization and computability of all the knowledge necessary for the full comprehension of the object of architectural heritage an its conservation. Such a knowledge representation is worked out upon conceptual categories defined above all within architectural criticism and conservation scope. The present paper aims at further extending the scope of conceptual modelling within cultural heritage conservation already formalized by the model. A special focus is directed on decay analysis and surfaces conservation project.

  8. Conservation Process Model (cpm): a Twofold Scientific Research Scope in the Information Modelling for Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, D.; Acierno, M.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present research is to develop an instrument able to adequately support the conservation process by means of a twofold approach, based on both BIM environment and ontology formalisation. Although BIM has been successfully experimented within AEC (Architecture Engineering Construction) field, it has showed many drawbacks for architectural heritage. To cope with unicity and more generally complexity of ancient buildings, applications so far developed have shown to poorly adapt BIM to conservation design with unsatisfactory results (Dore, Murphy 2013; Carrara 2014). In order to combine achievements reached within AEC through BIM environment (design control and management) with an appropriate, semantically enriched and flexible The presented model has at its core a knowledge base developed through information ontologies and oriented around the formalization and computability of all the knowledge necessary for the full comprehension of the object of architectural heritage an its conservation. Such a knowledge representation is worked out upon conceptual categories defined above all within architectural criticism and conservation scope. The present paper aims at further extending the scope of conceptual modelling within cultural heritage conservation already formalized by the model. A special focus is directed on decay analysis and surfaces conservation project.

  9. High-Quality 3d Models and Their Use in a Cultural Heritage Conservation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, G.; Bonora, V.; Conti, A.; Fiorini, L.

    2017-08-01

    Cultural heritage digitization and 3D modelling processes are mainly based on laser scanning and digital photogrammetry techniques to produce complete, detailed and photorealistic three-dimensional surveys: geometric as well as chromatic aspects, in turn testimony of materials, work techniques, state of preservation, etc., are documented using digitization processes. The paper explores the topic of 3D documentation for conservation purposes; it analyses how geomatics contributes in different steps of a restoration process and it presents an overview of different uses of 3D models for the conservation and enhancement of the cultural heritage. The paper reports on the project to digitize the earthenware frieze of the Ospedale del Ceppo in Pistoia (Italy) for 3D documentation, restoration work support, and digital and physical reconstruction and integration purposes. The intent to design an exhibition area suggests new ways to take advantage of 3D data originally acquired for documentation and scientific purposes.

  10. The Application of Chemistry to Conserve Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    During the past 50 years the amount of chemistry applied to the preservation of all sorts of materials, from wood, to ceramics, glass and metallic objects has increased dramatically as materials conservation laboratories became established around the world. In Australia, the finding of a series of historic shipwrecks of ships from the Dutch…

  11. Exposure to culturable and total microbiota in cultural heritage conservation laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał L. Górny

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To date, the scientific source materials usually focus on microbial contamination of the museum or library collections themselves, while the exposure of persons who professionally deal with this type of objects in cultural heritage conservation laboratories is ignored. Material and Methods: The study was carried out in 9 naturally ventilated conservation laboratories with no history of water damage. Viable (understood as culturable bioaerosol stationary samples were collected in both outdoor and indoor environments using 6-stage Andersen impactor. Simultaneously, stationary and personal indoor bioaerosol measurements were carried out using both Gesamtstaubprobenahme an der Person (GSP and Button filter samplers. These measurements were complemented by evaluation of microbial content in the dust settled on conserved works of art. All impactor, filter, and settled dust samples were quantitatively examined to obtain viable and total concentrations of bacteria and fungi. All isolated microbial strains were taxonomically identified. Results: At workplaces, the concentrations of viable microorganisms in air were below 2000 cfu/m3 and accounted for not more than 5.5% of total microbiota. The study showed that quantitative assessment of viable bioaerosol can be made with an Andersen impactor as well as by using Button and GSP filter samplers, irrespective of whether they are applied for personal or stationary measurements. Compared to the impactor, however, the use of filter samplers for microbial contamination monitoring substantially limits the scope of qualitative information which can be obtained. Size distribution analysis revealed that the largest “load” of microorganisms can penetrate into the respiratory tract between the trachea and terminal bronchi, and thereby may be responsible for allergic inflammations in exposed workers. Conclusions: The precise assessment of microbial hazards in conservation laboratories should comprise

  12. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry for the Nondestructive Investigation of Conservation Treatments of Cultural Heritage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manfredi, Marcello; Robotti, Elisa; Bearman, Greg; France, Fenella; Barberis, Elettra; Shor, Pnina; Marengo, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    ... the original work is properly cited. 1. Introduction The conservation of cultural heritage is a challenge that could be overcome only with an interdisciplinary approach, creating new partnerships and co...

  13. Research project: “Charter on the Risk for Cultural Heritage conservation in bounded environments”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Meli

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available As for the objectives set by the Charter on the Risk of Cultural Heritage and of the Territorial Information System at a regional level and in particular concerning Sicily, the research is aimed at reaching two goals with an integral and consistent approach. The first objective is to collect the necessary information and to carry out an action plan in order to help the person in charge with the cultural unit (museum, library, archive, picture gallery to reach and keep a good “status” of the cultural heritage and at the same time to keep a high quality of life and work in the cultural unit. The document which will be drafted will provide the basic and general information for the various areas of the working environment that are adjacent to each other. At the same time the document will provide guidelines for the safety and the conservation of the cultural collections of the museum and will have to be adapted to each cultural unit with specific features concerning the “system: manufactures with historical-artistic interest / or interesting for the conservation environment”. Some sites that are considered to be emblematic will be tested, and this is the second objective of the research, they will be carefully chosen as representative of the various, complex and variable logistic and cultural situations of our country and in particular of Sicily.

  14. The National Commitment Towards Conserving the Heritage (documentation of Historical and Cultural Sites in Gcc Countries)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSulaiti, F.

    2013-07-01

    The five Arab Gulf countries of Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman possess many shared characteristics and historical ties across their common peninsula. The prime factor uniting them is the historical nature of their entwined involvement with peoples and nations beyond the region. That the Gulf has been an important water passageway since ancient times suggests that the inhabitants of its shores met early on with other civilizations. The knowledge of one's roots, history, and traditional arts supports awareness of inherited culture and can help contextualize and illuminate community reflection and identification. The intricacy of the recording and understanding processes of documentation requires skilled professionals, with knowledge and awareness for the associated tasks. Responsible of cultural heritage should provide the adequate documentations, recording and updating of the records. Collaboration of different individuals such as specialist heritage, archaeologists, surveyors, conservators, researchers, architectural historians, and many other expert personnel is the golden key of successful documentation. The purpose of this document is to show the authorities of Gulf Arab countries and their planning measures, management and sharing effect of recording the cultural heritage. This essay identifies key points in the approach to contextualizing and developing cultural identity in a way that respects organic qualities. Through highlighting a number of archeological ruins and outlining management plans, the essay explores frameworks that can be applied to promote and preserve integral identity of important sites and their greater surrounding communities.

  15. Colloid and materials science for the conservation of cultural heritage: cleaning, consolidation, and deacidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, Piero; Chelazzi, David; Giorgi, Rodorico; Poggi, Giovanna

    2013-04-30

    Serendipity and experiment have been a frequent approach for the development of materials and methodologies used for a long time for either cleaning or consolidation of works of art. Recently, new perspectives have been opened by the application of materials science, colloid science, and interface science frameworks to conservation, generating a breakthrough in the development of innovative tools for the conservation and preservation of cultural heritage. This Article is an overview of the most recent contributions of colloid and materials science to the art conservation field, mainly focusing on the use of amphiphile-based fluids, gels, and alkaline earth metal hydroxide nanoparticles dispersions for the cleaning of pictorial surfaces, the consolidation of artistic substrates, and the deacidification of paper, canvas, and wood. Future possible directions for solving several conservation issues that still need to be faced are also highlighted.

  16. Challenges, Strategies and Techniques for International Training in Technology for Cultural Heritage Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppich, R.; Almagro Vidal, A.

    2013-07-01

    Technology to document and investigate cultural heritage sites is rapidly advancing - multispectral and high dynamic range imaging, spherical high resolution photography, three-dimensional laser scanning and unmanned aerial vehicles are only a few of the new technologies available to heritage conservation professionals to record monuments, buildings, city centres and landscapes. These advanced tools are giving architects, engineers and conservation professionals' new insights and additional information which helps to make better informed decisions. But this technology and the knowledge about its correct use are extremely unevenly distributed across the world. The Digital Divide is present and growing in the field of cultural heritage preservation (Letellier, 2001). Many of those responsible for the management, maintenance and care of some of the world's most significant cultural heritage sites do not have access to or information about the latest technologies. They are also confronted with an overwhelming assortment of new technologies and consultants or developers that promote them and therefore must allocate their limited budgets with limited information. What is to be done about bridging this gap? Obviously cost and accessibility are issues. However one of the most important challenges to be addressed is education. As the base knowledge of these technologies is very uneven this leads to further questions: Are there strategies or methodologies for teaching this technology? How to combine and balance different professional backgrounds from different and so unevenly distributed places around the world and provide them all with useful information to make good documentation and conservation decisions? This paper will describe the methodology developed over the last ten years in teaching documentation technologies to diverse groups of cultural heritage professionals and students from Côte d'Ivoire, Germany, Belgium, Kosovo, Albania, Nigeria, Egypt, Japan, Iraq

  17. Standardization in the Cultural Heritage in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Mo; Wang mingling; Zhang Lei

    2007-01-01

    China has begun its standardization process in the cultural heritage since 1960.The standards contributed a lot to the development of the heritage conservation practices. In this paper, the author summaries the existing condition of standardization in the cultural heritages and museums field in China, and presents Standards for the Classification of Collected Cultural Heritages. Also this paper points out the problems which exist in the standardization in the cultural heritage, and gives the advice to solve these problems.

  18. Electrochemical Evaluation of a Recycled Copolymer Coating for Cultural Heritage Conservation Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Hernández-Escampa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS is a well-known discard product from the industry. This copolymer can be dissolved in organic solvents, and thin films can be created by immersion. Two requirements for coatings used for cultural heritage conservation purposes are transparency and reversibility, both fulfilled by ABS films. The aim of this work was to characterize the copolymer and to evaluate the electrochemical properties of ABS coatings applied to copper. Such performance was compared to that of a commercial varnish commonly used in conservation. The results indicate high protection values of the ABS film, generating a potential application for this waste material. The electrochemical techniques included electrochemical noise, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization.

  19. Integrated Conservation of the Cantonese Opera Art Museum and Intangible Cultural Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Q.; Li, X.

    2015-01-01

    Cantonese Opera, as the sole cultural heritage of Guangdong Province of China so far, which was included in the World Intangible Cultural Heritage List by the UNESCO, bears the cultural memory of the Lingnan region and as well as the overseas Chinese worldwide. Located in the core historic urban area – Enning Road of Guangzhou, the Cantonese Opera Art Museum is designed in Lingnan traditional garden manner, through going deep into the Cantonese opera culture, Lingnan traditional gard...

  20. Software for storage and management of microclimatic data for preventive conservation of cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Navajas, Angel; Merello, Paloma; Beltrán, Pedro; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

    2013-02-27

    Cultural Heritage preventive conservation requires the monitoring of the parameters involved in the process of deterioration of artworks. Thus, both long-term monitoring of the environmental parameters as well as further analysis of the recorded data are necessary. The long-term monitoring at frequencies higher than 1 data point/day generates large volumes of data that are difficult to store, manage and analyze. This paper presents software which uses a free open source database engine that allows managing and interacting with huge amounts of data from environmental monitoring of cultural heritage sites. It is of simple operation and offers multiple capabilities, such as detection of anomalous data, inquiries, graph plotting and mean trajectories. It is also possible to export the data to a spreadsheet for analyses with more advanced statistical methods (principal component analysis, ANOVA, linear regression, etc.). This paper also deals with a practical application developed for the Renaissance frescoes of the Cathedral of Valencia. The results suggest infiltration of rainwater in the vault and weekly relative humidity changes related with the religious service schedules.

  1. Software for Storage and Management of Microclimatic Data for Preventive Conservation of Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Navajas, Ángel; Merello, Paloma; Beltrán, Pedro; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Cultural Heritage preventive conservation requires the monitoring of the parameters involved in the process of deterioration of artworks. Thus, both long-term monitoring of the environmental parameters as well as further analysis of the recorded data are necessary. The long-term monitoring at frequencies higher than 1 data point/day generates large volumes of data that are difficult to store, manage and analyze. This paper presents software which uses a free open source database engine that allows managing and interacting with huge amounts of data from environmental monitoring of cultural heritage sites. It is of simple operation and offers multiple capabilities, such as detection of anomalous data, inquiries, graph plotting and mean trajectories. It is also possible to export the data to a spreadsheet for analyses with more advanced statistical methods (principal component analysis, ANOVA, linear regression, etc.). This paper also deals with a practical application developed for the Renaissance frescoes of the Cathedral of Valencia. The results suggest infiltration of rainwater in the vault and weekly relative humidity changes related with the religious service schedules. PMID:23447005

  2. Diamantina: World Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Alencar Machado Albuquerque

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Awareness on preservation of cultural values in Brazil has been characterized as a current trend, and local communities play an important role in this process. The country’s preservationist policy has emerged with the Institute of National Historical and Artistic Heritage that aims at identifying and preserving the historical, cultural and artistic heritage. In the Brazilian scene the city of Diamantina/MG stands out for its remarkable cultural heritage, considered by UNESCO a World Cultural Heritage.

  3. Southern Tunisia as an example of international partnership in cultural and geological heritage conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessi, M.; Cantelli, L.; Fanti, F.; Gabbianelli, G.; Mohsen, H.

    2012-04-01

    National Geoparks initiatives are essential strategies to enhance the value of Earth's heritage and to promote a regional sustainable socio-economic and cultural development. As an example for geological heritage development, an ongoing partnership between the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences of the University of Bologna (Italy) and the Office Nationales des Mines (Tunisia) attempt to ensure divulgation and preservation of the geological, geomorphological and archeological values of the Tataouine region in South Tunisia, with the final goal to create a Geopark. In this region, different environmental and cultural heritages that comprehend paleontology, geomorphology, stratigraphy and archeology coexist. Mesozoic beds that crop out extensively in the Tataouine region known since the beginning of the 20th century as Continental Intercalaire, yield numerous dinosaur and other vertebrate remains as well as tracksites. Moreover these Mesozoic deposits have been intensively modified for centuries by the local populations who created complex systems of artificial terraces, called jessour, in order to retain rainwater in the arid Tunisian climate and to exploit the scarce farm soil. These human artifacts deeply modified the morphological and hydrogeological landscape and created a unique cultural value that need to be preserved. From the perspective of science and conservation, a well-documented geological inventory of the fossiliferous sites has been produced and will be available as an electronic database. In particular, the Beni Ghedir valley, near the Goumrassene village, has been chosen has the main Geopark location as it includes, in a restricted area, a perfect example of jessour artifacts together with some well-preserved Ksour (ancient storage structures) and nicely preserved fossil sites. An interactive map of the artificial terrances has been produced using the ArcGis technology, in order to highlight the connection between the valley

  4. Connecting to the World's Collections: Making the Case for the Conservation and Preservation of Our Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Joyce Hill

    2009-01-01

    Sixty cultural heritage leaders from thirty-two countries, including representatives from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, South America, Australia, Europe, and North America gathered in October 2009 in Salzburg, Austria, to develop a series of practical recommendations to ensure optimal collections conservation worldwide. Convened at Schloss…

  5. New methodologies for the conservation of cultural heritage: micellar solutions, microemulsions, and hydroxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Michele; Berti, Debora; Baglioni, Piero

    2010-06-15

    Modern civilization's inherited artworks have a powerful impact on society, from political, sociological, and anthropological points of view, so the conservation of our Cultural Heritage is fundamental for conveying to future generations our culture, traditions, and ways of thinking and behaving. In the conservation of cultural artifacts, scientists intervene in the degradation of often unique handcrafts, resulting from a delicate balance of aging, unpredicted events, environmental conditions, and sometimes incorrect previous restoration treatments, the details of which are often not precisely known. Nanoscience and nanotechnology are revolutionizing materials science in a pervasive way, in a manner similar to polymer chemistry's revolution of materials science over the preceding century. The continuous development of novel nanoparticle-based materials and the study of physicochemical phenomena at the nanoscale are creating new approaches to conservation science, leading to new methodologies that can "revert" the degradation processes of the works of art, in most cases "restoring" them to their original magnificent appearance. Until recently, serendipity and experiment have been the most frequent design principles of formulations for either cleaning or consolidation of works of art. Accordingly, the past has witnessed a number of actively detrimental treatments, such as the application of acrylic and vinyl resins to wall paintings, which can irreversibly jeopardize the appearance (or even the continued existence) of irreplaceable works of art. Current research activity in conservation science is largely based on the paradigm that compatibility of materials is the most important prerequisite for obtaining excellent and durable results. The most advanced current methodologies are (i) the use of water-based micelles and microemulsions (neat or combined with gels) for the removal of accidental contaminants and polymers used in past restorations and (ii) the application

  6. Culture Development Planning in the Special Region of Yogyakarta (Management Planning of Cultural Heritage in Kotagede District based on Community Empowerment Conservation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Suryanti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Special Region of Yogyakarta is a cultural rich city with excellent cultural resources. Yogyakarta should manage their assets with long-term planning to keep the sustainability. There is a very unique planning process due to a combination of political, technocratic, participatory, top down and bottom up approaches. This planning process is comprehensive or integrated because its involved many actor from multisectoral, multidisciplinary, multi regulatory, and multi planning documents, etc. Local wisdoms have been coloring the planning documents. This study describe and analyze the cultural development planning in Yogyakarta especially on the Management Planning in Kotagede Cultural Heritage District. We used qualitative descriptive approach methods and Miles and Huberman analysis methods. Participation of community and Non Governmental Organization (NGO in conservation planning of cultural heritage in this area is very significant in simplify the government task because people have been more literate in planning, have database of cultural assets, and capable of making their own decisions for the future of the region. Participatory rural appraisal (PRA dan Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA were integrated in the planning process of Kotagede Heritage District management, thus it becomes a model of cultural heritage with community empowerment-based conservation. Keywords: culture development planning, comprehensive planning, heritage cultural district, community empowerment-based conservation.

  7. Spatial Analysis of Cultural Heritage Landscapes in Rural China: Land Use Change and Its Risks for Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huirong; Verburg, Peter H.; Liu, Liming; Eitelberg, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Cultural heritage landscapes are consistently perceived as landscapes of high value. However, these landscapes are very vulnerable to change. In China, rapid land use change, especially urbanization, has become one of the main challenges for the conservation of cultural heritage landscapes in rural areas. This paper focuses on the designated cultural villages in rural China by systematically analyzing the spatial distribution of the designated cultural landscape across the country and assessing the threats these traditional landscapes are facing under current and future urbanization and other land use pressures. Current designated cultural heritage landscapes in China are predominantly located in the rural and peri-urban regions of Central and South China and less frequently found in other regions. Especially in these regions risks to land use change are large. These risks are assessed based on observed recent land use change and land use model simulations for scenarios up to 2050. The risk assessment reveals that especially in Southeast China along the sea coast and near the cities along the Yangtze River, high pressures are expected on cultural heritage landscapes due to urbanization. At the same time, in Southwest China, especially in Yunnan and Guizhou provinces, high pressures due to other land use changes are expected, including land abandonment. This assessment gives direction and guidance toward the selection of the most threatened cultural villages for detailed investigation and additional protection measures.

  8. Spatial Analysis of Cultural Heritage Landscapes in Rural China: Land Use Change and Its Risks for Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huirong; Verburg, Peter H; Liu, Liming; Eitelberg, David A

    2016-06-01

    Cultural heritage landscapes are consistently perceived as landscapes of high value. However, these landscapes are very vulnerable to change. In China, rapid land use change, especially urbanization, has become one of the main challenges for the conservation of cultural heritage landscapes in rural areas. This paper focuses on the designated cultural villages in rural China by systematically analyzing the spatial distribution of the designated cultural landscape across the country and assessing the threats these traditional landscapes are facing under current and future urbanization and other land use pressures. Current designated cultural heritage landscapes in China are predominantly located in the rural and peri-urban regions of Central and South China and less frequently found in other regions. Especially in these regions risks to land use change are large. These risks are assessed based on observed recent land use change and land use model simulations for scenarios up to 2050. The risk assessment reveals that especially in Southeast China along the sea coast and near the cities along the Yangtze River, high pressures are expected on cultural heritage landscapes due to urbanization. At the same time, in Southwest China, especially in Yunnan and Guizhou provinces, high pressures due to other land use changes are expected, including land abandonment. This assessment gives direction and guidance toward the selection of the most threatened cultural villages for detailed investigation and additional protection measures.

  9. Restoring Cultural Heritage Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Most of the post-quake cultural heritage rescue and protection projects in Sichuan have been completed The State Administration of Cultural Heritage recently rewarded 132 individuals and organizations for their work in rescuing and protecting cultural relics damaged by the Wenchuan earthquake on May12,2008.

  10. Interactions between nanostructured calcium hydroxide and acrylate copolymers: implications in cultural heritage conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretti, Emiliano; Chelazzi, David; Rocchigiani, Giulia; Baglioni, Piero; Poggi, Giovanna; Dei, Luigi

    2013-08-06

    The interactions between an acrylic copolymer, poly ethylmethacrylate/methylacrylate (70:30) (Poly(EMA/MA), and Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles were investigated in order to establish the reciprocal influence of these two compounds on their peculiar properties. The carbonation kinetics of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles by atmospheric CO2 was investigated by FTIR and SEM measurements and compared to that of a nanocomposite film. CaCO3 formation occurred even in the presence of the copolymer, but only after an induction period of ca. 200 h and with a lower reaction rate. Some implications in cultural heritage conservation dealing with application of nanolime on artifacts previously treated with acrylic copolymers were discussed. Contact angle measurements, mechanical cohesion properties, and water vapor permeability allowed us to conclude that the optimum behavior of nanolime with respect to transpiration was not compromised by the presence of the copolymer, and the behavior in terms of mechanical properties recovery by the application of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles remained excellent even in the presence of poly(EMA/MA).

  11. Cultural heritage and sustainable development in SUIT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Algreen-Ussing, Gregers; Hassler, Uta; Kohler, Niklaus

    2002-01-01

    The position paper is composed of 18 thesis, which are presented in four groups: Cultural Heritage, Momuments and Public Space, Active Conservation and Sustainable Development.......The position paper is composed of 18 thesis, which are presented in four groups: Cultural Heritage, Momuments and Public Space, Active Conservation and Sustainable Development....

  12. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry for the Nondestructive Investigation of Conservation Treatments of Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Marcello; Robotti, Elisa; Bearman, Greg; France, Fenella; Barberis, Elettra; Shor, Pnina; Marengo, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Today the long-term conservation of cultural heritage is a big challenge: often the artworks were subjected to unknown interventions, which eventually were found to be harmful. The noninvasive investigation of the conservation treatments to which they were subjected to is a crucial step in order to undertake the best conservation strategies. We describe here the preliminary results on a quick and direct method for the nondestructive identification of the various interventions of parchment by means of direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and chemometrics. The method has been developed for the noninvasive analysis of the Dead Sea Scrolls, one of the most important archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. In this study castor oil and glycerol parchment treatments, prepared on new parchment specimens, were investigated in order to evaluate two different types of operations. The method was able to identify both treatments. In order to investigate the effect of the ion source temperature on the mass spectra, the DART-MS analysis was also carried out at several temperatures. Due to the high sensitivity, simplicity, and no sample preparation requirement, the proposed analytical methodology could help conservators in the challenging analysis of unknown treatments in cultural heritage.

  13. Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry for the Nondestructive Investigation of Conservation Treatments of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Manfredi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today the long-term conservation of cultural heritage is a big challenge: often the artworks were subjected to unknown interventions, which eventually were found to be harmful. The noninvasive investigation of the conservation treatments to which they were subjected to is a crucial step in order to undertake the best conservation strategies. We describe here the preliminary results on a quick and direct method for the nondestructive identification of the various interventions of parchment by means of direct analysis in real time (DART ionization and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and chemometrics. The method has been developed for the noninvasive analysis of the Dead Sea Scrolls, one of the most important archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. In this study castor oil and glycerol parchment treatments, prepared on new parchment specimens, were investigated in order to evaluate two different types of operations. The method was able to identify both treatments. In order to investigate the effect of the ion source temperature on the mass spectra, the DART-MS analysis was also carried out at several temperatures. Due to the high sensitivity, simplicity, and no sample preparation requirement, the proposed analytical methodology could help conservators in the challenging analysis of unknown treatments in cultural heritage.

  14. Matsu Cultural Heritage and Its Conservation in Bohai Rim - Case Study on the Hall of Fujian in Yantai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, S.

    2015-08-01

    Since the Yuan Dynasty, the belief of Matsu had started to spread from the birthplace to the northern coastal areas in China. Matsu worship developed to the pinnacle with the official promotion on account of the government's dependence on grain transported by sea since the mid-Qing Dynasty. A large amount of Matsu temples emerged in coastal cities of Bohai Rim where it still keeps a large number of them until now. It has much relationship between the spread of Matsu culture and the flow of Fujian population. It was one of the main building way that the Matsu temples attached to the local hall of Fujian in Bohai Rim. The Hall of Fujian in Yantai, Which was built with materials taken from Fujian, in the feature of traditional architectural style from QuanZhou, is very different from the local building style of Yantai. This case indicates that maritime culture of the south area had spread and developed in the north areas under the promotion of the population flow and the economic transaction. The essay introduces briefly about the development of Matsu culture in Bohai Rim and takes the case study of the Hall of Fujian in Yantai analyzing its causes and features, and the value as Matsu heritage. Then the paper will discuss the conservation of Matsu culture mere include the tangible and the intangible culture heritage around the origin area, the heritages of the spread area also have the same importance significance. With the evolution of the society, it calls urgent attention and protection of Matsu culture in Bohai Rim.

  15. Nanostructure and irreversible colloidal behavior of Ca(OH)2: implications in cultural heritage conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Navarro, C; Ruiz-Agudo, E; Ortega-Huertas, M; Hansen, E

    2005-11-22

    Although Ca(OH)2 is one of the oldest art and building material used by mankind, little is known about its nanostructural and colloidal characteristics that play a crucial role in its ultimate performance as a binder in lime mortars and plasters. In particular, it is unknown why hydrated lime putty behaves as an irreversible colloid once dried. Such effect dramatically affects the reactivity and rheology of hydrated lime dispersions. Here we show that the irreversible colloidal behavior of Ca(OH)2 dispersions is the result of an oriented aggregation mechanism triggered by drying. Kinetic stability and particle size distribution analysis of oven-dried slaked lime or commercial dry hydrate dispersions exhibit a significant increase in settling speed and particle (cluster) size in comparison to slaked lime putty that has never been dried. Drying-related particle aggregation also leads to a significant reduction in surface area. Electron microscopy analyses show porous, randomly oriented, micron-sized clusters that are dominant in the dispersions both before and after drying. However, oriented aggregation of the primary Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals (approximately 60 nm in size) is also observed. Oriented aggregation occurs both before and during drying, and although limited before drying, it is extensive during drying. Nanocrystals self-assemble in a crystallographically oriented manner either along the 100 or equivalent 110 directions, or along the Ca(OH)2 basal planes, i.e., along [001]. While random aggregation appears to be reversible, oriented aggregation is not. The strong coherent bonding among oriented nanoparticles prevents disaggregation upon redispersion in water. The observed irreversible colloidal behavior associated with drying of Ca(OH)2 dispersions has important implications in heritage conservation, particularly considering that nowadays hydrated lime is often the preferred alternative to portland cement in architectural heritage conservation. Finally, our

  16. Innovation in Preserving and Conserving Book Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armida Batori

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The Istituto Centrale di Patologia del Libro (ICPL is a branch of the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities whose work is chiefly concerned with research and specialized training in the conservation and restoration of library materials. The Institute was founded in 1938 during a truly propitious period for cultural heritage in general. It was in 1939, in fact, that Law No. 1089 - 'The Safeguarding of Articles of Artistic and Historic Interest' - was issued, and in the same year the Istituto Centrale di Restauro was established under the direction of Cesare Brandi.

  17. Art phenomena and cultural heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Mahne, Nal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this diploma was to outline the curriculum of art workshops on cultural heritage, organized in gallery Krpan in Cerknica. The paper is composed of two parts. It links field of cultural heritage in connection with art planning. In the theoretical part we introduced the concept of cultural heritage, its various forms as well as its protection and preservation with our relation to cultural heritage. Further it reflects field of etnographic record connected with still usefull p...

  18. Built heritage monitoring conservation management

    CERN Document Server

    Boriani, Maurizio; Guidi, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, up-to-date overview on the most pressing issues in the conservation and management of archaeological, architectural, and urban landscapes. Multidisciplinary research is presented on a wide range of built heritage sites, from archaeological ruins and historic centers through to twentieth century and industrial architectural heritage. The role of ICT and new technologies, including those used for digital archiving, surveying, modeling, and monitoring, is extensively discussed, in recognition of their importance for professionals working in the field. Detailed attention is also paid to materials and treatments employed in preventive conservation and management. With contributions from leading experts, including university researchers, professionals, and policy makers, the book will be invaluable for all who seek to understand, and solve, the challenges faced in the protection and enhancement of the built heritage.

  19. ‘Inheriting’ our Cultural Heritage: Changes of paradigm of conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Francesco Musso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The world is quickly and deeply changing, facing new challenges in the built environment. Conservation can play a crucial role for preserving the future of the planet, not wasting but rather continuing to use (or reuse the depot of physical traces that the previous ages left us, as provisional responsible for them, in cultural ways and respectful. A crucial question rises apropos: are we really ready and able to inherit this impressive mine of knowledge, “identity” and cultural richness? We cannot in fact go on along the paths that have been traced, within the western world and culture, since more than two centuries about conservation/restoration (with all their contradictions and suggestions. We cannot behave as if nothing has changed and ignoring the problems of the contemporary societies, or like they were external to our commitments, interests and responsibilities. The key-lecture will deal with some of the main challenges that the culture of conservation (or “movement”, as someone could call it will have to face in the near future in order to survive and not to reduce itself to an ancillary role and to an un-influencing condition within the contemporary world. A particular focus will be put for this reason on the crucial role that ICT play also in this field.

  20. European cultural heritage initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Pizza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The number of countries engaged in developing global strategies for the protection and preservation of cultural heritage is continuously increasing. This is doubly significant: intrinsically for its cultural value, extrinsically for its effects on the economy, territory, environment and society. The Ministry of Education, University and Research coordinates and supports projects submitted by cultural institutes of excellence. Among the Flagship Projects of the National Research Programme 2010-2012 is the study of the sumptuous Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum. Excavations, which took place in the eighteenth century, produced many detailed documents, but 90% of the Villa remains unexplored. As part of the International Platform on space exploration, a world conference is to be held at the church of San Romano in Lucca, Italy, in which prestigious Italian and foreign structures are involved, regarding technical innovation for the protection and preservation of cultural heritage.

  1. Crowdsourcing Lost Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, E. K.; Georgopoulos, A.; Panagiotopoulos, G.; Kaliampakos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Cultural Heritage all over the world is at high risk. Natural and human activities endanger the current state of monuments and sites, whereas many of them have already been destroyed especially during the last years. Preventive actions are of utmost importance for the protection of human memory and the prevention of irreplaceable. These actions may be carried out either in situ or virtually. Very often in situ preventive, or protective or restoration actions are difficult or even impossible, as e.g. in cases of earthquakes, fires or war activity. Digital preservation of cultural heritage is a challenging task within photogrammetry and computer vision communities, as efforts are taken to collect digital data, especially of the monuments that are at high risk. Visit to the field and data acquisition is not always feasible. To overcome the missing data problem, crowdsourced imagery is used to create a visual representation of lost cultural heritage objects. Such digital representations may be 2D or 3D and definitely help preserve the memory and history of the lost heritage. Sometimes they also assist studies for their reconstruction. An initiative to collect imagery data from the public and create a visual 3D representation of a recently destroyed stone bridge almost 150 years old is being discussed in this study. To this end, a crowdsourcing platform has been designed and the first images collected have been processed with the use of SfM algorithms.

  2. The friendly heating project and the conservation of the cultural heritage preserved in churches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camuffo, Dario [National Research Council (CNR), Padua (IT). Inst. of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (ISAC)

    2011-07-01

    The buildings sector is receiving important attention in the development of sustainable energy efficiency policies. Historic buildings and churches constitute a problem because they have enormous volumes, the envelope has low efficiency and for their nature such buildings escape from the legislative framework. This paper discusses the main findings of the EU funded project Friendly-Heating. Heating only finalized to the thermal comfort of churchgoers is not compatible with conservation: the higher the comfort level, the stronger the departure from the historical climate and the higher the risk for conservation. The importance of keeping the unchanged the historical climate is stressed by the European standard EN 15757: 2010 ''Conservation of Cultural Property - Specifications for temperature and relative humidity to limit climate-induced mechanical damage in organic hygroscopic materials''. A compromise should be necessarily found between different needs, i.e. thermal comfort, artwork conservation, energy saving and cost. Thermal comfort is negatively correlated with all other needs, the others going all in the same direction. An optimisation can be found by controlling the heat dispersion: instead to heating the whole building, it is convenient to keep heat localised around the congregation and reduce dispersions as far as possible. Instead of using systems that require continuous operation, it is more convenient to use only local, occasional heating. Artworks will safely remain in their historical climate; a small quantity of heat will reach and cross the envelope, thus reducing energy consumption and cost. Churchgoers may have some heat, especially on feet and legs and heavier clothing too may be helpful to optimise the balance towards a better advantage. The above concepts have inspired the European standard EN 15759: 2011 ''Conservation of cultural property - Specification and control of indoor environment - Part 1. Heating of

  3. Scientific methods and cultural heritage an introduction to the application of materials science to archaeometry and conservation science

    CERN Document Server

    Artioli, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Artioli provides an introduction to the methods and rationales of the scientific investigation of cultural heritage materials, with an emphasis placed on the analytical strategies, modes of operation and resulting information rather than on technicalities.

  4. Development of a technique based on multi-spectral imaging for monitoring the conservation of cultural heritage objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Emilio; Manfredi, Marcello; Zerbinati, Orfeo; Robotti, Elisa; Mazzucco, Eleonora; Gosetti, Fabio; Bearman, Greg; France, Fenella; Shor, Pnina

    2011-11-14

    A new approach for monitoring the state of conservation of cultural heritage objects surfaces is being developed. The technique utilizes multi-spectral imaging, multivariate analysis and statistical process control theory for the automatic detection of a possible deterioration process, its localization and identification, and the wavelengths most sensitive to detecting this before the human eye can detect the damage or potential degradation changes occur. A series of virtual degradation analyses were performed on images of parchment in order to test the proposed algorithm in controlled conditions. The spectral image of a Dead Sea Scroll (DSS) parchment, IAA (Israel Antiquities Authority) inventory plate # 279, 4Q501 Apocryphal Lamentations B, taken during the 2008 Pilot of the DSS Digitization Project, was chosen for the simulation.

  5. APPLICATION OF THE QUALITY NORMS TO THE MONITORING AND THE PREVENTIVE CONSERVATION ANALYSIS OF THE CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Andretta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the study of the indoor microclimate has assumed increasing importance, especially for the problems associated with the conservation of the cultural heritage housed in museums, galleries and libraries. In this paper, we describe the most important national standards relative to the procedures for the measurements and the analysis of the environmental conditions regarding the preservation of the works of art. These methods are related to the measurement techniques, which have to be applied for monitoring and analyzing the microclimatic conditions of museums, galleries and archives; these norms report, also, the threshold reference values for optimal climatic conditions. Furthermore, we present some considerations on the importance and on the foundations of the proposed scientific/methodological approaches. Finally, we have done a reasoned analysis on some reference values reported by the international regulations with some considerations on the possible chemical/physical mechanisms of degradation of the valuable objects.

  6. Cultural Heritage communication technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ippoliti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This magazine issue is about the relationship between digital techniques and the communication of cultural heritage and specifically aims at portraying how the interest and implications of these two things are widespread. Without trying to go too in depth, various points of view have been compared, each taken from different articles presenting a wide range of possible approaches on the subject of creating a wealth of information on cultural heritage and how it can be made available to the public without difficulty. Therefore, this issue wants to create a forum for a many-sided comparison built on a wealth of experience and opinions of different authors. In this way the abundance and versatility of the contributing professions (architects, archaeologists, engineers, mathematicians, graphic designers, artists, video producers, digital experts, 3D graphic designers, critics, directors, etc. has given life to a precious blend of know-how, which is without doubt enhanced by present-day digital technology.

  7. Notes on the relation between rails and cultural and architectural heritage conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mauro

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The railways, like all other types of linear transport infrastructures (highways, motorways, waterways, pipelines, power lines, etc., and even sheep tracks in our not to distant past cross the country and interact with the environment. More often than not, this interaction due to transport modalities has a “negative” connotation because of the impact on the environment of the infrastructure as such and associated effects due to: noise and vibrations, atmospheric pollution, emission of greenhouse gases, accidents, and traffic congestion. If we analyse the effects of the various transport modalities in terms of their comparative external costs (the social and economic costs of the environmental impact, we can see that, from a quantitative point of view, the railways are the most ecologically compatible modality. This kind of analysis should be improved by taking into consideration other effects such as those due to land use, fragmentation of landscape, and effects on the cultural and architectural heritage. To illustrate this approach, the birth and early period of railways in the city of Roma and in the Roman Campagna, and the evolution of the great station of Roma Termini, are briefly reviewed and discussed. In this way, important elements are evidenced; inter alia: the continuing interaction in such a historically ancient urban and suburban settlement due to transport infrastructures (from ancient Roman roads and aqueducts to modern motorways and railways; the large variety of architectural and archaeological structures (including the artistic and landscaping aspects affected by the interaction; the frequent occurrence of architectonic objects marking the urban landscape in a such a way that the site appears peculiarly recognizable (for instance, the Servian Walls Aggere for the central station of Roma Termini. Finally, the archaeological sites discovered during the construction works of new High Speed Train (TAV lines are briefly

  8. Authenticity and conservation state of art works: the market and auction houses & Presentation of the historical-technical Journal “Conservation Science in Cultural Heritage"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The title Authenticity and conservation state of art works: The market and auction houses mirrors the particular status of confusion and instability in which the auction houses – find themselves – nowadays. It is an international situation of existential and economic crisis in which humanity appears to be excited and schizophrenic. This lecture is part of a series all dedicated to various aspects of art, with a particular focus on the great Italian artist Giorgio Morandi. A good selection of his works is currently displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Giorgio Morandi conceived art as a “practice of silence”, where his “still life” functioned as a filter to observe the world outside his small cloistered art studio. By emphasizing the importance of weight and gravity with grace and attention, this artist can therefore teach us how important it is to judge a piece of art not only subjectively – giving greatest relevance to the satisfaction of individual aesthetical standards – but also objectively – where the techniques and the materials utilized assume the greatest significance. This allows the estimator to estimate correctly their economic and financial value. The second part of the lecture consists in the presentation of the historical-technical journal Conservation Science in Cultural Heritage. It represents an emblematic gathering of experts, symbolizing therefore a necessary encounter among people with different cultural backgrounds, experiences and skills. They meet to address and discuss issues related to their common field of study, the Cultural Heritage sector. This jolts, as it can be imagined, American art critics. They often lack social criticism showing them to be too focused on aesthetics and elegance of form. The consequent question arises: is this really true?

  9. Geospatial database for heritage building conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basir, W. N. F. W. A.; Setan, H.; Majid, Z.; Chong, A.

    2014-02-01

    Heritage buildings are icons from the past that exist in present time. Through heritage architecture, we can learn about economic issues and social activities of the past. Nowadays, heritage buildings are under threat from natural disaster, uncertain weather, pollution and others. In order to preserve this heritage for the future generation, recording and documenting of heritage buildings are required. With the development of information system and data collection technique, it is possible to create a 3D digital model. This 3D information plays an important role in recording and documenting heritage buildings. 3D modeling and virtual reality techniques have demonstrated the ability to visualize the real world in 3D. It can provide a better platform for communication and understanding of heritage building. Combining 3D modelling with technology of Geographic Information System (GIS) will create a database that can make various analyses about spatial data in the form of a 3D model. Objectives of this research are to determine the reliability of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) technique for data acquisition of heritage building and to develop a geospatial database for heritage building conservation purposes. The result from data acquisition will become a guideline for 3D model development. This 3D model will be exported to the GIS format in order to develop a database for heritage building conservation. In this database, requirements for heritage building conservation process are included. Through this research, a proper database for storing and documenting of the heritage building conservation data will be developed.

  10. An Interdisciplinary Conservation Module for Condition Survey on Cultural Heritages with a 3d Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedelì, C.

    2013-07-01

    In order to make the most of the digital outsourced documents, based on new technologies (e.g.: 3D LASER scanners, photogrammetry, etc.), a new approach was followed and a new ad hoc information system was implemented. The obtained product allow to the final user to reuse and manage the digital documents providing graphic tools and an integrated specific database to manage the entire documentation and conservation process, starting from the condition assessment until the conservation / restoration work. The system is organised on two main modules: Archaeology and Conservation. This paper focus on the features and the advantages of the second one. In particular it is emphasized its logical organisation, the possibility to easily mapping by using a very precise 3D metric platform, to benefit of the integrated relational database which allows to well organise, compare, keep and manage different kind of information at different level. Conservation module can manage along the time the conservation process of a site, monuments, object or excavation and conservation work in progress. An alternative approach called OVO by the author of this paper, force the surveyor to observe and describe the entity decomposing it on functional components, materials and construction techniques. Some integrated tools as the "ICOMOS-ISCS Illustrated glossary … " help the user to describe pathologies with a unified approach and terminology. Also the conservation project phase is strongly supported to envision future intervention and cost. A final section is devoted to record the conservation/restoration work already done or in progress. All information areas of the conservation module are interconnected to each other to allows to the system a complete interchange of graphic and alphanumeric data. The conservation module it self is connected to the archaeological one to create an interdisciplinary daily tool.

  11. CONSERVATION PROCESS MODEL (CPM): A TWOFOLD SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH SCOPE IN THE INFORMATION MODELLING FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. Fiorani; M. Acierno

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to develop an instrument able to adequately support the conservation process by means of a twofold approach, based on both BIM environment and ontology formalisation...

  12. 77 FR 38317 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background...

  13. 76 FR 3155 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed...

  14. 78 FR 42104 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed...

  15. 77 FR 74864 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting.... App., we announce that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a...

  16. 75 FR 57292 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed...

  17. 77 FR 15386 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background...

  18. Nanoparticles for cultural heritage conservation: calcium and barium hydroxide nanoparticles for wall painting consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Rodorico; Ambrosi, Moira; Toccafondi, Nicola; Baglioni, Piero

    2010-08-16

    Nanotechnology provides new concepts and materials for the consolidation and protection of wall paintings. In particular, humble calcium and barium hydroxide nanoparticles offer a versatile and highly efficient tool to combat the main degradation processes altering wall paintings. Clear example of the efficacy and potentiality of nanotechnology is represented by the conservation in situ of Maya wall paintings in the archaeological area in Calakmul (Mexico).

  19. Urban cultural landscapes, opportunity for the conservation of heritage and the sustainable tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Antonio Zárate Martín

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the relevance of the “urban views” and of the “inner urban scenes” as motivation for the tourist visit of the historical cities and the necessity to develop strategies for its putting in value like tourist product. The “urban cultural landscapes” would generate wealth and employment, and, therefore, they would be an alternative to policies that put the intensives uses of the ground in front to considerations of identity and cultural type. That will be the only way to stop the threats that overfly the urban cultural landscapes, in spite of we are far from the periods of fast population increase and strong urbanization like was the 1960 years and the second half of the 1990 until 2007.

  20. Data and interpretation: enhancing conservation of art and cultural heritage through collaboration between scientist, conservator, and art historian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jo-Fan

    2012-07-01

    Conservation practices can be greatly enhanced and influenced by scientific analysis and art historical insights. In the same respect, scientific data can be contextualized and substantiated by findings from visual examination and historical research. Such collaboration can contribute to the field of conservation in multiple ways: by assisting the conservator to investigate treatment options, discover artists' materials and techniques, determine date of manufacture, and investigate conservation treatment materials. Several technical studies conducted by the author and her collaborators employed micro-x-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), Raman Spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). These techniques were used on the following previously published projects such as a Japanese painting at the Museum of Fine Arts at Boston, Thai manuscripts at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum at Harvard University, and Chinese export paintings on pith at the Winterthur Museum. Although these studies have been published in the past, they are worthy examples to illustrate how collaborations between conservator, scientist, and art historian complement one another. This presentation will also touch upon ethics in sampling of fine art materials and several online databases such as Infrared and Raman User Group (IRUG) and Conservation and Art Materials Encyclopedia Online (CAMEO), which have proven to be very helpful in the field of conservation.

  1. Development of neutron imaging quantitative data treatment to assess conservation products in cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realini, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Conti, Claudia; Grazzi, Francesco; Perelli Cippo, Enrico; Hovind, Jan

    2017-08-14

    Distribution, penetration depth and amount of new mineralogical phases formed after the interaction between an inorganic treatment and a matrix are key factors for the evaluation of the conservation treatment behaviour. Nowadays, the conventional analytical methodologies, such as vibrational spectroscopies, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, provide only qualitative and spot information. Here, we report, for the first time, the proof of concept of a methodology based on neutron imaging able to achieve quantitative data useful to assess the formation of calcium oxalate in a porous carbonatic stone treated with ammonium oxalate. Starting from the neutron attenuation coefficient of Noto stone-treated specimens, the concentrations of newly formed calcium oxalate and the diffusion coefficient have been calculated for both sound and decayed substrates. These outcomes have been also used for a comparative study between different treatment modalities. Graphical abstract Horizontal slice at 300 mm depth and CaOx molar density profile by NEUTRA output.

  2. Innovative systems for cultural heritage conservation. Millimeter wave application for non-invasive monitoring and treatment of works of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Bisceglia; De Leo, Roberto; Pastore, Anna Pia; von Gratowski, Svetlana; Meriakri, Viatcheslav

    2011-01-01

    A novel non invasive technique and a suitable apparatus for disinfestation of artworks is introduced. Non destructive and non invasive techniques are often irreplaceable in order to preserve and restore cultural heritage objects in its structure and shape. Although many techniques are available for art and archaeological works the non invasive methods are preferred as they leave the object untouched after treatment. Environmental parameters, such as humidity, can damage culture heritage objects and also results in spring up variety of pests and other micro-organisms. Non-invasive monitoring of these damage and also disinfestation treatments and drying with help of electromagnetic waves are preferred as they keep the object untouched after treatment. Application of millimeter waves for solving this problem is discussed here. Millimeter waves have high spatial resolution and absorption in water as well as in bio-objects that are usually moist and at the same time minimal interaction with dry culture heritage objects by itself. Different phases of the microwaves treatment (MW) of artworks are described, some results are shown and discussed. Many biological forms don't survive over a certain temperature, called lethal temperature which, for most xylophages is about 53-55 degrees C, while for moulds and funguses is between 65 and 70 degrees C. In order to evaluate the management of disinfestation of works of art, incident power, temperature, exposure time were monitored. The monitoring of temperature is essential in order to prevent damages. A computer simulation allows to predict and monitor the heating process.

  3. Micro-layers of polystyrene film preventing metal oxidation: implications in cultural heritage conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambi, Francesca; Carretti, Emiliano; Dei, Luigi; Baglioni, Piero

    2014-12-01

    Protection of surfaces directly exposed to the detrimental action of degradative agents (i.e. oxygen, air pollutants and bacteria) is one of the most important challenges in the field of conservation of works of art. Metallic objects are subjected to specific surface corrosion phenomena that, over the years, make mandatory the research of innovative materials that should avoid the direct contact between the metal surface and the weathering agents. In this paper, the set-up, characterisation and application of a new reversible material for preserving metal artefacts are reported. Micro-layers constituted of low-adhesive polystyrene (PS) films obtained from recycling waste packaging materials made of expanded PS were studied. The morphology and thickness of PS films were characterised by optical, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A further check on thickness was carried out by means of visible spectrophotometry doping the films with a hydrophobic dye. Thermal properties of the PS micro-layers were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry coupled with optical microscopy. Permeability of the PS films to water vapour was also determined. The potential of the low-adhesive PS films, that enabled an easy removal in case of film deterioration, for preventing metal oxidation was investigated on brass specimens by simulating standard artificial corrosion programmes. Morphological and chemical (coupling the energy-dispersive X-rays spectrometry to SEM measurements) analyses carried out on these metal samples showed promising results in terms of surface protection against corrosion.

  4. Applied microbiology and biotechnology in the conservation of stone cultural heritage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P

    2006-11-01

    The contribution of applied microbiology and biotechnology for the preservation and restoration of culturally relevant stoneworks has been used only to a minor extent. Until recently it only involved the identification of the living organisms accountable for the deterioration of those materials by classic phenotypic identification methods. This seems to be changing, given the amount of work recently published that focuses in the introduction of molecular-based techniques for the detection of microorganisms in historic stone. Such techniques complement and expand the information up till now gathered by conventional identification methods. Along with this, efforts are being made to develop and implement bio-based methodologies that may actively contribute to the bioremediation of weathered historic stoneworks. The present mini-review aims to provide an overview of recent findings on these matters.

  5. Drawing & Design for Cultural Heritage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Amoruso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Design for cultural heritage includes theories, methodologies, and design techniques which encompasses the system of cultural heritage in its broadest sense addressing the cognitive, social and symbolic meaning for a territory and a community. Traditionally the representation disciplines are able to converse with the multiple fields of industrial design expertise proposing “interpretative models” for the analysis and representation of historical, cultural, aesthetic and environmental significance of cultural heritage and of its tangible and intangible issues. Strategy of valorization, such as explanation of the value of heritage, consists of the mapping of these values: 3D modeling, representation and multimedia. Representation become a mean for structured knowledge and flexible but also to configure the forms of innovation through the creative potential of Industrial Design.

  6. Cultural heritage of astronomical observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    2011-06-01

    We present the results of the ICOMOS international symposium ``Cultural Heritage of Astronomical Observatories (around 1900) - From Classical Astronomy to Modern Astrophysics'' (Oct. 2008). The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relevance of modern observatories to the cultural heritage of humankind and to select partner observatories which, due to the date of their construction or to their architectural or scientific importance are comparable to Hamburg Observatory, as international cooperation partners for a serial trans-national application.

  7. Digital preservation technology for cultural heritage

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Mingquan; Wu, Zhongke

    2012-01-01

    ""Digital Preservation Technology for Cultural Heritage"" discusses the technology and processes in digital preservation of cultural heritage. It covers topics in five major areas: Digitization of cultural heritage; Digital management in the cultural heritage preservation; Restoration techniques for rigid solid relics; Restoration techniques for paintings; Digital museum. It also includes application examples for digital preservation of cultural heritage. The book is intended for researchers, advanced undergraduate and graduate students in Computer Graphics and Image Processing as well as Cu

  8. Bim for Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, M.; Osello, A.

    2013-07-01

    When you think about the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) Industry people tend to refers to new buildings, but nowadays the recovery of existing ones is increasingly the subject of the research. The current historical context raises this issue at the center of numerous thought due both to economic and environmental conditions. So, the need to refurbish the cultural heritage is becoming more important than the construction of new buildings. Modern technologies allow professionals to do this to turn the buildings into structures capable to meet the users' confort with a considerable energy saving. Italy is trying to make a change to the construction industry through the national InnovANCE project, which aims to develop the first national database able to share information among professionals through the help of Building Information Modeling (BIM). In this way the subject involved in a construction process can update their way of working, with a consequent time and cost saving. This paper aims to present the way in which the InnovANCE project can be considered as the key for Italy to change the way to conceive the building industry, using a case study such as the old thermal power of Politecnico di Torino, starting from the survey step. The methodology followed to obtain the 3D model will be described, starting from the data of a topographic and a laser scanner survey and from an archival documents research.

  9. Oenotourism and conservation: a holistic approach to special interest tourism from a cultural heritage perspective - the Azienda Agricola Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor Nemethy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In wine producing countries viticultural and oenological practices and traditions, trades and crafts, the built and written heritage, the history, social structures, economy, a number of intangible values and the viticultural landscape constitute the cultural heritage of a wine region. Thus, the touristic products of oenotourism are complex attractions with a substantial number of educational elements, such as on-site wine appreciation courses, organized wine excursions on well known wine routes, wine festivals, international sommelier days or agro-tourism in wine estates where tourists may have the opportunity to participate in the harvest and learn more about the wine making process. The main target groups of wine-tourism consist of educated, mostly middle aged people with reasonably good economy and a clear intention to learn more about the culture and history of the country and its viticultural areas in an informal, entertaining way. An increasing number of vintners expand their agribusiness with a complete product structure such as grape seed oil, grappa, fruit juice, cheese, olive oil, food supplements produced from grapes, accommodation facilities from bed and breakfast to hotels and restaurants, creating herewith ideal conditions for tourism, often utilizing the network of completing, additional tourist attractions in the neighbourhood. Special attention shall be paid to the organic viticulture and wine production based on the maintenance of ecological cycles in the vineyard, because it can be the basis of eco-wine tourism, and even wine-heritage tourism due to the revival of certain traditional cultivation methods, trades and crafts linked to the historical routes of the wine industry. In this study we analyze the main aspects of wine-heritage and the terroir as source for touristic product development and propose a model for micro-region based sustainable oenoturism and eco-oenotourism with increasing economical viability.

  10. The project Salvalarte respira pulito: a multidisciplinary operative tool for the conservation and use of Cultural Heritage in Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbaro

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns the description of the contents and of the methods of the project “SALVALARTE respira pulito” (“SAVE ART and breathe clean air” promoted by Legambiente, ARPA and the Regional Center for the Project and the Restoration of the Region Sicily, in cooperation with the University of Palermo. The goal of the project was to analyze and collect information on the condition of the cultural heritage in Sicily. The purpose of the goal was both to provide guidelines for the safeguard, the promotion and the correct use of cultural sites, adopting a more scientific approach of the problem which would be divided in three phases: detection and cataloging of the cultural heritage at risk, monitoring of a significant sample of monuments that might represent the whole nation, and finally diffusion of the results. The activities carried out in 2003 enabled the definition of an optimal monitoring procedure. The main test of validation of the survey and analysis methodology was executed considering Corso V Emanuele in Palermo as case-study, since it is where many and important monumental elements and structures are located.

  11. The World Heritage and cultural landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Landscapes have a range of values that communities recognize as important and want to conserve. Cultural and natural values are the qualities which make a place or landscape important. In particular, we can consider Cultural Landscapes an important and constitutional part of the World Heritage. It is fundamental that stakeholders must know what values are to be found in their cultural landscapes and consequently reinforce the protection and enhancement of the values. The attempt to help the awareness is presented in the paper and discussed as an UNESCO instrument of observation, retention and pro-active conservation of the heritage of our past, as institutional to the formation of continuity in the future years to come and for the future generations. Finally, one case study is also illustrated as a very good example of effective values-based management

  12. NIGERIAN CULTURAL HERITAGE: PRESERVATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dean SPGS NAU

    consist of inter related parts which work for the integration and stability of the .... colonial civil servants such as K.C. Murray who was an art teacher,. B. E. Bernard ..... establishment and maintenance of museums and for discovery of heritage ...

  13. Cultural Research and Intangible Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheenagh Pietrobruno

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Intangible heritage deemed worthy of preservation is often regarded as traditional culture that reflects the identity of a particular nation or group. Traditional cultures are distinct from commercial forms, which are transmitted and promoted via businesses, commercial establishments, and media. Research on culture reveals the way that a large part of the world's intangible heritage includes practices that interweave tradition and commodification as well as blur the boundaries between nations. As these practices do not fit into the clear categories of "traditional" or "national", they may not be considered for preservation in official project documents such as the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (2003, by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO. Many of these practices are being, nonetheless, stored today through the unofficial archiving of moving images on the Internet, facilitated by Web 2.0. Through the case studies of various Caribbean performing arts, this paper illustrates how cultural research can provide a comprehensive understanding of intangible culture in both its lived and digital contexts, knowledge that in turn challenges the process of categorization and the measures of preservation of intangible heritage proposed by UNESCO.

  14. Language Technology for Cultural Heritage

    CERN Document Server

    Sporleder, Caroline; Zervanou, Kalliopi

    2011-01-01

    The digital age has had a profound effect on our cultural heritage and the academic research that studies it. Staggering amounts of objects, many of them of a textual nature, are being digitised to make them more readily accessible to both experts and laypersons. Besides a vast potential for more effective and efficient preservation, management, and presentation, digitisation offers opportunities to work with cultural heritage data in ways that were never feasible or even imagined. To explore and exploit these possibilities, an interdisciplinary approach is needed, bringing together experts fr

  15. 78 FR 48460 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: 1. Benefit wildlife resources; 2. Encourage...

  16. 78 FR 25463 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: 1. Benefit wildlife resources;...

  17. 77 FR 16051 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Office of the Secretary Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Office of the... Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). The Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that (a) benefit wildlife resources; (b) encourage partnership among the...

  18. 77 FR 57577 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: 1. Benefit wildlife resources; 2. Encourage...

  19. 78 FR 73205 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: 1. Benefit wildlife resources;...

  20. 77 FR 31636 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: 1. Benefit...

  1. Cultural Heritage in a Digital Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte

    Advanced digital technologies and shifting paradigms of communication are challenging contemporary cultural heritage institutions to provide new forms of representations and experiences that include modern consumers as active co-creators in, rather than passive consumers of, cultural heritage com...

  2. Great Importance Attached to Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Intangible Cultural Heritage on Verge of Extinction? With the acceleration of globalization and modernization, dramatic changes have taken place in China's cultural ecology: intangible cultural heritage is confronted with great challenges and a lot of orally and behaviorally transmitted cultural heritage disappear one after another; a great deal of traditional craftsmanship is on the verge of extinction; a large number of precious objects and materials of historical and cultural values are destroyed,deserted or lost in foreign countries; arbitrary misuse and excessive exploitation of intangible cultural heritage occur from time to time. Therefore, the protection of intangible cultural heritage brooks no delay.

  3. Diversity and Taxonomy in Cultural Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Myridis, N. E.

    2012-01-01

    The discipline of Cultural Heritage is nowadays developing very well. Moreover, the field of Cultural Heritage Preservation is also developing well. The necessity of well-organized taxonomy and classification now seems to be an outstanding significant topic. The scope of this paper regards such taxonomy; more precisely, it proposes this kind of taxonomy. The final products of this paper are the Diagram of Cultural Heritage & its Preservation and the Universal Cultural Heritage & Preservation ...

  4. Between Planning and Heritage: Cultural Parks and National Heritage Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso González, Pablo; Macías Vázquez, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The number of cultural parks and heritage areas is increasing in Europe and the United States. Those are spreading over other areas where the economic sectors related to tourism and leisure gain weight. Heritage areas or parks are heterogeneous initiatives that place cultural heritage at the heart of spatial planning policy and economic development, aiming at the reinvention of large territories and local community participation in planning. Their relevance stems from their potential influenc...

  5. Social quality in the conservation process of living heritage sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kong, P.

    2008-01-01

    The "UNESCO World Heritage Convention" was ratificated on November 16, 1972. Since then, both public and private sectors around the world have attached growing importance to the safeguarding and conservation of selected cultural and natural "objects", focusing on physical characteristics. World

  6. Information retrieval in cultural heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, M.; Kamps, J.; de Keijzer, V.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the opportunities and challenges of applying modern information retrieval techniques to the cultural heritage domain. Although the field of information retrieval is closely associated with computer science, it originally emerged from library science — also one of the main disc

  7. Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Norhasimah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is experiencing an incredible pace of tourism development and heritage tourism is one of the tourism branches that have long contributed to appeal the tourist destination and acts as important marketing tool to attract tourist especially with special interests in heritage and arts. Cultural heritage tourism has emerged as a potential form of alternative tourism among both international tourists as well as Malaysian domestic travelers. The difference of ethnics present in Malaysia brought different local knowledge discipline ranging from its architecture, handicrafts, traditional attire, music and dance, which reflects a colorful heritage and an amalgamated culture. There are arise of conflict in management of cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia face by tourism managers, stakeholders, governments, cultural heritage managers and local community itself. In order to maintain, conserve and preserve the resources and assets of cultural heritage in Malaysia, a system or management need to be develop that take into consideration on every issues and challenge, so that the decision making process is reliable to optimize the value of cultural heritage tourism industry in Malaysia. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview and discuss the status, issues and challenge of cultural heritage tourism in Malaysia.

  8. Introducing Urban Cultural Heritage Management into Urban Planning Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>1. Concept comparison of urban cultural heritage management and urban planning management 1.1 Urban cultural heritage managementUrban cultural heritage management is an important component of cultural heritage management which is a systematic conser-vation to maintain the cultural value of cul-tural heritages so as to meet the enjoyment demand of the current or future generations. At present, the cultural heritage conserva-tion principles have been defined by many worldwide laws or charters, such as the Venice Charter of ICOMOS, the UNESCO World Heritage Convention, etc., and have been brought into legislation or policies in many countries. The fi nal goal of urban cul-tural heritage management is to find a real sustainable approach to manage heritages, which could benefit the heritages them-selves, the heritage managers and the local communities as well. Cultural heritage man-agement includes the management of urban cultural heritages, that of natural heritages in non-urban areas and that of intangible cultural heritages.1.2 Urban planning managementUrban planning management is a type of urban management. From the practical viewpoint, urban management should be an overall management which includes urban planning management, urban infrastructure and public facility management, urban en-vironment and public order management, etc., takes urban infrastructures and public resources as management object, and ischaracterized by the goal of exerting the comprehensive effects of economy, society and environment. While from the techni-cal viewpoint, urban planning management refers to the planning management executed by urban governments based on the relevant laws and regulations, including the manage-ment of urban land-use and that of different types of constructions. It actually means the organizing, guiding, controlling and coordinating process focusing on different construction projects in cities. The urban cultural heritage mentioned here includes all the physical

  9. 77 FR 10543 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Office of the Secretary Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Charter AGENCY: Office of the... Secretary of Agriculture have renewed the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council..., providing recommendations for: (a) Implementing the Recreational Hunting and Wildlife Resource...

  10. 77 FR 4575 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February...

  11. 76 FR 30192 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App., we announce that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation...

  12. 76 FR 66955 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February...

  13. The Future of Palestinian Cultural Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Lynn; Boytner, Ran

    2010-01-01

    The future of cultural heritage in the Middle East ought to concern all who are interested in human cultural heritage, whether that interest lies in archaeology, architecture and the built environment, and/or traditional cultural practices. The WAC Inter-Congress in Ramallah in August, 2009 provided a much-needed platform for the discussion of the present and future treatment of Palestinian cultural heritage. The location of the conference enabled participation by a much broader range of Pale...

  14. The University of Alcala de Henares (madrid, Spain), as a Dynamic Example and Laboratory of the Recovery, Rehabilitation, and Conservation of the Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría Valiente, E.; da Casa Martín, F.; Celis D'amicoa, F.; Navarro, P. C.

    2013-07-01

    Cardinal Cisneros launched in 1499 a major universitary project, that was located in Alcala de Henares (Madrid, Spain). It bestowed recently the recognition of the Council of Europe as a World Heritage Site in 1998 by UNESCO. Cisneros created the new university in the vicinity of the Roman town of Complutum. This site had two qualities which were particularly important: it was placed at a safe distance from the power of the Crown at Toledo, and it was well connected with other main Spanish cities, through the Roman road or calzada that crossed the Iberian peninsula from South to North going along some important settlements as Mérida, Toledo, Zaragoza, and Barcelona. Thus the old town of Alcala de Henares still keeps the remains of the Visigothic, Roman, Muslim and Hebrew cultures. Since the end of the fifteenth century the built Renaissance complex has gone through three clear stages, where lots of relevant architects developed their work. Among them, Pedro Gumiel and Rodrigo Gil de Hontañón can be cited for their first drawings, but other anonymous architects have also contributed to build such an interesting project. In a second stage some repairs were needed on the former structures, in order to adapt them to their new functions due to deterioration or even to changes in ownership or uses (as happened to the Colegio Mayor de San Ildefonso). Finally, at the latest stage at the end of the 20th and the early 21st centuries a new regeneration project took place in order to introduce the modern technologies and energy-efficient standards the old universitary buildings. An interesting example of this modern practices on dynamic conservation of the historical heritage is the new Learning and Research Center (LRC) on the ruins of San Diego headquarter built in 1859 on the site of the Franciscan convent of Santa Maria de Jesus, founded in 1445 by Archbishop Alonso Carrillo (which in turn it replaced an earlier one). The aims of the new LRC are to, preserve and

  15. Necessity of “Historic Cultural Heritage and Conservation” Course in Interior Architecture Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atalan, Özlem; Sevinç, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    .... Architectural education is considered to be a complex process. Teaching the historical cultural heritage and conservation of historic structures constitutes an important part of architectural education...

  16. Cultural Heritage exposed to landslide and flood risk in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzichino, Daniele; Cacace, Carlo; Iadanza, Carla; Trigila, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Italy is the country that owns most of the world cultural heritage as it's clear from the list of sites of inestimable value to humanity, prepared by UNESCO under the Convention concerning the protection of the world cultural and natural heritage ratified in 1972. The Italian territory is also particularly prone to natural hazards such as landslides, floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, subsidence and coastal erosion which undermine the protection and preservation of cultural heritage. Aim of the present work is to provide an estimate of architectural, monumental and archaeological heritage exposed to landslide and flood risk at national scale. The input data are: the Italian Cultural Heritage database (Carta del Rischio del patrimonio culturale) realized by ISCR (Central Institute for the Conservation and Restoration); the Italian Landslide Inventory (Progetto IFFI) developed by ISPRA (Italian National Institute for Environmental Protection and Research) and the Regions and Self-Governing Provinces of Italy and the flood hazard zones defined by the Italian River Basin Authorities. Italian landslide inventory contains more than 486,000 landslides affecting an area of about 20,800 km2, equal to 6.9% of Italian territory. In order to estimate the number and type of cultural heritage at risk some GIS processing have been carried out, overlapping information from the above mentioned databases. The analysis provided the following results: Cultural Heritage exposed to landslide risk were estimated to 5.511 (6.6%) while the ones exposed to flood risk results 9.859 (11.7%). Two case studies concerning landslide phenomena affecting important Italian municipalities and the flood risk of historical centre of Rome, have been also analyzed. These results could be used to identify priorities and plan field surveys, detailed studies and monitoring systems, allowing job scheduling of cultural heritage maintenance. This need becomes more and more a necessity taking into account

  17. D Photographs in Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kiel, St.

    2013-07-01

    This paper on providing "oo-information" (= objective object-information) on cultural monuments and sites, based on 3D photographs is also a contribution of CIPA task group 3 to the 2013 CIPA Symposium in Strasbourg. To stimulate the interest in 3D photography for scientists as well as for amateurs, 3D-Masterpieces are presented. Exemplary it is shown, due to their high documentary value ("near reality"), 3D photography support, e.g. the recording, the visualization, the interpretation, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. This also includes samples for excavation documentation, 3D coordinate calculation, 3D photographs applied for virtual museum purposes and as educational tools. In addition 3D photography is used for virtual museum purposes, as well as an educational tool and for spatial structure enhancement, which in particular holds for inscriptions and in rock arts. This paper is also an invitation to participate in a systematic survey on existing international archives of 3D photographs. In this respect it is also reported on first results, to define an optimum digitization rate for analog stereo views. It is more than overdue, in addition to the access to international archives for 3D photography, the available 3D photography data should appear in a global GIS(cloud)-system, like on, e.g., google earth. This contribution also deals with exposing new 3D photographs to document monuments of importance for Cultural Heritage, including the use of 3D and single lense cameras from a 10m telescope staff, to be used for extremely low earth based airborne 3D photography, as well as for "underwater staff photography". In addition it is reported on the use of captive balloon and drone platforms for 3D photography in Cultural Heritage. It is liked to emphasize, the still underestimated 3D effect on real objects even allows, e.g., the spatial perception of extremely small scratches as well as of nuances in color differences

  18. Cultural Routes and Intangible Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Zabbini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical interpretation of thematic routes helps to predict the effects on the territories visited by cultured tourists who want to enrich their cultural and emotional baggage. After the analysis of some interpretations, this paper will examine how the practical implementation of an itinerary approved by the Council of Europe has evolved over the years. And it will also reflect on the practical results in the areas involved in that project. "The Hannibal Pathway ", the main overland walk on the "Phoenician Route - Cultural Route recognized by the Council of Europe" – represents a case of study that allows to reflect over the impact of cultural tourism based on immaterial heritage. In fact, in the areas where the battle of 21 June 217 BC took place, nothing tangible is left, except the landscape that has kept its conformation intact. In these areas, thanks to the foresight of the local governments in the last three decades, the landscape of the plain has been preserved. This makes possible today to propose an historical path precisely based on the landscape and on the new techniques for the valorization of the heritage. In the Tuoro plain it is possible to see the battlefields, thus retracing the various stages of the battle, supported by the Documentation Centre of the Capra Palace and virtual reconstructions of high technical quality.

  19. Adapting Intangible Cultural Heritage to Economic Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan; Sun Yongjian

    2006-01-01

    @@ Regarding the relationship between intangible cultural heritage and intellectual property rights (IPRs), China's Foreign Trade exclusively interviewed Dr. Jur. Wei Zhi, associate professor at Peking University Law School.

  20. Documentation of Cultural Heritage Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Grobovšek

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:The first and important phase of documentation of cultural heritage objects is to understand which objects need to be documented. The entire documentation process is determined by the characteristics and scope of the cultural heritage object. The next question to be considered is the expected outcome of the documentation process and the purpose for which it will be used. These two essential guidelines determine each stage of the documentation workflow: the choice of the most appropriate data capturing technology and data processing method, how detailed should the documentation be, what problems may occur, what the expected outcome is, what it will be used for, and the plan for storing data and results. Cultural heritage objects require diverse data capturing and data processing methods. It is important that even the first stages of raw data capturing are oriented towards the applicability of results. The selection of the appropriate working method can facilitate the data processing and the preparation of final documentation. Documentation of paintings requires different data capturing method than documentation of buildings or building areas. The purpose of documentation can also be the preservation of the contemporary cultural heritage to posterity or the basis for future projects and activities on threatened objects. Documentation procedures should be adapted to our needs and capabilities. Captured and unprocessed data are lost unless accompanied by additional analyses and interpretations. Information on tools, procedures and outcomes must be included into documentation. A thorough analysis of unprocessed but accessible documentation, if adequately stored and accompanied by additional information, enables us to gather useful data. In this way it is possible to upgrade the existing documentation and to avoid data duplication or unintentional misleading of users. The documentation should be archived safely and in a way to meet

  1. Cultural Mapping of the Heritage Districts in Medan, North Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, I.; Ratna; Sitorus, R.; Affan, M.

    2017-03-01

    Medan as one of the historical towns in Indonesia is rich with architectural and urban heritages; however, there still has no integrated plan to safeguard them. This paper discusses the cultural mapping of the seven heritage conservation districts in the city of Medan. It focuses on exploring the process and challenges of the study from the initial step of data collections to the building of the cultural maps with web based GIS. Multi-method of data collection tactics or triangulation such as field survey, interviews was done to cover the cultural data resources including both tangible (or quantitative) and intangible (or qualitative). Participation of the local community is essential to identify mainly the intangibles one. Based on the preliminary analysis of the seven heritage districts in Medan city, Merdeka-Kesawan area had whole categories of the cultural assets and resources compared to other six heritage areas. Consequently, it influences the enhancement its cultural heritage significance. By using our methods, we emphasized the importance of the cultural mapping in preparing the conservation policies and strategies of the seven heritage districts in Medan.

  2. Understanding cultural heritage experts’ information seeking needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K. Amin (Alia); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); L. Hardman (Lynda); A. van Nispen

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractWe report on our user study on the information seeking behavior of cultural heritage experts and the sources they use to carry out search tasks. Seventeen experts from nine cultural heritage institutes in the Netherlands were interviewed and asked to answer questionnaires about their

  3. A Holistic Conserving Approach on Heritage of the Grand Canal,China:Cultural Values Assessment of the Canal Under Historical Context of Jiangnan Civilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development process of the Jiangnan Civilization under the specific condition of the Yangtze River Delta,where numerous rivers and waterways have worked together as a natural and cultural matrix of the canal for thousands of years.To preserve it as a heritage,it is crucial to recognize that the local civilization has very much benefited from the flourishing natural and artificial network of waterways that is an indivisible part of the Grand Canal.This significant characteristic makes the canal as a heritage different from the present concept of "cultural route."

  4. 76 FR 17442 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference AGENCY... February 2010, the Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: (a... public, the sporting conservation community, the shooting and hunting sports industry,...

  5. 76 FR 12130 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference AGENCY... February 2010, the Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: (a... public, the sporting conservation community, the shooting and hunting sports industry,...

  6. Monitoring of Vibrations for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage the Case of the Summer Palace in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.; Zhang, L.; Liu, G.; Ba, Z.

    2017-08-01

    In order to research the influence of the environmental vibration and the protection of the architectural heritage, CMG-5TCDE accelerometer was used to obtain the real-time vibration monitoring data of the Grand Stage in the Garden of Virtuous Harmony in Summer Palace. This paper employs the control variable method and the multivariate statistical analysis, integrating monitoring statistics with wind speed and transportation observation statistics to make interrelated analysis, in order to study the response rules and impact degree of the Grand Stage under the environmental vibration impact. The analyses of the vibration monitoring statistic of the recent two years show that the vibration acceleration of the Grand Stage is below 10mm/s2, which is remarkable related with factors such as visitors flow rate, transportation and weather.

  7. Cultural heritage conservation and tourism development from cultural creative industry%基于文化创意产业的文化遗产保护与旅游开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席岳婷; 赵荣

    2012-01-01

    This paper, on the basis of cultural creation industry, analyzes the relationship between the cultural heritage conservation and tourism development, and discusses how to achieve the balance be- tween them with the help of the cultural creative industry so as to realize better tourist experience of them. The results show that a good coordin-ation of the two are the important approach to the conservation and development. And through the cultural creation industry, the service of cultural heritage and tourism can be extended and it is of great significance to the further conservation and development.%基于文化创意产业视角,分析文化遗产保护与旅游开发之间的关系,重点论述二者如何借助文化创意产业的文化、智力及科技因素达到和谐平衡,从而实现文化遗产价值并提升受众旅游体验。分析认为:文化遗产保护与旅游开发和谐共生是实现文化传承与发展的重要途径;通过文化创意产业策略完成文化遗产保护与旅游服务延伸,实现文化遗产保护与旅游开发最大程度的和谐,具有一定的实践意义。

  8. Sustainable Development of Heritage Areas: Towards Cyber-Physical Systems Integration in Extant Heritage Buildings and Planning Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Mohamed Khodeir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although architectural heritage reflects the evolution of human civilization throughout history, nevertheless, civilized and social changes of heritage areas in many countries led to their degradation. Historical building management and planning conservation raise two important issues: the restoration and improvement of historical areas features and adopting a framework of sustainable development in heritage regions. Recently a number of processes have arose to aid in the aforementioned problems, namely the heritage building information modelling (HBIM and the  cyber-physical systems approach (CPS, where the latter is believed to  achieve great potentials hereby integrating virtual models and physical construction and  enabling bidirectional coordination. Since HBIM has recently been investigated through a number of recent research and application, the aim of this paper is to explore the potentials offered by the CPS, to move from 3D content model to bi-dimensional coordination for achieving efficient management of built heritage. To tackle the objective of this paper, firstly, a review of the BIM use in the field of cultural heritage  was undergone, Secondly, reporting the existing BIM/HBIM platforms, analyzing cyber-physical systems integration in extant heritage buildings and in planning conservation were performed. Results of this paper took the form of detailed comparative analysis between both CPS and HBIM, which could guide decision makers working in the field of heritage buildings management, in addition to shedding light on the main potentials of the emerging CPS.

  9. DNA Sequencing in Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vai, Stefania; Lari, Martina; Caramelli, David

    2016-02-01

    During the last three decades, DNA analysis on degraded samples revealed itself as an important research tool in anthropology, archaeozoology, molecular evolution, and population genetics. Application on topics such as determination of species origin of prehistoric and historic objects, individual identification of famous personalities, characterization of particular samples important for historical, archeological, or evolutionary reconstructions, confers to the paleogenetics an important role also for the enhancement of cultural heritage. A really fast improvement in methodologies in recent years led to a revolution that permitted recovering even complete genomes from highly degraded samples with the possibility to go back in time 400,000 years for samples from temperate regions and 700,000 years for permafrozen remains and to analyze even more recent material that has been subjected to hard biochemical treatments. Here we propose a review on the different methodological approaches used so far for the molecular analysis of degraded samples and their application on some case studies.

  10. The cultural heritage conservation oriented research and application of IOT%面向文化遗址保护的物联网技术研究与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董亚波; 曾波; 鲁东明

    2011-01-01

    大部分文化遗址因其所处环境的特殊性,导致现有常规的信息化技术手段无法有效实施,而传统的文化遗址保护技术也无法实现文化遗产保护与利用的最大化。物联网作为一项新兴的前沿热门信息技术,已经广泛应用于众多领域,具有能够与文化遗址保护工作紧密结合的发展潜力。本工作首先分析了文化遗址保护的现状与面临的问题,并对物联网技术与文化遗址保护的关系进行了深入阐述。针对文物保护领域的特殊需求,着重描述了文物本体与环境信息采集、监测数据的远距离传输,监测数据的实时分析处理三方面相关的物联网技术,并对涉及关键技术应用解决方案进行了分析说明。最后简要介绍了已经部署运行的典型文化遗址保护利用系统———基于物联网技术的敦煌莫高窟保护与利用系统,系统经过连续几年的运行积累了大量的监测数据,为敦煌莫高窟文物的保护做出了重要的贡献。随着物联网技术的进一步发展,在文物保护方面的应用将更加深入和广泛,这将进一步提升文物保护工作的效率。%Because most of the cultural heritages have special environment,the existing information technologies cannot be used in these areas.Moreover,traditional site protection technologies also cannot maximize the conservation and utilization of cultural relics.IOT is applied in many areas as a rising frontier information technique.It has huge potential to integrate with the conservation of cultural heritages.In this work,firstly is the situation of cultural heritage protection and the existing problems in the conservation of cultural sites is analyzed.The relationship between IOT and cultural heritage conservation also is described.The work discusses specially three parts of IOT technology which consist the information collecting of the heritage and environment,the long distance transmission of detective data

  11. A database devoted to the insects of the cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Fohrer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This database, implemented by both the CICRP and the INRA, gathers the most important pests affecting the cultural heritage. These insects represent a serious threat to the preservation of cultural properties such as museum collections, libraries and archives, movable objects and immovable objects in historical buildings. It is an easy tool for identifying the species of interest. It also permits very prompt undertaking of the required actions against the infestations. This database is of interest to any professional in charge of the conservation of the cultural heritage along with any other professional or scientist interested in these subjects.

  12. Mobile NMR: An essential tool for protecting our cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baias, Maria

    2017-01-01

    What is 'cultural heritage'? Is it simply our legacy of physical artifacts - or is it our collective legacy as human societies - how we want to be remembered by future generations? With time, negligence, and even military conflict working to erase the past, we must ask: Can a better understanding of our shared heritage assists us in addressing cultural differences in the present day? And how can science both help us understand the historic record and work to preserve it? In this perspective article, we examine an emerging scientific method, mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which can help us examine in a non-invasive way important objects and sites of our cultural heritage. Following these investigations, one can envisage ways for protecting our global heritage for future generations. For this purpose, we examine how this method can be used to non-destructively explore historical artifacts, which can lead to understanding the science behind the creation of these treasured items - paintings, frescoes, parchments, historical buildings, musical instruments, ancient mummies, and other artifacts. This perspective article follows few relevant examples from the scientific literature where mobile NMR has been applied in a non-invasive way to analyze objects of cultural heritage. One can envision possible future advancements of this technique and further applications where portable NMR can be used for conservation of cultural heritage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. CULTURAL HERITAGE IN SMART CITY ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Angelidou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how the historical and cultural heritage of cities is and can be underpinned by means of smart city tools, solutions and applications. Smart cities stand for a conceptual technology-and-innovation driven urban development model. By becoming ‘smart’, cities seek to achieve prosperity, effectiveness and competitiveness on multiple socio-economic levels. Although cultural heritage is one of the many issues addressed by existing smart city strategies, and despite the documented bilateral benefits, our research about the positioning of urban cultural heritage within three smart city strategies (Barcelona, Amsterdam, and London reveals fragmented approaches. Our findings suggest that the objective of cultural heritage promotion is not substantially addressed in the investigated smart city strategies. Nevertheless, we observe that cultural heritage management can be incorporated in several different strategic areas of the smart city, reflecting different lines of thinking and serving an array of goals, depending on the case. We conclude that although potential applications and approaches abound, cultural heritage currently stands for a mostly unexploited asset, presenting multiple integration opportunities within smart city contexts. We prompt for further research into bridging the two disciplines and exploiting a variety of use cases with the purpose of enriching the current knowledge base at the intersection of cultural heritage and smart cities.

  14. Cultural Heritage in Smart City Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidou, M.; Karachaliou, E.; Angelidou, T.; Stylianidis, E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates how the historical and cultural heritage of cities is and can be underpinned by means of smart city tools, solutions and applications. Smart cities stand for a conceptual technology-and-innovation driven urban development model. By becoming `smart', cities seek to achieve prosperity, effectiveness and competitiveness on multiple socio-economic levels. Although cultural heritage is one of the many issues addressed by existing smart city strategies, and despite the documented bilateral benefits, our research about the positioning of urban cultural heritage within three smart city strategies (Barcelona, Amsterdam, and London) reveals fragmented approaches. Our findings suggest that the objective of cultural heritage promotion is not substantially addressed in the investigated smart city strategies. Nevertheless, we observe that cultural heritage management can be incorporated in several different strategic areas of the smart city, reflecting different lines of thinking and serving an array of goals, depending on the case. We conclude that although potential applications and approaches abound, cultural heritage currently stands for a mostly unexploited asset, presenting multiple integration opportunities within smart city contexts. We prompt for further research into bridging the two disciplines and exploiting a variety of use cases with the purpose of enriching the current knowledge base at the intersection of cultural heritage and smart cities.

  15. Towards a Phenomenology of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo De Nardis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work fits into the broader academic debate on the legitimacy of the Sociology of Cultural Heritage. The origin of the term itself is investigated by analyzing the words that compose it and their interpretation in the context of post-modern society. The paper then explores some specific aspects of the discipline, such as the fight against the deterioration of Cultural Heritage and the attempt to make it economically attractive and profitable. Finally, it examines in detail several dimensions related to Art and Culture: the desacralization of museums and cultural artefacts, the articulation of historical and artistic heritage, the rediscovery of popular culture and, finally, the definition of the sense of Cultural Heritage.

  16. Conservation and adaptive reuse of industrial heritage in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Song

    2007-01-01

    This paper takes a retrospective review of the evolution of the conservation of industrial heritage in urban Shanghai since the 1990s within the context of the international industrial heritage conservation movement,with the emphasis on the construction of preservation systems,technical regulation compilation and conservation practice.Active conservation and adaptive reuse is the focus within the framework of the conservation of the architectural characteristics of industrial buildings and the townscape of industrial districts.

  17. Constructing the contemporary via digital cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Torsten Arni Caleb

    2015-01-01

    The present article questions the construction of 'the contemporary' in digital cultural heritage archives as specific strategic articulations between past and present with regard to the future. A historical exploration of the discourse of cultural heritage presents three strategic axes supposedly...... the possibility of ascribing inherent epistemological, existential, empirical and geopolitical force to a given technological archival order. - See more at: http://twentyfour.fibreculturejournal.org/2015/06/04/fcj-174-constructing-the-contemporary-via-digital-cultural-heritage/#sthash.sNhW8uuA.dpuf...

  18. RICH: Research and Innovation for Cultural Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Vincenzo Barone; Daniele Licari; Franco Maria Nardini

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes RICH: a new architecture conceived and developed at the Scuola Normale Superiore, for collecting, promoting and sharing cultural heritage data. Starting with the observation that cultural heritage is a cross-cutting field of research where needs are often poorly integrated with each other, a new architecture is required, aimed at solving this integration issue. RICH provides a first step in this direction by addressing several needs in this field through state-of-the-art ...

  19. Intangible Cultural Heritage and Its Legal Protection in IPR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Feimin

    2006-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ. Legal Definition of Intangible Cultural Heritage Intangible Cultural Heritage is a foreign word introduced into Chinese Culture lately. Even though it is very popular in Chinese Language Culture, its meaning is quite vague.

  20. Multifunctional encoding system for assessment of movable cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornari, V.; Bernikola, E.; Osten, W.; Groves, R. M.; Marc, G.; Hustinx, G. M.; Kouloumpi, E.; Hackney, S.

    2007-07-01

    This is an introductory paper of a recent EC project dealing with research in cultural heritage and aiming to communicate new fields of application for optical metrology techniques. The project is in its initial state and more conclusive information is expected to be available at the time of the perspective conference. Nowadays safety, ethical, economical and security issues as well as the increase demand for loaning of art objects for exhibitions in transit, are forcing the Conservation Community to undertake strong initiatives and actions against various types of mistreatment, damage or fraud, during transportation of movable Cultural Heritage. Therefore the interest directs to the development of innovative methodologies and instrumentation to respond to critical aspects of increased importance in cultural heritage preservation, among which of prior consideration are: to secure proper treatment, assess probable damage, fight fraud actions in transportation.

  1. Management Documentation: Indicators & Good Practice at Cultural Heritage Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppich, R.; Garcia Grinda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation for cultural heritage places usually refers to describing the physical attributes, surrounding context, condition or environment; most of the time with images, graphics, maps or digital 3D models in their various forms with supporting textural information. Just as important as this type of information is the documentation of managerial attributes. How do managers of cultural heritage places collect information related to financial or economic well-being? How are data collected over time measured, and what are significant indicators for improvement? What quality of indicator is good enough? Good management of cultural heritage places is essential for conservation longevity, preservation of values and enjoyment by the public. But how is management documented? The paper will describe the research methodology, selection and description of attributes or indicators related to good management practice. It will describe the criteria for indicator selection and why they are important, how and when they are collected, by whom, and the difficulties in obtaining this information. As importantly it will describe how this type of documentation directly contributes to improving conservation practice. Good practice summaries will be presented that highlight this type of documentation including Pamplona and Ávila, Spain and Valletta, Malta. Conclusions are drawn with preliminary recommendations for improvement of this important aspect of documentation. Documentation of this nature is not typical and presents a unique challenge to collect, measure and communicate easily. However, it is an essential category that is often ignored yet absolutely essential in order to conserve cultural heritage places.

  2. Polymer films removed from solid surfaces by nanostructured fluids: microscopic mechanism and implications for the conservation of cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudino, Martina; Selvolini, Giulia; Montis, Costanza; Baglioni, Michele; Bonini, Massimo; Berti, Debora; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-03-25

    Complex fluids based on amphiphilic formulations are emerging, particularly in the field of conservation of works of art, as effective and safe liquid media for the removal of hydrophobic polymeric coatings. The comprehension of the cleaning mechanism is key to designing tailored fluids for this purpose. However, the interaction between nanostructured fluids and hydrophobic polymer films is still poorly understood. In this study, we show how the combination of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides interesting and complementary insight into this process. We focused on the interaction between an ethyl methacrylate/methyl acrylate 70:30 copolymer film deposited onto a glass surface and a water/nonionic surfactant/2-butanone (MEK) ternary system, with MEK being a good solvent and water being a nonsolvent for the polymer. Our results indicate a synergy between the organic solvent and the surfactant assemblies: MEK rapidly swells the outer layers of the polymer film allowing for the subsequent diffusion of solvent molecules, while the amphiphile decreases the interfacial energy between the polymeric coating and the liquid phase, favoring dewetting and dispersion of swollen polymer droplets in the aqueous phase. The chemical nature of the surfactant and the microstructure of the assemblies determine both the kinetics and the overall efficiency of polymer removal, as assessed by comparing the behavior of similar formulations containing an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS).

  3. Cultural heritage conservation and communication by digital modeling tools. Case studies: minor architectures of the Thirties in the Turin area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, A., Jr.; Spallone, R.

    2015-08-01

    Between the end of the twenties and the beginning of the World war two Turin, as the most of the Italian cities, was endowed by the fascist regime of many new buildings to guarantee its visibility and to control the territory: the fascist party main houses and the local ones. The style that was adopted for these constructions was inspired by the guide lines of the Modern movement which were spreading by a generation of architects as Le Corbusier, Gropius, Mendelsohn. At the end of the war many buildings were reconverted to several functions that led heavy transformations not respectful of the original worth, other were demolished. Today it's possible to rebuild those lost architectures in their primal format as it was created by their architects on paper (and in their mind). This process can guarantee the three-dimensional perception, the authenticity of the materials and the placement into the Turin urban tissue, using static and dynamic digital representation systems. The "three-dimensional re-drawing" of the projects, thought as an heuristic practice devoted to reveal the original idea of the project, inserts itself in a digital model of the urban and natural context as we can live it today, to simulate the perceptive effects that the building could stir up today. The modeling skills are the basis to product videos able to explore the relationship between the environment and "re-built architectures", describing with the synthetic movie techniques, the main formal and perceptive roots. The model represents a scientific product that can be involved in a virtual archive of cultural goods to preserve the collective memory of the architectural and urban past image of Turin.

  4. The Political Nature of Digital Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quincy McCrary

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Collecting organizations such as libraries and museums are vehicles for shifting paradigms of knowledge and power. Digital technologies are also implicated with historical transformations in language, society, and culture. To discuss the digital is to engage simultaneously with an impressive array of simulacra, instantaneous communication, ubiquitous media, and global interconnectedness (Cameron & Kenderdine, 2007. Digital cultural heritage can be viewed as a political concept and practice, the relations between communities and heritage institutions as mediated through technologies, the reshaping of social, cultural, and political power in relation to cultural organizations made possible through communication technologies, and the representation and interpretation of digital cultural heritage. The following paper will address each of these concerns, outlining current scholarship on the topic and critically engaging with the content.

  5. Urban Cultural Heritage Endangerment: Degradation of historico-cultural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Eric; Cabral, Pedro; Caetano, Mário; Painho, Marco; Nijkamp, Peter

    2010-05-01

    land-use. This brings forth a dichotomy between areas to cope with population increase (and therefore highly probable of urbanization) and regions of valuable historico-cultural and archaeological legacy. To bridge this dichotomy, this paper attempts to provide a methodology for measuring cultural heritage endangerment brought by urban pressure. By using spatial modeling to prompt urban growth combined with archaeological predictive models, composing a secondary layer, a propensity map for areas with extremely high cultural value and where urban growth should be dealt with especial care become evident. Fundamentally, the joined model of Cultural Heritage Endangerment, tackles a recent and unprecedented problem at global level: Committing urban planning to allow the conservation of cultural and archaeological legacy for future generation. In an attempt to abridge the consequences of the decadence of historico-cultural landscapes, the historico-cultural endangerment (HCE) method will be applied to two entirely different regions in the world. On one side, the methodology will be applied on a regional emphasis in the Algarve region in Portugal, addressing the input of maintaining the integrity of archaeological landscapes, and on the other, a local micro-simulation of the Giza Pyramids in Egypt, shall allow to envision a segment of local consequences of urban pressure on irreplaceable monuments. The conclusions of both study-cases abridge the global nature of this problem as well as the importance of HCE implementation at different scales.

  6. CONSERVATION OF HERITAGE MASONRY IN CANADA: A CURRENT PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Shrive

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Canada is a young country with respect to its built heritage. The need to conserve examples of its structures as a record of the history of settlement and growth has been recognized for some time by the somewhat small conservation community. The heritage conservation sector is growing compared to new construction. Unfortunately, there is a distinct lack of professional expertise (architects and engineers familiar with the older traditional construction materials and methods, leading to some recommendations with respect to heritage structures being inconsistent with conservation principles. There is even less knowledge with respect to understanding how modern interventions will affect the construction supposedly being conserved. There is therefore a need for education in conservation principles and methodology. Two new programs are described, one at the undergraduate level at Carleton University, and the other at the graduate level at the University of Calgary. Both of these programs are being developed with advice from the Heritage Conservation Directorate of Public Works and Government Services Canada. The potentially negative consequences of the current lack of expertise for heritage structures are compounded by the current system for deciding whether or not a structure has heritage value. The system is inconsistent across the country, depending on how the guidelines interpreted and enforced. The federal and provincial and some municipal governments have collaborated in establishing guidelines for their areas of responsibility, but there is no overarching regulation for the protection of heritage across the country.

  7. Reanimating cultural heritage through digital technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Digital technologies are becoming extremely important for web-based cultural heritage applications. This thesis presents novel digital technology solutions to 'access and interact' with digital heritage objects and collections. These innovative solutions utilize service orientation (web services), workflows, and social networking and Web 2.0 mashup technologies to innovate the creation, interpretation and use of collections dispersed in a global museumscape, where community participation is a...

  8. Modernising Dutch Heritage Conservation: Current Progress and Ongoing Challenges for Heritage-Based Planning and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, Dutch heritage conservation shifted from a preservationist and object-focused to an area-based and development-oriented activity. Today's heritage management looks not only at the monument itself, but at its spatial context. The Belvedere Memorandum in 1999 has played a key ro

  9. Heritage Conservation in the "Back Shed" of the Learning City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshier, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Describes Back Shed, a group of New Zealand heritage conservationists who center their work in lifelong learning. Situates their activities in the context of the learning city, a community development concept that mobilizes learning resources across many sectors. Discusses heritage conservation as a process of meaning making. (Contains 29…

  10. Agri-cultural Heritage Research and Conservation Practices in China:Progresses and Perspectives%中国农业文化遗产研究与保护实践的主要进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵庆文; 张丹; 何露; 孙业红

    2011-01-01

    performing a variety of agri-cultural practices suitable for different natural conditions and created splendid agri-cultural heritages, including agri-cultural landscapes, knowledge, techniques and so on.The solid foundations for the study of agri-cultural heritage were laid by the research in agri-cultural archeology, agri-cultural history, philosophy of traditional agriculture, and agri-cultural folklore started at the beginning of the 20th century.In 2005, the Qingtian Rice-Fish Culture System in Zhejiang Province was selected as the first Globally Important Agri-cultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) pilot site in China by FAO.It is a milestone of the study in agri-cultural heritage in China, characterized by cooperation among multi-disciplines, combination of theory and practice,and the harmony between conservation and development.This paper introduces research progresses of agri-cultural heritage and its conservation, including documentary-based research,archaeology, concept and connotation, system structure and mechanism, multi-functionality of agriculture, and ecosystem services.It also summarizes the experiences and results achieved on dynamic conservation, law and policy supporting, conservation and development approaches.In addition, there are some issues we need to pay more attention to during the dynamic conservation of agri-cultural heritage: 1) to enrich the research content of agri-cultural heritage, and to pay more attention to the mechanism and quantitative studies of traditional agriculture ecological models, 2) to study the agri-cultural heritage interdisciplinary, 3) to enhance the investigation, acquisition, and excavation of agri-cultural heritage values, 4) to pay more attention to innovation, development and utilization of the agri-cultural heritage, 5) to pay more attention to the agrobiodiversity and agro-cultural diversity to promote the local development and living standards, and to further support the modern agriculture, 6) to avoid the

  11. Cultural heritage and identity politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    During, R.

    2011-01-01

    ‘As the authors in this fascinating volume point out, both heritage and identity discourse can be instrumentalized, by proponents and opponents of European integration, as they can be commodified, in branding efforts with various implementations. Just as in Macchiavelli’s Europe, political and econo

  12. Cultural heritage and identity politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    During, R.

    2011-01-01

    ‘As the authors in this fascinating volume point out, both heritage and identity discourse can be instrumentalized, by proponents and opponents of European integration, as they can be commodified, in branding efforts with various implementations. Just as in Macchiavelli’s Europe, political and

  13. Robots and Cultural Heritage: New Museum Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Germak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new technologies to enhance the visiting museum experience is not a novelty. A large variety of interactive systems are nowadays available, including virtual tours, which makes cultural heritage accessible remotely. The theme of increase in accessibility and attractiveness has lately been faced with the employment of the service robotics, covering various types of applications. Regrettably, many of robotics solutions appear less successful in terms of utility and usability. On the basis of this awareness, a design for a new robotic solution for cultural heritage has been proposed. The project, developed at the royal residence of Racconigi Castle, consists of a telepresence robot designed as a tool to explore inaccessible areas of the heritage. The employed robot, called Virgil, was expressly designed for the project. The control of the robot is entrusted to the museum guides in order to enhance their work and enrich the cultural storytelling.

  14. Hybrid Experience Space for Cultural Heritage Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar; Christensen, Mogens Fiil; Mayerhofer, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    by daily use of experience products like computer-games, IMAX cinemas and theme parks featuring virtual reality installations. “It’s a question of stone-axe displays versus Disney-power installations” as one of the involved museum professionals point it, “but we don’t want any of these possibilities......”. The paper presents an actual experience design case in Zea Harbour, Greece dealing with these challenges using hybrid experience space communicating cultural heritage material. Ar-chaeological findings, physical reconstructions and digital models are mixed to effec-tively stage the interactive experience...... space. The Zea Case is a design scenario for the Museum of the Future showing how Cultural Heritage institutions can reinvent the rela-tion to the visitor and the neighbourhood. While Hybrid Experience Space can be used for Cultural Heritage Communication in traditional exhibitions we have reached...

  15. Heritage conservation for city marketing: The imaging of the historic city of Georgetown, Penang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumarni Ismail ,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of imaging for city marketing purposes has the implication on culture, conservation and heritage. City marketing, especially in the European context, has been examined in interdisciplinary literature with special focus on imaging for tourism. Little is reported about the imaging of those cities' ex-colonies in the East. The Historic City of Georgetown in Penang, dubbed 'the City of Living Culture', has been gearing her development towards living up to the image. This paper examines the imaging of the Historic City of Georgetown for heritage tourism and city marketing tool by the public agencies involved. A short introduction to city marketing, imaging and heritage tourism is offered due to sparse literature in the built environment literature and to serve as a foundation to the main discourse of this paper. The bulk of this paper discusses the conservation of heritage as image dimensions in the marketing of Georgetown. We submitted that Georgetown has successfully utilised and capitalised on its cultural diversity and tangible heritage based on its colonial legacy to promote the city as evidenced by its recent inscription into UNESCO's World Heritage Site list. Nonetheless, building and maintaining the synergy between the government, the private sector and the people is essential for the city's heritage tourism industry.

  16. Between tradition and technological innovation: challenges to lime Heritage conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluci Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to discuss the relationship between traditional and scientific technological knowledge as innovative and fundamental to heritage conservation. It is argued that this innovation does not necessarily come from scientific knowledge, but potentially from a wise articulation between these two types of knowledge. This discussion starts from an already long process of reflection on lime heritage conservation, as developed in LNEC from research projects.

  17. Between tradition and technological innovation: challenges to lime Heritage conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluci Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to discuss the relationship between traditional and scientific technological knowledge as innovative and fundamental to heritage conservation. It is argued that this innovation does not necessarily come from scientific knowledge, but potentially from a wise articulation between these two types of knowledge. This discussion starts from an already long process of reflection on lime heritage conservation, as developed in LNEC from research projects.

  18. Cultural Resources as Sustainability Enablers: Towards a Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan O. Keitumetse

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available People inhabit and change environments using socio-cultural and psycho-social behaviors and processes. People use their socio-cultural understanding of phenomena to interact with the environment. People are carriers of cultural heritage. These characteristics make cultural values ubiquitous in all people-accessed and people-inhabited geographic spaces of the world, making people readily available assets through which environmental sustainability can be implemented. Yet, people’s conservation development is rarely planned using cultural resources. It is against this background that a Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM model is initiated as a new approach that outlines the symbiosis between cultural heritage, environment and various stakeholders, with a view to create awareness about neglected conservation indicators inherent in cultural resources and better placed to complement already existing natural resources conservation indicators. The model constitutes a two-phased process with four (04 levels of operation, namely: level I (production; level II (reproduction; level III (consumption that distinguish specific components of cultural heritage resources to be monitored at level IV for sustainability using identified cultural conservation indicators. Monitored indicators, which are limitless, constitute work in progress of the model and will be constantly reviewed, renewed and updated through time. Examples of monitoring provided in this article are the development of cultural competency-based training curriculum that will assist communities to transform cultural information into certifiable intellectual (educational and culture-economic (tourism assets. Another monitoring example is the mainstreaming of community cultural qualities into already existing environmental conservation frameworks such as eco-certification to infuse new layers of conservation indicators that enrich resource sustainability. The technical

  19. 微生物分子生态学技术在文物保护中应用的进展%Application of microbial molecular ecology in conservation of cultural heritage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚丽

    2012-01-01

    微生物分子生态学技术近年来在文物保护研究中得到了广泛的应用,已经成为控制文物被微生物侵害的一个不可或缺的工具。本研究较系统地总结了国内外利用微生物分子生态学技术进行文物保护研究的进展,为更有效防治微生物危害侵蚀文物,进而长久的保存文物提供理论支持。%In recent years, microbial molecular ecology has been widely applied in the field of conservation. This article reviews the domestic and international application of microbial ecology technology for conservation of cultural heritage objects, so as to effectively prevent microbiological damage to them. This review provides theoretical foun- dations for long - term conservation of cultural heritage objects.

  20. Online Cultural Heritage Exhibitions: A Survey of Information Retrieval Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chern Li

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: What kinds of online cultural heritage exhibitions are now available on the internet? How far have these cultural heritage institutions voyaged in terms of harnessing the power of information and communication technology and the interactivity of multimedia systems to exhibit cultural heritage resources? This study aims to highlight the…

  1. Whose History? Transnational cultural heritage in Tranquebar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Tranquebar has been declared as a heritage town by the government of Tamil Nadu due to the presence of a significant number of well-preserved built structures, especially dating from 1620-1845, when the town was a Danish trading colony. These remains of past cultural encounters attract wide public...

  2. Planning and commitment in cultural heritage projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarveld, Marlijn; Smit, Marnix; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to generate insights into the planning process for reusing cultural heritage within urban redevelopment projects and identifies barriers to and drivers for stakeholder commitment. Design/methodology/approach – Characteristics of five Dutch urban redevelopment

  3. Planning and commitment in cultural heritage projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarveld, Marlijn; Smit, Marnix; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to generate insights into the planning process for reusing cultural heritage within urban redevelopment projects and identifies barriers to and drivers for stakeholder commitment. Design/methodology/approach – Characteristics of five Dutch urban redevelopment pr

  4. Planning and commitment in cultural heritage projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarveld, M.Y.; Smit, M.; Dewulf, G.P.M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to generate insights into the planning process for reusing cultural heritage within urban redevelopment projects and identifies barriers to and drivers for stakeholder commitment. Design/methodology/approach – Characteristics of five Dutch urban redevelopment

  5. Digital Preservation of Ethnic Cultural Heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Nonja; Marinova, Dora; van Faassen, M.; Stasiuk, Glen; Zacher, L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the state of the art of digitisation of cultural heritage in Australian archives and libraries in a comparative way. Globalisation and the digital age not only brings new possibilities but also entails on questions of how we perceive ourselves and how we want to preserve our

  6. Taiwan's underwater cultural heritage documentation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Y.-Y.

    2015-09-01

    Taiwan is an important trading and maritime channels for many countries since ancient time. Numerous relics lie underwater due to weather, wars, and other factors. In the year of 2006, Bureau of Cultural Heritage (BOCH) entrusted the Underwater Archaeological Team of Academia Sinica to execute the underwater archaeological investigation projects. Currently, we verified 78 underwater targets, with 78 site of those had been recognized as shipwrecks sites. Up to date, there is a collection of 638 underwater objects from different underwater archaeological sites. Those artefacts are distributed to different institutions and museums. As very diverse management methods/systems are applied for every individual institution, underwater cultural heritage data such as survey, excavation report, research, etc. are poorly organized and disseminated for use. For better communication regarding to Taiwan's underwater cultural heritage in every level, a universal format of documentation should be established. By comparing the existing checklist used in Taiwan with guidelines that are followed in other countries, a more intact and appropriate underwater cultural heritage condition documentation system can be established and adapted in Taiwan.

  7. Cantieri aperti per progetti di fruizione del Cultural Heritage digitalizzato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bassani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The transition from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 and the subsequent dissemination of technologies and products of the approach of open Information and Communication Technologies (ICT make stronger the link between technology and Cultural Heritage (CH, giving new impetus to the use of projects content, to access projects and conservation projects of the sources. Among the tools that are enabling the formulation of this new generation of cultural products include: the use of the Internet as mass media and open content as a culture in its various manifestations and evolution.

  8. Persistent Identifiers for Dutch cultural heritage institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ras, Marcel; Kruithof, Gijsbert

    2016-04-01

    Over the past years, more and more collections belonging to archives, libraries, media, museums, and knowledge institutes are being digitised and made available online. These are exciting times for ALM institutions. They are realising that, in the information society, their collections are goldmines. Unfortunately most heritage institutions in the Netherlands do not yet meet the basic preconditions for long-term availability of their collections. The digital objects often have no long lasting fixed reference yet. URL's and web addresses change. Some digital objects that were referenced in Europeana and other portals can no longer be found. References in scientific articles have a very short life span, which is damaging for scholarly research. In 2015, the Dutch Digital Heritage Network (NDE) has started a two-year work program to co-ordinate existing initiatives in order to improve the (long-term) accessibility of the Dutch digital heritage for a wide range of users, anytime, anyplace. The Digital Heritage Network is a partnership established on the initiative of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. The members of the NDE are large, national institutions that strive to professionally preserve and manage digital data, e.g. the National Library, The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, the Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Archive of the Netherlands and the DEN Foundation, and a growing number of associations and individuals both within and outside the heritage sector. By means of three work programmes the goals of the Network should be accomplished and improve the visibility, the usability and the sustainability of digital heritage. Each programme contains of a set of projects. Within the sustainability program a project on creating a model for persistent identifiers is taking place. The main goals of the project are (1) raise awareness among cultural heritage institutions on the

  9. The Standard of Management and Application of Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Ya Ning

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using digital technology for cultural heritage documentation is a global trend in the 21 st century. Many important techniques are currently under development, including 3D digital imaging, reverse engineering, GIS (Geographic Information Systems etc. However, no system for overall management or data integration is yet available. Therefore, we urgently need such a system to efficiently manage and interpret data for the preservation of cultural heritages. This paper presents a digitizing process developed in Taiwan by the authors. To govern and manage cultural property, three phases of property conservation, registration, restoration and management, has been set up along a timeline. In accordance with the laws of cultural property, a structural system has been built for project management, including data classification and data interpretation with self-documenting characteristics. Through repository information and metadata, a system catalogue (also called data dictionary (Figure 1 was created. The primary objective of the study is to create an integrated technology for an efficient management of databases. Several benefits could be obtained from this structural standard: (1 cultural heritage management documentation can be centralized to minimize the possibility of data re-entry resulting inconsistency, and also to facilitate simultaneous updating of data; (2 since multiple data can be simultaneously retrieved and saved in real time, the incidence of errors can be reduced; (3 this system could be easily tailored to meet the administrative requirements for the standardization of documentation exchanged between cultural properties institutions and various county and city governments.

  10. 76 FR 16638 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference; Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference... teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). The teleconference was to... provide advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors. For more information about the...

  11. Social, ethnical, cultural and confessional features of architectural heritage of monasteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolov Vladimir Pavlovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Monasteries, their activity and lifestyle have always played an important role in the culture of various nations. Monasteries are objects of cultural heritage. Their architecture is connected with national features on a nation, particular canons of Christian (orthodox, catholic, Buddhistic or other religion. The article describes ancient monasteries in Russia amid the global development, historical national characteristics monasteries are analyzed, as well as architectural ensembles, reflecting the function and role of monasteries in public life, showing their spiritual and cultural heritage, monastic tradition, the historical value of the monastic landscape and its conservation conditions, the inclusion of the monasteries in the world cultural heritage is noted.

  12. Recent trends in IBA for cultural heritage studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Lucile, E-mail: lucile.beck@cea.fr

    2014-08-01

    Ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques play an important role in the field of cultural heritage. IBA was one of the first physical methods applied to archaeology in the 70s. 40 years later, more than 25 accelerator laboratories were or are involved in cultural heritage applications. The advantages of the IBA techniques match very well the requirements for the analysis of archaeological or museum objects: non destructiveness, major, minor and trace element analysis, information in depth, elemental mapping… Thanks to this collected information, IBA techniques can answer archaeological and conservation questions: provenance determination, ancient technologies (fabrication, transformation, recipes…) and conservation issues. In spite of the competition with portable devices and large facilities (such as synchrotron or neutron reactors), the IBA methods keep their interest due to the possibility of associating two or three of them according to the archaeological or art issue. In this article, some examples chosen for their original approach are presented: PIXE for X-radiography, provenance of prehistoric pigments and painting characterisation. They illustrate the useful versatility of IBA for cultural heritage studies. Perspectives for further improvements are also proposed.

  13. Cultural Heritage and the Public Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Savenije

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, libraries, archives and museums from across Europe have been the custodians of our rich and diverse cultural heritage. They have preserved and provided access to the testimonies of knowledge, beauty and imagination, such as sculptures, paintings, music and literature. The new information technologies have created unbelievable opportunities to make this common heritage more accessible for all. Recently, the European Commission commissioned a ‘Comité des Sages’ to make recommendations on ways and means to make Europe's cultural heritage and creativity available on the Internet and to preserve it for future generations. In the United States the Association of Research Libraries (ARL endorsed a number of principle recommendations to its members regarding the digitisation of cultural heritage. Both the Comité des Sages and the ARL emphasize the added value of digitisation. The Comité underlines that the digitised material can in itself be a driver of innovation and can be at the basis of new services in sectors such as tourism and learning (Comité des Sages 2011 and the ARL stresses the added value for researchers (ARL Principles July 2010. For over a century, libraries have participated in successful resource sharing cooperatives that have made content widely accessible. According to both the ARL and the Comité, the same spirit should govern commercial digitisation activities. In the best of all possible worlds, there would in our view be some level of free access to all content, with only special value-added services restricted to a subscription model. A landmark in the discussion about Open Access to information is the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities. Referring to this Declaration, people often put emphasis on recent research publications. But the following is also one of the objectives of the Declaration: “encouraging the holders of cultural heritage to support open access

  14. VIDEOR: cultural heritage risk assessment and monitoring on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Antonio; Dore, Nicole; Giovagnoli, Annamaria; Cacace, C.

    2016-08-01

    Cultural heritage is constantly threatened by several factors, such as anthropic activities (e.g. urbanization, pollution) and natural events (e.g. landslides, subsidence) that compromise cultural assets conservation and integrity over time. Italy is the country with the highest number of UNESCO cultural and natural World Heritage sites (51) containing both monuments and archaeological assets of global significance that need to be preserved for future generations, as declared and requested both by UNESCO and the European Commission. VIDEOR, the first web-service completely dedicated to cultural heritage, arises as support tool to institutions and organisations responsible of CH safeguard, with the goal to guarantee a constant and continuous monitoring of cultural assets considered to be at risk. Thanks to its services, VIDEOR allows a periodic situation evaluation, performed with the use of satellite remote sensing data (both optical and SAR) and aerial platform remote sensing data (UAVs), these last used when satellites identify a critical situation that requires deeper analyses. This constant and periodic monitoring will allow not only always updated information about the asset health status, but also early warnings launched by the operative center (NAIS) directly to experts of the responsible institutions (ISCR) after risk identification. The launch of early warnings will be essential for triggering promptly activities of preventive restoration, a less expensive way of intervention if compared to the post-event restoration, both in economic terms and in terms of historical preservation of a country.

  15. Reflections on the Metacultural Nature of Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Tauschek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most central findings of recent heritage research in cultural anthropology points to heritage as a social process and as the result of a metacultural operation. This article discusses the metacultural nature of heritage by focusing on the history of heritage both as a concrete social practice and as a powerful concept of cultural policy. For heuristic reasons, the article tends to put the conceptualisation of heritage as a metacultural product in question and proposes to translate concepts from ritual studies into heritage research.

  16. Tourist guides’ perceptions of cultural heritage tourism in South Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clinton David van der Merwe

    2016-01-01

    Heritage tourism is a fast growing niche of cultural tourism worldwide. In Africa, several countries, including South Africa, place great emphasis on the growth of heritage tourism because of its potential for local economic development...

  17. Terahertz and Cultural Heritage Science: Examination of Art and Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Cosentino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural Heritage scientists need methodologies to examine Art and Archaeology in order to understand artistic materials and techniques and devise better conservation procedures. This review discusses the most successful and promising applications of Terahertz (THz technology in Cultural Heritage Science. THz is used in homeland security and for plenty of other industrial sectors and it presents a number of valuable features specifically for the investigation of Art and Archaeology: No radiation risk, low power, non-contact and reflection mode. Recent technical advancements are also making its application fast, mobile and relatively affordable creating a potential for its diffused implementation in museums. While THz is most promising for the investigation of multilayered art, such as paintings, it has been tested on a very large range of artifacts, from manuscripts to mummies and lacquered historical furniture.

  18. THE NOTION OF AUTHENTICITY REVISITED A SEARCH FOR URBAN HERITAGE CONSERVATION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widjaja Martokusumo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last five decades urban heritage conservation has evolved significantly as an urban design discipline which is nec-essary for dealing with older urban areas that were once reduced to being the locus of monuments worthy of architectural conservation. Recent international experiences highlight conflicting interests in term of intention and focus, between archaeologist, who focus on monument restoration, and urban designers, who emphasize the need of conserving the spirit of the past. Nonetheless, a new understand-ing about urban heritage was materialized from the latest urban conservation praxis involving archaeologists, urban planners, urban de-signers and architects. The new insight about urban heritage has brought new approaches to urban conservation during recent decades. The latest of these approaches aim at the creation of enjoyable urban experiences that have a historical identity, rather at the simple re-tention of authentic urban history. In fact, urban heritage conservation is not simply a matter of preserving and creating harmonious constellation between historic fabrics and new infill developments, but rather a continuing project in shaping the environment. Based on several observations, this paper discusses that historic fabrics contribute considerably in place making, in enriching the quality of a place and offer opportunities for cultural appreciation. Thus, creating a sense of place is more than to the exact restoration of urban details. It also argues the importance of the making of interesting and liveable urban quarters that guarantee social, cultural and environmental sustainability.

  19. Studies of Immovable Cultural Heritage Changes in Regional Parks of Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aušra Mlinkauskienė

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of both the legislative analysis and research into the heritage status indicate that the existing heritage protection measures can no longer stop negative changes springing up in this sphere. Real cultural heritage of historical memory and cultural assets, as well as tourism resources and component changes of true identity of cultural landscape, appliance and conservation have never been complexly studied either theoretically or practically not only in Lithuania, but in neighboring states too. Protected areas (Smart 1990, Fairclough 1999, Thomas 2003 have a special status in most countries, if they want to solve this problem. Although theoretical and practical basis establishing protected territories and their network was formed from environmental provisions in Lithuania, however, juridical documents of protected territories evidence that the function of complex protected territories i.e. their conservation, restoration and the use of culturally valuable landscapes and cultural objects is not being performed. After the Restoration of Independence, Lithuania has started to focus more on real cultural heritage in protected territories, especially in regional parks, but the threat of losing the heritage has not disappeared. Neglect of heritage regulation and transformations of juridical basis of protected territories system have a strong impact on the changes in conditions of real cultural heritage in Lithuanian complex protected territories - regional parks. Study results of real cultural heritage in Lithuanian regional parks, their quantitative and qualitative changes educed from test results obtained in the heritage evaluation of proposed sites with reference to a paradigm of real cultural heritage suggested by the author are being discussed in the article.

  20. Anthropogenic global warming threatens world cultural heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Cazenave, A.

    2014-01-01

    1748-9326; Numerous cultural sites of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) world cultural Heritage are located in low-lying coastal regions. Because of anthropogenic global warming and induced sea level rise, many of these sites will be partially or totally flooded in the coming centuries/millennia. This is shown in a recent study by Marzeion and Levermann (2014 Environ. Res. Lett. 9 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/9/3/034001] 034001 ). Projecting...

  1. RICH: Research and Innovation for Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Barone

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes RICH: a new architecture conceived and developed at the Scuola Normale Superiore, for collecting, promoting and sharing cultural heritage data. Starting with the observation that cultural heritage is a cross-cutting field of research where needs are often poorly integrated with each other, a new architecture is required, aimed at solving this integration issue. RICH provides a first step in this direction by addressing several needs in this field through state-of-the-art technologies such as 3D vision and virtualization. The paper outlines the principal building blocks of the architecture by planning and explaining each step in terms of functionality. We also report some preliminary experiences that are being carried out using this architecture.

  2. Sustaining Cultural and Natural Heritage in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arta Dollani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the ongoing project “School for Cultural Heritage through Map Exploitation” (SCHEME, an integrated set of activities designed to support social inclusion in heritage promotion processes in Albania. The main project goal is delivering ICT tools (map and crowdfunding platforms and procedures as well as improving the capacity of stakeholders to sustainably valorize hidden resources. The underlying approach has capitalized on existing technologies and experiences through the development of an advanced interactive multimedia map using data produced in the Ljubljana Process. Subsequently, the map will be extended by collecting more data on the Lake Ohrid Region, which has been selected as a pilot area to promote the neglected inland, relieving pressure on more famous coastal sites. A contest among schools will enrich the database, uploading multifaceted memories collected by students. The winning cultural asset will be the object of a small-scale rehabilitation project supported by a fundraising campaign through a crowdfunding platform. The centrality of people’s active participation will contribute to governance innovation by reverting to traditional top-down promotion processes and practices, in which heritage consumers represent passive recipients of ready-made offers and messages. The map platform also holds specific potential for cultural tourism purposes, avoiding mistakes in the geo-localization of sites.

  3. Intangible Cultural Heritages of Arunachal Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmirekha Sarma

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intangible cultural heritage includes traditions or living expressions, inherited from our predecessors and transmitted to our successors orally or by gesture, discussed mainly within five broad domains: oral traditions and expressions including language; performing arts; social practices, rituals, festive events; knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe or the knowledge and traditional craftsmanship. Intangible cultural heritage, which only can be experienced, virtually could be anything; objects, songs, stories or skills; are considered important to preserve for future generations, because these create a community’s identity and forming the belongingness to a country, a tradition or a way of life. With 31 indigenous communities with different oral traditions and languages, Arunachal Pradesh, a hill state of India is known to be one of the magnificent multilingual and multicultural indigenous peoples areas of the world. By songs, dances, dresses, rituals or simply the gestures, the people express and maintain their different living styles which make Arunachal Pradesh vivaciously vibrant in the realms of intangible cultural heritages.

  4. Tibetan Cultural Heritages under Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUR STAFF REPORTERS

    2011-01-01

    @@ From the annual grand gala celebrating the Spring Festival on the state broadcaster China Central Television to the World Expo in Shanghai in 2010,Tibetan culture is a highlight in the show,which has grabbed the attention of domestic and international audience with its uniqueness and rich diversity.

  5. Necessity of “Historic Cultural Heritage and Conservation” Course in Interior Architecture Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atalan Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For five decades, academics and architects have been debating the subject of historical conservation techniques. Nowadays, much of building activities take place in historic areas. Most of the architects and interior architects are engaged to renovation or restoration of historical buildings. Architectural education is considered to be a complex process. Teaching the historical cultural heritage and conservation of historic structures constitutes an important part of architectural education. So, it is essential for students of architecture and interior architecture to be aware of the philosophy of conservation of historic cultural heritage. The course of “Historic Cultural Heritage and Conservation” which is about cultural heritage and principles, takes place in the undergraduate curriculum in the architecture and interior architecture departments of Izmir University. By this course knowledge of conservation, and restoration techniques were introduced. While students were taking this course also they were working on a studio project about a case study of an historical building. This paper considers the students’ approach to conservation and reuse of old warehouse building, in the scope of studio project. The aim of this paper is to show how the students were referred to conservation techniques on their studio projects while taking “Historic Cultural Heritage and Conservation” course.

  6. International Education and Cultural Heritage: Alliance or Antagonism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandiraki, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Although international education is difficult to define, its promotion of cultural diversity is widely accepted. Cultural heritage is the backbone and the product of cultural histories; it is, therefore, essential to national identity construction. As international education is very diverse, its relationship with cultural heritage ranges from…

  7. Towards an open, participatory cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderhoff, Merete

    2014-01-01

    Since the modern museum was defined in the Age of Enlightenment as a cornerstone in democratic society, public museums have been on a mission to inspire and ensure equal access to knowledge, education, and participation in culture. With the digital technologies of the 21st century, we are seeing...... brand new opportunities to fulfil this mission. Millions, even billions, of people across the globe are connected by the Internet, where they have access to communicating, learning, exchanging, developing, creating, and sharing with each other. How can the cultural heritage sector embrace this unique...

  8. A Robotic Mobile Platform for Service Tasks in Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Carbone

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the preservation and survey of cultural heritage goods is attracting increasing interest from the media. Several famous historical sites seem to require an increased effort to maintain their preservation. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to find sufficient funds and human resources to fulfil these needs. Accordingly, this paper outlines a specific application of service robotics to cultural heritage, with the aim to reduce the required time and costs for surveying and maintaining cultural heritage goods. These applications require careful attention paid to the proper design of a robotic mobile platform with the features necessary to fulfil tasks of architectonic survey and preservation. To this end, specific operation scenarios have been carefully described in order to identify the specific design requirements and constraints that are raised by, for example, the necessity of operation over delicate surfaces, or the presence of unevenness or obstacles. The authors then propose a design solution for a service robot fit for the analysis, survey and conservation of historical sites, as based on the characteristics of the outlined scenarios. A preliminary prototype is also described herewith, in order to show its engineering feasibility in relation to the simulated operation scenarios.

  9. Connecting World Heritage Nominations and Monitoring with the Support of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vileikis, O.; Dumont, B.; Serruys, E.; Van Balen, K.; Tigny, V.; De Maeyer, P.

    2013-07-01

    Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are challenging the way cultural heritage has been managed and evaluated in the past. Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are unique in that they consist of multiple sites listed as one property, distributed in different countries, involving a large diversity of stakeholders in the process. As a result, there is a need for precise baseline information for monitoring, reporting and decision making. This type of nomination requires different methodologies and tools to improve the monitoring cycle from the beginning of the nomination towards the periodic reporting. The case study of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System (CHRIS) illustrates the use of a Geographical Content Management System (Geo-CMS) supporting the serial transnational World Heritage nomination and the monitoring of the Silk Roads in the five Central Asian countries. The Silk Roads CHRIS is an initiative supported by UNESCO World Heritage Centre (WHC) and the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), and developed by a consortium headed by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation (RLICC) at the KULeuven. The Silk Roads CHRIS has been successfully assisting in the preparation of the nomination dossiers of the Republics of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan and will be used as a tool for monitoring tool in the Central Asian countries.

  10. Analysis Of Conservation Experience Of Heritage Objects In Lithuania (The Curonian Spit And Norway (The Vega Archipelago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijolė Piekienė

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Curonian Spit (Lithuania and Vega Archipelago (Norway are objects on the UNESCO World Heritage List because of their special kind of landscapes that have been formed not without human intervention. Landscapes created by nature itself or with human help are exceptional works which, as determined by the legal acts in regulation of these processes, have to be referred to as objects of cultural heritage. The cultural heritage must be protected, exhibited and viewed as objects of science and cognition. Lithuania and Norway have different conditions formed for identification, conservation and protection of these works, but both countries have recognized that protection of cultural heritage, passing it on for future generations is the duty of the state. Prospects of heritage management and development, and exchange of experience should be the top priorities for action in Lithuania.

  11. Women in landscape architecture and heritage conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria; Theodoridou, Magda; Hayashi, Mikiko; Anghelache, Mirela Adriana

    2017-04-01

    This contribution present research done by Marie Curie fellows in Italy. The first author investigated early landscape architecture in Italy, by Italian and by mobile Romanian landscape planers. The very first one was princess Jeanne Ghyca, who did the parterre d'eau at villa Gamberaia by Florence. This villa influenced the landscape architecture of Italy such as Piero Porcinai or Marie Teresa Parpagliolo. Maria Teresa Parpagliolo is the next name to deal as, since she designed the landscape of the EUR (Esposizione Universale Roma), in a time when Mussolini denied the contribution of women. Water characterises also this planning, with an aquarium being built currently under the lake. Maria Teresa Parpagliolo also worked with Elena Luzzatto, the first women architect in Italy, at the design of the military cemetery in Rome. This work will also be presented. Elena Luzzatto contributed to other Roman cemeteries as well, designing funerary stones for Verano and the cemetery at Prima Porta which will be presented. The work on cemeteries will be put in context of Rome (acatholic cemetery for example) and Italy (Carlo Scarpa, Aldo Rossi contributions). The investigation on the role of women will be compared to other programmes dealing with, for example the COST network genderSTE dealing with cities and climate change which are relevant for landscape, and MOMOWO, a European culture project on early woman planers. The next two authors did research on conservation issues, through the network EPISCON, and this is resulting in role models for the GEMS booklet and the Romanian role models booklet. The fourth author also was a Marie Curie fellow in Italy, at the ROSE school in Pavia, doing research on earthquake mitigation along with the first author's Marie Curie stay. The story will also be promoted in the Marie Curie Alumni chapter Romania.

  12. Severe Local Storms Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Morgan, G. M.; Stel, F.

    2009-09-01

    Local storms always had a deep impact on people communities, mainly because of the severe damage caused, because of their unpredictability and, up to a few years ago, even because of the lack of knowledge and awareness on their physical origin. Because of this large impact on real life and on imagination, people needed and wanted to describe and report the occurrence of these events, giving them suited names. Often, these nouns are related to the myth developed to explain the cause of the events. In this work, a short presentation and description of the popular nouns used to describe severe local storm events in different areas of the World is given. Countries taken into account span from Italy, moving toward Africa and reaching a few communities of Native Americans. The etymology of the names gives interesting information, useful even under the anthropological point of view, on the Culture and Believes of the peoples who adopted them. This research work is the result of an underground activity carried out in the last ten years by the authors, during their contacts with students and researchers coming from different Countries and mainly met at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste.

  13. Multilingual Access to Cultural Heritage Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Oberländer-Târnoveanu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available For the visitor to the ARENA Portal for Archaeological Records of Europe Networked Access, the first option is to choose the language of the interface: Danish, English, Icelandic, Polish, Norwegian or Romanian. These are the languages of the six partners in the European project developed between 2001 and 2004. We expect a significant number of visitors from these countries, which made the choice of each respective mother tongue a natural one. Is the option of several languages just a courtesy for our public? It is more than that - it is a tool to facilitate access to multilingual archaeological information. Before we were ready for visitors to our sites, we had to understand each other, to index our digital resources using common terms, to find the right equivalents for archaeological realities described in several languages, to explain the concepts behind the words. Language is related to culture, identity and memory. There is a growing concern about the dominance of English as a global language of communication, while probably the majority of known languages are in danger of disappearing and cultural diversity is menaced. If we wish to make cultural heritage resources accessible to more people and to share knowledge, language is a key. My article is an attempt to address these issues. I will explore the role of language in scientific communication, multilingualism on the Internet, language policies, and also have a closer look at terminological tools for cultural heritage, especially for archaeology.

  14. Tourist guides’ perceptions of cultural heritage tourism in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merwe Clinton David van der

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heritage tourism is a fast growing niche of cultural tourism worldwide. In Africa, several countries, including South Africa, place great emphasis on the growth of heritage tourism because of its potential for local economic development. Cultural and heritage tourism are being advocated as an important niche within the South African economy. This paper explores the perceptions of cultural heritage tourist guides in South Africa towards heritage tourism, it is argued that the country’s National Department of Tourism must improve the poor governance and poor management of South African heritage assets, and enhance the preservation, transformation and segmented marketing of South Africa’s cultural assets (at all levels of government in order to sustain and grow cultural tourism in the future.

  15. D Tracking Based Augmented Reality for Cultural Heritage Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battini, C.; Landi, G.

    2015-02-01

    The development of contactless documentation techniques is allowing researchers to collect high volumes of three-dimensional data in a short time but with high levels of accuracy. The digitalisation of cultural heritage opens up the possibility of using image processing and analysis, and computer graphics techniques, to preserve this heritage for future generations; augmenting it with additional information or with new possibilities for its enjoyment and use. The collection of precise datasets about cultural heritage status is crucial for its interpretation, its conservation and during the restoration processes. The application of digital-imaging solutions for various feature extraction, image data-analysis techniques, and three-dimensional reconstruction of ancient artworks, allows the creation of multidimensional models that can incorporate information coming from heterogeneous data sets, research results and historical sources. Real objects can be scanned and reconstructed virtually, with high levels of data accuracy and resolution. Real-time visualisation software and hardware is rapidly evolving and complex three-dimensional models can be interactively visualised and explored on applications developed for mobile devices. This paper will show how a 3D reconstruction of an object, with multiple layers of information, can be stored and visualised through a mobile application that will allow interaction with a physical object for its study and analysis, using 3D Tracking based Augmented Reality techniques.

  16. Heritage, health and place: The legacies of local community-based heritage conservation on social wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Andrew; Smyth, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Geographies of health challenge researchers to attend to the positive effects of occupying, creating and using all kinds of spaces, including 'green space' and more recently 'blue space'. Attention to the spaces of community-based heritage conservation has largely gone unexplored within the health geography literature. This paper examines the personal motivations and impacts associated with people's growing interest in local heritage groups. It draws on questionnaires and interviews from a recent study with such groups and a conceptual mapping of their routes and flows. The findings reveal a rich array of positive benefits on the participants' social wellbeing with/in the community. These include personal enrichment, social learning, satisfaction from sharing the heritage products with others, and less anxiety about the present. These positive effects were tempered by needing to face and overcome challenging effects associated with running the projects thus opening up an extension to health-enabling spaces debates.

  17. Towards an open, participatory cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderhoff, Merete

    2014-01-01

    opportunity to make our institutions and work truly support a connected world? Museums around the world are acting on this question by 'going open'. They are providing free and uninhibited access to reuse of their digitized collections and data, and they are opening up their minds to a new open way of working...... and experiences published in my book Sharing is Caring. Openness and sharing in the cultural heritage sector (2014), I will present examples of how we are involving the public actively, and provide the background rationale for why we are opening up our collections and ways of working....

  18. The Albanian Cultural Heritage on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maiellaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available EnThe paper discusses the production of an interactive map (both for desktop and for mobile aiming to support the promotion of the cultural heritage, using an authoring system. At present, the tools feature 13 heritage sites across the County of Tirana, which are supported by text and photographs supplied by IMK - Instituti i Monumenteve te Kultures ‘Gani Strazimiri’ (Institute for Cultural Monuments within the project ‘S.O.S. – Squiperia Open Source’, funded by the Apulia Region. We include experience of developing the tools as a possible benefit to other developers in the cultural sector.ItL'articolo illustra la produzione di una mappa interattiva (per sistemi 'desktop' e 'mobile' finalizzata a dare supporto alla promozione del patrimonio culturale, realizzata mediante un sistema autore. Attualmente il sistema gestisce 13 siti di interesse culturale collocati nel distretto di Tirana in Albania, con testi e fotografie fornite da IMK - Instituti i Monumenteve te Kultures 'Gani Strazimiri' (Istituto per i Monumenti della Cultura nell'ambito del progetto 'S.O.S. - Squiperia Open Source', finanziato dalla Regione Puglia. La descrizione del sistema può essere utile agli sviluppatori che operano nel settore culturale. 

  19. Cultural heritage training in the US military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svec, Leedjia

    2014-01-01

    Cultural competence is a vital component of many missions in today's military. Cultural competence enables one to further a mission, save resources, and save lives. Conversely, a lack of cultural competence may bring about challenges to mission completion, requirement for more resources, waste of resources, and destruction of lives. Cultural competence involves many components. One particular component is cultural heritage awareness and protection of cultural property. This study sought to assess current understanding of cultural property protection and determine the effectiveness of a training aimed at increasing cultural property protection awareness, knowledge, and comfort within the military setting. It was hypothesized that participants would vary in their level of awareness, knowledge, and comfort of cultural property protection, and that all would show a significant improvement in knowledge scores post training. Factors such as deployment experience were examined for potential correlation with measures such as awareness. A 14 question pre-read survey was developed to assess participants' demographics, awareness, knowledge, and comfort with cultural property protection. Awareness included value, laws, and procedures while knowledge examined "know how" such as how to bed down in a protected structure or communicate information about the structure. Comfort assessed one's comfort with engaging in the knowledge based tasks. A 24 question post read survey was administered to assess awareness, knowledge, and comfort, and to solicit additional feedback on the manual itself. The survey utilized a 1-5 rating scale with 1 representing no awareness, knowledge, or comfort and 5 representing absolute awareness, knowledge, and comfort with different aspects of cultural property protection. Cultural property protection value was highest pre and post training while knowledge regarding recovery of property was rated lowest pre and post training. Results are encouraging for

  20. Some Experiences in 3D Laser Scanning for Assisting Restoration and Evaluating Damage in Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, L. M.; Finat, Javier; Fernández-Martin, J. J.; Martínez, J.; SanJose, J. I.

    The recent incorporation of laser devices provides advanced tools for assisting the conservation and restoration of Cultural Heritage. It is necessary to have as complete as possible understanding of the object state before evaluating or defining the reach of the restoration process. Thus, a special effort is devoted to surveying, measuring and generating a high-resolution 3D model prior to restoration planning. This work presents results of several experiments performed on damaged pieces for evaluation purposes in Cultural Heritage. Some software tools are applied for carving-work analysis, conservation-state monitoring, and simulation of weathering processes for evaluating temporal changes. In all cases considered, a high resolution information capture has been performed with a laser scanner, the Minolta 910. Our approach is flexible enough to be adapted to other kinds of pieces or Cultural Heritage artefacts, in order to provide an assessment for intervention planning in conservation and restoration tasks.

  1. International Conference on Remote Sensing Applications for Archaeological Research and World Heritage Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Monitoring the Ancient Countryside: Remote Sensing and GIS at the Chora of Chersonesos (Crimea, Ukraine). Integration of Remote Sensing and GIS for Management Decision Support in the Pendjari Biosphere Reserve (Republic of Benin). Monitoring of deforestation invasion in natural reserves of northern Madagascar based on space imagery. Cartography of Kahuzi-Biega National Park. Cartography and Land Use Change of World Heritage Areas and the Benefits of Remote Sensing and GIS for Conservation. Assessing and Monitoring Vegetation in Nabq Protected Area, South Sinai, Egypt, using combine approach of Satellite Imagery and Land Surveys. Evaluation of forage resources in semi-arid savannah environments with satellite imagery: contribution to the management of a protected area (Nakuru National Park) in Kenya. SOGHA, the Surveillance of Gorilla Habitat in World Heritage sites using Space Technologies. Application of Remote Sensing to monitor the Mont-Saint-Michel Bay (France). Application of Remote Sensing & GIS for the Conservation of Natural and Cultural Heritage Sites of the Southern Province of Sri Lanka. Social and Environmental monitoring of a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve: Case Study over the Vosges du Nord and Pfalzerwald Parks using Corona and Spot Imagery. Satellite Remote Sensing as tool to Monitor Indian Reservation in the Brazilian Amazonia. Remote Sensing and GIS Technology for Monitoring UNESCO World Heritage Sites - A Pilot Project. Urban Green Spaces: Modern Heritage. Monitoring of the technical condition of the St. Sophia Cathedral and related monastic buildings in Kiev with Space Applications, geo-positioning systems and GIS tools. The Murghab delta palaeochannel Reconstruction on the Basis of Remote Sensing from Space. Acquisition, Registration and Application of IKONOS Space Imagery for the cultural World Heritage site at Mew, Turkmenistan. Remote Sensing and VR applications for the reconstruction of archaeological landscapes

  2. Ancient Egypt in our Cultural Heritage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Vasiljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Inspiration derived from ancient Egypt is usually expressed through the Egyptian motifs in arts and popular culture of the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as through the non-scientific interpretations of the culture, very much based upon the Renaissance ones. The number and variety of material and non-material traces of this fascination are most expressed in the countries where, along with the early support for the institutional development of Egyptology, there existed economically potent educated middle classes (Western and Central Europe, USA, but may also be traced elsewhere. The public fascination by ancient Egypt has not ceased by the times of foundation of Egyptology, marked by the decipherment of the hieroglyphic script in 1822. Until the end of the 20th century Egyptologists have rarely dealt with the prelude to their discipline, limiting their interest to the critical approach to ancient sources and to noting the attempts to interpret the hieroglyphic script and the function of pyramids. However, the rising importance of the reception studies in other disciplines raised the interest of Egyptologists for the "fascination of Egypt", thus changing the status of various modes of expressing "Egyptomania" – they have thus become a part of the cultural heritage, registered, documented, preserved and studied. The research of this kind is only beginning in Serbia. The line of inquiry enhances the knowledge of the scope, manifestations and roles of the interest in Egypt, not limited by the national or political borders. On the other hand, the existence of the cultural heritage similar to the wider European view of ancient Egypt – short remarks by Jerotej Račanin, Kandor by Atanasije Stojković, the usage of architectural motifs derived from Egypt, the emergence of small private collections, to mention several early examples – all show that the research into the reception of ancient Egypt may contribute to the knowledge about the history

  3. Secondary metabolites: applications on cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, S; Scrano, L; Bonomo, M G; Salzano, G; Bufo, S A

    2013-01-01

    Biological sciences and related bio-technology play a very important role in research projects concerning protection and preservation of cultural heritage for future generations. In this work secondary metabolites of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola (Bga) ICMP 11096 strain and crude extract of glycoalkaloids from Solanaceae plants, were tested against a panel of microorganisms isolated from calcarenite stones of two historical bridges located in Potenza and in Campomaggiore (Southern Italy). The isolated bacteria belong to Bacillus cereus and Arthrobacter agilis species, while fungi belong to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Coprinellus, Fusarium, Rhizoctonio and Stemphylium genera. Bga broth (unfiltered) and glycoalkaloids extracts were able to inhibit the growth of all bacterial isolates. Bga culture was active against fungal colonies, while Solanaceae extract exerted bio-activity against Fusarium and Rhizoctonia genera.

  4. 75 FR 6056 - Establishment of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... Secretary of Agriculture establish the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). The Council will provide advice on wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that (1) benefit recreational... conservation community, wildlife conservation groups, the States, Native American Tribes, and the...

  5. Building Information Modelling for Cultural Heritage: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetis, S.; Delinasiou, A.; Stylianidis, E.

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the evolution and state-of-the-art of the use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the field of culture heritage documentation. BIM is a hot theme involving different characteristics including principles, technology, even privacy rights for the cultural heritage objects. Modern documentation needs identified the potential of BIM in the recent years. Many architects, archaeologists, conservationists, engineers regard BIM as a disruptive force, changing the way professionals can document and manage a cultural heritage structure. The latest years, there are many developments in the BIM field while the developed technology and methods challenged the cultural heritage community in the documentation framework. In this review article, following a brief historic background for the BIM, we review the recent developments focusing in the cultural heritage documentation perspective.

  6. Evaluation of heritage trees for conservation and management in Guangzhou City (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, C Y

    2004-01-01

    The recent fast pace of urbanization in China and other developing countries has exerted pressure on urban trees, which constitute a key urban environmental asset. The most outstanding trees should be treated as natural-cum-cultural heritage. Guangzhou City's growth has threatened its rich urban-tree endowment, a diversified assemblage of 200,000 trees represented by 254 species and located in three major habitats: roadside, park, and institutional grounds. Mainly based on age and performance, 348 trees were officially designated as heritage specimens. They were evaluated in the field for tree dimensions, habitat, performance, and landscape contribution, to establish enhanced conservation and management strategies. With only 25 species, heritage trees were dominated by five cultivated natives and encompass some of the city's rare species; some common urban-forest species were not represented. Older districts and roadside habitats, despite their compact town plan and limited growing space, had the largest tree dimensions and largest share of heritage trees. Many heritage trees were large with long life expectancy and the potential for biomass expansion, and had pivotal cityscape impacts where they occur. Old neighborhoods, traditional haven for the arborescent treasure, are being changed by construction activities and periodic typhoon and windstorm damages. Increasing development density could degrade the heritage trees and their growing space, and reduce tree quality and life span. Upgrading the statutory-administrative systems and arboricultural care can enhance long-term survival of the precious natural-cum-cultural heritage. The experience of Guangzhou in identifying and preserving its high-quality urban trees can provide management strategies for other cities.

  7. Heritage Conservation and Urban Landscaping of Ancient Pan Pool Neighborhood, Qufu: a Historical and Indigenous Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchun Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gu Pan Pool neighborhood got its name because of Gu Pan Chi, (古泮池,the ancient Pan Pool, located in the southeastern part of Confucius’ birthplace, Qufu, the birth place of Confucius with a history of 3000 year. Gu Pan Pool has been recently under preservation with the joint efforts of World Bank cultural heritage conservation project and the local municipal government. With disparate interests in mind, the three stakeholders of heritage, the world bank, Qufu municipal government and local residents are contradictory with each other in the regeneration process, in which the local voices are often ignored. The purpose of this paper is to rethink heritage making from a historical and indigenous perspective in the contemporary Chinese urban historic landscape planning process. The author contends that the cultural value and pluralism embedded in the ritual way of thinking in Chinese Classics inherited and transmitted for thousands of years could be an alternative way of thinking for the landscape planning practices in the homogenizing culture of global capitalism. This research aims to reinterpret and re-activate Confucianism as cultural heritage to enrich the understanding and hence the sustainability related to human action in urban spaces with emphasis on planning processes in contemporary China.

  8. Local natural and cultural heritage assets and community based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Local natural and cultural heritage assets and community based tourism: Challenges ... and cultural assets into tourism activities for the benefit of the community. ... all the functions of planning, development, marketing and management of the ...

  9. Tourist valorization of architectural cultural heritage of Sabac

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grčić Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Sabac is an important centre in the cultural geography of Serbia. A great number of architectural buildings that are listed in cultural-historic heritage of national interest were built in the city...

  10. Conflicted Heritage: Values, Visions and Practices in the Management and Preservation of Cultural and Environmental Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Kearsley

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage has become of great importance in a number of areas, including self-identity, community identity and as an economic sector through cultural tourism. Most definitions of heritage now accept that it is a perceptual construct with many meanings, both for those who identify and manage it and for those who consume it in various ways. Because heritage can be seen in many lights, the potential for conflict between users, managers and those who own heritage is high. This article examines the nature of heritage and heritage landscapes and discusses the many symbolic and economic benefits that can ensue; the changing nature of the markets for heritage is described. The various monetary and opportunity costs of heritage are discussed and the resultant conflicts outlined. The article goes on to examine the contradictions and conflicts inherent in the concept of authenticity and the issues involved in various modes of interpretation. Here the article asks that if heritage is accepted as that which ‘we’ wish to preserve, then who are ‘we’? This question is explored in the context of the impacts of tourism upon heritage in Southern New Zealand, including the impacts of recent development, perceptions of crowding and the nature of wilderness. Inter-cultural perceptions are explained through the differing perceptions of, and attitudes to, the natural world held by Maori and by others. The article concludes by noting that, while much heritage research is still based upon the product and its presentation, future studies will need to learn more on consumers, their attitudes , expectations and values.

  11. Community Participation in Ethnic Minority Cultural Heritage Management in China: A Case Study of Xianrendong Ethnic Cultural and Ecological Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Xu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Heritage protection in China has long been considered as the responsibility of the government. However, over the last 20 years, a number of heritage projects, mainly in ethnic minority regions, have attempted to engage with local communities. These seem to be an attractive alternative to top-down approaches. This paper explores the implications of a bottom-up approach for Chinese ethnic minority heritage management through an examination of the Ethnic Cultural and Ecological Village project in Xianrendong in Yunnan province. It is a result of my fascination with the project’s concept and my desire to understand its key characteristics, application and potential for future development in China. After a discussion of cultural performance, modernisation and inside/outside encounters, I conclude by suggesting that well-planned and well-informed community participation, with realistic control, contributes to reconciling tourism and cultural heritage conservation.

  12. Some Considerations on the Evolving Concepts of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Dorina Xheraj-Subashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of the property as general heritage and access to the entire society is a phenomenon which took matter during the French Revolution, where the entire heritage, especially of museums, should be considered as a public possession of all, in order to disseminate knowledge to all. In the Albanian context, the history to this heritage and the awareness took place in other circumstances, given the history and various developments in Albania. Given such circumstances, our analysis will be focused on the historical development and attention to national heritage, which was propagated at the same time as raising and awareness of missing values. These values have been attempt in different ways and related and have also changed during years of totalitarian period and then with the change of the political system. The paper tries to bring an overview of holistic term of culture heritage including museum law interpretation as part of cultural heritage legislation.

  13. Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Norhasimah; Masron Tarmiji; Ahmad Azizul

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia is experiencing an incredible pace of tourism development and heritage tourism is one of the tourism branches that have long contributed to appeal the tourist destination and acts as important marketing tool to attract tourist especially with special interests in heritage and arts. Cultural heritage tourism has emerged as a potential form of alternative tourism among both international tourists as well as Malaysian domestic travelers. The difference of ethnics present in Malaysia bro...

  14. Terahertz applications in cultural heritage: case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannacci, D.; Martos-Levif, D.; Walker, G. C.; Menu, M.; Detalle, V.

    2013-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging is a non-destructive, non-contact, non-invasive technology emerging as a tool for the analysis of cultural heritage. THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) techniques have the ability to retrieve information from different layers within a stratified sample, that enable the identification of hidden sub-layers in the case of paints and mural paintings. In this paper, we present the THz TDS2 system developed in the European Commission's 7th Framework Program project CHARISMA [grant agreement no. 228330]. Bespoke single processing algorithms; including a deconvolution algorithm can be deployed to increase the resolution and the global performance of the system. The potential and impact of this work is demonstrated through two case studies of mural paintings, where the capability to reveal the stratigraphy of the artworks is demonstrated.

  15. PROTECTION AND SUSTAINABLE VALORISATION OF THE IMMOVABLE CULTURAL HERITAGE IN THE DISTRICT OF CICEU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POTRA Alexandra-Camelia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Valorisation of the immovable cultural heritage of the District „Ținut” 1 of Ciceu for sustainable development. The object of the study is the analysis under various aspects of cultural heritage assets classified in the List of Historical Monuments, for plotting directions for their protection and conservation, namely the proposal of various strategic directions for the capitalization of the immovable cultural heritage for the sustainable development of the District of Ciceu. The analysis assumed the inventory, namely the classification of historical monuments, according to various criteria, such as typology, cultural value, age, representation, preservation status or depending on the rarity of its characteristics. The current preservation status of historical monuments indicates that over 50% of the total number, are in an advanced stage of decay-poor conservation- that is why in this study we proposed some ways to protect and preserve them. The proposal of certain preservation directions is closely related to another objective pursued in this study, namely good capitalization of historical monuments. The cultural heritage of the District of Ciceu constitutes an important local resource, and if it is capitalized – by respecting the preservation conditions, it may play an important role in achieving the sustainable development of this area. In this regard, we considered that the proposal of strategic directions such as rehabilitation through regeneration, namely the touristic capitalization of the immovable cultural heritage, would outline the importance and true value of this resource in the sustainable development of the District of Ciceu.

  16. The Protection of Cultural Heritage Sites from Geo-Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Agapiou, Athos; Cuca, Branka; Lysandrou, Vasiliki; Tzouvaras, Marios; Michaelides, Silas; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos; Margottini, Claudio; Cigna, Francesca; Crosta, Giovanni; Fernandez, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Cultural heritage sites are continuously impacted by several environmental and anthropogenic factors, including climate change, precipitation, natural hazards, wars, etc. However, there is limited data available regarding the effects of geo-hazards on cultural heritage sites. This paper presents the methodology of the PROTHEGO project, which uses radar interferometry to monitor surface deformation with mm precision to analyze the impact of geo-hazards in cultural heritage sites in Europe. PROTHEGO will provide a new, low-cost methodological approach for the safe management of cultural heritage monuments and sites located in Europe. The project will apply InSAR techniques to monitor monuments and sites that are potentially unstable due to landslides, sinkholes, settlement, subsidence, active tectonics as well as structural deformation, all of which can be effected of climate change and human interaction. The research methodology will be focused on long-term low-impact monitoring systems as well as indirect analysis of environmental contexts to investigate changes and decay of structure, material and landscape. The methodology will be applied to more than 450 sites on the UNESCO World Heritage List in geographical Europe. One of the case study selected is located in Cyprus at Choirokoitia, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. The outcomes of PROTHEGO will support correct planning and rebalancing the contrast between endogenous (structural and materials decay, the societal development, the anthropogenic pressure) and surrounding exogenous forces (natural hazards acting on the heritage) which affecting the European cultural heritage.

  17. Non invasive sensing technologies for cultural heritage management and fruition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of the information produced by science and technology for the knowledge of the cultural heritage depends on the quality of the feedback and, consequently, on the "cultural" distance between scientists and end-users. In particular, the solution to this problem mainly resides in the capability of end-users' capability to assess and transform the knowledge produced by diagnostics with regard to: information on both cultural objects and sites (decay patterns, vulnerability, presence of buried archaeological remains); decision making (management plan, conservation project, and excavation plan). From our experience in the field of the cultural heritage and namely the conservation, of monuments, there is a significant gap of information between technologists (geophysicists/physicists/engineers) and end-users (conservators/historians/architects). This cultural gap is due to the difficulty to interpret "indirect data" produced by non invasive diagnostics (i.e. radargrams/thermal images/seismic tomography etc..) in order to provide information useful to improve the historical knowledge (e.g. the chronology of the different phases of a building), to characterise the state of conservation (e.g. detection of cracks in the masonry) and to monitor in time cultural heritage artifacts and sites. The possible answer to this difficulty is in the set-up of a knowledge chain regarding the following steps: - Integrated application of novel and robust data processing methods; - Augmented reality as a tool for making easier the interpretation of non invasive - investigations for the analysis of decay pathologies of masonry and architectural surfaces; - The comparison between direct data (carrots, visual inspection) and results from non-invasive tests, including geophysics, aims to improve the interpretation and the rendering of the monuments and even of the archaeological landscapes; - The use of specimens or test beds for the detection of archaeological features and

  18. Restoring Cultural Heritage Sites Most of the post-quake cultural heritage rescue and protection projects in Sichuan have been completed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HAIRONG

    2011-01-01

    The State Administration of Cultural Heritage recently rewarded 132 individuals and organizations for their work in rescuing and protecting cultural relics damaged by the Wenchuan earthquake on May 12,2008.Two world cultural heritage sites,145 key state-level cultural heritage sites and 285 provincial-level cultural heritage sites as well as more than 1,000 city or county-level cultural heritage sites in Sichuan,Gansu and Shaanxi provinces were damaged by the earthquake,said Shan Jixiang,Director of the State Administration of Cultural Heritage.

  19. The industrial and cultural heritage in landscape: Industrial Heritage, Landscape, Intelligent Territory

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Areces, Miguel Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Scenic values, industrial traces and artistic heritage are intertwined in a continuous space. IndustrialHeritage has acquired a meaning beyond the aesthetic or testimonial to become a spatial or temporalcore face of forgetfulness and loss of place memory. The “smartplaces”, where active communitieslive, are or were able to organize themselves to design and reach a consensus concerning a projectfor the future. There is no approach to conservation, preservation and enhancement, or new uses ofhe...

  20. 75 FR 64611 - Italian American Heritage and Culture Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Proclamation 8585--Italian American Heritage and Culture Month, 2010 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0...; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8585 of October 14, 2010 Italian American Heritage..., generations of Italian Americans have helped shape our society and steer the course of our history. During...

  1. Telling or selling? Experiencing South African cultural heritage tourism products

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanovic, Milena; Saayman, Melville

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the experience economy the unique experiential value of cultural heritage products comes to the forefront of cultural tourism development and is the main value proposition for emerging destinations, including South Africa. As South Africa’s democracy divedends had paid out by 1998, South African Tourism was left with an array of dormant cultural heritage resources (still) unable to turn them into meaningful tourist experiences. The reason is lack of understanding of tourist...

  2. Tourist valorization of architectural cultural heritage of Sabac

    OpenAIRE

    Grčić Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Sabac is an important centre in the cultural geography of Serbia. A great number of architectural buildings that are listed in cultural-historic heritage of national interest were built in the city. The goal of this work is to note and highlight the values of architectural cultural heritage of Sabac, which can be valorized for the purpose of tourism. The restoration, protection and inclusion of architectural values in the tourist offer of Sabac, combined with the other types of city tourism s...

  3. Cultural Heritage in the Gulf: Blight or Blessing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamel Boussaa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Gulf and after gaining independence in the 1960s and 1970s many cities witnessed a staggering rapid urban growth. The urban centers, which formed the central parts of these cities, underwent continuous pressures of destruction and redevelopment. A large number of these centers have been often demolished and replaced by alien imported high-rise buildings. The urban cores which escaped complete demolition have survived as isolated pockets in the middle of hybrid environments. This dilemma raises important questions; is this surviving cultural heritage blight or blessing? Is it "blight" and obstacle that stifles our cities from moving forward to aspire for a bright and prosperous future, or is it "blessing" an asset that can form a major catalyst to promote our cities while maintaining strong roots with their past? Accordingly, what should be the future of these surviving historic centers? Will they be demolished to pave way for more ambitious growth or can they be conserved and sustained for present and future generations? Will the historic city, the heart of urban life and the main protector of our cities identities, survive and continue to be places for living within the emerging global cities of today and tomorrow? This paper attempts to highlight the importance of dealing with the conservation and development issue, by raising and discussing the following question: How can our cultural heritage be a setting of appropriate conservation and development in the emerging global environments? In order to discuss this issue, three historic cities from the Gulf; Old Dubai in UAE, Old Jeddah in Saudi Arabia and Old Doha in Qatar will form the setting of this research.

  4. Mixed Reality Cultural Heritage Communication - The Zea Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Niels Einar; Christensen, Mogens Fiil; Mayerhofer, Mikkel

    ”. The poster presents an actual experience design case in Zea Harbour, Greece dealing with these challenges using mixed reality communicating cultural heritage material. Archaeological findings, physical reconstructions and digital models are mixed to effectively stage the interactive experience space. The Zea...... Case is a design scenario for the Museum of the Future showing how Cultural Heritage institutions can use a Glocal Approach to technology and architecture to reinvent the relation to the visitor and the neighbourhood. While Mixed Reality can be used for Cultural Heritage Communication in traditional...

  5. Preserving and documenting the Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Özkut

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of preservation may be described as a physical process that depends onconceptual facts. When observed from a conceptual point of view, ‘values’ cause the divergencesin the preservation process, which could be named as the pre-requisites of the construction.Values carry emotional and physical points of view. The emotional context, of course, dependson recognizing and remembering while physical context depends on direction of research. They are indicators of cultural characteristics and historical identity. ‘Cultural values’1, more over, explains the meanings attributed to the cultural property, which meanings will be preserved, and the reasons for their preservation. On behalf of this context, the preservation process may be defined as the preservation of the cultural heritage within an effective system. This effective system isaimed at attaining the total quality as a result of a synthesis of the technology, technique, and material originally deployed with those of the present. Besides, one of the most important inputin the preservation process is the priorities of the intervention to be held, as the latter will determine the decisions and types of intervention during the implementation phase of the preservation project. As a significant paradox, the most important parameter that shapes both a preservationproject and its process appears to be the risks that consist of indefinite input preventing theproject from a proper definition of its context. Since all physical problems and the social statusof the cultural property to be preserved have direct impact upon the design process of thepreservation project, these priorities and the risks should be clarified in the course of pre-assessment phase at the beginning of the preservation process.

  6. Safeguarding Cultural Heritage against Climate Change and Natural Hazards through Stakeholder Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Rosmarie; Zuvela-Aloise, Maja; Hollosi, Brigitta; Anders, Ivonne; Höfler, Angelika; Boi, Silvia; Resta, Vanni; Patrikakis, Charalampos

    2017-04-01

    Europe's cultural heritage is among the richest in the world, and draws millions of visitors to archeological sites, museums, monuments, castles, and other sites each year. The protection and conservation of European heritage is of utmost importance for our society, not only in order to preserve the European cultural identity, but also because cultural heritage is a wealth creator bringing tourism-related business opportunities on which many communities depend. However, Europe's heritage assets are extremely exposed to climate change and natural hazards, which threatens their integrity and may compromise their value. The goal of the STORM (Safeguarding Cultural Heritage through Technical and Organisational Management) project is to provide critical decision-making tools to European cultural heritage stakeholders affected by climate change and natural hazards. Here, the STORM project will be presented with a focus on climate change and natural hazard risk communication to the involved stakeholders. However, climate change communication is not a one-way process, and discussions with stakeholders are necessary to identify their specific needs. Hence, the STORM concept is tested through pilot site studies in five different countries: the Diocletian Baths in Rome, Italy; the Mellor Heritage site, Manchester, UK; the Roman Ruins of Tróia, Portugal; the Historical Centre of Rethymno on Crete, Greece and Ephesus, Izmir, Turkey. Furthermore, the past and future climatic conditions at the project's pilot sites are analysed in terms of mean state and extreme events (for example temperature and precipitation changes evident from observations and climate scenarios), which will be discussed with regard to their relevance for the local cultural heritage protection based on discussions with the stakeholders.

  7. An Open Source Software Platform for Visualizing and Teaching Conservation Tasks in Architectural Heritage Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose, I. Ignacio; Martinez, J.; Alvarez, N.; Fernandez, J. J.; Delgado, F.; Martinez, R.; Puche, J. C.; Finat, J.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we present a new software platform for interactive volumetric visualization of complex architectural objects and their applications to teaching and training conservation interventions in Architectural Cultural Heritage. Photogrammetric surveying is performed by processing the information arising from image- and range-based devices. Our visualization application is based on an adaptation of WebGL open standard; the performed adaptation allows to import open standards and an interactive navigation of 3D models in ordinary web navigators with a good performance. The Visualization platform is scalable and can be applied to urban environments, provided open source files be used; CityGML is an open standard based on a geometry -driven Ontology which is compatible with this approach. We illustrate our results with examples concerning to very damaged churches and a urban district of Segovia (World Cultural Heritage). Their connection with appropriate database eases the building evolution and interventions tracking. We have incorporated some preliminary examples to illustrate Advanced Visualization Tools and architectural e-Learning software platform which have been created for assessing conservation and restoration tasks in very damaged buildings. First version of the Advanced Visualization application has been developed in the framework of ADISPA Spanish Project Results. Our results are illustrated with the application of these software applications to several very damaged cultural heritage buildings in rural zones of Castilla y Leon (Spain).

  8. GENERAL CONSIDERATION REGARDING EU LAW IN THE DOMAIN OF CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra STĂNCIULESCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The cultural heritage is a rich and diverse mosaic of cultural and creative expressions, our inheritance from previous generations of people and our legacy for those to come. In the terms of the Convention concerning the protection of the world cultural and natural heritage, the cultural heritage includes: monuments, such as architectural works, works of monumental sculpture and painting, elements or structures of an archaeological nature; groups of buildings and sites, such as works of man or the combined works of nature and man and areas including archaeological sites, all of these being of outstanding universal value from the point of view of history, art or science. Because of its substantial importance for the evolution of humanity, all nations in general and the European Union in particular, should have the duty of ensuring the identification, protection, conservation, presentation and transmission to future generations of the cultural and natural heritage. EU law states through the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union at article 167 that the action of the Union shall be aimed at encouraging cooperation between Member States and, if necessary, supporting and supplementing the action in areas such as: improvement of the knowledge and dissemination of the culture and history of the European people; conservation and safeguarding of cultural heritage of European significance and others. While policy in this area is primarily the responsibility of Member States, regional and local authorities, the EU is committed to safeguarding and enhancing Europe's cultural heritage through a number of policies and programmes. Due to the lack of such policies and programmes, the lack of consistent terminology and legal definitions, especially between EU languages, the lack of information and data on the crimes that affect cultural goods, the purpose of the essay is to emphasize the need of a rigorous legal program and policy and to observe the

  9. Heritage protection, technological culture and theoretical weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucina Napoleone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the values that have guided traditionally the theoretical approach in the field of restoration (such as truth, beauty, authenticity, etc… were more and more weakened. At the same time, the technical knowledge, traditionally seen as means to reach some goals conceived in a theoretical context, has had an impressive increase.  In the recent past, each one of the theoretical positions – such as conservation, restoration, re-use, renovation, etc – has bent technology to its ideas and has used the progress to reach its goals. However, now we have an inversion of trend: technology has corroded ideas and goals. As the philosopher Emanuele Severino has argued, the instruments which a man has, have the tendency to transform their nature: they turn from means into goals. Thanks to the capability to offer efficient and cost-effective solutions, technology has put theory into the background. Technology feeds on itself, generating needs that will be satisfied by further technological advances, while theory is suffering dramatically, as it is only able to rough out generic horizons. This paper proposes some reflections about the importance of integrating theory into the technological and scientific processes, in order to impose external restrictions related to ethics, authenticity and responsibility.  Keywords: protection, heritage, theory, technique, restoration

  10. Culture heritage and identity - some cases in Taiwan on the protection of cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R. W.-C.

    2015-09-01

    The protection of cultural heritage relates to an issue of identity. How a nation or a state tries to face to its history is often revealed on the protection of cultural heritage. Taiwan is as a country with complex history, especially the period after World War II. This article will work on some significant cases, regarded as ideological representation of identity. This article works on the cultural identity by observing and analyzing different cases of classified Historic Monuments. In different political periods, we see how the government tries to fabricate on the identity issue by working on Historic Monuments preservation. During the presidency of Chiang Kai-shek and his son Chiang Ching-kuo, the classification of Historic Monuments tried to focus on those make by former Chinese migrants. They tried hard to establish and reaffirm the ever existing "fact" of people in Taiwan. Whereas after the late 1980s and 1990s, after Chiang's reign, local conscience has been awaken. Political ambience turned to a new era. This freedom of speech of post-Chiang's reign encourages people to seek on their identity. The complex political situation of Taiwan makes this seeking cultural identity related to the seeking of independence of Taiwan. The respect to the aboriginal people also reoriented to include the preservation of their tribes and villages.

  11. Globalisation And African Cultural Heritage Erosion: Implications For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globalisation And African Cultural Heritage Erosion: Implications For Policy. ... Moreover, economic growth and development have frequently been ... and technology for sustainable development and local community livelihoods. Keywords: ...

  12. Phenomenological classification of cultural heritage: role of virtual reality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hyuk-Jin Lee

    2017-01-01

    .... With the emergence of Virtual Reality (VR) technologies in cultural heritage field, it is necessary to understand how and why different cognitive media such as realor visual reality including VR, are differently recognized by people...

  13. Implementing Mobile Virtual Exhibition to Increase Cultural Heritage Visibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cristian Ciurea; Alin Zamfiroiu; Alin Grosu

    2014-01-01

      The paper presents an implementation of iOS mobile application designed as a virtual exhibition, which aims to increase the accessibility and visibility of physical objects that composite cultural heritage elements...

  14. Filling gaps in cultural heritage documentation by 3D photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Schuhr

    2015-08-01

    Niepce (1827, but seem to promise a great future also in 3D Cultural Heritage documentation. *Last not least 3D printers more and more seem to conquer the IT-market, obviously showing an international competition.

  15. Written Cultural Heritage in the Context of Adopted Legal Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kodrič-Dačić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose: Libraries collect written cultural heritage which is not only the most valuable part of their collections but also a part of library materials which is, due to digitalization projects in the last decade, becoming more and more interesting to librarians and library users. The main goal of the study is a theoretical research of library materials acknowledged as Slovenian heritage. By defining the basic terms it highlights the attributes which are immanent to library materials, derived from the context of their origin or later destiny. Slovenian library legislation concerning protection of written cultural heritage is also critically analysed.Methodology/approach: Comparative analyses of European and Slovenian legislation concerning librarianship and written cultural heritage. Research limitation: Research was mainly limited to professional literature and resources dealing with written cultural heritage. Originality/practical implications: Results of the research serve as formal criteria for definition of library materials as written heritage and suggest how to improve legislation in the field of protection of written heritage in libraries. 

  16. Interaction between cultural/creative tourism and tourism/cultural heritage industries

    OpenAIRE

    Virginija, Dr. Jurėnienė

    2016-01-01

    The chapter presents a review of the conceptions of cultural and creative tourism, their resources, objectives and their benefit and damage to the nature and the society. It is very important in the postmodern society to not only develop cultural tourism that is one of the most rapidly growing branches of economy, but also to employ cultural heritage and does not always develop the common heritage and tourism industry. This is an especially sore point because the common cultural heritage and ...

  17. Mediterranean diet, culture and heritage: challenges for a new conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier Medina, F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the present article is to discuss the role of the Mediterranean diet as a part of Human Culture and Intangible Cultural Heritage. Until the present, Mediterranean diet has been observed as a healthy model of medical behaviour. After its proposal as a Cultural Heritage of the Humanity at UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), Mediterranean diet is actually being observed as a part of Mediterranean culture and starting its concept as an equivalent of Mediterranean Cultural Food System or Mediterranean Culinary System. At the candidacy of Mediterranean diet as a World Cultural Intangible Heritage to be presented at UNESCO in 2008, this new conception is making sense. A new point of view that will be capital in the future discussions about the Mediterranean diet, their challenges and their future perspectives.

  18. Wireless Remote Monitoring System for Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan HUYNH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing systems to collect temperature and relative humidity data at cultural heritage buildings require technical knowledge by people who are working with it, which is very seldom that they do have. The systems available today also require manual downloading of the collected data from the sensor to a computer for central storage and for further analysis. In this paper a wireless remote sensor network based on the ZigBee technology together with a simplified data collection system is presented. The system does not require any knowledge by the building administrator after the network is deployed. The wireless sensor device will automatically join available network when the user wants to expand the network. The collected data will be automatically and periodically synchronized to a remote main server via an Internet connection. The data can be used for centralized monitoring and other purpose. The power consumption of the sensor module is also minimized and the battery lifetime is estimated up to 10 years.

  19. FOREWORD: Cultural heritage and civil engineering Cultural heritage and civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Nicola; Soldovieri, Francesco; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2012-08-01

    This special issue of Journal of Geophysics and Engineering offers a diverse panorama of approaches and technologies that aim to characterize and analyse the state of conservation and health of cultural heritage and civil infrastructure. In particular, it provides a significant overview not only of the effectiveness but also of the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques. The choice of diagnostic strategy depends on the material (concrete, masonry), the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment, etc). The paper by Fornaro et al reports an important technological advance in the field of slow deformation monitoring of civil infrastructure by means of differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) from satellite platforms. The paper shows how the joint exploitation of the last generation of X-band SAR sensors, such as TerraSAR-X, and novel tomographic approaches makes possible advanced multi-dimensional imaging of real structures such as the Las Vegas Monorail. Within the same SAR-based applications, Tapete et al tested the capability of persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) techniques in the preventative diagnosis of deformation threatening the structural stability of archaeological monuments and buried structures in the Roman Forum, Palatino Hill and Oppio Hill in the centre of Rome. A PSInSAR processing approach, based on the use of the SqueeSAR algorithm, has been shown to be highly suitable for retrieving not only information about displacements of the archaeological remains, but also evidence of criticalities affecting partially or totally buried structures, such as those discovered at Nero's Golden

  20. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  1. Burhanpur Cultural Landscape Conservation: Inspiring Quality for Sustainable Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Wahurwagh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The heritage landscape of Burhanpur has an architectural and horticultural composition, consisting of many historic gardens, a unique water management system, a sustainable planning and design framework, the use of landscape and topography with numerous heritage components and historical monuments, temples, tombs and mosques that are locally, regionally and nationally significant. Conserving Burhanpur as an inspirational model for other sites is not only a cultural heritage objective, but it is also a crucial component of the heritage-based sustainable regeneration of the landscape, because it is directly linked to environmental integrity, economic efficiency and resources for present and future generations. Although the last decade has witnessed vigorous efforts by the municipal corporation to preserve and develop Burhanpur by designating it as one of the heritage cities of the UNESCO—Indian Heritage Cities Network (in 2006, a coherent, holistic and sustainable heritage outcome has not been achieved. This paper proposes to harness the cultural landscape as an approach for the sustainable regeneration of Burhanpur heritage and takes a holistic approach to the interpretation of the historic district and natural landscape of the city, where historic buildings are located.

  2. Necessity of “Historic Cultural Heritage and Conservation” Course in Interior Architecture Education

    OpenAIRE

    Atalan Özlem; Sevinç Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    For five decades, academics and architects have been debating the subject of historical conservation techniques. Nowadays, much of building activities take place in historic areas. Most of the architects and interior architects are engaged to renovation or restoration of historical buildings. Architectural education is considered to be a complex process. Teaching the historical cultural heritage and conservation of historic structures constitutes an important part of architectural education. ...

  3. How to Promote Sustainable Relationships between Heritage Conservation and Community, Based on a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Community residents have a strong stake in a local heritage site and may be an important force in its conservation, management and development. Positive relationships between the heritage site and community residents can promote its protection. A questionnaire survey was conducted with local residents of Bogda World Natural Heritage, Xinjiang, China, to assess their perceptions towards the World Natural Heritage, and their attitudes towards participation in heritage conservation. The local residents have made positive contributions to the conservation of heritage resource in the past several years. However, because of the asymmetry between responsibility for conservation and benefit sharing, the authors recommend that a “Community co-management framework” should be established to mobilize residents to participate in heritage conservation. Furthermore, participatory approaches and communication mechanisms are suggested to promote sustainable relationships between community development and heritage conservation. The empirical study can be used as an input to policy making and management for sustainable conservation, and the study contributes to the literature related to community participation at heritage sites.

  4. Which Heritage? Which Landscape? Defining the Authenticity of Cultural Heritage in Karula National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Rattus

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the conflict between Karula National Park in South-Estonia and a local tourist entrepreneur, caused by restrictions due to the heritage protection of the national park. The conflict is regarded as a dialogue between different ways of interpretation of cultural heritage or heritage representations in which different ideological contexts, convictions and coping strategies are intertwined. The article describes the representational practices of both dialogue partners or the implementation of conceptual worlds through concrete behaviour and demonstrates how such actions can express certain social relations, as well as the use of the notion authenticity as an ideological argument in order to legitimize specific heritage representations or, on the contrary, prevent them.

  5. Tourist valorization of architectural cultural heritage of Sabac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grčić Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabac is an important centre in the cultural geography of Serbia. A great number of architectural buildings that are listed in cultural-historic heritage of national interest were built in the city. The goal of this work is to note and highlight the values of architectural cultural heritage of Sabac, which can be valorized for the purpose of tourism. The restoration, protection and inclusion of architectural values in the tourist offer of Sabac, combined with the other types of city tourism such as the event and cultural tourism, contribute to the affirmation of this city as a tourist centre of West Serbia.

  6. Validation of a Business Model for Cultural Heritage Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian CIUREA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a business model for the efficiency optimization of the interaction between all actors involved in cultural heritage sector, such as galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM. The validation of the business model is subject of analyses and implementations in a real environment made by different cultural institutions. The implementation of virtual exhibitions on mobile devices is described and analyzed as a key factor for increasing the cultural heritage visibility. New perspectives on the development of virtual exhibitions for mobile devices are considered. A study on the number of visitors of cultural institutions is carried out and ways to increase the number of visitors are described.

  7. The IV International Symposium ProGEO on the Conservation of the Geological Heritage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.A.P.Wimbledom; J.B.Brilha

    2006-01-01

    @@ The IV International Symposium ProGEO on the Conservation of the Geological Heritage was held between 13-16 September 2005 at Braga organised by ProGEO (European Association for the Conservation of the Geological Heritage) and by the Earth Sciences Department of the University of Minho.

  8. Coupling non invasive and fast sampling of proteins from work of art surfaces to surface plasmon resonance biosensing: Differential and simultaneous detection of egg components for cultural heritage diagnosis and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, S; Carretti, E; Dei, L; Baglioni, P; Minunni, M

    2016-11-15

    Despite the wide application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to a broad area of interests, from environment to food analysis, from drug discovery to diagnostics, its exploitation in cultural heritage conservation is still unexplored. Water-based highly viscous polymeric dispersions (HVPD) composed by partially hydrolyzed polyvinyl acetate (PVA), borax, and water, were recently developed and successfully applied for the selective removal of surface degradation patinas (i.e. protein materials, natural resins etc.) from paintings of historical and artistic interest. This approach is here coupled for the first time to a SPR biosensor to simultaneously recognize albumen, yolk, or their mixtures in HVPD extracts. Ovalbumin and immunoglobulin Y are selected as analytes for egg white and yolk recognition, respectively. The biosensor was first characterized on standard analytes within the range 0-400mgL(-1) and then on fresh and dried egg albumen and yolk down to 2·10(^4) and 1·10(^5) dilution factors, respectively. Once optimized, the biosensor was combined to the HVPD application on simulated and real art samples for the evaluation of hen egg presence in the extract, i.e. albumen, yolk, or their co-presence in the matrix. For a contemporary 'sacred icon', realized by the traditional egg tempera procedure described by Cennino Cennini, the biosensor successfully distinguished different uses of egg components for the realization of painted and gilded areas, i.e. yolk and albumen, respectively. Finally, a XVIII century italian painting whose the realization technique is unknown, was tested confirming its egg tempera-based realization technique.

  9. Promotion of Cultural Heritage in Batangas and Cavite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Dexter R. Buted

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available – The study aimed to identify the commonly visited cultural heritage sites in Batangas and Cavite; to assess the cultural heritage sites in Batangas and Cavite in terms of physical, social and economic aspects; and to determine existing promotional patterns of Batangas and Cavite. Descriptive type of research was utilized in the study. Results showed that the most visited cultural heritage attraction in Taal, Batangas was Basilica of St. Martin de Tours while in Maragondon, Cavite the most visited was Andres Bonifacio Trial House . Blogs, Websites and Facebook are mostly used by the municipality of Taal in promoting their cultural heritage sites. While Cavite sticks to always using leaflets/flyers, brochures as their promotional materials. Cultural heritage sites in both Taal and Maragondon were perceived to have positive results in the assessments based on different aspects such as physical, social and economic aspects. The promotional materials of Taal and Maragondon are often used. A proposed plan of action was made to promote cultural attraction in Maragondon, Cavite and Taal, Batangas.

  10. Cultural Heritage: An Introduction to Entanglements of Knowledge, Politics and Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kuutma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Heritage is today actively implemented in policies globally, and yet the categorisation and instrumentalisation of the realm of cultural heritage entails rather contradictory aspects. In the discourse of culture, heritage is an abstraction, and what it signifies is subject to interpretation. This contribution gives a brief overview of the contemporary discussion of the epistemological and ontological premises of cultural heritage. It has been stated that heritage is a social construction, and a mode of cultural production that emanates from a metacultural relationship. The critical assessment and theorisation of heritage includes an enquiry into tangible and intangible heritagisation, knowledge production, heritage politics, and the question of ownership.

  11. BUILT HERITAGE DOCUMENTATION AND MANAGEMENT: AN INTEGRATED CONSERVATION APPROACH IN BAGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mezzino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Good practices in heritage conservation are based on accurate information about conditions, materials, and transformation of built heritage sites. Therefore, heritage site documentation and its analysis are essential parts for their conservation. In addition, the devastating effects of recent catastrophic events in different geographical areas have highly affected cultural heritage places. Such areas include and are not limited to South Europe, South East Asia, and Central America. Within this framework, appropriate acquisition of information can effectively provide tools for the decision-making process and management. Heritage documentation is growing in innovation, providing dynamic opportunities for effectively responding to the alarming rate of destruction by natural events, conflicts, and negligence. In line with these considerations, a multidisciplinary team – including students and faculty members from Carleton University and Yangon Technological University, as well as staff from the Department of Archaeology, National Museum and Library (DoA and professionals from the CyArk foundation – developed a coordinated strategy to document four temples in the site of Bagan (Myanmar. On-field work included capacity-building activities to train local emerging professionals in the heritage field (graduate and undergraduate students from the Yangon Technological University and to increase the technical knowledge of the local DoA staff in the digital documentation field. Due to the short time of the on-field activity and the need to record several monuments, a variety of documentation techniques, including image and non-image based ones, were used. Afterwards, the information acquired during the fieldwork was processed to develop a solid base for the conservation and monitoring of the four documented temples. The relevance of developing this kind of documentation in Bagan is related to the vulnerability of the site, often affected by natural

  12. Built Heritage Documentation and Management: AN Integrated Conservation Approach in Bagan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzino, D.; Chan, L.; Santana Quintero, M.; Esponda, M.; Lee, S.; Min, A.; Pwint, M.

    2017-08-01

    Good practices in heritage conservation are based on accurate information about conditions, materials, and transformation of built heritage sites. Therefore, heritage site documentation and its analysis are essential parts for their conservation. In addition, the devastating effects of recent catastrophic events in different geographical areas have highly affected cultural heritage places. Such areas include and are not limited to South Europe, South East Asia, and Central America. Within this framework, appropriate acquisition of information can effectively provide tools for the decision-making process and management. Heritage documentation is growing in innovation, providing dynamic opportunities for effectively responding to the alarming rate of destruction by natural events, conflicts, and negligence. In line with these considerations, a multidisciplinary team - including students and faculty members from Carleton University and Yangon Technological University, as well as staff from the Department of Archaeology, National Museum and Library (DoA) and professionals from the CyArk foundation - developed a coordinated strategy to document four temples in the site of Bagan (Myanmar). On-field work included capacity-building activities to train local emerging professionals in the heritage field (graduate and undergraduate students from the Yangon Technological University) and to increase the technical knowledge of the local DoA staff in the digital documentation field. Due to the short time of the on-field activity and the need to record several monuments, a variety of documentation techniques, including image and non-image based ones, were used. Afterwards, the information acquired during the fieldwork was processed to develop a solid base for the conservation and monitoring of the four documented temples. The relevance of developing this kind of documentation in Bagan is related to the vulnerability of the site, often affected by natural seismic events and

  13. Cultural Heritage Conservation of Hakka Culture in Hong Kong:taking Fanling District in New Territory as the case studies%人在异乡为异客:香港客家文化之保育--以新界粉岭地区为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹舟

    2014-01-01

    文章选取香港新界北区的粉岭作为个案研究对象,通过追溯客家文化社群在粉岭的历史沿革,分析以崇谦堂、联合墟、粉岭戏院为代表的农村社区是如何实现公众民主参与和文化资源共享的,并考察文化政策、文化组织、民间社团、科研机构合力传承和推广客家文化的现有成果。透过全球化与都市化背景之下农村传统文化社区的转型,客观评价客家文化保育的当代价值,即作为一种独特的地方文化资源,用以抵抗全球化带来的单一化与平面化。%This paper mainly investigates the cultural heritage conservation of Hakka culture in Hong Kong,taking Fanling district in New Territory as the case studies. By reviewing the historical development of Hakka cultural community in Fanling,this research ex-plores how the rural community fulfills its civic engagement and cultural sharing by taking Luen Wo market and Fanling theatre as ex-ample. Last but not least,how the cultural policy conserves historical monuments and the local organization promotes Hakka culture will be analyzed in a global context. By explaining the transition of rural community in the global city,this paper examines the modern values of cultural heritage conservation. As the unique local culture,Hakka culture in Hong Kong has greatly resists against the one-di-mensional trajectory of globalization.

  14. Conserving Space Heritage - The Case for Tranquillity Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewer, G.

    One of the most important and spectacular events in the history of space exploration was the first Moon Landing of 1969. Safe from the ravages of erosion, agriculture, industry or the expansion of human settlement, the greatest threat to the site of this momentous event - Tranquillity Base - is likely to be from a meteor impact. However, with the advent of space tourism and commercial space travel, the site of humankind's first visit to a celestial body may come under threat of a different kind - that of souvenir hunters and miners. In this paper, the historical background to the Apollo programme is outlined and the sequence of events that made up the Apollo 11 mission, which conducted the first Moon landing, is described before concluding with a consideration of the heritage conservation issues of Tranquillity Base.

  15. Assessing representativeness of places for conservation reservation and heritage listing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Brendan G.; Nix, Henry A.; Hutchinson, Michael F.; MacMahon, June P.; Fleming, P. Michael

    1988-07-01

    Problems arising from application of the representative criterion for conservation and natural heritage evaluation are discussed. An ecological basis to this criterion is suggested that focuses on those key environmental factors dominating biotic response. A methodology is proposed that utilizes computer-based methods of establishing and interrogating spatial data bases (geographic information systems), environmental modeling, and numeric analysis. An example is presented illustrating some of the advantages and limitations of classification and dimension reduction techniques in both defining bioenvironments and displaying their spatial distribution. The advantages of this method for representativeness evaluation are that it maximizes the utility of available data, is explicit and repeatable, and enables large areas to be analyzed at relatively fine scales.

  16. A Contribution to the Rethinking of the European Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Stojmenska - Elzeser

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this text the author questions the possibility of unique European identity and the processes of forming the common European cultural heritage. The problem of Eurocentrism, the unstable categories of center and periphery in culture, the geopolitics influences and the problem of Eurocentrism and exclusiveness are considered as well. The incorporation of Macedonian culture in the European heritage shows a very specific angle of perception, because it has many difficulties and prejudices connected with so called “small cultures” identification. It is discussed through the examples of two eminent Macedonian intellectuals: Blaze Koneski and Goran Stefanovski.

  17. Noninvasive testing of art and cultural heritage by mobile NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Perlo, Juan; Presciutti, Federica; Anselmi, Chiara; Doherty, Brenda

    2010-06-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has many applications in science, medicine, and technology. Conventional instrumentation is large and expensive, however, because superconducting magnets offer maximum sensitivity. Yet NMR devices can also be small and inexpensive if permanent magnets are used, and samples need not be placed within the magnet but can be examined externally in the stray magnetic field. Mobile stray-field NMR is a method of growing interest for nondestructive testing of a diverse range of materials and processes. A well-known stray-field sensor is the commercially available NMR-MOUSE, which is small and can readily be carried to an object to be studied. In this Account, we describe mobile stray-field NMR, with particular attention to its use in analyzing objects of cultural heritage. The most common data recorded are relaxation measurements of (1)H because the proton is the most sensitive NMR nucleus, and relaxation can be measured despite the inhomogeneous magnetic field that typically accompanies a simple magnet design. Through NMR relaxation, the state of matter can be analyzed locally, and the signal amplitude gives the proton density. A variety of stray-field sensors have been designed. Small devices weighing less than a kilogram have a shallow penetration depth of just a few millimeters and a resolution of a few micrometers. Access to greater depths requires larger sensors that may weigh 30 kg or more. The use of these sensors is illustrated by selected examples, including examinations of (i) the stratigraphy of master paintings, (ii) binder aging, (iii) the deterioration of paper, (iv) wood density in master violins, (v) the moisture content and moisture profiles in walls covered with paintings and mosaics, and (vi) the evolution of stone conservation treatments. The NMR data provide unique information to the conservator on the state of the object--including past conservation measures. The use of mobile NMR remains relatively new, expanding

  18. First aid to Cultural Heritage. Training initiatives on rapid documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro Vidal, A.; Tandon, A.; Eppich, R.

    2015-08-01

    Recent dramatic events have brought to the forefront the debate on how to protect, safeguard and document Cultural Heritage in conflict areas. Heritage places have become battlefields, sources of illicit trafficking and even deliberate targets of destruction because of the politicisation to further conflict ideologies as well as misinterpretation of the values they represent. Is it possible to protect Cultural Heritage under such circumstances? If yes, when is the right time to intervene and who can help in this task? How can documentation and training assist? The International Course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis promoted by ICCROM (The International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property) in collaboration with various partners focuses specifically on ways to help in such difficult and stressful situations. This paper explores the methodological approach and highlights the special circumstances that surround rapid documentation and preliminary condition assessment in conflict areas, and in cases of complex emergencies such as an earthquake striking a conflict area. The paper identifies international actors that might play a special and crucial role in the first steps of such a situation and recognizes the need for training activities to strengthen capacities for disaster response to cultural heritage at national and regional levels.

  19. RECORDING INFORMATION ON ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE SHOULD MEET THE REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSERVATION Digital Recording Practices at the Summer Palace

    OpenAIRE

    L. Zhang; Y. Cong; Bai, C; Wu, C

    2017-01-01

    The recording of Architectural heritage information is the foundation of research, conservation, management, and the display of architectural heritage. In other words, the recording of architectural heritage information supports heritage research, conservation, management and architectural heritage display. What information do we record and collect and what technology do we use for information recording? How do we determine the level of accuracy required when recording architectural ...

  20. Moutai Applying for World Intangible Cultural Heritage Listing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ In order to carry on China's traditional distillation and brewing techniques by Kweichow Moutai,Shanxi Fen Chiew,and Luzhou Laojiao,classic representatives of the sauce-flavor,delicate-flavor,and strong-flavor liquors,have applied to the United Nations Eductional,Scientific and Cultural Organization(UNESCO) for the World Intangible Cultural Heritage listing.

  1. A cybernetic model of computerization of the cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. Filip

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An e-Europe for all should include the facilitation of European citizens to the cultural heritage of Europe and Mediterranean area. This paper proposes a vision for a transition to complex systems combining IT organizations and cultural institutions. It describes the impact and limits and proposes a preliminary cybernetic model to study the relationship between the organizations implied.

  2. Educational, Economic and Social Influences on Cultural Heritage in Trinidad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufoy-Bastick, Beatrice

    2009-01-01

    This research presents traditional cultural heritage (CH) as a dynamic social process--a positive feedback loop enhancing cultural identity and institutional authority through a contested authoritative inclusion of the "objects" it comprises. It then focuses on one part of that process, the individuals' construction of their CH, and…

  3. Preservation of Scientific and Cultural Heritage in Balkan Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonta, Yasar

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The peoples living in the Balkan Peninsula over centuries have created a very rich cultural heritage and the constant political upheavals in the region have affected the development and preservation of their cultures. This paper aims to review the internet infrastructure and networked readiness levels of the Balkan countries, which are…

  4. Collaboration in Cultural Heritage Digitisation in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk-Jin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of collaboration in cultural heritage preservation in East Asia, including digital projects, and to suggest practical improvements based on a cultural structuralism perspective. Design/methodology/approach: Through exploratory research, the paper addresses aspects for successful…

  5. Online Cultural Heritage Exhibitions: A Survey of Strategic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chern Li

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to report findings from a study that looked at a range of strategic issues faced in the development, management and maintenance of online cultural heritage exhibitions. The study examined exhibitions from different types of cultural agencies and asked questions about whether, for instance, the exhibitions are part of the…

  6. Heritage/Culture Preservation Model Bilingual Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samayoa, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Our first generation children face a loss of heritage in today's public schools. Unfortunately, the assets that one's bilingual ability brings into the classroom are difficult for educators to fully understand. Often this may happen because professionals in the field of education lack the knowledge about the need for children to maintain their…

  7. Cultural heritage and sustainable development in SUIT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Algreen-Ussing, Gregers; Hassler, Uta; Kohler, Niklaus

    2004-01-01

    Urban projects, plans and other programmes falls under present Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) directive as well as the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) directive. There is a need to adopt more comprehensive understanding of urban built heritage, one that would enable taking into co...

  8. Built urban heritage conservation in Islamic societies: Study case in Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meutia, Z. D.

    2017-06-01

    This paper aims to find the concept of the built heritage related to Islamic societies with a case study in the city of Banda Aceh through study literature review, with the context of the planning in the era of uncertainty. In this paper will be elaborated and described what it was about heritage and urban heritage and conservation Islamic values in heritage, as well as explain the concept of the built heritage conservation in Islamic societies. Discussion and analysis will be done through its study literature. Literature reviews about built urban heritage conservation and perspective of the Islamic societies in Banda aceh was done using systematic methodology literature review. This methodology summarizes research results earlier that presents the fact that a more comprehensive and balanced. The synthesis of the results conducted using narrative techniques or technique of qualitative. The discovery paper in this paper is to understand the relationship the built heritage conservation of Islamic societies perspective that consider shari’a aspect and local tradition in built urban heritage that can affect to heritage planning.

  9. Phenomenological classification of cultural heritage: role of virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk-Jin Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human consciousness is always the consciousness toward some thing and our perception of cultural heritage is no exception. Thus, understanding human cognition is closely related to understanding how the perceptible objects are classified in human mind. The perceptible objects include both physical and virtual experiences and thoughts, and it is important and necessary to analyze the types and the effective levels of those objects. With the emergence of Virtual Reality (VR technologies in cultural heritage field, it is necessary to understand how and why different cognitive media such as realor visual reality including VR, are differently recognized by people. This study suggests the philosophical and theoretical frame for the usage of phenomenological classfication and analysis. By using this new classification with the case of Korean built heritage, the role of VR is explained in cultural discourse of the community.

  10. Museums, Diasporas and the Sustainability of Intangible Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saphinaz-Amal Naguib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the work of museums in constructing the intangible cultural heritage of migration and diasporas. I address the cultural dimension of sustainability and examine what happens to living traditions in migratory contexts, in particular, in contexts of international migrations, and consider different participatory approaches used by museums. I propose that collaborative projects drawing upon the principles of ecomuseology and what I describe as participation by endowment may provide new ways of involving groups of immigrant background. I limit the discussion to questions tied to the intangible cultural heritage of migration to Europe and argue that by recording, documenting, safeguarding and keeping the intangible heritage of diasporas alive, museums contribute in promoting self-esteem among these populations and social cohesion in society.

  11. JPEG2000 and dissemination of cultural heritage over the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politou, Eugenia A; Pavlidis, George P; Chamzas, Christodoulos

    2004-03-01

    By applying the latest technologies in image compression for managing the storage of massive image data within cultural heritage databases and by exploiting the universality of the Internet we are now able not only to effectively digitize, record and preserve, but also to promote the dissemination of cultural heritage. In this work we present an application of the latest image compression standard JPEG2000 in managing and browsing image databases, focusing on the image transmission aspect rather than database management and indexing. We combine the technologies of JPEG2000 image compression with client-server socket connections and client browser plug-in, as to provide with an all-in-one package for remote browsing of JPEG2000 compressed image databases, suitable for the effective dissemination of cultural heritage.

  12. The American Schools of Oriental Research Cultural Heritage Initiatives: Monitoring Cultural Heritage in Syria and Northern Iraq by Geospatial Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Danti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The American Schools of Oriental Research Cultural Heritage Initiatives (ASOR CHI continues to address the cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Northern Iraq by: (1 monitoring, reporting, and fact-finding; (2 promoting global awareness; and (3 conducting emergency response projects and developing post-conflict rehabilitation plans. As part of this mission, ASOR CHI, through a public–government collaboration with the United States of America (US Department of State, has been provided with access to hundreds of thousands of satellite images, some within 24 h of the image being taken, in order to assess reports of damage to cultural heritage sites, to discover unreported damage, and to evaluate the impacts of such incidents. This work is being done across an inventory of over 13,000 cultural heritage sites in the affected regions. The available dataset of satellite imagery is significantly larger than the scales that geospatial specialists within archaeology have dealt with in the past. This has necessitated a rethinking of how the project uses satellite imagery and how ASOR CHI and future projects can more effectively undertake the important work of cultural heritage monitoring and damage assessment.

  13. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance sensors to cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-04-21

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  14. FCJ-174 Constructing the contemporary via digital cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Andreasen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article questions the construction of 'the contemporary' in digital cultural heritage archives as specific strategic articulations between past and present with regard to the future. A historical exploration of the discourse of cultural heritage presents three strategic axes supposedly executed by the archive. Via a fourfold problematisation of the notion of the contemporary these axes are further developed with regard to W.J.T. Mitchell and Georges Didi-Huberman's respective readings of Warburg's Atlas Mnemosyne and Malraux's Musée imaginaire. The article finally questions the possibility of ascribing inherent epistemological, existential, empirical and geopolitical force to a given technological archival order.

  15. Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensors to Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Proietti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  16. Human-Computer Interaction, Tourism and Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.

    We present a state of the art of the human-computer interaction aimed at tourism and cultural heritage in some cities of the European Mediterranean. In the work an analysis is made of the main problems deriving from training understood as business and which can derail the continuous growth of the HCI, the new technologies and tourism industry. Through a semiotic and epistemological study the current mistakes in the context of the interrelations of the formal and factual sciences will be detected and also the human factors that have an influence on the professionals devoted to the development of interactive systems in order to safeguard and boost cultural heritage.

  17. Automatic Damage Detection for Sensitive Cultural Heritage Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerra, D.; Tian, J.; Lysandrou, V.; Plank, S.

    2016-06-01

    The intentional damages to local Cultural Heritage sites carried out in recent months by the Islamic State (IS) have received wide coverage from the media worldwide. Earth Observation data is an important tool to assess these damages in such non-accessible areas: If a fast response is desired, automated image processing techniques would be needed to speed up the analysis. This paper shows the first results of applying fast and robust change detection techniques to sensitive areas. A map highlighting potentially damaged buildings is derived, which could help experts at timely assessing the damages to the Cultural Heritage sites in the observed images.

  18. Basic Visual Disciplines in Heritage Conservation: Outline of Selected Perspectives in Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobovikov-Katz, A.

    2017-08-01

    Acknowledgement of the value of a basic freehand sketch by the information and communication community of researchers and developers brought about the advanced developments for the use of sketches as free input to complicated processes of computerized visualization, so as to make them more widely accessible. However, a sharp reduction and even exclusion of this and other basic visual disciplines from education in sciences, technology, engineering and architecture dramatically reduces the number of future users of such applications. The unique needs of conservation of cultural heritage pose specific challenges as well as encourage the formulation of innovative development tasks in related areas of information and communication technologies (ICT). This paper claims that the introduction of basic visual disciplines to both communities is essential to the effectiveness of integration of heritage conservation needs and the advanced ICT development of conservation value, and beyond. It provides an insight into the challenges and advantages of introducing these subjects in a relevant educational context, presents some examples of their teaching and learning in the modern environment, including e-learning, and sketches perspectives to their application.

  19. BASIC VISUAL DISCIPLINES IN HERITAGE CONSERVATION: OUTLINE OF SELECTED PERSPECTIVES IN TEACHING AND LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lobovikov-Katz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acknowledgement of the value of a basic freehand sketch by the information and communication community of researchers and developers brought about the advanced developments for the use of sketches as free input to complicated processes of computerized visualization, so as to make them more widely accessible. However, a sharp reduction and even exclusion of this and other basic visual disciplines from education in sciences, technology, engineering and architecture dramatically reduces the number of future users of such applications. The unique needs of conservation of cultural heritage pose specific challenges as well as encourage the formulation of innovative development tasks in related areas of information and communication technologies (ICT. This paper claims that the introduction of basic visual disciplines to both communities is essential to the effectiveness of integration of heritage conservation needs and the advanced ICT development of conservation value, and beyond. It provides an insight into the challenges and advantages of introducing these subjects in a relevant educational context, presents some examples of their teaching and learning in the modern environment, including e-learning, and sketches perspectives to their application.

  20. The Economic Benefits to Conserve Melaka City’s Living Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chooi Chea Chiam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Heritage is everyone's legacy and living heritage would be able to tell us who we are, where we have come from and what we have accomplished. It is a source of strength and confidence that puts the changes of society into perspective and helps us to build a better future for ourselves and the future generations. The Malaysia government has highlighted the importance of conservation of a living heritage and has since been promoting heavily the heritage conservation for many years, adjusting its role to meet changing needs and circumstances, following recognition of the importance of living heritage. Melaka implemented a RM2 heritage charge on per night accommodation since April 2012 after recognising the needs for the city to conserve the unique living heritage in Melaka City. This study was conducted in Melaka City, one of UNESCO Heritage Site listings. A total sample of 502 was collected from the visitors in Melaka City for this study.The aim of this study was to determine the value of willingness-to-pay by visitors to pay the heritage charge in the city using single-bounded contingent valuation dichotomous choice method (single-bounded CVM-DC.

  1. Cultural heritage of Varna and its tourist recognisability in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dombrowicz M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage of the European civilization constitutes cultural and spiritual property of the ancestors, as well as current generations of the Varna city. It represents both material and non-material value, defines the European culture. It includes all the environmental consequences arising from the interaction between the man and the surroundings over the course of history. Assessment of tourist potential of Varna performed on 9-14th September, 2014, by the members of the “European Traveler” scientific circle, students of tourist and recreation, as well as heritage and culture tourism at Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz, made it possible to identify the main points of tourist recognizability in relation to the city and region. The staid points are predominantly based on the unique cultural assets of the city and the region - in large measure related to the origins of the European civilization - as well as current cultural events organized in the city.

  2. Cultural heritage of Varna and its tourist recognisability in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowicz, M.; Gruszka, P.; Jarecka, I.

    2016-03-01

    Cultural heritage of the European civilization constitutes cultural and spiritual property of the ancestors, as well as current generations of the Varna city. It represents both material and non-material value, defines the European culture. It includes all the environmental consequences arising from the interaction between the man and the surroundings over the course of history. Assessment of tourist potential of Varna performed on 9-14th September, 2014, by the members of the "European Traveler" scientific circle, students of tourist and recreation, as well as heritage and culture tourism at Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz, made it possible to identify the main points of tourist recognizability in relation to the city and region. The staid points are predominantly based on the unique cultural assets of the city and the region - in large measure related to the origins of the European civilization - as well as current cultural events organized in the city.

  3. Iniciativa de ley federal del patrimonio cultural de la nacion (Draft of Federal Law for the Cultural Heritage of the Nation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexico.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of the draft of a law for the preservation of Mexican national heritage, particularly for the protection, conservation, and recuperation of cultural objects. The document consists of twelve chapters and six articles. Chapter 1 declares the protection, conservation,…

  4. Iniciativa de ley federal del patrimonio cultural de la nacion (Draft of Federal Law for the Cultural Heritage of the Nation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexico.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of the draft of a law for the preservation of Mexican national heritage, particularly for the protection, conservation, and recuperation of cultural objects. The document consists of twelve chapters and six articles. Chapter 1 declares the protection, conservation,…

  5. Cultural Heritage Meets Mobile Media - and New Games Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens F.

    The paper describes and evaluates a recent project in Aalborg, Denmark, dealing with the communication of cultural heritage and industrial culture to young people via their own preferred media platform: mobile phones. The communication was based on the new cultural genre: Alternative Reality Games......, a method that - so to speak - writes the player into the story and history, and a method that because of the narrative form is especially well-suited to support coherences and coherent stories....

  6. Cultures and the global(ist) future: globalism, heritage and cultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultures and the global(ist) future: globalism, heritage and cultural revitalisation. ... Journal of Social Development in Africa ... globalist philosophy is the emergent dichotomy between the “One World culture” movement versus the revitalisation ...

  7. Abstracts of the TICCIH Canada conference on industrial strength : conserving Canada's industrial heritage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The conservation and rehabilitation of Canada's industrial sites represents some of the most innovative examples of heritage site development. This conference provided a forum for various stakeholder, conservation specialists, and community planners to discuss issues and strategies for preserving Canada's industrial heritage. Challenges related to preserving industrial heritage as historic sites and museums were discussed. Methods of strengthening community identity and engagement with industrial heritage preservation were also presented. The future of an industrial heritage network was considered. The conference was divided into the following 7 sessions: (1) new site development, brownfield to heritage sites, (2) inventories, evaluation and awareness, (3) industrial heritage of Hamilton, (4) conservation, adaptive reuse and economic viability, a case study of the Toronto distillery project, (5) industrial landscapes, (6) preserving the intangibles, and (7) industrial heritage museums, issues in conservation, interpretation, and sustainability. The conference featured 19 papers, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  8. LINKS BETWEEN CULTURAL HERITAGE TOURISM AND OVERALL SENSE OF TOURIST WELL-BEING

    OpenAIRE

    Jew, Jeongyong

    2015-01-01

    Cultural heritage tourism is still the growing segment of tourism industry. Moreover, many tourists prefer exploring something new, cultural heritage tourism (CHT) has become one of the major "new" segments of tourism demand. Therefore, it is true that cultural heritage tourism has been one of the major sources of both quantitative and qualitative growth of tourism industry in many countries. In regard to the context of cultural heritage tourism industry, by identifying the rel...

  9. Cultural landscapes as heritage in Malaysia: Potentials, threats, and current practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, R.

    2013-01-01

    The rural cultural landscape in Malaysia is relatively under-researched. The current heritage practices focus on built heritage as national heritage, which implies the everyday landscapes of the rural areas have been neglected as potential heritage and have received little attention from politicians

  10. Cultural landscapes as heritage in Malaysia: Potentials, threats, and current practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, R.

    2013-01-01

    The rural cultural landscape in Malaysia is relatively under-researched. The current heritage practices focus on built heritage as national heritage, which implies the everyday landscapes of the rural areas have been neglected as potential heritage and have received little attention from politicians

  11. Cultural Heritage Recording Utilising Low-Cost Closerange Photogrammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kirchhöfer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage is under a constant threat of damage or even destruction and comprehensive and accurate recording is necessary to attenuate the risk of losing heritage or serve as basis for reconstruction. Cost effective and easy to use methods are required to record cultural heritage, particularly during a world recession, and close-range photogrammetry has proven potential in this area. Off-the-shelf digital cameras can be used to rapidly acquire data at low cost, allowing non-experts to become involved. Exterior orientation of the camera during exposure ideally needs to be established for every image, traditionally requiring known coordinated target points. Establishing these points is time consuming and costly and using targets can be often undesirable on sensitive sites. MEMS-based sensors can assist in overcoming this problem by providing small-size and low-cost means to directly determine exterior orientation for close-range photogrammetry. This paper describes development of an image-based recording system, comprising an off-the-shelf digital SLR camera, a MEMS-based 3D orientation sensor and a GPS antenna. All system components were assembled in a compact and rigid frame that allows calibration of rotational and positional offsets between the components. The project involves collaboration between English Heritage and Loughborough University and the intention is to assess the system’s achievable accuracy and practicability in a heritage recording environment. Tests were conducted at Loughborough University and a case study at St. Catherine’s Oratory on the Isle of Wight, UK. These demonstrate that the data recorded by the system can indeed meet the accuracy requirements for heritage recording at medium accuracy (1-4cm, with either a single or even no control points. As the recording system has been configured with a focus on low-cost and easy-to-use components, it is believed to be suitable for heritage recording by non

  12. Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage Initiatives in Tanzania and Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Bill; Parthesius, Robert

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this paper is provide an overview of the capacity building programmes in maritime and underwater cultural heritage (MUCH) conducted by the authors in Tanzania and Mozambique. Tanzania and Mozambique have long histories of indigenous cultures, foreign contacts and influences and African adaptations beginning in the late Greco-Roman period, when the coastal populations exploited the peoples and riches of the interior. Today the coastline contains numerous examples of indigenous tangible and intangible heritage and many sites and histories related to the Swahili culture. Some exploratory research and training has been conducted in Tanzania and Mozambique, but the implementation by local residents of their own MUCH programme is still at an early stage. Under a UNESCO agreement framework, Tanzania in particular has started to develop a MUCH programme, which can assist in highlighting their extensive histories, cultural landscapes and cultural identity.

  13. Protection of European Cultural Heritage from geo - hazards: the PROTHEGO project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Cigna, Francesca; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Fernandez Merodo, José Antonio

    2016-04-01

    modeling and field surveying for the most critical sites will be carried out to discover cause and extent of the observed motions. PROTHEGO will enhance Cultural Heritage management at National level, reinforcing institutional support and governance through knowledge and innovation, identifying, assessing and monitoring risks, strengthening disaster preparedness at heritage properties in the future. PROTHEGO will provide a new remote sensing tool and a new methodological approach, for the safety management of cultural heritage, at low cost and covering monuments and sites located in Europe. The project will promote interdisciplinary and collaborative R&D activities, transferring the highest level of knowledge, quality and standards from space and earth sciences to cultural heritage conservation sciences. The tools developed during the project (e.g. GIS platform, project web sites, European Hazards database assessment, Guidelines, best practices) will be useful to policy makers (public and private) in the field of cultural heritage to inform decision making based on the integrated risk assessment. The outcomes of PROTHEGO will support correct planning and rebalancing the contrast between endogenous (structural and materials decay, the societal development, the anthropogenic pressure) and surrounding exogenous forces (natural hazards acting on the heritage) which affecting the European cultural heritage

  14. The Danish digitalized Cultural Heritage and its users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransson, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    In this Ph.D. project three different cultural heritage resources on the web are studied with a triangulation of methods. 1) The users’ navigational strategies to reach the resources and their usage of them are examined by web log analysis. 2) User attitude and experiences are collected through...

  15. Pacific discourses about cultural heritage and its protection: An introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The articles collected in this special issue aim at addressing the debate about the protection and use of cultural heritage in the Pacific within the context of globalization. Contributions aim specifically at analyzing the tension that exists between, on the one hand, political, legal and economic

  16. Pacific discourses about cultural heritage and its protection: An introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The articles collected in this special issue aim at addressing the debate about the protection and use of cultural heritage in the Pacific within the context of globalization. Contributions aim specifically at analyzing the tension that exists between, on the one hand, political, legal and economic

  17. Personalization in crowd-driven annotation for cultural heritage collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkshoorn, C.; Oosterman, J.; Aroyo, L.; Houben, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Many cultural heritage institutions are confronted with a big challenge when it comes to adapting the process of registration, annotation and digitization of their collections to meet the new technological demands for providing their collections online with Web and mobile technologies. With limited

  18. Challenges of Digital Preservation for Cultural Heritage Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, Tom; Hauttekeete, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    This article elaborates four major issues hampering the sustainability of digital preservation within cultural heritage institutions: digitization, metadata indexes, intellectual property rights management and business models. Using a case-study approach, the digitization of audiovisual collections within the performing arts institutions in…

  19. Assessing environmental effects on organic materials in cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyatzis, Stamatis; Ioakimoglou, Eleni; Facorellis, Yorgos

    2015-01-01

    Under the auspices of INVENVORG (Thales Research Funding Program – NRSF), and within a holistic approach for assessing environmental effects on organic materials in cultural heritage (CH) artefacts, the effect of artificial ageing on elemental and molecular damage and their effects on the structu...

  20. Personalization in crowd-driven annotation for cultural heritage collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkshoorn, C.; Oosterman, J.; Aroyo, L.; Houben, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Many cultural heritage institutions are confronted with a big challenge when it comes to adapting the process of registration, annotation and digitization of their collections to meet the new technological demands for providing their collections online with Web and mobile technologies. With limited

  1. Climate control in cultural heritage buildings in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Poul Klenz [The National Museum, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Conservation; Brostroem, Tor [Gotland Univ., Visby (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Conservation heating has been used for decades to control the RH in cultural heritage buildings. But if the building is not used for living or working, heating is not needed for human comfort. The chemical decay of organic materials depends mainly on temperature, so it is better for preservation to reduce heating. The air exchange rate is related to the design of the building envelope. With rising energy prices humidity control by dehumidification may be an attractive alternative. The potential for energy efficient RH control was examined for a generic building exposed to the monthly average outside temperature and RH in Denmark. The indoor temperature was allowed to follow the outside average, whereas the indoor RH was controlled to 40 % 50 % 60 % or 70 %. Dehumidification was implemented in three different buildings: A recent museum store, a medieval church, and an 18th century country mansion. The energy consumption depends on the RH set point, the air exchange rate and the source of liquid moisture to the building. The air exchange rate related to the design of the building envelope. Single glazed windows and doors are the most important sources of leakage to buildings. Lack of maintenance may lead to poor performance of the dehumidifier and waste energy. (orig.)

  2. Examining the Role of Religious Identity in the Preservation of Cultural Heritage among Youth in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   Many social studies confirm that religion has an influential role in forming attitudes, trends and the meaning of social behaviors. However, so far little attention has been paid to examining the relationship between religious integrity and architectural space. Regarding to the fact that in many parts of the world cultural heritage places such as mosques, shrines, squares, temples and streets are alive and the public can use them actively, the present study intends to examine the relationship between religious identity and cultural heritage conservation. Based on the importance of youth's values, socialization and demographic characteristics of the Iranian population, youth were selected as this research's subjects. Material s and Methods   According to research goals, to assess the role of religion in social life and focusing on active preservation of cultural heritage, three indicators of belief, emotion and outcome were selected to measure religious identity. In this study, religious identity is reflected in the role of a person in reproducing religious institutions and the importance of religious behaviors in lifestyle and interactions.   There are two approaches to preserve cultural heritage: passive and active. While the first one aims at preventing any damage to cultural heritage, in the active approach, cultural heritage is more than buildings and structures. It includes values and history of a society; thus preservation requires social engagement and development of social bonds between people and places. If people do not understand the hidden values of buildings, their protection loses its importance. For active preservation, three indicators of emotion, cognition and function were distinguished.   Data were gathered by survey, using multistage cluster sampling. A total of 343 people were questioned in 6 Isfahan urban districts as sample size. To test the assumptions, structural equation modeling was used in AMOS

  3. PROJECT ANQA: DIGITIZING AND DOCUMENTING CULTURAL HERITAGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Akhtar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The practice of digitizing cultural heritage sites is gaining ground among conservation scientists and scholars in architecture, art history, computer science, and related fields. Recently, the location of such sites in areas of intense conflict has highlighted the urgent need for documenting cultural heritage for the purposes of preservation and posterity. The complex histories of such sites requires more than just their digitization, and should also include the meaningful interpretation of buildings and their surroundings with respect to context and intangible values. Project Anqa is an interdisciplinary and multi-partner effort that goes beyond simple digitization to record at-risk heritage sites throughout the Middle East and Saharan Africa, most notably in Syria and Iraq, before they are altered or destroyed. Through a collaborative process, Anqa assembles documentation, historically contextualizes it, and makes data accessible and useful for scholars, peers, and the wider public through state-of-the-art tools. The aim of the project is to engage in capacity-building on the ground in Syria and Iraq, as well as to create an educational web platform that informs viewers about cultural heritage in the region through research, digital storytelling, and the experience of virtual environments.

  4. Project Anqa: Digitizing and Documenting Cultural Heritage in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S.; Akoglu, G.; Simon, S.; Rushmeier, H.

    2017-08-01

    The practice of digitizing cultural heritage sites is gaining ground among conservation scientists and scholars in architecture, art history, computer science, and related fields. Recently, the location of such sites in areas of intense conflict has highlighted the urgent need for documenting cultural heritage for the purposes of preservation and posterity. The complex histories of such sites requires more than just their digitization, and should also include the meaningful interpretation of buildings and their surroundings with respect to context and intangible values. Project Anqa is an interdisciplinary and multi-partner effort that goes beyond simple digitization to record at-risk heritage sites throughout the Middle East and Saharan Africa, most notably in Syria and Iraq, before they are altered or destroyed. Through a collaborative process, Anqa assembles documentation, historically contextualizes it, and makes data accessible and useful for scholars, peers, and the wider public through state-of-the-art tools. The aim of the project is to engage in capacity-building on the ground in Syria and Iraq, as well as to create an educational web platform that informs viewers about cultural heritage in the region through research, digital storytelling, and the experience of virtual environments.

  5. European Cultural and Touristic Heritage: Sighisoara vs. Verona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Virginia Dragulanescu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Europe is one of the world’s regions with the largest concentration of heritage sites and is also the top tourist destination in the world. Even if every European country has a unique and valuable cultural endowment, the socio-economic evolution of each country led to differences in their development stage. The hereby paper aims to highlight the importance of touristic activities in the sustainable development of a touristic area with the help of a specific form of tourism based on the cultural and historical assets. The two heritage cities chosen for this study are Sighisoara (Romania and Verona (Italy, both enrolled to the World Heritage List based on their outstanding historical and architectural value. By using qualitative research methods like the observation and the comparison, but also the analysis of statistic data regarding the tourist floe in the chosen destinations, this paper tries to enhance the possibility of partnership between Sighisoara and Verona based on their comparable medieval and cultural features, highlighting the importance of destination management know-how exchange and the added value of these heritage cities. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the tourism potential of both cities, but also the problems they face regarding in from of the short length of tourist stay, coming with a possible solution of joint destination branding of the two cities and the proposal for two thematic travel packages designed to promote them on the European market

  6. Microclimate Management for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Alterio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a line of research aimed at studying in detail the interaction between air conditioning/heating systems and thermo hygrometric conditions inside museums. An experimental test was carried out on the microclimatic conditions inside a building envelope, using as case studies the interiors of the Castle of Chiaramonte in Favara (Agrigento, and the Church of Saint Matthew (Palermo. In this phase of the work the “real” measured values and the recommended “optimal” values were compared for the various museum exhibits displayed. The analysis of the complex dynamic interaction of climate conditions, the need for the museum pieces to be preserved in a situation of maximum stability, the problems regarding thermal comfort in relation to users’ enjoyment of the exhibition space, the construction model of the building envelope – the synergy between all these variables led to establishing the final design project. This consists of an air conditioning system with radiant panels, floor heating, cooling system and primary air, in which the benefits seen from an environmental and energy point of view, are fully explained. The conservation of cultural heritage collections in museums, on the one hand implies that the attentionof the specialists must turn to the prevention of the natural degradation caused through time and on the other to improve the quality of the environment. This means environmental parameters must be checked and monitoring techniques used. Since the connective tissue between the museum and its container is the environment, the building-plant system must be held responsible for the “degradation suffered by the museum itself” or “be largely responsible for its optimal conservation with the passing of time”.

  7. Cultural routes: characterization and challenges of a new category of world cultural heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Yáñez, Celia; Universidad de Granada

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies in depth the progress that cultural routes, as a new category of World Cultural Heritage, introduce in heritageprotection, as a result of their multidimensional, transnational and wide territorial extension. For this purpose it focuses onboth its scientific definition and its differentiation from other heritage categories, as well as on the challenges that set out itsfull assumption in the framework of the Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural H...

  8. Business Planning for Cultural Heritage Institutions. A Framework and Resource Guide to Assist Cultural Heritage Institutions with Business Planning for Sustainability of Digital Asset Management Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishoff, Liz; Allen, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a framework and resource guide to help cultural heritage institutions plan sustainable access to their digital cultural assets and to do so by means that link their missions to planning modes and models. To aid cultural heritage organizations in the business-planning process, this resource will do the…

  9. Technical Assistance for the Conservation of Built Heritage at Bagan, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzino, D.; Santana Quintero, M.; Ma Pwint, P.; Tin Htut Latt, W.; Rellensmann, C.

    2016-06-01

    Presenting the outcomes of a capacity building activity, this contribution illustrates a replicable recording methodology to obtain timely, relevant and accurate information about conditions, materials and transformations of heritage structures. The purpose of the presented training activity consisted in developing local capabilities for the documentation of the built heritage at Bagan, Myanmar, employing different IT-supported techniques. Under the Director of UNESCO, the direct supervision of the chief of the culture unit, and in close consultation and cooperation with the Association of Myanmar Architects, the Department of Archaeology National Museum and Library (DoA) a documentation strategy has been developed in order to set up a recording methodology for the over three thousand Bagan monuments. The site, located in central Myanmar, in South East Asia, was developed between the IX and the XIII century as capital of the Myanmar kingdom. In the last years, this outstanding site has been exposed to an increasing number of natural hazards including earthquakes and flooding that strongly affected its built structures. Therefore, a documentation strategy to quickly capture shape, color, geometry and conditions of the monuments, in order to develop proper conservation projects, was needed. The scope of the training activity consisted in setting up a recording strategy updating the existing Bagan inventory, using three Buddhist temples as pilot cases study. The three documented temples were different in size, construction period, conditions and shape. The documentation included several IT-supported techniques including: Electronic Distance Measurements (EDM), SFM Photogrammetry, Laser Scanning, Record Photography as well as hand measurement and field notes. The monuments' surveying has been developed in accordance with the guidelines and standards established by the ICOMOS International Committee for Documentation of Cultural Heritage (CIPA). Recommendations on how

  10. Cultural heritage evaluation: a reappraisal of some critical concepts involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela IACOB

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to build a synoptic picture of the facets of the economic category called “value”, with practicality in the tangible cultural heritage field, from the point of view of a traditionally economists-specific approach: concern for the financial sustainability of any decision. Moreover, the methods from the economics literature regarding the valences of the “cultural value” concept prove the obsoleteness of the common opinion according to which the economic approach is primarily interested in financial metrics. In as much as the ultimate goal of the scientific process is to identify the most effective cultural heritage preservation and evaluation methods, the study also reflects the public-private interference in this area.

  11. Microbial deterioration of cultural heritage and works of art--tilting at windmills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterflinger, Katja; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2013-11-01

    Microorganisms (bacteria, archaea and fungi), in addition to lichens and insect pests, cause problems in the conservation of cultural heritage because of their biodeteriorative potential. This holds true for all types of historic artefacts, and even for art made of modern materials, in public buildings, museums and private art collections. The variety of biodeterioration phenomena observed on materials of cultural heritage is determined by several factors, such as the chemical composition and nature of the material itself, the climate and exposure of the object, in addition to the manner and frequency of surface cleaning and housekeeping in museums. This study offers a review of a variety of well-known biodeterioration phenomena observed on different materials, such as stone and building materials, objects exhibited in museums and libraries, as well as human remains and burial-related materials. The decontamination of infected artefacts, exhibition rooms and depots incurs high expenditure for museums. Nevertheless, the question has to be raised: whether the process of biodeterioration of cultural heritage can or should be stopped under all circumstances, or whether we have to accept it as a natural and an implicit consecution of its creation. This study also highlights critically the pros and cons of biocide treatments and gives some prominent examples of successful and unsuccessful conservation treatments. Furthermore, an outlook on the future research needs and developments in this highly interesting field is given.

  12. Algal 'greening' and the conservation of stone heritage structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Nick A; Viles, Heather A; Ahmad, Samin; McCabe, Stephen; Smith, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    In humid, temperate climates, green algae can make a significant contribution to the deterioration of building stone, both through unsightly staining ('greening') and, possibly, physical and chemical transformations. However, very little is known about the factors that influence the deteriorative impact and spatial distribution of green algal biofilms, hindering attempts to model the influence of climate change on building conservation. To address this problem, we surveyed four sandstone heritage structures in Belfast, UK. Our research had two aims: 1) to investigate the relationships between greening and the deterioration of stone structures and 2) to assess the impacts of environmental factors on the distribution of green biofilms. We applied an array of analytical techniques to measure stone properties indicative of deterioration status (hardness, colour and permeability) and environmental conditions related to algal growth (surface and sub-surface moisture, temperature and surface texture). Our results indicated that stone hardness was highly variable but only weakly related to levels of greening. Stone that had been exposed for many years was, on average, darker and greener than new stone of the same type, but there was no correlation between greening and darkening. Stone permeability was higher on 'old', weathered stone but not consistently related to the incidence of greening. However, there was evidence to suggest that thick algal biofilms were capable of reducing the ingress of moisture. Greening was negatively correlated with point measurements of surface temperature, but not moisture or surface texture. Our findings suggested that greening had little impact on the physical integrity of stone; indeed the influence of algae on moisture regimes in stone may have a broadly bioprotective action. Furthermore, the relationship between moisture levels and greening is not straightforward and is likely to be heavily dependent upon temporal patterns in moisture

  13. Resilience and Adaptation of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change; International Workshop in Ravello (Italy) 18-19 May 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Roger-Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Cultural Heritage is the core of civilization and mankind and contributes substantially to quality of life. Its preservation for its historical value and aesthetics, for its conservation and transmission, must be one of the paramount preoccupations of each citizen and institution. It is therefore fundamental to guard against a major evolution of our planet that is increasing and harmful for all the materials: climate imbalance. The tangible Cultural Heritage, often in an urban environment, is threatened both by extreme climate events, relatively short but recurrent, and by slow, insidious and continuous ones, often in relationship with pollution. The main climate factor at global scale - a general increase of mean temperatures leading to sea level rise - will have direct and indirect consequences on Cultural Heritage. The other climate threats (rain, relative humidity, solar radiation, drought, wind, floods…) and pollution (by gases and particles) will have specific effects on materials of Cultural Heritage, both outdoors (façades of monuments, historical centres of cities, open-air statues, cultural landscapes…) and indoors (museums, libraries, reserves, collections…). Since the 1st International Workshop on « Climate Change and Cultural Heritage » held at the European University Centre for Cultural Heritage in Ravello in May 2009, three important events appeared: • The publication in 2014 of the 5th IPCC Assessment Report. For the first time the Cultural Heritage was cited in an IPCC Report. • The holding in 2015 in Paris of the COP21. Some round-tables were organised during this conference concerning the Cultural Heritage. • The holding the same year in Paris of the International Scientific Conference "Our Common Future under Climate Change" in the frame and ahead of the COP21. Cultural Heritage was the topic of a special session at this important conference. During the last decade, the European scientific community was focused on the Threats and

  14. Research, protection and evaluation of Sicilian and Mediterranean marine cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Tusa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater archaeology in the Mediterranean should be based on a comprehensive, deep knowledge of a wide context of cultural environment. It is impossible to carry out an in-depth study of a specific wreck or site without having an overall cultural as well as historical perspective. It is, in fact, quite clear to everybody that even the most faraway shores of the Mediterranean were connected by means of a dense network of sea routes based on a rich trade throughout the centuries. But underwater archaeology also means the chance to understand the past environment due to the possibility of detecting ancient sea shores which nowadays are found below sea level. Today underwater archaeology also means deep sea research in extraterritorial waters. This aspect of underwater archaeological research is deeply connected with legal aspects that, in the framework of the recently approved UNESCO draft regarding the protection of underwater cultural heritage, should be planned according to international cooperation. 109 Conservation Science in Cultural Heritage Sicily has a great role in Mediterranean underwater archaeology because of its history and heritage, but also because Regional Government plays an important role in international debate in this field and because in Sicily a great impulse has been given to underwater archaeology research and cultural evaluation through the Soprintendenza del Mare

  15. The cultural heritage of pastoralism - local knowledge, state identity and the global perspective: the example of local breeds in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hounet, Y; Brisebarre, A-M; Guinand, S

    2016-11-01

    Over the past few decades, the heritage designation process has come to impact on the way of life of many nomadic pastoralists across the world. Since the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage was adopted in 1972, policies for the conservation of protected areas have been implemented under the aegis of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), especially in countries of the South, with a varying impact on the practices and perceptions of pastoral communities. Heritage policies were further extended by the establishment of the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage (the Convention was adopted by the UNESCO General Conference in October 2003 and came into force in 2006) and the list of Cultural Landscapes (adoption in 1992, with the first site listed in 1993). This enthusiasm for heritage, which is felt by States and local communities alike, provides an opportunity to study the contradictions and changing perceptions of the nomadic and pastoral identity. In this context of wholesale heritage designation, it is interesting to examine how local knowledge - especially that on hardy animal breeds - is promoted and safeguarded. The authors focus on the case of Morocco, where the national association of sheep and goat breeders (ANOC) oversees breed selection and health policy for local breeds, in order to demonstrate that greater recognition of farmers' knowledge and their ability to identify hardy animals can ensure the sustainability of farms in both South and North from a socio-economic, genetic and health standpoint.

  16. Documentation Protocols to Generate Risk Indicators Regarding Degradation Processes for Cultural Heritage Risk Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioussi, A.; Karoglou, M.; Bakolas, A.; Labropoulos, K.; Moropoulou, A.

    2013-07-01

    Sustainable maintenance and preservation of cultural heritage assets depends highly on its resilience to external or internal alterations and to various hazards. Risk assessment of a heritage asset's can be defined as the identification of all potential hazards affecting it and the evaluation of the asset's vulnerability (building materials and building structure conservation state).Potential hazards for cultural heritage are complex and varying. The risk of decay and damage associated with monuments is not limited to certain long term natural processes, sudden events and human impact (macroscale of the heritage asset) but is also a function of the degradation processes within materials and structural elements due to physical and chemical procedures. Obviously, these factors cover different scales of the problem. The deteriorating processes in materials may be triggered by external influences or caused because of internal chemical and/or physical variations of materials properties and characteristics. Therefore risk evaluation should be dealt in the direction of revealing the specific active decay and damage mechanism both in mesoscale [type of decay and damage] and microscale [decay phenomenon mechanism] level. A prerequisite for risk indicators identification and development is the existence of an organised source of comparable and interoperable data about heritage assets under observation. This unified source of information offers a knowledge based background of the asset's vulnerability through the diagnosis of building materials' and building structure's conservation state, through the identification of all potential hazards affecting these and through mapping of its possible alterations during its entire life-time. In this framework the identification and analysis of risks regarding degradation processes for the development of qualitative and quantitative indicators can be supported by documentation protocols. The data investigated by such protocols help

  17. 75 FR 80885 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Buddhist Heritage of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Buddhist Heritage of Pakistan... Buddhist Heritage of Pakistan,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United...

  18. Infrared thermographic assessment of materials and techniques for the protection of cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moropoulou, Antonia; Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Koui, Maria; Delegou, Ekaterini T.; Tsiourva, Theodora

    2001-09-01

    In this work, infrared thermography was applied and investigated as a non-destructive tool in the assessment of materials and techniques for the protection of cultural heritage. Diagnostic studies on monuments and historic buildings, situated in Greece, were performed. Long wave infrared thermography was used on restoration and traditional - historic materials concerning architectural surfaces and historic structures for research purposes such as: the assessment of moisture impact to porous stone masonries and the evaluation of conservation interventions (materials and techniques) regarding, consolidation interventions on porous stone masonries, restoration of masonries by repair mortars, and cleaning of facades. The results of this work indicate that thermography can be considered as a powerful diagnostic nondestructive tool for the preservation and protection of cultural heritage.

  19. A multi-disciplinary approach for the structural monitoring of Cultural Heritages in a seismic area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Musacchio, Massimo; Guerra, Ignazio; Porco, Giacinto; Stramondo, Salvatore; Casula, Giuseppe; Caserta, Arrigo; Speranza, Fabio; Doumaz, Fawzi; Giovanna Bianchi, Maria; Luzi, Guido; Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria; Montuori, Antonio; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Vecchio, Antonio; Gervasi, Anna; Bonali, Elena; Romano, Dolores; Falcone, Sergio; La Piana, Carmelo

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years, the concepts of seismic risk vulnerability and structural health monitoring have become very important topics in the field of both structural and civil engineering for the identification of appropriate risk indicators and risk assessment methodologies in Cultural Heritages monitoring. The latter, which includes objects, building and sites with historical, architectural and/or engineering relevance, concerns the management, the preservation and the maintenance of the heritages within their surrounding environmental context, in response to climate changes and natural hazards (e.g. seismic, volcanic, landslides and flooding hazards). Within such a framework, the complexity and the great number of variables to be considered require a multi-disciplinary approach including strategies, methodologies and tools able to provide an effective monitoring of Cultural Heritages form both scientific and operational viewpoints. Based on this rationale, in this study, an advanced, technological and operationally-oriented approach is presented and tested, which enables measuring and monitoring Cultural Heritage conservation state and geophysical/geological setting of the area, in order to mitigate the seismic risk of the historical public goods at different spatial scales*. The integration between classical geophysical methods with new emerging sensing techniques enables a multi-depth, multi-resolution, and multi-scale monitoring in both space and time. An integrated system of methodologies, instrumentation and data-processing approaches for non-destructive Cultural Heritage investigations is proposed, which concerns, in detail, the analysis of seismogenetic sources, the geological-geotechnical setting of the area and site seismic effects evaluation, proximal remote sensing techniques (e.g. terrestrial laser scanner, ground-based radar systems, thermal cameras), high-resolution aerial and satellite-based remote sensing methodologies (e.g. aeromagnetic surveys

  20. The Importance of Cultural Heritage in Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avvisati, Gala; Di Vito, Mauro; Marotta, Enrica; Sangianantoni, Agata; Peluso, Rosario; de Vita, Sandro; Nave, Rosella; Vertechi, Enrico; De Natale, Giuseppe; Ghilardi, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the Earth Sciences community is facing the need to achieve a more effective and efficient dissemination of its scientific culture. There is now a growing needing to integrate the use of "traditional" dissemination media of cultural heritage with the new digital technologies. Getting people involved in geoheritage site's activities represents a crucial issue in order to better communicate and increase the collective awareness of natural hazards, risk, and environmental change. The Reale Osservatorio Vesuviano (ROV) which is part of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), owns collections unique in their combination of scientific, historical and artistic importance. The long history of ROV is extensively documented in its collections. This heritage - of great scientific and cultural value and unique for its abundance and variety - tells the story of the first observatory in the world, closely linked to the activity of Vesuvius, and the commitment of many scientists who dedicated their lives to study the volcano. The collections include: a) old books on volcanological matters, b) collection of rocks, minerals, volcanic ash and other materials from historical eruptions of Vesuvius, c) recordings on smoked paper of Vesuvius seismic activity from 1915 until 1970, d) scientific instruments, e) geological and geomorphological maps and models, f) vintage photographs and filmed sequences of eruptions, g) gouaches of Vesuvius and h) lava medals. The exposition of these collections, improved with the new digital contents, may trace new and unexplored routes for the dissemination of Earth Sciences related culture. The ethical duty of the ROV is the creation of an universal identity by taking a picture of the evolution of the society through the training of the culture of seismic and volcanic risk. A disappearance of its heritage could represent an huge impoverishment of its community: the ROV carries in fact the cultural identity of the

  1. The use of radiation in the study of cultural heritage artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, Dudley; Otieno-Alego, Vincent; Treasure, Alana; Kubik, Maria; Hallam, David

    2017-08-01

    Patrons of art galleries and museums, tourists visiting historic buildings, and sightseers viewing archaeological sites are generally unaware of the extent to which science and technology has contributed to the value of what they see. Many countries rely on cultural tourism to generate national wealth. The use of radiation of many kinds to assist in the conservation/restoration of cultural heritage artefacts is described in this paper. In particular, the paper will describe studies of the pigments used in historic Australian Indigenous art, the degradation of manuscripts written using iron-gall inks, the protection of statues against corrosion and the selection of lubricants for use in old machinery.

  2. Study on Information Management for the Conservation of Traditional Chinese Architectural Heritage - 3d Modelling and Metadata Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Y. N.; Weng, K. H.; Huang, H. Y.

    2013-07-01

    After over 30 years of practise and development, Taiwan's architectural conservation field is moving rapidly into digitalization and its applications. Compared to modern buildings, traditional Chinese architecture has considerably more complex elements and forms. To document and digitize these unique heritages in their conservation lifecycle is a new and important issue. This article takes the caisson ceiling of the Taipei Confucius Temple, octagonal with 333 elements in 8 types, as a case study for digitization practise. The application of metadata representation and 3D modelling are the two key issues to discuss. Both Revit and SketchUp were appliedin this research to compare its effectiveness to metadata representation. Due to limitation of the Revit database, the final 3D models wasbuilt with SketchUp. The research found that, firstly, cultural heritage databasesmustconvey that while many elements are similar in appearance, they are unique in value; although 3D simulations help the general understanding of architectural heritage, software such as Revit and SketchUp, at this stage, could onlybe used tomodel basic visual representations, and is ineffective indocumenting additional critical data ofindividually unique elements. Secondly, when establishing conservation lifecycle information for application in management systems, a full and detailed presentation of the metadata must also be implemented; the existing applications of BIM in managing conservation lifecycles are still insufficient. Results of the research recommends SketchUp as a tool for present modelling needs, and BIM for sharing data between users, but the implementation of metadata representation is of the utmost importance.

  3. Digital Tools for Documenting and Conserving Bahrain's Built Heritage for Posterity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzino, D.; Barazzetti, L.; Santana Quintero, M.; El-Habashi, A.

    2017-08-01

    Documenting the physical characteristics of historic structures is the first step for any preventive maintenance, monitoring, conservation, planning and promotion action. Metric documentation supports informative decision-making process for property owners, site managers, public officials, and conservators. This information serves also a broader purpose, over time, it becomes the primary means by which scholars, heritage professionals, and the general public understand a site that radically changed or disappeared. Further, documentation supports monitoring as well as the character-defining elements analysis, relevant to define the values of the building for the local and international community. The awareness of these concepts oriented the digital documentation and training activities, developed between 2016 and 2017, for the Bahrain Authority for Culture and Antiquities (BACA) in Bahrain. The developed activities had two main aims: a) support the local staff in using specific recording techniques to efficiently document and consequently preserve built heritage sites with appropriate accuracy and in a relatively short period; b) develop a pilot project in collaboration with BACA to validate the capacity of the team to accurately document and produce measured records for the conservation and management of Bahrain built heritage. The documentation project has been developed by a multidisciplinary team of experts from BACA, Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), Carleton University, Canada and a contracted researcher from the Gicarus Lab, Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) in Italy. In the training activities, the participants have been exposed to a wide range of recording techniques, illustrating them the selection criteria for the most suitable one, according to requirements, site specifications, categories of values identified for the various built elements, and budget. The pilot project has been tested on three historical structures, both with strong connotations in

  4. A Conceptual Framework for Conserving Heritage Buildings in Malaysia From the Perspective of Facilities Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hasif Rafidee Bin Hasbollah

    2015-01-01

      Heritage buildings are part of human creation, which produces icons for a country, provides local identity, reflects the cultural values and background, represents a source of memory, historical...

  5. From Oss CAD to Bim for Cultural Heritage Digital Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetis, S.; Karachaliou, E.; Stylianidis, E.

    2017-02-01

    The paper illustrates the use of open source Computer-aided design (CAD) environments in order to develop Building Information Modelling (BIM) tools able to manage 3D models in the field of cultural heritage. Nowadays, the development of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) has been rapidly growing and their use tends to be consolidated. Although BIM technology is widely known and used, there is a lack of integrated open source platforms able to support all stages of Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM) processes. The present research aims to use a FOSS CAD environment in order to develop BIM plug-ins which will be able to import and edit digital representations of cultural heritage models derived by photogrammetric methods.

  6. Trends in High Performance Liquid Chromatography for Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degano, Ilaria; La Nasa, Jacopo

    2016-04-01

    The separation, detection and quantitation of specific species contained in a sample in the field of Cultural Heritage requires selective, sensitive and reliable methods. Procedures based on liquid chromatography fulfil these requirements and offer a wide range of applicability in terms of analyte types and concentration range. The main applications of High Performance Liquid Chromatography in this field are related to the separation and detection of dyestuffs in archaeological materials and paint samples by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with suitable detectors. The relevant literature will be revised, with particular attention to sample treatment strategies and future developments. Reversed phase chromatography has also recently gained increasing importance in the analysis of lipid binders and lipid materials in archaeological residues: the main advantages and disadvantages of the new approaches will be discussed. Finally, the main applications of ion chromatography and size exclusion chromatography in the field of Cultural Heritage will be revised in this chapter.

  7. Public cultural heritage properties enhancement and reuse strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania De Medici

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The sale and the granting of long-term licence to let private stakeholders use public buildings often lead to changes in the buildings’ use, requiring compliance with new needs. Reuse choices are often taken without a large-scale enhancing strategy concerning physical, economic and social context. Therefore it is necessary to define evaluation patterns to support the choices of the operators involved in the privatization process, in order to preserve the values of the assets and to guarantee the land’s development trends. The paper shows a method set to guide both local and central governments – as owners of cultural heritage properties – and public departments – performing control activities on cultural heritage management – in deciding new uses for buildings.

  8. ATHENA: Remote Sensing Science Center for Cultural Heritage in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Agapiou, Athos; Lysandrou, Vasiliki; Themistocleous, Kyriakos; Cuca, Branka; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Krauss, Thomas; Cerra, Daniele; Gessner, Ursula; Schreier, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    The Cultural Heritage (CH) sector, especially those of monuments and sites has always been facing a number of challenges from environmental pressure, pollution, human intervention from tourism to destruction by terrorism.Within this context, CH professionals are seeking to improve currently used methodologies, in order to better understand, protect and valorise the common European past and common identity. "ATHENA" H2020-TWINN-2015 project will seek to improve and expand the capabilities of the Cyprus University of Technology, involving professionals dealing with remote sensing technologies for supporting CH sector from the National Research Center of Italy (CNR) and German Aerospace Centre (DLR). The ATHENA centre will be devoted to the development, introduction and systematic use of advanced remote sensing science and technologies in the field of archaeology, built cultural heritage, their multi-temporal analysis and interpretation and the distant monitoring of their natural and anthropogenic environment in the area of Eastern Mediterranean.

  9. DIGITAL PRESERVATION OF PRINTED CULTURAL HERITAGE IN ESTONIA. STRATEGY. METHODOLOGY. PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimo, Tiiu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of national cultural heritage has been during the last years actively discussed both on institutional and state levels. In October 2003 the working group on digital preservation by theMinistry of Culture elaborated preservation guidelines Strategy of digital preservation of Estonian cultural heritage for years 2004–2007. The strategy is based on the principles of eEurope 2002Action Plan (2000 and Lund Principles (2001.The state strategy is aimed to achieve collaboration of different memory institutions in order to elaborate an unified view on cultural heritage and its digitisation as well as to preservation of digitally created cultural heritage. It is also important to guarantee preservation of cultural heritage and to make it accessible to the public use through the contemporary possibilities of informationand communication technologies. Digitisation and preservation of digitized heritage will be coordinated by the state. The main coordinators are the Ministry of Culture, The Ministry of Educationand Science, the State Chancellery and the National Archive.The methodology of decision making for digital preservation is based on the principles of the UNESCO programme Memory of the World. The choice of objects for digitisation is based on need and expediency that can be evaluated on the ground of acultural value of an object, conservation risks, physical condition of an object and necessity of use.In 2004–2005 metadata requirements for digital preservation were elaborated. The guidelines foresee that digitized objects will be described by four categories of metadata: administrative andtechnical metadata, metadata on access inhibitors and restrictions of use and descriptive metadata. Estonian documentary heritage is located today in different memory institutions: in state or public institutions like archives, libraries and museums, in private possession, in religious and scientific institutions and in possession of the third sector

  10. Preferences Evaluation with a Choice Experiment on Cultural Heritage Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Bravi, Marina; Gasca, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on the elicitation of tourist preferences from an economic evaluation standpoint and in relation to the Royal Savoy's Residences, a cultural network included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. After analyzing the visits to the Metropolitan Museum System of Turin City (Italy), a conjoint choice experiment was implemented, where future scenarios of public/private supply were defined by a certain number of tour packages, characterized by different services and prices. The resul...

  11. NBU Digital Collection “Bulgarian Cultural Heritage Materials”

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Our experience in maintaining digital collections is described, which urged us to go deep in the process and build centralized digitalization policy. It instigated developing new strategy, adopting new technological solutions and staff training. The emphasis falls is placed on our digital collection “Bulgarian Cultural Heritage Materials” as an example of a focused digitization at the New Bulgarian University (NBU) Library and our answer to modern trends in launching digital...

  12. Terrestrial laser scanning for heritage conservation: the Cologne Cathedral documentation project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, D.; Sperner, J.; Hoepner, S.; Tenschert, R.

    2017-08-01

    Contemporary terrestrial laser scanners and photogrammetric imaging systems are an invaluable tool in providing objectively precise, as-built records of existing architectural, engineering and industrial sites. The comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) recording of culturally important sites such as heritage buildings, monuments, and sites can serve a variety of invaluable purposes; the data can assist in the conservation, management, and repair of a structure, as well as provide a visually engaging educational resource for both the public and scholars. The acquired data acts as a form of digital preservation, a timeless virtual representation of the as-built structure. The technical capability of these systems is particularly suited for the documentation of a richly articulated and detailed building such as the high Gothic Cologne Cathedral. The 3D documentation of the Cologne Cathedral UNESCO World Heritage Site is a multiphase project developed by Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh in partnership with the Fresenius University of Applied Sciences, Cologne, and the Metropolitankapitel der Hohen Domkirche Köln Dombauhütte. The project has also received generous support from Zoller + Fröhlich (Z+F) and the City of Cologne.

  13. Photogrammetric Exploitation of Hdr Images for Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntregka; Georgopoulos; Quintero

    2013-07-01

    Basic goal of this project is to investigate and therefore highlight the usefulness of High Dynamic Range Images for photogrammetric applications in the field of Cultural Heritage Documentation. Scenes with High Dynamic range - difference between the brightest and the darkest parts - is impossible to be recorded without loss of details and texture in dark areas (due to underexposure) and in bright areas (due to overexposure) because of digital sensor's limitation in high dynamic range recording. In digital recording, the most recent and effective solution is High Dynamic Range Images (HDRI). These images are created by merging multiple images of the same scene, each of which has been taken with different shutter speed and thus providing a better range of images with different exposures. An HDR image alone is overcoming the loss of information caused by unfavorable lighting conditions. In photogrammetric applications, images have to be of high quality and represent faithfully the scene they depict. For applications of Cultural Heritage Documentation, where during image acquisition lighting conditions might be difficult, HDR technology can positively contribute to the acquisition of images of better quality and, consequently, to the creation of orthophotos with no radiometric problems. In this paper, a detailed reference to HDRI technology is made and also the geometric reliability and photogrammetric applicability of HDR images is examined and confirmed. In addition, an example of photogrammetric application in Cultural Heritage Documentation is presented and evaluated.

  14. Efficient cultural heritage image restoration with nonuniform illumination enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmal, Marwa; Souidene, Wided; Attia, Rabah

    2017-01-01

    Cultural heritage digitization has been of research interest for several decades. For such, the quality of the stored images should be pleasant to see. However, as images captured by digital devices may include undesirable effects, conducting an enhancement on the image is essential. In this context, we present a framework for the purpose of cultural heritage image illumination enhancement. First, a mapping curve based on saturation feedback is created to adjust the contrast. Then illumination is enhanced by applying a modified homomorphic filter in the frequency domain. The technique employs an optimization search process based on the efficient golden section search algorithm to compute the optimal parameters to produce the enhanced image. Finally, a color restoration function is applied to overcome the problem of color violation. The resulted image represents a trade-off among local contrast improvement, detail enhancement, and preserving the naturalness of the image. Experiments are conducted on a collected dataset of cultural heritage images and compared to some of the state-of-the-art image enhancement methods using a set of quantitative assessments criteria. Results have shown that our proposed approach is able to accomplish a wide set of the performance goals.

  15. Accommodation of China’s Industrial Heritage in Urban Conservation Practices (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter G. Rowe; Har Ye Kan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the conservation of industrial heritage in China has gained increasing attention within the broader context of urban conservation practices. For both policy-makers and scholars, accommodating this industrial heritage will emerge as a pertinent issue for consideration as a growing number of industrial architectural legacies dating from the Republican and Maoist eras come under (re)development pressures. This paper thus traces the development of industrial heritage conservation practices in China and discusses several dilemmas intrinsic to this type of conservation, including issues of authenticity, representativeness, and distinction. Based on comparative case studies from China and other international precedents, this paper also seeks to illustrate the different approaches that could be pursued while still attaining a balance between competing interests and claims.

  16. Accommodation of China’s Industrial Heritage in Urban Conservation Practices (I)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter G. Rowe; Har Ye Kan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the conservation of industrial heritage in China has gained increasing attention within the broader context of urban conservation practices. For both policy-makers and scholars, accommodating this industrial heritage will emerge as a pertinent issue for consideration as a growing number of industrial architectural legacies dating from the Republican and Maoist eras come under (re)development pressures. This paper thus traces the development of industrial heritage conservation practices in China and discusses several dilemmas intrinsic to this type of conservation, including issues of authenticity, representativeness, and distinction. Based on comparative case studies from China and other international precedents, this paper also seeks to illustrate the different approaches that could be pursued while still attaining a balance between competing interests and claims.

  17. Linking buildings, archives and museums of the 19th century Turin's Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborrino, R.; Rinaudo, F.

    2015-08-01

    The documentation of Cultural Heritage asset is the basis for all the interventions and policies on Cultural heritage conservation and management. The documentation is mainly based on historic knowledge and metric survey. As far as historic knowledge is concerned many information are still recorded and preserved inside written documents that are usually not easy to reach and correctly understandable by all the experts that have specific responsibilities on Cultural Heritage. The digitalization of documents (hardly faced in the last years) is not sufficient to guarantee the effective access to the historical information useful inside a documentation process. The documentation always needs an historical interpretation based on a critical reading produced by linking heterogeneous materials. Iconography also is an important source when it is correctly interpreted and linked to other sources. IT development and digital technology diffusion allowed offering new way to record, organize and share historical information: GIS and 3D modeling can be used as standard approaches to transfer the historical knowledge in a proper way to specialists involved in Cultural Heritage conservation and management. They have been generally used as tool to represent information for different targets, the ones mostly for specialized users, the others for edutainment. GIS are largely diffused yet in the Cultural Heritage management, and 3D modeling is wide spread used in museums communication. Nevertheless, both of them have more potential. They could be integrated in order to manage different data set related with the same matter. They could be used to make new research by surveying and improving interpretation in a way ready to transmit the outcomes. To produce a new generation of affordable digital historical products is necessary that the GIS and 3D modeling design and realization would be developed in a multidisciplinary approach that must be explained and demonstrated to the people that

  18. Globalization and cultural heritage: rebuilding local identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Rotman

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available New articulations are outlined actually instead of globalization process. In this setting, the concept "national" adopts a new preeminence and it is expressed through specific cultural ways. Paradoxically, in a globalizated context, countries suffer an outdoors process of homogeneization and an inner fragmentation one. In this context, a revitalization process of "national identity" arises strongly. These happens in our research, in periodical events organized by the national state. This cultural phenomena are based on the recovery and rebuilding of "national identity" Our case study is the "Traditional Handicrafts and Popular Traditions Fair" in Mataderos neighborhood in Buenos Aires city.

  19. Filling gaps in cultural heritage documentation by 3D photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    This contribution promotes 3D photography as an important tool to obtain objective object information. Keeping mainly in mind World Heritage documentation as well as Heritage protection, it is another intention of this paper, to stimulate the interest in applications of 3D photography for professionals as well as for amateurs. In addition this is also an activity report of the international CIPA task group 3. The main part of this paper starts with "Digging the treasure of existing international 3D photography". This does not only belong to tangible but also to intangible Cultural Heritage. 3D photography clearly supports the recording, the visualization, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. Therefore the use of 3D photography in C.H. should increase on an international level. The presented samples in 3D represent a voluminous, almost partly "forgotten treasure" of international archives for 3D photography. The next chapter is on "Promoting new 3D photography in Cultural Heritage". Though 3D photographs are a well-established basic photographic and photogrammetric tool, even suited to provide "near real" documentation, they are still a matter of research and improvement. Beside the use of 3D cameras even single lenses cameras are very much suited for photographic 3D documentation purposes in Cultural Heritage. Currently at the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal, low altitude aerial photography is exposed from a maximum height of 13m, using a hand hold carbon telescope rod. The use of this "huge selfie stick" is also an (international) recommendation, to expose high resolution 3D photography of monuments under expedition conditions. In addition to the carbon rod recently a captive balloon and a hexacopter UAV- platform is in use, mainly to take better synoptically (extremely low altitude, ground truth) aerial photography. Additional experiments with respect to "easy

  20. Cultural heritage and multidimensional representations of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Anne Lise

    2006-01-01

    as branding the city or cultural environments in a broader sense. In the geo-information community as well as in the built environment metadata and meta-information as means of communicating content and usability of datasets and information setups has been a key matter for several years. The approach...

  1. Exploring Cultural Heritage in a Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lynn E.

    2009-01-01

    Preschool and kindergarten classes in the United States are entering a time of unprecedented diversity and demographic transformation. Teachers must plan and implement a curriculum that reflects, supports, and values the varieties of cultural backgrounds, religious affiliations, socioeconomic classes, and language groups that children represent.…

  2. Documentation and Cultural Heritage Inventories - Case of the Historic City of Ahmadabad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, K.

    2015-08-01

    Located in the western Indian state of Gujarat, the historic city of Ahmadabad is renowned for the unparalleled richness of its monumental architecture, traditional house form, community based settlement patterns, city structure, crafts and mercantile culture. This paper describes the process followed for documentation and development of comprehensive Heritage Inventories for the historic city with an aim of illustrating the Outstanding Universal Values of its Architectural and Urban Heritage. The exercise undertaken between 2011 & 2014 as part of the preparation of world heritage nomination dossier included thorough archival research, field surveys, mapping and preparation of inventories using a combination of traditional data procurement and presentation tools as well as creation of advanced digital database using GIS. The major challenges encountered were: need to adapt documentation methodology and survey formats to field conditions, changing and ever widening scope of work, corresponding changes in time frame, management of large quantities of data generated during the process along with difficulties in correlating existing databases procured from the local authority in varying formats. While the end result satisfied the primary aim, the full potential of Heritage Inventory as a protection and management tool will only be realised after its acceptance as the statutory list and its integration within the larger urban development plan to guide conservation, development and management strategy for the city. The rather detailed description of evolution of documentation process and the complexities involved is presented to understand the relevance of methods used in Ahmadabad and guide similar future efforts in the field.

  3. Technical means and system guarantee of museumprotection and inheritance for intangible cultural heritage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Intangible cultural heritage has a rich connotation of unique thinking way, ethical imaginationand cultural awareness, which is an important sign of national spiritual culture. Possessing the specialvalues of professionalism, permanency, security and openness, with the advantages museums play acentral role in inheriting and rescuing our intangible cultural heritage. Museums have a lot of technicalmeans for museums to protect and inherit intangible cultural heritage, such as scientific research,preservation of material carrier, museum publications, displays on intangible cultural heritage, estab-lishing thematic museums. In intangible cultural heritage, agricultural heritage is the most importantpart. The core content of which is the ideas and methods of harmony between mankind and environ-ment. There is a variety of practices on the protection by China National Agricultural Museum.

  4. Computational chemistry meets cultural heritage: challenges and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantacci, Simona; Amat, Anna; Sgamellotti, Antonio

    2010-06-15

    Chemistry is central to addressing topics of interest in the cultural heritage field, offering particular insight into the nature and composition of the original materials, the degradation processes that have occurred over the years, and the attendant physical and chemical changes. On the one hand, the chemical characterization of the constituting materials allows researchers to unravel the rich information enclosed in a work of art, providing insight into the manufacturing techniques and revealing aspects of artistic, chronological, historical, and sociocultural significance. On the other hand, despite the recognized contribution of computational chemistry in many branches of materials science, this tool has only recently been applied to cultural heritage, largely because of the inherent complexity of art materials. In this Account, we present a brief overview of the available computational methods, classified on the basis of accuracy level and dimension of the system to be simulated. Among the discussed methodologies, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT represent a good compromise between accuracy and computational cost, allowing researchers to model the structural, electronic, and spectroscopic properties of complex extended systems in condensed phase. We then discuss the results of recent research devoted to the computer simulation of prototypical systems in cultural heritage, namely, indigo and Maya Blue, weld and weld lake, and the pigment minium (red lead). These studies provide insight into the basic interactions underlying the materials properties and, in some cases, permit the assignment of the material composition. We discuss properties of interest in the cultural heritage field, ranging from structural geometries and acid-base properties to IR-Raman vibrational spectra and UV-vis absorption-emission spectra (including excited-state deactivation pathways). We particularly highlight how computational chemistry applications in cultural

  5. Design of a social constructivism-based curriculum for primary science education in Confucian heritage culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Thu Hang, N.

    2014-01-01

    This study is about the application of social constructivism in primary science curriculum in Confucian heritage culture. It was found that the implementation of social constructivism in Confucian heritage culture was low and influenced by cultural divergences between Confucian cultural philosophy a

  6. Design of a social constructivism-based curriculum for primary science education in Confucian heritage culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Thu Hang, N.

    2014-01-01

    This study is about the application of social constructivism in primary science curriculum in Confucian heritage culture. It was found that the implementation of social constructivism in Confucian heritage culture was low and influenced by cultural divergences between Confucian cultural philosophy a

  7. Design of a social constructivism-based curriculum for primary science education in Confucian heritage culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Thu Hang, N.

    2014-01-01

    This study is about the application of social constructivism in primary science curriculum in Confucian heritage culture. It was found that the implementation of social constructivism in Confucian heritage culture was low and influenced by cultural divergences between Confucian cultural philosophy

  8. Conversation with Philippe Daverio between Design and Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Russo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Design for the enhancement of the Cultural Heritage is today an issue of great topical interest. Philippe Daverio answers general questions to express his own opinion regarding the effect of new technology in the fruition of museums and art-works, re-design applied to the regeneration of the city, the importance of historical museums as expressions of stratified culture, the civic and ethical value of projects and the revival of interior design works that marked the history of design.

  9. Effects of Community Service-Learning on Heritage Language Learners' Attitudes toward Their Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual y Cabo, Diego; Prada, Josh; Lowther Pereira, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of participation in a community service-learning experience on Spanish heritage language learners' attitudes toward their heritage language and culture. Quantitative and qualitative data from heritage language learners demonstrated that engagement in community service-learning activities as part of the Spanish…

  10. Valuing Heritage in Macau: On Contexts and Processes of Urban Conservation Kulturelles Erbe in Macau: Zu Rahmenbedingungen und Prozessen städtischer Denkmalpflege

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Chung

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the evolving values of urban heritage in Macau in terms of the various conservation approaches and mechanisms employed, and the shifting emphases on heritage and development within the context of continuity and change in Macau. Accumulated over four centuries of cultural interchange, the richly layered Historic Centre of the former Portuguese-administered outpost attained World Heritage status in 2005. After situating the problem pertaining to the multifaceted nature of heritage valorisation, the city’s trajectory of urban conservation leading up to the 1999 retrocession will be traced, and germane issues concerning heritage management vis-à-vis effects of post-handover urban developments assessed. As the latest culmination of value imbalances and conflicts arising from urban change, the Guia Lighthouse controversy will be critically appraised to speculate on a timely re-evaluation of Macau’s heritage conservation process. Der vorliegende Beitrag untersucht die sich wandelnde Haltung in Macau zum eigenen kulturellen Erbe, und zwar mit Blick auf die verschiedenen Konservierungsansätze und die dazu angewandten Methoden sowie auf die unterschiedliche Bedeutung von Kulturellem Erbe und Entwicklung im Kontext von Kontinutät und Wandel in der Stadt.

  11. Cultural heritage omni-stereo panoramas for immersive cultural analytics - From the Nile to the Hijaz

    KAUST Repository

    Smith, Neil

    2013-09-01

    The digital imaging acquisition and visualization techniques described here provides a hyper-realistic stereoscopic spherical capture of cultural heritage sites. An automated dual-camera system is used to capture sufficient stereo digital images to cover a sphere or cylinder. The resulting stereo images are projected undistorted in VR systems providing an immersive virtual environment in which researchers can collaboratively study the important textural details of an excavation or historical site. This imaging technique complements existing technologies such as LiDAR or SfM providing more detailed textural information that can be used in conjunction for analysis and visualization. The advantages of this digital imaging technique for cultural heritage can be seen in its non-invasive and rapid capture of heritage sites for documentation, analysis, and immersive visualization. The technique is applied to several significant heritage sites in Luxor, Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

  12. Digitization of Cultural Heritage of Slovak Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehovská, J.; Brunčák, P.; Dedík, L.; Kravjanská, I.; Sučíková, A.

    2016-06-01

    The Monuments Board of the Slovak Republic within the Operational Programme Information Society from 2012, is digital documenting selected national cultural monuments of the Slovak Republic. Within this project 1,855 architectural objects in Slovakia has been digitized by internal component of the The Monuments Board SR and external suppliers. For measurement there were used the most modern surveying technologies - digital photogrammetry (DP) of land and aerial images and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The outputs of digitization are point cloud, highly detailed polygon models, orthoimages, gigapixel images and 2D drawing documentations. During the project, arose the need to process the huge number of images (thousands or tens of thousands) and also need a TLS connection to DP. For this reason, started Slovak commercial firm developing of new software which enable this processing and connection. The outcomes are unique spatial models of large architectural complexes (castles, monasteries, churches...) with high detail and accuracy up to 1 cm. Article is devoted to the project description and the method of digitization for the specific types of the cultural monuments.

  13. Visitors’ Experience, Place Attachment and Sustainable Behaviour at Cultural Heritage Sites: A Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Buonincontri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable tourism research has attracted wide interest from scholars and practitioners. While several heritage sites are mandated to provide optimum visitor satisfaction with increasing competition in the market, managers of heritage sites face growing challenges in striking a balance between consumption and conservation. This calls for promoting more sustainable behaviours among consumers of heritage. This study proposes a conceptualization of sustainable behaviour for heritage consumers. Using the attitude–behaviour relationship underpinned by the Theory of Reasoned Action, it develops and proposes a conceptual framework that integrates visitors’ heritage experiences, their attachment to heritage sites, and their general and site-specific sustainable heritage behaviour and presents their interrelationships as proposed hypotheses. Theoretical contributions and practical implications for heritage site managers are discussed.

  14. The Contested White Lady: A Critique of New Zealand Cultural Heritage Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Neill

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article critiques New Zealand’s cultural heritage politics by positing that vernacular items, like an iconic eatery called the White Lady, does not meet the legislative criteria enabling cultural heritage status. If vernacular artefacts, including ‘kiwiana’, are to be integrated within cultural heritage, then changes within legislation, definitions and participant preconceptions are necessary. This study argues that cultural heritage is dominated by artefacts and historic places; that ‘kiwiana’ and other vernacular items of social history, practice and tradition are relegated. Items of ‘kiwiana’ act as touchstones of identity for New Zealanders. Therefore, their omission distorts the view of New Zealand’s cultural heritage. The application of cultural heritage status to the White Lady is important because of its transcendence of time and social change, its aesthetic, and also because of its present-day hospitality offering.

  15. Spatial Techniques to Visualize Acoustic Comfort along Cultural and Heritage Routes for a World Heritage City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to visualize acoustic comfort along tourist routes. Route-based tourism is crucial to the sustainability of tourism development in historic areas. Applying the concept of route-based tourism to guide tourists rambling along cultural and heritage routes can relieve overcrowded condition at hot scenic spots and increase the overall carrying capacity of the city. However, acoustic comfort along tourist routes is rarely addressed in academic studies and decision-making. Taking Macao as an example, this paper has studied pedestrian exposure to traffic noise along the cultural and heritage routes. The study is based on a GIS-based traffic noise model system with a high spatial resolution down to individual buildings along both sides of the street. Results show that tourists suffer from excessive traffic noise at certain sites, which may have negative impact on the promotion of route-based tourism in the long run. In addition, it is found that urban growth affects urban form and street layout, which in turn affect traffic flow and acoustic comfort in urban area. The present study demonstrates spatial techniques to visualize acoustic comfort along tourist routes, and the techniques are foreseen to be used more frequently to support effective tourism planning in the future.

  16. A S.M.A.R.T. system for the seismic vulnerability mitigation of Cultural Heritages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montuori, Antonio; Costanzo, Antonio; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Vecchio, Antonio; Minasi, Mario; Falcone, Sergio; La Piana, Carmelo; Stramondo, Salvatore; Casula, Giuseppe; Giovanna Bianchi, Maria; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Musacchio, Massimo; Doumaz, Fawzi; Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Both assessment and mitigation of seismic vulnerability connected to cultural heritages monitoring are non-trivial issues, based on the knowledge of structural and environmental factors potential impacting the cultural heritage. A holistic approach could be suitable to provide an effective monitoring of cultural heritages within their surroundings at different spatial and temporal scales. On the one hand, the analysis about geometrical and structural properties of monuments is important to assess their state of conservation, their response to external stresses as well as anomalies related to natural and/or anthropogenic phenomena (e.g. the aging of materials, seismic stresses, vibrational modes). On the other hand, the investigation of the surrounding area is relevant to assess environmental properties and natural phenomena (e.g. landslides, earthquakes, subsidence, seismic response) as well as their related impacts on the monuments. Within such a framework, a multi-disciplinary system has been developed and here presented for the monitoring of cultural heritages for seismic vulnerability assessment and mitigation purposes*. It merges geophysical investigations and modeling, in situ measurements and multi-platforms remote sensing sensors for the non-destructive and non-invasive multi-scales monitoring of historic buildings in a seismic-prone area. In detail, the system provides: a) the long-term and the regional-scale analysis of buildings' environment through the integration of seismogenic analysis, airborne magnetic surveys, space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and multi-spectral sensors. They allow describing the sub-surface fault systems, the surface deformation processes and the land use mapping of the regional-scale area on an annual temporal span; b) the short-term and the basin-scale analysis of building's neighborhood through geological setting and geotechnical surveys, airborne Light Detection And Radar (LiDAR) and ground-based SAR sensors. They

  17. Design of a hybrid (wired/wireless) acquisition data system for monitoring of cultural heritage physical parameters in Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Diego, Fernando-Juan; Esteban, Borja; Merello, Paloma

    2015-03-25

    Preventive conservation represents a working method and combination of techniques which helps in determining and controlling the deterioration process of cultural heritage in order to take the necessary actions before it occurs. It is acknowledged as important, both in terms of preserving and also reducing the cost of future conservation measures. Therefore, long-term monitoring of physical parameters influencing cultural heritage is necessary. In the context of Smart Cities, monitoring of cultural heritage is of interest in order to perform future comparative studies and load information into the cloud that will be useful for the conservation of other heritage sites. In this paper the development of an economical and appropriate acquisition data system combining wired and wireless communication, as well as third party hardware for increased versatility, is presented. The device allows monitoring a complex network of points with high sampling frequency, with wired sensors in a 1-wire bus and a wireless centralized system recording data for monitoring of physical parameters, as well as the future possibility of attaching an alarm system or sending data over the Internet. This has been possible with the development of three board's designs and more than 5000 algorithm lines. System tests have shown an adequate system operation.

  18. Challenges for ICT/UCT Applications and Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim H. Veltman

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available While a precise forecast for the next decades is clearly impossible, some major challenges that need to be addressed in the next 10-20 years can be identified. Technologically there will be a shift from Information and Communication Technologies (ICT to Universal Convergence Technologies (UCT. In the cultural realm, these challenges include problems of repositories, the changing scope of cultural heritage; new links between national, regional and local; between culture, knowledge and scholarship; approaches to intellectual property and to models of culture. Five dangers are outlined, namely, over-zealous commercialism; anti-technology among scholars, anti-universal narratives; forgetting the past and a systematic destruction of memory. The need for a permanent E-Culture Net is outlined which would a address these challenges; b develop critical methods; c create new models of culture that transcend Euro-Centric visions and d focus on a Distributed European Electronic Resource (DEER.The American vision of the Internet remains focusses largely on uni-lingual e-commerce. By contrast, the European vision, through its links with tourism, clearly has financial dimensions, and at the same time is developing a multi-lingual approach to cultural heritage that includes historical and cultural dimensions. This vision extends beyond culture to new definitions of knowledge. While the rhetoric of the day may focus on profit schedules for the next quarter, it is important to recall that major changes in new media have much longer cycles entailing decades and even centuries before their full effects are appreciated.

  19. Cultural and historical heritage: An asset for city branding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvijić Siniša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving wider recognition is part of the development agenda of contemporary cities, which are all confronted with the need to stand out and compete against one another. City branding reads as and plays an important role in this struggle for recognition. The identity of a city is generated over a long period, as it undergoes historical change, resulting in cultural diversity as the product of a specific environment. This paper discusses the possibility of using the cultural and historical heritage of Trebinje and its identity as an asset to create its city brand. Trebinje is a small city situated in the vicinity of Dubrovnik, a major tourist destination with a rich cultural and historical heritage and an excellent city brand. Dubrovnik may be seen as jeopardising the development of Trebinje’s authentic identity; on the other hand, the strong historical ties between the two cities can actually be used as an asset to develop Trebinje’s city brand. The material and non-material heritage which helped the formation of Trebinje’s identity, is analysed. The Mediterranean region in which it is located, its rich history, authentic architecture and different cultural influences, including the national poet Jovan Dučić, have all helped create Trebinje’s genius loci. The same factors may be used to communicate its new image. After that, the paper outlines models of the possible use of the recognised assets to brand the city and emphasise the importance of the effective presentation of these assets for creating a recognisable city image. It also proposes specific actions and interventions that may contribute to branding the city.

  20. Exploring empowerment within the Gullah Geechee cultural heritage corridor: implications for heritage tourism development in the Lowcountry

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. Bynum Boley; Cassandra Johnson Gaither

    2015-01-01

    While scholarship on the Gullah Geechee (GG) people has been extensive, little research has examined heritage tourism’s potential to empower or disempower the GG. In an attempt to shed light on this, the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor (GGCHC) was chosen as a case-study site because of its 2006 designation by Congress to protect and promote the unique...

  1. From "models" to "reality", and Return. Some Reflections on the Interaction Between Survey and Interpretative Methods for Built Heritage Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoni, F.; Freddi, F.; Zerbi, A.

    2017-05-01

    It's well known that more and more accurate methodologies and automatic tools are now available in the field of geometric survey and image processing and they constitute a fundamental instrument for cultural heritage knowledge and preservation; on the other side, very smart and precise numerical models are continuously improved and used in order to simulate the mechanical behaviour of masonry structures: both instruments and technologies are important part of a global process of knowledge which is at the base of any conservation project of cultural heritage. Despite the high accuracy and automation level reached by both technologies and programs, the transfer of data between them is not an easy task and defining the most reliable way to translate and exchange information without data loosing is still an open issue. The goal of the present paper is to analyse the complex process of translation from the very precise (and sometimes redundant) information obtainable by the modern survey methodologies for historic buildings (as laser scanner), into the very simplified (may be too much) schemes used to understand their real structural behaviour, with the final aim to contribute to the discussion on reliable methods for cultural heritage knowledge improvement, through empiricism.

  2. Protection of Geographical Indication and Intangible Cultural Heritage of the Chinese Food Product Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-guo; WANG Shu-ting; XIONG Wan-zhen; HUANG Li-min

    2012-01-01

    The geographical Indications intellectual property and intangible cultural heritage are the general focus of attention of the world today. In the Chinese food product resources, there are 44 kinds of national geographical indication products, 41 national geographical indication trademarks, 9 kinds of national and 212 kinds of provincial-level intangible cultural heritage. This article introduces the geographical indication protection and geographical indication trademark registration of the Chinese food products, the protection of intangible cultural heritage of traditional craftsmanship; discusses the countermeasures for the protection of geographical indication intellectual property and intangible cultural heritage; finally puts forth several recommendations.

  3. Cultural heritage and memory: untangling the ties that bind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viejo-Rose, Dacia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Today in heritage studies memory looms larger than ever, there are memory parks, memory politics, and memory wars, there is discussion of ‘dissonant’, ‘dark’, and ‘difficult’ heritage linked to memories of traumatic past events. But what to we mean when we use the word ‘memory’ in the field of heritage? How is the divide between its social and individual realms bridged? This article theorizes the intimate relationship between heritage and memory by focusing on three areas. First, it maps out the vocabulary that has emerged from the heritage-memory dyad including how notions of collective memory and lieux de mémoire have been used, and occasionally misused, as well as the metaphors employed in the process. Second, the emergence of memory studies is considered, providing a brief overview of its foundations as well as assessing how it differs from, overlaps with, and contributes to heritage research. A third section offers a brief review of recent developments in cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology relating to memory and how this might inform heritage studies. The concluding discussion provides a synthesis of the theoretical and empirical contribution of memory research to furthering out understanding of cultural heritage and proposes directions for future work on the area of confluence between the two.La memoria impregna hoy como nunca antes los estudios del patrimonio. Hay parques, políticas y guerras de la memoria. Se habla de un patrimonio “disonante”, “oscuro” o “difícil” vinculado al recuerdo de pasados sucesos traumáticos. Pero, ¿a qué nos referimos cuando usamos la palabra “memoria” en el campo del patrimonio? ¿Cómo se cruza el abismo que separa sus dimensiones social e individual? Este artículo teoriza sobre la íntima relación entre patrimonio y memoria, centrándose en tres áreas. La primera cartografía el vocabulario generado por la díada patrimonio-memoria, incluido

  4. Exploring Race, Culture, and Family in the Identities of Mixed Heritage Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Pecero, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Family plays an integral role in racial and cultural socialization, yet how mixed heritage students understand the concepts of race and culture in relation to family is unclear. This qualitative study explored the interplay of race, culture, and family in the identity constructions of 25 mixed heritage students. Findings suggest the centrality of…

  5. Exploring Race, Culture, and Family in the Identities of Mixed Heritage Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Pecero, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Family plays an integral role in racial and cultural socialization, yet how mixed heritage students understand the concepts of race and culture in relation to family is unclear. This qualitative study explored the interplay of race, culture, and family in the identity constructions of 25 mixed heritage students. Findings suggest the centrality of…

  6. Culture and cooperation: cooperative learning in Asian Confucian heritage cultures. The case of Viet Nam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The study is concerned with the influence of western educational approaches upon non-western societies and cultural groups. In applying western educational approaches, often a detailed consideration of its consequences to the culture and heritage of a non-western civilization is neglected. This is b

  7. ROBOTICS AND VIRTUAL REALITY FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE DIGITIZATION AND FRUITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Calisi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our novel approach for acquiring and managing digital models of archaeological sites, and the visualization techniques used to showcase them. In particular, we will demonstrate two technologies: our robotic system for digitization of archaeological sites (DigiRo result of over three years of efforts by a group of cultural heritage experts, computer scientists and roboticists, and our cloud-based archaeological information system (ARIS. Finally we describe the viewers we developed to inspect and navigate the 3D models: a viewer for the web (ROVINA Web Viewer and an immersive viewer for Virtual Reality (ROVINA VR Viewer.

  8. Robotics and Virtual Reality for Cultural Heritage Digitization and Fruition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisi, D.; Cottefoglie, F.; D'Agostini, L.; Giannone, F.; Nenci, F.; Salonia, P.; Zaratti, M.; Ziparo, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present our novel approach for acquiring and managing digital models of archaeological sites, and the visualization techniques used to showcase them. In particular, we will demonstrate two technologies: our robotic system for digitization of archaeological sites (DigiRo) result of over three years of efforts by a group of cultural heritage experts, computer scientists and roboticists, and our cloud-based archaeological information system (ARIS). Finally we describe the viewers we developed to inspect and navigate the 3D models: a viewer for the web (ROVINA Web Viewer) and an immersive viewer for Virtual Reality (ROVINA VR Viewer).

  9. Ion beam analysis in cultural heritage studies: Milestones and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dran, Jean-Claude; Calligaro, Thomas [Centre for research and restoration of the museums of France, Palais du Louvre Paris (France)

    2013-07-18

    For three decades, ion beam analysis (IBA) in external mode was considered as the best choice for the characterisation of cultural heritage materials, as it combines excellent analytical performance and non-invasive character. However, in recent years, other analytical techniques arose as serious competitors, such as those based on synchrotron radiation (X-ray absorption, fluorescence or diffraction) or those using portable instruments (XRF, micro-Raman). It is shown that nevertheless IBA remains unmatched thanks to two unique features, namely the analysis of light elements and the high-resolution 3D chemical imaging.

  10. Application of Neutron Tomography in Culture Heritage research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongy, T

    2014-02-01

    Neutron Tomography (NT) investigation of Culture Heritages (CH) is an efficient tool for understanding the culture of ancient civilizations. Neutron imaging (NI) is a-state-of-the-art non-destructive tool in the area of CH and plays an important role in the modern archeology. The NI technology can be widely utilized in the field of elemental analysis. At Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2), a collimated Neutron Radiography (NR) beam is employed for neutron imaging purposes. A digital CCD camera is utilized for recording the beam attenuation in the sample. This helps for the detection of hidden objects and characterization of material properties. Research activity can be extended to use computer software for quantitative neutron measurement. Development of image processing algorithms can be used to obtain high quality images. In this work, full description of ETRR-2 was introduced with up to date neutron imaging system as well. Tomographic investigation of a clay forged artifact represents CH object was studied by neutron imaging methods in order to obtain some hidden information and highlight some attractive quantitative measurements. Computer software was used for imaging processing and enhancement. Also the Astra Image 3.0 Pro software was employed for high precise measurements and imaging enhancement using advanced algorithms. This work increased the effective utilization of the ETRR-2 Neutron Radiography/Tomography (NR/T) technique in Culture Heritages activities.

  11. 77 FR 25191 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... accordance with the requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App., we announce that..., the sporting conservation community, the shooting and hunting sports industry, wildlife conservation... support for the Sport Wildlife Trust Fund; 3. Fostering wildlife and habitat conservation and ethics in...

  12. Infusing Culture in English Learning: An Attempt to Preserve Cultural Heritages in Jayapura Municipality, Papua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigati Yektiningtyas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Papua is rich with cultural heritages: hundreds of vernacular languages, tribes, folklores and other unique traditions. Unfortunately, these heritages are not recognized by the young generation anymore. Modernization, technology, and new comers are assumed as the background. As the capital of the province, Jayapura is the most influenced place for the changes. As an attempt to re-introduce and preserve the ancestor’s cultural heritages, cultural infusion in learning English (as one type of learning is regarded important. From seven tribes living in Jayapura, as the first step, Sentani is chosen as the priority. This paper discusses English learning materials by infusing Sentani culture. Folktales are chosen as learning materials for Elementary School students, malo[1] for Junior High School students, the procedure to make kayi/ifa[2] for Senior High Schoo students.  This infusion hopes that young generation is able to learn English as well as to acknowledge one of the cultural heritages of Papua. They can be strongly rooted in their culture and respect others’ culture. DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2017.200105

  13. Tourismological valorization of intangible cultural heritage of Serbia according to the Hilary du Cros method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Bjeljac

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The folk artistry of Serbia is rich in spiritual values tied to customs, celebrations, music, song, dance, games, stories and legends, and this kind of cultural heritage is presented through numerous festivals, events and tourist manifestations. In 2012, the network for the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage was formed, comprised of the National committee for intangible cultural heritage, the Commission for admission into the registry of intangible cultural heritage, a network of coordinators and the Center for intangible cultural heritage of Serbia. These institutions have chosen 6 elements of intangible cultural heritage, out of 27 suggestions: the slava, the Đurđevdan ritual, the kolo dance, singing accompanied by gusle, Slovakian naive painting, the custom of making and lighting farmers’ candles, Pirot carpet weaving, and Zlakusa pottery as elements of cultural heritage which reflect the national and cultural identity of the Serbian people, and Slavic minorities. These elements of intangible cultural heritage have a certain tourism potential and can represent an important factor in the forming of the tourist brand of Serbia. In order to determine the importance of the 27 suggestions of intangible cultural elements of Serbia, an analysis was conducted, using an adapted form of the Hilary du Cros method of tourist valorization.

  14. Conserving Historic Urban Landscape and Beautifying the City by Means of its History

    OpenAIRE

    Guoping Wang

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on three issues concerning historic urban landscape conservation under the background of new urbanization: the first one is attaching great importance to cultural heritage conservation in rapid urbanization; the second one is laying great emphasis on historic urban landscape conservation which is part of cultural heritage conservation; the third is Hangzhou’s practice in cultural heritage conservation.

  15. La terminología de los títulos de los proyectos de conservación del patrimonio cultural = The terminology of projects titles of the conservation of cultural heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante Montoro, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Los títulos de los proyectos de intervención en el patrimonio cultural tangible, como resultado del análisis de una muestra del inventario del fondo documental de la asociación española de empresas de restauración del patrimonio histórico (ARESPA), aporta la evolución de la terminología aplicada en los procesos de conservación. La restauración es una intervención frecuente, aunque en los títulos es común mencionar dos intervenciones. Sin embargo, para facilitar el i...

  16. Linking geological Heritage Conservation to Education and Research at the University of Bucharest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrasanu, A.

    2012-04-01

    MSc curriculum or intensive courses in geoconservation to form professionals able to provide a holistic view of nature and to work for promotion of geoscience, raise public awareness, educate decision-makers (Andrasanu, 2005, Corte Bacci, 2008, Brihlla, 2009, Zouros and Mckeever, 2009) University of Bucharest developed research and educational projects (Erasmus, Leonardo da Vinci) both for geological heritage conservation in the frame of ProGEO and also in fostering geoparks development in Romania. The paper presents geoeducation as part of the geoconservation activities, and the role teaching staff and students are playing in curriculum design, research and educational activities, sustained or developed by University of Bucharest. Three examples were selected to be detailed: (i) a new MSc program Applied Geo-biology in natural and cultural heritage conservation; (ii) Geoconservation as a case study in the frame of the European Virtual Seminar in Sustainable Development (http://www.openuniversiteit.nl), and (iii) Geosciences as part of outdoor learning activities in the frame of the international project In and Out (http://www.viauc.com).

  17. Introducing the Tripartite Digitization Model for Engaging with the Intangible Cultural Heritage of the City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Rodil, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the notion of intangible cultural heritage as a driver for smart city learning applications. To this end, we shortly explore the notion of intangible heritage before presenting the tripartite digitization model that was originally developed for indigenous cultural...... heritage but can equally be applied to the smart city context. We then discuss parts of the model making use of a specific case study aiming at re-creating places in the city....

  18. Using Remote Sensing Technology on the Delimitation of the Conservation Area for the Jianan Irrigation System Cultural Landsccape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. H.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years the cultural landscape has become an important issue for cultural heritages throughout the world. It represents the "combined works of nature and of man" designated in Article 1 of the World Heritage Convention. When a landscape has a cultural heritage value, important features should be marked and mapped through the delimitation of a conservation area, which may be essential for further conservation work. However, a cultural landscape's spatial area is usually wider than the ordinary architectural type of cultural heritage, since various elements and impact factors, forming the cultural landscape's character, lie within a wide geographic area. It is argued that the conservation of a cultural landscape may be influenced by the delimitation of the conservation area, the corresponding land management measures, the limits and encouragements. The Jianan Irrigation System, an historical cultural landscape in southern Taiwan, was registered as a living cultural heritage site in 2009. However, the system's conservation should not be limited to just only the reservoir or canals, but expanded to irrigated areas where farmland may be the most relevant. Through the analysis process, only approximately 42,000 hectares was defined as a conservation area, but closely related to agricultural plantations and irrigated by the system. This is only half of the 1977 irrigated area due to urban sprawl and continuous industrial expansion.

  19. The market value of cultural heritage in urban areas: an application of spatial hedonic pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazrak, Faroek; Nijkamp, Peter; Rietveld, Piet; Rouwendal, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The current literature often values intangible goods like cultural heritage by applying stated preference methods. In recent years, however, the increasing availability of large databases on real estate transactions and listed prices has opened up new research possibilities and has reduced various existing barriers to applications of conventional (spatial) hedonic analysis to the real estate market. The present paper provides one of the first applications using a spatial autoregressive model to investigate the impact of cultural heritage—in particular, listed buildings and historic-cultural sites (or historic landmarks)—on the value of real estate in cities. In addition, this paper suggests a novel way of specifying the spatial weight matrix—only prices of sold houses influence current price—in identifying the spatial dependency effects between sold properties. The empirical application in the present study concerns the Dutch urban area of Zaanstad, a historic area for which over a long period of more than 20 years detailed information on individual dwellings, and their market prices are available in a GIS context. In this paper, the effect of cultural heritage is analysed in three complementary ways. First, we measure the effect of a listed building on its market price in the relevant area concerned. Secondly, we investigate the value that listed heritage has on nearby property. And finally, we estimate the effect of historic-cultural sites on real estate prices. We find that, to purchase a listed building, buyers are willing to pay an additional 26.9 %, while surrounding houses are worth an extra 0.28 % for each additional listed building within a 50-m radius. Houses sold within a conservation area appear to gain a premium of 26.4 % which confirms the existence of a `historic ensemble' effect.

  20. Digital Workflow for the Conservation of Bahrain Built Heritage: the Sheik Isa Bin ALI House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, L.; Mezzino, D.; Santana Quintero, M.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, the commercial market offers several tools for digital documentation of historic sites and buildings. Photogrammetry and laser scanning play a fundamental role in the acquisition of metric information, which is then processed to generate reliable records particularly useful also in the built heritage conservation field. Although potentially very fast and accurate, such techniques require expert operators to produce reliable results, especially in the case of complex and large sites. The aim of this paper is to present the digital workflow developed for data acquisition and processing of the Shaikh Isa Bin Ali house in Muharraq, Bahrain. This historic structure is an outstanding example of Bahrain architecture as well as tangible memory of the country history, with strong connotations in the Bahrain cultural identity. The building has been documented employing several digital techniques, including: aerial (drone) and terrestrial photogrammetry, rectifying photography, total station and laser scanning. The documentation project has been developed for the Bahrain Authority for Culture and Antiquities (BACA) by a multidisciplinary team of experts from Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS, Carleton University, Canada) and Gicarus Lab (Politecnico di Milano, Italy).

  1. Deformation Measurement Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner for Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbesoglu, M. O.; Bakirman, T.; Gokbayrak, O.

    2016-10-01

    Historical structures are one of the most essential element of cultural heritage. They reflect history, lifestyle and tradition of a country and society. However, they are damaged through the years due to human activities and natural hazards. Therefore, digital documentation of structures and monuments is critical for preservation, sustainability and protection of cultural heritage. Terrestrial laser scanner is a widespread used tool for obtaining 3D representation of real world. In this study, we aimed to measure deformation of deformed minaret of a historical mosque using terrestrial laser scanner. In order to represent the geometry of the deformed minaret with high accuracy, 31 horizontal sections were created from the transition segment to the spire of the minaret with 30 cm intervals. The changing curvatures of the minaret were analysed in three parts; cylindrical part, balcony part and upper part. The offsets from the vertical axes for the parts of the minaret were found as 10.14 cm, 13.97 cm and 16.51 cm, respectively.

  2. [ANATOMICAL PREPARATIONS IN MUSEUMS A SPECIAL CATEGORY OF CULTURAL HERITAGE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monza, Francesca; Licata, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The international debate on the issue of human remains in museums and on the ethical issues related to their exhibition stimulates reflection on the Italian anatomical collections and on their preparations. A definition of human remains or of anatomical preparation does not exist in the Italian legislation. The anatomical specimens in museums are protected by the laws of Cultural Heritage as part of public collections, but their status is not well defined. By their nature of human material they would in fact be considered as a special category of Cultural Heritage. Because they are part of a cadaver they can be regarded as res nullius, but since treated with special techniques they could also change their meaning and being considered a species nova. Finally, it reflects on the possibility of creating a museum in Italy composed by new anatomical preparations. The article outline the contours of a museological issue that deserves to be investigated in order to better identify the anatomical preparations and their management in museums.

  3. Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams as Diagnostics for Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Scisciò, M.; Antici, P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces the first use of laser-generated proton beams as diagnostic for materials of interest in the domain of Cultural Heritage. Using laser-accelerated protons, as generated by interaction of a high-power short-pulse laser with a solid target, we can produce proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopies (PIXE). By correctly tuning the proton flux on the sample, we are able to perform the PIXE in a single shot without provoking more damage to the sample than conventional methodologies. We verify this by experimentally irradiating materials of interest in the Cultural Heritage with laser-accelerated protons and measuring the PIXE emission. The morphological and chemical analysis of the sample before and after irradiation are compared in order to assess the damage provoked to the artifact. Montecarlo simulations confirm that the temperature in the sample stays safely below the melting point. Compared to conventional diagnostic methodologies, laser-driven PIXE has the advantage of being potentially quicker and more efficient. PMID:28266496

  4. Effectiveness of granite cleaning procedures in cultural heritage: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo-Antonio, J S; Rivas, T; López, A J; Fiorucci, M P; Ramil, A

    2016-11-15

    Most of the Cultural Heritage built in NW Iberian Peninsula is made of granite which exposition to the environment leads to the formation of deposits and coatings, mainly two types: biological colonization and sulphated black crusts. Nowadays, another form of alteration derives from graffiti paints when these are applied as an act of vandalism. A deep revision needs to be addressed considering the severity of these deterioration forms on granite and the different cleaning effectiveness achieved by cleaning procedures used to remove them. The scientific literature about these topics on granite is scarcer than on sedimentary carbonate stones and marbles, but the importance of the granite in NW Iberian Peninsula Cultural Heritage claims this review centred on biological colonization, sulphated black crusts and graffiti on granite and their effectiveness of the common cleaning procedures. Furthermore, this paper carried out a review of the knowledge about those three alteration forms on granite, as well as bringing together all the major studies in the field of the granite cleaning with traditional procedures (chemical and mechanical) and with the recent developed technique based on the laser ablation. Findings concerning the effectiveness evaluation of these cleaning procedures, considering the coating extraction ability and the damage induced on the granite surface, are described. Finally, some futures research lines are pointed out.

  5. Thermal Neutron Tomography for Cultural Heritage at INR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Marin; Mandescu, Dragos

    The neutron and gamma imaging facility placed at the tangential channel of the TRIGA-ACPR from INR was used for tomography investigations on a test object with good results and shortly followed its involvement for tomography investigations on prehistoric statues of clay from the Arges County Museum. This activity was performed in connection with a research contract with IAEA with title "The neutron and gamma imaging method combined with neutron-based analytical methods for cultural heritage research", in the frame of a current CRP, that helps curators to reveal the internal structure and composition of the objects. The detector system has been developed based on two interchangeable scintillators, one for thermal neutrons and the other one for gamma radiations, a mirror of float glass coated with aluminum and two interchangeable CCD cameras. Experiments of tomography imaging for two prehistoric statues of clay with CCD STARLIGHT XPRESS SXV-H9 camera with XD-4 type image intensifier are presented in this paper. The tomography reconstructions with Octopus software have shown the potential of good results even for 100 projections/1800. This was a good opportunity for the dissemination of the investigation methods based on neutrons for cultural heritage and beyond this area.

  6. Culture and Local Development: the Interaction of Cultural Heritage and Creative Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Gordin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to examine the various forms of interaction between cultural heritage and creative industries to support the development of various types of cultural clusters in St. Petersburg. The study was based on a model, which provides several types of partnership cultural heritage (CH could have with the creative industries (CI: CH as a “decoration” for the CI, as “content”, as a “brand”, as the creator of the needs. Authors’ classification of cultural clusters in St. Petersburg is described, including clusters of cultural heritage, ethnic cultural clusters, the mass-cultural (consumer-oriented cultural clusters, art - incubators. One of the main findings is the low willingness of many public cultural institutions to have any form of interaction with the creative industries. The second group of findings concerned the ability to attract creative industries to provide services for residents of St. Petersburg in cooperation with public institutions of culture

  7. Application of molecular techniques for the assessment of microorganism diversity on cultural heritage objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlewska, Anna; Adamiak, Justyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their unpredictable ability to adapt to varying environmental conditions, microorganisms inhabit different types of biological niches on Earth. Owing to the key role of microorganisms in many biogeochemical processes, trends in modern microbiology emphasize the need to know and understand the structure and function of complex microbial communities. This is particularly important if the strategy relates to microbial communities that cause biodeterioration of materials that constitute our cultural heritage. Until recently, the detection and identification of microorganisms inhabiting objects of cultural value was based only on cultivation-dependent methods. In spite of many advantages, these methods provide limited information because they identify only viable organisms capable of growth under standard laboratory conditions. However, in order to carry out proper conservation and renovation, it is necessary to know the complete composition of microbial communities and their activity. This paper presents and characterizes modern techniques such as genetic fingerprinting and clone library construction for the assessment of microbial diversity based on molecular biology. Molecular methods represent a favourable alternative to culture-dependent methods and make it possible to assess the biodiversity of microorganisms inhabiting technical materials and cultural heritage objects.

  8. Kinetics and Mechanism of Calcium Hydroxide Conversion into Calcium Alkoxides: Implications in Heritage Conservation Using Nanolimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Vettori, Irene; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion

    2016-05-24

    Nanolimes are alcohol dispersions of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles used in the conservation of cultural heritage. Although it was believed that Ca(OH)2 particles were inert when dispersed in short-chain alcohols, it has been recently shown that they can undergo transformation into calcium alkoxides. Little is known, however, about the mechanism and kinetics of such a phase transformation as well as its effect on the performance of nanolimes. Here we show that Ca(OH)2 particles formed after lime slaking react with ethanol and isopropanol and partially transform (fractional conversion, α up to 0.08) into calcium ethoxide and isopropoxide, respectively. The transformation shows Arrhenius behavior, with apparent activation energy Ea of 29 ± 4 and 37 ± 6 kJ mol(-1) for Ca-ethoxide and Ca-isopropoxide conversion, respectively. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses of reactant and product phases show that the alkoxides replace the crystalline structure of Ca(OH)2 along specific [hkl] directions, preserving the external hexagonal (platelike) morphology of the parent phase. Textural and kinetic results reveal that this pseudomorphic replacement involves a 3D diffusion-controlled deceleratory advancement of the reaction front. The results are consistent with an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation replacement mechanism. Analysis of the carbonation of Ca(OH)2 particles with different degree of conversion into Ca-ethoxide (α up to 0.08) and Ca-isopropoxide (α up to 0.04) exposed to air (20 °C, 80% relative humidity) reveals that Ca-alkoxides significantly reduce the rate of transformation into cementing CaCO3 and induce the formation of metastable vaterite, as opposed to stable calcite which forms in untransformed Ca(OH)2 samples. Similar effects are obtained when a commercial nanolime partially transformed into Ca-ethoxide is subjected to carbonation. Such effects may hamper/delay the strengthening or consolidation effects of nanolimes, thus having

  9. Popular music as cultural heritage: scoping out the field of practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.C. Brandellero (Amanda); M.S.S.E. Janssen (Susanne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper sets out to deepen our understanding of the relationship between popular music and cultural heritage and to delineate the practices of popular music as cultural heritage. The paper illustrates how the term has been mobilised by a variety of actors, from the public to the

  10. Is the Learning Approach of Students from the Confucian Heritage Culture Problematic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Tuyet

    2013-01-01

    This article is concerned with the learning style adopted by Asian students who come from a Confucian heritage culture (CHC) such countries as China, Vietnam, Singapore, Korea and Japan are considered countries with Confucian heritage culture (Phuong-Mai et al. 2005). These students are generally viewed as typically passive, unwilling to ask…

  11. Popular music as cultural heritage: scoping out the field of practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandellero, A.; Janssen, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper sets out to deepen our understanding of the relationship between popular music and cultural heritage and to delineate the practices of popular music as cultural heritage. The paper illustrates how the term has been mobilised by a variety of actors, from the public to the private sector, t

  12. Popular music as cultural heritage: scoping out the field of practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.C. Brandellero (Amanda); M.S.S.E. Janssen (Susanne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper sets out to deepen our understanding of the relationship between popular music and cultural heritage and to delineate the practices of popular music as cultural heritage. The paper illustrates how the term has been mobilised by a variety of actors, from the public to the priva

  13. MOSAICA: A Web-2.0 Based System for the Preservation and Presentation of Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri; Herscoviz, Orit; Kaberman, Zvia; Dori, Yehudit J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of how to present cultural heritage resources in a way that attracts potential users is becoming important in our ever-changing world. This paper describes MOSAICA system--a web 2.0-based toolbox, dedicated for the preservation and presentation of cultural heritage. This paper also describes an evaluation study that examined MOSAICA…

  14. Digital Forensics and Born-Digital Content in Cultural Heritage Collections. CLIR Publication No. 149

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Matthew G.; Ovenden, Richard; Redwine, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is twofold: first, to introduce the field of digital forensics to professionals in the cultural heritage sector; and second, to explore some particular points of convergence between the interests of those charged with collecting and maintaining born-digital cultural heritage materials and those charged with collecting…

  15. Measuring enjoyable informal learning using augmented reality at cultural heritage site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendit, Ulka Chandini; Zaibon, Syamsul Bahrin; Bakar, Juliana Aida Abu

    2016-08-01

    The instrument of evaluation of measuring enjoyable informal learning at cultural heritage site was produced by validity and reliability analysis. It involved two cycles of steps, content validity and face validity and content validity and reliability analysis. From the analysis, it was found out that the instrument is reliable to be measure enjoyable informal learning at cultural heritage site.

  16. The value of Europeana: the welfare effects of better access to digital cultural heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poort, J.; van der Noll, R.; Ponds, R.; Rougoor, W.; Weda, J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, Europeana was launched as a service platform for digital cultural heritage and content from libraries, archives, galleries and museums from all over the European Union. The aim was to make Europe’s rich cultural heritage accessible for all. Since its launch, the number of records in the Eur

  17. The value of Europeana: the welfare effects of better access to digital cultural heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poort, J.; van der Noll, R.; Ponds, R.; Rougoor, W.; Weda, J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, Europeana was launched as a service platform for digital cultural heritage and content from libraries, archives, galleries and museums from all over the European Union. The aim was to make Europe’s rich cultural heritage accessible for all. Since its launch, the number of records in the

  18. Application of X-ray Computed Tomography to Cultural Heritage diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morigi, M.P.; Casali, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; D' Errico, V. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Physical methods of diagnosis are more and more frequently applied in the field of Cultural Heritage either for scientific investigations or for restoration and conservation purposes. X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the most powerful non-destructive testing techniques for the full-volume inspection of an object, as it is able to give morphological and physical information on the inner structure of the investigated sample. The great variety of size and composition that characterizes archaeological findings and art objects requires the development of tomographic systems specifically designed for Cultural Heritage analysis. In the last few years our research group has developed several acquisition systems for Digital Radiography and X-ray CT. We are able to perform high resolution micro-tomography of small objects (voxel size of few microns) as well as CT of large objects (up to 2 m of size). In this paper we will mainly focus the attention on the results of the investigation recently performed on two Japanese wooden statues with our CT system for large works of art. The CT analysis was carried out on site at the Conservation and Restoration Center ''La Venaria Reale'', where the statues have been restored before their exposition at the Oriental Art Museum in Turin. (orig.)

  19. International Astronomical-Cultural Initiatives and Ukrainian Astronomical Heritage in the Context of World Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantseva, L.

    2011-09-01

    Astronomy as science of world view has left its mark in many areas of human culture. Astronomical movable and immovable monuments as cultural and scientific content recently started to be studied carefully, and finally receive their recognition for their further preservation. Various international organizations have initiated a diverse case studies of these monuments, produced some recommendations for their organization, typology, division into periods. In joint programs, experts of IAU, UNESCO, ICOMOS elaborate criteria for selection of monuments of global significance. Complete study of astronomical sights will allow to consider the history of scientific knowledge dissemination in time and in space. Ukraine has also carefully examined their stored astronomical monuments scattered in astronomical observatories, libraries, archives, museums, university collections, architectural ensembles, archaeological parks and cemeteries. In conditions of instability and crises it is important to establish uniqueness or typicality of certain historical sites, to study their characteristics and identity, relationship with global trends that will enable their successful promotion and protection. Part of these research works are conducted in our observatories, but not as intensively as in other countries. They have not engaged in related industries and professionals authorized state institutions. Not having used an active effort in this case, we can stay behind the big international project for study the intellectual and cultural heritage.

  20. HSC5: synchrotron radiation and neutrons for cultural heritage studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Anne [Institut Neel - CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France); Artioli, G. [Padova Univ. (Italy); Bleuet, P.; Cotte, M.; Tafforeau, P.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Dumas, P.; Somogyl, A. [SOLEIL Synchrotron, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Cotte, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, UMR171, 75 - Paris (France)]|[European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Kockelmann, W. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom); Kolar, J. [Ljubljana Univ., Morana RTD, Slovenia, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (Slovenia); Areon, I. [Nova Gorica Univ. (Slovenia); Meden, A.; Strlie, M. [Ljubljana Univ., Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (Slovenia); Pantos, M. [Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Vendrell, M. [Barcelona Univ., dept. of Crystallography and Mineralogy (Spain); Wess, T. [Cardiff Univ., School of Optometry and Institute of Vision (Ireland); Gunneweg, J. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron and neutron sources offer recent and additional insight into the records of our cultural past. Over the last years, there has been an increasing demand for access to synchrotron radiation- and neutron-based techniques, and their applications in the fields of archaeological science and cultural heritage. The purpose of this Hercules Specialized Course is to give the participants an introduction to the basic principles of synchrotron radiation and neutron techniques (imaging, microscopy, diffraction, absorption and fluorescence, IR spectroscopy). The school provides cross-disciplinary examples illustrating the abilities of these techniques in a representative range of scientific cases concerning painting, archaeological artefacts, inks, pigments, fossils and the Dead Sea scrolls. This document gathers only the resumes of the lectures.

  1. Identification of collagen-based materials in cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Daniel P; Buckley, Michael; Promise, Ellen; Trauger, Sunia A; Holdcraft, T Rose

    2013-09-07

    All stakeholders in cultural heritage share an interest in fabrication methods and material technology. Until now methods for analysis of organic materials, particularly proteins, have not been widely available to researchers at cultural institutions. This paper will describe an analytical method for the identification of collagen-based materials from soft tissue sources and show examples of its application to diverse museum objects. The method, peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF), uses enzymatic digestion of extracted proteins to produce a mixture of peptides. The mass spectrum of the mixture contains characteristic marker ions-a peptide mass fingerprint-which are compared to species-specific markers from references as the basis of identification. Preliminary results indicate that analysis of materials from aged samples, several different tissue types, and tanned or untanned materials yields comparable PMF results. Significantly, PMF is simple, rapid, sensitive and specific, has been implemented in a museum laboratory, and is being practiced successfully by non-specialists.

  2. The Cultural Heritage of the Great Prespa Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema Muslli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Great Prespa region is situated in the Balkan Peninsula and is divided between Albania, Macedonia and Greece. It includes the Great Prespa Lake and the surrounding beach and meadow, areas designated for agricultural use and the towns of Pusteci (formerly known as Liqenas and Resen. This region is now part of the Trans-Boundary Biosphere Reserve ‘Ohrid-Prespa Watershed. Great and Small Prespa lakes plus Ohrid Lake are included in this newly-approved UNESCO world Heritage Site, but for this paper, we are looking only at the area surrounding the Great Prespa Lake. It is critical for this area to be protected immediately, because of the overuse it has undergone in recent years. While current levels of fauna are dangerously declining due to recent over-harvesting, this area has been known historically for its diverse natural and cultural features. Thus it is important to take drastic measures to reclaim the natural beauty immediately, including those areas currently covered by Prespa National Parks in Albania and Greece and Galichica and Pelisteri National Parks in Macedonia. Due to many wars over the centuries, it exists a mixture of Albanian and Macedonian culture. The historical and architectural remaining, religious structures and artifacts testify the richness and uniqueness of the communities of Pustec and Resen have. The cultural heritage is now a key element designated for the development of the region’s sustainable tourism development. This study was enhanced via the Geographic Info System (GIS digital presentation showing the opportunities for natural and cultural tourism in both countries (Albania and Macedonia.

  3. Analytical techniques applied to study cultural heritage objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzutto, M.A.; Curado, J.F.; Bernardes, S.; Campos, P.H.O.V.; Kajiya, E.A.M.; Silva, T.F.; Rodrigues, C.L.; Moro, M.; Tabacniks, M.; Added, N., E-mail: rizzutto@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    The scientific study of artistic and cultural heritage objects have been routinely performed in Europe and the United States for decades. In Brazil this research area is growing, mainly through the use of physical and chemical characterization methods. Since 2003 the Group of Applied Physics with Particle Accelerators of the Physics Institute of the University of Sao Paulo (GFAA-IF) has been working with various methodologies for material characterization and analysis of cultural objects. Initially using ion beam analysis performed with Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and recently Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL), for the determination of the elements and chemical compounds in the surface layers. These techniques are widely used in the Laboratory of Materials Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI-USP). Recently, the GFAA expanded the studies to other possibilities of analysis enabled by imaging techniques that coupled with elemental and compositional characterization provide a better understanding on the materials and techniques used in the creative process in the manufacture of objects. The imaging analysis, mainly used to examine and document artistic and cultural heritage objects, are performed through images with visible light, infrared reflectography (IR), fluorescence with ultraviolet radiation (UV), tangential light and digital radiography. Expanding more the possibilities of analysis, new capabilities were added using portable equipment such as Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) and Raman Spectroscopy that can be used for analysis 'in situ' at the museums. The results of these analyzes are providing valuable information on the manufacturing process and have provided new information on objects of different University of Sao Paulo museums. Improving the arsenal of cultural heritage analysis it was recently constructed an 3D robotic stage for the precise positioning of samples in the external beam setup

  4. Intangible Cultural Heritage and Geographical Indication of Specialty Resources: A Case Study of Shiyan City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai; HU; Wanzhen; XIONG; Zhiguo; SUN; Shuting; WANG; Limin; HUANG

    2013-01-01

    The protection of intangible cultural heritage and geographical indications of the specialty in Shiyan City was analyzed,and then related suggestions were proposed,for example,to collect and organize the intangible cultural heritage related to traditional specialty;to enhance the application of those intangible cultural heritage projects related to traditional industry and agriculture;to establish some demonstration bases for the productive protection of intangible cultural heritages;to strengthen the application of geographical indications of traditional specialty;to build national quality standards for various specialty with geographical indications;to integrate and cultivate the famous specialty brands with geographical indication;to implement the double protection of the geographical indications and intangible cultural heritages;to improve the poverty alleviation through developing the specialty industry with geographical indications.

  5. Cultural Heritage Tourism in South Africa: Perceived a Panacea for Rural Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildred Samukelisiwe Nkwanyana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultural heritage tourism is perceived as one of the major development opportunities for Africa. This study conducted in South Africa, enquired the perceptions of the local communities towards their cultural heritage tourism development, and their level of participation in such development. Quantitative data were collected from simple randomly selected respondents using a structured questionnaire. Descriptive data analysis provided information required to address research objective. Local community members surveyed are sceptic towards cultural heritage tourism development invariably becoming a panacea for their rural development. Cultural heritage tourism development in South Africa should align with the sustainable rural tourism critical success factors recommended by this paper. This study conducted in a district of South Africa has implications for cultural heritage tourism development in developing economies.

  6. Recording Information on Architectural Heritage Should Meet the Requirements for Conservation Digital Recording Practices at the Summer Palace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Cong, Y.; Wu, C.; Bai, C.; Wu, C.

    2017-08-01

    The recording of Architectural heritage information is the foundation of research, conservation, management, and the display of architectural heritage. In other words, the recording of architectural heritage information supports heritage research, conservation, management and architectural heritage display. What information do we record and collect and what technology do we use for information recording? How do we determine the level of accuracy required when recording architectural information? What method do we use for information recording? These questions should be addressed in relation to the nature of the particular heritage site and the specific conditions for the conservation work. In recent years, with the rapid development of information acquisition technology such as Close Range Photogrammetry, 3D Laser Scanning as well as high speed and high precision Aerial Photogrammetry, many Chinese universities, research institutes and heritage management bureaux have purchased considerable equipment for information recording. However, the lack of understanding of both the nature of architectural heritage and the purpose for which the information is being collected has led to several problems. For example: some institutions when recording architectural heritage information aim solely at high accuracy. Some consider that advanced measuring methods must automatically replace traditional measuring methods. Information collection becomes the purpose, rather than the means, of architectural heritage conservation. Addressing these issues, this paper briefly reviews the history of architectural heritage information recording at the Summer Palace (Yihe Yuan, first built in 1750), Beijing. Using the recording practices at the Summer Palace during the past ten years as examples, we illustrate our achievements and lessons in recording architectural heritage information with regard to the following aspects: (buildings') ideal status desired, (buildings') current status

  7. RECORDING INFORMATION ON ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE SHOULD MEET THE REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSERVATION Digital Recording Practices at the Summer Palace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The recording of Architectural heritage information is the foundation of research, conservation, management, and the display of architectural heritage. In other words, the recording of architectural heritage information supports heritage research, conservation, management and architectural heritage display. What information do we record and collect and what technology do we use for information recording? How do we determine the level of accuracy required when recording architectural information? What method do we use for information recording? These questions should be addressed in relation to the nature of the particular heritage site and the specific conditions for the conservation work. In recent years, with the rapid development of information acquisition technology such as Close Range Photogrammetry, 3D Laser Scanning as well as high speed and high precision Aerial Photogrammetry, many Chinese universities, research institutes and heritage management bureaux have purchased considerable equipment for information recording. However, the lack of understanding of both the nature of architectural heritage and the purpose for which the information is being collected has led to several problems. For example: some institutions when recording architectural heritage information aim solely at high accuracy. Some consider that advanced measuring methods must automatically replace traditional measuring methods. Information collection becomes the purpose, rather than the means, of architectural heritage conservation. Addressing these issues, this paper briefly reviews the history of architectural heritage information recording at the Summer Palace (Yihe Yuan, first built in 1750, Beijing. Using the recording practices at the Summer Palace during the past ten years as examples, we illustrate our achievements and lessons in recording architectural heritage information with regard to the following aspects: (buildings’ ideal status desired, (buildings

  8. [Preserving the cultural heritage of health in Brazil: an emerging question].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Juliane Conceição Primon

    2015-12-01

    In a discussion that applies the category "heritage" to goods within the realm of health, the article problematizes the recent recognition and incipient protection of the cultural heritage of health in Brazil. It presents a roster of assets that receive federal protection through Brazil's Instituto do Patrimônio Histórico e Artístico Nacional (IPHAN), including hospitals and health-related buildings as well as inventories conducted in a number of state capitals by the Brazilian Network for Cultural Heritage in Health. This approach suggests that preserving this valuable heritage is a matter of importance for the history of health in Brazil.

  9. Values in nature conservation, tourism and UNESCO World Heritage Site stewardship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liburd, Janne J.; Becken, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    tourism operators, public sector managers and other stakeholders from the iconic World Heritage Site and tourism destination, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR) reveal how shifting ideologies and government policies increased pressures on nature, resulting in new alliances between stewards from...... the tourism sector and national and international organizations. These alliances were built on shared nature conservation values and successfully reduced increasing development pressures. Three distinct phases in this process emerged at the GBR, which were driven by personal values held by tourism industry...... representatives, and their recognition of tourism’s reliance on nature for business success. Changing mainstream ideologies and political values can erode World Heritage and Protected Areas, and recalibrate values – including the universal values on which World Heritage Sites depend – towards more anthropocentric...

  10. The World Heritage Convention, the environment, and compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    This Article highlights a particular strength of the World Heritage Convention within the international environmental law project that enhances conservation of natural areas, flora, and fauna. This strength relates to the World Heritage Convention’s ability to pull states towards meaningful compliance with obligations connected to protecting, conserving, presenting, and transferring to future generations the world’s natural (and cultural) heritage.

  11. The heritage and museums field: A controversial cultural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrieta Urtizberea, Iñaki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of acceptance as heritage and musealisation do not respond to history or aesthetics-related criteria, but rather to identity-related criteria. They do not concern scientists, specialists and policy-makers alone, but also social groups. The choice of cultural assets is not an objective consequence of their formal characteristics. It is the result of the selection made by social agents so as to represent a group identity. But no social group is homogeneous; on the contrary they are diverse and complex so the identity references, and therefore the cultural assets, do not have to be univocal. Beyond the aseptic discourses, many of these processes are controversial. Differences regarding the identity references and the uses to be made of cultural assets lead to the field of heritage and museums being spaces where interests and values clash. This article presents and analyses the conflicts that arose in the Basque municipality of Legazpi when the process of musealisation and acceptance of iron production as heritage first started.

    Los procesos de patrimonialización y musealización de la cultura no responden a criterios históricos o estéticos, sino identitarios. No atañen a científicos, especialistas y políticos solamente, sino a colectivos sociales. La elección de unos bienes culturales no es una consecuencia objetiva de sus características formales, es el resultado de la selección llevada a cabo por agentes sociales con el fin de representar una identidad grupal. Pero ningún colectivo social es uniforme, sino, al contrario, es diverso y complejo, de tal modo que los referentes identitarios y, consecuentemente, los bienes culturales no tienen por qué ser unívocos. Más allá de los discursos asépticos, muchos de esos procesos se presentan conflictivos. Diferencias acerca de los referentes identitarios y de los usos que se les quieren dar a los bienes culturales acarrean que el campo patrimonial y museístico sea un

  12. Systematic Contradiction Between Heritage Conservation and Tourism Development: Cleaning the Temple and Cemetery of Confucius and the Kong Family Mansion in Qufu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Degang; Sun Wanzhen

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of the tourist industry, world heritage sites become more and more popular among tourists from home and abroad. Therefore, heritage tourism has become a new hotspot. However, while world heritage sites are making obvious economic benefit from tourism,they also bring various problems and contradictions, of which the most troublesome one is the contradiction between heritage conservation and tourism development. To discuss and analyze the root and the essence of the above contradiction and find a way to bring about harmony between them is an important program faced by our national heritage management practice and academic research. Based on the case of cleaning the Temple and Cemetery of Confucius and the Kong Family Mansion in Qufu, this paper analyzes the reasons why our national world cultural heritage sites bring about the above contradiction in the process of tourism development and points out that the improper system and stakeholders' benefit imbroglio are respectively the root and the essence of the contraction. Then, it also puts forward corresponding solutions.

  13. Tourism and Cultural Heritage: Higher Education and Entrepreneurship Development in Transition Phase. The Tunisian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faysal Mansouri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This is to lay down an approach to develop tourism and cultural heritage through higher education and entrepreneurship development for economies in transition: The case of Tunisia. There is a need to provide incentives to people to have favorable preferences toward a tourism based in part on cultural heritage in a phase where everything is being under construction institutions, legislations, and relationships alike. Cultural heritage and tourism development may be enhanced by a diversification strategy to enrich the image of local touristic destinations (diversification of site visits, purchases of new products, new circuits, and discovery of monumental heritage, museum, park and gardens, natural sites. Moreover, it is of great importance to invest in youth entrepreneurship development to orient toward business creation and development in the domain of tourism and cultural heritage.

  14. Conversion of water towers – an instrument for conserving heritage assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea-Loreta Cercleux

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water towers are symbolical landmarks that refer to the industrialization. The oldest water towers are technical and industrial assets whose current and future evolution is a sensitive matter as a result of the economic context that brought about the closing of numerous industrial enterprises and abandoning infrastructure assets, including water towers. Some water towers were included on the national cultural-heritage lists across the world, thanks to the manifold values they incorporate (technological, historical, architectural, esthetical, among others. In this context, it has become necessary to convert them, with the twofold purpose of conserving them and assigning them a new function, for the local community members. Although there are numerous models for good practice in the conversion of water towers in several European countries, in Romania their reuse is a difficult process, most of the time burdened by shortcomings of legislation or lack of financial support. The study’s main purpose is to present reasons for the conversion of water towers and to highlight several good practice models, as well as to present several water towers with a high potential for conversion.

  15. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence and archaeometry: Application in the Argentinean cultural heritage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Cristina [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Laboratorio de Quimica de Sistemas Heterogeneos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, P. Colon 850 (C1063ACU), Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: Cristina.Vazquez@cnea.gov.ar; Albornoz, Ana [Agencia Rio Negro Cultura, Museo de la Patagonia F.P.Moreno, Centro Civico s/n Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Hajduk, Adam [CONICET, Museo de la Patagonia F.P.Moreno, Centro Civico s/n Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Elkin, Dolores [CONICET Instituto Nacional de Antropologia y Pensamiento Latinoamericano, 3 de febrero 1378 (C1426AEL) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Custo, Graciela; Obrustky, Alba [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-12-15

    Archaeometry is an interdisciplinary research area involved in the development and use of scientific methods in order to answer questions concerned with the human history. In this way the knowledge of archaeological objects through advanced chemical and physical analyses permits a better preservation and conservation of the cultural heritage and also reveals materials and technologies used in the past. In this sense, analytical techniques play an important role in order to provide chemical information about cultural objects. Considering the non destructive characteristic of this study, analytical techniques must be adequate in order to prevent any alteration or damage and in addition to allow the conservation of their integrity. Taking into account the irreplaceable character of the archaeological and artistic materials considered in this study, analytical techniques must be adequate in order to prevent any alteration or damage and in addition to allow the conservation of their integrity. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry as a geometric variant of conventional X-ray fluorescence is a proved microanalytical technique considering the small amount of sample required for the analysis. A few micrograms are enough in order to reveal valuable information about elemental composition and in this context it is highly recommended for artwork studies. In this paper a case study is presented in which Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry has been successfully employed in the archaeometry field. Examples from Argentinean cultural heritage sites related with the determination of pigments in paintings on canvas and in rock sites as well as in underwater archaeology research are shown.

  16. The Cultural Socialization Scale: Assessing family and peer socialization toward heritage and mainstream cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijie; Benner, Aprile D; Kim, Su Yeong

    2015-12-01

    In a culturally diverse society, youth learn about multiple cultures from a variety of sources, yet the existing assessment of cultural socialization has been limited to parents' efforts to teach youth about their heritage culture. The current study adapted and extended an existing cultural socialization measure (Umaña-Taylor & Fine, 2004) to assess 4 types of socialization practices encountered specifically during adolescence: cultural socialization by families and peers toward both one's heritage culture and the mainstream culture. In a pilot study, we developed the Cultural Socialization Scale based on retrospective reports from 208 young adults, maximizing young adults' ability to reason and reflect their adolescent experiences with various socialization practices. In the primary study, we examined the psychometric properties of the scale using reports from 252 adolescents. Cultural socialization occurred from both socialization agents toward both cultures. Our Cultural Socialization Scale demonstrated stable factor structures and high reliabilities. We observed strong factorial invariance across the 4 subscales (6 items). Multiple indicators multiple causes models also demonstrated invariance for each subscale across adolescents' demographic characteristics (i.e., gender, race/ethnicity, nativity, socioeconomic status, language of assessment). The implications of the Cultural Socialization Scale are discussed.

  17. Mirror or Masquerade? On Representational Ethics in Cultural Heritage Museology And Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell Râna

    2014-01-01

    Icelandic cultural heritage museology is embedded in a complex of social, political, and economic matters, at both the national and continental levels, that look to tourism as an opportunity for development in rural regions. The present paper draws on master’s research that examined the relationships of Westfjords communities with two maritime heritage museums in the region. Two qualitative case studies based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with heritage producers connected to each si...

  18. Edutainment, cultural innovation and social inclusion. Fort360, a project for cultural heritage enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Pietro Martinelli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available   Fort360 project is a cultural initiative that receives the main directives of edutainment processes, trying to provide an answer to the necessity of a capillary system of information and awareness about the dismissing cultural heritage. The proposed study – carried out in the Fort Bravetta, Rome – presents a video where the educational aspect, related to the historical and architectural site contents, is strictly connected with the playful and emotional quality, resulted from a VR interaction with a panoramic video. This first case study focuses on the use of low-cost digital instrumentation and tries to improve the value of culture from the bottom, proposing an alternative way of cultural heritage enjoyment, based on participation and on interdisciplinarity of the proposed contents.

  19. Cultural diversity and Ottoman heritage in contemporary Greek popular novels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Trine Stauning

    with regard to the meaning allocated to past cultural diversity. For some it appears as a source of inspiration to and understanding of today’s intercultural challenges (Χριστόπουλος and Θέμελης), while others approach the diversity in more traditional ‘romaio-centric’ ways (Καλπούζος). The analysis......Public and scholarly interest in the impact of Ottoman history and culture on the successor states is increasing. Cultural co-existence in Ottoman society is explored perhaps in an attempt to find answers in the past to contemporary challenges emerging from transnational mobility....../migration. Such interest is obvious in international academia as well as in the cultural sphere of the countries in South-eastern Europe. In Greece, the recent celebration of the 100 years of Thessaloniki’s incorporation in the Greek state has accentuated the city’s Ottoman heritage. A plenitude of exhibitions...

  20. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, A. L.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.

    2016-11-01

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient "nanotechnologies"; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  1. Interactive Embodied Agents for Cultural Heritage and Archaeological presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Seron

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Maxine, a powerful engine to develop applications with embodied animated agents is presented. The engine, based on the use of open source libraries, enables multimodal real-time interaction with the user: via text, voice, images and gestures. Maxine virtual agents can establish emotional communication with the user through their facial expressions, the modulation of the voice and expressing the answers of the agents according to the information gathered by the system: noise level in the room, observer’s position, emotional state of the observer, etc. Moreover, the user’s emotions are considered and captured through images. For the moment, Maxine virtual agents have been used as virtual presenters for Cultural Heritage and Archaeological shows.

  2. Knowledge Acquisition from Historical Documents for Preserving Transylvanian Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POP, C.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a solution for preserving the cultural heritage by performing knowledge acquisition from historical documents. We developed a system that gathers knowledge by processing the content of historical documents to enable knowledge retrieval as response to ontologically-guided queries. Knowledge acquisition, one of the main workflows in our system, aims to semantically annotate the content of historical documents and to enrich the domain ontology through lexical annotation and knowledge extraction processes. We use two types of rules in knowledge extraction, one dealing with extracting the relevant information from the documents' content and another one for mapping the extracted information to ontology concepts and properties. Our work was validated on documents available in the Cluj County National Archives addressing the Transylvanian medieval history.

  3. Documentation of cultural heritage sites using the INSPIRE directive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkadolou, Eleni; Prastacos, Poulicos

    2016-08-01

    The INSPIRE directive, adopted by the EC in 2007 provides the guidelines for the organization of all geographic data and is the basis for establishing a Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI). Documentation of cultural heritage sites such as archeological areas, historic places and others is not a thematic area addressed in the directive. However, as discussed in this paper the directive can be extended to cover the documentation of these sites as well. The location of an archaeological area and its monuments, its legal status, the surrounding physical environment (NATURA protected areas), the protection zones around the site and the permitted development can be documented following the INSPIRE directive. Additionally, results of research carried out in these sites such as geophysical surveys, use of satellite images or topographical surveys can be also organized using the INSPIRE guidelines.

  4. Assessing environmental effects on organic materials in cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyatzis, Stamatis; Ioakimoglou, Eleni; Facorellis, Yorgos

    2015-01-01

    Under the auspices of INVENVORG (Thales Research Funding Program – NRSF), and within a holistic approach for assessing environmental effects on organic materials in cultural heritage (CH) artefacts, the effect of artificial ageing on elemental and molecular damage and their effects...... on the structural integrity of bone was investigated. Metapodial roe deer bone samples were artificially aged under humidity and atmospheres of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in room temperature. Elemental micro-analysis of bone material through SEM-EDX and molecular investigations through FTIR and Raman spectroscopy......, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELIZA) were realized. Results show damage within the inorganic and the organic matrix; incorporation of sulfur and nitrogen groups, minor reduction of specific aminoacids and changes in collagen integrity were...

  5. Oblique aerial images and their use in cultural heritage documentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Oblique images enable three-dimensional (3d) modelling of objects with vertical dimensions. Such imagery is nowadays systematically taken of cities and may easily become available. The documentation of cultural heritage can take advantage of these sources of information. Two new oblique camera...... systems are presented and characteristics of such images are summarized. A first example uses images of a new multi-camera system for the derivation of orthoimages, façade plots with photo texture, 3d scatter plots, and dynamic 3d models of a historic church. The applied methodology is based...... developments. Special attention is given to the quality of input images. Investigations are carried out on edges in the images. The combination of oblique and nadir images enables new possibilities in the processing. The use of the near-infrared channel besides the red, green, and blue channel of the applied...

  6. The International Commission on Geoheritage (ICG) and the Heritage Sites and Collections Subcommission (HSCS): A new global framework for advancing the science and practice of geodiversity conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kevin; de Wever, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The ICG is a new Scientific Commission within IUGS, established at the 35th IGC, Cape Town, South Africa, in August 2016. The ICG was incorporates two pre-existing Task Groups, on Geoheritage (TGG) and the Heritage Stones (HSTG), now transformed into, respectively, the Heritage Sites and Collections Subcommission (HSCS) (http://geoheritage-iugs.mnhn.fr) and the Heritage Stones Subcommission (HSS) (http://globalheritagestone.com/). Although the latter focuses on culturally significant geological heritage resources, its recognition and selection of Global Heritage Stone Resources (GHSR) demonstrates the close symbiosis that exists between the two Subcommissions. The HSTG, however, will focus on those aspects of Geodiversity and Geoheritage associated with natural geological materials and processes, both in-situ (e.g. within 'geosites') and ex-situ in institutional collections - and hence, primarily facets of a natural rather than a cultural heritage. Although the foundations of an appreciation of this aspect of natural heritage conservation go back to at least the late 19th century, it was not until the 1980s that international collaborations began to develop, for instance in Europe, leading to the formation of ProGEO in Europe in 1993, with other groups, often focussed on specific tasks, developing in Africa, Australasia and within IUGS, UNESCO and IUCN. Nevertheless, until the GTG was formed in 2008, there had been no explicitly global focus for all aspects of geological heritage and its sustainable management. The GTG began the process of building a global resource for Geoheritage sites and collections through the establishment of a comprehensive website, including a review of national conservation legislation, links to national geosite inventories (with interactive maps) and the beginnings of an inventory of 'Global Geosites' (a process first begun, abortively, in the 1990s in IUGS). The work of the GTG has confirmed within IUGS the significance of Geoheritage as

  7. Analysis of Cultural Heritage by Accelerator Techniques and Analytical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Toque, Jay Arre; Murayama, Yusuke

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present the result of experimental investigation using two very important accelerator techniques: (1) synchrotron radiation XRF and XAFS; and (2) accelerator mass spectrometry and multispectral analytical imaging for the investigation of cultural heritage. We also want to introduce a complementary approach to the investigation of artworks which is noninvasive and nondestructive that can be applied in situ. Four major projects will be discussed to illustrate the potential applications of these accelerator and analytical imaging techniques: (1) investigation of Mongolian Textile (Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan Period) using XRF, AMS and electron microscopy; (2) XRF studies of pigments collected from Korean Buddhist paintings; (3) creating a database of elemental composition and spectral reflectance of more than 1000 Japanese pigments which have been used for traditional Japanese paintings; and (4) visible light-near infrared spectroscopy and multispectral imaging of degraded malachite and azurite. The XRF measurements of the Japanese and Korean pigments could be used to complement the results of pigment identification by analytical imaging through spectral reflectance reconstruction. On the other hand, analysis of the Mongolian textiles revealed that they were produced between 12th and 13th century. Elemental analysis of the samples showed that they contained traces of gold, copper, iron and titanium. Based on the age and trace elements in the samples, it was concluded that the textiles were produced during the height of power of the Mongol empire, which makes them a valuable cultural heritage. Finally, the analysis of the degraded and discolored malachite and azurite demonstrates how multispectral analytical imaging could be used to complement the results of high energy-based techniques.

  8. Review of Recording, Documentation, Information Management for the Conservation of Heritage Places [Book

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hardie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When one considers the enormous variety and diversity of heritage assets across the world ranging from buried remains to extant buildings, historic landscapes to submerged wrecks, tackling the thorny issues of recording, documentation and information management in a single publication is always going to be a challenge. Add into the mix the breadth of documentation likely to arise from or be required by conservation projects such as research-driven laser scanning and computer modelling of a world heritage site, a conservation management plan archive, or the more modest output from the construction of an extension to a listed building, then trying to set out principles to ensure consistent high quality and accessible data that can be applied across the world, is no mean objective. As the eminently sensible Kate Clark points out in the opening paper in volume 2 of this publication, "Understanding the physical fabric of a site is an important first step in finding the right conservation strategy, and documentation is the first step in understanding". This book offers case studies, arguments and a framework for integrating documentation into the conservation process and claims to offer new concepts and ideas to advance the field. It puts forward a clear set of twelve principles and guidelines which it suggests will help heritage managers and decision makers in ensuring that they succeed in understanding their roles and responsibilities. In doing so, the authors believe this will help them to choose the correct documentation strategy for their project.

  9. Chinese Identity in London-An Analysis from the Aspects of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ning

    2014-01-01

    The basic aim of this study is to find out and understand the strength and inspira-tion behind the identity of Chinese in London , and how it has been maintained from the aspects of cul-tural heritage and cultural memory . “Individuals have always been capable of i-dentifying with different social groups and spatial scales” ( Ashworth et al.2007, 4); and further-more, as Sewell puts it , “culture exists only in and through practices” ( 1999 in Ashworth et al . 2007, 7).Therefore, the main methodology for researching Chinese identity in London will be through interviews and questionnaires , looking for answers by asking questions about the circum-stances of Chinese daily lives; at the same time , the ways of their maintenance will be explored fur-ther . The questionnaires were divided into mainly two groups of respondents:Chinese and non-Chi-nese, and they were done in Chinatown and in my volunteer group doing the placement at the Museum of London Docklands . The purpose of question-naires was to unearth general ideas about Chinese identity. The interviews were based on semi -struc-tured questions .The questions were based on the use of an “interview guide” ( Bernard 2006, 212 ) , which directed the conversation towards their daily lives , connections with China , living habits, social surroundings such as friends , and interests . Meanwhile , during the interviewing process, the respondents were also encouraged to feel free to talk more about other things that they would like to say . Through these interviews , a general description of Chinese lives in London could be drawn . When talking to interviewees about China-town, we find that it is a place connected with dai-ly life;whereas for non-Chinese , it is considered more as tourist or leisure site full of lanterns and an enormous variety of restaurants ( Masters et al . 2008, 67) .A lot of Chinese get jobs there in or-der to survive .Chinese go to Chinatown to buy food and commodities that are not

  10. 76 FR 39433 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C... public, the sporting conservation ] community, the shooting and hunting sports industry, wildlife...) Increasing public awareness of and support for the Sport Wildlife Trust Fund; (c) Fostering wildlife and...

  11. Monument Damage Information System (mondis): AN Ontological Approach to Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciotti, R.; Valach, J.; Kuneš, P.; Čerňanský, M.; Blaško, M.; Křemen, P.

    2013-07-01

    Deriving from the complex nature of cultural heritage conservation it is the need for enhancing a systematic but flexible organization of expert knowledge in the field. Such organization should address comprehensively the interrelations and complementariness among the different factors that come into play in the understanding of diagnostic and intervention problems. The purpose of MONDIS is to endorse this kind of organization. The approach consists in applying an ontological representation to the field of heritage conservation in order to establish an appropriate processing of data. The system allows replicating in a computer readable form the basic dependence among factors influencing the description, diagnosis and intervention of damages to immovable objects. More specifically MONDIS allows to input and search entries concerning object description, structural evolution, location characteristics and risk, component, material properties, surveys and measurements, damage typology, damage triggering events and possible interventions. The system supports searching features typical of standard databases, as it allows for the digitalization of a wide range of information including professional reports, books, articles and scientific papers. It also allows for computer aided retrieval of information tailored to user's requirements. The foreseen outputs will include a web user interface and a mobile application for visual inspection purposes.

  12. Present Conditions and Strategies of Intangible Cultural Heritage Protection in Sichuan Ethnic Autonomous Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yunxia

    2013-01-01

    The intangible cultural heritage of ethnic minorities is the most typical cultural re-source with ethnic characteristics . Its scientific protection and effective usage can not only help to transmit and develop the intangible cultural herit-age of ethnic minorities , but also can transform the ethnic minorities ’ cultural resources into advanta-geous resources , thus, promoting economic devel-opment in ethnic minority autonomous areas .For a long time, the ethnic minority autonomous areas have paid considerable attention to the protection of ethnic intangible cultural heritage ; explored vari-ous effective protective measures; and built up an effective model for protecting ethnic intangible cul-tural heritage guaranteed by the ethnic autonomous law.

  13. Digital Technology in the protection of cultural heritage Bao Fan Temple mural digital mapping survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-08-01

    the mural surface patch model. For the degradation of the surface of the pigment layer, we use the patch model to simulate the scan obtained from an analysis. Statistics calculated relatively objective mural surface area from volume data, providing more accurate quantitative data for the mural conservation, especially, providing a viable technology for accurate monitoring of continued degradation. We believe, in order to make use of the three-dimensional laser scanning technology in a digital heritage conservation application, the technology should not only be used to record the object geometry and play a role in record keeping aspects, but, rather, should be used during the investigation to protect against targeted degradation and a more meaningful interpretation function. Like the development of the medical application of X-ray technology not only retains a picture, but more importantly, through this technical interpretation of patient pathology, guides doctors in carrying out the treatment work. Therefore, in the process of digitization of cultural heritage research, the focus should shift to the use of digital technology in the analysis of heritage object degradation and degradation monitoring surveys can promote the application of digital technology in the conservation of cultural heritage.

  14. Heritage Language Education: Valuing the Languages, Literacies, and Cultural Competencies of Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Corinne A.; Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    2017-01-01

    This article argues for the value of heritage language programs and the micro-level language policies that support them, focusing on a case study of a program in the USA to make this argument. We also argue for the importance of recognizing students' heritage languages, cultures, and individual goals and identities in mainstream school programs.…

  15. Exploring Three-js library possibilitiesfor the dissemination of cultural heritage projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Palomar-Vazquez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For whatever project related with the study and conservation of cultural heritage, the dissemination stage of tree-dimensional (3D information must be a key part of the whole process. Most of the existing web-based platforms are using WebGL technology to disseminate 3D content through Web navigators, despite they are normally generic, with a low level of viewers ‘customization. Alternatively, users can make use of several libraries, most of them open source, which allow a complete adaptation to the specific project features, even though enough level of programming skills are necessary to use them. In the present paper we will describe the minimum requirements that any cultural heritage dissemination project should contain and its implementation using Three-js, one of the most versatile open source libraries for 3D visualization. In addition, we will show several examples of Three-js integration with other libraries that take advantage from HTML5 (HyperText Markup Language, version 5 to enhance the user's experience on a Web platform.

  16. A Shape-Adjusted Tridimensional Reconstruction of Cultural Heritage Artifacts Using a Miniature Quadrotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Théo Louiset

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The innovative automated 3D modeling procedure presented here was used to reconstruct a Cultural Heritage (CH object by means of an unmanned aerial vehicle. Using a motion capture system, a small low-cost quadrotor equipped with a miniature low-resolution Raspberry Pi camera module was accurately controlled in the closed loop mode and made to follow a trajectory around the artifact. A two-stage process ensured the accuracy of the 3D reconstruction process. The images taken during the first circular trajectory were used to draw the artifact’s shape. The second trajectory was smartly and autonomously adjusted to match the artifact’s shape, then it provides new pictures taken close to the artifact and, thus, greatly improves the final 3D reconstruction in terms of the completeness, accuracy and quickness, in particular where the artifact’s shape is complex. The results obtained here using close-range photogrammetric methods show that the process of automated 3D model reconstruction based on a robotized quadrotor using a motion capture system is a realistic approach, which could provide a suitable new digital conservation tool in the cultural heritage field.

  17. Latest advancements in fluorescence hyperspectral lidar imaging of the cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, V.; Conti, C.; Lognoli, D.; Palombi, L.

    2013-11-01

    Fluorescence lidar imaging can be regarded as an effective tool for early diagnostics and documentation of the outdoor cultural heritage, with the aim of a correct planning of conservation and restoration of monuments. In this paper we present the latest advancements on fluorescence hyperspectral lidar imaging recently achieved at IFAC-CNR in terms of instrumentation and novel applications. In particular, the paper focuses on the upgrading of some key technical features, such as: the scan speed of the sensor, spatial resolution at the surface and field of view of the instrument. The upgrading of these technical characteristics has also made it possible to successfully extend the applicability of the technique to the diagnostics on wall paintings, which requires an improved spatial resolution. Finally, we outline the potential of a new concept of fluorescence lidar imaging system, based on the integration of hyperspectral and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy, which enhances the capabilities of the technique for the characterization of the materials to be investigated in cultural heritage assets.

  18. Disaster Risk Management and Measurement Indicators for Cultural Heritage in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Y. N.; Cheng, C. F.; Cheng, H. M.

    2015-08-01

    Under the influence of global climate change, the risk preparedness has become a universal issue in different research fields. In the conservation of cultural heritage, disaster risk management is becoming one of the major research topics. Besides researches on the theory and mechanism of disaster risk management, the tools for the performance of site managers to protect cultural heritage is another important issue that needs development. UNESCO and ICOMOS have released some important documents on disaster risk management including its concept, identification, evaluation, mitigation, monitoring and resilience, etc. However, there is a big gap between concept and implementation in Taiwan. Presently there are 2000 monuments in Taiwan that hardly meet the modern code. First, based on international documents released, this research presents 13 disaster indicators on monuments and their environments. Next, 345 monuments in northern Taiwan are taken as examples to evaluate their risk situations with indicators designed in 2011. Some positive recommendations were given at the same time. As a result, a comparative evaluation was completed in 2012 and some key issues are found, such as too many electrical facilities, lack of efficient firefighting equipment, and a shortage of management mechanism, just to name a few. Through the improvement of the management, some major risk can be mitigated. In 2013~14, this research took 23 national monuments from the 345 monuments to evaluate their risk situations and compare the differences between national and local monuments. Results show that almost all management mechanisms in the national monuments have been established and are running well. However, problems like inappropriate electrical facilities and insufficient monitoring equipment remain. In addition, the performance of private monuments is not as good as public ones. Based on the collected information and evaluation, this research develops safety measures of heritage

  19. Integrating Cultural Heritage into Contemporary Life. The Perspective of Local Communities: The Case of Arcadia, Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Lappa; Evangelia Georgitsoyanni

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to highlight the importance of integrating cultural heritage into contemporary life as a means to contribute to the economic and tourism development of a historical area and as an asset to local development. The study focuses on the cultural goods of Arcadia in central Peloponnese, Greece, an area of great history and rich architectural heritage, which gives a distinct cultural identity to the region. The overall objective of the current research is to describe how the ...

  20. Heritage Conservation under Cultural Diversity and Social Harmony: Centering on the Resolutions of ICOM 2007 and 2010 General Conferences%文化多元与社会和谐观照下的遗产保护——以两次国际博协大会决议为中心

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯春燕

    2012-01-01

    对比2007年和2010年两次国际博协大会决议可以看出,尊重与保护文化多样性是近年国际博协的主要政策导向。决议从多个方面倡导世界各国的博物馆在遗产保护中秉持多元文化理念,加强自身所应承担的道德责任,促进不同民族之间相互理解和相互包容,进而促进人类公平、正义与社会和谐。%The two resolutions from ICOM 2007 and 2010 general conferences indicate that to respect and preserve cultural diversity has been a guiding trend of ICOM's main policies in the recent years.The resolutions advocate from many perspectives that museums should keep cultural diversity in mind in their practices in heritage conservation and strengthen their sense of responsibility in moral standards,so as to enhance the mutual understanding and tolerance between nations and promote human justice and social harmony.

  1. Pictorial materials database: 1200 combinations of pigments, dyes, binders and varnishes designed as a tool for heritage science and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, Tiziana; Buscaglia, Paola; Migliorini, Simonetta; Nervo, Marco; Piccablotto, Gabriele; Piccirillo, Anna; Pisani, Marco; Puglisi, Davide; Vaudan, Dario; Zucco, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    The conservation of artworks requires a profound knowledge about pictorial materials, their chemical and physical properties and their interaction and/or degradation processes. For this reason, pictorial materials databases are widely used to study and investigate cultural heritage. At Centre for Conservation and Restoration La Venaria Reale, we prepared a set of about 1200 mock-ups with 173 different pigments and/or dyes, used across all the historical times or as products for conservation, four binders, two varnishes and four different materials for underdrawings. In collaboration with the Laboratorio Analisi Scientifiche of Regione Autonoma Valle d'Aosta, the National Institute of Metrological Research and the Department of Architecture and Design of the Polytechnic of Turin, we created a scientific database that is now available online (http://www.centrorestaurovenaria.it/en/areas/diagnostic/pictorial-materials-database) designed as a tool for heritage science and conservation. Here, we present a focus on materials for pictorial retouching where the hyperspectral imaging application, conducted with a prototype of new technology, allowed to provide a list of pigments that could be more suitable for conservation treatments and pictorial retouching. Then we present the case study of the industrial painting Notte Barbara (1962) by Pinot Gallizio where the use of the database including modern and contemporary art materials showed to be very useful and where the fibre optics reflectance spectroscopy technique was decisive for pigment identification purpose. Later in this research, the mock-ups will be exploited to study degradation processes, e.g., the lightfastness, or the possible formation of interaction products, e.g., metal carboxylates.

  2. Ireland and the UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Seán

    2010-12-01

    Ratification by Ireland of the 2001 UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage will not be able to take place until after enactment of additional domestic legislation. The reasons for this are examined in the context of Ireland's legal system. Since 1987 Ireland has had extensive legal protection for underwater cultural heritage, but the jurisdictional aspects of the Convention are key to understanding why additional legislation is necessary. Issues relating to salvage law are also considered. The 2001 Convention is placed in the context of development of Irish policy on underwater cultural heritage.

  3. Research on the Geographical Indication and Cultural Heritage of China’s Yellow Tea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min; TIAN; Zhiguo; SUN; Zhiyang; LIU; Guangping; DING

    2014-01-01

    The yellow tea falls within one of the six basic categories of tea,and it is a type of unique and ancient tea in China. Junshan Yinzhen is one of China’s Top Ten Teas,and Yueyang City in Hunan Province is the hometown of yellow tea. The yellow tea now has 2 national geographical indication products,4 national geographical indication trademarks,1 national geographical indication of agricultural products,and 3 items of provincial intangible cultural heritage. The famous brand of yellow tea is just the brand cultural heritage. This article expounds the current situation of geographical indication and cultural heritage protection,and put forth the corresponding recommendations.

  4. Identifying potential indicators of conservation value using natural heritage occurrence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, Peter B; Penskar, Michael R; Schools, Edward H; Enander, Helen D

    2006-02-01

    Conservation planning based on the occurrence of rare species has been criticized as being too limited in scope to conserve biodiversity as a whole. Conversely, planning based on indicator taxa may lack sufficient focus to conserve those species in greatest need of conservation. An alternative approach is to identify a variety of species at risk that are associated with areas of conservation value, which is defined based on species-independent characteristics. We identified potential indicators of conservation value using occurrence data on species at risk and independent information on conservation value that incorporated indices of ecosystem integrity. We propose a taxonomically diverse group of indicator species that are strongly associated with areas of exceptional ecosystem integrity, to serve as a focus for further research and in planning for biodiversity conservation. We identify potential indicator species by defining a null model in which species at risk are equally associated with areas of high ecosystem integrity, then by conducting randomization tests to identify noncompliant species in the state of Michigan, USA. Areas of high ecosystem integrity are selected using criteria to flag (1) secure biotic communities with structural integrity and few exotic species, (2) natural areas subjected to expert review, (3) contiguous relict areas of forest interior, (4) contiguous areas of unmodified wetland, and (5) all these areas combined. We determine the spatial occurrence of species at risk using data from Michigan's statewide Natural Heritage database. The potential indicators include plants, insects, and birds. Their species identity and distribution of occurrences varies with the five scenarios, and together the species broadly cover the entire state. These species at risk, many of which occur throughout the Great Lakes region, may be used to identify additional areas potentially high in conservation value and to monitor their conservation. The ecological

  5. Green copper pigments biodegradation in cultural heritage: from malachite to moolooite, thermodynamic modeling, X-ray fluorescence, and Raman evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Kepa; Sarmiento, Alfredo; Martínez-Arkarazo, Irantzu; Madariaga, Juan Manuel; Fernández, Luis Angel

    2008-06-01

    Moolooite (copper oxalate), a very rare compound, was found as a degradation product from the decay of malachite in several specimens of Cultural Heritage studied. Computer simulations, based on heterogeneous chemical equilibria, support the transformation of malachite to moolooite through the intermediate copper basic sulfates or copper basic chlorides, depending on the presence of available free sulfate or chloride anions in the chemical system. Raman and X-ray fluorescence spectral evidence found during the analysis of the three case studies investigated supported the model predictions. According to the study, the presence of lichens and other microorganisms might be responsible for the decay phenomena. This work tries to highlight the importance of biological attack on specimens belonging to Cultural Heritage and to demonstrate the consequences of oxalic acid, excreted by some of these microorganisms, on the conservation and preservation of artwork.

  6. Pop art, hybrid cultures and intangible cultural heritage in El Salvador. The particular case of “Chirajito” clown

    OpenAIRE

    Melara Martínez, Mario Alberto; Becario Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA)

    2014-01-01

    This article makes a reflection from Intangible cultural heritage about a popular artistic expression, that, for such a long timehas gained validity and reconnaissance among Salvadorian community but it is out of official artistic parameters because it’sa non academic character. From the question, is or not Chirajito clown Salvadorian intangible cultural heritage? is tackle thehistoric happening of Clown figure, the gaps in Salvadorian cultural legislation, generic concepts of international c...

  7. Collaborative reputation systems in a cultural heritage scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Salvatore; De Michele, Pasquale; Galletti, Ardelio; Ponti, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, algorithms for reputation systems are been widely developed in order to achieve correct ratings for products, services, companies, digital contents and people. We start from a comprehensive mathematical model for Collaborative Reputation Systems (CRSes), present in the literature and formally defined as a recurrence relation that generates a sequence of trust matrices, from which the reputation of the items and the raters can be derived. Even though this model can be applied to several scenarios, the focus of this work is related to its application in a real case, that is a cultural event scenario. More in detail, in cultural heritage environment, the data collected in an event represent the basic knowledge to be inferred. The main idea is to correctly use the available technology and data to give a reliable rate (reputation) for both visitors and artworks. These rates will be very useful to classify the visiting style of the visitors and to fix the artworks that have most attracted visitors.

  8. From Geophysics to Microgeophysics for Engineering and Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Cosentino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodologies of microgeophysics have been derived from the geophysical ones, for the sake of solving specific diagnostic and/or monitoring problems regarding civil engineering and cultural heritage studies. Generally, the investigations are carried out using different 2D and 3D tomographic approaches as well as different energy sources: sonic and ultrasonic waves, electromagnetic (inductive and impulsive sources, electric potential fields, and infrared emission. Many efforts have been made to modify instruments and procedures in order to improve the resolution of the surveys as well as to significantly reduce the time of the measurements without any loss of information. This last point has been achieved by using multichannel systems. Finally, some applications are presented, and the results seem to be very promising and promote this new branch of geophysics. Therefore, these methodologies can be used even more to diagnose, monitor, and safeguard not only engineering buildings and/or large structures, but also ancient monuments and cultural artifacts, such as pottery, statues, and so forth.

  9. ``Campo del Cielo'' Meteorites: Astronomical Heritage and Cultural Colonialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro Martín; Altman, Agustina

    2012-09-01

    In the province of Chaco, Argentina, there is a very unique dispersion of metallic meteorites called ``Campo del Cielo''. One of the meteoric fragments of this dispersion, the meteorite called ``El Chaco'', consisting of 37 tons, is the second heaviest in the world. These meteorites are of great importance to the worldview of the Moqoit, aboriginal people that inhabit this region. For the local Creole population the meteorites are also relevant, that's why they have being cited in numerous documents and reports since the colonial period. During the first months of 2012, two Argentine artists and the Artistic Director of the German contemporary art exhibition called dOCUMENTA (13) tried to move ``El Chaco'' meteorite to Germany in order to exhibit it as an artistic object. Due to the fact that moving the meteorite could have a negative impact according to the Moqoit cosmology and that they were not able to participate in the decision they begun a manifestation against the movement of El Chaco. The opposition made by aboriginal communities and experts in cultural astronomy was able to stop the transfer. The whole process and its impact on the local community have promoted a deep discussion about art, science and cultural colonialism. In this paper we aim to address this debate and its consequences. This will allow us to think about contemporary forms of colonialism that are hidden in many scientific and artistic projects. Furthermore, we aim to debate about the most effective ways of protecting astronomical heritage in the Third World.

  10. A Semantic Approach for Recommendations generation: some Cultural Heritage applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio De Tommasi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available EnThe growing availability of data in the information systems has raised the challenging problem of distinguishing between the resources that belong to the same information context. Starting from the hypothesis that the information system is based on Semantic Web technologies, is it possible to use these technologies to make an information system more adaptive to user requirements in order to enable personalization and differentiation mechanisms in the information delivery process?This paper proposes an approach to building recommendations by using Semantic Web technologies, in order to give the users a different access to the information. The outcome is a semantic recommender engine, capable of retrieving and ranking semantically annotated resources, by using a set of domain ontologies and a semantic matching algorithm. We are showing some applications of this model in the Cultural Heritage domain in which the presented approach seems to be particularly effective, due to the richness of semantic structures and models existing for such domain.ItLa crescente quantità di dati disponibili da parte dei sistemi informativi ha sollevato il complesso problema della distinzione tra risorse appartenenti allo stesso contesto informativo. Partendo dall'ipotesi che il sistema informativo si basi sulle tecnologie proprie del Web Semantico, è possibile utilizzare tali tecnologie per rendere il sistema adattivo ai requisiti dell'utente, abilitando, in questo modo, meccanismi di personalizzazione e differenziazione?Questo articolo propone un approccio per la generazione di recommendation,  utilizzando le tecnologie del Web Semantico, al fine di fornire, ai singoli utenti, accessi differenziati alle informazioni. Il risultato è un motore di generazione di recommendation semantiche, in grado di recuperare e classificare risorse annotate semanticamente, avvalendosi di un set di ontologie di dominio e di un algoritmo di matching semantico. Saranno

  11. Protection of Geographical Indication and Intangible Cultural Heritage of the Chrysanthemum Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai; HU; Zhiguo; SUN; Wanzhen; XIONG; Limin; HUANG; Shuting; WANG

    2013-01-01

    We conduct an analysis on the current protection of geographical indication intellectual property and intangible cultural heritage of chrysanthemum resources. The following recommendations are explored and set forth: ( i) Collecting and sorting the intangible cultural heritage related to chrysanthemum,and declaring the provincial and national list; ( ii) Establishing the productive protection demonstration bases of intangible cultural heritage related to chrysanthemum; ( iii) Strengthening the declaration of geographical indication intellectual property protection of chrysanthemum; ( iv) Encouraging the use of special marks of geographical indication,and cultivating chrysanthemum brand; ( v) Establishing various kinds of national quality standards of geographical indication of chrysanthemum; ( vi) Implementing the double protection of intangible cultural heritage and geographical indication of traditional chrysanthemum.

  12. Zone of Sochi 2014 Olympic sites and its historical and cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander А. Cherkasov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the historical-cultural heritage area of Sochi-2014 Olympics. Attention of the multinational representation in the territory, by clarifying the concept – an indigenous person to temporary space.

  13. A New Acquisition and Imaging System for Environmental Measurements: An Experience on the Italian Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Leccese

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new acquisition system for remote control of wall paintings has been realized and tested in the field. The system measures temperature and atmospheric pressure in an archeological site where a fresco has been put under control. The measuring chain has been designed to be used in unfavorable environments where neither electric power nor telecommunication infrastructures are available. The environmental parameters obtained from the local monitoring are then transferred remotely allowing an easier management by experts in the field of conservation of cultural heritage. The local acquisition system uses an electronic card based on microcontrollers and sends the data to a central unit realized with a Raspberry-Pi. The latter manages a high quality camera to pick up pictures of the fresco. Finally, to realize the remote control at a site not reached by internet signals, a WiMAX connection based on different communication technologies such as WiMAX, Ethernet, GPRS and Satellite, has been set up.

  14. A new acquisition and imaging system for environmental measurements: an experience on the Italian cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccese, Fabio; Cagnetti, Marco; Calogero, Andrea; Trinca, Daniele; di Pasquale, Stefano; Giarnetti, Sabino; Cozzella, Lorenzo

    2014-05-23

    A new acquisition system for remote control of wall paintings has been realized and tested in the field. The system measures temperature and atmospheric pressure in an archeological site where a fresco has been put under control. The measuring chain has been designed to be used in unfavorable environments where neither electric power nor telecommunication infrastructures are available. The environmental parameters obtained from the local monitoring are then transferred remotely allowing an easier management by experts in the field of conservation of cultural heritage. The local acquisition system uses an electronic card based on microcontrollers and sends the data to a central unit realized with a Raspberry-Pi. The latter manages a high quality camera to pick up pictures of the fresco. Finally, to realize the remote control at a site not reached by internet signals, a WiMAX connection based on different communication technologies such as WiMAX, Ethernet, GPRS and Satellite, has been set up.

  15. The characterization of artefacts of cultural heritage significance using physical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creagh, D.C. [Cultural Heritage Research Centre, Division of Science and Design, University of Canberra, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia)]. E-mail: dcreagh@bigpond.net.eu

    2005-12-15

    All societies attempt to preserve their cultural heritage because it is this that gives them their identity. How artefacts are identified as being of significance to society, and how to preserve these for posterity, depend on the sophistication of those societies, their wealth, and the determination of members of the societies to preserve their past. If conservation or restoration measures are being undertaken complex analytical experiments must be undertaken beforehand to ensure that the work is being undertaken in an appropriate manner. These investigations may employ electromagnetic (IR, VIS, UV, X-ray, {gamma}-ray) or particulate (electron, proton, neutron, and ion beams) radiation. The use of many of these techniques is described in this paper in experiments on Australian Aboriginal bark paintings, a suit of armour belonging to a famous Australian outlaw, and the degradation of colour motion picture film.

  16. Digital preservation for heritages

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    ""Digital Preservation for Heritages: Technologies and Applications"" provides a comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of digital technologies in the area of cultural heritage preservation, including digitalization, research aiding, conservation aiding, digital exhibition, and digital utilization. Processes, technical frameworks, key technologies, as well as typical systems and applications are discussed in the book. It is intended for researchers and students in the fields of computer science and technology, museology, and archaeology. Dr. Dongming Lu is a professor at College of Computer Sci

  17. The use of environmental impact assessment in protecting the built cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flynn, Errol David

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the application of the environmental impact assessment as a means of protecting the built and cultural heritage during and after the construction of the new national opera house in the Holmen area of Copenhagen. It assesses the affect the new building has had...... on the surrounding built and cultural heritage and examines how the environmental impact assessment was used during the development process....

  18. Review of present European environmental policies and legislation involving cultural heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Teller, Jacques; Bond, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Cultural heritage is being addressed by a number of Charters and Conventions and it is clear that its consideration within decision-making processes is progressively becoming a real challenge, both for developers and public authorities. Against this background, this paper reviews the environmental assessment framework developed by the European Community, as this should increasingly influence decision making about cultural heritage in an urban setting. The legislative framework for access to e...

  19. SfM for Orthophoto to Generation: A Winning Approach for Cultural Heritage Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    F. Chiabrando; E. Donadio; F. Rinaudo

    2015-01-01

    3D detailed models derived from digital survey techniques have increasingly developed and focused in many field of application. The high detailed content and accuracy of such models make them so attractive and usable for large sets of purposes in Cultural Heritage. The present paper focuses on one of the main techniques used nowadays for Cultural Heritage survey and documentation: the image matching approach or Structure from Motion (SfM) technique. According to the low cost nature a...

  20. Novel approach of signal normalization for depth profile of cultural heritage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvilay, D.; Detalle, V.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of cultural heritage materials is always complex and specific because unique. Materials are most often heterogeneous and organized in several layers such as mural paintings or corrosion products. The characterization of a complete artwork's stratigraphy is actually one of the questions of science conservation. Indeed, the knowledge of these layers allows completing the history of the work of art and a better understanding of alteration processes in order to set up an appropriate conservation action. The LIBS technique has been employed to study the stratigraphy of an artwork thanks to the ablation laser. However, as we know, atomic information could be insufficient to characterize two materials composed by the same based elements. Therefore, an additional molecular analysis, like Raman spectroscopy; is sometimes necessary for a better identification of the material in particular for organic coatings in cultural heritage. We suggest in this study to use Standard Normal Variate (SNV) as a common normalization for different kinds of spectra (LIBS and Raman spectroscopy) combined with a 3D colour representation for stratigraphic identification of the different layers composing the complex material from artwork. So in this investigation, the SNV method will be applied on LIBS and Raman spectra but also on baseline Raman spectra often considering as nuisance. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the versatility of SNV applied on varied spectra like LIBS, Raman spectra as well as the luminescence background. This original work considers the SNV with a 3D colour representation as a probable new perspective for an easy recognition of a structure layered with a direct overview of the depth profile of the artwork.

  1. European Master-Doctorate Course on "Vulnerability of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, R.-A.

    2009-04-01

    « Vulnerability of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change », European Master-Doctorate Course, Council of Europe, Strasbourg 7-11 September 2009 The character of Cultural Heritage is closely related to the climate, and the urban landscape and the built heritage have been designed with the local climate in mind. The stability of Cultural Heritage is, therefore, closely tied to its interactions with the ground and the atmosphere. Climate Change is thus expected to have either catastrophic or subtle effects on Cultural Heritage materials and Cultural Landscapes. The major aim of the 2009 Strasbourg Course is to ensure that young European students are informed on these important problems and will be able in the future to undertake rigorous ongoing scientific monitoring of changes in conditions of Cultural Heritage. The Programme of the Course will cover the following topics: • Heritage Climatology • Principles of Mitigation and Adaptation of Cultural Heritage to Climate Change • Impact of Climate Change on building structures • Dose-Response and Damage Functions for materials in a Changing Climate • Modelling sea salts transport and deposition • Modelling wetting and drying of historic buildings • Impact of Climate Change on building materials: stone, mortar, modern glass, stained glass windows • Impact of Climate Change on organic materials • Biological impact of Climate Change on Cultural Heritage • Sea level rise models and possible application to Cultural Heritage • Past, present and future for Venice • The policies and action plans of International Organisations (Council of Europe, UNESCO, ICCROM) The Course is addressed to young people with scientific background: physicists, chemists, geologists, biologists, engineers, because of the high scientific level of the background required to follow the lectures. Teaching will be delivered in English without any simultaneous translation. The teachers belong to European Universities, National

  2. Wireless sensor networks evaluation for heritage monitoring; in the development of decay detecting techniques for a preventive conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inmaculada Martínez Garrido, María; Fort, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring systems using sensor techniques are widely used in the field of cultural heritage. In recent decades, the use of monitoring techniques involving sensors has been evolving in a wide way, because of the increasing importance they have in the observation of decay phenomena in order to establish predictive strategies to promote a preventive conservation. Wireless sensor networks, formed by a group of sensors nodes or monitoring points which have wireless communication, allow us a great number of nonexistent advantages until now since they have an easier way of installation, maintenance and fault detection versus wired networks previously used, with the costs reduction and the increase of reliability in measurement systems that this fact entails. To assess the suitability of wireless sensor networks it is necessary to take into account many factors since heritage is a very demanding field. This paper evaluates the quality of communications in various deployments of heritage interest, both architectural and natural heritage, of a competitive wireless sensor networks platform which has been subjected to different conditions of range in demanding monitoring environments. To measure the communication quality, multiple parameters for the characterization of the received signal and the links were taken into account, such as the RSSI, which measures the power level of the received signal and the percentage of correctly received messages, among others. Additionally, it will be also of relevance to achieve a long-term and low energy monitoring, since measured parameters do not undergo significant variations in short periods of study, so that the evaluation includes energy and consumption aspects of wireless sensor networks systems, establishing a final assessment methodology for this type of technology applied to the heritage monitoring field. Furthermore some design software / hardware aspects are evaluated for an appropriate validation of the system from the point

  3. Digital Documentation of Ships in Cultural Heritage: a European Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, A.

    2017-08-01

    Ships of different shapes and times are lying in harbours, on land or in museums, all over the world. Our aim with this paper was to review work done on digital documentation of ships in Cultural Heritage based on different initiatives in Europe using Coordinate Measuring Machine (Newport Ship and Doel 1); Total Station Theodolite (Vasa and Mary-Rose) and Laser scanning (LaScanMar and Traditional boats of Ireland). Our results showed that some discrepancy exist between the projects, in terms of techniques and expertise at hand. Furthermore, few guidelines have been in practice but only for Archaeology and Ethnology. However, no standards are existing. Three focuses have emerged: documentation of single ship elements, monitoring of the long-term deformation processes and the documentation of collections of ships. We discussed the diversity of expert's background and the complexity of comparability between projects. In conclusion, guidelines are necessary to enable a common ground for all professions to work together, e.g. in Architecture. This path must be taken now for digital documentation of ships, if not information and knowledge will be lost on the way.

  4. Evaluating Unmanned Aerial Platforms for Cultural Heritage Large Scale Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, A.; Oikonomou, C.; Adamopoulos, E.; Stathopoulou, E. K.

    2016-06-01

    When it comes to large scale mapping of limited areas especially for cultural heritage sites, things become critical. Optical and non-optical sensors are developed to such sizes and weights that can be lifted by such platforms, like e.g. LiDAR units. At the same time there is an increase in emphasis on solutions that enable users to get access to 3D information faster and cheaper. Considering the multitude of platforms, cameras and the advancement of algorithms in conjunction with the increase of available computing power this challenge should and indeed is further investigated. In this paper a short review of the UAS technologies today is attempted. A discussion follows as to their applicability and advantages, depending on their specifications, which vary immensely. The on-board cameras available are also compared and evaluated for large scale mapping. Furthermore a thorough analysis, review and experimentation with different software implementations of Structure from Motion and Multiple View Stereo algorithms, able to process such dense and mostly unordered sequence of digital images is also conducted and presented. As test data set, we use a rich optical and thermal data set from both fixed wing and multi-rotor platforms over an archaeological excavation with adverse height variations and using different cameras. Dense 3D point clouds, digital terrain models and orthophotos have been produced and evaluated for their radiometric as well as metric qualities.

  5. EVALUATING UNMANNED AERIAL PLATFORMS FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE LARGE SCALE MAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Georgopoulos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to large scale mapping of limited areas especially for cultural heritage sites, things become critical. Optical and non-optical sensors are developed to such sizes and weights that can be lifted by such platforms, like e.g. LiDAR units. At the same time there is an increase in emphasis on solutions that enable users to get access to 3D information faster and cheaper. Considering the multitude of platforms, cameras and the advancement of algorithms in conjunction with the increase of available computing power this challenge should and indeed is further investigated. In this paper a short review of the UAS technologies today is attempted. A discussion follows as to their applicability and advantages, depending on their specifications, which vary immensely. The on-board cameras available are also compared and evaluated for large scale mapping. Furthermore a thorough analysis, review and experimentation with different software implementations of Structure from Motion and Multiple View Stereo algorithms, able to process such dense and mostly unordered sequence of digital images is also conducted and presented. As test data set, we use a rich optical and thermal data set from both fixed wing and multi-rotor platforms over an archaeological excavation with adverse height variations and using different cameras. Dense 3D point clouds, digital terrain models and orthophotos have been produced and evaluated for their radiometric as well as metric qualities.

  6. DIGITAL DOCUMENTATION OF SHIPS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE: A EUROPEAN REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Colson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ships of different shapes and times are lying in harbours, on land or in museums, all over the world. Our aim with this paper was to review work done on digital documentation of ships in Cultural Heritage based on different initiatives in Europe using Coordinate Measuring Machine (Newport Ship and Doel 1; Total Station Theodolite (Vasa and Mary-Rose and Laser scanning (LaScanMar and Traditional boats of Ireland. Our results showed that some discrepancy exist between the projects, in terms of techniques and expertise at hand. Furthermore, few guidelines have been in practice but only for Archaeology and Ethnology. However, no standards are existing. Three focuses have emerged: documentation of single ship elements, monitoring of the long-term deformation processes and the documentation of collections of ships. We discussed the diversity of expert’s background and the complexity of comparability between projects. In conclusion, guidelines are necessary to enable a common ground for all professions to work together, e.g. in Architecture. This path must be taken now for digital documentation of ships, if not information and knowledge will be lost on the way.

  7. Patrimonio cultural y turismo en el México posrevolucionario/Cultural heritage and tourism in post-revolutionary Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eugenio Mercado López

    2016-01-01

      This article discusses the beginning of the relationship between cultural heritage and tourism in the plans and programs of government in Mexico during the first decades of the twentieth century...

  8. Literary Routes: Contributions to Natural/Cultural Heritage Tourism. How landscape transforms literature and tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalinda Ruiz Scarfuto

    2013-12-01

    ;  Don Quijote of La Mancha (1603 was first made tangible as a literary route in 1780 with a detailed topographical surveyor map inspiring visitors like Washington Irving (1829, Alexander Dumas (1861, and Hans Christian Andersen (1880 to the Spanish plains. This eventually galvanized into an innovative move to pass the Don Quijote Route Law (2007, complete with GPS coordinates. In Japan, Basho’s literary route (1700 with its natural elements changed the style of Japanese Haiku, encouraging writers around the world to follow in his footsteps, and Humboldt’s account of his Andes’ route in South America inspired Lewis & Clark, Darwin, and Muir to follow a similar path that spurred events, websites, and even a NASA astrobiology project to conserve and access the accumulated heritage of these literary routes.  Economic investments in literary routes in natural settings have been initiated by worldwide government ministries of culture, recreation/tourism, environment, economy, and/or education, demonstrating commitments to the conservation of landscapes which have inspired literature. Hence, literary routes can highly contribute to cultural itineraries in natural settings.

  9. Analysis Of Usefulness Of Satellite Image Processing Methods For Investigations Of Cultural Heritage Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osińska-Skotak, Katarzyna; Zapłata, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the analysis of usefulness of WorldView-2 satellite image processing, which enhance information concerning the cultural heritage objects. WorldView-2 images are characterised by the very high spatial resolution and high spectral resolution; that is why they create new possibilities for many applications, including investigations of the cultural heritage. The vicinities of Iłża have been selected as the test site for presented investigations. The presented results of works are the effect of research works, which were performed in the frames of the scientific project "Utilisation of laser scanning and remote sensing in protection, investigations and inventory of the cultural heritage. Development of non-invasive, digital methods of documenting and recognising the architectural and archaeological heritage", as the part of "The National Programme for the Development of Humanities" of the Minister of Science and Higher Education in the period of 2012-2015.

  10. Many Bottles for Many Flies: Managing Conflict over Indigenous Peoples’ Cultural Heritage in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ritter

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article critically considers the legal regulation of Indigenous people's cultural heritage in Western Australia and its operation within the framework of Australia's federal system of government. The article also sets out the different ways in which Indigenous cultural heritage is conceptualised, including as a public good analogous to property of the crown, an incidental right arising from group native title and as the subject of private contract. The article explores the various notions of 'Indigenous cultural heritage' that exist under Western Australian public law and the significant role of private contractual arrangements. Particular attention is devoted to the uneasy nexus between the laws of native title and heritage in Western Australia.

  11. a Survey on Topics, Researchers and Cultures in the Field of Digital Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münster, S.

    2017-08-01

    Digital heritage comprises a broad variety of approaches and topics and involves researchers from multiple disciplines. While the use of digital methods in the text-oriented disciplines dealing with cultural heritage is widely discussed and canonized, an up-to-date investigation on cultural heritage as a scholarly field is currently missing. The extended abstract is about a three-stage investigation on standards, publications, disciplinary cultures as well as scholars in the field of digital heritage, carried out in 2016 and 2017. It includes results of a workshop-based survey involving 44 researchers, 15 qualitative interviews as well as an online survey with nearly 1000 participants. As an overall finding, a community is driven by researchers from European countries and especially Italy with a background in humanities, dealing with topics of data acquisition, data management and visualization. Moreover, conference series are most relevant for a scientific discourse, and especially EU projects set pace as most important research endeavours.

  12. Promotion of the cultural heritage of Mediterranean city in the scope of upgrading cultural tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Vladan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available World and especially European trends of tourist economy are mainly focused on development of diversity in cultural tourism. Cultural tourism is a complex of numerous activities that enables not only the affirmation of cultural-historic motives, but also provides important resources for renewal of cultural-historic monuments, tangible and intangible heritage and resources. Today, there is no serious and ambitious country that does not prefer development of tourism in its development strategies as a planetary phenomenon and development sector. This specially refers to cultural tourism, as a competitive segment, based on local authenticity, unique areas, urban entities and ambiance, different historic layers and monuments, local tradition, myths and customs, affirmative mentality of population, geographic and ecological resources, in brief - complex and original identity of its area and its population. Cultural tourism in Montenegro has a modest tradition and only recently through valuable but sporadic initiatives and encouragements from Europe, attempts to valorize its own potentials, making them competitive through creative projects and programs. It is most certainly that the Montenegrin coast is a deeply settled part of complex Mediterranean cultural sphere that possesses certain characteristics which marks it as a unique cultural space in which different historical, geographic, confessional and other influences from surroundings intersect, predefining it for development of cultural tourism. This paper represents an effort to create a professional study report, although limited to single destination - city of Budva that treats cultural tourism in correlation with evaluation of renewal and use of cultural-historic and built heritage. From the mentioned reasons and within described context, this paper tends to be a small, but precisely created contribution to the future actions of creating complex tourist offer at Montenegrin coast, especially in

  13. Documentation of Cultural Heritages Using a GIS Based Information and Management System; Case Study of Safranbolu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, D. Z.; Alkan, M.; Kutoglu, S. S.; Akcin, H.

    2010-12-01

    Documentation of the cultural heritage sites is extremely important for monitoring and preserves them from natural disasters and human made activities. Due to its very rich historical background from the first human settlements in Catalhoyuk and Alacahoyuk and civilizations such as Byzantine, Seljuk and Ottoman, there are lots of cultural heritage sites in Turkey. 3D modeling and recording of historical buildings using modern tools and techniques in several locations of Turkey have been conducted and still continuing. The nine cultural sites in Turkey are included in the protection list of UNESCO as cultural heritage and one of them is the township of Safranbolu, which is the one of the most outstanding example of the traditional Turkish Architecture and also unique itself in terms of conservation of the human settlement in their authentic environmental motif up till now. In this study outcomes and further studies of a research project related to study area which is supported by the Turkish National Research Center (TUBITAK) with the project number 106Y157, will be presented in details. The basic aim of the study is development a GIS based information and management system for the city of Safranbolu. All historical buildings which are registered are assigned with the database. 3D modeling some of the selected building among the buildings which are registered as historical monuments using different data comes from different sources similar to their original constructions were realized and then it will be distributed via internet by a web-based information system designed during the project. Also some of the buildings were evaluated using close range photogrammetric technique to obtain their façade reliefs, were also assigned with the database. Designed database consists of 3D models, locations, historical information, cadastral and land register data of the selected buildings together with the other data collected during the project related to buildings. Using this

  14. Terrace Agriculture of the Hani People – Cultural Heritage of the South-West China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kladovshchikova Mariya Evgenyevna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the features of terrace agriculture of Hani and Yi indigenous minorities, living in the Yunnan province in the South-West China, just a step away from the Laos and Vietnam boundaries. The cultural landscape of the Hani rice terraces, included into the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2013 (Cultural Landscape of Honghe Hani Rice Terraces, expresses the conservation of the minorities’ course of life during the last 1 300 years. The geological framework, climate patterns and conform type of vegetation predefine the specific character of natural conditions necessary for terrace agriculture and red rice growth – the most important crop within the region. At that, the landscape picture which fully reflects the season fluctuations of regional subtropical climate, also facilitates to aesthetic and romantic perception forming, symbolizing man-made environment integral and interlaced into natural landscape. The special focus is made on the description of terraced slopes unique morphology and ancient land cultivation technologies for the essential regional culture – red rice. Preservation of centuries-old traditions of efficient agriculture makes it possible to achieve integration of cultural and natural landscapes, that seamlessly comprises the ethnic minorities’ life, as well as to prevent development of erosion and landslide slope processes. The elements of the traditional Hani people way of life, including ritual customs associated with terrace agriculture, are particularly described.

  15. Conservation and enhancement of fashion heritage. The role of post social history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Calanca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fashion and its history form a fundamental tile of the Cultural Heritage of a nation and a community. Over recent years “Fashion and Heritage” has meant institutional research project and studies. Particularly, in terms of Italian context, in the last decades, Italy and Fashion, are two keywords that can’t be separated: the contemporary image of Italy is deeply signed from fashion industry and vice versa. Italian fashion is indeed a cultural icon, an element of style and wellbeing, an aesthetic and establishing reference for the Quality of Life, in which history play a leading role.

  16. A Serious Game for Romanic Bathhouse: the Combination of Learning and fun for Cultural Heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Current cultural heritages often make use of images, sounds and video together, aiming to complement existing presentations and to create a memora-ble exhibition. In addition to this, modern culture heritages’ identities have shift-ed from simple holders of cultural objects to an educational

  17. A Serious Game for Romanic Bathhouse: the Combination of Learning and fun for Cultural Heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Current cultural heritages often make use of images, sounds and video together, aiming to complement existing presentations and to create a memora-ble exhibition. In addition to this, modern culture heritages’ identities have shift-ed from simple holders of cultural objects to an educational institu

  18. A Study of Awareness of Cultural Heritage among the Teachers at University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Savita

    2015-01-01

    Cultural Heritage means to inherent and cultivate the cultural disinclinations from one generation to next generation. It is possible by education as well as following the traditional livelihood of ours; it is conducted formal/consciously or informal/unconsciously. One of the traits of education is to hand on the cultural values and behaviour…

  19. San Luis Valley - Taos Plateau Landscape-Level Cultural Heritage Values and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wescott, Konstance L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Abplanalp, Jennifer M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brown, Jeff [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Cantwell, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dicks, Merrill [Bureau of Land Management, Taos, NM (United States); Fredericks, Brian [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Krall, Angie [US Forest Service, Creede, CO (United States); Rollins, Katherine E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sullivan, Robert [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Valdez, Arnie [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verhaaren, Bruce [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vieira, Joseph [Bureau of Land Management, Monte Vista, CO (United States); Walston, Lee [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zvolanek, Emily A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The San Luis Valley – Taos Plateau Landscape-Level Cultural Heritage Values and Risk Assessment (hereafter referred to as cultural assessment) is a BLM pilot project designed to see whether the Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) framework (already established and implemented throughout many ecoregions in the West) can be applied to the cultural environment.

  20. Geography of conservation spending, biodiversity, and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T R; Rankin, P S

    2016-10-01

    We used linear and multivariate models to examine the associations between geography, biodiversity, per capita economic output, national spending on conservation, governance, and cultural traits in 55 countries. Cultural traits and social metrics of modernization correlated positively with national spending on conservation. The global distribution of this spending culture was poorly aligned with the distribution of biodiversity. Specifically, biodiversity was greater in the tropics where cultures tended to spend relatively less on conservation and tended to have higher collectivism, formalized and hierarchical leadership, and weaker governance. Consequently, nations lacking social traits frequently associated with modernization, environmentalism, and conservation spending have the largest component of Earth's biodiversity. This has significant implications for setting policies and priorities for resource management given that biological diversity is rapidly disappearing and cultural traits change slowly. Therefore, we suggest natural resource management adapt to and use characteristics of existing social organization rather than wait for or promote social values associated with conservation spending. Supporting biocultural traditions, engaging leaders to increase conservation commitments, cross-national efforts that complement attributes of cultures, and avoiding interference with nature may work best to conserve nature in collective and hierarchical societies. Spending in modernized nations may be a symbolic response to a symptom of economic development and environmental degradation, and here conservation actions need to ensure that biodiversity is not being lost. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Active Satellite Sensors for the needs of Cultural Heritage: Introducing SAR applications in Cyprus through ATHENA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhartsiouk, Demetris; Agapiou, Athos; Lynsadrou, Vasiliki; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Nisantzi, Argyro; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Brcic, Ramon; Eineder, Michael; Krauss, Thomas; Cerra, Daniele; Gessner, Ursula; Schreier, Gunter

    2017-04-01

    Non-invasive landscape investigation for archaeological purposes includes a wide range of survey techniques, most of which include in-situ methods. In the recent years, a major advance in the non-invasive surveying techniques has been the introduction of active remote sensing technologies. One of such technologies is spaceborne radar, known as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). SAR has proven to be a valuable tool in the analysis of potential archaeological marks and in the systematic cultural heritage site monitoring. With the use of SAR, it is possible to monitor slight variations in vegetation and soil often interpreted as archaeological signs, while radar sensors frequently having penetrating capabilities offering an insight into shallow underground remains. Radar remote sensing for immovable cultural heritage and archaeological applications has been recently introduced to Cyprus through the currently ongoing ATHENA project. ATHENA project, under the Horizon 2020 programme, aims at building a bridge between research institutions of the low performing Member States and internationally-leading counterparts at EU level, mainly through training workshops and a series of knowledge transfer activities, frequently taking place on the basis of capacity development. The project is formed as the consortium of the Remote Sensing and Geo-Environment Research Laboratory of the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT), the National Research Council of Italy (CNR) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). As part of the project, a number of cultural heritage sites in Cyprus have been studied testing different methodologies involving SAR imagery such as Amplitude Change Detection, Coherence Calculation and fusion techniques. The ATHENA's prospective agenda includes the continuation of the capacity building programme with upcoming training workshops to take place while expanding the knowledge of radar applications on conservation and risk monitoring of cultural heritage sites through

  2. Towards Optimal Spectral and Spatial Documentation of Cultural Heritage. Cosch - AN Interdisciplinary Action in the Cost Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boochs, F.; Bentkowska-Kafel, A.; Degringy, C.; Hautta-Kasari, M.; Rizvic, S.; Sitnik, R.; Tremeau, A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces the aims and early activities of Colour and Space in Cultural Heritage (COSCH), an interdisciplinary European network of experts in the latest optical measuring techniques and electronic imaging applied to documentation of artefacts. COSCH is a forum open to organisations, institutions and companies interested in collaboration within the emerging field of precise spectral and spatial imaging techniques, in physical and chemical sciences applied to cultural heritage objects, as well as in research and applications to conservation and art-historical analysis of such objects. COSCH started in November 2012. Funded by COST, an intergovernmental framework for European Cooperation in Science and Technology, COSCH networking activities enable knowledge exchange and coordination of nationally-funded research on a European level with occasional contribution of experts from other countries. Funding has been made available for four years (2012-2016). Participation is open to researchers across a wide range of disciplines, including computer scientists and museum professionals, art historians and academics in heritage-related fields. COSCH is a trans-domain Action (TD1201) of the COST Domain Materials, Physics and Nanosciences (MPNS) which facilitates and promotes innovation in material science. The work of COSCH is defined in the Memorandum of Understanding between the COST Office and the Chairman of COSCH. The Memorandum is available from http://www.cost.eu/domains_actions/mpns/Actions/TD1201 alongside the latest progress report and other documents. The scientific work draws on earlier and current research of the participants and is organised around the following areas: spectral and spatial object documentation; algorithms and procedures; analysis and restoration of surfaces and objects of material culture; visualisation of cultural heritage objects and its dissemination. Up-to-date information about COSCH activities, including its scientific and

  3. Governmentalities of Alevi Cultural Heritage: On Recognition, Surveillance and "Domesticated Diversity" in Contemporary Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weineck

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Cultural Heritage as such has a rather positive connotation, bringing together notions of safeguarding and human creativity, critical investigations have underlined the various strategic, economic and political rationalities inscribed in this term. In 2010 the UNESCO rendered the Alevi ritual sequence semah Intangible Cultural Heritage and as such it was inscribed in the Turkish National Inventory of Cultural Heritage – although Alevis are not recognized by the Turkish state and its Sunni-Turkist understandings of belonging. The celebration of an Alevi ritual as enriching Turkey’s ‘cultural diversity’ thus asks for an analytical approach that comes to terms with this tension of recognition, ongoing political surveillance and the very specific understandings of diversity that are put into play. With reference to Foucaults (and particularly Roses approach to contemporary government as “governmentality”, Cultural Heritage can be grasped in its ambivalent (but not necessarily conflicting nature as cultural self-fulfillment and governmental control. The paper thus enlarges the analytical scale of thinking about Cultural Heritage in its correlation with identity-formation, the politics of recognition and governance.

  4. Standards in chestnut coppice system: cultural heritage or coltural requirement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manetti MC

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Standards in chestnut coppice system: cultural heritage or coltural requirement? This paper aims at evaluating the role of standards in chestnut coppices from a biological and functional perspective. In addition to a detailed analysis of Italian regulations on the issue, the technical definition of the term is analysed: (i as for the functional role of standards; (ii to assess whether the required functions are technically necessary and are being actually performed. In this contex, the results of an experimental trial are reported. The goal of the trial were to assess the shoots’ parameters, the stand productivity, the dynamics of canopy cover in coppices with or without standards. In 2001, at harvesting operations in a coppice aged 30 with standards managed by the local community, two experimental plots 2500 m2 each were established. The two theses being compared were: simple coppice and coppixce with standards (100 standards per hectare. The released standards were qualified immediately after final harvesting. Sprouting ability, growth pattern and stool vitality were surveyed in March 2004 (at age 2, in May 2008 (at age 6 and in April 2010 (at age 8. First results highlighted the evidence of statistically significant differences between the two thesis. The high number of standards effected negatively both vitality and growth pattern of the stools. Simple coppice recorded a lower shoot mortality, a higher diametrical growth and canopy cover degree as well; the heigth growth was, on the opposite, significantly lower. These results, although referred to a limited lifespan (1/3 of the rotation time and to one site only, underline productive, ecological and environmental benefits and as a consequence suggest the widening of the experimental network and the development of new, more relevant and consistent rules, making acceptable the simple coppice as a possible silvicultural choice to be applied to chestnut coppices.

  5. Acoustic Intervention in a Cultural Heritage: The Chapel of the Royal Palace in Caserta, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Berardi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The modern use of ancient heritage sites can be, to say the least, challenging from an acoustical perspective. In fact, modern needs may require acoustical interventions in contrast with the preservation issues of the cultural heritage. This paper deals with this topic in an UNESCO designated world heritage site, the Palatine Chapel of the Royal Palace in Caserta, Italy. Since this chapel is currently being used for meetings and music chamber concerts, the acoustical characteristics of the chapel, originally used for religious purposes, are investigated. Field measurements were undertaken to evaluate the acoustical performance of the empty chapel. The measurements were then used to calibrate and validate a computer simulation model. Different acoustical treatments are then considered and simulations are used to determine the related acoustical improvements. Finally, the benefits of different acoustical treatments which are respectful of the aesthetic and historical value of this cultural heritage are discussed.

  6. 3D DOCUMENTATION AND BIM MODELING OF CULTURAL HERITAGE STRUCTURES USING UAVS: THE CASE OF THE FOINIKARIA CHURCH

    OpenAIRE

    K. Themistocleous; A. Agapiou; D. Hadjimitsis

    2016-01-01

    The documentation of architectural cultural heritage sites has traditionally been expensive and labor-intensive. New innovative technologies, such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), provide an affordable, reliable and straightforward method of capturing cultural heritage sites, thereby providing a more efficient and sustainable approach to documentation of cultural heritage structures. In this study, hundreds of images of the Panagia Chryseleousa church in Foinikaria, Cyprus were ta...

  7. Digital imaging for cultural heritage preservation analysis, restoration, and reconstruction of ancient artworks

    CERN Document Server

    Stanco, Filippo; Gallo, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Experiencing the Past: Computer Graphics in Archaeology, F. Stanco and D. TanasiThe Past and the Future: Archaeology and Computer ScienceFrom the Field to the Screen: 3D computer graphics and the Archaeological HeritageThe Archeomatica ProjectArchaeological 3D ModelingHaghia Triada, CretePolizzello Mountain, SicilyDigital RestorationDealing with Image Data in Archaeology: New PerspectivesUsing Digital 3D Models for Study and Restoration of Cultural Heritage Artifacts, M.

  8. Literary Routes: Contributions to Natural/Cultural Heritage Tourism. How landscape transforms literature and tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalinda Ruiz Scarfuto

    2013-01-01

    Literary routes inspired by landscapes is a topic where cultural and natural routes merge to form an added value of heritage that is greater than either one standing alone.  Landscape is traditionally defined as a consequence of transformations by humans, and its scope rarely takes into account how nature has inspired literature to advance the “intellectual development of humankind,” hence transforming heritage.  Literary routes paralleling transhumance routes embraced by the Sami, First Nati...

  9. Automatic Camera Calibration for Cultural Heritage Applications Using Unstructured Planar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, K.; Kalisperakis, I.; Grammatikopoulos, L.; Karras, G.; Petsa, E.

    2013-07-01

    As a rule, image-based documentation of cultural heritage relies today on ordinary digital cameras and commercial software. As such projects often involve researchers not familiar with photogrammetry, the question of camera calibration is important. Freely available open-source user-friendly software for automatic camera calibration, often based on simple 2D chess-board patterns, are an answer to the demand for simplicity and automation. However, such tools cannot respond to all requirements met in cultural heritage conservation regarding possible imaging distances and focal lengths. Here we investigate the practical possibility of camera calibration from unknown planar objects, i.e. any planar surface with adequate texture; we have focused on the example of urban walls covered with graffiti. Images are connected pair-wise with inter-image homographies, which are estimated automatically through a RANSAC-based approach after extracting and matching interest points with the SIFT operator. All valid points are identified on all images on which they appear. Provided that the image set includes a "fronto-parallel" view, inter-image homographies with this image are regarded as emulations of image-to-world homographies and allow computing initial estimates for the interior and exterior orientation elements. Following this initialization step, the estimates are introduced into a final self-calibrating bundle adjustment. Measures are taken to discard unsuitable images and verify object planarity. Results from practical experimentation indicate that this method may produce satisfactory results. The authors intend to incorporate the described approach into their freely available user-friendly software tool, which relies on chess-boards, to assist non-experts in their projects with image-based approaches.

  10. Cultural heritage and archaeology materials studied by synchrotron spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Loïc; Robinet, Laurianne; Thoury, Mathieu; Janssens, Koen; Cohen, Serge X.; Schöder, Sebastian

    2012-02-01

    The use of synchrotron radiation techniques to study cultural heritage and archaeological materials has undergone a steep increase over the past 10-15 years. The range of materials studied is very broad and encompasses painting materials, stone, glass, ceramics, metals, cellulosic and wooden materials, and a cluster of organic-based materials, in phase with the diversity observed at archaeological sites, museums, historical buildings, etc. Main areas of investigation are: (1) the study of the alteration and corrosion processes, for which the unique non-destructive speciation capabilities of X-ray absorption have proved very beneficial, (2) the understanding of the technologies and identification of the raw materials used to produce archaeological artefacts and art objects and, to a lesser extent, (3) the investigation of current or novel stabilisation, conservation and restoration practices. In terms of the synchrotron methods used, the main focus so far has been on X-ray techniques, primarily X-ray fluorescence, absorption and diffraction, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We review here the use of these techniques from recent works published in the field demonstrating the breadth of applications and future potential offered by third generation synchrotron techniques. New developments in imaging and advanced spectroscopy, included in the UV/visible and IR ranges, could even broaden the variety of materials studied, in particular by fostering more studies on organic and complex organic-inorganic mixtures, while new support activities at synchrotron facilities might facilitate transfer of knowledge between synchrotron specialists and users from archaeology and cultural heritage sciences.

  11. Valorization of cultural heritage in a context of social policy of sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Nikodijević, Dragan

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyses cultural tourism as a generator of economic development. Namely, cultural tourism is seen as a part of broader social activities, which are covered by the notion of cultural economy. These activities aim to link cultural potentials of a region or a country with business ideas and to transform them from consumption factors to generators of sustainable development. The fact that all indicators say that tourist consumption is much higher in those areas where cultural heritage ...

  12. Economic Valuation of Cultural Heritage: Application to a museum located in the Alto Douro Wine Region– World Heritage Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural assets are increasingly being considered in the policies of social and economic development of territories due to spillover effects. However, since cultural assets are not transacted in the market, their use value should be calculated using indirect methods of evaluation or non market techniques. In this paper, the travel cost method was chosen to estimate the curve of demand in the Museum of Lamego which constitutes an important cultural item of the Alto Douro Wine Region, classified by UNESCO in 2001, as a world heritage site – a living and evolving cultural landscape. The results of the application of the Poisson model confirm the expected, that is, the probability of visiting the museum is positively influenced by the educational level, female gender and negatively by the travel cost.

  13. Economic Valuation of Cultural Heritage: Application to a museum located in the Alto Douro Wine Region- World Heritage Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Fonseca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural assets are increasingly being considered in the policies of social and economic development of territories due to spillover effects. However, since cultural assets are not transacted in the market, their use value should be calculated using indirect methods of evaluation or non market techniques. In this paper, the travel cost method was chosen to estimate the curve of demand in the Museum of Lamego which constitutes an important cultural item of the Alto Douro Wine Region, classified by UNESCO in 2001, as a world heritage site - a living and evolving cultural landscape. The results of the application of the Poisson model confirm the expected, that is, the probability of visiting the museum is positively influenced by the educational level, female gender and negatively by the travel cost.

  14. Documenting and preserving: new technologies for the knowledge, the safeguarding and the communication of Armenian cultural heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Cardaci

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of survey is the architecture’s comprehension. To the end of cultural heritage conservation, it is also necessary to communicate the acquired knowledge. In the recent years, this need has resulted in a radical change in cataloging and digitization systems and telematics networking. Moreover, the use of laser scanner has transformed not only the approaches related to metrics data acquisition and graphic rendering but has also given the opportunity to share important data on the web. This paper focus on the usefulness of new technologies for documentation, showing a case study developed in Armenia.

  15. Connecting Asian Heritage Conservation to the Idea of Performative Regionalism: A Case of Community-Enhancing Design Interventions in the Historical Art District of Liulichang Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Thamrin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The active and sometimes ruthless modernisation in Asia has triggered an urgent need to secure the protection and continuation of its rich heritage and diverse regional attributes. However, as in the case of China, the Asian perspective of conservation is different from the West in terms of the nature or ways of design interventions produced and its purposes. This phenomenon has frequently triggered criticisms from heritage conservation professionals. Hence, the objective of this paper is to explore the interventions done on Asian heritage sites, taking the Liulichang Art District in Beijing as the case study, and analyze the positive influence they have brought. The paper starts by distinguishing the Asian concept and values of authenticity in conservation that differ from the West and how these principles have been applied in Liulichang, a famous ancient street known for the selling and practice of classical Chinese arts, mostly for Chinese painting. Using the phenomenological method of analysis, the paper further elaborates on the importance of community building in learning and appreciating the art of Chinese painting and discusses the positive impact made by the design interventions in Liulichang, particularly in terms of community engagement and creation of novel ways to accommodate traditional cultural practices of Chinese painting. Results reflect that the Asian perspective of conservation do not always follow the principle of minimum intervention favoured by the West, but how contemporary interventions could be merged into the heritage site to revive regional communities and cultural activities, connecting Asian architectural conservation with the design approach coined by Barbara Allen (2005 as Performative Regionalism, hence developing the idea and practice of this approach as a result of the discussion. Rather than merely following textual or scientific procedures like in the West, this approach requires a more experiential way of

  16. Heritage, sacredness and power: on different categories of historical and cultural patrimony in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Sapiezinskas Krás Borges Canani

    Full Text Available This article deals with the concept of heritage present in the public policies of cultural, artistic and historical heritage preservation, aiming to widen the apprehension of the concept. Bringing examples from my fieldwork in Venezianos Lane, in Porto Alegre, my purpose in this article is to analise the attribution of values to specific buildings, objects or processes as a way to produce new meanings within the different contexts in which it occurs, observing specially the construction of signification from the point of view of familiar heritage, heritage objects seen as sacred properties and the dimension of power involved in such process. Considering the ressignifications which resulted from the heritage acknoledgement, I analise the different categories perceived by the city inhabitants who are involved with the heritage, not in a passive way, but owning the capacity to construct new significances and to give meaning to the world around them. I try to underline the symbolic dimension present in this process in which the property acquires a meaning and comes to be considered heritage.

  17. Though This be Madness: Heritage Methods for Working in Culturally Diverse Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Petersen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1998, the NSW Migration Heritage Centre was conceived by the NSW Government as a virtual heritage centre to help ageing former migrants tell their stories. Migration museums and other organisations interested in heritage are grappling with how to identify, record, preserve and interpret the heritage legacy of migration and settlement in their communities. The distinctions between museum and environmental heritage practices have diminished during the past decade in Australia. The Centre’s methodologies are based on historic method and thematic and typology studies, better known for their application to heritage place identification and archaeological artefact studies than for their more recent use by some Australian museum curators for the survey and documentation of collections and community participation in heritage. The ‘virtual museum’ has enabled the Centre to break away from the centralised museum concept, with the associated trappings of venue management, to pioneer a decentralised and dispersed museum model that works almost entirely in collaborative community history research partnerships to document culturally significant collections, and associated migration memories, held by communities and private individuals. The work is centralised on the Centre’s website as a virtual collection of objects, places and associated memories. They are presented in online exhibitions for student research and as a destination for the mass audiences of the worldwide web.

  18. Polarization Second Harmonic Generation Discriminates Between Fresh and Aged Starch-Based Adhesives Used in Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Gavgiotaki, Evaggelia; Melessanaki, Kristallia; Tsafas, Vassilis; Filippidis, George

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we report that polarization second harmonic generation (PSHG) microscopy, commonly used in biomedical imaging, can quantitatively discriminate naturally aged from fresh starch-based glues used for conservation or restoration of paintings, works of art on paper, and books. Several samples of fresh and aged (7 years) flour and starch pastes were investigated by use of PSHG. In these types of adhesives, widely used in cultural heritage conservation, second harmonic generation (SHG) contrast originates primarily from the starch granules. It was found that in aged glues, the starch SHG effective orientation (SHG angle, θ) shifts to significantly higher values in comparison to the fresh granules. This shift is attributed to the different degree of granule hydration between fresh and aged adhesives. Thus noninvasive high-resolution nonlinear scattering can be employed to detect and quantify the degree of deterioration of restoration adhesives and to provide guidance toward future conservation treatments.

  19. INTEGRATED DATA CAPTURING REQUIREMENTS FOR 3D SEMANTIC MODELLING OF CULTURAL HERITAGE: THE INCEPTION PROTOCOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Di Giulio

    2017-02-01

    In order to face these challenges and to start solving the issue of the large amount of captured data and time-consuming processes in the production of 3D digital models, an Optimized Data Acquisition Protocol (DAP has been set up. The purpose is to guide the processes of digitization of cultural heritage, respecting needs, requirements and specificities of cultural assets.

  20. From an Ancient Tradition to the Present. Chinese Cultural Heritage Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching Fang; Lee, Amy

    This cultural heritage resource guide has been prepared as a tool for teachers to help promote better understanding of Chinese students in the New York City public schools. China has an ancient history and a rich cultural tradition, and people all over the world have recognized China as one of the world's greatest civilizations. The earliest…