WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultural consensus analysis

  1. Measuring perceptions of climate change in northern Alaska: pairing ethnography with cultural consensus analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Carothers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Given current and projected warming trends in the Arctic and the important role played by subsistence hunting and fishing in the life of northern rural communities, it is increasingly important to document local observations of climate change and its impacts on livelihood practices. We describe ethnographic research exploring local observations of climate changes and related impacts on subsistence fisheries in three Iñupiat communities in northwest Alaska and six Athabascan communities in the Yukon River drainage. We found consistent agreement among perceptions concerning a broad range of environmental changes affecting subsistence practices in these communities. These observations of environmental changes are not experienced in isolation but within the context of accompanying social changes that are continually reshaping rural Alaskan communities and subsistence economies. In this paper we reflect on our research approach combining multiple methods of inquiry. Participant observation and semidirected interviews provided the conceptual framework for broadening our focus from climate and environmental change to community residents' understanding of climate change in the context of their holistic human-environment worldview. Cultural consensus analysis allowed us to assess the extent to which perceptions of change are shared among hunters and fishers within and between villages and regions and to identify those phenomena occurring or experienced at smaller scales. Reflecting on this multimethods approach, we highlight important questions that have emerged about how we understand, synthesize, and represent local knowledge, especially as it is used in regulatory or management arenas.

  2. Medicinal plants in Mexico: healers' consensus and cultural importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, M; Ankli, A; Frei, B; Weimann, C; Sticher, O

    1998-12-01

    Medicinal plants are an important element of indigenous medical systems in Mexico. These resources are usually regarded as part of a culture's traditional knowledge. This study examines the use of medicinal plants in four indigenous groups of Mexican Indians, Maya, Nahua, Zapotec and - for comparative purposes - Mixe. With the first three the methodology was similar, making a direct comparison of the results possible. In these studies, the relative importance of a medicinal plant within a culture is documented using a quantitative method. For the analysis the uses were grouped into 9-10 categories of indigenous uses. This report compares these data and uses the concept of informant consensus originally developed by Trotter and Logan for analysis. This indicates how homogenous the ethnobotanical information is. Generally the factor is high for gastrointestinal illnesses and for culture bound syndromes. While the species used by the 3 indigenous groups vary, the data indicate that there exist well-defined criteria specific for each culture which lead to the selection of a plant as a medicine. A large number of species are used for gastrointestinal illnesses by two or more of the indigenous groups. At least in this case, the multiple transfer of species and their uses within Mexico seems to be an important reason for the widespread use of a species. Medicinal plants in other categories (e.g. skin diseases) are usually known only in one culture and seem to be part of its traditional knowledge.

  3. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  4. Eating Disorders: Cultural Model and Consensus Regarding Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manochio-Pina, Marina; Dos Santos, José Ernesto; Dressler, William W; Pessa Ribeiro, Rosane Pilot

    2015-01-01

    The cultural model of food was applied to 112 adult patients with eating disorders (PG) and 36 healthy adult women (CG) of similar age. The Free List and Ranking of Foods was used to group foods and verify consensus and cultural aspects. Calories, health, and taste were the dimensions used by the participants to group the foods, and strong consensus was achieved in regard to calories and health. There were, however, inter- and intra-group divergences in regard to these ideas, especially in the PG. The CG used distinct criteria, showing a more complex model.

  5. Patterns of cultural consensus and intracultural diversity in Ghanaian complementary feeding practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Nikhila; Pelto, Gretel; Tawiah, Charlotte; Zobrist, Stephanie; Milani, Peiman; Manu, Grace; Laar, Amos; Parker, Megan

    2017-04-06

    Designing effective interventions to improve infant and young child (IYC) feeding requires knowledge about determinants of current practices, including cultural factors. Current approaches to obtaining and using research on culture tend to assume cultural homogeneity within a population. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent of cultural consensus (homogeneity) in communities where interventions to improve IYC feeding practices are needed to address undernutrition during the period of complementary feeding. A second, related objective was to identify the nature of intracultural variation, if such variation was evident. Selected protocols from the Focused Ethnographic Study for Infant and Young Child Feeding Manual were administered to samples of key informants and caregivers in a peri-urban and a rural area in Brong-Ahafo, Ghana. Cultural domain analysis techniques (free listing, caregiver assessment of culturally significant dimensions, and food ratings on these dimensions), as well as open-ended questions with exploratory probing, were used to obtain data on beliefs and related practices. Results reveal generally high cultural consensus on the 5 dimensions that were assessed (healthiness, appeal, child acceptance, convenience, and modernity) for caregiver decisions and on their ratings of individual foods. However, thematic analysis of caregiver narratives indicates that the meanings and content of the constructs connoted by the dimensions differed widely among individual mothers. These findings suggest that research on cultural factors that affect IYC practices, particularly cultural beliefs, should consider the nature and extent of cultural consensus and intracultural diversity, rather than assuming cultural homogeneity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Analysis of a cultural consensus model of two good-life sub-domains--health & well-being and migration & socioeconomic milieu--in three population groups in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peternel, Lana; Malnar, Ana; Klarić, Irena Martinović

    2015-07-01

    In this study the construct of a 'good life' was explored among upper secondary school senior pupils and their parents and teachers by applying cultural consensus model analysis. A total of 469 students, 474 parents and 158 teachers from four Croatian cities participated in the study, which was conducted in 2011/2012. The information collected through interviewing and free-listing during the first phase of the study was used to create a set of structured questionnaire questions as a part of the survey in the second phase of data collection. The results are reported on two good-life sub-domains: 'health & well-being' and 'migration & socioeconomic milieu'. The results indicate heterogeneity of the sample groups, incomplete inter-generational transmission of cultural values and examples of two sub-groups that resist cultural norms and do not comply with the dominant 'competence-as-sharing' paradigm. The value of testing the cultural consensus model based on the emic approach and locally significant phenomena is demonstrated for planning and conducting holistic anthropological research.

  7. Culture as common sense: perceived consensus versus personal beliefs as mechanisms of cultural influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xi; Tam, Kim-Pong; Morris, Michael W; Lee, Sau-Lai; Lau, Ivy Yee-Man; Chiu, Chi-Yue

    2009-10-01

    The authors propose that culture affects people through their perceptions of what is consensually believed. Whereas past research has examined whether cultural differences in social judgment are mediated by differences in individuals' personal values and beliefs, this article investigates whether they are mediated by differences in individuals' perceptions of the views of people around them. The authors propose that individuals who perceive that traditional views are culturally consensual (e.g., Chinese participants who believe that most of their fellows hold collectivistic values) will themselves behave and think in culturally typical ways. Four studies of previously well-established cultural differences found that cultural differences were mediated by participants' perceived consensus as much as by participants' personal views. This held true for cultural differences in the bases of compliance (Study 1), attributional foci (Study 2), and counterfactual thinking styles (Study 3). To tease apart the effect of consensus perception from other possibly associated individual differences, in Study 4, the authors experimentally manipulated which of 2 cultures was salient to bicultural participants and found that judgments were guided by participants' perception of the consensual view of the salient culture.

  8. [Cultural consensus regarding food in pregnant adolescents from Guadalajara, México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Suárez, Claudia C; García-De Alba, Javier E; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar M; Romero-Velarde, Enrique; Romo-Huerta, Hiliana P; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio

    2008-01-01

    Characterising the semantic structure and cultural consensus level of pregnant adolescents attending outpatient consultation at the 'Dr. Juan I Menchaca' civil hospital in Guadalajara. A qualitative study using free-list structured interviews. Non-randomised propositive sampling included 54 pregnant adolescents aged 12-19. There was a significant degree of cultural consensus concerning breakfast and dinner food; 14 foods were detected for breakfast and 8 for dinner. Ascertaining the pattern of cultural consensus concerning food led us to reinforcing, modifying or adding healthy foods to pregnant adolescents' diet.

  9. Interprofessionalism and ethics: consensus or clash of cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Rob; Kerridge, Ian; McPhee, John; Freeman, Sonia

    2002-08-01

    The ethical arguments which underpin the call for interdisciplinary collaboration are analysed. In particular, the concept of 'teamwork' is considered as well as the organisational, professional, personal and cultural obstacles that constitute the barriers to the effective development of interdisciplinary relationships.

  10. Graph- versus Vector-Based Analysis of a Consensus Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delzanno, Giorgio; Rensink, Arend; Traverso, Riccardo; Bošnački, Dragan; Edelkamp, Stefan; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto; Wijs, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The Paxos distributed consensus algorithm is a challenging case-study for standard, vector-based model checking techniques. Due to asynchronous communication, exhaustive analysis may generate very large state spaces already for small model instances. In this paper, we show the advantages of graph tr

  11. Statistical Development and Application of Cultural Consensus Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-31

    1988), the full GCM was developed that allowed heterogeneity in informants, guessing bias as well as heterogeneity in item difficulty (cultural...Research Associates ( ARA ) and includes faculty researchers from several universities. Batchelder is a researcher on this grant, and Mark Steyvers is...using that software. First, as mentioned, it only applies to a special case of the GCM for T/F items, where there is no informant heterogeneity in

  12. Semi-supervised consensus clustering for gene expression data analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yunli; Pan, Youlian

    2014-01-01

    Background Simple clustering methods such as hierarchical clustering and k-means are widely used for gene expression data analysis; but they are unable to deal with noise and high dimensionality associated with the microarray gene expression data. Consensus clustering appears to improve the robustness and quality of clustering results. Incorporating prior knowledge in clustering process (semi-supervised clustering) has been shown to improve the consistency between the data partitioning and do...

  13. Cultural consensus modeling to measure transactional sex in Swaziland: Scale building and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding-Miller, Rebecca; Dunkle, Kristin L; Cooper, Hannah L F; Windle, Michael; Hadley, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Transactional sex is associated with increased risk of HIV and gender based violence in southern Africa and around the world. However the typical quantitative operationalization, "the exchange of gifts or money for sex," can be at odds with a wide array of relationship types and motivations described in qualitative explorations. To build on the strengths of both qualitative and quantitative research streams, we used cultural consensus models to identify distinct models of transactional sex in Swaziland. The process allowed us to build and validate emic scales of transactional sex, while identifying key informants for qualitative interviews within each model to contextualize women's experiences and risk perceptions. We used logistic and multinomial logistic regression models to measure associations with condom use and social status outcomes. Fieldwork was conducted between November 2013 and December 2014 in the Hhohho and Manzini regions. We identified three distinct models of transactional sex in Swaziland based on 124 Swazi women's emic valuation of what they hoped to receive in exchange for sex with their partners. In a clinic-based survey (n = 406), consensus model scales were more sensitive to condom use than the etic definition. Model consonance had distinct effects on social status for the three different models. Transactional sex is better measured as an emic spectrum of expectations within a relationship, rather than an etic binary relationship type. Cultural consensus models allowed us to blend qualitative and quantitative approaches to create an emicly valid quantitative scale grounded in qualitative context.

  14. Two-phase analysis in consensus genetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronin, Y; Mester, D; Minkov, D; Belotserkovski, R; Jackson, B N; Schnable, P S; Aluru, S; Korol, A

    2012-05-01

    Numerous mapping projects conducted on different species have generated an abundance of mapping data. Consequently, many multilocus maps have been constructed using diverse mapping populations and marker sets for the same organism. The quality of maps varies broadly among populations, marker sets, and software used, necessitating efforts to integrate the mapping information and generate consensus maps. The problem of consensus genetic mapping (MCGM) is by far more challenging compared with genetic mapping based on a single dataset, which by itself is also cumbersome. The additional complications introduced by consensus analysis include inter-population differences in recombination rate and exchange distribution along chromosomes; variations in dominance of the employed markers; and use of different subsets of markers in different labs. Hence, it is necessary to handle arbitrary patterns of shared sets of markers and different level of mapping data quality. In this article, we introduce a two-phase approach for solving MCGM. In phase 1, for each dataset, multilocus ordering is performed combined with iterative jackknife resampling to evaluate the stability of marker orders. In this phase, the ordering problem is reduced to the well-known traveling salesperson problem (TSP). Namely, for each dataset, we look for order that gives minimum sum of recombination distances between adjacent markers. In phase 2, the optimal consensus order of shared markers is selected from the set of allowed orders and gives the minimal sum of total lengths of nonconflicting maps of the chromosome. This criterion may be used in different modifications to take into account the variation in quality of the original data (population size, marker quality, etc.). In the foregoing formulation, consensus mapping is considered as a specific version of TSP that can be referred to as "synchronized TSP." The conflicts detected after phase 1 are resolved using either a heuristic algorithm over the

  15. Circles of Consensus: The Preservation of Cultural Diversity through Political Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Jaria i Manzano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Western modern culture has expanded at the universal level and has thereby become a threat to other cultures, particularly those of chthonic communities. But these cultures have progressively recognized its worth as a source of richness, which can be very useful in facing future challenges to humanity. Moreover, in terms of human dignity and the equality of all human beings, Western modern culture has to be recognized as having an intrinsic value as well. Given these facts, we must find a way to protect this cultural diversity in an effective manner. It is obvious that assimilationist or isolationist models are not satisfactory. So I propose a third way. I call it an integrationist or a deep approach. It consists of giving political density to cultural diversity through the design of federalist strategies that have, as a result, the definition of different levels of decision (circles of consensus. After having exposed my model, I will pay attention to the recent constitutional experiences in Ecuador and Bolivia, where some new developments in this sense are intended. I compare these models with my proposal and, finally, I analyze the main problems that a deep approach to preserving cultural diversity has to face up to.

  16. Circles of Consensus: The Preservation of Cultural Diversity through Political Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Jaria i Manzano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Western modern culture has expanded at the universal level and has thereby become a threat to other cultures, particularly those of chthonic communities. But these cultures have progressively recognized its worth as a source of richness, which can be very useful in facing future challenges to humanity. Moreover, in terms of human dignity and the equality of all human beings, Western modern culture has to be recognized as having an intrinsic value as well. Given these facts, we must find a way to protect this cultural diversity in an effective manner. It is obvious that assimilationist or isolationist models are not satisfactory. So I propose a third way. I call it an integrationist or a deep approach. It consists of giving political density to cultural diversity through the design of federalist strategies that have, as a result, the definition of different levels of decision (circles of consensus. After having exposed my model, I will pay attention to the recent constitutional experiences in Ecuador and Bolivia, where some new developments in this sense are intended. I compare these models with my proposal and, finally, I analyze the main problems that a deep approach to preserving cultural diversity has to face up to.

  17. Consensus and Stability Analysis of Networked Multiagent Predictive Control Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Ping

    2017-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the consensus and stability problem of multiagent control systems via networks with communication delays and data loss. A networked multiagent predictive control scheme is proposed to achieve output consensus and also compensate for the communication delays and data loss actively. The necessary and sufficient conditions of achieving both consensus and stability of the closed-loop networked multiagent control systems are derived. An important result that is obtained is that the consensus and stability of closed-loop networked multiagent predictive control systems are not related to the communication delays and data loss. An example illustrates the performance of the networked multiagent predictive control scheme.

  18. The role of consensus and culture in children's imitation of inefficient actions.

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    DiYanni, Cara J; Corriveau, Kathleen H; Kurkul, Katelyn; Nasrini, Jad; Nini, Deniela

    2015-09-01

    A significant body of work has demonstrated children's imitative abilities when learning novel actions. Although some research has examined the role of cultural background in children's imitation of inefficient actions, to our knowledge no research has explored how culture and conformity interact when engaging in imitation. In Study 1, 87 Caucasian American and Chinese American preschoolers were presented with either one model or three models performing an inefficient action. Whereas there were no cultural differences in imitation in the Single Model condition, Chinese Americans were significantly more likely to copy the model's preference for an inefficient tool in the Consensus condition. Children's tool choice was associated with their justification for their choice as well as their memory for the model's action. Study 2 explored the impact of immigration status on the cultural differences in children's tool choice by including 16 first-generation Caucasian American children. When comparing the findings with the rates from Study 1, both groups of Caucasian American preschoolers imitated at rates significantly lower than the Chinese American preschoolers. We suggest that the tool choices of Caucasian American children relate to a tendency to engage in a perceptually driven mode of learning, whereas the choices of the Chinese American children reflect a greater likelihood to use a socially driven mode.

  19. Consensus comparative analysis of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohong Zhang

    Full Text Available Global transcriptional analyses have been performed with human embryonic stem cells (hESC derived cardiomyocytes (CMs to identify molecules and pathways important for human CM differentiation, but variations in culture and profiling conditions have led to greatly divergent results among different studies. Consensus investigation to identify genes and gene sets enriched in multiple studies is important for revealing differential gene expression intrinsic to human CM differentiation independent of the above variables, but reliable methods of conducting such comparison are lacking. We examined differential gene expression between hESC and hESC-CMs from multiple microarray studies. For single gene analysis, we identified genes that were expressed at increased levels in hESC-CMs in seven datasets and which have not been previously highlighted. For gene set analysis, we developed a new algorithm, consensus comparative analysis (CSSCMP, capable of evaluating enrichment of gene sets from heterogeneous data sources. Based on both theoretical analysis and experimental validation, CSSCMP is more efficient and less susceptible to experimental variations than traditional methods. We applied CSSCMP to hESC-CM microarray data and revealed novel gene set enrichment (e.g., glucocorticoid stimulus, and also identified genes that might mediate this response. Our results provide important molecular information intrinsic to hESC-CM differentiation. Data and Matlab codes can be downloaded from S1 Data.

  20. Conocimientos sobre VIH/SIDA en adolescentes urbanos: consenso cultural de dudas e incertidumbres Knowledge of HIV/AIDS among urban adolescents: cultural consensus of doubts and uncertainties

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    Ramiro Caballero-Hoyos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Describir conocimientos sobre VIH/SIDA en adolescentes de distintos estratos socioeconómicos, mediante un análisis de consenso cultural. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal muestral descriptivo y correlacional. Cuestionario aplicado a 758 adolescentes de Guadalajara, Jalisco, México, entre julio de 1995 y marzo de 1996. Análisis: a consenso por estratos y género con análisis factorial, b estimación de patrón cultural de respuestas correctas y de concordancia de respuestas individuo/grupo por correlaciones r de Pearson. RESULTADOS: Hubo altos grados de consenso en todos los estratos. La concordancia de conocimientos individuo/grupo fue mayor en estratos superiores. El patrón de respuestas correctas mostró: a conocimientos similares sobre formas de transmisión casual, características del SIDA y alto riesgo en trabajadoras del sexo comercial, y b diferencias basadas en dudas e incertidumbres sobre la protección del condón, la distinción VIH/SIDA y la transmisión en clínicas. CONCLUSIONES: Los conocimientos son homogéneos en todos los estratos y se orientan hacia un modelo biomédico. Sin embargo, contienen elementos de duda e incertidumbre que precisan de intervenciones informativas segmentadas.OBJECTIVE: To describe the knowledge of HIV/AIDS among adolescents from different socioeconomic strata (SS, using cultural consensus analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional descriptive and analytic study was conducted from July 1995 to March 1996, among 758 adolescents from Guadalajara, México. Data were collected using a questionnaire, and analyzed by means of: a consensus by SS and gender using factorial analysis; and b identification of the cultural pattern of correct answers, and concordance of individual/group answers using Pearson's r correlation coefficients. RESULTS: There was a high degree of consensus across SS. The individual/group knowledge concordance was greater in higher SS. The pattern of correct

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Danish consensus version of the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Anita; Dalgaard, Vita Ligaya; Nielsen, Kent Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of the present study were to (i) cross-culturally adapt a Danish consensus version of the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) and (ii) evaluate its psychometric properties in terms of agreement, reliability, validity, responsiveness, and interpretability among patients...

  2. High and Low Consensus Groups: A Content and Relational Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStephen, Rolayne S.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzed the complete interaction of high and low consensus groups in a basic small group course. Interaction analysis indicated that both the relational and content levels of communication are significantly different for high versus low consensus groups. The conclusion that increased feedback leads to decision satisfaction was confirmed. (JAC)

  3. Functional Analysis of HIV/AIDS Stigma: Consensus or Divergence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Hassan; Hossain, Syeda Zakia

    2011-01-01

    Functional theory proposes that attitudes may serve a variety of purposes for individuals. This study aimed to determine whether stigmatized attitudes toward HIV/AIDS serve the same function for all (consensus function) or serve different functions for different individuals (divergence function) by assessing various aspects of HIV/AIDS stigma…

  4. Cultural Analysis - towards cross-cultural understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullestrup, Hans

    The book considers intercultural understanding and co-action, partly by means of general insight into concept of culture and the dimensions which bring about cultural differences, and partly as a methodology to analyse a certain culture - whether one's own or others'. This leads towards an unders......The book considers intercultural understanding and co-action, partly by means of general insight into concept of culture and the dimensions which bring about cultural differences, and partly as a methodology to analyse a certain culture - whether one's own or others'. This leads towards...... a theoretical/abstract proposal for cultural understanding. The second part presents a theoretical/abstract proposal for under-standing intercultural plurality and complexity. The third part provides an empirical model for the analysis of intercultural co-action. Finally, the fourth part present and discusses...

  5. Cultural models, consensus analysis, and the social organization of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatewood, John B

    2012-07-01

    The introductory essay to this collection correctly observes that there are many "challenges for rapprochement" between anthropology and (the rest of) cognitive science. Still, the possibilities of fruitful interchanges provide some hope for the parties getting back together, at least on an intermittent basis. This response offers some views concerning the "incompatibility" of psychology and anthropology, reviews why cognitive anthropology drifted away from cognitive science, and notes two areas of contemporary interest within cognitive anthropology that may lead to a re-engagement.

  6. CONSENSO CULTURAL SOBRE EL INTENTO DE SUICIDIO EN ADOLESCENTES/CULTURAL CONSENSUS REGARDING SUICIDE ATTEMPTS IN ADOLESCENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Javier Eduardo García de Alba; Roque Quintanilla Montoya; Luis Miguel Sánchez Loyo; Teresita Morfín López; José Ignacio Cruz Gaitán

    2011-01-01

      Este estudio buscó identificar la estructura semántica del dominio cultural, el promedio de conocimiento y el grado de consenso cultural manifestado por los adolescentes sobre el intento de suicidio...

  7. Consensus-Based Course Design and Implementation of Constructive Alignment Theory in a Power System Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfretti, Luigi; Farrokhabadi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the implementation of the constructive alignment theory (CAT) in a power system analysis course through a consensus-based course design process. The consensus-based design process involves both the instructor and graduate-level students and it aims to develop the CAT framework in a holistic manner with the goal of including…

  8. Consensus analysis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R; Brødsgaard, I; Miller, ML

    1997-01-01

    A quantitative method for validating qualitative interview results and checking sample parameters is described and illustrated using common pain descriptions among a sample of Anglo-American and mandarin Chinese patients and dentists matched by age and gender. Assumptions were that subjects were...... of covalidating questionnaires that reflect results of qualitative interviews are recommended in order to estimate sample parameters such as intersubject agreement, individual subject accuracy, and minimum required sample sizes....

  9. Consensus analysis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R; Brødsgaard, I; Miller, ML

    1997-01-01

    A quantitative method for validating qualitative interview results and checking sample parameters is described and illustrated using common pain descriptions among a sample of Anglo-American and mandarin Chinese patients and dentists matched by age and gender. Assumptions were that subjects were...

  10. A formal concept analysis approach to consensus clustering of multi-experiment expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Presently, with the increasing number and complexity of available gene expression datasets, the combination of data from multiple microarray studies addressing a similar biological question is gaining importance. The analysis and integration of multiple datasets are expected to yield more reliable and robust results since they are based on a larger number of samples and the effects of the individual study-specific biases are diminished. This is supported by recent studies suggesting that important biological signals are often preserved or enhanced by multiple experiments. An approach to combining data from different experiments is the aggregation of their clusterings into a consensus or representative clustering solution which increases the confidence in the common features of all the datasets and reveals the important differences among them. Results We propose a novel generic consensus clustering technique that applies Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) approach for the consolidation and analysis of clustering solutions derived from several microarray datasets. These datasets are initially divided into groups of related experiments with respect to a predefined criterion. Subsequently, a consensus clustering algorithm is applied to each group resulting in a clustering solution per group. These solutions are pooled together and further analysed by employing FCA which allows extracting valuable insights from the data and generating a gene partition over all the experiments. In order to validate the FCA-enhanced approach two consensus clustering algorithms are adapted to incorporate the FCA analysis. Their performance is evaluated on gene expression data from multi-experiment study examining the global cell-cycle control of fission yeast. The FCA results derived from both methods demonstrate that, although both algorithms optimize different clustering characteristics, FCA is able to overcome and diminish these differences and preserve some relevant biological

  11. Cultural Understanding Through Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Jean-Francois

    1986-01-01

    A college course used an explicit intercultural approach and collective research activities to compare French and American cultures and to examine the reasons for cultural attitudes and culture conflict. Class assignments dealt with contrastive analyses of American and French institutions like advertising, cinema, feminism, etc. (MSE)

  12. Cultural Understanding Through Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Jean-Francois

    1986-01-01

    A college course used an explicit intercultural approach and collective research activities to compare French and American cultures and to examine the reasons for cultural attitudes and culture conflict. Class assignments dealt with contrastive analyses of American and French institutions like advertising, cinema, feminism, etc. (MSE)

  13. Cultural Analysis in Geography: A Course Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, W.

    1981-01-01

    The article offers a description of a one semester college-level course in cultural geography. The outline is based on six themes--cultural analysis in geography, cultural universals, perception of the cultural environment, cultural diffusion, folk culture and popular culture, and humans and the land. (DB)

  14. Where there is no evidence: use of expert consensus methods to fill the evidence gap in low-income countries and cultural minorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In both developing countries and in relation to cultural minorities there have been calls to scale up mental health services and for evidence-informed policy and practice. Evidence based medicine The evidence based medicine movement has had a major influence in improving practice. However, implementation of this approach has some major difficulties. One that has been neglected is the situation where there is no relevant evidence. This situation is more likely to occur for healthcare decisions in developing countries or for cultural minorities within developed countries, because resources do not exist for expensive research studies. Consensus methods Consensus methods, such as the Delphi process, can be useful in providing an evidence base in situations where there is insufficient evidence. They provide a way of systematically tapping the expertise of people working in the area and give evidence that is readily applicable for a particular country and culture. Although consensus methods are often thought of as low in the hierarchy of evidence, consensus is central to the scientific process. We present four examples where the Delphi method was used to assess expert consensus in situations where no other evidence existed: estimating the prevalence of dementia in developing countries, developing mental health first aid guidelines in Asian countries, mental health first aid guidelines for Australian Aboriginal people, and modification of the concept of 'recovery' for Australian immigrant communities. Conclusion Consensus methods can provide a basis for decision-making and considered action when there is no evidence or when there are doubts about the applicability of evidence that has been generated from other populations or health system settings.

  15. Untangling long branches: identifying conflicting phylogenetic signals using spectral analysis, neighbor-net, and consensus networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Martyn; Holland, Barbara R; Gray, Russell D; Spencer, Hamish G

    2005-08-01

    Long-branch attraction is a well-known source of systematic error that can mislead phylogenetic methods; it is frequently invoked post hoc, upon recovering a different tree from the one expected based on prior evidence. We demonstrate that methods that do not force the data onto a single tree, such as spectral analysis, Neighbor-Net, and consensus networks, can be used to detect conflicting signals within the data, including those caused by long-branch attraction. We illustrate this approach using a set of taxa from three unambiguously monophyletic families within the Pelecaniformes: the darters, the cormorants and shags, and the gannets and boobies. These three families are universally acknowledged as forming a monophyletic group, but the relationship between the families remains contentious. Using sequence data from three mitochondrial genes (12S, ATPase 6, and ATPase 8) we demonstrate that the relationship between these three families is difficult to resolve because they are separated by a short internal branch and there are conflicting signals due to long-branch attraction, which are confounded with nonhomogeneous sequence evolution across the different genes. Spectral analysis, Neighbor-Net, and consensus networks reveal conflicting signals regarding the placement of one of the darters, with support found for darter monophyly, but also support for a conflicting grouping with the outgroup, pelicans. Furthermore, parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses produced different trees, with one of the two most parsimonious trees not supporting the monophyly of the darters. Monte Carlo simulations, however, were not sensitive enough to reveal long-branch attraction unless the branches are longer than those actually observed. These results indicate that spectral analysis, Neighbor-Net, and consensus networks offer a powerful approach to detecting and understanding the source of conflicting signals within phylogenetic data.

  16. Development of a consensus method for culture of Clostridium difficile from meat and its use in a survey of U.S. retail meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbago, Brandi; Thompson, Angela D; Greene, Sharon A; MacCannell, Duncan; MacGowan, Charles E; Jolbitado, Beverly; Hardin, Henrietta D; Estes, Stephanie R; Weese, J Scott; Songer, J Glenn; Gould, L Hannah

    2012-12-01

    Three previously described methods for culture of Clostridium difficile from meats were evaluated by microbiologists with experience in C. difficile culture and identification. A consensus protocol using BHI broth enrichment followed by ethanol shock and plating to selective and non-selective media was selected for use, and all participating laboratories received hands-on training in the use of this method prior to study initiation. Retail meat products (N = 1755) were cultured for C. difficile over 12 months during 2010-2011 at 9 U.S. FoodNet sites. No C. difficile was recovered, although other clostridia were isolated. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Consensus problem of delayed linear multi-agent systems analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Cheng-Lin

    2017-01-01

    In the context of coupled-coordination control mechanisms, this book focuses on the delay robustness of consensus problems with asynchronously coupled and synchronously coupled consensus algorithms respectively. Moreover, constructive consensus algorithms that tolerate larger communication delays are proposed according to idea of compensation. By providing rigorous theoretical proofs and numerous numerical simulations, it enhances readers’ understanding of the consensus coordination control mechanism of multi-agent systems with communication delays.

  18. Eliminating health disparities through culturally and linguistically centered integrated health care: consensus statements, recommendations, and key strategies from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Katherine; Chapa, Teresa; Ybarra, Rick; Martinez, Octavio N

    2014-05-01

    This report is the outcome of an expert consensus meeting sponsored by the United States Deparment of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health, which was convened to formulate consensus statements, provide recommendations and identify key strategies from practice for implementing integrated health and behavioral health care intended to improve health status for underserved populations.

  19. Consensus analysis of switching multi-agent systems with fixed topology and time-delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yongquan; Sun, Jitao

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the average consensus problems of the discrete-time Markov switching linear multi-agent systems (LMAS) with fixed topology and time-delay. Firstly, we introduce a concept of the average consensus to adapt the stochastic systems. Secondly, a time-delay switching consensus protocol is proposed. By developing a new signal mode, the switching signal of the systems and the time-delay signal of the controller can be merged into one signal. Thirdly, by Lyapunov technique, two LMIs criteria of average consensus are provided, and they reveal that the consensus of the multi-agent systems relates to the spectral radius of the Laplacian matrix. Furthermore, by our results and CCL-type algorithms, we can get the gain matrices. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the efficiency of our results.

  20. CONSENSO CULTURAL SOBRE EL INTENTO DE SUICIDIO EN ADOLESCENTES/ CULTURAL CONSENSUS REGARDING SUICIDE ATTEMPTS IN ADOLESCENTS/ CONSENSO CULTURAL SOBRE TENTATIVA DE SUICÍDIO EM ADOLESCENTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio Cruz Gaitán

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio buscó identificar la estructura semántica del dominio cultural, el promedio de conocimiento y el grado de consenso cultural manifestado por los adolescentes sobre el intento de suicidio. Fue un estudio cualitativo de listas libres, con un muestreo propositivo no aleatorizado de 27 adolescentes entre 13 y 18 años. Los resultados evidenciaron un solo modelo semántico. En lo estructural se identificó el problema familiar como una causa importante del intento suicida; las categorías depresión y tristeza se consideraron como signos y síntomas previos a esta tentativa y no como causas. Como estrategias de prevención, se consideró recibir información mediante pláticas o establecer conversaciones sobre los problemas. Este modelo permite proponer estrategias de prevención que privilegien el núcleo familiar.

  1. Sampled-Data-Based Consensus and $L_{2}$ -Gain Analysis for Heterogeneous Multiagent Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Sheng-Li; Xia, Weiguo; Sun, Xi-Ming; Wang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the sampled-data-based consensus problem of heterogeneous multiagent systems under directed graph topology with communication failure. The heterogeneous multiagent system consists of first-order and second-order integrators. Consensus of the heterogeneous multiagent system may not be guaranteed if the communication failure always happens. However, if the frequency and the length of the communication failure satisfy certain conditions, consensus of the considered system can be reached. In particular, we introduce the concepts of communication failure frequency and communication failure length. Then, with the help of the switching technique and the Lyapunov stability theory, sufficient conditions are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities, which guarantees that the heterogeneous multiagent system not only achieves consensus but also maintains a desired L2 -gain performance. A simulation example is given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method in this paper.

  2. Analysis of the structural consensus of the zinc coordination centers of metalloprotein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kirti; Kumar, Anil; Durani, Susheel

    2007-10-01

    In a recent sequence-analysis study it was concluded that up to 10% of the human proteome could be comprised of zinc proteins, quite varied in the functional spread. The native structures of only few of the proteins are actually established. The elucidation of rest of the sequences of not just human but even other actively investigated genomes may benefit from knowledge of the structural consensus of the zinc-binding centers of the currently known zinc proteins. Nearly four hundred X-ray and NMR structures in the database of zinc-protein structures available as of April 2007 were investigated for geometry and conformation in the zinc-binding centers; separately for the structural and catalytic proteins and individually in the zinc centers coordinated to three and four amino-acid ligands. Enhanced cysteine involvement in agreement with the observation in human proteome has been detected in contrast with previous reports. Deviations from ideal coordination geometries are detected, possible underlying reasons are investigated, and correlations of geometry and conformation in zinc-coordination centers with protein function are established, providing possible benchmarks for putative zinc-binding patterns of the burgeoning genome data.

  3. Consensus Analysis of High-Order Multiagent Systems with General Topology and Asymmetric Time-Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangcui Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the consensus problem for high-order multiagent systems (MAS with directed network and asymmetric time-varying time-delays. It is proved that the high-order multiagent system can reach consensus when the network topology contains a spanning tree and time-delay is bounded. The main contribution of this paper is that a Lyapunov-like design framework for the explicit selection of protocol parameters is provided. The Lyapunov-like design guarantees the robust consensus of the high-order multiagent system with respect to asymmetric time-delays and is independent of the exact knowledge of the topology when the communication linkages among agents are undirected and connected.

  4. Arabic Interface Analysis Based on Cultural Markers

    CERN Document Server

    Khanum, Mohammadi Akheela; Chaurasia, Mousmi A

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the Arabic interface design elements that are largely influenced by the cultural values. Cultural markers are examined in websites from educational, business, and media. Cultural values analysis is based on Geert Hofstede's cultural dimensions. The findings show that there are cultural markers which are largely influenced by the culture and that the Hofstede's score for Arab countries is partially supported by the website design components examined in this study. Moderate support was also found for the long term orientation, for which Hoftsede has no score.

  5. Analysis of Distributed Consensus Time Synchronization with Gaussian Delay over Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Xiong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents theoretical results on the convergence of the distributed consensus timing synchronization (DCTS algorithm for wireless sensor networks assuming general Gaussian delay between nodes. The asymptotic expectation and mean square of the global synchronization error are computed. The results lead to the definition of a time delay balanced network in which average timing consensus between nodes can be achieved despite random delays. Several structured network architectures are studied as examples, and their associated simulation results are used to validate analytical findings.

  6. Concept analysis of culture applied to nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzilli, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Culture is an important concept, especially when applied to nursing. A concept analysis of culture is essential to understanding the meaning of the word. This article applies Rodgers' (2000) concept analysis template and provides a definition of the word culture as it applies to nursing practice. This article supplies examples of the concept of culture to aid the reader in understanding its application to nursing and includes a case study demonstrating components of culture that must be respected and included when providing health care.

  7. Expert Panel Consensus for and Analysis of Key Attributes on Websites Devoted to Weight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen L.; Land, Diane; Johnson, Chandrika; Miller, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity presents major challenges to public health in the United States. Trials of web-based interventions for weight control suggest that the Internet is a promising option for program delivery. Purpose: This study sought consensus among experts regarding critical components of successful weight control and to systematically examine…

  8. Systematic review of evidence and consensus on perianal fistula: an analysis of national and international guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groof, E J; Cabral, V N; Buskens, C J; Morton, D G; Hahnloser, D; Bemelman, W A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of perianal fistula has evolved with the introduction of new techniques and biologicals in Crohn's disease (CD). Several guidelines are available worldwide, but many recommendations are controversial or lack high-quality evidence. The aim of this work was to provide an overview of the current available national and international guidelines for perianal fistula and to analyse areas of consensus and areas of conflicting recommendations, thereby identifying topics and questions for future research. MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed were systematically searched for guidelines on perianal fistula. Inclusion was limited to papers in English less than 10 years old. The included topics were classified as having consensus (unanimous recommendations in at least two-thirds of the guidelines) or controversy (fewer than three guidelines commenting on the topic or no consensus) between guidelines. The highest level of evidence was scored as sufficient (level 3a or higher of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence 2009, http://www.cebm.net/oxford-centre-evidence-based-medicine-levels-evidence-march-2009/) or insufficient. Twelve guidelines were included and topics with recommendations were compared. Overall, consensus was present in 15 topics, whereas six topics were rated as controversial. Evidence levels varied from strong to lack of evidence. Evidence on the diagnosis and treatment of perianal fistulae (cryptoglandular or related to CD) ranged from nonexistent to strong, regardless of consensus. The most relevant research questions were identified and proposed as topics for future research. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    Our results point to significant national variation both in terms of the perceived aim of consensus conferences, expectations to conference outcomes, conceptions of the roles of lay people and experts, and in terms of the way in which the role of public deliberation is interpreted. Interestingly...

  10. Mental health first aid for Indigenous Australians: using Delphi consensus studies to develop guidelines for culturally appropriate responses to mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Claire M

    2009-08-01

    and appropriate by the panellists. Conclusion Aboriginal mental health experts were able to reach consensus about culturally appropriate first aid for mental illness. The Delphi consensus method could be useful more generally for consulting Indigenous peoples about culturally appropriate best practice in mental health services.

  11. Providing culturally appropriate mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent: development of expert consensus guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Chalmers, Kathryn J.; Bond, Kathy S.; Jorm, Anthony F; Kelly, Claire M; Kitchener, Betty A; Williams-Tchen, AJ

    2014-01-01

    Background It is estimated that the prevalence of mental illness is higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents compared to non-Aboriginal adolescents. Despite this, only a small proportion of Aboriginal youth have contact with mental health services, possibly due to factors such as remoteness, language barriers, affordability and cultural sensitivity issues. This research aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for anyone who is providing first aid to an Australian...

  12. Modeling and Flocking Consensus Analysis for Large-Scale UAV Swarms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, distributed coordination control of the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV swarms has been a particularly active topic in intelligent system field. In this paper, through understanding the emergent mechanism of the complex system, further research on the flocking and the dynamic characteristic of UAV swarms will be given. Firstly, this paper analyzes the current researches and existent problems of UAV swarms. Afterwards, by the theory of stochastic process and supplemented variables, a differential-integral model is established, converting the system model into Volterra integral equation. The existence and uniqueness of the solution of the system are discussed. Then the flocking control law is given based on artificial potential with system consensus. At last, we analyze the stability of the proposed flocking control algorithm based on the Lyapunov approach and prove that the system in a limited time can converge to the consensus direction of the velocity. Simulation results are provided to verify the conclusion.

  13. Sampled-data based average consensus with measurement noises:convergence analysis and uncertainty principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tao; ZHANG JiFeng

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,sampled-data based average-consensus control is considered for networks consisting of continuous-time first-order Integrator agents in a noisy distributed communication environment.The Impact of the sampling size and the number of network nodes on the system performances is analyzed.The control input of each agent can only use information measured at the sampling instants from its neighborhood rather than the complete continuous process,and the measurements of its neighbors'states are corrupted by random noises.By probability limit theory and the property of graph Laplacian matrix,it is shown that for a connected network,the static mean square error between the individual state and the average of the Initial states of all agents can be made arbitrarily small,provided the sampling size is sufficiently small.Furthermore,by properly choosing the consensus gains,almost sure consensus can be achieved.It is worth pointing out that an uncertainty principle of Gaussian networks is obtained,which implies that in the case of white Gausslan noises,no matter what the sampling size is,the product of the steady-state and transient performance indices is always equal to or larger than a constant depending on the noise intensity,network topology and the number of network nodes.

  14. Application of consensus scoring and principal component analysis for virtual screening against β-secretase (BACE-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to identify novel chemical classes of β-secretase (BACE-1 inhibitors, an alternative scoring protocol, Principal Component Analysis (PCA, was proposed to summarize most of the information from the original scoring functions and re-rank the results from the virtual screening against BACE-1. METHOD: Given a training set (50 BACE-1 inhibitors and 9950 inactive diverse compounds, three rank-based virtual screening methods, individual scoring, conventional consensus scoring and PCA, were judged by the hit number in the top 1% of the ranked list. The docking poses were generated by Surflex, five scoring functions (Surflex_Score, D_Score, G_Score, ChemScore, and PMF_Score were used for pose extraction. For each pose group, twelve scoring functions (Surflex_Score, D_Score, G_Score, ChemScore, PMF_Score, LigScore1, LigScore2, PLP1, PLP2, jain, Ludi_1, and Ludi_2 were used for the pose rank. For a test set, 113,228 chemical compounds (Sigma-Aldrich® corporate chemical directory were docked by Surflex, then ranked by the same three ranking methods motioned above to select the potential active compounds for experimental test. RESULTS: For the training set, the PCA approach yielded consistently superior rankings compared to conventional consensus scoring and single scoring. For the test set, the top 20 compounds according to conventional consensus scoring were experimentally tested, no inhibitor was found. Then, we relied on PCA scoring protocol to test another different top 20 compounds and two low micromolar inhibitors (S450588 and 276065 were emerged through the BACE-1 fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay. CONCLUSION: The PCA method extends the conventional consensus scoring in a quantitative statistical manner and would appear to have considerable potential for chemical screening applications.

  15. Why Consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Polletta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activists have long justified their egalitarian organizational forms in prefigurative terms. Making decisions by consensus, decentralizing organization, and rotating leadership serves to model the radically democratic society that activists hope to bring into being. Our comparison of consensus-based decision-making in three historical periods, however, shows that activists have understood the purposes of prefiguration in very different ways. Whereas radical pacifists in the 1940s saw their cooperative organizations as sustaining movement stalwarts in a period of political repression, new left activists in the 1960s imagined that their radically democratic practices would be adopted by ever-widening circles. Along with the political conditions in which they have operated, activists’ distinctive understandings of equality have also shaped the way they have made decisions. Our interviews with 30 leftist activists today reveal a view of decision-making as a place to work through inequalities that are informal, unacknowledged, and pervasive.

  16. Consensus building for interlaboratory studies, key comparisons, and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Amanda; Lafarge, Thomas; Possolo, Antonio; Toman, Blaza

    2017-06-01

    Interlaboratory studies in measurement science, including key comparisons, and meta-analyses in several fields, including medicine, serve to intercompare measurement results obtained independently, and typically produce a consensus value for the common measurand that blends the values measured by the participants. Since interlaboratory studies and meta-analyses reveal and quantify differences between measured values, regardless of the underlying causes for such differences, they also provide so-called ‘top-down’ evaluations of measurement uncertainty. Measured values are often substantially over-dispersed by comparison with their individual, stated uncertainties, thus suggesting the existence of yet unrecognized sources of uncertainty (dark uncertainty). We contrast two different approaches to take dark uncertainty into account both in the computation of consensus values and in the evaluation of the associated uncertainty, which have traditionally been preferred by different scientific communities. One inflates the stated uncertainties by a multiplicative factor. The other adds laboratory-specific ‘effects’ to the value of the measurand. After distinguishing what we call recipe-based and model-based approaches to data reductions in interlaboratory studies, we state six guiding principles that should inform such reductions. These principles favor model-based approaches that expose and facilitate the critical assessment of validating assumptions, and give preeminence to substantive criteria to determine which measurement results to include, and which to exclude, as opposed to purely statistical considerations, and also how to weigh them. Following an overview of maximum likelihood methods, three general purpose procedures for data reduction are described in detail, including explanations of how the consensus value and degrees of equivalence are computed, and the associated uncertainty evaluated: the DerSimonian-Laird procedure; a hierarchical Bayesian

  17. Culture Representation in Human Reliability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gertman; Julie Marble; Steven Novack

    2006-12-01

    Understanding human-system response is critical to being able to plan and predict mission success in the modern battlespace. Commonly, human reliability analysis has been used to predict failures of human performance in complex, critical systems. However, most human reliability methods fail to take culture into account. This paper takes an easily understood state of the art human reliability analysis method and extends that method to account for the influence of culture, including acceptance of new technology, upon performance. The cultural parameters used to modify the human reliability analysis were determined from two standard industry approaches to cultural assessment: Hofstede’s (1991) cultural factors and Davis’ (1989) technology acceptance model (TAM). The result is called the Culture Adjustment Method (CAM). An example is presented that (1) reviews human reliability assessment with and without cultural attributes for a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system attack, (2) demonstrates how country specific information can be used to increase the realism of HRA modeling, and (3) discusses the differences in human error probability estimates arising from cultural differences.

  18. Consensus analysis of networks with time-varying topology and event-triggered diffusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yujuan; Lu, Wenlian; Chen, Tianping

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the consensus problem of networks with time-varying topology. Event-triggered rules are employed in diffusion coupling terms to reduce the updating load of the coupled system. Two strategies are considered: event-triggered strategy, that each node observes the state information in an instantaneous way, to determine the next triggering event time, and self-triggered strategy, that each node only needs to observe the state information at the event time to predict the next triggering event time. In each strategy, two kinds of algorithms are considered: the pull-based algorithm, that the diffusion coupling term of every node is updated at the latest observations of the neighborhood at its triggered time, and push-based algorithm, the diffusion coupling term of every node uses the state information of its neighborhood at their latest triggered time. It is proved that if the coupling matrix across time intervals with length less than some given constant has spanning trees, then the proposed algorithms can realize consensus. Examples with numerical simulation are provided to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  19. Do we see eye to eye? The relationship between internal communication and between-group strategic consensus: A case analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Desmidt (Sebastian); B.R.J. George (Bert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAlthough organization-wide strategic consensus is considered a prerequisite for effective strategy execution, research analyzing the degree, content, and antecedents of strategic consensus between hierarchically distant employee groups is limited. The present study addresses this issue

  20. Do we see eye to eye? The relationship between internal communication and between-group strategic consensus: A case analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Desmidt (Sebastian); B.R.J. George (Bert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAlthough organization-wide strategic consensus is considered a prerequisite for effective strategy execution, research analyzing the degree, content, and antecedents of strategic consensus between hierarchically distant employee groups is limited. The present study addresses this issue b

  1. Do we see eye to eye? The relationship between internal communication and between-group strategic consensus: A case analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Desmidt (Sebastian); B.R.J. George (Bert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAlthough organization-wide strategic consensus is considered a prerequisite for effective strategy execution, research analyzing the degree, content, and antecedents of strategic consensus between hierarchically distant employee groups is limited. The present study addresses this issue b

  2. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis reveals similar substrate consensus motif for human Mps1 kinase and Plk1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Dou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of the Mps1 kinase family play an essential and evolutionarily conserved role in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, a surveillance mechanism that ensures accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis. Human Mps1 (hMps1 is highly phosphorylated during mitosis and many phosphorylation sites have been identified. However, the upstream kinases responsible for these phosphorylations are not presently known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we identify 29 in vivo phosphorylation sites in hMps1. While in vivo analyses indicate that Aurora B and hMps1 activity are required for mitotic hyper-phosphorylation of hMps1, in vitro kinase assays show that Cdk1, MAPK, Plk1 and hMps1 itself can directly phosphorylate hMps1. Although Aurora B poorly phosphorylates hMps1 in vitro, it positively regulates the localization of Mps1 to kinetochores in vivo. Most importantly, quantitative mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates that at least 12 sites within hMps1 can be attributed to autophosphorylation. Remarkably, these hMps1 autophosphorylation sites closely resemble the consensus motif of Plk1, demonstrating that these two mitotic kinases share a similar substrate consensus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: hMps1 kinase is regulated by Aurora B kinase and its autophosphorylation. Analysis on hMps1 autophosphorylation sites demonstrates that hMps1 has a substrate preference similar to Plk1 kinase.

  3. Members' attendance rates and outcomes of relationship education groups: A consensus-dispersion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlighan, D Martin; Owen, Jesse; Antle, Becky

    2017-04-01

    Relationship education programs (REPs) are an effective way to enhance relationship communication, prevent relational distress, and increase relationship quality. Most REPs are delivered in a group format; however, there is little known about the influence of group processes on outcomes for these programs, such as group members' attendance. Therefore, the current study applied a dispersion-consensus model to test the impact of attendance at the member and group levels on group members' REP outcomes. In a sample of 558 lower income, primarily African American participants, we examined whether individual and group attendance rates influenced posttreatment communication patterns and relationship quality. Results indicated that an individual group member's attendance was significantly and positively related to their posttreatment relationship quality, although this relationship is complex. Specifically, this relationship was stronger in groups with higher levels of attendance as well as groups with more attendance variability. In addition, results indicated that group members reported better posttreatment relationship quality in groups with less variability in members' attendance. However, we found a significant interaction between attendance consensus and variability, and an individual group member's posttreatment relationship quality, suggesting that group members report higher levels of relationship quality in groups where the attendance of the group as a whole is lower yet more consistent. No significant relationships were found for group member's posttreatment communication patterns. Our findings suggest that the rate and variability in the group's attendance, as well as an individual group member's own attendance significantly impacts their posttreatment relationship quality in complex ways. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. ANALYSIS OF MECHANISMS FINANCING OF CULTURAL SPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costandachi Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work is made analysis concern basically state structures of culture and arts activities, is describes the problems are met during the reforming process the financial mechanisms in cultural sphere. Author disclosed the ways evolve private and estate financing cultural sphere, also is disclosed why is need estate financial support. The work contains something detailed measures actions to improve financial and mechanisms financing of cultural sphere. Analyzing questions of modernization of budgetary financing of branch the author have formulated effectiveness of use of budgetary funds at all levels in cultural structures and proposed the ways of finishing of market reforms in cinematography. In the final of work is presented scheme system of financing, formation and distribution of financial resources in cinematography and is making conclusions and is offered wais of the solutions created present situation in this sphere in Moldova.

  5. A computer-based group discussion support tool for achieving consensus and culture change using the organisational culture assessment instrument (OCAI): an action design research study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee Mui Suan, Jaclyn

    2015-01-01

    Organisational culture change is a long and complex process that typically takes years to complete and has a very low success rate. This Action Design Research Study in an educational setting, addresses the problem by the proposed use of an Action Design Research Methodology to build and deploy an I

  6. Putting the pediatrics milestones into practice: a consensus roadmap and resource analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Daniel J; Spector, Nancy D; Calaman, Sharon; West, Daniel C; Cruz, Mario; Frohna, John G; Gonzalez Del Rey, Javier; Gustafson, Kristina K; Poynter, Sue Ellen; Rosenbluth, Glenn; Southgate, W Michael; Vinci, Robert J; Sectish, Theodore C

    2014-05-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has partnered with member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties to initiate the next steps in advancing competency-based assessment in residency programs. This initiative, known as the Milestone Project, is a paradigm shift from traditional assessment efforts and requires all pediatrics residency programs to report individual resident progression along a series of 4 to 5 developmental levels of performance, or milestones, for individual competencies every 6 months beginning in June 2014. The effort required to successfully make this shift is tremendous given the number of training programs, training institutions, and trainees. However, it holds great promise for achieving training outcomes that align with patient needs; developing a valid, reliable, and meaningful way to track residents' development; and providing trainees with a roadmap for learning. Recognizing the resources needed to implement this new system, the authors, all residency program leaders, provide their consensus view of the components necessary for implementing and sustaining this effort, including resource estimates for completing this work. The authors have identified 4 domains: (1) Program Review and Development of Stakeholders and Participants, (2) Assessment Methods and Validation, (3) Data and Assessment System Development, and (4) Summative Assessment and Feedback. This work can serve as a starting point and framework for collaboration with program, department, and institutional leaders to identify and garner necessary resources and plan for local and national efforts that will ensure successful transition to milestones-based assessment. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Content Analysis of Advertisements in Different Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Lazović

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, advertising examples are being analyzed and used as yet another form of communication, on account of their ubiquity (e.g. billboards, Internet, television, magazines. Designed to compel us to purchase products, advertisements have the potential to greatly impact our lives. They show current trends in social preferences, they reveal cultural values and norms of the target audience and, finally, they can be the mirror of the times people live in. The purpose of this paper is to give a brief overview of the findings in previously carried–out research relating to cross–cultural content analysis of advertisements. The reports have addressed both linguistic and extra–linguistic features and trends in advertising and emphasized language– and culture–specific elements. This paper also gives ideas for future studies, since nowadays, due to international marketing and increasing globalization there are more cultural transfers to be explored, as cultures are coming in contact far more frequently.

  8. Continuity and consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    maternal leave. These changes can be explained as adjustments to post-industrial conditions within a political culture relying on class compromises and a broad consensus informed by expert advice coming from civil servants and ad hoc policy commissions. The paper concludes that changes in Danish family......In Danish family policy, changes initiated by the present conservative-liberal government differ little from those proposed by the opposition. Recent changes are minor, but significant ones occurred in the 1960s, when childcare was universalized, and in the 1980s, when parental leave substituted...

  9. Metabolic biotransformation half-lives in fish: QSAR modeling and consensus analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Ester; van der Wal, Leon; Arnot, Jon A; Gramatica, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Bioaccumulation in fish is a function of competing rates of chemical uptake and elimination. For hydrophobic organic chemicals bioconcentration, bioaccumulation and biomagnification potential are high and the biotransformation rate constant is a key parameter. Few measured biotransformation rate constant data are available compared to the number of chemicals that are being evaluated for bioaccumulation hazard and for exposure and risk assessment. Three new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) for predicting whole body biotransformation half-lives (HLN) in fish were developed and validated using theoretical molecular descriptors that seek to capture structural characteristics of the whole molecule and three data set splitting schemes. The new QSARs were developed using a minimal number of theoretical descriptors (n=9) and compared to existing QSARs developed using fragment contribution methods that include up to 59 descriptors. The predictive statistics of the models are similar thus further corroborating the predictive performance of the different QSARs; Q(2)ext ranges from 0.75 to 0.77, CCCext ranges from 0.86 to 0.87, RMSE in prediction ranges from 0.56 to 0.58. The new QSARs provide additional mechanistic insights into the biotransformation capacity of organic chemicals in fish by including whole molecule descriptors and they also include information on the domain of applicability for the chemical of interest. Advantages of consensus modeling for improving overall prediction and minimizing false negative errors in chemical screening assessments, for identifying potential sources of residual error in the empirical HLN database, and for identifying structural features that are not well represented in the HLN dataset to prioritize future testing needs are illustrated. © 2013.

  10. Guest Editorial: Cultural Analysis as Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Petersen, Morten Krogh; Ren, Carina Bregnholm;

    2012-01-01

    Recently, cultural analyses – especially ethnographic descriptions of everyday-life practices – seem to have found new audiences situated within what Nigel Thrift has termed ‘soft capitalism’ (2006,1997). Ethnography is increasingly perceived by businesses, organizations, and industry as a key...... to producing surplus value due to its ability to gain access to the world of customers, users and citizens; for instance, by uncovering user demands (cf. Cefkin, 2009). This begs the question of what cultural analysis can and ought to do – beyond the scope of acting as a witness for truth and delivering facts...... to a whole new genre of business empiricism – and how to avoid reducing ethnographically-based cultural analysis to a simple matter of methods. What does it entail if we are to more strategically engage with compressed, to-the-point depictions of everyday life? The contributors to this special issue engage...

  11. Intergroup Consensus/Disagreement in Support of Group-Based Hierarchy: An Examination of Socio-Structural and Psycho-Cultural Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Ching; Pratto, Felicia; Johnson, Blair T.

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analysis examined the extent to which socio-structural and psycho-cultural characteristics of societies correspond with how much gender and ethnic/racial groups differ on their support of group-based hierarchy. Robustly, women opposed group-based hierarchy more than men did, and members of lower power ethnic/racial groups opposed…

  12. Guest Editorial: Cultural Analysis as Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Petersen, Morten Krogh; Ren, Carina Bregnholm

    2012-01-01

    to a whole new genre of business empiricism – and how to avoid reducing ethnographically-based cultural analysis to a simple matter of methods. What does it entail if we are to more strategically engage with compressed, to-the-point depictions of everyday life? The contributors to this special issue engage...

  13. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  14. Modeling and sensitivity analysis of consensus algorithm based distributed hierarchical control for dc microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    of dynamic study. The aim of this paper is to model the complete DC microgrid system in z-domain and perform sensitivity analysis for the complete system. A generalized modeling method is proposed and the system dynamics under different control parameters, communication topologies and communication speed...... the dynamics of electrical and communication systems interact with each other. Apart from that, the communication characteristics also affect the dynamics of the system. Due to discrete nature of information exchange in communication network, Laplace domain analysis is not accurate enough for this kind...

  15. Environmental Stress Testing of the Single Sample Cylinder: A Proven Consensus Standard for Internal Gas Analysis (IGA) or Residual Gas Analysis (RGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, Philipp WH

    2010-01-01

    In August 2008, Schuessler Consulting was contracted by NASA GSFC in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) program to perform two separate studies on moisture laden air in a stainless steel cylinder that had been designed to become a consensus standard for Test Method 1018. This Test Method was originally released for hybrids under Mil. Std. 883 but was quickly utilized on other microelectronic devices under the auspice of Mil. Std. 750. The cylinder had subsequently been fabricated for the 750 community. It was back-filled with moist air and subsequently analyzed over a period of time under a previous NASA contract. It had been shown that moisture in the 4000 - 5000 ppm range could be analyzed rather precisely with a mass spectrometer, commonly referred to as a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). The scope of this study was to ascertain if the composition and precision varied as a function of thermal shock at sub-zero temperatures and whether there was consensus when the standard was submitted to other RGA units. It was demonstrated and published that the consensus standard would yield precise RGA data for moisture within +/- 1% when optimized for a given RGA unit. It has been subsequently shown in this study at Oneida Research Services, that sub-zero storage did not affect that precision when a well-defined protocol for the analysis was followed. The consensus standard was taken to a second facility for analysis where it was found that moisture adsorption on the transfer lines caused precision to drop to +/- 12%. The Single Sample Cylinder (SSC) is a one liter stainless steel cylinder with associated sampling valves and has considerable weight and volume. But this considerable size allows for approximately 300 gas samples of the same composition to be delivered to any RGA unit. Lastly, a smaller cylinder, approximately 75 cc, of a second consensus standard was fabricated and tested with a different mix of fixed gases where moisture was kept in the

  16. Systematic enrichment analysis of gene expression profiling studies identifies consensus pathways implicated in colorectal cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Lascorz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of gene expression profiling (GEP studies on colorectal carcinogenesis have been performed but no reliable gene signature has been identified so far due to the lack of reproducibility in the reported genes. There is growing evidence that functionally related genes, rather than individual genes, contribute to the etiology of complex traits. We used, as a novel approach, pathway enrichment tools to define functionally related genes that are consistently up- or down-regulated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: We started the analysis with 242 unique annotated genes that had been reported by any of three recent meta-analyses covering GEP studies on genes differentially expressed in carcinoma vs normal mucosa. Most of these genes (218, 91.9% had been reported in at least three GEP studies. These 242 genes were submitted to bioinformatic analysis using a total of nine tools to detect enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO categories or Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. As a final consistency criterion the pathway categories had to be enriched by several tools to be taken into consideration. Results: Our pathway-based enrichment analysis identified the categories of ribosomal protein constituents, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, carbonic anhydrase isozymes, and a general category related to inflammation and cellular response as significantly and consistently overrepresented entities. Conclusions: We triaged the genes covered by the published GEP literature on colorectal carcinogenesis and subjected them to multiple enrichment tools in order to identify the consistently enriched gene categories. These turned out to have known functional relationships to cancer development and thus deserve further investigation.

  17. Spreading the word on sports concussion: citation analysis of summary and agreement, position and consensus statements on sports concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alla, Sridhar; Sullivan, S John; McCrory, Paul; Hale, Leigh

    2011-02-01

    the growing concern over concussion in sports has led to the publication of five major summary and agreement, position and consensus statements since 2000. The dissemination of information from these statements is largely unknown and difficult to quantify, but their impact on the research community can be quantified by analysing the number of citations to these key publications. The purpose of this review is to report the number and pattern of citations to the key published statements on sports concussion. Web of Science, Scopus and PubMed were searched from 2000 to mid-December 2009 using two different search strategies. The first strategy used the search terms 'concussion' and 'first author' of the statement article, while the second used the 'title' of the target article as the key search term. the publications resulting from the three 'Concussion in Sport' (CIS) group conferences were cited by 532 journal articles, while the National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement was cited 123 times. The highest number of citations to each of the five identified statements was seen in 2009. British Journal of Sports Medicine was the most frequently cited journal. the citation analysis of the key statements on sports concussion has shown that the target papers have been widely cited in the research literature, with the highest number of citations being from the publications arising from the CIS group conferences. The authors have shown their preference to cite source articles published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

  18. Long-term seizure outcome for international consensus classification of hippocampal sclerosis: a survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Meng; Ge, Haitao; Shi, Chen; Shen, Hong; Wang, Yu; Pu, Song; Liu, Li; Wang, Haiyang; Xie, Chuncheng; Zhu, Minwei; Wang, Jiabin; Shi, Changbin; Lin, Zhiguo

    2015-02-01

    Surgery is regarded as a common treatment option for patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) as a result of hippocampal sclerosis (HS). However, approximately one-third of patients with intractable epilepsy did not become seizure-free after tailored resection strategies. It would be compelling to identify predictive factors of postoperative seizure outcomes. Our aim was to assess the correlation between HS classification and long-term postoperative seizure outcome in patients with MTLE due to HS. To investigate HS classification, semi-quantitative analysis and immunohistochemical staining of neuronal nuclei (NeuN) were performed on 100 postoperative hippocampal specimens. All patients had a 1-7 year postoperative follow-up. The postoperative seizure outcome was evaluated using International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) outcome classification. Three types of HS were recognized. The highest incidence of initial precipitating injury (IPI) was noted in the HS ILAE type 1 group (53.1%). The most favorable long-term seizure outcome was also noted in the HS ILAE type 1 group. The shortest epilepsy duration was recorded in the HS ILAE type 2 group (mean epilepsy duration=6.64 ± 5.83 years). The completely seizure free rate of patients in all groups declined with an increase in time. Our study for the first time demonstrated a significant correlation between HS ILAE types and long-term postoperative seizure outcome in patients with MTLE due to HS. Therefore, HS ILAE types have predictive value in long-term seizure outcome following epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Saturation of an intra-gene pool linkage map: towards a unified consensus linkage map for fine mapping and synteny analysis in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Carlos H; Fernandez, Andrea C; Franco-Herrera, Natalia; Cichy, Karen A; McClean, Phillip E; Vanderleyden, Jos; Blair, Matthew W

    2011-01-01

    Map-based cloning and fine mapping to find genes of interest and marker assisted selection (MAS) requires good genetic maps with reproducible markers. In this study, we saturated the linkage map of the intra-gene pool population of common bean DOR364 × BAT477 (DB) by evaluating 2,706 molecular markers including SSR, SNP, and gene-based markers. On average the polymorphism rate was 7.7% due to the narrow genetic base between the parents. The DB linkage map consisted of 291 markers with a total map length of 1,788 cM. A consensus map was built using the core mapping populations derived from inter-gene pool crosses: DOR364 × G19833 (DG) and BAT93 × JALO EEP558 (BJ). The consensus map consisted of a total of 1,010 markers mapped, with a total map length of 2,041 cM across 11 linkage groups. On average, each linkage group on the consensus map contained 91 markers of which 83% were single copy markers. Finally, a synteny analysis was carried out using our highly saturated consensus maps compared with the soybean pseudo-chromosome assembly. A total of 772 marker sequences were compared with the soybean genome. A total of 44 syntenic blocks were identified. The linkage group Pv6 presented the most diverse pattern of synteny with seven syntenic blocks, and Pv9 showed the most consistent relations with soybean with just two syntenic blocks. Additionally, a co-linear analysis using common bean transcript map information against soybean coding sequences (CDS) revealed the relationship with 787 soybean genes. The common bean consensus map has allowed us to map a larger number of markers, to obtain a more complete coverage of the common bean genome. Our results, combined with synteny relationships provide tools to increase marker density in selected genomic regions to identify closely linked polymorphic markers for indirect selection, fine mapping or for positional cloning.

  20. Best-practice checklists for tephra collection, analysis and reporting - a draft consensus from the Tephra 2014 workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.; Bursik, M. I.; Kuehn, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Tephra 2014 Workshop (3-7 August 2014) discussed major developments, best practices, future directions, and critical needs in tephra studies from both volcanological and tephrochronological perspectives. In a consensus-seeking session held at the end of the workshop, the international group of over 70 tephra scientists focused on two complementary themes: (A) the need for common best practices in tephra data collection and reporting among different scientific disciplines, and (B) the need to establish common, accessible mechanisms for tephra data archiving and retrieval. Tephra is the focus of a wide range of research in volcanology, petrology, tephrochronology and tephrostratigraphy (with applications in studies of environmental/climate change, surface processes, paleolimnology, etc.), ash dispersion and fallout modeling, and archaeology, paleoanthropology, and human origins. Researchers in each field have specific objectives that may or may not overlap. The focus on best practices is a first step towards standardized protocols for the collection, analysis and reporting of tephra data across and within disciplines. Such uniformity will facilitate the development and population of useful tephra databases. Current initiatives include the development of best practice checklists as a starting point for ensuring uniformity and completeness. The goals of the checklists are to: 1) ensure consistency among tephra scientists, regardless of research focus, 2) provide basic, comprehensible, metadata requirements, especially those who collect tephra as a peripheral part of their research, 3) help train students, and 4) help journal editors to know which essential metadata should be included in published works. Consistency in tephra sample collection, analysis, and reporting attained by use of these checklists should ultimately aid in improving correlation of tephras across geographically large areas, and facilitate collaborative tephra research. Current and future

  1. The evolutionary analysis of cultural behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Shennan

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available A team of archaeologists and anthropologists from UCL and the University of Southampton has been awarded a large grant by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Board to set up a Centre for the Evolutionary Analysis of Cultural Behaviour. It is one of only ten research centres to be funded in the UK under this new AHRB scheme and is the first in the world dedicated to its subject. Here the Centre's director and a colleague outline its aims and describe two of the first research projects to be undertaken.

  2. Cultural Characteristics and Cultural Consensus of Social Management:Based on Civil Interaction Theory%社会管理的文化属性及共识:基于公民交往视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜冰

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary for citizens and civil groups to take part in social management because it will help to realize management goal and promote the social operation. But in China,this idea has not been extensively ac­ cepted by social administrators who are short of understanding cultural characteristics of social management, and citizens are ignored as management objects instead of subjects for a long time. In fact,citizens are of prac­ tice that civic membership could be realized only during the process of social management,public interaction, exerting rights and taking responsibilities. Social management is characteristic of publicity and inclusivity to heterogeneous culture in public sphere. It shows that citizens are one of the social management subjects. If the position of citizens is assured in managing public affairs,administrators will provide a stage for citizens to ex­ press advices,divergences,and conflictions. Then the cultural consensus of harmony without uniformity will come into being and a good social order will be anticipated.%公民或公民团体参与社会管理是实现社会目标、提升整体运行水平的必然要求。然而由于现实中对社会管理文化属性认识不足,公民长期作为社会管理对象,被忽略于管理主体之外。公民范畴所具有的实践品格强调公民身份只有在公共交往、社会管理以及享有权利履行义务过程中才能实现。社会管理文化指向公共领域的公共性、针对多元异质文化的包容性表明公民在社会管理中的主体地位具有原发性。肯定公民主体地位的社会管理能够给意见、分歧乃至冲突提供交流平台,以“和而不同”的文化共识实现社会管理的良性秩序。

  3. Analysis on Cultural Connotation of Tea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG; Zirui

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a large number of Chinese borrowed words emerge in English.However, cultural connotation of these Chinese borrowed words may fail to penetrate into the minds of foreign people.This study aims to demonstrate the cultural connotation of tea and hopes to raise readers’ cultural awareness, which is beneficial to cross-cultural communication.

  4. A network analysis of developing brain cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, V. N.; Boeff, D. V.; Evans, C. D.; Crowe, D. A.; Amirikian, B.; Georgopoulos, A.; Georgopoulos, A. P.

    2012-08-01

    We recorded electrical activity from four developing embryonic brain cultures (4-40 days in vitro) using multielectrode arrays (MEAs) with 60 embedded electrodes. Data were filtered for local field potentials (LFPs) and downsampled to 1 ms to yield a matrix of time series consisting of 60 electrode × 60 000 time samples per electrode per day per MEA. Each electrode time series was rendered stationary and nonautocorrelated by applying an ARIMA (25, 1, 1) model and taking the residuals (i.e. innovations). Two kinds of analyses were then performed. First, a pairwise crosscorrelation (CC) analysis (±25 1 ms lags) revealed systematic changes in CC with lag, day in vitro (DIV), and inter-electrode distance. Specifically, (i) positive CCs were 1.76× more prevalent and 1.44× stronger (absolute value) than negative ones, and (ii) the strength of CC increased with DIV and decreased with lag and inter-electrode distance. Second, a network equilibrium analysis was based on the instantaneous (1 ms resolution) logratio of the number of electrodes that were above or below their mean, called simultaneous departure from equilibrium, SDE. This measure possesses a major computational advantage over the pairwise crosscorrelation approach because it is very simple and fast to calculate, an important factor for the analysis of large networks. The results obtained with SDE covaried highly with CC over DIV, which further validates the usefulness of this measure as a computationally effective tool for large scale network analysis.

  5. Sports dance artistic expression culture analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zegang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, the sports dance has entered every stage of the people’s life, has become the public’s favorite sport. Sports dance has been well developed. This article mainly uses the literature material law to carry on the detailed analysis to the sports dance constitution, elaborated in detail the sports dance artistic expression. The composition of sports dance elements; sports dance is a form of dance art show; sports dance through the dance art can be divided into three aspects, namely, form, music, shape of the expressive force. In this paper, the study will be more in-depth excavation of the cultural connotation of sports dance, and promote the development of sports dance can be more comprehensive. In 20s of last century, Chinese Sports Dance Association officially joined the International Sports Dance Association, which also makes our country’s sports dance and international exchange more frequent. However, due to China’s sports dance sports dance learning time is not long, while learning is influenced by Chinese traditional culture, the sports dance movements are too conservative, there is a very large gap and international enthusiasm, bold and unrestrained, the pursuit of individual sports dance in the dance style, music and performance hand. Sports dance originated from abroad, it is produced in the daily life of people in foreign countries. China’s domestic sports dance players in learning dance at the same time, the production and the connotation of dance is not very understanding, therefore, it is difficult to better reflect the emotional expression of sports dance. Although the sports dance is a kind of similar to the competitive projects, but it is also a kind of dance culture, and to constitute a force from the dance art show a detailed study, detailed mining playing officer of sports dance performance further, reducing China’s sports dance and international sports dance gap.

  6. Chest electrical impedance tomography examination, data analysis, terminology, clinical use and recommendations: consensus statement of the TRanslational EIT developmeNt stuDy group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Inéz; Amato, Marcelo B P; van Kaam, Anton H; Tingay, David G; Zhao, Zhanqi; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Bodenstein, Marc; Gagnon, Hervé; Böhm, Stephan H; Teschner, Eckhard; Stenqvist, Ola; Mauri, Tommaso; Torsani, Vinicius; Camporota, Luigi; Schibler, Andreas; Wolf, Gerhard K; Gommers, Diederik; Leonhardt, Steffen; Adler, Andy

    2017-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has undergone 30 years of development. Functional chest examinations with this technology are considered clinically relevant, especially for monitoring regional lung ventilation in mechanically ventilated patients and for regional pulmonary function testing in patients with chronic lung diseases. As EIT becomes an established medical technology, it requires consensus examination, nomenclature, data analysis and interpretation schemes. Such consensus is needed to compare, understand and reproduce study findings from and among different research groups, to enable large clinical trials and, ultimately, routine clinical use. Recommendations of how EIT findings can be applied to generate diagnoses and impact clinical decision-making and therapy planning are required. This consensus paper was prepared by an international working group, collaborating on the clinical promotion of EIT called TRanslational EIT developmeNt stuDy group. It addresses the stated needs by providing (1) a new classification of core processes involved in chest EIT examinations and data analysis, (2) focus on clinical applications with structured reviews and outlooks (separately for adult and neonatal/paediatric patients), (3) a structured framework to categorise and understand the relationships among analysis approaches and their clinical roles, (4) consensus, unified terminology with clinical user-friendly definitions and explanations, (5) a review of all major work in thoracic EIT and (6) recommendations for future development (193 pages of online supplements systematically linked with the chief sections of the main document). We expect this information to be useful for clinicians and researchers working with EIT, as well as for industry producers of this technology. PMID:27596161

  7. Chest electrical impedance tomography examination, data analysis, terminology, clinical use and recommendations: consensus statement of the TRanslational EIT developmeNt stuDy group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Inéz; Amato, Marcelo B P; van Kaam, Anton H; Tingay, David G; Zhao, Zhanqi; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Bodenstein, Marc; Gagnon, Hervé; Böhm, Stephan H; Teschner, Eckhard; Stenqvist, Ola; Mauri, Tommaso; Torsani, Vinicius; Camporota, Luigi; Schibler, Andreas; Wolf, Gerhard K; Gommers, Diederik; Leonhardt, Steffen; Adler, Andy

    2017-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has undergone 30 years of development. Functional chest examinations with this technology are considered clinically relevant, especially for monitoring regional lung ventilation in mechanically ventilated patients and for regional pulmonary function testing in patients with chronic lung diseases. As EIT becomes an established medical technology, it requires consensus examination, nomenclature, data analysis and interpretation schemes. Such consensus is needed to compare, understand and reproduce study findings from and among different research groups, to enable large clinical trials and, ultimately, routine clinical use. Recommendations of how EIT findings can be applied to generate diagnoses and impact clinical decision-making and therapy planning are required. This consensus paper was prepared by an international working group, collaborating on the clinical promotion of EIT called TRanslational EIT developmeNt stuDy group. It addresses the stated needs by providing (1) a new classification of core processes involved in chest EIT examinations and data analysis, (2) focus on clinical applications with structured reviews and outlooks (separately for adult and neonatal/paediatric patients), (3) a structured framework to categorise and understand the relationships among analysis approaches and their clinical roles, (4) consensus, unified terminology with clinical user-friendly definitions and explanations, (5) a review of all major work in thoracic EIT and (6) recommendations for future development (193 pages of online supplements systematically linked with the chief sections of the main document). We expect this information to be useful for clinicians and researchers working with EIT, as well as for industry producers of this technology.

  8. Cultural concepts of parenting. A linguistic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hentschel, Elke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of a larger cross cultural research project on "parenting ethnotheories", where mothers of three months old infants were interviewed about their ideas on good parental care for small babies. They were confronted with picture cards, displaying different parenting behaviours from their own cultural community and were asked to comment on the appropriateness and inappropriateness of such behaviour. This paper addresses 40 of the German language interviews with a total 78,484 words. The central focus of this analysis is the frequency and distribution of modal particles as used in these interviews and as compared to two other corpora with a total of 60,000 words. The results indicate substantial differences with respect to the most frequently used particles, which can be explained by the attitudes of these women towards the particular topic being addressed in the interviews. The particle halt was used 17 times more often, whereas the usually very frequent doch was used 16 times less than usual. Based on the meaning of these particles in the German language, conclusions can be drawn concerning the more or less conscious representation of parenting ideas. The women interviewed regarded their ideas as unchangeable (as expressed in halt and are convinced that others share their worldview (as expressed in the low incidence of doch.

  9. Ways of life analysis and food culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Land, Birgit

    Executive Summary 1. People's food patterns are among other things influenced by their social environments. Analysing the relationship between the social environment and food culture is an important lead in trying to derive consumer objectives directed towards the food sector. 2. The way of life...... typology proposed by Højrup may be a useful device for analysing how the social environment impacts food patterns. Højrup proposes three ways of life: the independent way of life, the wage-earner way of life, and the career-bound way of life. He relates these types to empirical observation by qualitative...... applied to large-scale social changes which affect everyday life. Work by Ziehe, which describes such changes by the processes of technocratization and destruction of tradition, is invoked to supplement way of life analysis....

  10. Analysing Cultural Models in Socio-Cultural Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Laura

    2007-01-01

    This paper illustrates how classroom discourse demands a multi-layered analysis. The first analysis focuses on classroom discourse and provides a picture of pupil participation in teacher-pupil interactions: who is inducted into discourse and who is not. However, this local micro-analysis does not afford interpretation at the level of the…

  11. Consensus of Hybrid Multi-Agent Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshi; Ma, Jingying; Wang, Long

    2017-01-27

    In this brief, we consider the consensus problem of hybrid multiagent systems. First, the hybrid multiagent system is proposed, which is composed of continuous-time and discrete-time dynamic agents. Then, three kinds of consensus protocols are presented for the hybrid multiagent system. The analysis tool developed in this brief is based on the matrix theory and graph theory. With different restrictions of the sampling period, some necessary and sufficient conditions are established for solving the consensus of the hybrid multiagent system. The consensus states are also obtained under different protocols. Finally, simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  12. Consensus clustering in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; 10.1038/srep00336

    2012-01-01

    The community structure of complex networks reveals both their organization and hidden relationships among their constituents. Most community detection methods currently available are not deterministic, and their results typically depend on the specific random seeds, initial conditions and tie-break rules adopted for their execution. Consensus clustering is used in data analysis to generate stable results out of a set of partitions delivered by stochastic methods. Here we show that consensus clustering can be combined with any existing method in a self-consistent way, enhancing considerably both the stability and the accuracy of the resulting partitions. This framework is also particularly suitable to monitor the evolution of community structure in temporal networks. An application of consensus clustering to a large citation network of physics papers demonstrates its capability to keep track of the birth, death and diversification of topics.

  13. Concerns about cultural neurosciences: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Mateo, Marina; Cabanis, Maurice; Cruz de Echeverría Loebell, Nicole; Krach, Sören

    2012-01-01

    Ten years ago, neuroscientists began to study cultural phenomena by using functional MRI. Since then the number of publications in this field, termed cultural neuroscience (CN), has tremendously increased. In these studies, particular concepts of culture are implied, but rarely explicitly discussed. We argue that it is necessary to make these concepts a topic of debate in order to unravel the foundations of CN. From 40 fMRI studies we extracted two strands of reasoning: models investigating universal mechanisms for the formation of cultural groups and habits and, models assessing differences in characteristics among cultural groups. Both strands simplify culture as an inflexible set of traits and specificities. We question this rigid understanding of culture and highlight its hidden evaluative nature.

  14. Consensus theoretic classification methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benediktsson, Jon A.; Swain, Philip H.

    1992-01-01

    Consensus theory is adopted as a means of classifying geographic data from multiple sources. The foundations and usefulness of different consensus theoretic methods are discussed in conjunction with pattern recognition. Weight selections for different data sources are considered and modeling of non-Gaussian data is investigated. The application of consensus theory in pattern recognition is tested on two data sets: 1) multisource remote sensing and geographic data and 2) very-high-dimensional remote sensing data. The results obtained using consensus theoretic methods are found to compare favorably with those obtained using well-known pattern recognition methods. The consensus theoretic methods can be applied in cases where the Gaussian maximum likelihood method cannot. Also, the consensus theoretic methods are computationally less demanding than the Gaussian maximum likelihood method and provide a means for weighting data sources differently.

  15. International and Cultural Implications on Internationalization Analysis of Multinational Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Vargas-Hernández

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aims to analyze some of the institutional and cultural implications on internationalization analysis of multinational firms. The analysis begins questioning what the main institutional and cultural variables are considered in the involvement of internationalization of multinational firms. To answer this question, a literature review types approach in areas like internationalization of multinational firms based on institutional and cultural frameworks is followed. Secondly, these institutional and cultural variables are analyzed to integrate findings. Finally, the paper argues the need to design a better institutional and cultural balance among the development of a glocal-regional transformation, convergence and governance.

  16. On consensus biomarker selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambin Anna

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent development of mass spectrometry technology enabled the analysis of complex peptide mixtures. A lot of effort is currently devoted to the identification of biomarkers in human body fluids like serum or plasma, based on which new diagnostic tests for different diseases could be constructed. Various biomarker selection procedures have been exploited in recent studies. It has been noted that they often lead to different biomarker lists and as a consequence, the patient classification may also vary. Results Here we propose a new approach to the biomarker selection problem: to apply several competing feature ranking procedures and compute a consensus list of features based on their outcomes. We validate our methods on two proteomic datasets for the diagnosis of ovarian and prostate cancer. Conclusion The proposed methodology can improve the classification results and at the same time provide a unified biomarker list for further biological examinations and interpretation.

  17. Analysis of organizational culture with social network models

    OpenAIRE

    Titov, S.

    2015-01-01

    Organizational culture is nowadays an object of numerous scientific papers. However, only marginal part of existing research attempts to use the formal models of organizational cultures. The lack of organizational culture models significantly limits the further research in this area and restricts the application of the theory to practice of organizational culture change projects. The article consists of general views on potential application of network models and social network analysis to th...

  18. Levels and Patterns in the Analysis of the Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Aida Cimpeanu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge and analysis of the component elements of the organizational culture helps us greatly understand the respective culture, establish the main guidelines of the company values and understand the behaviours and attitudes of the employees. M. Thevenet indentifies two levels at which the culture manifests itself: the external level – the outside culture (which refers to local, regional or national culture, and the inner level –the internal culture (including organizational culture, professional culture, the culture of a group. Starting from this assumption, one can identify the main components of the organizational culture: founders, the organization’s history, values, beliefs and symbols, the way of thinking, the standards of behaviour etc. Some of these are visible, forming a cultural foundation surface, while others create a less visible foundation of culture – the hidden level. Kotter and Heskett agree that these two levels of analysis are very connected and influence each other. Considering their importance, other authors identify three, four or more levels of culture (Denison, Hofstede, Shein, bringing forth first the values then the rituals, heroes and symbols. Different models of culture analysis help us explain the elements of culture and understand its importance by providing for the researchers a starting point in explaining specific aspects related to the organizational culture and the organizational behaviour. By understanding the organizational culture, the members of an organization are able to shape their behaviour, can recognize their rights and obligations inside the company and the style of internal communication. They can determine the style of clothing and the dominant attitude inside the company, the way in which the management defines and implements its decisions and the staff policy.

  19. Intergroup consensus/disagreement in support of group-based hierarchy: an examination of socio-structural and psycho-cultural factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Ching; Pratto, Felicia; Johnson, Blair T

    2011-11-01

    A meta-analysis examined the extent to which socio-structural and psycho-cultural characteristics of societies correspond with how much gender and ethnic/racial groups differ on their support of group-based hierarchy. Robustly, women opposed group-based hierarchy more than men did, and members of lower power ethnic/racial groups opposed group-based hierarchy more than members of higher power ethnic/racial groups did. As predicted by social dominance theory, gender differences were larger, more stable, and less variable from sample to sample than differences between ethnic/racial groups. Subordinate gender and ethnic/racial group members disagreed more with dominants in their views of group-based hierarchy in societies that can be considered more liberal and modern (e.g., emphasizing individualism and change from traditions), as well as in societies that enjoyed greater gender equality. The relations between gender and ethnic/racial groups are discussed, and implications are developed for social dominance theory, social role theory, biosocial theory, social identity theory, system justification theory, realistic group conflict theory, and relative deprivation theory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Intergroup Consensus/Disagreement in Support of Group Based Hierarchy: An Examination of Socio-Structural and Psycho-Cultural Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Ching; Pratto, Felicia; Johnson, Blair T.

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analysis examined the extent to which socio-structural and psycho-cultural characteristics of societies correspond with how much gender and ethnic/racial groups differ on their support of group-based hierarchy. Robustly, women opposed group-based hierarchy more than men did and members of lower-power ethnic/racial groups opposed group-based hierarchy more than members of higher-power ethnic/racial groups. As predicted by social dominance theory, gender differences were larger, more stable, and less variable from sample to sample than differences between ethnic/racial groups. Subordinate gender and ethnic/racial group members disagreed more with dominants in their views of group-based hierarchy in societies that can be considered more liberal and modern (e.g., emphasizing individualism and change from traditions), as well as in societies that enjoyed greater gender equality. The relations between gender and ethnic/racial groups are discussed and implications are developed for social dominance theory, social role theory and biosocial theory, social identity theory, system justification theory, realistic group conflict theory and relative deprivation theory. PMID:22023142

  1. Cultural competence and social relationships: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvrin, M; Lorant, V

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the role of social relationships in the sharing of cultural competence by testing two hypotheses: cultural competence is a socially shared behaviour; and central healthcare professionals are more culturally competent than non-central healthcare professionals. Sustaining cultural competence in healthcare services relies on the assumption that being culturally competent is a socially shared behaviour among health professionals. This assumption has never been tested. Organizational aspects surrounding cultural competence are poorly considered. This therefore leads to a heterogeneous implementation of cultural competence - especially in continental Europe. We carried out a social network analysis in 24 Belgian inpatient and outpatient health services. All healthcare professionals (ego) were requested to fill in a questionnaire (Survey on social relationships of health care professionals) on their level of cultural competence and to identify their professional relationships (alter). We fitted regression models to assess whether (1) at the dyadic level, ego cultural competence was associated with alter cultural competence, and (2) health professionals of greater centrality had greater cultural competence. At the dyadic level, no significant associations were found between ego cultural competence and alter cultural competence, with the exception of subjective exposure to intercultural situations. No significant associations were found between centrality and cultural competence, except for subjective exposure to intercultural situations. Being culturally competent is not a shared behaviour among health professionals. The most central healthcare professionals are not more culturally competent than less central health professionals. Culturally competent health care is not yet a norm in health services. Health care and training authorities should either make cultural competent health care a licensing criteria or reward culturally competent health care

  2. An Action Design Research on development and deployment of a computer-based group discussion support tool for achieving consensus and culture change at an educational institution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee Mui Suan, Jaclyn; Hillegersberg, van Jos; Kumar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Organisational culture change is a long and complex process that typically takes years to complete and has a very low success rate. This project addresses the problem by the proposed use of an Action Design Research Methodology to build and deploy an IT artifact named Organisational Culture Assessme

  3. Cross-Cultural Analysis on Complements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恒

    2014-01-01

    Nativized varieties of English must reflect native pragmatic norms and cultural conventions. Complements, as a polite social behavior, is analyzed from the perspective of Chinese English speaker and American English speaker to emphasize the im-portance of the cross-cultural differences in pragmatic uses.

  4. Cross-Cultural Analysis on Apologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘恒; 范明

    2014-01-01

    Nativized varieties of English must reflect native pragmatic norms and cultural conventions. Apology, as a polite social behavior, was analyzed from the perspective of Chinese English speaker and American English speaker to emphasize the impor-tance of the cross-cultural differences in pragmatic uses.

  5. When goals diverge: Staff consensus and the organizational climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Gerald; Ulaszek, Wendy R; Lin, Hsiu-Ju; Wexler, Harry K

    2009-08-01

    A sample of correctional officers and prison substance abuse treatment staff collected by the National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices Survey is used to provide an exploratory study of an aspect of organizational culture consisting of consensus (agreement) among prison personnel regarding their beliefs about rehabilitation in the presence of conflicting organizational goals and aspects of the organizational climate important to change. Findings show that among those staff members responding to the survey, the belief in rehabilitation scale mean score was associated with higher levels of organizational commitment, and interdepartmental coordination. However, an hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analysis that used an index score derived from the standard deviation for staff consensus regarding these same beliefs about rehabilitation produced a different pattern of results, showing that high levels of consensus were associated with job frustration, cynicism towards the ability of the institution to change, and lower levels of organizational commitment. The authors conclude that, although the sample may not express the beliefs of corrections officers or prison-based treatment staff at large, within the sample, consensus appeared to play a unique role in evaluating the effect of divergent goals on organizational climate as it relates to change, and warrants consideration when considering the effects of organizational climate.

  6. Cultural traits as units of analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Michael J.; Lyman, R. Lee; Mesoudi, Alex; VanPool, Todd L.

    2010-01-01

    Cultural traits have long been used in anthropology as units of transmission that ostensibly reflect behavioural characteristics of the individuals or groups exhibiting the traits. After they are transmitted, cultural traits serve as units of replication in that they can be modified as part of an individual's cultural repertoire through processes such as recombination, loss or partial alteration within an individual's mind. Cultural traits are analogous to genes in that organisms replicate them, but they are also replicators in their own right. No one has ever seen a unit of transmission, either behavioural or genetic, although we can observe the effects of transmission. Fortunately, such units are manifest in artefacts, features and other components of the archaeological record, and they serve as proxies for studying the transmission (and modification) of cultural traits, provided there is analytical clarity over how to define and measure the units that underlie this inheritance process. PMID:21041205

  7. Cultural traits as units of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Michael J; Lyman, R Lee; Mesoudi, Alex; VanPool, Todd L

    2010-12-12

    Cultural traits have long been used in anthropology as units of transmission that ostensibly reflect behavioural characteristics of the individuals or groups exhibiting the traits. After they are transmitted, cultural traits serve as units of replication in that they can be modified as part of an individual's cultural repertoire through processes such as recombination, loss or partial alteration within an individual's mind. Cultural traits are analogous to genes in that organisms replicate them, but they are also replicators in their own right. No one has ever seen a unit of transmission, either behavioural or genetic, although we can observe the effects of transmission. Fortunately, such units are manifest in artefacts, features and other components of the archaeological record, and they serve as proxies for studying the transmission (and modification) of cultural traits, provided there is analytical clarity over how to define and measure the units that underlie this inheritance process.

  8. Annotation and analysis of a large cuticular protein family with the R&R Consensus in Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ningjia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most abundant family of insect cuticular proteins, the CPR family, is recognized by the R&R Consensus, a domain of about 64 amino acids that binds to chitin and is present throughout arthropods. Several species have now been shown to have more than 100 CPR genes, inviting speculation as to the functional importance of this large number and diversity. Results We have identified 156 genes in Anopheles gambiae that code for putative cuticular proteins in this CPR family, over 1% of the total number of predicted genes in this species. Annotation was verified using several criteria including identification of TATA boxes, INRs, and DPEs plus support from proteomic and gene expression analyses. Two previously recognized CPR classes, RR-1 and RR-2, form separate, well-supported clades with the exception of a small set of genes with long branches whose relationships are poorly resolved. Several of these outliers have clear orthologs in other species. Although both clades are under purifying selection, the RR-1 variant of the R&R Consensus is evolving at twice the rate of the RR-2 variant and is structurally more labile. In contrast, the regions flanking the R&R Consensus have diversified in amino-acid composition to a much greater extent in RR-2 genes compared with RR-1 genes. Many genes are found in compact tandem arrays that may include similar or dissimilar genes but always include just one of the two classes. Tandem arrays of RR-2 genes frequently contain subsets of genes coding for highly similar proteins (sequence clusters. Properties of the proteins indicated that each cluster may serve a distinct function in the cuticle. Conclusion The complete annotation of this large gene family provides insight on the mechanisms of gene family evolution and clues about the need for so many CPR genes. These data also should assist annotation of other Anopheles genes.

  9. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce "rational consensus", that is, "mathematical aggregation", by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  10. The Limits of Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, John B.

    Dynamics in the education policy arena suggest that, despite two generations of researchers extolling democratic leadership styles and consensus building over autocratic techniques, wide participation in policymaking and the broadest possible consensus are not always productive: American society has not yet agreed on what schools should…

  11. European consensus on the medical management of acute radiation syndrome and analysis of the radiation accidents in Belgium and Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourmelon, Patrick; Benderitter, Marc; Bertho, Jean Marc; Huet, Christelle; Gorin, Norbert Claude; De Revel, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    A European consensus concerning the medical management of mass radiation exposure was obtained in 2005 during a conference held by the European Group for Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation, the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, and the University of Ulm. At the conference, a two-step triage strategy to deal with large masses of radiation-exposed patients was designed. The first step of this strategy concerns the first 48 h and involves scoring the patients exclusively on the basis of their clinical symptoms and biological data. This allows the non-irradiated bystanders and outpatient candidates to be identified. The remaining patients are hospitalized and diagnosis is confirmed after the first 48-h period according to the METREPOL (Medical Treatment Protocols for radiation accident victims) scale. This grades the patients according to the severity of their symptoms. It was also agreed that in the case of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), emergency hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is not necessary. Instead, cytokines that promote hematological reconstruction should be administered as early as possible for 14-21 d. Crucial tests for determining whether the patient has residual hematopoiesis are physical dose reconstructions combined with daily blood count analyses. It was agreed that HSC transplantation should only be considered if severe aplasia persists after cytokine treatment. Two recent cases of accidental radiation exposure that were managed successfully by following the European consensus with modification are reviewed here. Thus, a European standard for the evaluation and treatment of ARS victims is now available. This standard may be suitable for application around the world.

  12. A cross-cultural analysis of Jammu, Kashmir and Ladakh (India) medicinal plant use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairola, Sumeet; Sharma, Jyotsana; Bedi, Yashbir Singh

    2014-09-11

    plants between Jammu and Kashmir. Maximum numbers of plant taxa were used for treating dermatological problems (321), followed by cold, cough and throat related ailments (250), fever (224), joint and muscle related ailments (215), gastrointestinal disorders (210), urogenital ailments (199), respiratory ailments (151), body pain (135) and gynecological disorders (127). This is the first study from the J&K state, which has examined the medicinal plant use in three divisions of J&K and discussed the promising medicinal plant species with cross-cultural consensus. The analysis of the data suggested that while large numbers of plants are used medicinally in each division, there is a low interregional consensus and high variation between medicinal plants used in these divisions, which is due to both cultural divergence as well as biological distinctness. The issues related to current status of knowledge on medicinal plants used by indigenous communities of J&K have been discussed and some recommendations have been made for future studies on medicinal plants in J&K region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Flux analysis of mammalian cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal cells are used for the production of vaccines and pharmaceutical proteins. The increase in demand for these products requires an increase in volumetric productivity of animal cell culture processes, which can be attained through an increase in biomass concentration and/or specific productivit

  14. Flux analysis of mammalian cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal cells are used for the production of vaccines and pharmaceutical proteins. The increase in demand for these products requires an increase in volumetric productivity of animal cell culture processes, which can be attained through an increase in biomass concentration and/or specific

  15. Consensus recommendations for improvement of unmet clinical needs--the example of chronic graft-versus-host disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Jacopo; Manfredi, Lucia; Postacchini, Laura; Tedesco, Silvia; Leoni, Pietro; Gabrielli, Armando; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Olivieri, Attilio; Pomponio, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Consensus recommendations are used to improve the methodology of research about rare disorders, but their uptake is unknown. We studied the uptake of consensus recommendations in steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease (SR-cGVHD). Although in 2006 the National Institutes of Health (NIH) cGVHD consensus project produced recommendations for clinical trials, guidelines have emphasised the scarcity of valuable evidence for all tested interventions. We searched Medline (PubMed) between Jan 1, 1998, and Oct 1, 2013, for non-randomised studies of systemic treatment for SR-cGVHD. To measure adherence to NIH recommendations, we applied a 61 item checklist derived from the NIH consensus document. We did a meta-analysis to measure pooled effect size for overall response rate (ORR) and meta-regression analyses to measure the effect of deviations from NIH recommendations on pooled effect size. We included 82 studies related to nine interventions. Conformity to NIH recommendations was evenly low across the analysed timeframe (1998-2013), and did not change significantly after publication of NIH recommendations. The pooled effect size for ORR for systemic treatment of SR-cGVHD was 0.66 (95% CI 0.62-0.70). Increased adherence to NIH recommendations in a score of items defining correct response assessment was associated with a significant reduction in ORR (-4.2%, 95% CI -6.6 to -1.9; p=0.001). We recorded no significant association between ORR and sets of items related to correct diagnostic definition of SR-cGVHD (change in ORR -3.1%, 95% CI -7.7 to 1.5), specification of primary intervention (0, -3.8 to 3.6), or concomitant treatments (-1.6%, -5.4 to 2.3). The score of items defining correct response assessment increased after publication of NIH recommendations. Our findings show evidence of bias in the reported efficacy of treatment of SR-cGVHD. The overall effect of NIH recommendations in scientific literature is scarce; however, NIH recommendations improved

  16. Investigating the cultural patterns of corruption: A nonparametric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Halkos, George; Tzeremes, Nickolaos

    2011-01-01

    By using a sample of 77 countries our analysis applies several nonparametric techniques in order to reveal the link between national culture and corruption. Based on Hofstede’s cultural dimensions and the corruption perception index, the results reveal that countries with higher levels of corruption tend to have higher power distance and collectivism values in their society.

  17. A Cultural Analysis of Harmony and Conflict: Towards an Integrated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    Social harmony is now a major national policy in China and in .... core component of communication competence in Chinese culture .... frameworks for a full understanding of the conflict behavior of ..... situation and cultural attitudes, people are motivated to resolve .... confirmatory factor analysis of these data showed that the.

  18. Consensus Formation in Science Modeled by Aggregated Bibliographic Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The level of consensus in science has traditionally been measured by a number of different methods. The variety is important as each method measures different aspects of science and consensus. Citation analytical studies have previously measured the level of consensus using the scientific...... journal as their unit of analysis. To produce a more fine grained citation analysis one needs to study consensus formation on an even more detailed level – i.e. the scientific document or article. To do so, we have developed a new technique that measures consensus by aggregated bibliographic couplings...

  19. Analysis of Western Film' influence on Chinese Film Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗淞译

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are the place where the international film culture originated. The western film has a far-reaching influence on the development of film and television industry all over the world. As China's film and television industry is in the era of reform, it is an essential part to use the experience in development of western films which can provide Chinese film culture with guidance in various fields. The present thesis firstly gives an analysis into characteristics of the western film culture and summarizes its influences on Chinese film culture, and then provides film art reform with some feasible suggestions.

  20. MISIS-2: A bioinformatics tool for in-depth analysis of small RNAs and representation of consensus master genome in viral quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Jonathan; Otten, Patricia; Baerlocher, Loïc; Farinelli, Laurent; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-07-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA (sRNA) molecules such as miRNAs, siRNAs and piRNAs regulate gene expression and repress transposons and viruses. AGO/PIWI family proteins sort functional sRNAs based on size, 5'-nucleotide and other sequence features. In plants and some animals, viral sRNAs are extremely diverse and cover the entire viral genome sequences, which allows for de novo reconstruction of a complete viral genome by deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of viral sRNAs. Previously, we have developed a tool MISIS to view and analyze sRNA maps of viruses and cellular genome regions which spawn multiple sRNAs. Here we describe a new release of MISIS, MISIS-2, which enables to determine and visualize a consensus sequence and count sRNAs of any chosen sizes and 5'-terminal nucleotide identities. Furthermore we demonstrate the utility of MISIS-2 for identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at each position of a reference sequence and reconstruction of a consensus master genome in evolving viral quasispecies. MISIS-2 is a Java standalone program. It is freely available along with the source code at the website http://www.fasteris.com/apps.

  1. A Study On Distributed Model Predictive Consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Keviczky, Tamas

    2008-01-01

    We investigate convergence properties of a proposed distributed model predictive control (DMPC) scheme, where agents negotiate to compute an optimal consensus point using an incremental subgradient method based on primal decomposition as described in Johansson et al. [2006, 2007]. The objective of the distributed control strategy is to agree upon and achieve an optimal common output value for a group of agents in the presence of constraints on the agent dynamics using local predictive controllers. Stability analysis using a receding horizon implementation of the distributed optimal consensus scheme is performed. Conditions are given under which convergence can be obtained even if the negotiations do not reach full consensus.

  2. DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE CULTURE FOLLOWING THE CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenko Zahariev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Corporate culture more sensibly makes additions to the economic knowledge, accompanies the strategy and tactics in management. It feels in manners and overall activity of the organization - it is empathy and tolerance, respect and responsibility. The new corporate culture transforms each participant, changes his/her mind in the general collaborations and working habits. The new corporate culture requires improving the management style. It is no longer necessary the leader only to rule, to administer and control, but to lead and inspire. The leader sets challenging targets, optimizes the performance of the teams, fuels an optimistic mood and faith, gains agreement between workers, monitors and evaluate the work in a fair way. Current study raises the problem of interpreting cultural profiles in modern organizations and analyzes corporate culture after the changes during the transition period in Bulgaria. The descriptive analysis of corporate culture allows the relatively precise identification of its various types based on the accepted classification signs.

  3. Reflections of Culture: An Analysis of Japanese and American Advertising Appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Barbara

    A study examined the advertising of Japan and the United States to determine if commercial messages reflect the cultural values of a particular society, thereby indicating the need for specialized campaigns. It was hypothesized that the majority of Japanese advertisements would use the traditional appeals of group, consensus, soft sell, veneration…

  4. Practical Techniques for Achieving Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, John A.

    Consensus is important in the making of a policy decision. If a decision is reached without consensus, morale and unit satisfaction may both suffer. With genuine consensus, a unit tends to willingly support and implement the new policy. After analyzing how observed small groups had actually reached consensus, the following ten techniques were…

  5. Tuberculosis:an experience from Mycobacterium smears and culture analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeehaida M; Siti Asma H; Siti Hawa H; Zaidah AR; Norbanee TH

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Simple tests like direct smear of the acid fast bacilli (AFB)and Mycobacterium culture could assist the diagnosis of tuberculosis.This study is aimed at reviewing the outcome of smears,culture results and con-tamination rate among specimens requested for AFB smear and Mycobacterium culture.Methods:Retrospec-tive laboratory data analysis requesting for Mycobacterium culture from January 2005 till December 2006 was done in a tertiary teaching hospital of Universiti Sains Malaysia,Kubang Kerian,Kelantan,Malaysia.Re-sults:Four hundred and sixty seven (36.6%)isolates grew from 1 277 specimens.Of these isolates,314 (67.2%)grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis,23 (4.9%)grew Mycobacterium other than tuberculosis and 38 (8.1%)grew contaminants.Among the M.tuberculosis cultures,165 (52.5%)had growth of more than 100 confluent colonies,whereas 39 cultures (12.4%)had growth of less than 19 colonies.Direct smear for AFB among smear positive cases showed presence of more than 50 bacilli /line in 231 (49.5%)cases and smear negative cases accounted for 63 (13.5%).Among smear positive cases,291 (94.5%)cultures grew Myco-bacterium species and another 17 (5.5%)cultures grew contaminants.In smear negative cases,32 (62.7%) cultures grew Mycobacterium species and 19 (37.3%)cultures grew contaminants.Conclusion:The results from data analysis of the Mycobacterium cultures should be critically utilized in order to review the laboratory performance and to improve its services in the future.Some of the data is also useful to the administrators of the hospital in terms of estimating the risk of occupational hazard faced by the health care workers.

  6. Comparative Analysis of German and Anglo-Saxon Business Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamburg Andrea

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Two premises built the starting point for following study: that cultural background, cultural conditioning have a considerable influence upon business area at one hand and at the other hand that nations having common origins are likely to present similar cultural conditioning. The first hypothesis found proving in the works of theoreticians and practitioners like E.T. Hall, Geert Hofstede, Richard Gesteland and others dealing with the problem of people’s “mental programming” called culture and with cultural differences around the world. For the second premise we wanted to analyze three cultures having common Germanic roots namely the German, British (focusing on the English component of it and American cultures through the prism of their concept of time, relation to business, working and communicational style, structure of management, attitude towards hierarchy and interpersonal distance including physical contact. As the results of our comparative analysis showed above mentioned business cultures had very much in common regarding attitude to time, business and interpersonal distance but in the other segments they presented considerable differences as well. Taking all aspects into consideration the similarities deriving from their common Germanic origin offer the three cultures in question some advantages in business relations but the essential differences they present should be minded, too to avoid failure in deal making.

  7. Computational cluster validation for microarray data analysis: experimental assessment of Clest, Consensus Clustering, Figure of Merit, Gap Statistics and Model Explorer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utro Filippo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inferring cluster structure in microarray datasets is a fundamental task for the so-called -omic sciences. It is also a fundamental question in Statistics, Data Analysis and Classification, in particular with regard to the prediction of the number of clusters in a dataset, usually established via internal validation measures. Despite the wealth of internal measures available in the literature, new ones have been recently proposed, some of them specifically for microarray data. Results We consider five such measures: Clest, Consensus (Consensus Clustering, FOM (Figure of Merit, Gap (Gap Statistics and ME (Model Explorer, in addition to the classic WCSS (Within Cluster Sum-of-Squares and KL (Krzanowski and Lai index. We perform extensive experiments on six benchmark microarray datasets, using both Hierarchical and K-means clustering algorithms, and we provide an analysis assessing both the intrinsic ability of a measure to predict the correct number of clusters in a dataset and its merit relative to the other measures. We pay particular attention both to precision and speed. Moreover, we also provide various fast approximation algorithms for the computation of Gap, FOM and WCSS. The main result is a hierarchy of those measures in terms of precision and speed, highlighting some of their merits and limitations not reported before in the literature. Conclusion Based on our analysis, we draw several conclusions for the use of those internal measures on microarray data. We report the main ones. Consensus is by far the best performer in terms of predictive power and remarkably algorithm-independent. Unfortunately, on large datasets, it may be of no use because of its non-trivial computer time demand (weeks on a state of the art PC. FOM is the second best performer although, quite surprisingly, it may not be competitive in this scenario: it has essentially the same predictive power of WCSS but it is from 6 to 100 times slower in time

  8. Delphi consensus on the diagnosis and management of dyslipidaemia in chronic kidney disease patients: A post hoc analysis of the DIANA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleix Cases Amenós

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The consensus to analyse the lipid profile in CKD patients suggests acknowledgement of the high cardiovascular risk of this condition. However, the lack of consensus in considering renal function or albuminuria, both when selecting a statin and during follow-up, suggests a limited knowledge of the differences between statins in relation to CKD. Thus, it would be advisable to develop a guideline/consensus document on the use of statins in CKD.

  9. State, Culture and Life-modes. The foundations of Life-mode analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højrup, Thomas

    livsformsanalyse, statsteori, life-mode analysis, statsforms, dialectics, philosophy, war, culture......livsformsanalyse, statsteori, life-mode analysis, statsforms, dialectics, philosophy, war, culture...

  10. Taiwanese Dermatological Association consensus for the management of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yu Chu

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The consensus provides a comprehensive overview of treatment for AD, with some local and cultural considerations for practitioners in Taiwan, especially the use of wet dressings/wraps, systemic immunomodulatory agents, and complementary therapies.

  11. LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC TERMS IN CULTURAL CONTEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurenkova, Y.V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of a comparative analysis of five economic terms ("business", "competition", "salary", "boss", "profit" in the context of the culture of Russia and the United States. The research shows that some words were borrowed in both languages from different sources (for example, "salary", some of them were borrowed from one source (for example, "business", and some were received from own original words (for example, "profit", "boss". Comparison of cultural contexts and dictionary entries shows that the terms analyzed in this paper primarily help to understand how the two countries (Russia and the US can be culturally different. The study also illustrates how these terms have developed their own additional meanings, characteristic of their cultural and social development. Consequently, certain concepts can be transformed through the prism of a cultural vision of the world of different peoples.

  12. Culture analysis and metaphor psychotherapy with Arab-Muslim clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwairy, Marwan

    2009-02-01

    Attempting to reveal unconscious content and promoting self-actualization may be counterproductive for clients who come from collectivistic cultures. Such treatment goals may expose clients to harsh confrontations with the family. Clients with dependency traits, low ego-strength, and strict families may be helped through metaphor psychotherapy or culture analysis. Metaphor therapy makes it possible to deal symbolically and indirectly with unconscious content; culture analysis can pave the way to reveal unconscious needs and enable clients to establish a new order within their belief systems and within their families. The present article describes these two therapy methods and illustrates their clinical use with an Arab-Muslim suffering from depression. Through such therapy anchored in his own culture and religion, the client altered his beliefs, became satisfied with himself, and found successful ways to adapt to his family.

  13. Culture-dependent and culture-independent qualitative analysis of probiotic products claimed to contain bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masco, L; Huys, G; De Brandt, E; Temmerman, R; Swings, J

    2005-07-15

    A total of 58 probiotic products obtained worldwide, which were claimed to contain Bifidobacterium strains (including 22 yoghurts, 5 dairy fruit drinks, 28 food supplements and 3 pharmaceutical preparations) were investigated in parallel using a culture-dependent and a culture-independent approach. Three isolation media previously reported as selective for Bifidobacterium were evaluated for their suitability in the quality analysis of these products. Subsequently, possible bifidobacterial colonies were picked from the best medium and identified by means of rep-PCR fingerprinting using the BOX primer (BOX-PCR). Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, formerly classified as Bifidobacterium lactis, was most frequently found, but strains belonging to Bifidobacterium longum biotypes longum and infantis, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium breve were recovered also. In parallel, all products were also subjected to culture-independent analysis which involved a nested-PCR step on total bacterial DNA extracted directly from the product, followed by separation of the amplicons by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and subsequent identification of species from the band patterns. By conventional cultivation, 70.7% of the products analysed were found to contain culturable bifidobacteria whereas by culture-independent DGGE analysis members of the genus Bifidobacterium could be detected in 96.5% of the analysed products. Genotypic characterization of a number of bifidobacterial isolates at the strain level by means of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed a relatively high degree of genomic homogeneity among the Bifidobacterium strains currently used in the probiotic industry.

  14. The Consensus: Another View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    Comments on the seven points of consensus presented in "A Theoretical Basis for Teaching the Receptive Skills" by Stephen Krashen, et al., particularly on the terminology that is derived from Krashen's other writings. Offers eight statements which reflect in more general terms an interpretation of Krashen's theories for language teachers…

  15. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce “rational consensus”, that is, “mathematical aggregation”, by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  16. A Delphic consensus assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberg, Kjell; Krenning, Eric; Sundin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    and pancreastatin); monoanalyte measurements; and lack sensitivity, specificity and predictive capacity. None of them meet the NIH metrics for clinical usage. A multinational, multidisciplinary Delphi consensus meeting of NEN experts (n = 33) assessed current imaging strategies and biomarkers in NEN management...

  17. Making Consensus Tractable

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2010-01-01

    The process of consensus voting has many distinct advantages: it fosters discussion and participation, empowers minorities and independent thinkers, and is more likely, after a decision has been made, to secure the participants' support for the chosen course of action. The disadvantage of consensus decision making is, of course, the difficulty of reaching consensus. While this challenge is largely overcome in many theoretical settings such as Aumann's ``agree to disagree'' result, a hitherto unsolved difficulty is the lack of a framework offering rational (i.e., Bayesian) consensus decision making that can be performed using simple and efficient calculations. We propose a model featuring two possible states of the world and a finite number of individuals. The group has to come to a binary decision, where the merit of each of the two possible courses of action depends on the state of the world. Each member of the group has a private and independent signal at his or her disposal, giving some indication as to wh...

  18. Embarrassment as a key to understanding cultural differences. Basic principles of cultural analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    1995-01-01

    I introduce here the principles I use in my investigation of intercultural marketing and management. I explain how I discovered them, and show how they spring from a theoretical understanding of the dynamic of cultural differences. One of the basic methodological principles for my analysis...

  19. Sports dance artistic expression culture analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Zegang

    2017-01-01

    At present, the sports dance has entered every stage of the people’s life, has become the public’s favorite sport. Sports dance has been well developed. This article mainly uses the literature material law to carry on the detailed analysis to the sports dance constitution, elaborated in detail the sports dance artistic expression. The composition of sports dance elements; sports dance is a form of dance art show; sports dance through the dance art can be divided into three aspects, namely, fo...

  20. EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN GALATI COUNTY BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela GHEORGHE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data collected as part of the COMOR Project, developed by The Scientific Society of Management from Romania, for the analysis of organizational culture in the Romanian business environment, we have initiated an exploration using Business Intelligence tools. The purpose of this analysis is to find relevant information about the organizational culture for Galati County, starting from the results obtained in this project, and, using data mining techniques, to investigate relationships and links between responses to different survey questions, in this "mine" data, gathered by the project team effort.

  1. A New Foreign Policy Consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the achievements of Reagan's foreign policy. Explores the question: Did Reagan reconstruct a domestic foreign policy consensus? Concludes that no consensus was reached. Analyzes Reagan's political beliefs, including his antinuclear sentiments, and examines relations between Reagan and Congress. (RW)

  2. Homogeneity and heterogeneousness in European food cultures: An exploratory analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, Søren; Madsen, Tage Koed

    One type pf boundaries rarely explored in international marketing but of potentially vital importance to international marketing are the cultural boundaries dividing Europe into regions with indidvidual cultural background and different consumptui patterns. This paper explores information about...... such cultural patterns of food consumption based on information from an existing database originating from a 1989 pan-European life style suvey questioning around 20,000 people in 16 European countri divided into 79 regions. A factor analysis reduced the number of variables from 138 to 41, discovering...... the latent factor structuring the Europeans' responses to questions about t their food behaviour and preferences. On the basis of the factor variables, a cluster analysis was made in order to produce a picture of the groupings of the single regions, thus getting a picture of the pattern of European food...

  3. The"Consensus on the Use of Copyrighted Works" and Its Bearing upon the Participatory Culture' s Copyright Environment%"版权作品使用共识"与参与式文化的版权政策环境

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤杰

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental conflict between digital participatory culture represented by "user generated content" and the modern copyright regime has been widely acknowledged.However, a comprehensive analysis of the following three aspects, namely, recent legislative initiatives and legal cases in the North American juris-prudence regarding the use of copyrighted works, new marketing strategies and profit-making modes achieved by moderately relaxing copyright protection in the copyright industry, and the quasi-copyright norms spontaneously established by participatory culture practitioners, reveals that there exists a principled consensus of the use of copyrighted work.It provides a new perspective and dimension in creating a congenial copyright environment for the orderly blossoming of participatory culture.%以"用户创造内容"为代表的参与式文化形态与现代版权保护体系之间产生了冲突,但通过对近年来北美立法及司法机构关于使用版权作品的法律规定及判例、版权产业适度放松版权保护而成就的新型营销乃至盈利模式以及参与式文化创作者群体自发形成的准版权规范进行梳理,发现这三者之间存在着一种原则性的"版权作品使用共识". 这为我们考察如何为参与式文化的有序繁荣构建适宜的版权政策环境提供了新的视角与维度.

  4. Consensus formation in science modeled by aggregated bibliographic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    The level of consensus in science has traditionally been measured by a number of different methods. The variety is important as each method measures different aspects of science and consensus. Citation analytical studies have previously measured the level of consensus using the scientific journal...... as their unit of analysis. To produce a more fine grained citation analysis one needs to study consensusformation on an even more detailed level – i.e. the scientific document or article. To do so, we have developed a new technique that measures consensus by aggregatedbibliographiccouplings (ABC) between...

  5. Spanish Consensus Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2016-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  6. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  7. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  8. The Cultural Analysis of Soft Systems Methodology and the Configuration Model of Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Staadt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Organizations that find themselves within a problematic situation connected with cultural issues such as politics and power require adaptable research and corresponding modeling approaches so as to grasp the arrangements of that situation and their impact on the organizational development. This article originates from an insider-ethnographic intervention into the problematic situation of the leading public housing provider in Luxembourg. Its aim is to describe how the more action-oriented cultural analysis of soft systems methodology and the theory-driven configuration model of organizational culture are mutually beneficial rather than contradictory. The data collected between 2007 and 2013 were analyzed manually as well as by means of ATLAS.ti. Results demonstrate that the cultural analysis enables an in-depth understanding of the power-laden environment within the organization bringing about the so-called “socio-political system” and that the configuration model makes it possible to depict the influence of that system on the whole organization. The overall research approach thus contributes toward a better understanding of the influence and the impact of oppressive social environments and evolving power relations on the development of an organization.

  9. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  10. Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Shen, Yuan Kui; Aiden, Aviva Presser; Veres, Adrian; Gray, Matthew K; Pickett, Joseph P; Hoiberg, Dale; Clancy, Dan; Norvig, Peter; Orwant, Jon; Pinker, Steven; Nowak, Martin A; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2011-01-14

    We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of 'culturomics,' focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. Culturomics extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities.

  11. Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Shen, Yuan Kui; Aiden, Aviva P.; Veres, Adrian; Gray, Matthew K.; Pickett, Joseph P.; Hoiberg, Dale; Clancy, Dan; Norvig, Peter; Orwant, Jon; Pinker, Steven; Nowak, Martin A.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2011-01-01

    We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of ‘culturomics’, focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. ‘Culturomics’ extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities. PMID:21163965

  12. Dynamics and energetics: a consensus analysis of the impact of calcium on EF-CaM protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Elodie; Blondel, Arnaud; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2009-02-18

    We have studied the relationship between dynamical correlations and energetic contributions in an attempt to model the transmission of information inside protein-protein complexes. The complex formed between the edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis and calmodulin (CaM) was taken as an example, as the formation and stability of the complex depend on the calcium complexation level. The effect of calcium through EF-CaM residue network has been investigated with various approaches: 1), the elastic network model; 2), the local feature analysis; 3), the generalized correlations; and 4), the energetic dependency maps (EDMs), on 15-ns molecular dynamics simulations of the complex loaded with 0, 2, or 4 Ca2+ ions. The elastic network model correctly describes the basic architecture of the complex but is poorly sensitive to the level of calcium compared to the other methods. The local feature analysis allows us to characterize the local dynamics of the complex and the propagation of the calcium signal through CaM. The analyses of global dynamics and energetics--through generalized correlations and EDMs--provide a comprehensive picture of EF-CaM architecture and can be unified by using the concept of residue network connectedness. A medium connectedness, defined as the ability of each residue to communicate with all remaining parts of the complex, is observed for the 2Ca2+ level, which was experimentally identified as the most stable form of EF-CaM. The hierarchy of relative stabilities given by the EDMs sheds a new light on the EF-CaM interaction mechanism described experimentally and supports an organization of the complex architecture centered around nucleation points.

  13. Stochastic synchronization analysis of cultured human glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazsi, Gabor; Cornell-Bell, Ann; Simonotto, Enrico; Neiman, Alexander; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    The production of calcium waves is a property of a healthy astrocyte culture when exposed to the neurotransmitter kainate [Jung et al, J. Neurophys, 79, 1098 (1998)]. Healthy and epileptic tissues differ to a great extent in their dynamics: while a healthy cell culture shows much pattern formation, and wave propagation, the epileptic tissue shows spatially irregular flickering activity or global oscillation. Developing statistical tools to describe healthy versus epileptic tissue dynamics could be very important in order to study the effects of specific drugs, or to identify oscillation centers in the epileptic brain. We perform a statistical analysis in terms of phase synchronization. We show that hyper active epileptic astrocyte cultures are characterized by synchronization between different regions of the network taken from the uncus part of the brain.

  14. Batch variation between branchial cell cultures: An analysis of variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Grosell, M.; Kristensen, L.

    2003-01-01

    We present in detail how a statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to sort out the effect of an unexpected batch-to-batch variation between cell cultures. Two separate cultures of rainbow trout branchial cells were grown on permeable filtersupports ("inserts"). They were supposed...... and introducing the observed difference between batches as one of the factors in an expanded three-dimensional ANOVA, we were able to overcome an otherwisecrucial lack of sufficiently reproducible duplicate values. We could thereby show that the effect of changing the apical medium was much more marked when...... the radioactive lipid precursors were added on the apical, rather than on the basolateral, side. Theinsert cell cultures were obviously polarized. We argue that it is not reasonable to reject troublesome experimental results, when we do not know a priori that something went wrong. The ANOVA is a very useful...

  15. Achieving consensus in robot swarms design and analysis of strategies for the best-of-n problem

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the design and analysis of collective decision-making strategies for the best-of-n problem. After providing a formalization of the structure of the best-of-n problem supported by a comprehensive survey of the swarm robotics literature, it introduces the functioning of a collective decision-making strategy and identifies a set of mechanisms that are essential for a strategy to solve the best-of-n problem. The best-of-n problem is an abstraction that captures the frequent requirement of a robot swarm to choose one option from of a finite set when optimizing benefits and costs. The book leverages the identification of these mechanisms to develop a modular and model-driven methodology to design collective decision-making strategies and to analyze their performance at different level of abstractions. Lastly, the author provides a series of case studies in which the proposed methodology is used to design different strategies, using robot experiments to show how the designed strategies can b...

  16. Cultural Paradigms in Management Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Sulkowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an idea for understanding cultural processes in the organizational discourse from the perspective of four paradigms in management sciences based on the concept of G. Burrell and G. Morgan.Methodology: The author has elaborated a valuable list of structures of the scientifi c theory based on the respective paradigms and has compared cultural paradigms in management sciences. The methodology involves an analysis of classical and recent world literature. Nowadays there is no consensus on the defi nitions, types or research models of organizational culture.Originality: In the literature on the subject we can fi nd many, sometimes contradictory cultural research studies that require further analysis. Precisely because of the diversity and complexity of cultural issues in management sciences a multi-paradigmatic analysis is necessary. The paper presents a proposal for a pluralistic approach to the theory and methodology of cultural studies in management sciences.

  17. The impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus guidelines on Gleason grading - a matched-pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kasper D; Thomsen, Frederik B; Nerstrøm, Camilla; Røder, Martin A; Iversen, Peter; Toft, Birgitte G; Vainer, Ben; Brasso, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    To investigate whether the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2005 revision of the Gleason grading system has influenced the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), as the new guideline implies that some prostate cancers previously graded as Gleason score 6 (3 + 3) are now considered as 7 (3 + 4). A matched-pair analysis was conducted. In all, 215 patients with Gleason score 6 or 7 (3 + 4) prostate cancer on biopsy who underwent RP before 31 December 2005 (pre-ISUP group), were matched 1:1 by biopsy Gleason score, clinical tumour category, PSA level, and margin status to patients undergoing RP between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2011 (post-ISUP group). Patients were followed until BCR defined as a PSA level of ≥0.2 ng/mL. Risk of BCR was analysed in a competing-risk model. The median follow-up was 9.5 years in the pre-ISUP group and 4.8 years in the post-ISUP group. The 5-year cumulative incidences of BCR were 34.0% and 13.9% in the pre-ISUP and post-ISUP groups, respectively (P ISUP Gleason score 6 and post-ISUP Gleason score 7 (3 + 4) (P = 0.34). In a multiple Cox-proportional hazard regression model, ISUP 2005 grading was a strong prognostic factor for BCR within 5 years of RP (hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.54; P < 0.001). The revision of the Gleason grading system has reduced the risk of BCR after RP in patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 and 7 (3 + 4). This may have consequences when comparing outcomes across studies and historical periods and may affect future treatment recommendations. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Behavior analysts and cultural analysis: Troubles and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagodi, E. F.; Jackson, Kevin

    1989-01-01

    Three strategic suggestions are offered to behavior analysts who are concerned with extending the interests of our discipline into domains traditionally assigned to the social sciences: (1) to expand our world-view perspectives beyond the boundaries commonly accepted by psychologists in general; (2) to build a cultural analytic framework upon the foundations we have developed for the study of individuals; and (3) to study the works of those social scientists whose views are generally compatible with, and complementary to, our own. Sociologist C. Wright Mills' distinction between troubles and issues and anthropologist Marvin Harris's principles of cultural materialism are related to topics raised by these three strategies. The pervasiveness of the “psychocentric” world view within psychology and the social sciences, and throughout our culture at large, is discussed from the points of view of Skinner, Mills, and Harris. It is suggested that a thorough commitment to radical behaviorism, and continuation of interaction between radical behaviorism and cultural materialism, are necessary for maintaining and extending an issues orientation within the discipline of behavior analysis and for guarding against dilutions and subversions of that orientation by “deviation-dampening” contingencies that exist in our profession and in our culture at large. PMID:22478014

  19. Applying importance-performance analysis to patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yii-Ching; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Hsieh, Wan-Lin; Weng, Shao-Jen; Hsieh, Liang-Po; Huang, Chih-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    The Sexton et al.'s (2006) safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) has been widely used to assess staff's attitudes towards patient safety in healthcare organizations. However, to date there have been few studies that discuss the perceptions of patient safety both from hospital staff and upper management. The purpose of this paper is to improve and to develop better strategies regarding patient safety in healthcare organizations. The Chinese version of SAQ based on the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation is used to evaluate the perceptions of hospital staff. The current study then lies in applying importance-performance analysis technique to identify the major strengths and weaknesses of the safety culture. The results show that teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition and working conditions are major strengths and should be maintained in order to provide a better patient safety culture. On the contrary, perceptions of management and hospital handoffs and transitions are important weaknesses and should be improved immediately. Research limitations/implications - The research is restricted in generalizability. The assessment of hospital staff in patient safety culture is physicians and registered nurses. It would be interesting to further evaluate other staff's (e.g. technicians, pharmacists and others) opinions regarding patient safety culture in the hospital. Few studies have clearly evaluated the perceptions of healthcare organization management regarding patient safety culture. Healthcare managers enable to take more effective actions to improve the level of patient safety by investigating key characteristics (either strengths or weaknesses) that healthcare organizations should focus on.

  20. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  1. Delphi consensus on the diagnosis and management of dyslipidaemia in chronic kidney disease patients: A post hoc analysis of the DIANA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases Amenós, Aleix; Pedro-Botet Montoya, Juan; Pascual Fuster, Vicente; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Pintó Sala, Xavier; Ascaso Gimilio, Juan F; Millán Nuñez-Cortés, Jesús; Serrano Cumplido, Adalberto

    This post hoc study analysed the perception of the relevance of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dyslipidaemia screening and the choice of statin among primary care physicians (PCPs) and other specialists through a Delphi questionnaire. The questionnaire included 4blocks of questions concerning dyslipidaemic patients with impaired carbohydrate metabolism. This study presents the results of the impact of CKD on screening and the choice of statin. Of the 497 experts included, 58% were PCPs and 42% were specialists (35, 7% were nephrologists). There was consensus by both PCPs and specialists, with no difference between PCPs and specialists, that CKD patients should undergo a dyslipidaemia screening and that the screening should be part of routine clinical practice. However, there was no consensus in considering the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (although there was consensus among PCPs and nephrologists), or considering albuminuria when selecting a statin, or in determining albuminuria during follow-up after having initiated treatment with statins (although there was consensus among the nephrologists). The consensus to analyse the lipid profile in CKD patients suggests acknowledgment of the high cardiovascular risk of this condition. However, the lack of consensus in considering renal function or albuminuria, both when selecting a statin and during follow-up, suggests a limited knowledge of the differences between statins in relation to CKD. Thus, it would be advisable to develop a guideline/consensus document on the use of statins in CKD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. On radicalizing behaviorism: A call for cultural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagodi, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Our culture at large continues many practices that work against the well-being of its members and its chances for survival. Our discipline has failed to realize its potential for contributing to the understanding of these practices and to the generation of solutions. This failure of realization is in part a consequence of the general failure of behavior analysts to view social and cultural analysis as a fundamental component of radical behaviorism. This omission is related to three prevailing practices of our discipline. First, radical behaviorism is characteristically defined as a “philosophy of science,” and its concerns are ordinarily restricted to certain epistemological issues. Second, theoretical extensions to social and cultural phenomena too often depend solely upon principles derived from the analysis of behavior. Third, little attention has been directed at examining the relationships that do, or that should, exist between our discipline and related sciences. These practices themselves are attributed to certain features of the history of our field. Two general remedies for this situation are suggested: first, that radical behaviorism be treated as a comprehensive world view in which epistemological, psychological, and cultural analyses constitute interdependent components; second, that principles derived from compatible social-science disciplines be incorporated into radical behaviorism. PMID:22478643

  3. On radicalizing behaviorism: A call for cultural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagodi, E F

    1986-01-01

    Our culture at large continues many practices that work against the well-being of its members and its chances for survival. Our discipline has failed to realize its potential for contributing to the understanding of these practices and to the generation of solutions. This failure of realization is in part a consequence of the general failure of behavior analysts to view social and cultural analysis as a fundamental component of radical behaviorism. This omission is related to three prevailing practices of our discipline. First, radical behaviorism is characteristically defined as a "philosophy of science," and its concerns are ordinarily restricted to certain epistemological issues. Second, theoretical extensions to social and cultural phenomena too often depend solely upon principles derived from the analysis of behavior. Third, little attention has been directed at examining the relationships that do, or that should, exist between our discipline and related sciences. These practices themselves are attributed to certain features of the history of our field. Two general remedies for this situation are suggested: first, that radical behaviorism be treated as a comprehensive world view in which epistemological, psychological, and cultural analyses constitute interdependent components; second, that principles derived from compatible social-science disciplines be incorporated into radical behaviorism.

  4. Analysis of pedagogical and cultural situations from the vantage point of discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Murillo-Murgueítio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper encompasses analyses of pedagogical and cultural situations from the perspective of some of the authors studied in our discourse analysis class. Cultural authenticity and cultural stereotypes are dealt with stemming from real issues and mirroring them through the lens of Kramsch ́s (1998 insights. McCarthy (1994 is referred to when a curricular principle, the familiar to unfamiliar principle is considered as a pedagogical approach in ESL teaching.

  5. Semiautomated analysis of dendrite morphology in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Eric S; Langhammer, Chris L; Kutzing, Melinda K; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying dendrite morphology is a method for determining the effect of biochemical pathways and extracellular agents on neuronal development and differentiation. Quantification can be performed using Sholl analysis, dendrite counting, and length quantification. These procedures can be performed on dendrite-forming cell lines or primary neurons grown in culture. In this protocol, we describe the use of a set of computer programs to assist in quantifying many aspects of dendrite morphology, including changes in total and localized arbor complexity.

  6. US AND THAI ADVERTISING: A CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria SEITZ; Nabil RAZZOUK; Pasinee KAEWMESRI

    2011-01-01

    With the Internet, international marketing has taken on a whole new meaning; however, the decision to standardize or adapt advertising messages remains a perplexing one for marketers around the world. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the degree of standardized advertising in print advertisement across different cultures. Content analysis was used to measure the degree of standardization in print advertisement for self-image projective products. The sample consisted of 63 ...

  7. Analysis of the Relationship between Tourism and Food Culture

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, gastronomy has established itself as one of the key elements for the enhancement, sustainable and consolidation of tourist destinations. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the advancement of knowledge on gastronomic tourism in European countries, specifically in the analysis of the relationship between gastronomy, culture and tourism as the research focuses on the city of Córdoba, Spain. The methodology of this research involved conducting surveys with foreign traveler...

  8. Assessing School Work Culture: A Higher-Order Analysis and Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Zimmerman, Kurt J.

    This paper reviews a work culture productivity model and reports the development of a work culture instrument based on the culture productivity model. Higher order principal components analysis was used to assess work culture, and a third-order factor analysis shows how the first-order factors group into higher-order factors. The school work…

  9. Cross-cultural comparisons among the sensory characteristics of fermented soybean using Korean and Japanese descriptive analysis panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, L; Chung, S-J

    2007-11-01

    One of the most important initial steps in exporting a food product to another country from the R&D perspective is to describe and translate the sensory characteristics of a food product appropriately into the language of the target country. The objectives of this study were to describe and compare the sensory characteristics of Korean and Japanese style fermented soybean products, and to cross-culturally compare the lexicons of the identical product generated by the Korean and Japanese panelists. Four types of Korean and 4 types of Japanese style fermented soybean consisting of whole bean type and paste type were analyzed. Ten Korean and 9 Japanese panelists were recruited in Korea. Two separate descriptive analyses were conducted, with the panelists differing in their country of origin. Each group was trained, developed lexicon, and conducted descriptive analysis independently. Analysis of variance and various multivariate analyses were applied to delineate the sensory characteristics of the samples and to compare the cross-cultural differences in the usage of lexicon. The Korean and Japanese panelists generated 48 and 36 sensory attributes, respectively. Cross-cultural consensus was shown for evaluating the whole bean type fermented soybean and white miso, which were relatively distinctive samples. However, for the less distinctive samples, the panelists tend to rate higher in negative attributes for the fermented soybeans that originated from the other country. The Japanese panelists grouped the samples by their country of origin and soy sauce flavor was the main attribute for cross-cultural differentiation. However, the Korean panelists did not make a cross-cultural distinction among the samples.

  10. Culture phenomenon analysis on the forest tour activity of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Minjin

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes culture and forest culture, the intension of culture and forest culture, combines the understanding of the main cultural factor with the forest tour activity of China, analyzes the compatible phenomenon of Chinese forest culture and traditional culture, and explores culture of forest tourist site containing the meaning in forest tour. The author thinks the tour of forest culture which will be the important component of forest tour in forest culture,This paper puts forward simple questions existing in exploitation and advantage of forest tour culture, and proposes some countermeasures.

  11. Ion beam analysis in cultural heritage studies: Milestones and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dran, Jean-Claude; Calligaro, Thomas [Centre for research and restoration of the museums of France, Palais du Louvre Paris (France)

    2013-07-18

    For three decades, ion beam analysis (IBA) in external mode was considered as the best choice for the characterisation of cultural heritage materials, as it combines excellent analytical performance and non-invasive character. However, in recent years, other analytical techniques arose as serious competitors, such as those based on synchrotron radiation (X-ray absorption, fluorescence or diffraction) or those using portable instruments (XRF, micro-Raman). It is shown that nevertheless IBA remains unmatched thanks to two unique features, namely the analysis of light elements and the high-resolution 3D chemical imaging.

  12. Monitoring regulatory T cells in clinical samples: consensus on an essential marker set and gating strategy for regulatory T cell analysis by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Dijkgraaf, Eveline M; Battaglia, Alessandra; Beckhove, Philipp; Britten, Cedrik M; Gallimore, Awen; Godkin, Andrew; Gouttefangeas, Cecile; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Koenen, Hans J P M; Scheffold, Alexander; Shevach, Ethan M; Staats, Janet; Taskén, Kjetil; Whiteside, Theresa L; Kroep, Judith R; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg)-mediated immunosuppression is considered a major obstacle for successful cancer immunotherapy. The association between clinical outcome and Tregs is being studied extensively in clinical trials, but unfortunately, no consensus has been reached about (a) the markers and (b) the gating strategy required to define human Tregs in this context, making it difficult to draw final conclusions. Therefore, we have organized an international workshop on the detection and functional testing of Tregs with leading experts in the field, and 40 participants discussing different analyses and the importance of different markers and context in which Tregs were analyzed. This resulted in a rationally composed ranking list of "Treg markers". Subsequently, the proposed Treg markers were tested to get insight into the overlap/differences between the most frequently used Treg definitions and their utility for Treg detection in various human tissues. Here, we conclude that the CD3, CD4, CD25, CD127, and FoxP3 markers are the minimally required markers to define human Treg cells. Staining for Ki67 and CD45RA showed to provide additional information on the activation status of Tregs. The use of markers was validated in a series of PBMC from healthy donors and cancer patients, as well as in tumor-draining lymph nodes and freshly isolated tumors. In conclusion, we propose an essential marker set comprising antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD25, CD127, Foxp3, Ki67, and CD45RA and a corresponding robust gating strategy for the context-dependent analysis of Tregs by flow cytometry.

  13. Customized Consensus Spectral Library Building for Untargeted Quantitative Metabolomics Analysis with Data Independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry and MetaboDIA Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gengbo; Walmsley, Scott; Cheung, Gemmy C M; Chen, Liyan; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Beuerman, Roger W; Wong, Tien Yin; Zhou, Lei; Choi, Hyungwon

    2017-05-02

    Data independent acquisition-mass spectrometry (DIA-MS) coupled with liquid chromatography is a promising approach for rapid, automatic sampling of MS/MS data in untargeted metabolomics. However, wide isolation windows in DIA-MS generate MS/MS spectra containing a mixed population of fragment ions together with their precursor ions. This precursor-fragment ion map in a comprehensive MS/MS spectral library is crucial for relative quantification of fragment ions uniquely representative of each precursor ion. However, existing reference libraries are not sufficient for this purpose since the fragmentation patterns of small molecules can vary in different instrument setups. Here we developed a bioinformatics workflow called MetaboDIA to build customized MS/MS spectral libraries using a user's own data dependent acquisition (DDA) data and to perform MS/MS-based quantification with DIA data, thus complementing conventional MS1-based quantification. MetaboDIA also allows users to build a spectral library directly from DIA data in studies of a large sample size. Using a marine algae data set, we show that quantification of fragment ions extracted with a customized MS/MS library can provide as reliable quantitative data as the direct quantification of precursor ions based on MS1 data. To test its applicability in complex samples, we applied MetaboDIA to a clinical serum metabolomics data set, where we built a DDA-based spectral library containing consensus spectra for 1829 compounds. We performed fragment ion quantification using DIA data using this library, yielding sensitive differential expression analysis.

  14. Genotypic Characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates from Different Sources in the North-West Province, South Africa, Using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus PCR Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Njie Ateba

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In many developing countries, proper hygiene is not strictly implemented when animals are slaughtered and meat products become contaminated. Contaminated meat may contain Escherichia coli (E. coli O157:H7 that could cause diseases in humans if these food products are consumed undercooked. In the present study, a total of 94 confirmed E. coli O157:H7 isolates were subjected to the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC polymerase chain reaction (PCR typing to generate genetic fingerprints. The ERIC fragments were resolved by electrophoresis on 2% (w/v agarose gels. The presence, absence and intensity of band data were obtained, exported to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Office 2003 and used to generate a data matrix. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA and complete linkage algorithms were used to analyze the percentage of similarity and matrix data. Relationships between the various profiles and/or lanes were expressed as dendrograms. Data from groups of related lanes were compiled and reported on cluster tables. ERIC fragments ranged from one to 15 per isolate, and their sizes varied from 0.25 to 0.771 kb. A large proportion of the isolates produced an ERIC banding pattern with three duplets ranging in sizes from 0.408 to 0.628 kb. Eight major clusters (I–VIII were identified. Overall, the remarkable similarities (72% to 91% between the ERIC profiles for the isolate from animal species and their corresponding food products indicated some form of contamination, which may not exclude those at the level of the abattoirs. These results reveal that ERIC PCR analysis can be reliable in comparing the genetic profiles of E. coli O157:H7 from different sources in the North-West Province of South Africa.

  15. Analysis of the Relationship between Tourism and Food Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Jiménez-Beltrán

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, gastronomy has established itself as one of the key elements for the enhancement, sustainable and consolidation of tourist destinations. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the advancement of knowledge on gastronomic tourism in European countries, specifically in the analysis of the relationship between gastronomy, culture and tourism as the research focuses on the city of Córdoba, Spain. The methodology of this research involved conducting surveys with foreign travelers who were lunching or dining at various restaurants in the historic area, and these facilities were characterized by having in their gastronomic menus major typical culinary products of the city using the concept of tapas, i.e., the presentation of gastronomy through small portions of food. The results of the study indicate that the healthy component of the gastronomy represents the main dimension. Based on the detected dimensions, three types of international visitors are established (healthy-cultural tourist, cultural tourist and generic tourist which are considered valid and useful for segmenting the market. This highlights the importance given to gastronomy by tourists as part of the cultural identity of a place and the satisfaction achieved through the gastronomy of the city of Córdoba.

  16. Microfluidics and cancer analysis: cell separation, cell/tissue culture, cell mechanics, and integrated analysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-01-21

    Among the growing number of tools available for cancer studies, microfluidic systems have emerged as a promising analytical tool to elucidate cancer cell and tumor function. Microfluidic methods to culture cells have created approaches to provide a range of environments from single-cell analysis to complex three-dimensional devices. In this review we discuss recent advances in tumor cell culture, cancer cell analysis, and advanced studies enabled by microfluidic systems.

  17. Conflict or Consensus?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Poulsen, Birgitte

    forms of institutional design of citizen participation processes, less attention has been paid to the role of public administrators, and their role in facilitating processes of citizen participation. Public administrators have to work with diverse groups of citizens with diverging, and often conflicting......, interests. However, many public administrators have not been adequately exposed to the rationales of conflicts and the skills in resolving conflicts. The aim of this paper is to analyse the different types of conflicts that public administrators experience in formal processes of citizen involvement. Whereas...... the literature of deliberative democracy claims that consensus is most often the result of rational deliberative processes, the claim of this paper is that conflicts is more likely a natural and integrated part of such deliberative acts. Conflicts are, thus, seen as inevitable. Also conflicts may function...

  18. An Analysis of the Relationship of Confucian Thoughts to Chinese Traditional Culture with Western Culture Concerned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝

    2008-01-01

    By drawing support from the kernel theories of Confucian thoughts and the dominant characteristic of Chinese traditional culture,this article was to introduce how Confucian thoughts play a chief role in Chinese traditional culture.The study first analyzed the kernel theories of Confucian thoughts and the chief characteristic of Chinese traditional culture in two parallel lines.Then Chinese traditional culture was deliberated in culture patterns with Confucian thoughts and Western Culture concerned.

  19. Measurement and analysis of calcium signaling in heterogeneous cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gillian R; Jack, Andrew D; Platts, Amy; Simpson, Peter B

    2006-01-01

    High-content imaging platforms capable of studying kinetic responses at a single-cell level have elevated kinetic recording techniques from labor-intensive low-throughput experiments to potential high-throughput screening assays. We have applied this technology to the investigation of heterogeneous cell cultures derived from primary neural tissue. The neuronal cultures mature into a coupled network and display spontaneous oscillations in intracellular calcium, which can be modified by the addition of pharmacological agents. We have developed algorithms to perform Fourier analysis and quantify both the degree of synchronization and the effects of modulators on the oscillations. Functional and phenotypic experiments can be combined using this approach. We have used post-hoc immunolabeling to identify subpopulations of cells in cocultures and to dissect the calcium responses of these cells from the population response. The combination of these techniques represents a powerful tool for drug discovery.

  20. Proteomic analysis of indium embryotoxicity in cultured postimplantation rat embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Makoto; Nakajima, Mikio; Mitsunaga, Katsuyoshi; Miyajima, Atsuko; Sunouchi, Momoko; Doi, Osamu

    2009-12-01

    Indium embryotoxicity was investigated by proteomic analysis with two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat embryos cultured from day 10.5 of gestation for 24h in the presence of 50 microM indium trichloride. In the embryo proper, indium increased quantity of several protein spots including those identified as serum albumin, phosphorylated cofilin 1, phosphorylated destrin and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. The increased serum albumin, derived from the culture medium composed of rat serum, may decrease the toxicity of indium. The increase of phosphorylated cofilin 1 might be involved in dysmorphogenicity of indium through perturbation of actin functions. In the yolk sac membrane, indium induced quantitative and qualitative changes in the protein spots. Proteins from appeared spots included stress proteins, and those from decreased or disappeared spots included serum proteins, glycolytic pathway enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, indicating yolk sac dysfunction. Thus, several candidate proteins that might be involved in indium embryotoxicity were identified.

  1. Political Consensus and Fiscal Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming difficult to maintain consensus in a period of economic austerity, and this possibly challenges the ability of democratic institutions to take decisions on tough economic questions. In order to find out how political consensus influences fiscal outcomes, this article sets out...

  2. Attitude extremity, consensus and diagnosticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pligt, J.; Ester, P.; van der Linden, J.

    1983-01-01

    Studied the effects of attitude extremity on perceived consensus and willingness to ascribe trait terms to others with either pro- or antinuclear attitudes. 611 Ss rated their attitudes toward nuclear energy on a 5-point scale. Results show that attitude extremity affected consensus estimates. Trait

  3. Main: ANAERO5CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO5CONSENSUS S000481 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO5CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  4. Main: ANAERO3CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO3CONSENSUS S000479 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO3CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00048

  5. Main: ANAERO4CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO4CONSENSUS S000480 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO4CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  6. Main: ANAERO2CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO2CONSENSUS S000478 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO2CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000479, S00048

  7. Main: ANAERO1CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO1CONSENSUS S000477 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO1CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000478, S000479, S00048

  8. The Anthropology of Clifford Geertz. Cultural Theory and the Interpretative Analysis of Cultures by Gordana Gorunović

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Krstić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gordana Gorunović. Antropologija Kliforda Gerca. Kulturna teorija i interpretativna analiza kultura. 2010. Beograd: Srpski genealoški centar i Odeljenje za etnologiju i antropologiju Filozofskog fakulteta. str. 286. [The Anthropology of Clifford Geertz. Cultural Theory and the Interpretative Analysis of Cultures

  9. Connecting Cultural Models of Home-Based Care and Childminders' Career Paths: An Eco-Cultural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyan, Holli A.; Nuttall, Joce

    2014-01-01

    Family day care or childminding involves a particularly transient workforce. This paper introduces Eco(logical)-Cultural Theory (ECT) to examine the cultural organisation of childminding and presents an ECT analysis of pilot survey results: asking minders about their daily routines and their career paths. Reasons for becoming a minder and…

  10. Cultural Meaning of Perceived Control: A Meta-Analysis of Locus of Control and Psychological Symptoms across 18 Cultural Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Shu-fai; Chio, Jasmine Hin-man; Chan, Man-pui Sally

    2013-01-01

    Integrating more than 40 years of studies on locus of control (LOC), this meta-analysis investigated whether (a) the magnitude of the relationship between LOC and psychological symptoms differed among cultures with distinct individualist orientations and (b) depression and anxiety symptoms yielded different patterns of cultural findings with LOC.…

  11. Computational tool for morphological analysis of cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Maria Ruth C R; Cestari, Idágene A; Cestari, Ismar N

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of a semiautomatic myocyte edge-detector using digital image processing. The algorithm was developed in Matlab 6.0 using the SDC Morphology Toolbox. Its conceptual basis is the mathematical morphology theory together with the watershed and Euclidean distance transformations. The algorithm enables the user to select cells within an image for automatic detection of their borders and calculation of their surface areas; these areas are determined by adding the pixels within each myocyte's boundaries. The algorithm was applied to images of cultured ventricular myocytes from neonatal rats. The edge-detector allowed the identification and quantification of morphometric alterations in cultured isolated myocytes induced by 72 hours of exposure to a hypertrophic agent (50 μM phenylephrine). There was a significant increase in the mean surface area of the phenylephrine-treated cells compared with the control cells (p<;0.05), corresponding to cellular hypertrophy of approximately 50%. In conclusion, this edge-detector provides a rapid, repeatable and accurate measurement of cell surface areas in a standardized manner. Other possible applications include morphologic measurement of other types of cultured cells and analysis of time-related morphometric changes in adult cardiac myocytes.

  12. Analysis of Delphinidin and Luteolin Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocyte Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Ezić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bioflavonoids delphinidin (2-(3,4,5-Trihydroxyphenylchromenylium-3,5,7-triol and luteolin (2-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl-5,7-dihydroxy-4-chromenone have been recognized as promising antioxidants and anticancer substances. Due to their extensive use, the goal of the research was to determine whether they have any genotoxic potential in vitro.Methods: Analysis of genotoxic potential was performed applying chromosome aberrations test in human lymphocyte culture, as this kind of research was not conducted abundantly for these two bioflavonoids. Delphinidin and luteolin were dissolved in DMSO and added to cultures in final concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 μM.Results: In human lymphocytes cultures Delphinidin induced PCDs in all treatments, potentially affecting the cell cycle and topoisomerase II activity. In concentration of 50 μM luteolin showed strong genotoxic effects and caused significant reduction of cell proliferation.Conclusion: Luteolin exhibited certain genotoxic and cytostatic potential. Delphinidin was not considered genotoxic, however its impact on mitosis, especially topoisomerase II activity, was revealed.

  13. Promises and Problems of Teaching with Popular Culture: A Linguistic Ethnographic Analysis of Discourse Genre Mixing in a Literacy Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefstein, Adam; Snell, Julia

    2011-01-01

    This article problematises a broad consensus in favour of importing popular culture into classrooms as a means of engaging pupils, transforming interactional norms and facilitating pupil understanding. A literacy lesson in which an English primary school teacher invoked the televised talent show, "X factor", in organising the class to…

  14. Methodological Quality of Consensus Guidelines in Implant Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Apaza, Karol; Ariza-Fritas, Tania; Málaga, Lilian; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Alarcón, Marco Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Consensus guidelines are useful to improve clinical decision making. Therefore, the methodological evaluation of these guidelines is of paramount importance. Low quality information may guide to inadequate or harmful clinical decisions. Objective To evaluate the methodological quality of consensus guidelines published in implant dentistry using a validated methodological instrument. Methods The six implant dentistry journals with impact factors were scrutinised for consensus guidelines related to implant dentistry. Two assessors independently selected consensus guidelines, and four assessors independently evaluated their methodological quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. Disagreements in the selection and evaluation of guidelines were resolved by consensus. First, the consensus guidelines were analysed alone. Then, systematic reviews conducted to support the guidelines were included in the analysis. Non-parametric statistics for dependent variables (Wilcoxon signed rank test) was used to compare both groups. Results Of 258 initially retrieved articles, 27 consensus guidelines were selected. Median scores in four domains (applicability, rigour of development, stakeholder involvement, and editorial independence), expressed as percentages of maximum possible domain scores, were below 50% (median, 26%, 30.70%, 41.70%, and 41.70%, respectively). The consensus guidelines and consensus guidelines + systematic reviews data sets could be compared for 19 guidelines, and the results showed significant improvements in all domain scores (p < 0.05). Conclusions Methodological improvement of consensus guidelines published in major implant dentistry journals is needed. The findings of the present study may help researchers to better develop consensus guidelines in implant dentistry, which will improve the quality and trust of information needed to make proper clinical decisions. PMID:28107405

  15. Comparative analysis of seven viral nuclear export signals (NESs reveals the crucial role of nuclear export mediated by the third NES consensus sequence of nucleoprotein (NP in influenza A virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Chutiwitoonchai

    Full Text Available The assembly of influenza virus progeny virions requires machinery that exports viral genomic ribonucleoproteins from the cell nucleus. Currently, seven nuclear export signal (NES consensus sequences have been identified in different viral proteins, including NS1, NS2, M1, and NP. The present study examined the roles of viral NES consensus sequences and their significance in terms of viral replication and nuclear export. Mutation of the NP-NES3 consensus sequence resulted in a failure to rescue viruses using a reverse genetics approach, whereas mutation of the NS2-NES1 and NS2-NES2 sequences led to a strong reduction in viral replication kinetics compared with the wild-type sequence. While the viral replication kinetics for other NES mutant viruses were also lower than those of the wild-type, the difference was not so marked. Immunofluorescence analysis after transient expression of NP-NES3, NS2-NES1, or NS2-NES2 proteins in host cells showed that they accumulated in the cell nucleus. These results suggest that the NP-NES3 consensus sequence is mostly required for viral replication. Therefore, each of the hydrophobic (Φ residues within this NES consensus sequence (Φ1, Φ2, Φ3, or Φ4 was mutated, and its viral replication and nuclear export function were analyzed. No viruses harboring NP-NES3 Φ2 or Φ3 mutants could be rescued. Consistent with this, the NP-NES3 Φ2 and Φ3 mutants showed reduced binding affinity with CRM1 in a pull-down assay, and both accumulated in the cell nucleus. Indeed, a nuclear export assay revealed that these mutant proteins showed lower nuclear export activity than the wild-type protein. Moreover, the Φ2 and Φ3 residues (along with other Φ residues within the NP-NES3 consensus were highly conserved among different influenza A viruses, including human, avian, and swine. Taken together, these results suggest that the Φ2 and Φ3 residues within the NP-NES3 protein are important for its nuclear export function

  16. Comparative analysis of seven viral nuclear export signals (NESs) reveals the crucial role of nuclear export mediated by the third NES consensus sequence of nucleoprotein (NP) in influenza A virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Kakisaka, Michinori; Yamada, Kazunori; Aida, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of influenza virus progeny virions requires machinery that exports viral genomic ribonucleoproteins from the cell nucleus. Currently, seven nuclear export signal (NES) consensus sequences have been identified in different viral proteins, including NS1, NS2, M1, and NP. The present study examined the roles of viral NES consensus sequences and their significance in terms of viral replication and nuclear export. Mutation of the NP-NES3 consensus sequence resulted in a failure to rescue viruses using a reverse genetics approach, whereas mutation of the NS2-NES1 and NS2-NES2 sequences led to a strong reduction in viral replication kinetics compared with the wild-type sequence. While the viral replication kinetics for other NES mutant viruses were also lower than those of the wild-type, the difference was not so marked. Immunofluorescence analysis after transient expression of NP-NES3, NS2-NES1, or NS2-NES2 proteins in host cells showed that they accumulated in the cell nucleus. These results suggest that the NP-NES3 consensus sequence is mostly required for viral replication. Therefore, each of the hydrophobic (Φ) residues within this NES consensus sequence (Φ1, Φ2, Φ3, or Φ4) was mutated, and its viral replication and nuclear export function were analyzed. No viruses harboring NP-NES3 Φ2 or Φ3 mutants could be rescued. Consistent with this, the NP-NES3 Φ2 and Φ3 mutants showed reduced binding affinity with CRM1 in a pull-down assay, and both accumulated in the cell nucleus. Indeed, a nuclear export assay revealed that these mutant proteins showed lower nuclear export activity than the wild-type protein. Moreover, the Φ2 and Φ3 residues (along with other Φ residues) within the NP-NES3 consensus were highly conserved among different influenza A viruses, including human, avian, and swine. Taken together, these results suggest that the Φ2 and Φ3 residues within the NP-NES3 protein are important for its nuclear export function during viral

  17. An Analysis of Differences of Toilet Culture between China and Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冠秋

    2014-01-01

    In an era of globalization and information explosion, culture difference has become one of those frequently-mentioned things. This paper is to make an detailed analysis of culture differences between China and Japan by paying more attention to a“not-very-decent-aspect”, namely, the toilets, and therefore, to explore the different cultural elements rooted in different toileting habits and attached cultures.

  18. A consensus microsatellite-based linkage map for the hermaphroditic bay scallop (Argopecten irradians and its application in size-related QTL analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Li

    Full Text Available Bay scallop (Argopecten irradians is one of the most economically important aquaculture species in China. In this study, we constructed a consensus microsatellite-based genetic linkage map with a mapping panel containing two hybrid backcross-like families involving two subspecies of bay scallop, A. i. irradians and A. i. concentricus. One hundred sixty-one microsatellite and one phenotypic (shell color markers were mapped to 16 linkage groups (LGs, which corresponds to the haploid chromosome number of bay scallop. The sex-specific map was 779.2 cM and 781.6 cM long in female and male, respectively, whereas the sex-averaged map spanned 849.3 cM. The average resolution of integrated map was 5.9 cM/locus and the estimated coverage was 81.3%. The proportion of distorted markers occurred more in the hybrid parents, suggesting that the segregation distortion was possibly resulted from heterospecific interaction between genomes of two subspecies of bay scallop. The overall female-to-male recombination rate was 1.13:1 across all linked markers in common to both parents, and considerable differences in recombination also existed among different parents in both families. Four size-related traits, including shell length (SL, shell height (SH, shell width (SW and total weight (TW were measured for quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis. Three significant and six suggestive QTL were detected on five LGs. Among the three significant QTL, two (qSW-10 and qTW-10, controlling SW and TW, respectively were mapped on the same region near marker AiAD121 on LG10 and explained 20.5% and 27.7% of the phenotypic variance, while the third (qSH-7, controlling SH was located on LG7 and accounted for 15.8% of the phenotypic variance. Six suggestive QTL were detected on four different LGs. The linkage map and size-related QTL obtained in this study may facilitate marker-assisted selection (MAS in bay scallop.

  19. Narratives of climate change : outline of a systematic approach to narrative analysis in cultural sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Annika

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses in particular research gaps in cultural sociology and in the analysis of climate change communication. Narratives have long played a significant role in cultural sociological analysis of empirical data. However, a systematic approach to social stories has yet to be developed and presents a gap in recent research in the realm of young cultural sociology. Following among others Smith’s model of genre an integrated model of cultural narrative analysis aims at integrating vit...

  20. Consensus Convolutional Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Biswarup

    2017-04-11

    Convolutional sparse coding (CSC) is a promising direction for unsupervised learning in computer vision. In contrast to recent supervised methods, CSC allows for convolutional image representations to be learned that are equally useful for high-level vision tasks and low-level image reconstruction and can be applied to a wide range of tasks without problem-specific retraining. Due to their extreme memory requirements, however, existing CSC solvers have so far been limited to low-dimensional problems and datasets using a handful of low-resolution example images at a time. In this paper, we propose a new approach to solving CSC as a consensus optimization problem, which lifts these limitations. By learning CSC features from large-scale image datasets for the first time, we achieve significant quality improvements in a number of imaging tasks. Moreover, the proposed method enables new applications in high dimensional feature learning that has been intractable using existing CSC methods. This is demonstrated for a variety of reconstruction problems across diverse problem domains, including 3D multispectral demosaickingand 4D light field view synthesis.

  1. Between consensus and contestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices.

  2. Measuring culture outside the head: a meta-analysis of individualism-collectivism in cultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morling, Beth; Lamoreaux, Marika

    2008-08-01

    Although cultural psychology is the study of how sociocultural environments and psychological processes coconstruct each other, the field has traditionally emphasized measures of the psychological over the sociocultural. Here, the authors call attention to a growing trend of measuring the sociocultural environment. They present a quantitative review of studies that measure cultural differences in "cultural products": tangible, public representations of culture such as advertising or popular texts. They found that cultural products that come from Western cultures (mostly the United States) are more individualistic, and less collectivistic, than cultural products that come from collectivistic cultures (including Korea, Japan, China, and Mexico). The effect sizes for cultural products were larger than self-report effect sizes for this dimension (reported in Oyserman, Coon, & Kemmelmeier, 2002). In addition to presenting this evidence, the authors highlight the importance of studying the dynamic relationships between sociocultural environments and psyches.

  3. Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John; Oreskes, Naomi; Doran, Peter T.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Verheggen, Bart; Maibach, Ed W.; Carlton, J. Stuart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Skuce, Andrew G.; Green, Sarah A.; Nuccitelli, Dana; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Winkler, Bärbel; Painting, Rob; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%-100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 048001) comes to a different conclusion using results from surveys of non-experts such as economic geologists and a self-selected group of those who reject the consensus. We demonstrate that this outcome is not unexpected because the level of consensus correlates with expertise in climate science. At one point, Tol also reduces the apparent consensus by assuming that abstracts that do not explicitly state the cause of global warming (‘no position’) represent non-endorsement, an approach that if applied elsewhere would reject consensus on well-established theories such as plate tectonics. We examine the available studies and conclude that the finding of 97% consensus in published climate research is robust and consistent with other surveys of climate scientists and peer-reviewed studies.

  4. Distributed Consensus over Wireless Sensor Networks Affected by Multipath Fading

    CERN Document Server

    Scutari, Gesualdo

    2008-01-01

    The design of sensor networks capable of reaching a consensus on a globally optimal decision test, without the need for a fusion center, is a problem that has received considerable attention in the last years. Many consensus algorithms have been proposed, with convergence conditions depending on the graph describing the interaction among the nodes. In most works, the graph is undirected and there are no propagation delays. Only recently, the analysis has been extended to consensus algorithms incorporating propagation delays. In this work, we propose a consensus algorithm able to converge to a globally optimal decision statistic, using a wideband wireless network, governed by a fairly simple MAC mechanism, where each link is a multipath, frequency-selective, channel. The main contribution of the paper is to derive necessary and sufficient conditions on the network topology and sufficient conditions on the channel transfer functions guaranteeing the exponential convergence of the consensus algorithm to a global...

  5. 一类离散时间异构多智能体系统的一致平衡点分析%Consensus equilibrium point analysis for a class of discrete-time heterogeneous multi-agent systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙一杰; 张国良; 张胜修; 曾静

    2015-01-01

    A linear consensus protocol for heterogeneous multi-agent systems composed of first-order and second-order agents is proposed. Based on the graph theory and the matrix theory, the sufficient conditions for achieving consensus and consensus equilibrium point are obtained respectively. It is proved that only the initial conditions of the root vertices contribute to the equilibrium point. The convergence interval is deduced. Then, the system can converge to arbitrary expected value in this interval by setting the parameters. Simulation analysis shows the correctness of the proposed theorems.%针对包含一阶二阶智能体的异构系统,提出一种线性一致性协议.利用图论和矩阵分析方法分析系统获得一致性的充分条件和一致平衡点,并证明仅网络中的根节点对平衡点起作用. 在此基础上,分析平衡点的取值范围,通过参数优化可以使系统收敛到该范围内任意给定的期望值.最后,通过仿真分析表明了理论分析的正确性.

  6. SWOT analysis of Banff: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the international Banff consensus process and classification system for renal allograft pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, M; Sis, B; Halloran, P F

    2007-10-01

    The Banff process defined the diagnostic histologic lesions for renal allograft rejection and created a standardized classification system where none had existed. By correcting this deficit the process had universal impact on clinical practice and clinical and basic research. All trials of new drugs since the early 1990s benefited, because the Banff classification of lesions permitted the end point of biopsy-proven rejection. The Banff process has strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT). The strength is its self-organizing group structure to create consensus. Consensus does not mean correctness: defining consensus is essential if a widely held view is to be proved wrong. The weaknesses of the Banff process are the absence of an independent external standard to test the classification; and its almost exclusive reliance on histopathology, which has inherent limitations in intra- and interobserver reproducibility, particularly at the interface between borderline and rejection, is exactly where clinicians demand precision. The opportunity lies in the new technology such as transcriptomics, which can form an external standard and can be incorporated into a new classification combining the elegance of histopathology and the objectivity of transcriptomics. The threat is the degree to which the renal transplant community will participate in and support this process.

  7. Fault Tolerant Consensus of Multi-Agent Systems with Linear Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the consensus problem of linear multi-agent systems with actuator faults. A fault estimator based consensus protocol is provided, together with a convergence analysis. It is shown that the consensus errors of all agents will converge to a small set around the origin, if parameters in the consensus protocol are properly chosen. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed protocol.

  8. Dynamical Consensus Algorithm for Second-Order Multi-Agent Systems Subjected to Communication Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cheng-Lin; LIU Fei

    2013-01-01

    To solve the dynamical consensus problem of second-order multi-agent systems with communication delay,delay-dependent compensations are added into the normal asynchronously-coupled consensus algorithm so as to make the agents achieve a dynamical consensus.Based on frequency-domain analysis,sufficient conditions are gained for second-order multi-agent systems with communication delay under leaderless and leader-following consensus algorithms respectively.Simulation illustrates the correctness of the results.

  9. Consensus of second-order multi-agent systems with nonuniform time delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wen-Guang; Liu Ji-Zhen; Zeng De-Liang; Hu Yong

    2013-01-01

    In this study,the consensus problem for a class of second-order multi-agent systems with nonuniform time delays is investigated.A linear consensus protocol is used to make all agents reach consensus and move with a constant velocity.By a frequency-domain analysis,a simplified sufficient condition is given to guarantee the consensus stability of the dynamic system.Finally,the effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results is illustrated through numerical simulations.

  10. Embarrassment as a key to understanding cultural differences. Basic principles of cultural analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    1995-01-01

    of culture is a focusing on cultural misunderstanding; and the way to obtain relevant material on such misunderstanding is, according to me, to get people to talk about things that surprised them, that the embarassed about, or simply gor irritated withm int heir meeting with foreign cultures. I also point...

  11. Analysis of Cultural Heritage by Accelerator Techniques and Analytical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Toque, Jay Arre; Murayama, Yusuke

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present the result of experimental investigation using two very important accelerator techniques: (1) synchrotron radiation XRF and XAFS; and (2) accelerator mass spectrometry and multispectral analytical imaging for the investigation of cultural heritage. We also want to introduce a complementary approach to the investigation of artworks which is noninvasive and nondestructive that can be applied in situ. Four major projects will be discussed to illustrate the potential applications of these accelerator and analytical imaging techniques: (1) investigation of Mongolian Textile (Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan Period) using XRF, AMS and electron microscopy; (2) XRF studies of pigments collected from Korean Buddhist paintings; (3) creating a database of elemental composition and spectral reflectance of more than 1000 Japanese pigments which have been used for traditional Japanese paintings; and (4) visible light-near infrared spectroscopy and multispectral imaging of degraded malachite and azurite. The XRF measurements of the Japanese and Korean pigments could be used to complement the results of pigment identification by analytical imaging through spectral reflectance reconstruction. On the other hand, analysis of the Mongolian textiles revealed that they were produced between 12th and 13th century. Elemental analysis of the samples showed that they contained traces of gold, copper, iron and titanium. Based on the age and trace elements in the samples, it was concluded that the textiles were produced during the height of power of the Mongol empire, which makes them a valuable cultural heritage. Finally, the analysis of the degraded and discolored malachite and azurite demonstrates how multispectral analytical imaging could be used to complement the results of high energy-based techniques.

  12. A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Advertisements from High-Context Cultures and Low-Context Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, He

    2016-01-01

    With the development of economy and the change of social culture, advertisements have penetrated our life slowly and done a lot to the commercial markets. Advertisements have often been analyzed in a stylistic way for its unique language style. But language is an important part, as well as a carrier, of culture. Advertising language, as other…

  13. Is There a Consensus on Consensus Methodology? Descriptions and Recommendations for Future Consensus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jane; Carline, Jan D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    The authors of this article reviewed the methodology of three common consensus methods: nominal group process, consensus development panels, and the Delphi technique. The authors set out to determine how a majority of researchers are conducting these studies, how they are analyzing results, and subsequently the manner in which they are reporting their findings. The authors conclude with a set of guidelines and suggestions designed to aid researchers who choose to use the consensus methodology in their work.Overall, researchers need to describe their inclusion criteria. In addition to this, on the basis of the current literature the authors found that a panel size of 5 to 11 members was most beneficial across all consensus methods described. Lastly, the authors agreed that the statistical analyses done in consensus method studies should be as rigorous as possible and that the predetermined definition of consensus must be included in the ultimate manuscript. More specific recommendations are given for each of the three consensus methods described in the article.

  14. Introductory biology and ecological literacy: A critical cultural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Joseph Damian

    Despite the lack of accepted standards for the introductory biology course for students majoring in biology, the content and format of the first-year biology course is remarkably uniform in terms of both curriculum and pedagogy. This investigation is a critical cultural analysis of the purpose of, and practices within, undergraduate biology education in general, and the introductory biology course in particular. Drawing on a theoretical framework that combines critical philosophical inquiry, ecological literacy, science studies, and cultural studies, I argue that the failure of biology educators within the university to acknowledge the diversity of their student body and to actively engage social and ecological issues has resulted in a curriculum that has almost no meaning for students, and that is socially and ecologically irresponsible. This work is a search for meaningful alternatives. Within this work, I attempt to provide biology educators, as well as would-be reformers, with a seldom-seen view of academic biology. This is done to unsettle the status quo, and to initiate processes of seeking out spaces for change. Through the discourses of critical pedagogy and ecological literacy I examine the laboratories, lecture halls, teaching practices, and course materials that students encounter as they experience "the study of life." Additionally, I place the genesis and evolution of the introductory biology course within the sociohistorical context of reform in science education and academic biology in an effort to explain the amazing and problematic stability of this course.

  15. Social Management of Cultural Conflict Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hong-Mei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to integrate the cultural concepts of basic social value judgments and make the members of society to form an active participation in the consensus, the study use the multi-form subculture and multi-value conflict form in the society as study aim to analysis of that the heterogeneous culture not only will not deconstruct the society but also will bring society to obtain the compatible capacity towards the same. This study indicates that the cultural inertia safeguard their own interests can easily turn into the fuse of conflict in different cultural patterns interactive cooperation of social management. The subcultures collision of the main of pluralistic society management, collectivism and individualistic culture conflict is the main form of social cultural conflict management, the emergence and impact of different cultures is an important driving force for progress and cultural shape.

  16. Analysis of Gender Equality Competence Present in Cultural Positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Mimbrero Mallado

    Full Text Available Abstract: Articulating the gender dimension in organizations is not easy because their members have to be trained to adopt positions that facilitate the implementation of solutions that help to combat inequalities. The aim of this article was to identify the gender equality competence present in the three types of cultural positions Castells proposed in members of a City CouncilinSevilla-Spain, who wanted to implement gender mainstreaming. The participants were 27 people (16 women and 11 men. The methodused was discourse analysis. The obtained results show that, while all competences were present in the projectposition,in the resistance position, there was none. In the legitimizers, we observed inconsistency in the discourse presented. This arouses considerations on the importance of knowing the gender equality competences in order to implement gender mainstreaming in organizations.

  17. Analysis of pediatrics expert consensus citation from 2009 to 2012%2009-2012年儿科专家共识引文分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚明

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the expert consensus on pediatric literature citation.Method By the method of bibliometrics,experts' citation from2009 to2012 were statistically analyzed with bibliometrics.Result 18 expert consensus articles were identified,of which16 have citations.The citation rate is 88.89%,with an average citation of 21.47.The sources are mainly journals; the cited articles are mainly in foreign language (65.73%); ; the price index is 57.30%.Conclusion Expert consensus citation is novel,mainly from periodicals,and primarily in foreign language.But the citation quality needs to be improved further.%目的 探讨专家共识参考文献的引用情况.方法 采用文献计量学方法,对20092012年专家共识的引文情况进行统计分析.结果 18篇专家共识有引文的16篇,引文率为88.89%,平均引文量21.47条;引文类型以期刊为主;引文语种中文占34.27%,外文占65.73%;普赖斯指数为57.30%.结论 专家共识引文内容较新颖,引文类型以期刊为主,外文则以英文为主,普赖斯指数高于50%,但引文的质量还应进一步提高.

  18. An Analysis of Cultural Shock and Adaptionin Film Crocodile Dundee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tian-yang

    2014-01-01

    Crocodile Dundee, set in both the Australian Outback and the New York City, is a rather successful comedy film which focuses on the exotic love of the two characters. From an intercultural communication approach, this paper analyzes the cultural shock and adaption experienced by the Australian hero and American heroine. The culture shocks in the film happened when they in turn came to a new cultural setting, and eventually it reveals that two characters have been developing from culture shock to adaptation.

  19. Community College Mission Influence on Culture: An Organizational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, E. Gerome

    2013-01-01

    Strong agreement of mission and culture has been found in more effective colleges (Fjortoft & Smart, 1994). For leaders, the culture of an organization provides the context for which decisions about organizational change processes can be made (Malm, 2008). The purpose of this study was to explore the culture present within a community college…

  20. Characterization of European Management Perspective Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida CÎMPEANU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because Europe is characterized by the coexistence of several cultures whose characteristics have both similarities and differences but appreciable, the results of researchers in this regard are different from each other, this distinction is often made based on the prevailing values of that culture , which determines the orientation of the country for a certain system, management style or to a specific profile manager. A particularly important role in characterizing cultural factors play European management, each differing from the other culture as module in addressing various fundamental issues that characterize that society. These issues can be characterized by certain general cultural dimensions that Hofstede defines them as aspects of a culture that can be measured in relation to other cultures. The differences between management systems in European countries (mainly EU countries in the context of this article, the study is based on four cultural dimensions of Hofstede model (power distance, individualism vs. collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, femininity vs. masculinity and change scores recorded for these dimensions in each country. Dimensions considered primarily affect organizational culture which in turn significantly influence the development and performance of the organization and its members, management practices and policies.Data from Hofstede's study reinforce and support the claim that European countries can be grouped systematically cultural groups (Nordic countries, Latin, Germanic, Anglo-Saxon, Eastern Europe that allow significant interpretation in terms of management organization, and that can speak of a typical single European culture but you can see all dimensions of cultural differences taken into account.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Chinese and American Cultural Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-ting

    2011-01-01

    Being aware of the differences that exist between cultures and knowing how to act when we are faced with puzzling cross-cultural situations are important skills for harmonious intercultural relations.Cross-cultural research shows that we can examine all c

  2. Multicultural Alliance of Behavior Analysis Standards for Cultural Competence in Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Elizabeth Hughes; Tanaka, Sakurako

    2013-01-01

    The United States Census bureau projects there will be significant increases in racial and ethnic diversity over the next four decades, in part due to international migration (Guarneri & Ortman, 2009). Due to the increase in culturally diverse populations working within the framework of behavior analysis, clinicians must ensure that they are…

  3. PCDD, PCDF, AND DL-PCB analysis in food: performance evaluation of the high-resolution gas chromatography/low-resolution tandem mass spectrometry technique using consensus-based samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelido, Anna Maria; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Abballe, Annalisa; di Domenico, Alessandro; Fulgenzi, Anna Rita; Iacovella, Nicola; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Valentini, Silvia; De Felip, Elena

    2012-02-15

    Due to safety concerns regarding dietary exposure to POPs, regulatory bodies are issuing detailed guidelines for testing for polychlorodibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDFs) ('dioxins') and dioxin-like (DL)-PCBs in foods of animal origin. Determination of the aforesaid chemicals at regulatory levels requires highly selective and sensitive testing techniques. The new generation of low-resolution mass spectrometers (triple quadrupoles) allows very low levels of quantification to be reached (in the order of tens of femtograms), thus suggesting a potential for their application in food and feed analysis. The performance of the low-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LRMS/MS) approach with triple quadrupoles was assessed on a qualified set of food samples from proficiency tests (PTs) and defense analysis. Accuracy was tested comparing the results with data from high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and with consensus values from PTs. The cumulative TEQ results were characterized by deviations not exceeding 15% of PCDD + PCDF, DL-PCB, and PCDD + PCDF + DL-PCB (TEQ(TOT)) reference consensus values (sample TEQ(TOT) range, 2.29-25.1 pgWHO-TEQ(97)/g fat). Congener analytical variabilities did not influence significantly the WHO-TEQ(97) outcome of the corresponding sample. This preliminary performance evaluation highlights the potential of LRMS/MS as a routine technique for quantitative analysis of PCDDs, PCDFs, and DL-PCBs in food.

  4. Applicability of Baumrind's Parent Typology to Collective Cultures: Analysis of Cultural Explanations of Parent Socialization Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews studies that have examined whether Baumrind's parenting styles are related to child outcomes similarly in cultures where independence is said to be emphasized versus cultures where interdependence is said to be emphasized. I present evidence showing that Baumrind's parenting styles have similar function in both collectivist…

  5. Applicability of Baumrind's Parent Typology to Collective Cultures: Analysis of Cultural Explanations of Parent Socialization Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews studies that have examined whether Baumrind's parenting styles are related to child outcomes similarly in cultures where independence is said to be emphasized versus cultures where interdependence is said to be emphasized. I present evidence showing that Baumrind's parenting styles have similar function in both collectivist…

  6. Culture or No Culture? A Latino Critical Research Analysis of Latino Persistence Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz; Morrison, Jeaná

    2016-01-01

    The recent literature on Latino persistence does not take into account these students' distinct cultural backgrounds. Most researchers of Latino persistence use the self-designation "Latino" as a proxy variable representing Latino culture. A Latino Critical Theory (LatCrit) lens is applied to the persistence literature to demonstrate the…

  7. PERSPECTIVE OF THE CULTURAL SOCIOLOGY AND THE ANALYSIS OF THE CIVIC CULTURE IN BOGOTÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Alfonso Penilla Medina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the city of Bogotá, since 1995 the program of Civic Culture (Cultura Ciudadana has won a remarkable visibility as an articulator axis of development programs. According to UNDP, Bogotá’s experiment received the award for Local Governance projects in 2003, for its significant achievements on the issue of urban civic coexistence and security, which have become the basis of human development projects for the city’s inhabitants. Along with this international award, the program of Civic Culture has generated a literature that approaches -from various perspectives- the dimensions, scope and limitations of this kind of experience as an institutional initiative. However, this set of works does not delve into the symbolic dimension, for it does not explain how the cultural structures, interpretative practices and performative conditions have an impact on the actual implementation of public policy, nor on its aims at building a Civic Culture in Bogota. At this point, an analytic gap can be detected, carrying some negative implications for the possibility of transferring the experience of the Civic Culture project from Bogotá, to other different contexts. In short, from the approach of Cultural Sociology, a theoretical gap in the literature on Civic Culture has been identified, which must be fulfilled in order to enrich the scope with a dimension that may improve the effectiveness of policies on Civic Culture.

  8. An Analysis of Cultural Obstacles on English Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏丽丽

    2014-01-01

    Language and culture can not be separated. It is impossible to learn language well if people do not master cultural back-ground. With the frequent communication between China and other nations throughout the world, cross-cultural communica-tive competence is put forward to be the ultimate goal of foreign language learning in China. However, in present situation, cul-tural factor has not gained its due place in students’English learning. Based on this circumstance, this paper analyzes the cultural obstacles on English learning from the aspects of listening, reading and communicating, and puts forward that while instructing English language, teachers of English should pay attention to and spread cultural background knowledge of English speaking na-tions to improve students’language comprehension ability and cross-cultural communicative competence.

  9. Cultural meanings of nature: an analysis of contemporary motion pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, Howard R; Anderson, John; Levasseur, Priscilla; Thweatt, Michael

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate current cultural meanings of nature, the authors asked 65 undergraduate students to "list 3 movies in which nature was an important aspect of the film." They also were asked to specify the natural element that stood out to them and describe "how it related to the overall theme of the movie." Two independent groups of raters skilled in interpretive analysis developed thematic meanings from these responses. Following this, in a 2nd study, a different group of participants rated the 18 most frequently mentioned natural elements on thematic scales derived from the initial interpretive analysis. Participants in the 1st study mentioned 33 different movies at least twice and 5 themes that captured the meaning of nature in these films. Correlational results derived from the 2nd study indicated that rating scales reflecting these 5 themes formed 2 distinct groups; the first group described settings in which nature is experienced as adversarial and plays a significant role in dramatic action, and the second group defined settings in which nature is viewed either as a place of refuge or simply as a locale in which ongoing narrative action occurs. The general conclusion reached in both studies concerns the often noted but not always appreciated fact that movies--similar to everyday events and actions--always take place in specific settings and that neither life events nor dramatic narratives can be understood apart from specific settings.

  10. Deriving consensus rankings via multicriteria decision making methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Poh Ai Ling; Mohamad Nasir Saludin; Masao Mukaidono

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - This paper seeks to take a cautionary stance to the impact of the marketing mix on customer satisfaction, via a case study deriving consensus rankings for benchmarking on selected retail stores in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach - The ELECTRE I model is used in deriving consensus rankings via multicriteria decision making method for benchmarking base on the marketing mix model 4P's. Descriptive analysis is used to analyze best practice among the four marketing tactics. Finding...

  11. Seeking Development in the Succession-An Analysis of Saussure's Structuralism and Strauss' Cultural Structuralism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨绍芳

    2009-01-01

    With an analysis of Saussure's linguistic structuralism and Strauss' cultural structuralism and exploration of their great impact on linguistic and cultural theory respectively, the author of this paper can safely draw the conclusion that "Saussure's perspective was to provide an intellectual seed that was to flower in later decades as structuralism became a general approach to the study of culture". Saussure, together

  12. Latino Definitions of Success: A Cultural Model of Intercultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to examine Latino intercultural competence via two separate methodologies. Phase 1 entailed discovering and generating themes regarding the features of intercultural competence based on semistructured interviews of 15 Latino adults. Phase 2 included conducting a cultural consensus analysis from the quantitative responses…

  13. Translating agency reform: rhetoric and culture in comparative perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smullen, A.

    2010-01-01

    Through comparative analysis this book examines and explains the official rhetoric of agency reform across consensus and adversarial political cultures. It traces the trajectory of talk about agency reform in The Netherlands, Sweden and Australia and identifies the national styles of speaking that m

  14. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocular allergy" was proposed as the general term to describe ocular allergic diseases. Consensus regarding classification was not reached. Signs and symptoms were considered extremely important for the diagnosis. It was consensus that a staging system should be proposed based on the disease severity. Environmental control, avoidance of allergens and the use of artificial tears were recommended as first line treatment. The secondary treatment should include topical anti-histamines, mast cell stabilizers and multi actions drugs. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictors were not recommended. Topical corticosteroids were recommended as third line of treatment for the most severe keratoconjunctivitis. Consensus was not reached regarding the use of systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressant. Surgical approach and unconventional treatments were not recommended as routine. CONCLUSION: The task of creating guidelines for ocular allergies showed to be very complex. Many controversial topics remain unsolved. A larger consensus including experts from different groups around the world may be needed to further improve the current recommendations for several aspects of ocular allergy.

  15. Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles: A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter B; Vignoles, Vivian L; Becker, Maja; Owe, Ellinor; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Brown, Rupert; Bourguignon, David; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B; Kreuzbauer, Robert; Cendales Ayala, Boris; Yuki, Masaki; Zhang, Jianxin; Lv, Shaobo; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit; Jaafar, Jas Laile; Fischer, Ronald; Milfont, Taciano L; Gavreliuc, Alin; Baguma, Peter; Bond, Michael Harris; Martin, Mariana; Gausel, Nicolay; Schwartz, Seth J; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Tatarko, Alexander; González, Roberto; Didier, Nicolas; Carrasco, Diego; Lay, Siugmin; Nizharadze, George; Torres, Ana; Camino, Leoncio; Abuhamdeh, Sami; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J; Koller, Silvia H; Herman, Ginette; Courtois, Marie; Fritsche, Immo; Espinosa, Agustín; Villamar, Juan A; Regalia, Camillo; Manzi, Claudia; Brambilla, Maria; Zinkeng, Martina; Jalal, Baland; Kusdil, Ersin; Amponsah, Benjamin; Çağlar, Selinay; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu; Möller, Bettina; Zhang, Xiao; Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Prieto Gil, Paula; Lorente Clemares, Raquel; Campara, Gabriella; Aldhafri, Said; Fülöp, Márta; Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin; Harb, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Variations in acquiescence and extremity pose substantial threats to the validity of cross-cultural research that relies on survey methods. Individual and cultural correlates of response styles when using 2 contrasting types of response mode were investigated, drawing on data from 55 cultural groups across 33 nations. Using 7 dimensions of self-other relatedness that have often been confounded within the broader distinction between independence and interdependence, our analysis yields more specific understandings of both individual- and culture-level variations in response style. When using a Likert-scale response format, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as similar to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour harmony, similarity with others and receptiveness to influence. However, when using Schwartz's (2007) portrait-comparison response procedure, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant but also connected to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour self-reliance and self-consistency. Extreme responding varies less between the two types of response modes, and is most prevalent among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant, and in cultures favouring self-reliance. As both types of response mode elicit distinctive styles of response, it remains important to estimate and control for style effects to ensure valid comparisons. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  16. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  17. Isolation and culture of adult human microglia within mixed glial cultures for functional experimentation and high-content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy M; Gibbons, Hannah M; Lill, Claire; Faull, Richard L M; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are thought to be involved in diseases of the adult human brain as well as normal aging processes. While neonatal and rodent microglia are often used in studies investigating microglial function, there are important differences between rodent microglia and their adult human counterparts. Human brain tissue provides a unique and valuable tool for microglial cell and molecular biology. Routine protocols can now enable use of this culture method in many laboratories. Detailed protocols and advice for culture of human brain microglia are provided here. We demonstrate the protocol for culturing human adult microglia within a mixed glial culture and use a phagocytosis assay as an example of the functional studies possible with these cells as well as a high-content analysis method of quantification.

  18. The Inter-cultural Analysis of PSA for Disaster between China and the West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭琳

    2014-01-01

    As a special and extensive type of advertising, public service advertising(PSA) has become an important cultural phe⁃nomenon. Same as commercial advertisement, PSA can also convey cultural values. Out of similar purposes, however, PSA for di⁃sasters between China and other western countries contain many differences. Aiming to reveal the cultural differences, this paper undertakes the analysis of PSA for disasters of China and other western countries from the perspective of inter-cultural communi⁃cation.

  19. Factor analysis of processes of corporate culture formation at industrial enterprises of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illiashenko Sergii

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Authors have analyzed and synthesized the features of formation and development of the corporate culture at industrial enterprises of Ukraine and on this basis developed recommendations for application in the management of strategic development. During the research authors used the following general scientific methods: at research of patterns of interaction national culture, corporate culture and the culture of the individual authors used logical generalization method; for determining factors influencing corporate culture formation with the level of occurrence authors used factor analysis; for trend analysis of the corporate culture development at appropriate levels authors used comparative method. Results of the analysis showed that macro- and microfactors are external and mezofaktors (adaptability of business and corporate governance, corporate ethics, corporate social responsibility and personnel policies, corporate finance are internal for an enterprise. Authors have identified areas for each of the factors, itemized obstacles to the establishment and development of corporate culture at Ukrainian industrial enterprises and proposed recommendations for these processes management.

  20. Consensus contact prediction by linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Bu, Dongbo; Li, Shuai Cheng; Li, Ming; Xu, Jinbo

    2007-01-01

    Protein inter-residue contacts are of great use for protein structure determination or prediction. Recent CASP events have shown that a few accurately predicted contacts can help improve both computational efficiency and prediction accuracy of the ab inito folding methods. This paper develops an integer linear programming (ILP) method for consensus-based contact prediction. In contrast to the simple "majority voting" method assuming that all the individual servers are equal and independent, our method evaluates their correlations using the maximum likelihood method and constructs some latent independent servers using the principal component analysis technique. Then, we use an integer linear programming model to assign weights to these latent servers in order to maximize the deviation between the correct contacts and incorrect ones; our consensus prediction server is the weighted combination of these latent servers. In addition to the consensus information, our method also uses server-independent correlated mutation (CM) as one of the prediction features. Experimental results demonstrate that our contact prediction server performs better than the "majority voting" method. The accuracy of our method for the top L/5 contacts on CASP7 targets is 73.41%, which is much higher than previously reported studies. On the 16 free modeling (FM) targets, our method achieves an accuracy of 37.21%.

  1. Gitksan medicinal plants-cultural choice and efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Leslie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of plants for healing by any cultural group is integrally related to local concepts of the nature of disease, the nature of plants, and the world view of the culture. The physical and chemical properties of the plants themselves also bear on their selection by people for medicines, as does the array of plants available for people to choose from. I examine use of medicinal plants from a "biobehavioral" perspective to illuminate cultural selection of plants used for medicine by the Gitksan of northwestern British Columbia, Canada. Methods Consultant consensus, "intercultural consensus", independent use of the same plants by other cultural groups, and phytochemistry and bioassay results from the literature, were employed in analysis of probable empirical efficacy of plant uses. Results 70% of 37 Gitksan medicinal plants were used similarly by other cultures where direct diffusion is not known to have occurred; eleven plants, including the eight most frequently mentioned medicinal plants, also show active phytochemicals or bioassays indicating probable physiologically based therapeutic effects. Conclusion Analysis of intercultural consensus revealed that the majority of cultures in the British Columbia region within the plant ranges use the same plants, or closely related species, in similar ways. The rigor of this analysis is effected by the lack of consistent data on all taxa of interest for all cultures within the region.

  2. Consensus and Variable Region PCR Analysis of Helicobacter pylori 3′ Region of cagA Gene in Isolates from Individuals with or without Peptic Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Cláudia Augustin; Pereira-Lima, Júlio C.; Blaya, Carolina; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2001-01-01

    The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. To investigate the cagA status of H. pylori-infected patients and the relationship between cagA and peptic ulcer disease, gastric biopsy specimens from 103 Caucasian patients in Brazil were analyzed by PCR. Since allelic variation in cagA exists and distinct H. pylori subgenotypes may circulate in different regions, PCR using primers for a variable 3′ region of the cagA gene according to a Japanese methodology and for a consensus cagA 3′ region used in Western methods was used for cagA detection. cagA was present in 53 (71%) of 75 H. pylori-positive cases when analyzed by the consensus region method and was associated with duodenal ulcer disease (P = 0.02), but not with gastric ulcer (P = 0.26), when compared to patients with duodenitis or gastritis. The variable region PCR method was able to detect 43 (57%) cagA-positive cases within the same group of H. pylori-positive patients and showed three subtypes of cagA (A, B/D, and C) that were not associated with clinical outcome. However, in 8 (18%) of the cases, more than one subtype was present, and an association between patients with multiple subtypes and disease outcome was observed when compared to patients with isolated subtypes (P = 0.048). cagA was a marker of H. pylori strains for duodenal ulcer disease in our population, and in spite of the differences in the 3′ region of the cagA gene, the Japanese methodology was able to detect the cagA status in most cases. The presence of multiple subgenotypes of cagA was associated with gastric ulcer. PMID:11158115

  3. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan

    2016-01-01

    on the effects of physical activity on children’s and youth’s fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process......From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term...

  4. C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Matthew C; D'Agati, Vivette D; Nester, Carla M; Smith, Richard J; Haas, Mark; Appel, Gerald B; Alpers, Charles E; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bedrosian, Camille; Braun, Michael; Doyle, Mittie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fogo, Agnes B; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Gale, Daniel P; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Griffin, Gene; Harris, Claire L; Holers, V Michael; Johnson, Sally; Lavin, Peter J; Medjeral-Thomas, Nicholas; Paul Morgan, B; Nast, Cynthia C; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Peters, D Keith; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Servais, Aude; Sethi, Sanjeev; Song, Wen-Chao; Tamburini, Paul; Thurman, Joshua M; Zavros, Michael; Cook, H Terence

    2013-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the definition of C3 glomerulopathy, appropriate complement investigations that should be performed in these patients, and how complement therapeutics should be explored in the condition. This meeting report represents the current consensus view of the group. PMID:24172683

  5. Febrile Seizures: Controversy and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Omer A.

    1983-01-01

    Although febrile convulsions are a relatively common complaint, the approach to their management is far from uniform and highly controversial. This article reviews the consensus statement on febrile convulsions arrived at by the Consensus Development Conference held in 1980 by the National Institutes of Health, together with other literature of interest to family physicians. Guidelines are given for the assessment, diagnosis and emergency treatment of febrile seizures. Epilepsy and atypical febrile convulsions are distinguished from simple febrile seizures. Prognosis, prevention, and the importance of counselling parents are discussed, as well as the controversial issue of prophylactic treatment. PMID:21286583

  6. Robust consensus of multi-agent systems with noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; LIU ZhiXin

    2009-01-01

    The consensus problem of multi-agent systems has attracted wide attention from researchers in recent years, following the initial work of Jadbabaie et al. on the analysis of a simplified Vicsek model. While the original Vicsek model contains noise effects, almost all the existing theoretical results on consensus problem, however, do not take the noise effects into account. The purpose of this paper is to initiate a study of the consensus problems under noise disturbances. First, the class of multi-agent systems under study is transformed into a general time-varying system with noise. Then, for such a system, the equivalent relationships are established among (ⅰ) robust consensus, (ⅱ) the positivity of the second smallest eigenvalue of a weighted Laplacian matrix, and (ⅲ) the joint connectivity of the associated dynamical neighbor graphs. Finally, this basic equivalence result is shown to be applicable to several classes of concrete multi-agent models with noise.

  7. Mixed-culture transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular basis of mixed-culture growth in Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieuwerts, Sander; Molenaar, Douwe; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Beerthuyzen, Marke; Stevens, Marc J A; Janssen, Patrick W M; Ingham, Colin J; de Bok, Frank A M; de Vos, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T

    2010-12-01

    Many food fermentations are performed using mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria. Interactions between strains are of key importance for the performance of these fermentations. Yogurt fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus (basonym, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) is one of the best-described mixed-culture fermentations. These species are believed to stimulate each other's growth by the exchange of metabolites such as folic acid and carbon dioxide. Recently, postgenomic studies revealed that an upregulation of biosynthesis pathways for nucleotides and sulfur-containing amino acids is part of the global physiological response to mixed-culture growth in S. thermophilus, but an in-depth molecular analysis of mixed-culture growth of both strains remains to be established. We report here the application of mixed-culture transcriptome profiling and a systematic analysis of the effect of interaction-related compounds on growth, which allowed us to unravel the molecular responses associated with batch mixed-culture growth in milk of S. thermophilus CNRZ1066 and L. bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365. The results indicate that interactions between these bacteria are primarily related to purine, amino acid, and long-chain fatty acid metabolism. The results support a model in which formic acid, folic acid, and fatty acids are provided by S. thermophilus. Proteolysis by L. bulgaricus supplies both strains with amino acids but is insufficient to meet the biosynthetic demands for sulfur and branched-chain amino acids, as becomes clear from the upregulation of genes associated with these amino acids in mixed culture. Moreover, genes involved in iron uptake in S. thermophilus are affected by mixed-culture growth, and genes coding for exopolysaccharide production were upregulated in both organisms in mixed culture compared to monocultures. The confirmation of previously identified responses in S. thermophilus using a different strain combination

  8. Analysis of cultural development of Isfahan city Using Factor analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Mohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended abstract1-IntroductionCultural spaces are consideredas one of the main factors for development. Cultural development is a qualitative and valuable process that for assessing it, quantitative indicators in cultural planning are used to obtain development objectives in the pattern of goods and services. The aim of the study is to determine and analyze cultural development level and regional inequality of different districts of Isfahan using factor analysis technique. The statistical population of the study is 14 districts of Isfahan municipality. The dominant approach ofthis study is quantitative – description and analytical. In this study, 35 indices have been summarized by factor analysis method and have been reduced to 5 factors and combined in significant ones and delivered.2 – Theoretical basesThe most important objectives of spatial planning, considering limitation of resources, are optimum distributions of facilities and services among different locations in which people live. To do this,there is a need to identify different locations in terms of having different facilities and services, so that developed locations are specified and planners can proceed to do something for spatial equilibrium and reducing privileged distance between districts.The present study has been conducted to reach to an equal development in Isfahan urban districts following identifying the situation and the manner of distributing development facilities cultural selected indices in different districts.3 – DiscussionCultural development of societies is evaluated by considering the changes and improvement of its indices and measured by quantitative frames. Cultural development indices are the most important tools for cultural planning in a special district in a society. In this study, cultural development indices have been used to determine the levels of districts. By using factor analysis model, the share of influential factors in the cultural

  9. The performance of fully automated urine analysis results for predicting the need of urine culture test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Yüksel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Urinalysis and urine culture are most common tests for diagnosis of urinary tract infections. The aim of our study is to examine the diagnostic performance of urine analysis and the role of urine analysis to determine the requirements for urine culture. Methods: Urine culture and urine analysis results of 362 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Culture results were taken as a reference for chemical and microscopic examination of urine and diagnostic accuracy of the test parameters, that may be a marker for urinary tract infection, and the performance of urine analysis were calculated for predicting the urine culture requirements. Results: A total of 362 urine culture results of patients were evaluated and 67% of them were negative. The results of leukocyte esterase and nitrite in chemical analysis and leukocytes and bacteria in microscopic analysis were normal in 50.4% of culture negative urines. In diagnostic accuracy calculations, leukocyte esterase (86.1% and microscopy leukocytes (88.0% were found with high sensitivity, nitrite (95.4% and bacteria (86.6% were found with high specificity. The area under the curve was calculated as 0.852 in ROC analysis for microscopic examination for leukocytes. Conclusion: Full-automatic urine devices can provide sufficient diagnostic accuracy for urine analysis. The evaluation of urine analysis results in an effective way can predict the necessity for urine culture requests and especially may contribute to a reduction in the work load and cost. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 286-289

  10. Structural Analysis of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Vanessa D.; Kang, Young-Shin; Thompson, George F.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the five-factor structure of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity (RACD) instrument, which assesses resident assistant (RA) confidence in addressing issues of cultural diversity in college and university residence halls. The instrument has five components that explore RA confidence: (1) belief in the need for cultural…

  11. Structural Analysis of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Vanessa D.; Kang, Young-Shin; Thompson, George F.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the five-factor structure of the Resident Assistant Cultural Diversity (RACD) instrument, which assesses resident assistant (RA) confidence in addressing issues of cultural diversity in college and university residence halls. The instrument has five components that explore RA confidence: (1) belief in the need for cultural…

  12. Private development-based forest conservation in Patagonia: comparing mental models and revealing cultural truths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Serenari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Private protected area (PPA conservation agents (CA engaging in development-based conservation in southern Chile have generated conflict with locals. Poor fit of dominant development-based conservation ideology in rural areas is commonly to blame. We developed and administered a cultural consensus survey near the Valdivian Coastal Reserve (RCV and Huilo Huilo Reserve (HH to examine fit of CA cultural truths with local residents. Cultural consensus analysis (CCA of 23 propositions reflecting CA cultural truths confirmed: (1 a single CA culture exists, and (2 RCV communities were more aligned with this culture than HH communities. Inadequate communication, inequitable decision making, divergent opinions about livelihood impacts and trajectories, and PPA purpose may explain differences between CAs and communities. Meanwhile, variability in response between and within communities may reflect differing environmental histories. Private protected area administrations might use CCA to confront cultural differences and thereby improve their community interactions.

  13. Consensus, contracts, and committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J D

    1991-08-01

    Following a brief account of the puzzle that ethics committees present for the Western Philosophical tradition, I will examine the possibility that social contract theory can contribute to a philosophical account of these committees. Passing through classical as well as contemporary theories, particularly Rawls' recent constructivist approach, I will argue that social contract theory places severe constraints on the authority that may legitimately be granted to ethics committees. This, I conclude, speaks more about the suitability of the theory to this level of analysis than about the ethics committee phenomenon itself.

  14. Music and Cultural Analysis in the Classroom: Introducing Sociology through Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlkvist, Jarl A.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates that popular music's potential as a tool for teaching interactive introductory sociology courses is enhanced when a cultural analysis of a specific music genre is incorporated into the classroom. Presents a two-part model for integrating a cultural analysis of heavy metal music and its subculture into the introductory course. Includes…

  15. An Analysis of the Cultural Roots of Pecola' Tragedy%An Analysis of the Cultural Roots of Pecola'Tragedy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛妮

    2016-01-01

    The Bluest Eye is Toni Morrison's first great masterpiece, who received the Nobel Prize. It describes the tragic fate of a black girl during the great depression, revealing the impact of the white cultural values of the United States on the soul of black people. This essay will explore the Cultural roots of the tragedy of Pocola from the two aspects: the shock of the White culture and the loss of Black culture. It revealed that only way that the blacks stick to their traditional foundation can they realize their self-value.

  16. A Brief Analysis on Cross-cultural Communication Strategy of Chinese Films under the Context of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Zhiyong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of globalization waves, the cross-cultural communication becomes more and more common nowadays. Chinese films, as a kind of mass media and the carrier of ideology, must meet the challenge in the world with active attitudes and take part in cross-cultural communication worldwide extensively. The context of globalization is not only a challenge but also an opportunity for Chinese films and if Chinese films want to be successful in the process of cross-cultural communication, it must find out a conjoint point between globalization and location to implement dual-coding of them. With the objective of consensus but different for the cultural demands of cross-cultural communication, the communicational strategies in culture,subject,art and operation must extensively use for reference and boldly create to renew the situation of Chinese films.

  17. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan;

    2016-01-01

    that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord...

  18. Balancing multiple roles through consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates how participants in haircutting sessions merge different roles during one of the most sensitive moments of an encounter: requesting and/or making revisions to a new cut. During the process of arriving at a consensus of whether or not changes need to be made to the new cut...

  19. Quantized average consensus with delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafarian, Matin; De Persis, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Average consensus problem is a special case of cooperative control in which the agents of the network asymptotically converge to the average state (i.e., position) of the network by transferring information via a communication topology. One of the issues of the large scale networks is the cost of co

  20. Chinese Identity in London-An Analysis from the Aspects of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ning

    2014-01-01

    The basic aim of this study is to find out and understand the strength and inspira-tion behind the identity of Chinese in London , and how it has been maintained from the aspects of cul-tural heritage and cultural memory . “Individuals have always been capable of i-dentifying with different social groups and spatial scales” ( Ashworth et al.2007, 4); and further-more, as Sewell puts it , “culture exists only in and through practices” ( 1999 in Ashworth et al . 2007, 7).Therefore, the main methodology for researching Chinese identity in London will be through interviews and questionnaires , looking for answers by asking questions about the circum-stances of Chinese daily lives; at the same time , the ways of their maintenance will be explored fur-ther . The questionnaires were divided into mainly two groups of respondents:Chinese and non-Chi-nese, and they were done in Chinatown and in my volunteer group doing the placement at the Museum of London Docklands . The purpose of question-naires was to unearth general ideas about Chinese identity. The interviews were based on semi -struc-tured questions .The questions were based on the use of an “interview guide” ( Bernard 2006, 212 ) , which directed the conversation towards their daily lives , connections with China , living habits, social surroundings such as friends , and interests . Meanwhile , during the interviewing process, the respondents were also encouraged to feel free to talk more about other things that they would like to say . Through these interviews , a general description of Chinese lives in London could be drawn . When talking to interviewees about China-town, we find that it is a place connected with dai-ly life;whereas for non-Chinese , it is considered more as tourist or leisure site full of lanterns and an enormous variety of restaurants ( Masters et al . 2008, 67) .A lot of Chinese get jobs there in or-der to survive .Chinese go to Chinatown to buy food and commodities that are not

  1. [The optimization of the nitric oxide quantitative analysis for its determination in the cultural medium of mammalian cell culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, M G; Fomina-Ageeva, E V; Bezuglov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The protocol for the quantitative analysis of nitric oxide as nitrite-ion suitable for determination of its production by a mammalian cell culture was developed. The optimal results were obtained using microvolume-adjusted Griess method after the preliminary reduction of NO3- to NO2- with non-activated cadmium. The protocol was verified on a rat glioma C6 cell culture. The developed method may be used for the nitric oxide determination in 96-well and 48-well microplates; the detection limit is 2.1 ± 0.1 μM for NO2- and 2.9 ± 0.1 μM for NO3-.

  2. Wireless sensor networks distributed consensus estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cailian; Guan, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief evaluates the cooperative effort of sensor nodes to accomplish high-level tasks with sensing, data processing and communication. The metrics of network-wide convergence, unbiasedness, consistency and optimality are discussed through network topology, distributed estimation algorithms and consensus strategy. Systematic analysis reveals that proper deployment of sensor nodes and a small number of low-cost relays (without sensing function) can speed up the information fusion and thus improve the estimation capability of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This brief also investiga

  3. Cross-Cultural Homestays: An Analysis of College Students' Responses After Living in an Unfamiliar Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roger M.; Dold, Eugene

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to investigate the effects of a cross-cultural homestay program on students' attitudes and health. Available from: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Transaction Periodicals Consortium, Rutgers-The State University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903. (MH)

  4. A Culturally Sensitive Analysis of Culture in the Context of Context: When Is Enough Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Peter H., Jr.

    Cultural context is not the sole source of human knowledge. Postmodern theory, in both its deconstructionist and affirmative approaches, offers an incomplete basis by which to study race, class, and gender, and undermines ethical interaction. Deconstructionism calls for the abandonment of generalizable research findings, asserting that the concept…

  5. A consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Xin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game. In our model, both of the two connected agents receive a benefit if they have the same opinion, otherwise they both pay a cost. Agents update their opinions by comparing payoffs with neighbors. The opinion of an agent with higher payoff is more likely to be imitated. We apply this model in scale-free networks with tunable degree distribution. Interestingly, we find that there exists an optimal ratio of cost to benefit, leading to the shortest consensus time. Qualitative analysis is obtained by examining the evolution of the opinion clusters. Moreover, we find that the consensus time decreases as the average degree of the network increases, but increases with the noise introduced to permit irrational choices. The dependence of the consensus time on the network size is found to be a power-law form. For small or larger ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time decreases as the degree exponent increases. However, for moderate ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time increases with the degree exponent. Our results may provide new insights into opinion dynamics driven by the evolutionary game theory.

  6. The effect of trauma on Neanderthal culture: A mathematical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahashi, W

    2017-02-04

    Traumatic lesions are often observed in ancient skeletal remains. Since ancient medical technology was immature, severely traumatized individuals may have frequently lost the physical ability for cultural skills that demand complex body movements. I develop a mathematical model to analyze the effect of trauma on cultural transmission and apply it to Neanderthal culture using Neanderthal fossil data. I estimate from the data that the proportion of adult individuals who suffered traumatic injuries before death was approximately 0.79-0.94, in which 0.37-0.52 were injured severely and 0.13-0.19 were injured before adulthood. Assuming that every severely traumatized individual and a quarter to a half of the other traumatized individuals lost the capacity for a cultural skill that demands complex control of the traumatized body part, I estimate that if an upper limb is associated with a cultural skill, each individual had to communicate closely with at least 1.5-2.6 individuals during adulthood to maintain the skill in Neanderthal society, and if a whole body is associated, at least 3.1-11.5 individuals were necessary. If cultural transmissions between experts and novices were inaccurate, or if low frequency skills easily disappeared from the population due to random drift, more communicable individuals were necessary. Since the community size of Neanderthals was very small, their high risk of injury may have inhibited the spread of technically difficult cultural skills in their society. It may be important to take this inhibition into consideration when we study Neanderthal culture and the replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans.

  7. [Multivariate analysis of blood culture positive rate of ICU patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A P; Liu, D; Chen, J; Li, X Y; Wang, H; An, Y Z

    2016-07-19

    To investigate the factors associated with positive results of blood culture and the impact of positive results on the prognosis of patients in ICU of Peking University People's Hospital. We retrospectively analyzed 1 008 blood culture results of 379 critical ill adult patients in ICU from July 1st, 2013 to June 30th, 2014. According to blood culture results, the patients were divided into positive and negative groups. The patients' maximal body temperature, sample collection times, number of bottles within 24 hours, routine hematological variables [(white blood cell count (WBC), percentage of neutrophils (NEU%), lymphocyte count (LYM), platelet count (PLT)], serum C-reactive protein (CRP), usage of antibiotics were compared between the two groups, as well as the patients' gender, age, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay and hospital mortality rate. The total positiverate of blood culture of our study was 15.38%, and the positive rate of patients was 24.27%.When compared between positive group and negative group, the medians of sample collection times were 3 and 1(P0.05) between the two groups in body temperature, NEU%, LYM, PLT, CRP or usage of antibiotics. Increasing the frequency of sampling and the bottles of blood culture will improve the positive rate of blood culture. The body temperature, WBC, NEU%, LYM, PLT, CRP, us age of antibiotics, gender and age have no effect on the positive rate of blood culture. The patients with positive blood culture results have longer duration of mechanical ventilation, longer ICU stayand higher hospital mortality rate.

  8. Cross-cultural Pragmatic Analysis on Speech Act

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟威

    2014-01-01

    The theory of speech acts tells us that when words are uttered, they perform three different kinds of speech acts. But cross-cultural communication raises a question that the same locutionary acts may perform different illocutionary acts and perlo-cutionary acts, and in order to achieve the same illocutionary acts and perlocutionary acts, people with different native languages may employ different locutionary acts to avoid the pragmatic failure. This paper aims to illustrate the differences on greeting, re-questing, and rejecting between Chinese and Americans, focus on the cultural factors in language and cross-cultural communica-tion, and using the fundamental cross-cultural theories to analyze the distinctions, such as Austin ’s Speech Act Theory, Brown and Levinson Face Theory, Edward T Hall’s High-Context and Low-Context Communication, and Hofestede’s Value Dimen-sions. Finally, it tells the English learners to focus on the cultural difference in the cross-cultural communication to achieve the successful communication.

  9. An Analysis on Cultural Differences in Advertising Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高雅

    2014-01-01

    Great opportunities together with great challenges are brought to the development of Chinese economy with the glo-balization of the world economy. Foreign businessmen want to share the market of China, while Chinese enterprisers with a broader sight have been thinking about selling products to international markets. Languages and cultures of different nations have their own characteristics. In order to communicate with each other, human beings must make use of the methods of translation. Thus, it shows that translation, which is a social activity of inter-language, inter-culture and inter-community, is linked closely to culture. Meanwhile, the features of translation represent similarly in advertising translation. Generally speaking, when doing ad-vertising translation, it can not only focus on language differences between the two sides, but also pay attention to cultural differ-ences. Or else it would be difficult to translate satisfying advertisements.By taking examples from Chinese-English and English-Chinese, this paper compares the different aspects between Chinese and Western thinking sets, traditional ideas and values in order to reflect differences of advertising translation based on different cultures. Finally, it will sum up some strategies of inter-cultural advertising translation.

  10. THE COLOMBIAN REALITY FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF BEHAIOVR ANALYSIS: PEACE AS A RESULT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BLANCA PATRICIA BALLESTEROS DE VALDERRAMA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the advantage of applying behavior analysis to cultural practices comprehension, considering cultural practices as group behaviors, selected and maintained by social reinforcement contingencies and metacontingencies. The three types of contingencies formulated by Skinner are described, and the principal existing data related to aggressive behavior. A proposal to analyze some relevant aspects to Colombian reality is formulated, and finally, an intent to analyze peace as a result of cultural practices is presented, emphasizing positive reciprocal social processes. Mattaini's (1996 suggestion to graphical representation of cultural practices analysis is applied.

  11. Culture and health reporting: a comparative content analysis of newspapers in the United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Peng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Health reporting has the potential to educate the public and promote health behaviors. Culture influences the style of such communication. Following the theorization of national cultures by Hofstede and Hofstede (2005) and Wilber (2000), this study compares health reporting in the United States and China through a content analysis of leading newspapers. The authors discover significant differences in health reporting in terms of controllability attribution, temporal orientation, citation of authority sources, and use of statistics. As one of the first comparative content analysis studies of health reporting in Eastern and Western cultures, this study provides a unique cultural lens for health communication scholars to better understand health information in the news media.

  12. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis using a convex analysis approach: Application to hybridoma cell cultures in perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes de Sousa, Sofia; Bastin, Georges; Jolicoeur, Mario; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, dynamic metabolic flux analysis (DMFA) has been developed in order to evaluate the dynamic evolution of the metabolic fluxes. Most of the proposed approaches are dedicated to exactly determined or overdetermined systems. When an underdetermined system is considered, the literature suggests the use of dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA). However the main challenge of this approach is to determine an appropriate objective function, which remains valid over the whole culture. In this work, we propose an alternative dynamic metabolic flux analysis based on convex analysis, DMFCA, which allows the determination of bounded intervals for the fluxes using the available knowledge of the metabolic network and information provided by the time evolution of extracellular component concentrations. Smoothing splines and mass balance differential equations are used to estimate the time evolution of the uptake and excretion rates from this experimental data. The main advantage of the proposed procedure is that it does not require additional constraints or objective functions, and provides relatively narrow intervals for the intracellular metabolic fluxes. DMFCA is applied to experimental data from hybridoma HB58 cell perfusion cultures, in order to investigate the influence of the operating mode (batch and perfusion) on the metabolic flux distribution.

  13. Systematic approach to sonographic evaluation of the pelvis in women with suspected endometriosis, including terms, definitions and measurements: a consensus opinion from the International Deep Endometriosis Analysis (IDEA) group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, S; Condous, G; van den Bosch, T; Valentin, L; Leone, F P G; Van Schoubroeck, D; Exacoustos, C; Installé, A J F; Martins, W P; Abrao, M S; Hudelist, G; Bazot, M; Alcazar, J L; Gonçalves, M O; Pascual, M A; Ajossa, S; Savelli, L; Dunham, R; Reid, S; Menakaya, U; Bourne, T; Ferrero, S; Leon, M; Bignardi, T; Holland, T; Jurkovic, D; Benacerraf, B; Osuga, Y; Somigliana, E; Timmerman, D

    2016-09-01

    The IDEA (International Deep Endometriosis Analysis group) statement is a consensus opinion on terms, definitions and measurements that may be used to describe the sonographic features of the different phenotypes of endometriosis. Currently, it is difficult to compare results between published studies because authors use different terms when describing the same structures and anatomical locations. We hope that the terms and definitions suggested herein will be adopted in centers around the world. This would result in consistent use of nomenclature when describing the ultrasound location and extent of endometriosis. We believe that the standardization of terminology will allow meaningful comparisons between future studies in women with an ultrasound diagnosis of endometriosis and should facilitate multicenter research. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Free-energy component analysis of 40 protein-DNA complexes: a consensus view on the thermodynamics of binding at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, B; McConnell, K; Dixit, S B; Das, A; Beveridge, D L

    2002-01-15

    Noncovalent association of proteins to specific target sites on DNA--a process central to gene expression and regulation--has thus far proven to be idiosyncratic and elusive to generalizations on the nature of the driving forces. The spate of structural information on protein--DNA complexes sets the stage for theoretical investigations on the molecular thermodynamics of binding aimed at identifying forces responsible for specific macromolecular recognition. Computation of absolute binding free energies for systems of this complexity transiting from structural information is a stupendous task. Adopting some recent progresses in treating atomic level interactions in proteins and nucleic acids including solvent and salt effects, we have put together an energy component methodology cast in a phenomenological mode and amenable to systematic improvements and developed a computational first atlas of the free energy contributors to binding in approximately 40 protein-DNA complexes representing a variety of structural motifs and functions. Illustrating vividly the compensatory nature of the free energy components contributing to the energetics of recognition for attaining optimal binding, our results highlight unambiguously the roles played by packing, electrostatics including hydrogen bonds, ion and water release (cavitation) in protein-DNA binding. Cavitation and van der Waals contributions without exception favor complexation. The electrostatics is marginally unfavorable in a consensus view. Basic residues on the protein contribute favorably to binding despite the desolvation expense. The electrostatics arising from the acidic and neutral residues proves unfavorable to binding. An enveloping mode of binding to short stretches of DNA makes for a strong unfavorable net electrostatics but a highly favorable van der Waals and cavitation contribution. Thus, noncovalent protein-DNA association is a system-specific fine balancing act of these diverse competing forces. With the

  15. How did the public respond to the 2015 expert consensus public health guidance statement on workplace sedentary behaviour? A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benjamin; Smith, Lee; Mansfield, Louise

    2017-02-02

    In June 2015, an expert consensus guidance statement was published recommending that office workers accumulate 2-4 h of standing and light activity daily and take regular breaks from prolonged sitting. This paper describes public responses to media coverage of the guidance, so as to understand public acceptability of the recommendations within the guidance, and perceptions of sitting and standing as health behaviours. UK news media websites that had reported on the sedentary workplace guidance statement, and permitted viewers to post comments responding to the story, were identified. 493 public comments, posted in a one-month period to one of six eligible news media websites, were thematically analysed. Three themes were extracted: (1) challenges to the credibility of the sedentary workplace guidance; (2) challenges to the credibility of public health; and (3) the guidance as a spur to knowledge exchange. Challenges were made to the novelty of the guidance, the credibility of its authors, the strength of its evidence base, and its applicability to UK workplaces. Public health was commonly mistrusted and viewed as a tool for controlling the public, to serve a paternalistic agenda set by a conspiracy of stakeholders with hidden non-health interests. Knowledge exchanges focused on correcting others' misinterpretations, raising awareness of historical or scientific context, debating current workplace health policies, and sharing experiences around sitting and standing. The guidance provoked exchanges of health-promoting ideas among some, thus demonstrating the potential for sitting reduction messages to be translated into everyday contexts by lay champions. However, findings also demonstrated confusion, misunderstanding and misapprehension among some respondents about the health value of sitting and standing. Predominantly unfavourable, mistrusting responses reveal significant hostility towards efforts to displace workplace sitting with standing, and towards public

  16. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a decide-announce-defend'' approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other's positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a safe'' context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  17. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a ``decide-announce-defend`` approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other`s positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a ``safe`` context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  18. Analysis of the cultural tourism trends and perspectives in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela TIGU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tourism brings a number of benefits, including the enhancement of economic opportunities by creating more jobs for local residents or the increase in income by stimulating and creating local and regional markets. Tourism can also help to protect natural and cultural heritage, preserve the values through education and interpretation, and help to support research and development of good environmental practices. This paper’s purpose is to analyse the cultural tourism in Romania, taking into consideration the potential of Romania’s cultural heritage and the benefits that tourism industry can bring to the country and to the local communities. The originality of this study is highlighted by the combination and correlation of statistics, including correlation and regression methods, that have as main purpose the computation and conclusions’ simplification, knowing that it is very difficult to quantify the multitude of all the factors that influence a specific phenomenon.

  19. A case for systemic environmental analysis of cultured meat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carolyn S Mattick; Amy E Landis; Braden R Allenby

    2015-01-01

    The environmental implications of cultured meat are profound. An anticipatory life cycle assessment of cultured meat published in 2011 suggested it could have a smal er impact than agricultural meat in al categories except energy consumption. As with most technologies, cultured meat wil almost certainly be accompanied by unintended consequences as wel as unforeseen costs and beneifts that accrue disproportionately to different stakeholders. Uncertainty associated with new engineered products cannot be completely eliminated prior to introduction, but ongoing environmental assessments of the technologies as they advance can serve to reduce unforeseen risks. Given the pace at which tissue engineering is advancing, systemic assessments of the technology wil be pivotal in mitigating unintended environmental consequences.

  20. Leadership and cultural competence of healthcare professionals: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvrin, Marie; Lorant, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    International migration is a global phenomenon challenging healthcare professionals to provide culturally competent care. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of leaders on the cultural competence of healthcare professionals. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to obtain data for a social network analysis in 19 inpatient services and five primary care services in Belgium. The Competences in Ethnicity and Health questionnaire was used. A total of 507 healthcare professionals, including 302 nurses, identified their social relationships with other healthcare professionals working in their service. Highest in-degree centrality was used to identify the leaders within each health service. Multiple regressions with the Huber sandwich estimator were used to link cultural competence of leaders with the cultural competence of the rest of the healthcare staff. Cultural competence of the healthcare staff was associated with the cultural competence of the leaders. This association remained significant for two specific domains of cultural competence-mediation and paradigm-after controlling for contextual and sociodemographic variables. Interaction analysis suggested that the leadership effect varied with the degree of cultural competence of the leaders. Cultural competence among healthcare professionals is acquired partly through leadership. Social relationships and leadership effects within health services should be considered when developing and implementing culturally competent strategies. This requires a cautious approach as the most central individuals are not always the same persons as the formal leaders.

  1. Fear of cultural extinction and psychopathology among Mandaean refugees: an exploratory path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Angela; Bryant, Richard A; Brooks, Robert; Steel, Zachary; Silove, Derrick

    2009-01-01

    The Mandaeans are a small religious community originating from Iraq and Iran who are facing the possibility of cultural extinction within the next few generations. This study aimed to examine the relationships between life experiences, psychopathology and fear of cultural extinction in Mandaean refugees. A survey was conducted of 315 adult Iraqi Mandaean refugees living in Australia. Past traumatic experiences and current resettlement difficulties were assessed. Mental health outcomes were also examined, including measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Fear of cultural extinction was measured by items developed in consultation with the Mandaean community. A path analysis was employed to investigate the relationship between trauma, living difficulties, PTSD, depression, and fear of cultural extinction. Results indicated that trauma and living difficulties impacted indirectly on fear of cultural extinction, while PTSD (and not depression) directly predicted levels of anxiety about the Mandaean culture ceasing to exist. The current findings indicate that past trauma and symptoms of posttraumatic stress contribute to fear of cultural extinction. Exposure to human rights violations enacted on the basis of religion has significant mental health consequences that extend beyond PTSD. The relationship between perception of threat, PTSD, and fear of cultural extinction is considered in the context of cognitive models of traumatic stress. Government immigration policy must prioritize the reunification of small, endangered groups to sustain cultural traditions. Treatment interventions implemented with cultural groups facing extinction should take into consideration anxiety about loss of culture.

  2. Pop-culture as a factor of Socialization: the Opportunities for Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I V Trotsuk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article offers the systematic analysis of the issues related to the sociological research of popular culture at theoretical and empirical levels. The former level of analysis deals with the definitions of pop-culture in comparison with the closely related concept of mass culture as well as interdisciplinary endeavours to conceptualize the range of topics related to popular culture. Furthermore, the functions of popular culture as well as its socialization opportunities (both positive and negative are outlined. As far as the empirical analysis is concerned, the above-mentioned issues have yet received little attention. The sociological analysis tools usually comprise nothing but youth leisure preferences and value orientations theme-based modules which are not infrequently supposed to confirm the negative influence of television on socialization. The authors put forward another approach to the empirical study of the impact of popular culture with the focus on the analysis of identification models represented in «texts» of popular culture. An example illustrating the application of the given approach (the content-analysis of the youth magazine «Molotok» is provided in this very item.

  3. Analysis of Tsunami Culture in Countries Affected by Recent Tsunamis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteban, M.; Tsimopoulou, V.; Shibayama, T.; Mikami, T.; Ohira, K.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004 there is a growing global awareness of the risks that tsunamis pose to coastal communities. Despite the fact that these events were already an intrinsic part of the culture of some countries (such as Chile and Japan), in many other places they had been virtually unheard of before 2004.

  4. A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Interpersonal Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Ronald E.; Klopf, Donald W.

    The Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation--Behavior (FIRO-B) was administered to 504 Japanese, 219 Australian, 73 Korean, and 397 United States college students to assess interpersonal needs in the four cultures. The FIRO-B provides ratings for inclusion, control, and affection needs on an "expressed" dimension to indicate the…

  5. Creativity of Chinese and American Cultures: A Synthetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Weihua; Kaufman, James C.

    2013-01-01

    The article integrates the seven papers of the two special issues with a special focus on discussing the differences in people's beliefs about creativity between the Chinese and American cultures: How it is conceived, evaluated, and nurtured. It uses three metaphors to capture major differences in these aspects, and highlights areas with profound…

  6. Analysis of Tsunami Culture in Countries Affected by Recent Tsunamis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteban, M.; Tsimopoulou, V.; Shibayama, T.; Mikami, T.; Ohira, K.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004 there is a growing global awareness of the risks that tsunamis pose to coastal communities. Despite the fact that these events were already an intrinsic part of the culture of some countries (such as Chile and Japan), in many other places they had been virtually unheard of before 2004. Ne

  7. Cultural Analysis of Designing in International Contraction Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王尚雪

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the author takes personal experience as an example to analyze the cultural differences and their influencesin designing phrase of international contraction projecm,which are the main differences in the translation of design codes and esthetic requirements.

  8. A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Interpersonal Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Ronald E.; Klopf, Donald W.

    The Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation--Behavior (FIRO-B) was administered to 504 Japanese, 219 Australian, 73 Korean, and 397 United States college students to assess interpersonal needs in the four cultures. The FIRO-B provides ratings for inclusion, control, and affection needs on an "expressed" dimension to indicate the behavior…

  9. Creativity of Chinese and American Cultures: A Synthetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Weihua; Kaufman, James C.

    2013-01-01

    The article integrates the seven papers of the two special issues with a special focus on discussing the differences in people's beliefs about creativity between the Chinese and American cultures: How it is conceived, evaluated, and nurtured. It uses three metaphors to capture major differences in these aspects, and highlights areas with profound…

  10. Cultural Genocide through Mainstream Media: A Brief Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olague, Rubén; Ekiaka Nzai, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    While the U.S. mainstream media continues to exercise its right of way in the American landscape, the predominant culture faces a population and popularity decrease. Diversity is slowly finding a perennial nest for growth, although minorities are still being shelled by mainstream media that consciously and unconsciously make the attack a priority…

  11. Values and the Scientific Culture of Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Maria R.; Roche, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    As scientists and practitioners, behavior analysts must make frequent decisions that affect many lives. Scientific principles have been our guide as we work to promote effective action across a broad spectrum of cultural practices. Yet scientific principles alone may not be sufficient to guide our decision making in cases with potentially…

  12. MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF CONSUMERS’ PREFERENCE AT THE RUSSIAN MARKET OF CULTURED MILK PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov V. Ruchinskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methodological and methodical basis of the developed methods of the multivariate statistical analysis of consumers’ preferences at the Russian market of cultured milk products is considered. The author carried out segmentation of consumers of the cultured milk production based on methods of multidimensional classification and allowing optimizing structure of production of milk production by domestic producers.

  13. The spatial metaphor of Utopia in Russian culture and in analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivinsky, Vladimir

    2014-02-01

    The spatial metaphor of Utopia is considered from a Jungian perspective along with its role in Russian culture and in analysis. Such post-Jungian concepts as the cultural complex and the archetypal story pattern of a victim are used in considering the desperate longing for a rescuer in patients' narratives and in Russian society. A clinical vignette is provided to illustrate these ideas.

  14. Longitudinal Analysis of Microbiota in Microalga Nannochloropsis salina Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Haifeng; Sale, Kenneth L; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao; Lane, Todd W; Yu, Eizadora T

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale open microalgae cultivation has tremendous potential to make a significant contribution to replacing petroleum-based fuels with biofuels. Open algal cultures are unavoidably inhabited with a diversity of microbes that live on, influence, and shape the fate of these ecosystems. However, there is little understanding of the resilience and stability of the microbial communities in engineered semicontinuous algal systems. To evaluate the dynamics and resilience of the microbial communities in microalgae biofuel cultures, we conducted a longitudinal study on open systems to compare the temporal profiles of the microbiota from two multigenerational algal cohorts, which include one seeded with the microbiota from an in-house culture and the other exogenously seeded with a natural-occurring consortia of bacterial species harvested from the Pacific Ocean. From these month-long, semicontinuous open microalga Nannochloropsis salina cultures, we sequenced a time-series of 46 samples, yielding 8804 operational taxonomic units derived from 9,160,076 high-quality partial 16S rRNA sequences. We provide quantitative evidence that clearly illustrates the development of microbial community is associated with microbiota ancestry. In addition, N. salina growth phases were linked with distinct changes in microbial phylotypes. Alteromonadeles dominated the community in the N. salina exponential phase whereas Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia were more prevalent in the stationary phase. We also demonstrate that the N. salina-associated microbial community in open cultures is diverse, resilient, and dynamic in response to environmental perturbations. This knowledge has general implications for developing and testing design principles of cultivated algal systems.

  15. At the intersection of culture and religion: a cultural analysis of religion's implications for secondary control and social affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Joni Y; Kim, Heejung S

    2011-08-01

    Religion helps people maintain a sense of control, particularly secondary control-acceptance of and adjustment to difficult situations--and contributes to strengthening social relationships in a religious community. However, little is known about how culture may influence these effects. The current research examined the interaction of culture and religion on secondary control and social affiliation, comparing people from individualistic cultures (e.g., European Americans), who tend to be more motivated toward personal agency, and people from collectivistic cultures (e.g., East Asians), who tend to be more motivated to maintain social relationships. In Study 1, an analysis of online church mission statements showed that U.S. websites contained more themes of secondary control than did Korean websites, whereas Korean websites contained more themes of social affiliation than did U.S. websites. Study 2 showed that experimental priming of religion led to acts of secondary control for European Americans but not Asian Americans. Using daily diary methodology, Study 3 showed that religious coping predicted more secondary control for European Americans but not Koreans, and religious coping predicted more social affiliation for Koreans and European Americans. These findings suggest the importance of understanding sociocultural moderators for the effects of religion.

  16. Culture and the Immune System: Cultural Consonance in Social Support and C-reactive Protein in Urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ribeiro, Rosane P; Dos Santos, José Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we examine the distribution of a marker of immune system stimulation-C-reactive protein-in urban Brazil. Social relationships are associated with immunostimulation, and we argue that cultural dimensions of social support, assessed by cultural consonance, are important in this process. Cultural consonance is the degree to which individuals, in their own beliefs and behaviors, approximate shared cultural models. A measure of cultural consonance in social support, based on a cultural consensus analysis regarding sources and patterns of social support in Brazil, was developed. In a survey of 258 persons, the association of cultural consonance in social support and C-reactive protein was examined, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, depressive symptoms, and a social network index. Lower cultural consonance in social support was associated with higher C-reactive protein. Implications of these results for future research are discussed.

  17. Cross-cultural perspectives on critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sheryl Daun

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this cross-cultural study was to explore critical thinking among nurse scholars in Thailand and the United States. The study used qualitative methodology to examine how nurse scholars describe critical thinking in nursing. Nurse educators in Thailand and the United States were questioned concerning the following aspects of critical thinking: essential components; teaching and evaluation techniques; characteristics of critical thinkers; and the importance of a consensus definition for critical thinking in nursing. Their statements, which revealed both common and specific cultural aspects of critical thinking, were subjected to content analysis. Certain themes emerged that have not been widely discussed in the literature, including the link between staying calm and thinking critically, the assertion that happiness is an essential component of critical thinking, and the participants' nearly unanimous support for coming to a consensus definition of critical thinking for nursing.

  18. Suspended Cell Culture ANalysis (SCAN) Tool to Enhance ISS On-Orbit Capabilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences and partner, Draper Laboratory, propose to develop an on-orbit immuno-based label-free Suspension Cell Culture ANalysis tool, SCAN tool, which...

  19. Ensemble distribution models in conservation prioritization: from consensus predictions to consensus reserve networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Laura; Cabeza, Mar; Pironon, Samuel; Barbet-Massin, Morgane; Maiorano, Luigi; Georges, Damien; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Aim Conservation planning exercises increasingly rely on species distributions predicted either from one particular statistical model or, more recently, from an ensemble of models (i.e. ensemble forecasting). However, it has not yet been explored how different ways of summarizing ensemble predictions affect conservation planning outcomes. We evaluate these effects and compare commonplace consensus methods, applied before the conservation prioritization phase, to a novel method that applies consensus after reserve selection. Location Europe. Methods We used an ensemble of predicted distributions of 146 Western Palaearctic bird species in alternative ways: four different consensus methods, as well as distributions discounted with variability, were used to produce inputs for spatial conservation prioritization. In addition, we developed and tested a novel method, in which we built 100 datasets by sampling the ensemble of predicted distributions, ran a conservation prioritization analysis on each of them and averaged the resulting priority ranks. We evaluated the conservation outcome against three controls: (i) a null control, based on random ranking of cells; (2) the reference solution, based on an expert-refined dataset; and (3) the independent solution, based on an independent dataset. Results Networks based on predicted distributions were more representative of rare species than randomly selected networks. Alternative methods to summarize ensemble predictions differed in representativeness of resulting reserve networks. Our novel method resulted in better representation of rare species than pre-selection consensus methods. Main conclusions Retaining information about the variation in the predicted distributions throughout the conservation prioritization seems to provide better results than summarizing the predictions before conservation prioritization. Our results highlight the need to understand and consider model-based uncertainty when using predicted

  20. Analysis on Citizenship Culture in the City of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Hashemianfar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBehavior of citizens and their quality of participation in the social activities is taken to account for one ofthe basic requirements of social capital and indication of being developed in the societies. Citizenshipculture and its key elements have been challenged through out the history of this concept by thinkers and theclear – sighted people who take interest in social problems and believe that civilization and progress ofhuman societies are related to the establishment of that culture and have been discussed and argued fromthe ancient era until now.Today , defining the amount of institutionalization of citizenship culture in order to define our situationin the development in the globalization back ground is urgent for achieving development indices.In this paper , after collecting data from surveying the city of Isfahan and historical study of citizenshipconcept , and by using different theories , the citizenship condition and its various dimension in the city andamong the people will be discussed.

  1. Rhodiola rosea in vitro culture - phytochemical analysis and antioxidant action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Furmanowa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various Rhodiola rosea organs and tissues from in vitro culture were studied in two areas: searching for the biological active four phenolic compounds and measurement of antioxidant activity of dry residues of EtOH-extracts soluble in PBS using chemiluminescence method. For phytochemical investigation HPLC method was used. Salidroside was typical for organs of intact plant, rosavin for roots of different origin and shoots of intact plants, triandrin was more typical for tissue cultured in vitro, but it was found in all studied samples. Caffeic acid was detected mainly in green and yellow lines of callus, less in other Rhodiola rosea plant material. The highest antioxidant activity showed the extract from 1,5-years-old callus of green and yellow line, which contained caffeic acid and triandrin. Further observations are in progress.

  2. Transactional Analysis - Cultural and Educational Perspectives of Negotiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lect. Ph. D. Oana Iucu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the negotiation topics from one modern perspective, as an managerial, cultural and protocol structure. The traditionally orientation, psycho-social and communicational, technically and instrumentally, has been extended with one dynamic and very actual approach to the protocol procedures. Here is also analyzed principals negotiation’s components, which are frequently mentioned in handbooks of management and negotiation, from the organizational and operational its consequences point of view.

  3. Analysis of Gender Equality Competence Present in Cultural Positions

    OpenAIRE

    Concepción Mimbrero Mallado; Joilson Pereira da Silva; Leonor María Cantera Espinosa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Articulating the gender dimension in organizations is not easy because their members have to be trained to adopt positions that facilitate the implementation of solutions that help to combat inequalities. The aim of this article was to identify the gender equality competence present in the three types of cultural positions Castells proposed in members of a City CouncilinSevilla-Spain, who wanted to implement gender mainstreaming. The participants were 27 people (16 women and 11 men)...

  4. Culture change in a museum: An action research analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dennehy, Robert F.; Morgan, Sandra; Lehrburger, Karen J.

    2004-01-01

    The move of a museum in the western United States to larger quarters resulted in an increase in visitors and requests for tours. To respond to the greater number of tours, new volunteers (docents) were recruited and trained. But conflicts arose between the old and new docents. As Docent Chair, one of the authors worked with the Curator of Education to understand the culture change faced by the old docent group and integrate the old and new docent groups. This paper analyzes the...

  5. An Analysis Of National Culture And Leadership Practices In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodi Wirawan Irawanto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Managers around the world need ideas and support to meet many of the challenges of leading. Leadership requires actions and strategies as well as convictions and ideas. Leadership occurs in relation with followers. Leading Indonesian people is not the same as leading Westerners nor is it the same as leading other Asian people. A leadership strategy effective in one culture can be counter-productive in another. In this paper, the use findings of Hofstede’s and the GLOBE’s studies are used to identify important values of Indonesians, relating them to Indonesian culture and leadership style in an organization setting. Indonesians emphasis collective well being and show a strong humane orientation within their society. The culture is assertive, and pays attention to maintaining harmony. Effective leaders are expected to show compassion while using a more paternalistic than autocratic leadership style. It is advisable that expatriate managers need to avoid actions that are not suited to these values and expectations.

  6. Cultural Crisis? An Analysis of the Issues Affecting the Ascension of Women in the Australian Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    publication of The Army Wife Handbook.92 In spite of the author’s attempt to downplay the stereotyped title, it clearly portrays the role of women ...CULTURAL CRISIS? AN ANALYSIS OF THE ISSUES AFFECTING THE ASCENSION OF WOMEN IN THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY A thesis presented to the...To) AUG 2013 – JUNE 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cultural Crisis? An Analysis of the Issues Affecting the Ascension of Women in the Australian

  7. The Importance of Consensus Information in Acceptance of Climate Change (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, public perception of the scientific consensus on human-caused global warming has been disturbingly low, in contrast to the overwhelming level of agreement among climate scientists and in peer-reviewed research. The misperception is partly cultural, with a significant link between perceived consensus and political ideology, and partly informational with all cultural groups exhibiting the misperception to varying degrees. This universal 'consensus gap' is in large part due to a persistent and focused misinformation campaign casting doubt on the consensus, dating back as early as the 1980s. Opponents of climate action have long recognized that perception of scientific consensus is linked to support for climate policy, a link only acknowledged by social scientists in the last few years. How do we counter the all-too-effective misinformation campaign? Psychological research tells us that a crucial aspect of effective refutations is an alternative narrative. In this case, an important counter-narrative to the consensus story is the strategy to perpetuate the impression of ongoing scientific debate. I will also present recent research into the effect that consensus information has on climate beliefs of Australians and Americans. For both groups, the consensus message significantly increased beliefs about human-caused global warming and outperformed interventions that feature evidence or scientists' expertise. For the Australian sample, consensus information partially neutralised the biasing influence of ideology. However, for Americans, a backfire effect (reduced climate belief) was observed for a small minority holding strong conservative views. A psychological model employing Bayesian Networks indicates that a key element to the backfire effect is conspiratorial thinking, consistent with other research finding a link between rejection of climate science and conspiratorial ideation. Thus when presented to a general audience, consensus information has an

  8. Culture-independent analysis of probiotic products by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmerman, R; Scheirlinck, I; Huys, G; Swings, J

    2003-01-01

    In order to obtain functional and safe probiotic products for human consumption, fast and reliable quality control of these products is crucial. Currently, analysis of most probiotics is still based on culture-dependent methods involving the use of specific isolation media and identification of a limited number of isolates, which makes this approach relatively insensitive, laborious, and time-consuming. In this study, a collection of 10 probiotic products, including four dairy products, one fruit drink, and five freeze-dried products, were subjected to microbial analysis by using a culture-independent approach, and the results were compared with the results of a conventional culture-dependent analysis. The culture-independent approach involved extraction of total bacterial DNA directly from the product, PCR amplification of the V3 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA, and separation of the amplicons on a denaturing gradient gel. Digital capturing and processing of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band patterns allowed direct identification of the amplicons at the species level. This whole culture-independent approach can be performed in less than 30 h. Compared with culture-dependent analysis, the DGGE approach was found to have a much higher sensitivity for detection of microbial strains in probiotic products in a fast, reliable, and reproducible manner. Unfortunately, as reported in previous studies in which the culture-dependent approach was used, a rather high percentage of probiotic products suffered from incorrect labeling and yielded low bacterial counts, which may decrease their probiotic potential.

  9. Metagenomic analysis for detecting pathogens in culture-negative infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yuto; Aoki, Kotaro; Okuma, Shinnosuke; Sato, Takahiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Pathogen identification is important for proper diagnosis and optimal treatment of infective endocarditis (IE). Blood and valve cultures are the gold standard for detecting pathogens responsible for IE. However, these tests only detect culturable pathogens, and have low sensitivity, especially in patients previously treated with antibiotics. Culture-negative IE is still a major clinical problem and a diagnostic challenge. Recently, metagenomic analysis using next generation sequencing has been used to detect pathogens directly from clinical samples. However, there are very few reports of the use of metagenomic analysis for pathogen identification in culture-negative IE cases and the usefulness of this new method is unknown. Here, we report a case of successful pathogen detection with metagenomic analysis in a patient of culture-negative IE. The patient underwent valve replacement surgery and received antibiotics for 5 weeks and survived. Using metagenomic analysis of resected vegetation, we detected Abiotrophia defectiva, which is often associated with culture-negative IE due to its fastidious growth. This method may be useful for pathogen identification in future cases of culture-negative IE.

  10. Passivity-based consensus for linear multi-agent systems under switching topologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi FENG; Guoqiang HU

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the passivity-based consensus analysis and synthesis problems for a class of stochastic multi-agent systems with switching topologies. Based on Lyapunov methods, stochastic theory, and graph theory, new different storage Lyapunov functions are proposed to derive sufficient conditions on mean-square exponential consensus and stochastic passivity for multi-agent systems under two different switching cases, respectively. By designing passive time-varying consensus protocols, the solvability conditions for the passivity-based consensus protocol synthesis problem, i.e., passification, are derived based on linearization techniques. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  11. Ethics committees and consensus in the post-totalitarian society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasa, J; Glasova, M

    2001-01-01

    Ethics committees are usually expected to reach and frame their decisions by consensus. In a post-totalitarian society the conception of consensus might somewhat differ from the one present in societies with a long-term, uninterrupted tradition of democratic development. In 1990s, post totalitarian societies of Central and East Europe have been walking difficult paths from the situation, when matters of public interest had been decided almost solely within the structures of a totalitarian power (usually a 'communist' party and by the party dominated governmental or municipal structures) and the political decisions implemented by more or less coercive exercise of that power (while requiring the broadest community attainment--'imposed consensus'); toward societies deciding their fate and matters of public interest via institutions of a modern, pluralistic, parliamentary democracy (subscribing implicitly or even explicitly to consensus, perceived mostly as 'overlapping' or 'procedural'). The paper gives an analysis of evolution of the notion of consensus in the post-totalitarian Slovakia as seen within the frame of the first decade of establishment and work of ethics committees in the institutions of biomedical research and health care. Examples of present challenges for ethics committees' consensual decision making are outlined.

  12. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  13. Research methods for formal consensus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Daphne; Warren-Forward, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews three research methods for developing consensus. Consensus statements and guidelines are increasingly used to clarify and standardise practice, and inform health policy, when relevant and rigorous evidence is lacking. Clinicians need to evaluate the quality of practice guidelines to determine whether to incorporate them into clinical practice or reject them. Formal methods of developing consensus provide a scientific method that uses expert panel members to evaluate current evidence and expert opinions to produce consensus statements for clinical problems. Online search for relevant literature was conducted in Medline and CINAHL. A literature review of consensus, consensus development and research methods papers published in English in peer-reviewed journals. The three methods of developing consensus discussed are the Delphi technique, nominal group technique and the consensus development conference. The techniques and their respective advantages are described, and examples from the literature are provided. The three methods are compared and a flowchart to assist researchers selecting an appropriate method is included. Online resources with information on the development and evaluation of clinical guidelines are reviewed. This paper will help researchers to select an appropriate research method for developing consensus statements and guidelines. When developing consensus guidelines for clinical practice, researchers should use a formal research method to ensure rigour and credibility.

  14. Globalization: political and economic and sociological analysis of cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Babicheva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the presented article the authors examine the political and economic and cultural situation in the world in the context of globalization. Special priority is accorded to the coverage of political and economic situation in the world. Because, the twentieth century has demonstrated the power of supranational military- political blocs, the possibility of coalitions of control groups, continental and regional associations, international organizations. At the end of the twentieth century, the contours of «world government» have outlined (world of the Board: some international organizations started performing important political integration functions. The value of the global division of labor has increased in the economic sphere, the role of transnational corporations has increased, which have become powerful forces in the world economy. Having lost the national roots, such corporations operate globally, using local resources and subsidies. The authors noted that the trend of globalization had its influence on the culture as well .Media unites peoples and continents , informing millions of people about the events in different parts of the world , attracting them to various cultural experiences , traditions and customs of exotic tribes and nationalities .Today, there is no doubt, that the desire to solve global problems that affect interests of the peoples of all continents leads to the formation of the world humanistic consciousness. It is proved that during a long period of time the phenomenon of globalization was considered in socio-political theories mainly from the point of economic centrism. As It is the economic sphere, in which the globalization centrism was mostly discovered. The basic classical concepts developed within the economic centrism: theory of imperialism, dependency theory, world system theory. It was marked that the presented economic-centric pictures of globalization cannot explain the cultural-historical diversity of the

  15. Cross-cultural analysis for conceptual understanding: English and Spanish perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, Keville; Rivas Acuña, Valentina; Whetsell, Martha; Tallier, Peggy

    2005-10-01

    Culture and primary language provides the context for understanding between the patient and the nurse and therefore is part of the foundation for nursing care. Knowledge development in nursing is predicated on mutual understanding and interpretation of language. Concept development has been identified as one of the approaches to the development of nursing knowledge. Since the process of concept analysis is based on understanding a phenomenon through language and experiences, this process is culture-bound and language-specific. The purpose of this column is to discuss the value of interviews with people from two different cultures resulting in an attempt to develop nursing knowledge with international relevance. An example of an analysis of a concept, worry, is provided, and the effects of culture and language on this nursing concept are discussed. The analysis was the result of collaboration among nurses from Mexico and the United States of America.

  16. Contribution of medical decision-making to consensus development conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, N.S.; Casparie, A.F.; Everdingen, J.J.E.

    1987-01-01

    A description is given of the consensus development conference as a method for either technology assessment or quality assurance in health care. The general features of the methodology are discussed, the Dutch approach is explained in more detail, and medical decision analysis and its potential cont

  17. International Consensus on Nasal Polyposis 2002-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladina, R; Clement, P; Lopatin, A; Mann, W; Passali, D

    2005-06-01

    Seventeen well-known experts in rhinosinusology from various countries tried to achieve consensus on the etiology, conservative approach and surgical approach to nasal polyposis. A Digi-Vote electronic system was used for an immediate computer analysis of expert answers to 23 questions related to the problem of nasal polyposis.

  18. Identifying influential individuals on intensive care units: using cluster analysis to explore culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Allan; Clark, Lindsey; Cheng, Tianyi; Franklin, Ella; Fernandez, Nicole; Ratwani, Raj; Parker, Sarah Henrickson

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify attribute patterns of influential individuals in intensive care units using unsupervised cluster analysis. Despite the acknowledgement that culture of an organisation is critical to improving patient safety, specific methods to shift culture have not been explicitly identified. A social network analysis survey was conducted and an unsupervised cluster analysis was used. A total of 100 surveys were gathered. Unsupervised cluster analysis was used to group individuals with similar dimensions highlighting three general genres of influencers: well-rounded, knowledge and relational. Culture is created locally by individual influencers. Cluster analysis is an effective way to identify common characteristics among members of an intensive care unit team that are noted as highly influential by their peers. To change culture, identifying and then integrating the influencers in intervention development and dissemination may create more sustainable and effective culture change. Additional studies are ongoing to test the effectiveness of utilising these influencers to disseminate patient safety interventions. This study offers an approach that can be helpful in both identifying and understanding influential team members and may be an important aspect of developing methods to change organisational culture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Resurrecting Class : Class voting and cultural voting in postwar western societies (1956-1990)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.J. Achterberg (Peter); D. Houtman (Dick); J. van der Waal (Jeroen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBy means of a re-analysis of the most relevant data source - the international social mobility and politics file - this paper criticizes the newly grown consensus in political sociology that class voting has declined since World War II. An increase of crosscutting cultural voting, rooted

  20. An analysis of the productivity of a CELSS continuous algal culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Arnett, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most attractive aspects of using algal cultures as plant components for a Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) is the efficiency with which they can be grown. Although algae are not necessarily intrinsically more efficient than higher plants, the ease which they can be handled and manipulated (more like chemical reagents than plants), and the culturing techniques available, result in much higher growth rates than are usually attainable with higher plants. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have demonstrated that algal growth and physiology is not detectable altered in a microgravity environment, (1) whereas the response of higher plants to zero gravity is unknown. In order to rationally design and operate culture systems, it is necessary to understand how the macroparameters of a culture system, e.g., productivity, are related to the physiological aspects of the algal culture. A first principles analysis of culture system is discussed, and a mathematical model that describes the relationship of culture productivity to the cell concentration of light-limited culture is derived. The predicted productivity vs cell concentration curve agrees well with the experimental data obtained to test this model, indicating that this model permits an accurate prediction of culture productivity given the growth parameters of the system.

  1. Fatigue In A Bravery Culture A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    present paper’s comparative analysis , achieving mastery or near-mastery over a non- intelligent adversary, as in the science of manned flight or...VALLEY INTELLIGENCE CENTER The DVIC advertised itself as a “24/7 all-hazard, all-crime, information and intelligence collection, analysis , and...BRAVERY CULTURE— A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS by John Anthony Romero December 2016 Thesis Advisor: Lauren F. Wollman Second Reader: Mark Perez

  2. [The analysis of the eugenic culture in ancient China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gong-Cheng; Zong, Hong

    2010-09-01

    There was a centuries-old culture of eugenics in ancient China. We should have comprehensive and objective cognition of this tradition. The ancient people did not generally advocate marrying at a mature age as do people of modern times. They not only considered the prepotency, but also were influenced by other complicated social factors on the problem of mate selection. Although advocates of coition techniques claimed the purpose of prepotency, the eugenic effect of coition techniques deserved to be suspect. Regarding the aspect of embryo conservation and care, the most significant thing was not so-called "prenatal education", but various antenatal care methods which were proposed by TCM scholars. By making a comparison with modern eugenics, the ancient eugenics had the characteristics of valuing the male child only, commiserating with deformity and being based on familial values.

  3. National Innovation System And Culture A Cross-Country Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Gogodze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the relationship between Hofstedes cultural dimensions and the constituents of a National Innovation System NIS. We consider an NIS as a special kind of intangible latent asset and identify its two constituents input and output capital. These are extracted through a modern NIS measurement model based on the Global Innovation Index. Using structural equation models we show that power distance and uncertainty avoidance and long-term orientation and indulgence vs. restraint act through the latent constructs PDUA and LTIV respectively. Moreover individualism IDV and NIS constituents are directly and negatively affected by PDUA. IDV and LTIV directly and positively affect the NIS constituents. Further the results show that masculinity vs. femininity significantly and negatively affects the NIS input constituent and significantly affects the NIS output constituent but its impact is negative for high-income countries and positive for non-high income countries.

  4. Culture-independent microbiological analysis of foley urinary catheter biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel N Frank

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI, a leading cause of nosocomial disease, is complicated by the propensity of bacteria to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices [1,2,3,4,5]. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the microbial diversity of these communities, we report the results of a culture-independent bacterial survey of Foley urinary catheters obtained from patients following total prostatectomy. Two patient subsets were analyzed, based on treatment or no treatment with systemic fluoroquinolone antibiotics during convalescence. Results indicate the presence of diverse polymicrobial assemblages that were most commonly observed in patients who did not receive systemic antibiotics. The communities typically contained both Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms that included multiple potential pathogens. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Prevention and treatment of CAUTI must take into consideration the possible polymicrobial nature of any particular infection.

  5. Consensus recommendations for anaesthetic peripheral nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Lasaosa, S; Cuadrado Pérez, M L; Guerrero Peral, A L; Huerta Villanueva, M; Porta-Etessam, J; Pozo-Rosich, P; Pareja, J A

    2017-06-01

    Anaesthetic block, alone or in combination with other treatments, represents a therapeutic resource for treating different types of headaches. However, there is significant heterogeneity in patterns of use among different professionals. This consensus document has been drafted after a thorough review and analysis of the existing literature and our own clinical experience. The aim of this document is to serve as guidelines for professionals applying anaesthetic blocks. Recommendations are based on the levels of evidence of published studies on migraine, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, cervicogenic headache, and pericranial neuralgias. We describe the main technical and formal considerations of the different procedures, the potential adverse reactions, and the recommended approach. Anaesthetic block in patients with headache should always be individualised and based on a thorough medical history, a complete neurological examination, and expert technical execution. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. AN ANALYSIS OF TURKISH NATIONAL AND MILITARY CULTURE IN THE CONTEXT OF KOREAN WAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ünsal Sığrı

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze Turkish national and military culture in the context of Korean War. The Korean War is the first international military contribution of modern Turkish Republic and Turkish Armed Forces. This was the first contact with other countries’ and cultures’ armies since the foundation of the modern republic. Following the war Turkey joined to NATO and became a certain member of western block of cold war era. Turkish troops’ efforts and involvement in the Korean War did not only contribute to independence of Korea but also contributed to the world peace. Turkish military has a cultural background, which mainly stems from sociological and managerial characteristics of Turkish national culture. In this study an analysis of Turkish military culture is made within scope of Korean War according to Hofstede’s (1980 four cultural dimensions

  7. Theories about consensus-based conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, William D

    2006-04-01

    "Conservation and the Myth of Consensus" (Peterson et al. 2005) levels several serious indictments against consensus-based approaches to environmental decision making. Namely, the authors argue that consensus processes (1) reinforce apathy and ignorance of conservation issues; (2) legitimize damage to the environment; (3) quash public debate about conservation; (4) solidify the existing balance of power in favor of prodevelopment forces; and (5) block progress toward an ecologically sustainable future. Careful scrutiny of consensus-based approaches is important, especially considering their surging use in conservation policy. In the spirit of advancing the debate further, I review some of the limitations of the essay and its modes of inquiry.

  8. Promoção da saúde e cultura política: a reconstrução do consenso Health promotion and political culture: reconstructing the consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Navarro Stotz

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto faz uma avaliação das noções de promoção da saúde e de empowerment ao problematizar os princípios que integram a cultura da saúde pública e orientam as propostas de políticas públicas formuladas especialmente para os chamados países "em desenvolvimento". Analisa-se particularmente empowerment, usualmente visto como uma forma de promoção individual e coletiva (comunitária, social da saúde de grupos em situação de maior vulnerabilidade social. Examina-se esta proposta à luz da crise do Estado de Bem-Estar Social e de sua superação, pela via neoliberal, nos anos da década de 1980, com destaque para as mudanças na apreensão conceitual e moral da realidade do capitalismo, em particular da política social, desde então pautada pelo princípio da equidade, em oposição ao da universalidade. A adoção deste princípio pela Organização Mundial da Saúde integra a cultura dominante no setor da saúde que é, contudo, pouco reflexiva, fortemente tecnicista e normativa. Construir uma nova cultura capaz de reconhecer o saber comum, incorporar as experiências sociais, apoiar as lutas reivindicativas e expressar a saúde como direito universal são os desafios propostos pelos autores.An evaluation about health promotion and empowerment is presented in this paper. Fundamental principles of a public health culture are studied from a problem-posing point of view, as they are the base of public policy proposals specially formulated for the so called "developing" countries. Empowerment is particularly analyzed, since it is considered a way chosen for individual and collective (community, social health promotion, connected to social groups under more vulnerable social conditions. The Welfare State crisis and the neoliberal approach, applied during the eighties to overcome it, gave grounds to examine this proposal, focusing on the changes occurred to capitalism in terms of conceptual and moral introjection of reality

  9. Peer Pressure Shapes Consensus, Leadership, and Innovations in Social Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    What is the effect of the combined direct and indirect social influences-peer pressure (PP)-on a social groups collective decisions? We present a model that captures PP as a function of the socio-cultural distance between individuals in a social group. Using this model and empirical data from 15 real-world social networks we found that the PP level determines how fast a social group reaches consensus. More importantly, the levels of PP determine the leaders who can achieve full control of their social groups. PP can overcome barriers imposed upon a consensus by the existence of tightly connected communities with local leaders or the existence of leaders with poor cohesiveness of opinions. A moderate level of PP is also necessary to explain the rate at which innovations diffuse through a variety of social groups.

  10. Cultural diversity: blind spot in medical curriculum documents, a document analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternotte, Emma; Fokkema, Joanne P I; van Loon, Karsten A; van Dulmen, Sandra; Scheele, Fedde

    2014-08-22

    Cultural diversity among patients presents specific challenges to physicians. Therefore, cultural diversity training is needed in medical education. In cases where strategic curriculum documents form the basis of medical training it is expected that the topic of cultural diversity is included in these documents, especially if these have been recently updated. The aim of this study was to assess the current formal status of cultural diversity training in the Netherlands, which is a multi-ethnic country with recently updated medical curriculum documents. In February and March 2013, a document analysis was performed of strategic curriculum documents for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in the Netherlands. All text phrases that referred to cultural diversity were extracted from these documents. Subsequently, these phrases were sorted into objectives, training methods or evaluation tools to assess how they contributed to adequate curriculum design. Of a total of 52 documents, 33 documents contained phrases with information about cultural diversity training. Cultural diversity aspects were more prominently described in the curriculum documents for undergraduate education than in those for postgraduate education. The most specific information about cultural diversity was found in the blueprint for undergraduate medical education. In the postgraduate curriculum documents, attention to cultural diversity differed among specialties and was mainly superficial. Cultural diversity is an underrepresented topic in the Dutch documents that form the basis for actual medical training, although the documents have been updated recently. Attention to the topic is thus unwarranted. This situation does not fit the demand of a multi-ethnic society for doctors with cultural diversity competences. Multi-ethnic countries should be critical on the content of the bases for their medical educational curricula.

  11. Subclinical hypothyroidism: Controversies to consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abbas Raza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnoses of subclinicaal hypothyroidism (SCH is biochemically made, when serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels is elevated while free thyroid hormone levels are within normal reference range. SCH is diagnosed after excluding all other causes of elevated TSH levels. Symptoms of SCH may vary from being asymptomatic to having mild nonspecific symptoms. The risk of progression to overt hypothyroidism is related to number of factors including initial serum TSH concentration, presence of auto antibodies, family history and presence goiter. Various screening recommendations for thyroid function assessment are in practice. There are still controversies surrounding SCH and associated risk of various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, pregnancy outcomes, neuropsychiatric issues, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemia. Consensus will require more large randomized clinical studies involving various age groups and medical condition, especially in developing countries. All these efforts will definitely improve our understanding of disease and ultimately patient outcomes.

  12. Learning consensus in adversarial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvoudakis, Kyriakos G.; García Carrillo, Luis R.; Hespanha, João. P.

    2013-05-01

    This work presents a game theory-based consensus problem for leaderless multi-agent systems in the presence of adversarial inputs that are introducing disturbance to the dynamics. Given the presence of enemy components and the possibility of malicious cyber attacks compromising the security of networked teams, a position agreement must be reached by the networked mobile team based on environmental changes. The problem is addressed under a distributed decision making framework that is robust to possible cyber attacks, which has an advantage over centralized decision making in the sense that a decision maker is not required to access information from all the other decision makers. The proposed framework derives three tuning laws for every agent; one associated with the cost, one associated with the controller, and one with the adversarial input.

  13. Humanitarian war: a new consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, S L

    2001-12-01

    The NATO bombing operation Allied Force against Yugoslavia in March-June 1999 represents the final disappearance of the narrowing divide between humanitarianism and politics: a war initiated and justified on humanitarian grounds. Although unlikely to be repeated any time soon, the Kosovo case appears to have cemented an ideological shift on the international right and even necessity of sing military force to protect civilians within sovereign states. Rather than humanitarians acknowledging the political context and consequences of their work, however, the case suggests the embrace of humanitarian principles of universality and neutrality by military organisations. This article discusses some consequences of the new consensus: neglect of the political context (both local and foreign) of such operations, interaction between the operational dynamics of relief operations and the logic of war and the political consequences of using the humanitarian legitimation and mission in such cases.

  14. International Consensus on drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoly, P; Adkinson, N F; Brockow, K; Castells, M; Chiriac, A M; Greenberger, P A; Khan, D A; Lang, D M; Park, H-S; Pichler, W; Sanchez-Borges, M; Shiohara, T; Thong, B Y- H

    2014-04-01

    When drug reactions resembling allergy occur, they are called drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) before showing the evidence of either drug-specific antibodies or T cells. DHRs may be allergic or nonallergic in nature, with drug allergies being immunologically mediated DHRs. These reactions are typically unpredictable. They can be life-threatening, may require or prolong hospitalization, and may necessitate changes in subsequent therapy. Both underdiagnosis (due to under-reporting) and overdiagnosis (due to an overuse of the term ‘allergy’) are common. A definitive diagnosis of such reactions is required in order to institute adequate treatment options and proper preventive measures. Misclassification based solely on the DHR history without further testing may affect treatment options, result in adverse consequences, and lead to the use of more-expensive or less-effective drugs, in contrast to patients who had undergone a complete drug allergy workup. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents on general or specific drug class-induced DHRs are available to support the medical decision process. The use of standardized systematic approaches for the diagnosis and management of DHRs carries the potential to improve outcomes and should thus be disseminated and implemented. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), and the World Allergy Organization (WAO), has decided to issue an International CONsensus (ICON) on drug allergy. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences and deficiencies of evidence, thus providing a comprehensive reference document for the diagnosis and management of

  15. Latin American culture and reading: text commentary and analysis of teaching as a resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mondaca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This present article develops an active learning pedagogical approach to enhance the process of reading comprehension in the XXI century classroom, through the incorporation of the Latin American culture in the use of educational resource of text analysis, which allows learners to generate a sense of belonging and cultural identity from elements such as literature, history, poetry, music, art, among others elements that make up the latinoamerican realm. This sense of cultural belonging involves learners in topics that are familiar to their contexts, recreating appreciation for reading.

  16. Development of an image analysis methodology for animal cell cultures characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, A.L.; Mesquita, D. P.; Xavier, Mariana; Rodrigues, L. R.; Kluskens, Leon; Ferreira, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    To establish a strong cell culture protocol and to evaluate experimental results, a quantitative determination of animal cells characteristics, such as confluence and morphology is quite often required. Quantitative image analysis using automated processing has become a routine methodology in a wide range of applications with the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. However, in animal cells cultures automatic techniques giving valuable information based on visual inspection ar...

  17. Living with sugar: influence of cultural beliefs on type 2 diabetes self-management of English-speaking Afro-Caribbean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chrystal A S

    2012-08-01

    Studies show that cultural beliefs influence disease conceptualization, adaption, and coping strategies of chronic diseases. This study investigated the type 2 diabetes cultural belief model of English-speaking Afro-Caribbean women in southwest Florida. A 53 item cultural consensus beliefs questionnaire was designed and administered to 30 Afro-Caribbean women diabetics. Cultural consensus analysis found that these women shared a single cultural belief model about type 2 diabetes, .72 ± .081 SD. Women with higher cultural knowledge scores (r(s) = -.41730, P = .0218) were significantly younger at type 2 diabetes diagnosis than women with lower scores. In qualitative interviews, women described ongoing struggles to modify their traditional Caribbean diet and believed in the efficaciousness of traditional Caribbean medicine and prayer to treat type 2 diabetes. These findings suggest that health practitioners treating English-speaking Afro-Caribbean diabetics should offer culturally appropriate nutritional guidance and inquire about their use of traditional Caribbean medicines.

  18. Rectal cancer radiotherapy: Towards European consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Vincenzo (Cattedra di Radioterapia, Univ. Cattolica S.Cuore, Rome (Italy)), E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Glimelius, Bengt (Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Background and purpose. During the first decade of the 21st century several important European randomized studies in rectal cancer have been published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized. This article summarizes the consensus about imaging and radiotherapy of rectal cancer and gives an update until May 2010. Methods. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each committee member commented and voted, sentence by sentence three times. Sentences which did not reach agreement after voting round no 2 were openly debated during the Conference in Perugia (Italy) December 2008. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', 'minimum consensus'. Results. The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only three (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Considerable progress has been made in staging and treatment, including radiation treatment of rectal cancer. Conclusions. This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe. In spite of substantial progress, many research challenges remain

  19. Natural, Behavioral and Cultural Selection/Analysis: An Integrative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Kalliu; Sandaker, Ingunn

    2016-01-01

    In Selection by Consequences, Skinner (1981) described a causal model that explains human behavior as a joint product of three levels of selection: (i) the contingencies of survival involved in natural selection, (ii) the contingencies of reinforcement involved in the selection of individual behavior, and (iii) contingencies of an evolving social environment. Since then, researchers from behavior analysis and other fi...

  20. Strategic consensus mapping : A new method for testing and visualizing strategic consensus within and between teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarakci, M.; Ates, N.Y.; Porck, J.P.; van Knippenberg, D.; Groenen, P.J.F.; de Haas, M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on strategic consensus focuses primarily on the extent of agreement among team members regarding organizational strategy. It does not include elements such as the content of the agreement, between-group consensus, or the significance of differences in consensus (e.g., for evaluating the eff

  1. Changing gender relations in Thailand: a historical and cultural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantiwiramanond, D

    1997-01-01

    In response to the stereotyping of Thai women in the media as either modern businesswomen or victims of male oppression, this article studies the changing gender roles and status of women in Thailand to identify the various roles played by Thai women and the ways these roles are linked to key cultural, economic, and political mechanisms in Thai society. After an introduction, the first section of the paper analyzes pre-modern Thai history from the mid-13th century with a look at the traditional social, political, and economic structure of feudal society to determine how women's status was affected by Thai Buddhism, absolute monarchy (the affect of the legal system on upper-class women), and matrifocal kinship (the effect of subsistence agriculture on lower-class women). This section also compares the historic status of upper- and lower-class Thai women. The second section of the article considers the effects of 1) the encroachment of Western colonialism in Southeast Asia during the period 1850-1925 and attendant criticisms of polygamy, 2) the post-1932 revolution that resulted in a constitutional monarchy, and 3) the post 1950s period of economic nationalism that has resulted in globalization. The article concludes that lower-class women have certain rights under the feudal system (before 1932) but were forced into certain roles by economic necessity and motherhood. Upper-class women enjoyed high status, but all women were victims of the Buddhist patriarchy and hierarchical systems. Western modernization caused a decline in polygamy and new opportunities for educated women but the status of Thai women has not changed substantially, and class-specific forms of female oppression continues unabated making lower-class women vulnerable to sexual exploitation.

  2. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus quasispecies that include homologues of human isolates revealed through whole-genome analysis and virus cultured from dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briese, Thomas; Mishra, Nischay; Jain, Komal; Zalmout, Iyad S; Jabado, Omar J; Karesh, William B; Daszak, Peter; Mohammed, Osama B; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N; Lipkin, W Ian

    2014-04-29

    ABSTRACT Complete Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) genome sequences were obtained from nasal swabs of dromedary camels sampled in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia through direct analysis of nucleic acid extracts or following virus isolation in cell culture. Consensus dromedary MERS-CoV genome sequences were the same with either template source and identical to published human MERS-CoV sequences. However, in contrast to individual human cases, where only clonal genomic sequences are reported, detailed population analyses revealed the presence of more than one genomic variant in individual dromedaries. If humans are truly infected only with clonal virus populations, we must entertain a model for interspecies transmission of MERS-CoV wherein only specific genotypes are capable of passing bottleneck selection. IMPORTANCE In most cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), the route for human infection with the causative agent, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), is unknown. Antibodies to and viral nucleic acids of MERS-CoV have been found in dromedaries, suggesting the possibility that they may serve as a reservoir or vector for human infection. However, neither whole viral genomic sequence nor infectious virus has been isolated from dromedaries or other animals in Saudi Arabia. Here, we report recovery of MERS-CoV from nasal swabs of dromedaries, demonstrate that MERS-CoV whole-genome consensus sequences from dromedaries and humans are indistinguishable, and show that dromedaries can be simultaneously infected with more than one MERS-CoV. Together with data indicating widespread dromedary infection in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, these findings support the plausibility of a role for dromedaries in human infection.

  3. Microsatellite instability analysis in hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer using the Bethesda consensus panel of microsatellite markers in the absence of proband normal tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dourisboure Ricardo J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant syndrome predisposing to the early development of various cancers including those of colon, rectum, endometrium, ovarium, small bowel, stomach and urinary tract. HNPCC is caused by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes, mostly hMSH2 or hMLH1. In this study, we report the analysis for genetic counseling of three first-degree relatives (the mother and two sisters of a male who died of colorectal adenocarcinoma at the age of 23. The family fulfilled strict Amsterdam-I criteria (AC-I with the presence of extracolonic tumors in the extended pedigree. We overcame the difficulty of having a proband post-mortem non-tumor tissue sample for MSI testing by studying the alleles carried by his progenitors. Methods Tumor MSI testing is described as initial screening in both primary and metastasis tumor tissue blocks, using the reference panel of 5 microsatellite markers standardized by the National Cancer Institute (NCI for the screening of HNPCC (BAT-25, BAT-26, D2S123, D5S346 and D17S250. Subsequent mutation analysis of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes was performed. Results Three of five microsatellite markers (BAT-25, BAT-26 and D5S346 presented different alleles in the proband's tumor as compared to those inherited from his parents. The tumor was classified as high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H. We identified in the HNPCC family a novel germline missense (c.1864C>A mutation in exon 12 of hMSH2 gene, leading to a proline 622 to threonine (p.Pro622Thr amino acid substitution. Conclusion This approach allowed us to establish the tumor MSI status using the NCI recommended panel in the absence of proband's non-tumor tissue and before sequencing the obligate carrier. According to the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD and the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumors (InSiGHT Database this is the first report of this mutation.

  4. Derivation of consensus inactivation status for X-linked genes from genome-wide studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Bradley P; Cotton, Allison M; Brown, Carolyn J

    2015-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation is the epigenetic silencing of the majority of the genes on one of the X chromosomes in XX therian mammals. In humans, approximately 15 % of genes consistently escape from this inactivation and another 15 % of genes vary between individuals or tissues in whether they are subject to, or escape from, inactivation. Multiple studies have provided inactivation status calls for a large subset of the genes on the X chromosome; however, these studies vary in which genes they were able to make calls for and in some cases which call they give a specific gene. This analysis aggregated three published studies that have examined X chromosome inactivation status of genes across the X chromosome, generating consensus calls and identifying discordancies. The impact of expression level and chromosomal location on X chromosome inactivation status was also assessed. Overall, we assigned a consensus XCI status 639 genes, including 78 % of protein-coding genes expressed outside of the testes, with a lower frequency for non-coding RNA and testis-specific genes. Study-specific discordancies suggest that there may be instability of XCI during cell culture and also highlight study-specific variations in call type. We observe an enrichment of discordant genes at boundaries between genes subject to and escaping from inactivation. This study has compiled a comprehensive list of X-chromosome inactivation statuses for genes and also discovered some biases which will help guide future studies examining X-chromosome inactivation.

  5. Application of digital radiography in the analysis of cultural heritage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oiveira, Davi F.; Calza, Cristiane; Rocha, Henrique S.; Nascimento, Joseilson R.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: davi@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: ccalza@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: henrique@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: joseilson@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    The scientific examination of artworks has gained increasing interest in the last years, allowing the characterization of materials and techniques employed by the artists. This analysis can be extremely valuable to conservation and restoration treatments. However, the fact that every artworks is a unique piece emphasizes the necessity of working with non-destructive techniques. Although radiography has been used in the technical examination of museum objects for many decades, digital radiography is rapidly becoming a preferred modality for this essential tool in the advanced examination of works of art. The ability to electronically combine images from the large painting into a single composite image file was extremely valuable and results in higher quality images than those achieved with conventional radiography. These images can be also processed and improved using adequate software. Additional advantages of digital radiography include the possibility of an almost immediate analysis of the results, use of an only recording film and absence of chemical processing. Radiographic imaging can be applied to the analysis of virtually all media including paintings, sculptures, woodworks, engravings, etc. This paper reports some case studies of the use of digital radiography in the study of paintings and sculptures, showing the feasibility and advantages of this technique for this kind of purpose. The radiographic images revealed the conservation state of the analyzed objects and various details of its execution in order to assist recently restoration processes. (author)

  6. Viability of lymphocyte culture, at different times after blood collection, for karyotype analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Maria Crubelati Bulla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Cytogenetics is the area of genetics that studies chromosomes, including numerical changes, and their relationship to structural imbalances. Among the classical cytogenetics tests, the GTG banding karyotype is the most widely used. The period of culture establishment is a critical step, which can affect the pre-analytical phase of the test.Objective:To evaluate, at different establishment times, culture viability and banding resolution.Material and methods:Collection of 10 ml blood from 10 subjects was carried out for culture analysis. For viability analysis, mitotic index (MI and banding resolution were assessed. Results: The comparative analysis of MI showed significant difference between times. In the assessment of banding resolution, the mean value of the bands was higher at times zero and 24 hour.Discussion:The MI reflects inhibition of cell cycle progression and/or loss of ability to proliferate. When the pair analysis was performed, a difference between zero and 48 hours was observed. The average number of bands analyzed at times zero and 24 hours did not indicate difference in the quantity and quality of the bands when cultures were grown immediately after blood collection or within 24 hours. At the 48th hour after blood collection significant reduction of band resolution was observed.Conclusion:These data highlight the importance of the biological material quality, as viability is lower when the culture is grown after 24 hours, as well as the banding resolution.

  7. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Ahlberg, J.; Glaros, A.G.; Kato, T.; Koyano, K.; Lavigne, G.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Manfredini, D.; Svensson, P.; Winocur, E.

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined

  8. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...

  9. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...

  10. Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhou; N. Hu; C.J. Spanos

    2016-01-01

    We propose Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning (VCMKL), a novel way of combining multiple kernels such that one class of samples is described by the logical intersection (consensus) of base kernelized decision rules, whereas the other classes by the union (veto) of their complements. The propose

  11. Consensus of a class of discrete-time nonlinear multi-agent systems in the presence of communication delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyun; Lin, Zongli

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we study the consensus problem for a class of discrete-time nonlinear multi-agent systems. The dynamics of each agent is input affine and the agents are connected through a connected undirected communication network. Distributed control laws are proposed and consensus analysis is conducted both in the absence and in the presence of communication delays. Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that our control laws ensure state consensus of the multi-agent system.

  12. Safeguards Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  13. Analysis of the Glutamate Agonist LY404,039 Binding to Nonstatic Dopamine Receptor D2 Dimer Structures and Consensus Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Seeman, Philip; Aksoydan, Busecan; Erol, Ismail; Kantarcioglu, Isik; Stein, Matthias; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2017-06-21

    Dopamine receptor D2 (D2R) plays an important role in the human central nervous system and is a focal target of antipsychotic agents. The D2(High)R and D2(Low)R dimeric models previously developed by our group are used to investigate the prediction of binding affinity of the LY404,039 ligand and its binding mechanism within the catalytic domain. The computational data obtained using molecular dynamics simulations fit well with the experimental results. The calculated binding affinities of LY404,039 using MM/PBSA for the D2(High)R and D2(Low)R targets were -12.04 and -9.11 kcal/mol, respectively. The experimental results suggest that LY404,039 binds to D2(High)R and D2(Low)R with binding affinities (Ki) of 8.2 and 1640 nM, respectively. The high binding affinity of LY404,039 in terms of binding to [(3)H]domperidone was inhibited by the presence of a guanine nucleotide, indicating an agonist action of the drug at D2(High)R. The interaction analysis demonstrated that while Asp114 was among the most critical amino acids for D2(High)R binding, residues Ser193 and Ser197 were significantly more important within the binding cavity of D2(Low)R. Molecular modeling analyses are extended to ensemble docking as well as structure-based pharmacophore model (E-pharmacophore) development using the bioactive conformation of LY404,039 at the binding pocket as a template and screening of small-molecule databases with derived pharmacophore models.

  14. Consensus statement on genetic research in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, M.G. Olde; der, V van; Burns, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the European Dementia Consensus Network developed a consensus on research ethics in dementia, taking into account the questions posed by the era of genetic research and its new research methods. The consensus process started with a Delphi procedure...... to analyze relevant stakeholders' positions by describing their statements on the possibilities and limitations of research into genetic determinants of Alzheimer disease and to describe and analyze the moral desirability of genetic research on Alzheimer disease. The conclusions drawn from the Delphi...... procedure fuelled the development of the consensus statement, which is presented in this paper. The consensus statement aims to stimulate ethically acceptable research in the field of dementia and the protection of vulnerable elderly patients with dementia from application of inadequate research methods...

  15. Tax Incentives Culture: An Analysis of Corporate Disclosures in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Gomes dos Reis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The disclosure of tax incentives Culture is essential for external users to make full analysis of the benefits generated by them. In this sense, the aim of this study was to verify the consistency and form of disclosure of the information disclosed by the Corporation Publicly Traded in southern Brazil, from the perspective of reducing the tax burden and the amount allocated to the Culture. The sample consisted of 27 Corporate Capital Open in southern Brazil and analyzed its financial statements, accompanying notes and supplementary reports through pre-established keywords, characterizing the research as descriptive, with a qualitative approach. The results showed the importance of the Notes, the Management Report and additional reports as Social and Sustainability Report. These reports had relevant information and helpful research. However, many of them did not have clear information about the tax incentives for culture. Some companies released the tax incentive culture along with other incentives, such as the Workers Food Program - PAT, which did not allow detailed analysis of the data. We found cases of disagreement between the Ministry of Culture and information disclosed statements. In some cases, were observed lack of information about the tax incentives in the statements and supplementary reports. It was concluded that the disclosure is lower than necessary, because only four out of a total of twenty seven companies analyzed, reported consistent, complete and appropriate on tax incentives for culture.

  16. Streamlining gene expression analysis: integration of co-culture and mRNA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott M; Singh, Chandresh; Lang, Jessica D; Strotman, Lindsay N; Alarid, Elaine T; Beebe, David J

    2014-02-01

    Co-culture of multiple cell types within a single device enables the study of paracrine signaling events. However, extracting gene expression endpoints from co-culture experiments is laborious, due in part to pre-PCR processing of the sample (i.e., post-culture cell sorting and nucleic acid purification). Also, a significant loss of nucleic acid may occur during these steps, especially with microfluidic cell culture where lysate volumes are small and difficult to access. Here, we describe an integrated platform for performing microfluidic cell culture and extraction of mRNA for gene expression analysis. This platform was able to recover 30-fold more mRNA than a similar, non-integrated system. Additionally, using a breast cancer/bone marrow stroma co-culture, we recapitulated stromal-dependent, estrogen-independent growth of the breast cancer cells, coincident with transcriptional changes. We anticipate that this platform will be used for streamlined analysis of paracrine signaling events as well as for screening potential drugs and/or patient samples.

  17. [Culture medium optimization and primary kinetics analysis for nisin production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Bai, J H; Cai, Z L; Ouyang, F

    2001-03-01

    Response surface methodology was used to optimize a medium for nisin production of Lactococcus lactis. In the first optimization step the influence of sucrose, soybean peptone, yeast extract, potassium dihydrogen phosphate, sodium chloride, and magnesium sulfur on nisin production was evaluated using a fractional factorial design. Potassium dihydrogen phosphate influenced nisin production positively while soybean peptone affected nisin production negatively. The other components had no significant effect on nisin production. The path of steepest ascent was used to approach the optimal region of the medium composition. In the third step the optimal concentrations of KH2PO4 and soybean peptone were determined by a central composite design and response surface analysis. The optimized medium allowed nisin production to be increased from 1074 IU/mL to 2150 IU/mL. The kinetic analysis showed that nisin production fashion at optimized and non-optimized media was not changed and maintained partially growth-associated. But the specific growth rates and the specific nisin production rates for the strain at the optimized medium were bigger than the ones at the non-optimized medium after the cells entered the middle of exponential phase.

  18. Cultural Meanings Construction: An Analysis of the Organic Grape Juice Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Dalmoro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the meanings networks that involve markets, this research aims to analyze cultural meanings production in the organic grape juice market, involving consumers and producers agents. It was adopted a qualitative approach with an interpretative character by interviews with 25 consumers and producers. Cultural meanings construction description and analysis involved the socio-cultural context, interaction between agents (producers and consumers and meanings assigned by each agent. Organics are meant as food for both agents. However, others meanings associated to organics operate in dichotomic levels. It results in a non-homogeneous network between producers and consumers, reflecting the different cultural universe of each agent. These results mainly contribute in understanding the patterns of production and consumption around the food market. The lack of consolidated networks of meanings limit the construction and establishment of organic products market structures.

  19. The symbolization of eggs in American culture: a sociologic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, W A

    2000-10-01

    To demonstrate that the recent decline in egg consumption in the United States was, in part, the result of a food scare that began in the 1960's. Using the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature, the frequency of articles about eggs, dietary cholesterol and heart disease in popular magazines was obtained. A content analysis was performed on a random sample of these articles. The increased trend in magazine articles and public statements by groups such as the American Heart Association linking eggs, blood cholesterol and heart disease is associated with the downward trend in egg consumption. Public exposure to negative messages about particular foods can contribute to a decline in their consumption. Exposure to more consistently positive messages about foods can bring about an increase in the consumption of those foods.

  20. SELECTING LEADERSHIP STYLES PROBLEM IN MANAGEMENT CULTURE: THEORETICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. DUKHINA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article carried out a theoretical analysis of the problem of choosing the team leadership styles, which is regarded as the most important component of the control system, due to the content management tasks. At the basis of individual management style management ideologies are implemented in practice through professional management experience as a manager, supervisor used the style or styles of synthesis will depend on the specific situations and managerial abilities. It is proved that the optimum style of management as a set of business and personal qualities of the head is one of the important criteria for successful completion of the collective tasks and the organization as a whole. The estimation of moral and functional components of the formal authority of the head. It is noted that a formal or official authority deterministic set of powers and the rights that assumes his position and that it provides no more than 60% effect on subordinates. Psychological authority consists of the elements of moral and functional authority. The basis of the moral authority of a manager is moral and ideological qualities of the person. Administrative capacity head examined on the basis of three criteria: personal, functional-activity and structure-psychological. There is analysis of the democratic, liberal and authoritarian leadership styles and the conclusion of the discussion of the problem.

  1. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boonfei; Jane Fowler, S; Laban, Nidal Abu; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities. PMID:25734684

  2. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boonfei; Fowler, S Jane; Abu Laban, Nidal; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-09-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities.

  3. Using Behavioral Consensus To Learn About Social Conventions In Early Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanying Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adults make inferences about the conventionality of others’ behaviours based on their prevalence across individuals. Here, we look at whether children use behavioural consensus as a cue to conventionality, and whether this informs which cultural models children choose to learn from. We find that 2- to 5-year old children exhibit increasing sensitivity to behavioural consensus with age, suggesting that like adults, young humans use behavioural consensus to identify social conventions. However, unlike previous studies showing children’s tendencies to prefer and to learn from members of a consensus, the present study suggests that there are contexts in which children prefer and learn from unconventional individuals. The implications of these different preferences are discussed.

  4. [Spanish consensus on infantile haemangioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselga Torres, Eulalia; Bernabéu Wittel, José; van Esso Arbolave, Diego L; Febrer Bosch, María Isabel; Carrasco Sanz, Ángel; de Lucas Laguna, Raúl; Del Pozo Losada, Jesús; Hernández Martín, Ángela; Jiménez Montañés, Lorenzo; López Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos; Martín-Santiago, Ana; Redondo Bellón, Pedro; Ruíz-Canela Cáceres, Juan; Torrelo Fernández, Antonio; Vera Casaño, Ángel; Vicente Villa, María Asunción

    2016-11-01

    Infantile haemangiomas are benign tumours produced by the proliferation of endothelial cells of blood vessels, with a high incidence in children under the age of one year (4-10%). It is estimated that 12% of them require treatment. This treatment must be administered according to clinical practice guidelines, expert experience, patient characteristics and parent preferences. The consensus process was performed by using scientific evidence on the diagnosis and treatment of infantile haemangiomas, culled from a systematic review of the literature, together with specialist expert opinions. The recommendations issued were validated by the specialists, who also provided their level of agreement. This document contains recommendations on the classification, associations, complications, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with infantile haemangioma. It also includes action algorithms, and addresses multidisciplinary management and referral criteria between the different specialities involved in the clinical management of this type of patient. The recommendations and the diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms of infantile haemangiomas contained in this document are a useful tool for the proper management of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Latino Definitions of Success: A Cultural Model of Intercultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to examine Latino intercultural competence via two separate methodologies. Phase 1 entailed discovering and generating themes regarding the features of intercultural competence based on semistructured interviews of 15 Latino adults. Phase 2 included conducting a cultural consensus analysis from the quantitative responses of 46 Latino adults to determine the cultural model of intercultural competence. The major results indicated that the participants, despite variations in socioeconomic and generational statuses, shared a common knowledge base regarding the competencies needed for Latinos to successfully navigate different cultures. Overall, the cultural model of Latino intercultural competence includes a set of skills that integrates traditional cultural values along with attributes of self-efficacy. The findings are discussed within a competence-based conceptualization of cultural adaptation and potential advancements in acculturation research.

  6. State Feedback Consensus for Multi-Agent System with Multiple Time-Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the multi-agent system to achieve a faster consensus with multiple time-delays under a directed asymmetric information exchange topology. We first assume that an agent processes its own state information with self-delay and receives state information from its neighbors with communication delays. Based on state proportion derivative feedback, the improved consensus protocol can accelerate the system to achieve a consensus. A sufficient condition for reaching consensus is then derived based on the Nyquist stability criterion and frequency domain analysis. In addition, a specific form of consensus equilibrium is obtained which is influenced by the initial states of agents, time-delays and state feedback intensity. Finally, simulations are presented to verify the validity of the theoretical results.

  7. Consensus protocol for heterogeneous multi-agent systems:A Markov chain approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Shan-Ying; Chen Cai-Lian; Guan Xin-Ping

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the consensus problem for heterogeneous multi-agent systems.Different from most existing consensus protocols,we consider the consensus seeking of two types of agents,namely,active agents and passive agents.The objective is to directly control the active agents such that the states of all the agents would achieve consensus.In order to obtain a computational approach,we subtly introduce an appropriate Markov chain to cast the heterogeneous systems into a unified framework.Such a framework is helpful for tackling the constraints from passive agents.Furthermore,a sufficient and necessary condition is established to guarantee the consensus in heterogeneous multi-agent systems.Finally,simulation results are provided to verify the theoretical analysis and the effectiveness of the proposed protocol.

  8. Leader-Following Consensus for Linear and Lipschitz Nonlinear Multiagent Systems With Quantized Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Lin; Hao, Fei; Wang, Long

    2016-06-21

    This paper studies the leader-following consensus problem for linear and Lipschitz nonlinear multiagent systems where the communication topology has a directed spanning tree with the leader as the root. Due to the constraints of communication bandwidth and storage space, agents can only receive uniform quantized information. We first consider the leader-following consensus problem for linear multiagent systems via quantized control. Then, in order to reduce the communication load, an event-triggered control strategy is investigated to solve the consensus problem for linear multiagent systems with uniform quantization. It is shown that leader-following practical consensus can be achieved and no Zeno behavior occurs in this case. Furthermore, the proposed control strategies are extended to investigate the leader-following consensus problem for multiagent systems with Lipschitz nonlinear dynamics. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the theoretical analysis.

  9. Cross-Cultural Food Consumption Behavior of Consumers in Fiji

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karishma Kavita Devi; Gurmeet Singh; Rafia Naz; Kim-Shyan Fam

    2015-01-01

      Though there is a consensus that global food consumption globally is regimenting, it remains undefined whether the cultural stimuli inducing consumers' choices, preferences, and consumption patterns...

  10. Do participatory scenario exercises promote systems thinking and build consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schmitt Olabisi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Participatory scenario processes are associated with positive social learning outcomes, including consensus-building and shifts toward more systemic thinking. However, these claims have not been assessed quantitatively in diverse cultural and socio-ecological settings. We convened three stakeholder workshops around the future of agricultural development and rural livelihoods in Burkina Faso, Nigeria, and Malawi, using a participatory scenario generation process to examine proposed research and action priorities under conditions of uncertainty. We administered pre- and post-workshop surveys, and used a paired t-test to assess how stakeholders’ rankings of research priorities changed after participating in the scenario visioning exercise. Workshop participants also listed their own priorities for research and implementation on both the pre- and post-survey forms. We found indications that the workshops promoted consensus-building around the research priorities, including a reduction in standard deviation of priority rankings post-workshop compared to pre-workshop; and a higher incidence of identical volunteered responses. We did not find evidence to support shifts in thinking to more systemic views of agricultural development. However, participants viewed themselves as having learned throughout the process. We conclude that scenario visioning does have the potential to foster consensus-building (one element of social learning among diverse stakeholder groups. We urge researchers to continue to monitor and measure systems thinking outcomes from scenario visioning so that these processes may be designed to be more effective.

  11. Peer Pressure Shapes Consensus, Leadership, and Innovations in Social Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Ernesto; Vargas-Estrada, Eusebio

    2013-01-01

    What is the effect of the combined direct and indirect social influences-peer pressure (PP)-on a social groups collective decisions? We present a model that captures PP as a function of the socio-cultural distance between individuals in a social group. Using this model and empirical data from 15 real-world social networks we found that the PP level determines how fast a social group reaches consensus. More importantly, the levels of PP determine the leaders who can achieve full control of the...

  12. Content analysis and the organisation of cultural repertories: The case of magic lantern slides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Francisco Javier Frutos Esteban

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of systematic analysis techniques of media messages is one of the methodological challenges to be approached in the communication field in the coming decades. Content analysis as a method to investigate in detail the contents of any type of material of human communication can be an essential tool in the ordered description of communicative and cultural repertories. It is a starting point to create a cultural ecology based on research in social communication, which in the present work is applied to the repertory of magic lantern slides. The magic lantern was an audiovisual media based on the projection of images and synchronic use of sounds that gained cultural significance between the 17th and 20th centuries.

  13. Genome-wide conserved consensus transcription factor binding motifs are hyper-methylated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Down Thomas A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation can regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction between DNA and proteins or protein complexes. Conserved consensus motifs exist across the human genome ("predicted transcription factor binding sites": "predicted TFBS" but the large majority of these are proven by chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq not to be biological transcription factor binding sites ("empirical TFBS". We hypothesize that DNA methylation at conserved consensus motifs prevents promiscuous or disorderly transcription factor binding. Results Using genome-wide methylation maps of the human heart and sperm, we found that all conserved consensus motifs as well as the subset of those that reside outside CpG islands have an aggregate profile of hyper-methylation. In contrast, empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs have a profile of hypo-methylation. 40% of empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs resided in CpG islands whereas only 7% of all conserved consensus motifs were in CpG islands. Finally we further identified a minority subset of TF whose profiles are either hypo-methylated or neutral at their respective conserved consensus motifs implicating that these TF may be responsible for establishing or maintaining an un-methylated DNA state, or whose binding is not regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions Our analysis supports the hypothesis that at least for a subset of TF, empirical binding to conserved consensus motifs genome-wide may be controlled by DNA methylation.

  14. Is the Hegemonic Position of American Culture Able to Subjugate Local Cultures of Importing Countries? A Constructive Analysis on the Phenomenon of Cultural Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Tien-Hui

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that globalization assists the USA to gain a hegemonic position, allowing it to export its culture. Because this exportation leads to the domination by American culture of the local cultures of importing countries, which are the key element in sustaining their citizens' national identity, citizens of these countries are…

  15. Is the Hegemonic Position of American Culture Able to Subjugate Local Cultures of Importing Countries? A Constructive Analysis on the Phenomenon of Cultural Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Tien-Hui

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that globalization assists the USA to gain a hegemonic position, allowing it to export its culture. Because this exportation leads to the domination by American culture of the local cultures of importing countries, which are the key element in sustaining their citizens' national identity, citizens of these countries are…

  16. Differing perceptions of safety culture across job roles in the ambulatory setting: analysis of the AHRQ Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickner, John; Smith, Scott A; Yount, Naomi; Sorra, Joann

    2016-08-01

    Experts in patient safety stress the importance of a shared culture of safety. Lack of consensus may be detrimental to patient safety. This study examines differences in patient safety culture perceptions among providers, management and staff in a large national survey of safety culture in ambulatory practices in the USA. The US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (SOPS) assesses perceptions about patient safety issues and event reporting in medical offices (ie, ambulatory practices). Using the 2014 data, we analysed responses from medical offices with at least five respondents. We calculated differences in perceptions of patient safety culture across six job positions (physicians, management, nurse practitioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs), nurses, clinical support staff and administrative/clerical staff) for 10 survey composites, the average of the 10 composites and an overall patient safety rating using multivariate hierarchical linear regressions. We analysed data from 828 medical offices with responses from 15 523 providers and staff, with an average 20 completed surveys per medical office (range: 5-367) and an average medical office response rate of 65% (range: 3%-100%). Management had significantly more positive patient safety culture perceptions on nine of 10 composite scores compared with all other job positions, including physicians. The composite that showed the largest difference was Communication Openness; Management (85% positive) was 22% points more positive than other clinical and support staff and administrative/clerical staff. Physicians were significantly more positive than PAs/NPs, nursing staff, other clinical and support staff and administrative/clerical staff on four composites: Communication About Error, Communication Openness, Staff Training and Teamwork, ranging from 3% to 20% points more positive. These findings suggest that managers need to pay attention to the training needs

  17. Analysis of the effect of leadership and organizational culture on the organizational effectiveness of radiological technologist's working environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, C.S. [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Bugok 3-Dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 607-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.M., E-mail: donald@cup.ac.kr [Department of Computer Education, Graduate School, Korea University, Anam-dong Seongbuk - gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present ideas to upgrade job performance and improve organizational management by analyzing leadership aspects and organizational cultures of radiological technologist organizations. Method: A questionnaire was used to collect data from 261 radiological technologists working in the city of Busan. Then, SPSS/PC + Win 13 was used to statistically analyze the collected data. One-way ANOVA was adopted to test differences among groups, and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the effect of organizational culture and leadership upon organizational effectiveness. Results: First, it was found that radiological technologists stressed consensus most among the 4 types of organizational culture and regarded core transformational leadership as the right type of leadership. Second, regarding the relationship between leadership and organizational effectiveness, transformational leadership had the highest influence upon organizational effectiveness. Third, as for the relationship between organizational culture and organizational effectiveness, it was found that a developmental culture has the highest influence upon organizational effectiveness, followed by a culture of consensus. Conclusion: If transformational leadership and consensual culture are used properly for upgrading job performance in the organization, conflicts among radiological technologists might be reduced, thereby enhancing organizational effectiveness.

  18. The SOS-framework (Systems of Sedentary behaviours): an international transdisciplinary consensus framework for the study of determinants, research priorities and policy on sedentary behaviour across the life course: a DEDIPAC-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastin, Sebastien F M; De Craemer, Marieke; Lien, Nanna; Bernaards, Claire; Buck, Christoph; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Nazare, Julie-Anne; Lakerveld, Jeroen; O'Donoghue, Grainne; Holdsworth, Michelle; Owen, Neville; Brug, Johannes; Cardon, Greet

    2016-07-15

    Ecological models are currently the most used approaches to classify and conceptualise determinants of sedentary behaviour, but these approaches are limited in their ability to capture the complexity of and interplay between determinants. The aim of the project described here was to develop a transdisciplinary dynamic framework, grounded in a system-based approach, for research on determinants of sedentary behaviour across the life span and intervention and policy planning and evaluation. A comprehensive concept mapping approach was used to develop the Systems Of Sedentary behaviours (SOS) framework, involving four main phases: (1) preparation, (2) generation of statements, (3) structuring (sorting and ranking), and (4) analysis and interpretation. The first two phases were undertaken between December 2013 and February 2015 by the DEDIPAC KH team (DEterminants of DIet and Physical Activity Knowledge Hub). The last two phases were completed during a two-day consensus meeting in June 2015. During the first phase, 550 factors regarding sedentary behaviour were listed across three age groups (i.e., youths, adults and older adults), which were reduced to a final list of 190 life course factors in phase 2 used during the consensus meeting. In total, 69 international delegates, seven invited experts and one concept mapping consultant attended the consensus meeting. The final framework obtained during that meeting consisted of six clusters of determinants: Physical Health and Wellbeing (71% consensus), Social and Cultural Context (59% consensus), Built and Natural Environment (65% consensus), Psychology and Behaviour (80% consensus), Politics and Economics (78% consensus), and Institutional and Home Settings (78% consensus). Conducting studies on Institutional Settings was ranked as the first research priority. The view that this framework captures a system-based map of determinants of sedentary behaviour was expressed by 89% of the participants. Through an international

  19. Identifying and Quantifying Cultural Factors That Matter to the IT Workforce: An Approach Based on Automated Content Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiedel, Theresa; Müller, Oliver; Debortoli, Stefan;

    2016-01-01

    builds on 112,610 online reviews of Fortune 500 IT companies collected from Glassdoor, an online platform on which current and former employees can anonymously review companies and their management. We perform an automated content analysis to identify cultural factors that employees emphasize...... of culture and the success of companies, the validity of this approach is often discussed and researchers call for new ways of studying culture. Therefore, our research goal is to present an alternative approach to culture analysis for examining which cultural factors matter to the IT workforce. Our study...... in their reviews. Through a regression analysis on numerical employee satisfaction ratings, we find that a culture of learning and performance orientation contributes to employee motivation, while a culture of assertiveness and gender inegalitarianism has a strong negative influence on employees’ satisfaction...

  20. Identifying and Quantifying Cultural Factors That Matter to the IT Workforce: An Approach Based on Automated Content Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiedel, Theresa; Müller, Oliver; Debortoli, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    builds on 112,610 online reviews of Fortune 500 IT companies collected from Glassdoor, an online platform on which current and former employees can anonymously review companies and their management. We perform an automated content analysis to identify cultural factors that employees emphasize...... of culture and the success of companies, the validity of this approach is often discussed and researchers call for new ways of studying culture. Therefore, our research goal is to present an alternative approach to culture analysis for examining which cultural factors matter to the IT workforce. Our study...... in their reviews. Through a regression analysis on numerical employee satisfaction ratings, we find that a culture of learning and performance orientation contributes to employee motivation, while a culture of assertiveness and gender inegalitarianism has a strong negative influence on employees’ satisfaction...

  1. Consensus of the 'Malasars' traditional aboriginal knowledge of medicinal plants in the Velliangiri holy hills, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velusamy Balasubramaniam

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many vanishing cultures that possess a wealth of knowledge on the medicinal utility of plants. The Malasars of Dravidian Tamils are an indigenous society occupying the forests of the Western Ghats, South India. They are known to be exceptional healers and keepers of traditional aboriginal knowledge (TAK of the flora in the Velliangiri holy hills. In fact, their expertise is well known throughout India as evidenced by the thousands of pilgrims that go to the Velliangiri holy hills for healing every year. Our research is the first detailed study of medicinal plants in India that considers variation in TAK among informants using a quantitative consensus analysis. A total of 95 species belonging to 50 families were identified for medicinal and general health purposes. For each species the botanical name, family, local name, parts used, summary of mode of preparation, administration and curing are provided. The consensus analysis revealed a high level of agreement among the informants usage of a particular plant at a local scale. The average consensus index value of an informant was FIC > 0.71, and over 0.80 for some ailments such as respiratory and jaundice. Some of the more common problems faced by the Malasars were gastrointestinal disorders, respiratory illness, dermatological problems and simple illness such as fever, cough, cold, wounds and bites from poisonous animals. We also discovered several new ethnotaxa that have considerable medicinal utility. This study supports claims that the Malasars possess a rich TAK of medicinal plants and that many aboriginals and mainstream people (pilgrims utilize medicinal plants of the Velliangiri holy hills. Unfortunately, the younger generation of Malasars are not embracing TAK as they tend to migrate towards lucrative jobs in more developed urban areas. Our research sheds some light on a traditional culture that believes that a healthy lifestyle is founded on a healthy environment and

  2. Historicizing in Critical Policy Analysis: The Production of Cultural Histories and Microhistories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Curtis A.

    2014-01-01

    The practice of critical policy analysis often emphasizes the importance of historicizing the present. However, there is very little guidance for critical policy analysts on the methodical production of histories. In this paper, I meet this need by arguing for the use of methodologies embedded in the production of both cultural histories and…

  3. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory and Domain Analysis: Metatheoretical Implications for Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cultural-historical activity theory is an important theory in modern psychology. In recent years, it has drawn more attention from related disciplines including information science. Argument: This paper argues that activity theory and domain analysis which uses the theory as one of its bases could bring about some important…

  4. Cultural Parallax and Content Analysis: Images of Black Women in High School History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyshner, Christine; Schocker, Jessica B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the representation of Black women in high school history textbooks. To examine the extent to which Black women are represented visually and to explore how they are portrayed, the authors use a mixed-methods approach that draws on analytical techniques in content analysis and from visual culture studies. Their findings…

  5. Parent-Child Interaction in Nigerian Families: Conversation Analysis, Context and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Annabel; Radford, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses a conversation analysis (CA) approach to explore parent-child interaction (PCI) within Nigerian families. We illustrate how speech and language therapists (SLTs), by using CA, can tailor recommendations according to the interactional style of each individual family that are consonant with the family's cultural beliefs. Three…

  6. Effect of Gender on Teachers' Organizational Culture Perception: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Cemalettin; Aytaç, Tufan; Gok, Enes

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the strength of the effect of gender, if there is any, on the perceptions of teachers on organizational culture in a meta-analysis. 27 studies consisting of Master's theses and PhD dissertations were chosen from the National Thesis/Dissertation Database provided by Turkish Council of Higher Education. The sample consists…

  7. Student Trajectories in Physics: The Need for Analysis through a Socio-Cultural Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Mara

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of student connections through time and space relative to the core discipline of physics is attempted, as viewed through the lens of actor-network-theory, by Antonia Candela. Using lenses of cultural realities, networks, and perceived power in the discourse of one specific university in the capital city of Mexico and one undergraduate…

  8. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  9. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  10. Historicizing in Critical Policy Analysis: The Production of Cultural Histories and Microhistories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Curtis A.

    2014-01-01

    The practice of critical policy analysis often emphasizes the importance of historicizing the present. However, there is very little guidance for critical policy analysts on the methodical production of histories. In this paper, I meet this need by arguing for the use of methodologies embedded in the production of both cultural histories and…

  11. Cultural Parallax and Content Analysis: Images of Black Women in High School History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyshner, Christine; Schocker, Jessica B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the representation of Black women in high school history textbooks. To examine the extent to which Black women are represented visually and to explore how they are portrayed, the authors use a mixed-methods approach that draws on analytical techniques in content analysis and from visual culture studies. Their findings…

  12. Preface Sections in English and Arabic Linguistics Books: A Rhetorico-Cultural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassier A. G. Al-Zubaidi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a genre analysis of linguistics books prefaces in English and Arabic. Following Swales' (1990 genre framework, this study is a small scale-based generic analysis of 80 preface texts, equally divided into 40 texts from English and Arabic. The corpus analysis revealed that to perform its communicative function, the genre of the preface sections has nine component moves with some variation between the two languages.  As to move type and frequency, the rhetorical structure of preface genre varies to some extent in the two different languages under investigation. In addition, the socio-cultural practices and assumptions of the book writers of the two languages are embedded in the language of preface genre. Due to the limitation of the present study, further research is required to examine this genre in depth. Keywords: Preface sections, Genre analysis, Socio-cultural patterns, Rhetorical structure, Move

  13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE CROSS CULTURAL MANAGEMENT IN IT VS NON IT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata KAPUR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of business which is considered a 'second industrial revolution' is a trend that makes Cross cultural Human Resource management crucial for all organizations. Multicultural workforce congregations and increasing global interactions in business, finance, culture etc. have become today's workplace realities.Cross-cultural differences are the cause of failed negotiations and interactions, resulting in losses to the firms. This study examines the best practices in managing across a culturally diverse and geographically dispersed workforce in IT and non IT organizations and makes comparative evaluation of these practices and strategies. The results of the comparative analysis study will lead to cross fertilization of ideas as the best practices for IT companies can be imbibed by and applied to the non IT companies and vice versa. This study ellucidates that cross-cultural management will give managers on international assignments the cultural understanding essential to accomplish their tasks leading to a committed workforce thereby resulting in better financial performance of the organization.

  14. Transient analysis and performance studies of two tubular photobioreactors for outdoor culture of Spirulina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, J.; Torzillo, G.; Pushparaj, B.; Carlozzi, P.; Materassi, R. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Florence (Italy). Centro di Studio dei Microhanismi Autotrofi

    1995-08-01

    A mathematical model to make a transient thermal analysis and to estimate the incident solar energy for two designs of tubular photobioreactor installed outdoors is presented here. In the first photobioreactor design the tubes were arranged in one plane, whereas in the second the tubes were arranged in two planes. The model was validated by comparing the experimental data and predicted values of culture temperature. Both the input solar energy and culture temperature in a tubular photobioreactor may be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy by employing the model. The performance of the two photobioreactors for mass culture of Spirulina was also studied in relation to their design and culture temperature. The average biomass yield obtained in one-plane and two-plane photobioreactors were (dry weight) 23.7 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} and 27.8 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} respectively. Such biomass yields corresponded to a volumetric productivity of (dry weight) 0.466 g litre{sup -1} day{sup -1} in the one-plane reactor and 1.5 g litre{sup -1} day{sup -1} in the two-plane reactor. We further observed that biomass yield could be increased by about 21% when the culture temperature was maintained at the optimal value of 35{sup o}C compared to another culture in which temperature changed according to the ambient temperature from 20 to 39{sup o}C during the day. (author)

  15. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... treatment protocols, 1) is based on current published evidence-based literature, 2) considers the current legal framework of the cascade regulation for the prescription of veterinary drugs in Europe, and 3) reflects the authors' experience. With this paper it is aimed to provide a consensus...

  16. MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE: A QUANTITATIVE-COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS [doi: 10.5329/RECADM.20100902007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valderí de Castro Alcântara

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at the analysis of the organizational culture at enterprises located in two towns with distinct quantitative traits, Rio Paranaíba and Araxá. While the surveyed enterprises in Rio Paranaíba are mostly micro and small enterprises (86%, in Araxá there are mostly medium and large companies (53%. The overall objective is to verify if there are significant differences in organizational culture among these enterprises and if they can be explained by the organization size. The research was quantitative and instruments for data collection were a questionnaire and a scale for measuring organizational culture containing four dimensions: Hierarchical Distance Index (IDH, Individualism Index (INDI, Masculinity Index (MASC and the Uncertainty Control Index (CINC. Tabulation and analysis of data were performed using the PASW Statistics 18, doing descriptive and inferential statistical procedures. Using a Reduction Factor (-21 the achieved indexes were classified into 5 intensity categories (from "very low" to "very high". The Student t test for two means was performed, revealing significant differences in Hierarchical Distance and Individualism between Araxá and Rio Paranaíba enterprises (p <0.05.   Keywords Organizational Culture; Dimensions of Organizational Culture; Araxá; Rio Paranaíba.

  17. Cultural Models Shaping Stalking From a Content Analysis of Italian Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Caputo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing spread of stalking in recent years has captured the community’s and media’s interest and highlighted complex legal, clinical and cultural issues. This phenomenon, far from being an individual problem, can be considered as a product of a growing culture that seems to reveal the crisis of current rules of social coexistence. This work aims at detecting the cultural repertoires that organise the stalking discourse, from an analysis of Italian newspaper articles, within a socio-constructivist paradigm. Emotional text analysis was conducted on a corpus of headlines and subheadings derived from 496 articles. These articles were published in major national newspapers and helped to identify four cultural repertoires (clusters that characterise the social representation of stalking: gender violence and women’s social independence (Cluster 1, psychological violence and control as illusion of intimacy (Cluster 2, anomic violence and intolerant individualism (Cluster 3, domestic violence and women’s marital obligation (Cluster 4. These repertoires are conceived along three latent dimensions which respectively refer to the cultural functions of stalking (Factor 1, representations of the victim (Factor 2, and gender inequalities (Factor 3. The paper offers a key to a social contextualisation of stalking in Italy, in order to re-think work practices within institutional agencies that deal with this phenomenon.

  18. Metabolic analysis of antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture under different stresses conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badsha, Md Bahadur; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Oga, Takushi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are commonly used as the host cell lines concerning their ability to produce therapeutic proteins with complex post-translational modifications. In this study, we have investigated the time course extra- and intracellular metabolome data of the CHO-K1 cell line, under a control and stress conditions. The addition of NaCl and trehalose greatly suppressed cell growth, where the maximum viable cell density of NaCl and trehalose cultures were 2.2-fold and 2.8-fold less than that of a control culture. Contrariwise, the antibody production of both the NaCl and trehalose cultures was sustained for a longer time to surpass that of the control culture. The NaCl and trehalose cultures showed relatively similar dynamics of cell growth, antibody production, and substrate/product concentrations, while they indicated different dynamics from the control culture. The principal component analysis of extra- and intracellular metabolome dynamics indicated that their dynamic behaviors were consistent with biological functions. The qualitative pattern matching classification and hierarchical clustering analyses for the intracellular metabolome identified the metabolite clusters whose dynamic behaviors depend on NaCl and trehalose. The volcano plot revealed several reporter metabolites whose dynamics greatly change between in the NaCl and trehalose cultures. The elastic net identified some critical, intracellular metabolites that are distinct between the NaCl and trehalose. While a relatively small number of intracellular metabolites related to the cell growth, glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium ion concentrations, the mechanism of antibody production was suggested to be very complicated or not to be explained by elastic net regression analysis. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Kinome profiling of Arabidopsis using arrays of kinase consensus substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieterse Corné MJ

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinome profiling aims at the parallel analysis of kinase activities in a cell. Novel developed arrays containing consensus substrates for kinases are used to assess those kinase activities. The arrays described in this paper were already used to determine kinase activities in mammalian systems, but since substrates from many organisms are present we decided to test these arrays for the determination of kinase activities in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Kinome profiling using Arabidopsis cell extracts resulted in the labelling of many consensus peptides by kinases from the plant, indicating the usefulness of this kinome profiling tool for plants. Method development showed that fresh and frozen plant material could be used to make cell lysates containing active kinases. Dilution of the plant extract increased the signal to noise ratio and non-radioactive ATP enhances full development of spot intensities. Upon infection of Arabidopsis with an avirulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, we could detect differential kinase activities by measuring phosphorylation of consensus peptides. Conclusion We show that kinome profiling on arrays with consensus substrates can be used to monitor kinase activities in plants. In a case study we show that upon infection with avirulent P. syringae differential kinase activities can be found. The PepChip can for example be used to purify (unknown kinases that play a role in P. syringae infection. This paper shows that kinome profiling using arrays of consensus peptides is a valuable new tool to study signal-transduction in plants. It complements the available methods for genomics and proteomics research.

  20. 文化强省下图书馆文化影响力分析%Analysis on the Cultural Influences of Libraries in a Cultural Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董玉宝

    2012-01-01

    文化强省中,图书馆作为文化设施的主要载体,发挥着对文化的引导、激励、凝聚、影响等作用。借助图表统计分析的方法,揭示了图书馆文化在文化强省中的影响力。%In a cultural province, libraries, as a major carrier of cultural facilities, play a leading, motivating, cohesive and influencing role of cultures. The paper, with the help of chart analysis, reveals the cultural influences of libraries in a cultural province.

  1. An Analysis on Cultural Values of Companies from China and the United States-Based on Hofstede’s Cultural Dimension Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    占小海; 张若晨

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, commercial competition is becoming fiercer and fiercer, and with the globalization proceeding, when a company tries to expand, promote and develop, it needs to adapt itself to the open business society while not losing its own cul-ture. Since English has been widely used in the world, an effective and suitable English website is essential for a company to use as a kind of advertisement and publicity, where its cultural values are presented.With companies’websites as subjects and Hofst-ede’s cultural dimension theory as the theoretical basis, this study, through text content and data analysis of company profiles, strategies and cultures, tries to find out the tendency of Chinese and American companies on the five cultural value dimensions, which is power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism, masculinity and long-term orientation. Accordingly, constructive suggestions are put forward to help appease and avoid misunderstandings, and promote business communication and collabora-tion.

  2. Culture Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Warner-Søderholm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether managers are concerned with financial issues, marketing, or human resource management (HRM, cultural values and practices do matter. The purpose of this article is to understand Norwegian managers’ cultural values within the cross-cultural landscape of her neighbors in the “Scandinavian cluster.” Clearly, subtle but disturbing differences may surface even when representatives from similar cultures work together. As a follow on from the GLOBE project, data based on the GLOBE instrument were collected on culture and communication values in Norway from 710 Norwegian middle managers for this present study. Although the Scandinavian cultures appear ostensibly similar, the results illustrate that research can reveal subtle but important cultural differences in nations that are similar yet dissimilar. All three Scandinavian societies appear intrinsically egalitarian; they appear to value low Power Distance, directness, and consensus in decision making and to promote Gender Egalitarianism. Nevertheless, there are significant differences in the degrees of commitment to these values by each individual Scandinavian partner. These differences need to be understood and appreciated to avoid misunderstandings.

  3. Cultural Policy in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Gestur

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the history of cultural policy in Iceland from a Nordic comparative perspective. National cultural policy takes form in the 19th and early 20th century as a part of the nation-building, emphasising the Icelandic language as the core of national identity, building cultural...... on the continuing emphasis on central cultural institution and the Icelandic language. Since the 1970s Cold War conflicts have been replaced by a consensus on growing support to artists and an armth's length policy, and furthermore the 1990s have seen a strong move towards NPM and international participation....... institutions and relying heavily on civic society enterprise. After national independence in 1918 there are growing conflicts in the cultural field and during the Cold War such conflicts take the form of an alliance of nationlism and socialism against NATO-oriented anti-communism. However, there is consensus...

  4. The effect of culture in forming e-loyalty intentions: A cross-cultural analysis between Argentina and Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belanche Gracia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase their markets, many companies are starting e-commerce internationalization processes that involve dealing with cultural differences among countries. Although most firms start internationalization strategies to similar countries, previous research has mainly focused on understanding expansion to countries with a great cultural distance. This study analyzes the relevance of culture in the formation of e-loyalty intentions in Argentina and Spain, two countries with slight cultural differences. Specifically, culture is proposed as a moderator of e-service quality and satisfaction effects on e-loyalty intentions. Results confirm that the influence of e-service quality on e-loyalty intentions is greater for Argentinian consumers (a little more individualistic, masculine, and less pragmatic culture compared to Spain. Besides, a greater influence of satisfaction on e-loyalty is found for Spanish consumers (a more pragmatic, collectivistic, and feminine culture compared to Argentina. The introduction of socio-demographic control variables, i.e. gender, age and education level, support the moderation effect of culture. According to these results, marketers should note that e-loyalty formation process differs across cultures, even between similar cultures. Further implications for international marketing strategies are widely discussed.

  5. Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Carious Tissue Removal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwendicke, F; Frencken, J.E; Bjørndal, L; Maltz, M; Manton, D.J; Ricketts, D; Van Landuyt, K; Banerjee, A; Campus, G; Doméjean, S; Fontana, M; Leal, S; Lo, E; Machiulskiene, V; Schulte, A; Splieth, C; Zandona, A.F; Innes, N.P.T

    2016-01-01

    The International Caries Consensus Collaboration undertook a consensus process and here presents clinical recommendations for carious tissue removal and managing cavitated carious lesions, including...

  6. A Cultural Analysis of Pound's Mistranslation in the Poem "Blue, blue is the Grass"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-dong; YANG Da-liang

    2001-01-01

    Ezra Pound is one of the founders of the American Imagist poetry, and Chinese Classic Poetry happened to be a great stimulus as the Renaissance from the Greeks to this poetry movement. Pound, who was deeply fascinated by Chinese poetry, has rendered many into English. Yet due to cultural differences, Pound's translation has a lot of mistakes. And this paper aims at a cultural analysis of the mistranslation on a certain text to display its influence upon the Imagist Movement in the history of American Poetry.

  7. "Heroes" and "villains" of world history across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Katja; Liu, James H; Sibley, Chris G; Paez, Dario; Gaines, Stanley O; Moloney, Gail; Leong, Chan-Hoong; Wagner, Wolfgang; Licata, Laurent; Klein, Olivier; Garber, Ilya; Böhm, Gisela; Hilton, Denis J; Valchev, Velichko; Khan, Sammyh S; Cabecinhas, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Emergent properties of global political culture were examined using data from the World History Survey (WHS) involving 6,902 university students in 37 countries evaluating 40 figures from world history. Multidimensional scaling and factor analysis techniques found only limited forms of universality in evaluations across Western, Catholic/Orthodox, Muslim, and Asian country clusters. The highest consensus across cultures involved scientific innovators, with Einstein having the most positive evaluation overall. Peaceful humanitarians like Mother Theresa and Gandhi followed. There was much less cross-cultural consistency in the evaluation of negative figures, led by Hitler, Osama bin Laden, and Saddam Hussein. After more traditional empirical methods (e.g., factor analysis) failed to identify meaningful cross-cultural patterns, Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) was used to identify four global representational profiles: Secular and Religious Idealists were overwhelmingly prevalent in Christian countries, and Political Realists were common in Muslim and Asian countries. We discuss possible consequences and interpretations of these different representational profiles.

  8. OGC Consensus: How Successful Standards Are Made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Reed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the history, background, and current status of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards development consensus process. The roots of the formation of the OGC lie in the early 1990s when a very strong market requirement for exchanging GIS data content was clearly stated. At that time, each GIS vendor had their own formats for publishing and/or exchanging their GIS data. There was no mechanism or organization that provided a forum for the GIS vendors and GIS data users to collaborate and agree on how to share GIS data. That requirement, along with the vision of a few individuals, led to the formation of the OGC. This paper describes the early development of the consensus process in the OGC, how this process has evolved over time, why consensus is so important for defining open standards that are implemented in the marketplace, and the future of the OGC consensus process.

  9. Quantitative proteome analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor Nonsporulating liquid cultures demonstrates a complex differentiation process comparable to that occurring in sporulating solid cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manteca, Angel; Jung, Hye R; Schwämmle, Veit

    2010-01-01

    Streptomyces species produce many clinically important secondary metabolites and present a complex developmental cycle that includes programmed cell death (PCD) phenomena and sporulation. Industrial fermentations are usually performed in liquid cultures, conditions in which Streptomyces strains...... of the different developmental stages in liquid and solid S. coelicolor cultures, in order to give new insights in Streptomyces biology, and improve industrial fermentations. Using iTRAQ labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis of peptides, we demonstrate that differentiation in S. coelicolor liquid cultures is comparable...

  10. Contesting Consensus Culture: The Case of Dutch Gothic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, R.L.; Wesseling, L.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently the Gothic novel was considered to be a predominantly Anglo-Saxon phenomenon, but there are now several studies that have convincingly uncovered relevant European contributions to the development of this genre. We are adding to this project of Anglo-European comparisons by investigati

  11. The Strategic Implications of Culture: A Historical Analysis of China’s Culture and Implications for US Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    7. 5 Ibid. 6 Fairbank, China: A New History, 18. 7 Yosef Lapid and Friedrich Kratochwil, eds., The Return of Culture and Identity in International...Relations Theory (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1996), 30. 8 Latourette, 400. 9 Yosef Lapid and Friedrich Kratochwil, eds., The Return of...Johnston, Alastair. Cultural Realism: Strategic Culture and Grand Strategy in Chinese History. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995. Lapid

  12. Population conference: consensus and conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, P D

    1984-01-01

    The United Nations-sponsored International Conference on Population held in Mexico City was both a rejection and an affirmation of a new policy of the Reagan administration. The policy denies international family planning funds to nongovernmental organizations that perform or actively promote abortion as a family planning method in other nations. A compromise statement was accepted urging governments to take appropriate measures to discourage abortion as a family planning method and when possible to provide for the humane treatment and counseling of women ho resorted to abortion. The statement on abortion was 1 of 88 reccomendations approved by the conference. The commitment expressed in the 10-year-old World Population Plan of Action to the rights and responsiblity to all people as reaffirmed. The conference also endorsed family life education and sex education as well as suitable family planning, information and services for adolescents, with due consideration given to the role, rights and obligations of parents. Increased support for international population and family planning programs was urged and World Bank President, Clausen, urged a 4-fold increase in international funding by the year 2000. Most of the conference's recommendations re devoted to the broad range of population policy issues, including morbidity and mortality, international and internal migration, the relationship between population and economic development and the status of women. The purpose of the recommendations is to increase the momentum of international support. The Mexico City conference was characterized by a remarkable degree of consensus about population policies with respect to integration with economic development, the need to respect individual rights and the recognition that all nations have sovereign rights to develop and implement their own population policies. Conflict and controversy arose in the areas of the arms race and the Middle East. The US position on abortion funding

  13. Seeking worldwide professional consensus on the principles of end-of-life care for the critically ill. The Consensus for Worldwide End-of-Life Practice for Patients in Intensive Care Units (WELPICUS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, Charles L; Truog, Robert D; Curtis, J Randall; Joynt, Gavin M; Baras, Mario; Michalsen, Andrej; Briegel, Josef; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Efferen, Linda; De Robertis, Edoardo; Bulpa, Pierre; Metnitz, Philipp; Patil, Namrata; Hawryluck, Laura; Manthous, Constantine; Moreno, Rui; Leonard, Sara; Hill, Nicholas S; Wennberg, Elisabet; McDermid, Robert C; Mikstacki, Adam; Mularski, Richard A; Hartog, Christiane S; Avidan, Alexander

    2014-10-15

    Great differences in end-of-life practices in treating the critically ill around the world warrant agreement regarding the major ethical principles. This analysis determines the extent of worldwide consensus for end-of-life practices, delineates where there is and is not consensus, and analyzes reasons for lack of consensus. Critical care societies worldwide were invited to participate. Country coordinators were identified and draft statements were developed for major end-of-life issues and translated into six languages. Multidisciplinary responses using a web-based survey assessed agreement or disagreement with definitions and statements linked to anonymous demographic information. Consensus was prospectively defined as >80% agreement. Definitions and statements not obtaining consensus were revised based on comments of respondents, and then translated and redistributed. Of the initial 1,283 responses from 32 countries, consensus was found for 66 (81%) of the 81 definitions and statements; 26 (32%) had >90% agreement. With 83 additional responses to the original questionnaire (1,366 total) and 604 responses to the revised statements, consensus could be obtained for another 11 of the 15 statements. Consensus was obtained for informed consent, withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, legal requirements, intensive care unit therapies, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, shared decision making, medical and nursing consensus, brain death, and palliative care. Consensus was obtained for 77 of 81 (95%) statements. Worldwide consensus could be developed for the majority of definitions and statements about end-of-life practices. Statements achieving consensus provide standards of practice for end-of-life care; statements without consensus identify important areas for future research.

  14. Pragmatism and Political Pluralism - Consensus and Pluralism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marsonet

    2015-07-01

    In our day the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has in a way revived these Peircean insights, putting forward an influential theory to the effect that consensus indeed plays a key role in human praxis, so that the primary task of philosophy is to foster it by eliminating the disagreement which we constantly have to face in the course of our daily life. In his “communicative theory of consensus,” furthermore, he claims that human communication rests on an implicit commitment to a sort of “ideal speech situation” which is the normative foundation of agreement in linguistic matters. Consequently, the quest for consensus is a constitutive feature of our nature of (rational human beings: rationality and consensus are tied together. A very strong consequence derives from Habermas’ premises: were we to abandon the search for consensus we would lose rationality, too, and this makes us understand that he views the pursuit of consensus as a regulative principle (rather than as a merely practical objective. Rescher opposes both Peirce’s eschatological view and Habermas’ regulative and idealized one.

  15. Needs Analysis of English Culture Background Introduction in Spoken English Classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丛丛

    2013-01-01

    With globalization there is an increasing need for spoken English for Chinese college students. However, the situation of the teaching system of spoken English in most universities in China is not satisfactory. Influenced by the exam-oriented teach⁃ing system, great importance has been put on English grammar and the skills of reading and writing. As a result, students’enthusi⁃asm in improving their spoken English is diminished. Actually, students need some knowledge about English culture background before they can communicate effectively. It is significant for teachers to find out the students’wants and lacks during their spoken English study. Besides, attentions should be paid to English culture background in spoken English classes by both teachers and students. This paper mainly aimed at finding out the needs of students for English culture background in spoken English classes based on the theory of needs analysis.

  16. Staff Potential of Cultural Sphere: Analysis of the Staff Needs and Features of its Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Mezhova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting of the needs in a labor market is considered as an important component of the marketing and as well it’s necessary for regulation and control of changes in the field of educational services, for strategic planning of vocational training for staff in the sphere of culture focused on population demand in the region. The aim of this research work is development and approbation of monitoring algorithm for needs in a labor market in cultural sphere. The paper reflects the analysis vocational training prospects in the field of a library science and social and cultural activity taking into account multilevel education on the basis of competence-based approach.

  17. Analysis Of Usefulness Of Satellite Image Processing Methods For Investigations Of Cultural Heritage Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osińska-Skotak, Katarzyna; Zapłata, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the analysis of usefulness of WorldView-2 satellite image processing, which enhance information concerning the cultural heritage objects. WorldView-2 images are characterised by the very high spatial resolution and high spectral resolution; that is why they create new possibilities for many applications, including investigations of the cultural heritage. The vicinities of Iłża have been selected as the test site for presented investigations. The presented results of works are the effect of research works, which were performed in the frames of the scientific project "Utilisation of laser scanning and remote sensing in protection, investigations and inventory of the cultural heritage. Development of non-invasive, digital methods of documenting and recognising the architectural and archaeological heritage", as the part of "The National Programme for the Development of Humanities" of the Minister of Science and Higher Education in the period of 2012-2015.

  18. Preparation of single cells from aggregated Taxus suspension cultures for population analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naill, Michael C; Roberts, Susan C

    2004-06-30

    A method for the isolation of single plant cells from Taxus suspension cultures has been developed for the analysis of single cells via rapid throughput techniques such as flow cytometry. Several cell wall specific enzymes, such as pectinase, pectolyase Y-23, macerozyme, Driselase(R), and cellulase were tested for efficacy in producing single cell suspensions. The method was optimized for single cell yield, viability, time, and representivity of aggregated cell cultures. The best combination for single cell isolation was found to be 0.5% (w/v) pectolyase Y-23 and 0.04% (w/v) cellulase. High viability (>95%) and high yields of single cell aggregates (>90%) were obtained following 4 hours of digestion for four separate Taxus cell lines. In addition, methyl jasmonate elicitation (200 microM) was found to have no effect on three of the four tested Taxus lines. Isolated single cells were statistically similar to untreated cell cultures for peroxidase activity (model cell wall protein) and paclitaxel content (secondary metabolite produced in Taxus cell cultures). In comparison, protoplasts showed marked changes in both peroxidase activity and paclitaxel content as compared to untreated cultures. The use of flow cytometry was demonstrated with isolated cells that were found to have > 99% viability upon staining with fluorescein diacetate. The development of a method for the isolation of single plant cells will allow the study of population dynamics and culture variability on a single cell level for the development of population models of plant cell cultures and secondary metabolism. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of Current Consensus Statement Recommendations for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis of William Beaumont Hospital and American Society of Breast Surgeon MammoSite Registry Trial Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Beitsch, Peter D. [Dallas Surgical Group, Dallas, Texas (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Arthur, Doug [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts and Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Keisch, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Healthcare Associates, Miami, Florida (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lyden, Maureen [Biostat International, Inc, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chen, Peter Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@pol.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) recommendations for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) are associated with significantly different outcomes in a pooled analysis from William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MammoSite® Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: APBI was used to treat 2127 cases of early-stage breast cancer (WBH, n=678; ASBrS, n=1449). Three forms of APBI were used at WBH (interstitial, n=221; balloon-based, n=255; or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, n=206), whereas all Registry Trial patients received balloon-based brachytherapy. Patients were divided according to the ASTRO CS into suitable (n=661, 36.5%), cautionary (n=850, 46.9%), and unsuitable (n=302, 16.7%) categories. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes were analyzed according to CS group. Results: The median age was 65 years (range, 32-94 years), and the median tumor size was 10.0 mm (range, 0-45 mm). The median follow-up time was 60.6 months. The WBH cohort had more node-positive disease (6.9% vs 2.6%, P<.01) and cautionary patients (49.5% vs 41.8%, P=.06). The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), and distant metastasis (DM) for the whole cohort were 2.8%, 0.6%, 1.6%. The rate of IBTR was not statistically higher between suitable (2.5%), cautionary (3.3%), or unsuitable (4.6%) patients (P=.20). The nonsignificant increase in IBTR for the cautionary and unsuitable categories was due to increased elsewhere failures and new primaries (P=.04), not tumor bed recurrence (P=.93). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes after breast-conserving surgery and APBI were seen in our pooled analysis. The current ASTRO CS guidelines did not adequately differentiate patients at an increased risk of IBTR or tumor bed failure in this large patient cohort.

  20. Children Trust a Consensus Composed of Outgroup Members--But Do Not Retain That Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eva E.; Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Harris, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Children prefer to learn from informants in consensus with one another. However, no research has examined whether this preference exists across cultures, and whether the race of the informants impacts that preference. In 2 studies, one hundred thirty-six 4- to 7-year-old European American and Taiwanese children demonstrated a systematic preference…

  1. Somaclonal variation: a morphogenetic and biochemical analysis of Mandevilla velutina cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maraschin

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell cultures of Mandevilla velutina have proved to be an interesting production system for biomass and secondary metabolites able to inhibit the hypotensive activity of bradykinin, a nonapeptide generated in plasma during tissue trauma. The crude ethyl acetate extract of cultured cells contains about 31- to 79-fold more potent anti-bradykinin compounds (e.g., velutinol A than that obtained with equivalent extracts of tubers. Somaclonal variation may be an explanation for the wide range of inhibitor activity found in the cell cultures. The heterogeneity concerning morphology, differentiation, carbon dissimilation, and velutinol A production in M. velutina cell cultures is reported. Cell cultures showed an asynchronous growth and cells in distinct developmental stages. Meristematic cells were found as the major type, with several morphological variations. Cell aggregates consisting only of meristematic cells, differentiated cells containing specialized cell structures such as functional chloroplasts (cytodifferentiation and cells with embryogenetic characteristics were observed. The time course for sucrose metabolism indicated cell populations with significant differences in growth and metabolic rates, with the highest biomass-producing cell line showing a cell cycle 60% shorter and a metabolic rate 33.6% higher than the control (F2 cell population. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of velutinol A in selected cell lines demonstrated the existence of velutinol A producing and nonproducing somaclones. These results point to a high genetic heterogeneity in general and also in terms of secondary metabolite content.

  2. Culinary culture and globalization: an analysis of British and German Michelin-starred restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Christel

    2011-12-01

    The high-end restaurant segment in Britain and Germany has long been shaped by the cultural hegemony of French haute cuisine, perpetuated by multiple processes, including the influence of the Michelin or Red Guide. Traditionally, this hegemony has been expressed in the prevalence of French expatriate chefs, culinary techniques and style and even restaurant culture. This paper investigates whether processes of globalization have weakened or even undermined this French cultural dominance in fine-dining restaurants and their culinary culture. To this end, the study identifies the various forms taken by globalization processes in this industry segment and then assesses their impact on the dominance of the French paradigm of culinary culture. The investigation focuses on British and German Michelin-starred restaurants, underlining both commonalities and divergences in the process of interaction between French, global and local influences. The study employs a qualitative method, using a number of case studies to discern cross-industry patterns. All chefs with two or three stars in the two countries, i.e. 45 chefs, were selected for the analysis of their cuisine.

  3. [Analysis and modelling of safety culture in a Mexican hospital by Markov chains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Martínez, J D; Cruz-Suárez, H; Santos-Reyes, J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse and model the safety culture with Markov chains, as well as predicting and/or prioritizing over time the evolutionary behaviour of the safety culture of the health's staff in one Mexican hospital. The Markov chain theory has been employed in the analysis, and the input data has been obtained from a previous study based on the Safety Attitude Questionnaire (CAS-MX-II), by considering the following 6 dimensions: safety climate, teamwork, job satisfaction, recognition of stress, perception of management, and work environment. The results highlighted the predictions and/or prioritisation of the approximate time for the possible integration into the evolutionary behaviour of the safety culture as regards the "slightly agree" (Likert scale) for: safety climate (in 12 years; 24.13%); teamwork (8 years; 34.61%); job satisfaction (11 years; 52.41%); recognition of the level of stress (8 years; 19.35%); and perception of the direction (22 years; 27.87%). The work environment dimension was unable to determine the behaviour of staff information, i.e. no information cultural roots were obtained. In general, it has been shown that there are weaknesses in the safety culture of the hospital, which is an opportunity to suggest changes to the mandatory policies in order to strengthen it. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Large sample neutron activation analysis: a challenge in cultural heritage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatelatos, Ion E; Tzika, Faidra

    2007-07-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis compliments and significantly extends the analytical tools available for cultural heritage and authentication studies providing unique applications of non-destructive, multi-element analysis of materials that are too precious to damage for sampling purposes, representative sampling of heterogeneous materials or even analysis of whole objects. In this work, correction factors for neutron self-shielding, gamma-ray attenuation and volume distribution of the activity in large volume samples composed of iron and ceramic material were derived. Moreover, the effect of inhomogeneity on the accuracy of the technique was examined.

  5. Finite-time consensus for heterogeneous multi-agent systems with mixed-order agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fenglan; Zhu, Wei

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the finite-time consensus for heterogeneous multi-agent systems composed of mixed-order agents over fixed and switching topologies. The control protocol of each agent using local information is designed and the detailed analysis of the finite-time consensus for fixed and switching interaction topologies is presented. The design of the finite-time consensus protocol is based on graph theory, matrix theory, and LaSalle's invariance principle. Both theoretical studies and simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method and the correctness of the obtained theoretical results.

  6. Observer-based consensus of networked thrust-propelled vehicles with directed graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cang, Weiye; Li, Zhongkui; Wang, Hanlei

    2017-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate the consensus problem for networked underactuated thrust-propelled vehicles (TPVs) interacting on directed graphs. We propose distributed observer-based consensus protocols, which avoid the reliance on the measurements of translational velocities and accelerations. Using the input-output analysis, we present necessary and sufficient conditions to ensure that the observer-based protocols can achieve consensus for both the cases without and with constant communication delays, provided that the communication graph contains a directed spanning tree. Simulation examples are finally provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the control schemes. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. "This Is No Slum!": A Critical Race Theory Analysis of Community Cultural Wealth in Culture Clash's "Chavez Ravine"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosso, Tara J.; Garcia, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing on a critical race theory framework, this article weaves together sociology, education, history, and performance studies to challenge deficit interpretations of Pierre Bourdieu's cultural capital theory and to analyze Culture Clash's play Chavez Ravine. The play recounts a decade of Los Angeles history through the perspectives of displaced…

  8. Mapping Proxy Sensitivity: A New Technique for Compositional Analysis of Cultured Biominerals and Inorganically Precipitated Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, A. C.; DePaolo, D. J.; DeYoreo, J.; Spero, H. J.; Russell, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Mineral composition is controlled by a host of environmental factors during precipitation. To build accurate paleo-reconstructions we need to separate the impact of each parameter on proxy behavior and use these data to build a chemical-scale understanding of mineral growth. Biomineral culture and inorganic precipitation experiments, where growth parameters can be manipulated independently, are uniquely suited to calibrate proxies and probe mechanism. Culture and precipitation experiments often involve overgrowth of an initial material. For example, seed crystals are used to control mineralogy and avoid nucleation during inorganic precipitation, while culture experiments in marine organisms typically start with wild specimens. New growth corresponding to the experimental conditions must be resolved from the initial material. Separation is typically achieved using microanalysis, skeletal dissection, or estimates of the initial mass and composition. Each approach imposes limits on the accuracy, precision or types of materials that can be analyzed. Slow growth rates and complicated geometries can make these techniques especially challenging when applied to biominerals. We present a method of compositional analysis for use in biological culture and inorganic growth experiments that overcomes many of these challenges. This method relies on growth in a mixed element stable isotope spike, requires neither the initial mass nor the initial composition to be known, harnesses the precision and sensitivity of bulk analysis, and applies even when it is impossible to physically identify newly grown material. Error analysis suggests this method can significantly improve the precision of metal/calcium measurements in experimentally grown material compared to current methods. Furthermore, the method can isolate different events through time, separating, for example, the impact of day and night cycles on biomineral composition. We will present metal/calcium ratios measured using the

  9. Randomized Optimal Consensus of Multi-agent Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Guodong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate and solve a randomized optimal consensus problem for multi-agent systems with stochastically time-varying interconnection topology. The considered multi-agent system with a simple randomized iterating rule achieves an almost sure consensus meanwhile solving the optimization problem $\\min_{z\\in \\mathds{R}^d}\\ \\sum_{i=1}^n f_i(z),$ in which the optimal solution set of objective function $f_i$ corresponding to agent $i$ can only be observed by agent $i$ itself. At each time step, each agent independently and randomly chooses either taking an average among its neighbor set, or projecting onto the optimal solution set of its own optimization component. Both directed and bidirectional communication graphs are studied. Connectivity conditions are proposed to guarantee an optimal consensus almost surely with proper convexity and intersection assumptions. The convergence analysis is carried out using convex analysis. The results illustrate that a group of autonomous agents can reach an opti...

  10. Delayed Consensus Problem for Single and Double Integrator Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Velasco-Villa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the analysis of the consensus problem for networks of agents constituted by single and double integrator systems. It is assumed that the communication among agents is affected by a constant time-delay. Previous and numerous analysis of the problem shows that the maximum communication time-delay that can be introduced to the network without affecting the consensus of the group of the agents depends on the considered topology. In this work, a control scheme that is based on the estimation of future states of the agents and that allows increasing the magnitude of a possible time-delay affecting the communication channels is proposed. How the proposed delay compensation strategy is independent of the network topology in the sense that the maximum allowable time-delay that could be supported by the network depends on a design parameter and not on the maximum eigenvalue of the corresponding Laplacian matrix is shown. It is formally proven that, under the proposed prediction scheme, the consensus of the group can be achieved by improving the maximum time-delay bounds previously reported in the literature. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  11. Distributed Position-Based Consensus of Second-Order Multiagent Systems With Continuous/Intermittent Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiang; Liu, Fang; Wen, Guanghui; Cao, Jinde; Yang, Xinsong

    2017-04-24

    This paper considers the position-based consensus in a network of agents with double-integrator dynamics and directed topology. Two types of distributed observer algorithms are proposed to solve the consensus problem by utilizing continuous and intermittent position measurements, respectively, where each observer does not interact with any other observers. For the case of continuous communication between network agents, some convergence conditions are derived for reaching consensus in the network with a single constant delay or multiple time-varying delays on the basis of the eigenvalue analysis and the descriptor method. When the network agents can only obtain intermittent position data from local neighbors at discrete time instants, the consensus in the network without time delay or with nonuniform delays is investigated by using the Wirtinger's inequality and the delayed-input approach. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the theoretical analysis.

  12. Event-Based Consensus for Linear Multiagent Systems Without Continuous Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lantao; Wen, Changyun; Guo, Fanghong; Liu, Zhitao; Su, Hongye

    2016-10-04

    In this paper, we propose a new distributed event-trigger consensus protocol for linear multiagent systems with external disturbances. Two consensus problems are considered: one is a leader-follower case and the other is a nonleader case. Different from the existing results, our proposed scheme enables each agent to decide when to transmit its state signals to its neighbors such that continuous communication between neighboring agents is avoided. Clearly, this can largely decrease the communication burden of the whole communication network. Besides, since the control signal for each agent is discontinuous because of the event-triggering mechanism, the existence of a solution for the closed-loop system in the classical sense may not be guaranteed. To solve this problem, we employ a nonsmooth analysis technique including differential inclusion and Filippov solution. Through nonsmooth Lyapunov analysis, it is shown that uniformly bounded consensus results are derived and the bound of the consensus error is adjustable by choosing suitable design parameters.

  13. Democracy-based consensus in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Massimiliano; Zangrillo, Alberto; Mucchetti, Marta; Nobile, Leda; Landoni, Paolo; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Landoni, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    High-quality evidence and derived guidelines, as typically published in major academic journals, are a major process that shapes physician decision-making worldwide. However, for many aspects of medical practice, there is a lack of High-quality evidence or an overload of somewhat contradictory low-quality information, which makes decision-making a difficult, uncertain, and unpredictable process. When the issues in question are important and evidence limited or controversial, the medical community seeks to establish common ground for "best practice" through consensus conferences and consensus statements or guidelines. Such consensus statements are seen as a useful tool to establish expert agreement, define the boundaries of acceptable practice, provide priorities for the research agenda, and obtain opinions from different countries and healthcare systems. This standard approach, however, can be criticized for being elitist, noninclusive, and poorly representative of the community of clinicians who will have to make decisions about the implementation of such recommendations. Accordingly, the authors propose a new model based on a combination of a local core meeting (detailed review and expert input) followed by a worldwide web-based network assessment (democracy-based consensus). The authors already have applied this approach to develop consensus on all nonsurgical interventions that increase or reduce perioperative mortality in critically ill patients and in those with acute kidney injury. The methodology was based on 5 sequential local and web-based steps. Both a panel of experts and a large number of professionals from all over the world were involved, giving birth to a new type of "democracy-based consensus." This new type of "democracy-based consensus" has the potential to increase grass-root clinician involvement, expand the reach to less-developed countries, provide a more global perspective on proposed interventions, and perhaps more importantly, increase

  14. Is in-group bias culture-dependent? A meta-analysis across 18 societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald; Derham, Crysta

    2016-01-01

    We report a meta-analysis on the relationship between in-group bias and culture. Our focus is on whether broad macro-contextual variables influence the extent to which individuals favour their in-group. Data from 21,266 participants from 18 societies included in experimental and survey studies were available. Using Hofstede's (1980) and Schwartz (2006) culture-level predictors in a 3-level mixed-effects meta-analysis, we found strong support for the uncertainty-reduction hypothesis. An interaction between Autonomy and real vs artificial groups suggested that in low autonomy contexts, individuals show greater in-group bias for real groups. Implications for social identity theory and intergroup conflict are outlined.

  15. Psychometric properties of the AHRQ Community Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture: a factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboneh, Ephrem A; Look, Kevin A; Stone, Jamie A; Lester, Corey A; Chui, Michelle A

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) developed a hospital patient safety culture survey in 2004 and has adapted this survey to other healthcare settings, such as nursing homes and medical offices, and most recently, community pharmacies. However, it is unknown whether safety culture dimensions developed for hospitals can be transferred to community pharmacies. The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Community Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The survey was administered to 543 community pharmacists in Wisconsin, USA. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the fit of our data with the proposed AHRQ model. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the underlying factor structure. Internal consistency reliabilities were calculated. A total of 433 usable surveys were returned (response rate 80%). Results from the confirmatory factor analysis showed inadequate model fit for the original 36 item, 11-factor structure. Exploratory factor analysis showed that a modified 27-item, four-factor structure better reflected the underlying safety culture dimensions in community pharmacies. The communication openness factor, with three items, dropped in its entirety while six items dropped from multiple factors. The remaining 27 items redistributed to form the four-factor structure: safety-related communication, staff training and work environment, organisational response to safety events, and staffing, work pressure and pace. Cronbach's α of 0.95 suggested good internal consistency. Our findings suggest that validation studies need to be conducted before applying safety dimensions from other healthcare settings into community pharmacies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF CULTURAL VARIABLES ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. AN ANALYSIS IN THE EUROPEAN CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai TALMACIU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Economic and social cohesion policy is the most important of EU policies to mitigate inequalities in economic development between member states, which tend to increase in the context of globalization. For this reason it becomes increasingly important to identify the causes of underdevelopment of lagging countries or regions, by analyzing the influence of economic, socio demographic, cultural, institutional and political variables on growth and development. Economic development is an evolutionary process in which people / society is the purpose and means, causes and effects thereof. The sustainable development must be an anthropocentric one, because the human factor has the decisive role in ensuring its success. In nowadays the economic progress of lagging countries or regions dramatically depends on their ability to harness the potential of creativity, skills and abilities of the human factor, by promoting those cultural values that can contribute to the higher growth. The development can be boosted when the population is driven by a strong work ethic, fierce desire to learn from the experiences of other countries, the attachment to the principles of quality and professional excellence, etc., and all this are closely related to the cultural matrix of the country. This article aims to identify the cultural aspects with a major impact on national or regional economic development and to provide an analysis of the implications of cultural differences between EU countries on disparities in development. In order to achieve these objectives will be used data on the situation of development indices (HDI, Legatum Prosperity Index, etc. and regarding the situation of some cultural variables in European countries, offered by the World Values Survey.

  17. Organizational Culture Influence On Total Productive Maintenance (TPM and Operational Performance Using RASCH Model Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Norhasni Mohd Asaad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Market globalization, competitive product and services, high economic crises are the most critical factors that influence the success of the manufacturing companies in global market. Therefore it is critical to the manufacturing companies to be efficient in production and lean tool may used to achieve that.  The most frequently used is the Total Preventive Maintenance (TPM, even though there are many studies have been conducted in relation to the TPM but there is limited research in investigating the effects of the TPM on operational performance. However, the result of the studies was not consistent, where TPM practice may have positive and negative impact on operational performance. Among the reason is the culture of the organization that influenced the implementation of TPM and operational performance. Due to that this study attempts to investigate the influence of organizational culture on the TPM implementation and operational performance.  Rasch model is used in this study due to its ability in interpreting and analyzing the ability of respondents in performing the difficult items. The online questionnaires were distributed to 63 randomly selected automotive companies located at Northern Region of Malaysia.  Results of the study revealed that the organizational culture has influenced on the successful implementation of TPM and operational performance. Therefore by the implementation of TPM in outstanding organizational culture can improve operational performance.   Keyword: Total Preventive Maintenance (TPM, Lean manufacturing, Operational performance, Organizational culture, Rasch modeldoi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.2How to cite this article:Mohd Asaad, M.N and Yusoff, R.Z. (2013. Organizational Culture Influence On Total Productive Maintenance (TPM and Operational Performance Using RASCH Model Analysis . The Asian Journal of Technology Management 6 (2: 72-81. Print ISSN: 1978-6956; Online ISSN: 2089-791X.  doi:10.12695/ajtm

  18. Mean Square Consensus for Uncertain Multiagent Systems with Noises and Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuangong Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the consensus problem in mean square for uncertain multiagent systems with stochastic measurement noises and symmetric or asymmetric time-varying delays. By combining the tools of stochastic analysis, algebraic graph theory, and matrix theory, we analyze the convergence of a class of distributed stochastic approximation type protocols with time-varying consensus gains. Numerical examples are also given to illustrate the theoretical results.

  19. Finite-time consensus for leader-following multi-agent systems over switching network topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng-Lan; Zhu, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Finite-time consensus problem of the leader-following multi-agent system under switching network topologies is studied in this paper. Based on the graph theory, matrix theory, homogeneity with dilation, and LaSalle's invariance principle, the control protocol of each agent using local information is designed, and the detailed analysis of the leader-following finite-time consensus is provided. Some examples and simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results.

  20. [Cultural domain of the causes of diabetes in three generations of popular stratum in Guadalajara, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Alba-García, Javier E; Salcedo-Rocha, Ana L; Hayes Bautista, David; Milke Najar, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    The growing prevalence of diabetes must be confronted in several ways. Establishing the generational transmission of cultural knowledge offers some guidelines to prevent and control the disease. Once we identify and compare the semantic structures of shared knowledge we lay the foundations of a culturally comprehensive care. The objective was to characterize the main elements about cultural domain of the causes of diabetes in a population of grandparents, parents and children belonging to popular strata in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. A cognitive anthropological study performed in 104 subjects selected randomly in Guadalajara. We applied the free listing technique in order to obtain the semantic model and the average of cultural knowledge on the causes of the disease through a consensus analysis.A cognitive anthropological study performed in 104 subjects selected randomly in Guadalajara. We applied the free listing technique in order to obtain the semantic model and the average of cultural knowledge on the causes of the disease through a consensus analysis. The studied groups were divided by generation: grandparents, parents and children. The data evidences intergenerational transmission, in form of a basic semantic structure, and a significant consensus around a single model. The semantic structure on the causes of the diabetes includes: a) the emotions, as traditional dimension; b) certain behaviours related with the lifestyle, as everyday dimension; c) some biomedical concepts, like an emergent dimension.

  1. Identification of neuronal network properties from the spectral analysis of calcium imaging signals in neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibau, Elisenda; Valencia, Miguel; Soriano, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in vitro are prominent systems to study the development of connections in living neuronal networks and the interplay between connectivity, activity and function. These cultured networks show a rich spontaneous activity that evolves concurrently with the connectivity of the underlying network. In this work we monitor the development of neuronal cultures, and record their activity using calcium fluorescence imaging. We use spectral analysis to characterize global dynamical and structural traits of the neuronal cultures. We first observe that the power spectrum can be used as a signature of the state of the network, for instance when inhibition is active or silent, as well as a measure of the network's connectivity strength. Second, the power spectrum identifies prominent developmental changes in the network such as GABAA switch. And third, the analysis of the spatial distribution of the spectral density, in experiments with a controlled disintegration of the network through CNQX, an AMPA-glutamate receptor antagonist in excitatory neurons, reveals the existence of communities of strongly connected, highly active neurons that display synchronous oscillations. Our work illustrates the interest of spectral analysis for the study of in vitro networks, and its potential use as a network-state indicator, for instance to compare healthy and diseased neuronal networks.

  2. Identification of Neuronal Network Properties from the Spectral Analysis of Calcium Imaging Signals in Neuronal Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisenda eTibau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks in vitro are prominent systems to study the development of connections in living neuronal networks and the interplay between connectivity, activity and function. These cultured networks show a rich spontaneous activity that evolves concurrently with the connectivity of the underlying network. In this work we monitor the development of neuronal cultures, and record their activity using calcium fluorescence imaging. We use spectral analysis to characterize global dynamical and structural traits of the neuronal cultures. We first observe that the power spectrum can be used as a signature of the state of the network, for instance when inhibition is active or silent, as well as a measure of the network's connectivity strength. Second, the power spectrum identifies prominent developmental changes in the network such as GABAA switch. And third, the analysis of the spatial distribution of the spectral density, in experiments with a controlled disintegration of the network through CNQX, an AMPA-glutamate receptor antagonist in excitatory neurons, reveals the existence of communities of strongly connected, highly active neurons that display synchronous oscillations. Our work illustrates the interest of spectral analysis for the study of in vitro networks, and its potential use as a network-state indicator, for instance to compare healthy and diseased neuronal networks.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis and in vitro culture of mosses from the Antarctic Fildes Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shenghao; ZHANG Zhaohui; WANG Nengfei; CONG Bailin; ZHANG Pengying; LIN Xuezheng; HUANG Xiaohang

    2014-01-01

    Molecular genetic techniques have proven very useful for initial analysis of the extent of genetic variation and dispersal in several Antarctic moss species. In the present study, the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rDNA) and internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA) were sequenced in nine individuals of different mosses from the Fildes Peninsula of Antarctica. Sequence alignment showed that the extreme environment tended to increase the genetic diversity of Antarctic mosses. In addition, in our phylogenetic analysis, one previously unidentiifed Antarctic moss species was characterized by comparison with SSU and ITS rDNA sequences of known moss species. Moreover, the optimal culture medium and conditions for surface explant sterilization and protonemata induction in tissue culture of Pohlia nutans were investigated. The successful establishment of a tissue culture protocol together with the phylogenetic analysis of Antarctic mosses will provide technological support to establish an effective resource regeneration method for discovering new functional genes and gaining novel insights into the mechanisms of stress acclimation.

  4. Development of a scale down cell culture model using multivariate analysis as a qualification tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Valerie Liu; Wang, Angela X; Yusuf-Makagiansar, Helena; Ryll, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In characterizing a cell culture process to support regulatory activities such as process validation and Quality by Design, developing a representative scale down model for design space definition is of great importance. The manufacturing bioreactor should ideally reproduce bench scale performance with respect to all measurable parameters. However, due to intrinsic geometric differences between scales, process performance at manufacturing scale often varies from bench scale performance, typically exhibiting differences in parameters such as cell growth, protein productivity, and/or dissolved carbon dioxide concentration. Here, we describe a case study in which a bench scale cell culture process model is developed to mimic historical manufacturing scale performance for a late stage CHO-based monoclonal antibody program. Using multivariate analysis (MVA) as primary data analysis tool in addition to traditional univariate analysis techniques to identify gaps between scales, process adjustments were implemented at bench scale resulting in an improved scale down cell culture process model. Finally we propose an approach for small scale model qualification including three main aspects: MVA, comparison of key physiological rates, and comparison of product quality attributes.

  5. Modern Attitudes Toward Older Adults in the Aging World: A Cross-Cultural Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Michael S; Fiske, Susan T

    2015-09-01

    Prevailing beliefs suggest that Eastern cultures hold older adults in higher esteem than Western cultures do, due to stronger collectivist traditions of filial piety. However, in modern, industrialized societies, the strain presented by dramatic rises in population aging potentially threatens traditional cultural expectations. Addressing these competing hypotheses, a literature search located 37 eligible papers, comprising samples from 23 countries and 21,093 total participants, directly comparing Easterners and Westerners (as classified per U.N. conventions) in their attitudes toward aging and the aged. Contradicting conventional wisdom, a random-effects meta-analysis on these articles found such evaluations to be more negative in the East overall (standardized mean difference = -0.31). High heterogeneity in study comparisons suggested the presence of moderators; indeed, geographical region emerged as a significant moderating factor, with the strongest levels of senior derogation emerging in East Asia (compared with South and Southeast Asia) and non-Anglophone Europe (compared with North American and Anglophone Western regions). At the country level, multiple-moderator meta-regression analysis confirmed recent rises in population aging to significantly predict negative elder attitudes, controlling for industrialization per se over the same time period. Unexpectedly, these analyses also found that cultural individualism significantly predicted relative positivity-suggesting that, for generating elder respect within rapidly aging societies, collectivist traditions may backfire. The findings suggest the importance of demographic challenges in shaping modern attitudes toward elders-presenting considerations for future research in ageism, cross-cultural psychology, and even economic development, as societies across the globe accommodate unprecedented numbers of older citizens.

  6. Quantitative analysis of organizational culture in occupational health research: a theory-based validation in 30 workplaces of the organizational culture profile instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Haines, Victor Y; Dextras-Gauthier, Julie

    2013-05-04

    This study advances a measurement approach for the study of organizational culture in population-based occupational health research, and tests how different organizational culture types are associated with psychological distress, depression, emotional exhaustion, and well-being. Data were collected over a sample of 1,164 employees nested in 30 workplaces. Employees completed the 26-item OCP instrument. Psychological distress was measured with the General Health Questionnaire (12-item); depression with the Beck Depression Inventory (21-item); and emotional exhaustion with five items from the Maslach Burnout Inventory general survey. Exploratory factor analysis evaluated the dimensionality of the OCP scale. Multilevel regression models estimated workplace-level variations, and the contribution of organizational culture factors to mental health and well-being after controlling for gender, age, and living with a partner. Exploratory factor analysis of OCP items revealed four factors explaining about 75% of the variance, and supported the structure of the Competing Values Framework. Factors were labeled Group, Hierarchical, Rational and Developmental. Cronbach's alphas were high (0.82-0.89). Multilevel regression analysis suggested that the four culture types varied significantly between workplaces, and correlated with mental health and well-being outcomes. The Group culture type best distinguished between workplaces and had the strongest associations with the outcomes. This study provides strong support for the use of the OCP scale for measuring organizational culture in population-based occupational health research in a way that is consistent with the Competing Values Framework. The Group organizational culture needs to be considered as a relevant factor in occupational health studies.

  7. Mixed-culture transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular basis of mixed-culture growth in Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieuwerts, S.; Molenaar, D.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Beerthuyzen, M.; Stevens, M.J.A.; Janssen, P.W.; Ingham, C.J.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Many food fermentations are performed using mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria. Interactions between strains are of key importance for the performance of these fermentations. Yogurt fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus (basonym, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.

  8. Performance of Italian Consensus for the Classification and Reporting of Thyroid Cytology (ICCRTC) in discriminating indeterminate lesions at low and high risk of malignancy. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Crescenzi, Anna; Giovanella, Luca

    2017-08-07

    Italian consensus for the classification and reporting of thyroid cytology was published in 2014 and it has been used in almost all Italian institutions. To date, there are not solid data on the reliability of Italian consensus for the classification and reporting of thyroid cytology in classifying low and high risk indeterminate nodules (Tir 3A and Tir 3B, respectively). Here, we reviewed and meta-analyzed the results of published articles to obtain evidence-based information on this topic. A comprehensive literature exploration of online databases was conducted by searching all published papers citing Italian consensus for the classification and reporting of thyroid cytology. The search was updated until June 2017, and references of the retrieved articles were also screened. Only original articles reporting histologic follow-up of nodules cytologically classified as Tir 3A and Tir 3B were eligible for inclusion. The literature search revealed 62 articles and six of these were eligible for the study. All papers were retrospective and published very recently. Overall, 423 indeterminate lesions, of which 180 Tir 3A and 243 Tir 3B, were found. Of these, 29 cancers were recorded in Tir 3A and 127 in Tir 3B. The pooled rate of malignancy was 17% (95% CI = 12 to 22%) in Tir 3A and 52% (95% CI = 46 to 58%) in Tir 3B. No significant publication bias was evident. Italian consensus for the classification and reporting of thyroid cytology 2014 shows high reliability in discriminating indeterminate lesions at low risk of malignancy from those at high risk.

  9. Consensus document on European brain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Jes; Baker, Mary G; Freund, Tamas; di Luca, Monica; Mendlewicz, Julien; Ragan, Ian; Westphal, Manfred

    2006-08-01

    Brain disease psychiatric and neurologic disease combined represents a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. Data collected by the World Health Organization (WHO) suggest that brain diseases are responsible for 35% of Europe's total disease burden. An analysis of all health economic studies of brain diseases in Europe, published by the European Brain Council (EBC) in June 2005, estimated the total cost of brain disease in Europe in 2004 to be Euro 386 billion. That burden is set to grow, mainly due to the fact that the European population is ageing. Investment in brain sciences does not match that burden now, let alone in the future. Brain research received only 8% of the life science budget in the European Commission's Fifth Framework Programme, which represents less than 0.01% of the annual cost of brain disorders for that period. Over the last decade, Europe has been losing ground to the USA and Japan in terms of both basic and clinical research. Many of Europe's young researchers are taking up posts in the USA and staying there. Big pharmaceutical companies are fleeing Europe for the USA, taking their drug development programmes with them. Research in the brain sciences now holds the promise of therapies that halt and even reverse neurodegeneration, of better diagnostic tools, neural prostheses for the paralysed and drugs for depression and anxiety that are tailored to the individual, thereby eliminating or reducing side effects. Our growing understanding of the normal brain could lead to better prevention of brain disease and to more effective teaching methods. The need for innovative treatments has never been greater, and Europe boasts clusters of excellent researchers in biotechnology who could collaborate with brain scientists and the pharmaceutical industry to realise this promise. But if Europe is to seize these opportunities and meet the challenge of brain disease, it needs to go forward on the basis of greater collaboration between

  10. Dynamic Average Consensus and Consensusability of General Linear Multiagent Systems with Random Packet Dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Min Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the consensus problem of general linear discrete-time multiagent systems (MASs with random packet dropout that happens during information exchange between agents. The packet dropout phenomenon is characterized as being a Bernoulli random process. A distributed consensus protocol with weighted graph is proposed to address the packet dropout phenomenon. Through introducing a new disagreement vector, a new framework is established to solve the consensus problem. Based on the control theory, the perturbation argument, and the matrix theory, the necessary and sufficient condition for MASs to reach mean-square consensus is derived in terms of stability of an array of low-dimensional matrices. Moreover, mean-square consensusable conditions with regard to network topology and agent dynamic structure are also provided. Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated through an illustrative example.

  11. [Palaeoparasitological analysis of guinea pig mummies of the Chiribaya culture, Moquegua Valley, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar de la Cruz, Katharina; Ribbeck, Regine; Daugschies, Arwid

    2003-01-01

    During several excavations of archeological sites in the Moquegua Valley, Southern Peru, various guinea pig mummies (Cavia aperea f. porcellus) have been discovered. They belong to the Chiribaya Culture (900-1100 AD). The outstanding preservation of the mummified animals gave rise to the idea of a paleoparasitological analysis. In the fur, numerous well preserved ectoparasites (lice, fleas, mites) could be recovered. Generally, ectoparasite remains are rarely found among archeological material. This is the first account of an extensive ectoparasitological analysis of animal mummies in Peru. A modified technique for recovery and preservation of the ectoparasites has been developed.

  12. Analysis of Integration Mode of Human Resources Development and Cultural Ecology in Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peihong; Zhang Shiqi

    2012-01-01

    People and culture coexist and human resources development and regional cultural ecology integrate, The present thesis for the first time puts forward the integration mode of human resources development and cultural ecology, argues that personnel innovation should be attracted by motive injection, open culture, resources integration, culture dilution, thinking blending and people-orientation and discusses the transmission mechanism for functions of integration mode of human resources development and cultural ecology from the aspects of cultural values, living styles and cultural industry.

  13. Cultural Policy in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Gestur

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the history of cultural policy in Iceland from a Nordic comparative perspective. National cultural policy takes form in the 19th and early 20th century as a part of the nation-building, emphasising the Icelandic language as the core of national identity, building cultural...... on the continuing emphasis on central cultural institution and the Icelandic language. Since the 1970s Cold War conflicts have been replaced by a consensus on growing support to artists and an armth's length policy, and furthermore the 1990s have seen a strong move towards NPM and international participation....

  14. New algorithm improves fine structure of the barley consensus SNP map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endelman Jeffrey B

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need to integrate information from multiple linkage maps is a long-standing problem in genetics. One way to visualize the complex ordinal relationships is with a directed graph, where each vertex in the graph is a bin of markers. When there are no ordering conflicts between the linkage maps, the result is a directed acyclic graph, or DAG, which can then be linearized to produce a consensus map. Results New algorithms for the simplification and linearization of consensus graphs have been implemented as a package for the R computing environment called DAGGER. The simplified consensus graphs produced by DAGGER exactly capture the ordinal relationships present in a series of linkage maps. Using either linear or quadratic programming, DAGGER generates a consensus map with minimum error relative to the linkage maps while remaining ordinally consistent with them. Both linearization methods produce consensus maps that are compressed relative to the mean of the linkage maps. After rescaling, however, the consensus maps had higher accuracy (and higher marker density than the individual linkage maps in genetic simulations. When applied to four barley linkage maps genotyped at nearly 3000 SNP markers, DAGGER produced a consensus map with improved fine structure compared to the existing barley consensus SNP map. The root-mean-squared error between the linkage maps and the DAGGER map was 0.82 cM per marker interval compared to 2.28 cM for the existing consensus map. Examination of the barley hardness locus at the 5HS telomere, for which there is a physical map, confirmed that the DAGGER output was more accurate for fine structure analysis. Conclusions The R package DAGGER is an effective, freely available resource for integrating the information from a set of consistent linkage maps.

  15. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ROMANIAN AND GERMAN NEGOTIATION STYLE BASED ON CULTURAL DIFFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREA HAMBURG

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of intensified international business relations and a unified European space the cultural background of economic agents in the field of international business is getting an increasing importance and leaves to a certain extent its marks on business behaviour of these individuals. Thus from the sixties of the past century onwards the problem of cultural differences and their influence upon professional relations lie in the centre of attention of several researchers like E.T. Hall, Geert Hofstede and others. In business negotiations one may observe a double conditioning of people’s negotiation style, at one hand it is the result of individual characteristics like personality, education, experience, personal charisma, but on the other hand there is a strong impact of collective factors, too such as the mental programming of each nation known under the name of culture. In the following study we undertake a Comparative/contrastive analysis of German and Romanian – culturally conditioned – negotiation style hoping to avoid at the same time to fall into the trap of stereotypy.

  16. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of coastal bioaerosols using culture dependent and independent techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Urbano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioaerosols are emerging as important yet poorly understood players in atmospheric processes. Microorganisms can impact atmospheric chemistry through metabolic reactions and can potentially influence physical processes by participating in ice nucleation and cloud droplet formation. Microbial roles in atmospheric processes are thought to be species-specific and potentially dependent on cell viability. Using a coastal pier monitoring site as a sampling platform, culture-dependent (i.e. agar plates and culture-independent (i.e. DNA clone libraries from filters approaches were combined with 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene targeting to obtain insight into the local atmospheric microbial composition. From 13 microbial isolates and 42 DNA library clones, a total of 55 sequences were obtained representing four independent sampling events. Sequence analysis revealed that in these coastal samples two fungal phyla, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, predominate among eukaryotes while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria predominate among bacteria. Furthermore, our culture-dependent study verifies the viability of microbes from all four phyla detected through our culture-independent study. Contrary to our expectations and despite oceanic air mass sources, common marine planktonic bacteria and phytoplankton were not typically found. The abundance of terrestrial and marine sediment-associated microorganisms suggests a potential importance for bioaerosols derived from beaches and/or coastal erosion processes.

  17. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of coastal bioaerosols using culture dependent and independent techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, R.; Palenik, B.; Gaston, C. J.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-02-01

    Bioaerosols are emerging as important yet poorly understood players in atmospheric processes. Microorganisms can impact atmospheric chemistry through metabolic reactions and can potentially influence physical processes by participating in ice nucleation and cloud droplet formation. Microbial roles in atmospheric processes are thought to be species-specific and potentially dependent on cell viability. Using a coastal pier monitoring site as a sampling platform, culture-dependent (i.e. agar plates) and culture-independent (i.e. DNA clone libraries from filters) approaches were combined with 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene targeting to obtain insight into the local atmospheric microbial composition. From 13 microbial isolates and 42 DNA library clones, a total of 55 sequences were obtained representing four independent sampling events. Sequence analysis revealed that in these coastal samples two fungal phyla, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, predominate among eukaryotes while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria predominate among bacteria. Furthermore, our culture-dependent study verifies the viability of microbes from all four phyla detected through our culture-independent study. Contrary to our expectations and despite oceanic air mass sources, common marine planktonic bacteria and phytoplankton were not typically found. The abundance of terrestrial and marine sediment-associated microorganisms suggests a potential importance for bioaerosols derived from beaches and/or coastal erosion processes.

  18. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of co-cultures: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreselassie, Nikodimos A; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach for performing (13)C metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) of co-culture systems. We demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to determine metabolic flux distributions in multiple species simultaneously without the need for physical separation of cells or proteins, or overexpression of species-specific products. Instead, metabolic fluxes for each species in a co-culture are estimated directly from isotopic labeling of total biomass obtained using conventional mass spectrometry approaches such as GC-MS. In addition to determining metabolic fluxes, this approach estimates the relative population size of each species in a mixed culture and inter-species metabolite exchange. As such, it enables detailed studies of microbial communities including species dynamics and interactions between community members. The methodology is experimentally validated here using a co-culture of two E. coli knockout strains. Taken together, this work greatly extends the scope of (13)C-MFA to a large number of multi-cellular systems that are of significant importance in biotechnology and medicine.

  19. Trends of Bacterial Keratitis Culture Isolates in Jerusalem; a 13- Years Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Michael; Wajnsztajn, Denise; Rosin, Boris; Block, Colin; Solomon, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the trends in pathogens and antibacterial resistance of corneal culture isolates in infectious keratitis during a period of 13 years at Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center. Methods A Retrospective analysis of bacterial corneal isolates was performed during the months of January 2002 to December 2014 at Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center. Demographics, microbiological data and antibiotic resistance and sensitivity were collected. Results A total of 943 corneal isolates were analyzed during a 13 year period. A total of 415 positive bacterial cultures and 37 positive fungal cultures were recovered, representing 48% of the total cultures. The Annual incidence was 34.78 ± 6.54 cases. The most common isolate was coagulase-negative staphylococcus (32%), which had a significant decrease in trend throughout the study period (APC = -8.1, p = 0.002). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) appears to have a decrease trend (APC = -31.2, P = 0.5). There was an increase in the resistance trend of coagulase-negative staphylococci to penicillin (APC = 5.0, P = keratitis. There was no significant change in the annual incidence of cases of bacterial keratitis seen over the past 13 years. Keratitis caused by MRSA appeared to decrease in contrast to the reported literature. PMID:27893743

  20. Fastest Distributed Consensus on Petal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarizadeh, Saber

    2010-01-01

    Providing an analytical solution for the problem of finding Fastest Distributed Consensus (FDC) is one of the challenging problems in the field of sensor networks. Here in this work we present analytical solution for the problem of fastest distributed consensus averaging algorithm by means of stratification and semi-definite programming, for two particular types of Petal networks, namely symmetric and Complete Cored Symmetric (CCS) Petal networks. Our method in this paper is based on convexity of fastest distributed consensus averaging problem, and inductive comparing of the characteristic polynomials initiated by slackness conditions in order to find the optimal weights. Also certain types of leaves are introduced along with their optimal weights which are not achievable by the method used in this work if these leaves are considered individually.

  1. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Reaching Consensus by Allowing Moments of Indecision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Swami, A.

    2015-10-01

    Group decision-making processes often turn into a drawn out and costly battle between two opposing subgroups. Using analytical arguments based on a master equation description of the opinion dynamics occurring in a three-state model of cooperatively interacting units, we show how the capability of a social group to reach consensus can be enhanced when there is an intermediate state for indecisive individuals to pass through. The time spent in the intermediate state must be relatively short compared to that of the two polar states in order to create the beneficial effect. Furthermore, the cooperation between individuals must not be too low, as the benefit to consensus is possible only when the cooperation level exceeds a specific threshold. We also discuss how zealots, agents that remain in one state forever, can affect the consensus among the rest of the population by counteracting the benefit of the intermediate state or making it virtually impossible for an opposition to form.

  3. Improving consensus contact prediction via server correlation reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jinbo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein inter-residue contacts play a crucial role in the determination and prediction of protein structures. Previous studies on contact prediction indicate that although template-based consensus methods outperform sequence-based methods on targets with typical templates, such consensus methods perform poorly on new fold targets. However, we find out that even for new fold targets, the models generated by threading programs can contain many true contacts. The challenge is how to identify them. Results In this paper, we develop an integer linear programming model for consensus contact prediction. In contrast to the simple majority voting method assuming that all the individual servers are equally important and independent, the newly developed method evaluates their correlation by using maximum likelihood estimation and extracts independent latent servers from them by using principal component analysis. An integer linear programming method is then applied to assign a weight to each latent server to maximize the difference between true contacts and false ones. The proposed method is tested on the CASP7 data set. If the top L/5 predicted contacts are evaluated where L is the protein size, the average accuracy is 73%, which is much higher than that of any previously reported study. Moreover, if only the 15 new fold CASP7 targets are considered, our method achieves an average accuracy of 37%, which is much better than that of the majority voting method, SVM-LOMETS, SVM-SEQ, and SAM-T06. These methods demonstrate an average accuracy of 13.0%, 10.8%, 25.8% and 21.2%, respectively. Conclusion Reducing server correlation and optimally combining independent latent servers show a significant improvement over the traditional consensus methods. This approach can hopefully provide a powerful tool for protein structure refinement and prediction use.

  4. Metabolic analysis of elicited cell suspension cultures of Cannabis sativa L. by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Jaroslav; Flores-Sanchez, Isvett Josefina; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2010-07-01

    Cannabis sativa L. plants produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites. Cannabis cell cultures were treated with jasmonic acid (JA) and pectin as elicitors to evaluate their effect on metabolism from two cell lines using NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. According to principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), the chloroform extract of the pectin-treated cultures were more different than control and JA-treated cultures; but in the methanol/water extract the metabolome of the JA-treated cells showed clear differences with control and pectin-treated cultures. Tyrosol, an antioxidant metabolite, was detected in cannabis cell cultures. The tyrosol content increased after eliciting with JA.

  5. Latin American Consensus on Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of anti-VEGF agents has allowed unprecedented progress in the management and treatment of ophthalmologic conditions characterized by an increased vascular permeability and intraocular neovascularization. One of these conditions is retinal vein occlusion (RVO.  RVO is one of the most common causes of reduced vision due to retinal vascular disease. Without timely treatment, macular edema, macular ischemia, neovascularization and other potential sequelae of RVO can lead to photoreceptor cell death and consequently to irreversible vision loss.   Treatments for this indication that have been recently approved by several regulatory agencies throughout the world include: the VEGF inhibitor ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech, the VEGF and placental growth factor inhibitor aflibercept (Eylea, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Bayer HealthCare, and a slow release intravitreal implant of dexamethasone (Ozurdex, Allergan. In addition bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech has been used extensively in an off-label manner.   These new treatments allow us to preserve vision for many RVO patients who could not have expected such favorable results just 5 or 6 years ago. However, not every treatment is effective for every patient, and whether one option is superior to another or a combination of options is superior to monotherapy, have yet to be definitively determined.   A growing body of literature with strong evidence supports the use of these new treatments. However, in several instances the literature is not conclusive to support unified management of RVO. This document is a summary analysis on RVO assembled by a group of specialists summoned by the Pan-American Vitreo-Retinal Society (SPRV to participate in this Latin American consensus.

  6. In control? IQC consensus and statutory regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Graham R; Fitzgibbon, Maria C; O'Shea, Paula

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - Internal quality control (IQC) represents an essential risk management tool within the total testing pathway (TTP) that contributes to the overall objective of assuring the quality of results produced in medical laboratories. Controlling analytical phase quality alone requires significant expertise and input by scientifically trained staff. This effort has escalated exponentially following the publication of the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO)15189:2012 requirements for quality and competence in medical laboratories. The reported inconsistency and diversity to IQC approaches in diagnostic laboratories is definitive evidence that international guidance in IQC programme design and implementation is long overdue. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach - Herein, the authors define, describe and critically examine the essential elements four stages of an IQC programme and suggest a template to inform both design and ease of implementation. For practical application, the authors have stratified the proposed methodology into four stages: staff education and training; IQC material; IQC targets; and IQC procedure, and provide recommendations that meet ISO15189:2012 requirements. Findings - These recommendations are informed by the published literature together with the collective experience working in clinical biochemistry and diagnostic endocrinology laboratories. The authors note that the laboratory staff's effort on IQC is a continuous process, driven by changes within each IQC stage, in response to risk analysis, maximising economic value or through professional leadership and central to IQC programme implementation and delivery. Practical implications - The authors offer a template that laboratories can use to inform the design and implementation of their IQC programme. Originality/value - The proposed IQC programme is user friendly, flexible and pragmatic with the potential to harmonise practice. The authors

  7. Carotid endarterectomy: current consensus and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Hermus, Linda; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2010-10-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of mortality, and carotid artery stenosis causes 8% to 29% of all ischemic strokes. Best medical treatment forms the basis of carotid stenosis treatment, and carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has an additional beneficial effect in high-grade stenosis. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has challenged CEA as a primary carotid intervention. At present, CEA remains the gold standard, but in the future, CAS techniques will evolve and might become beneficial for subgroups of patients with carotid stenosis. This chapter briefly describes the history of carotid interventions and current consensus and controversies in CEA. In the last two years, several meta-analyses were published on a variety of aspects of best medical treatment, CEA, and CAS. It is still a matter of debate as to whether asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis should undergo a carotid intervention. Especially because medical treatment has dramatically evolved since the early carotid trials. On the other hand, it is clear that carotid interventions in symptomatic patients with a high-grade stenosis should be performed as early as possible after the initial neurological event in order to achieve optimal stroke risk reduction. In CEA, the use of patching is advocated above primary closure, while the role of selective patching is still unclear. No differences in stroke and mortality rates are observed for routine versus selective shunting, for conventional versus eversion CEA, or for local versus general anesthesia. It is anticipated that in the future, there will be several interesting developments in carotid interventions such as plaque morphology analysis, acute interventions during stroke in progress, and further evolvement of CAS techniques.

  8. Overlapping community detection using weighted consensus clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LINTAO YANG; ZETAI YU; JING QIAN; SHOUYIN LIU

    2016-10-01

    Many overlapping community detection algorithms have been proposed. Most of them are unstable and behave non-deterministically. In this paper, we use weighted consensus clustering for combining multiple base covers obtained by classic non-deterministic algorithms to improve the quality of the results. We first evaluate a reliability measure for each community in all base covers and assign a proportional weight to each one. Then we redefine the consensus matrix that takes into account not only the common membership of nodes, but also the reliability of the communities. Experimental results on both artificial and real-world networks show that our algorithm can find overlapping communities accurately.

  9. On Conditions for Convergence to Consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, Jan

    2008-01-01

    A new theorem on conditions for convergence to consensus of a multiagent time-dependent time-discrete dynamical system is presented. The theorem is build up on the notion of averaging maps. We compare this theorem to Moreau's Theorem and his proposed set-valued Lyapunov theory (IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 50, no. 2, 2005). We give examples that point out differences of approaches including examples where Moreau's theorem is not applicable but ours is. Further on, we give examples that demonstrate that the theory of convergence to consensus is still not complete.

  10. Promoting Sustainability Transparency in European Local Governments: An Empirical Analysis Based on Administrative Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Navarro-Galera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the transparency of governments with respect to the sustainability of public services is a very interesting issue for stakeholders and academics. It has led to previous research and international organisations (EU, IMF, OECD, United Nations, IFAC, G-20, World Bank to recommend promotion of the online dissemination of economic, social and environmental information. Based on previous studies about e-government and the influence of administrative cultures on governmental accountability, this paper seeks to identify political actions useful to improve the practices of transparency on economic, social and environmental sustainability in European local governments. We perform a comparative analysis of sustainability information published on the websites of 72 local governments in 10 European countries grouped into main three cultural contexts (Anglo-Saxon, Southern European and Nordic. Using international sustainability reporting guidelines, our results reveal significant differences in local government transparency in each context. The most transparent local governments are the Anglo-Saxon ones, followed by Southern European and Nordic governments. Based on individualized empirical results for each administrative style, our conclusions propose useful policy interventions to enhance sustainability transparency within each cultural tradition, such as development of legal rules on transparency and sustainability, tools to motivate local managers for online diffusion of sustainability information and analysis of information needs of stakeholders.

  11. Cross-Cultural Analysis of Prototypicality Norms Used by Male and Female Persian and American Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biria, Reza; Bahadoran-Baghbaderani, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Human beings generally cut the realities of the world in various ways in order to express their thoughts and interact with other people. Naturally, words are linguistic categories which carry the intended concepts; however, humans tend to economize by bundling words into different conceptual classes. Accordingly, the present study sought to explore the prototypicality norms used by male and female Persian and American speakers adopting a cross cultural analysis. For this purpose, from the existing prototypes, four conceptual categories; namely, vehicles, vegetables, furniture, and clothes were randomly selected and used as the tertium comparationis for determining the way 120 male and female monolingual American and Persian speakers, sixty from each language, ranked the category membership of different conceptual members belonging to the targeted prototypes. The analysis of the obtained data based on participants' ranking of the prototypes along with the respective frequency values revealed that gender and culture played a significant role in identifying the category membership of various members of a given concept across different languages. The findings can have important implications for language teachers, material designers, and second language students since culture is an overriding factor in language learning.

  12. The consensus in the two-feature two-state one-dimensional Axelrod model revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Biral, Elias J P; Fontanari, José F

    2015-01-01

    The Axelrod model for the dissemination of culture exhibits a rich spatial distribution of cultural domains, which depends on the values of the two model parameters: $F$, the number of cultural features and $q$, the number of states each feature can assume. In the one-dimensional model with $F=q=2$, which is equivalent to the constrained voter model, Monte Carlo simulations indicate the existence of multicultural absorbing configurations in which at least one macroscopic domain coexist with a multitude of microscopic ones in the thermodynamic limit. However, rigorous analytical results for an infinite system indicate the existence of only monocultural or consensus configurations at equilibrium. Here we show that this disagreement is due simply to the different orders that the time-asymptotic limit and the thermodynamic limit are taken in those two approaches. In addition, we show how the consensus-only result can be derived using Monte Carlo simulations of finite chains.

  13. Legal Culture as the Determinant of Value Orientations in Youth in the Society of the Transition Period (Philosophical Analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulzhanova, Zhuldizay T.; Kulzhanova, Gulbaram T.

    2016-01-01

    This research is devoted to the philosophical analysis of legal culture as a determinant of value orientations in the transition period society. The purpose of the study is to discover the essence and specificity of legal culture as a determinant of value orientations in a transition society from the philosophical perspective. In accordance with…

  14. On Distributed Reduced-Order Observer-Based Protocol for Linear Multiagent Consensus under Switching Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss linear multiagent systems consensus problem with distributed reduced-order observer-based protocol under switching topology. We use Jordan decomposition method to prove that the proposed protocols can solve consensus problem under directed fixed topology. By constructing a parameter-dependent common Lyapunov function, we prove that the distributed reduced-order observer-based protocol can also solve the continuous-time multi-agent consensus problem under the undirected switching interconnection topology. Then, we investigate the leader-following consensus problem and propose a reduced-order observer-based protocol for each following agent. By using similar analysis method, we can prove that all following agents can track the leader under a class of directed interaction topologies. Finally, the given simulation example also shows the effectiveness of our obtained result.

  15. Team Cooperation in a Network of Multi-Vehicle Unmanned Systems Synthesis of Consensus Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Semsar-Kazerooni, Elham

    2013-01-01

    Team Cooperation in a Network of Multi-Vehicle Unmanned Systems develops a framework for modeling and control of a network of multi-agent unmanned systems in a cooperative manner and with consideration of non-ideal and practical considerations. The main focus of this book is the development of “synthesis-based” algorithms rather than on conventional “analysis-based” approaches to the team cooperation, specifically the team consensus problems. The authors provide a set of modified “design-based” consensus algorithms whose optimality is verified through introduction of performance indices. This book also: Provides synthesis-based methodology for team cooperation Introduces a consensus-protocol optimized performance index  Offers comparisons for use of proper indices in measuring team performance Analyzes and predicts  performance of  previously designed consensus algorithms Analyses and predicts team behavior in the presence of non-ideal considerations such as actuator anomalies and faults as wel...

  16. Consensus of Discrete Multiagent System with Various Time Delays and Environmental Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheping Yan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the consensus problem of discrete multiagent systems with time varying sampling periods is studied. Firstly, with thorough analysis of various delays among agents, the control input of each agent is designed with consideration of sending delay and receiving delay. With construction of discrete dynamics of state error vector, it is proved by applying Halanay inequality that consensus of the system can be reached. Further, the definition of bounded consensus is proposed in the situation where environmental disturbances exist. In order to handle this problem, the Halanay inequality is extended into a more general one with boundedness property. Based on the new Halanay inequality obtained, the boundedness of consensus error is guaranteed. At last, simulation examples are presented to demonstrate the theoretical conclusions.

  17. Diagnosis and treatments of Prader-Willi syndrome: a review of current consensuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Vital'evna Vitebskaya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed international consensuses of experts and clinical recommendations on diagnosis and treatment of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS: PWS consensus diagnostic criteria (1993; US PWS Association (PWSA-USA consensus statements on evaluating of breathing abnormalities (2007, osteoporosis (2008, growth hormone treatment in PWS (2000 and 2009; Endocrine society clinical practice guideline on Prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity (2008; the Second Expert Meeting of the Comprehensive Care of Patients with PWS Consensus published as Recommendations for the diagnosis and management of PWS (2008. Historical analysis and comparison of recommendations are presented in this review article. Absence of Russian clinical practice guidelines on PWS patients management makes necessary the detailed study of listed documents.

  18. Cultural beliefs that may discourage breastfeeding among Lebanese women: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wick Livia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the health benefits of breastfeeding are well established, early introduction of formula remains a common practice. Cultural beliefs and practices can have an important impact on breastfeeding. This paper describes some common beliefs that may discourage breastfeeding in Lebanon. Methods Participants were healthy first-time mothers recruited from hospitals throughout Lebanon to participate in a study on usage patterns of a telephone hotline for postpartum support. The hotline was available to mothers for the first four months postpartum and patterns of usage, as well as questions asked were recorded. Thematic analysis of the content of questions which referred to cultural beliefs and practices related to breastfeeding was conducted. Results Twenty four percent of the 353 women enrolled in the study called the hotline, and 50% of the calls included questions about breastfeeding. Mothers expressed concern about having adequate amounts of breast milk or the quality of their breast milk. Concerns that the mother could potentially harm her infant though breastfeeding were rooted in a number of cultural beliefs. Having an inherited inability to produce milk, having "bad milk", and transmission of abdominal cramps to infants through breast milk were among the beliefs that were expressed. Although the researchers live and work in Lebanon, they were not aware of many of the beliefs that are reported in this study. Conclusion There are a number of cultural beliefs that could potentially discourage breastfeeding among Lebanese women. Understanding and addressing local beliefs and customs can help clinicians to provide more culturally appropriate counselling about breastfeeding.

  19. Assessment of Military Cultural Competence: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eric G; Hall-Clark, Brittany N; Hamaoka, Derrick; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-08-01

    Cultural competence is widely considered a cornerstone of patient care. Efforts to improve military cultural competency have recently gained national attention. Assessment of cultural competence is a critical component to this effort, but no assessment of military cultural competence currently exists. An assessment of military cultural competence (AMCC) was created through broad input and consensus. Careful review of previous cultural competency assessment designs and analysis techniques was considered. The AMCC was organized into three sections: skills, attitudes, and knowledge. In addition to gathering data to determine absolute responses from groups with different exposure levels to the military (direct, indirect, and none), paired questions were utilized to assess relative competencies between military culture and culture in general. Piloting of the AMCC revealed significant differences between military exposure groups. Specifically, those with personal military exposure were more likely to be in absolute agreement that the military is a culture, were more likely to screen for military culture, and had increased knowledge of military culture compared to those with no military exposure. Relative differences were more informative. For example, all groups were less likely to agree that their personal culture could be at odds with military culture as compared to other cultures. Such perceptions could hinder asking difficult questions and thus undermine care. The AMCC is a model for the measurement of the skills, attitudes, and knowledge related to military cultural competence. With further validity testing, the AMCC will be helpful in the critical task of measuring outcomes in ongoing efforts to improve military cultural competence. The novel approach of assessing variance appears to reduce bias and may also be helpful in the design of other cultural competency assessments.

  20. Comparative multiparametric analysis of HeLa and RD cell culture reactions to solcoseryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magakian, Yu A; Karalyan, Z A; Karalova, E M; Abroyan, L O; Akopyan, L A; Gasparyan, M H; Jaghacpanyan, N G; Semerjyan, Z B; Ter-Pogossyan, Z R

    2009-10-01

    Reactions of continuous HeLa and RD cell cultures and their nuclear and nucleolar apparatus to addition of solcoseryl into the medium were studied. The monolayer density, proliferation activity, percentage of dead cells, RNA and DNA content in the nuclei and nucleoli, number of nucleoli in the nuclei, cell distribution in the population by the number of nucleoli in the nuclei, volume and complete surface area of the nuclei and nucleoli, and the nucleolar/nuclear ratio were evaluated. The cultures differently reacted to solcoseryl in the medium at the population and cellular levels of their organization. By the results of multiparametric analysis of the reactions of cells and their nuclear and nucleolar apparatus, solcoseryl can be referred to bioactive substances with characteristics of a factor regulating cell population growth.

  1. Network-based diffusion analysis reveals cultural transmission of lobtail feeding in humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jenny; Weinrich, Mason; Hoppitt, Will; Rendell, Luke

    2013-04-26

    We used network-based diffusion analysis to reveal the cultural spread of a naturally occurring foraging innovation, lobtail feeding, through a population of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) over a period of 27 years. Support for models with a social transmission component was 6 to 23 orders of magnitude greater than for models without. The spatial and temporal distribution of sand lance, a prey species, was also important in predicting the rate of acquisition. Our results, coupled with existing knowledge about song traditions, show that this species can maintain multiple independently evolving traditions in its populations. These insights strengthen the case that cetaceans represent a peak in the evolution of nonhuman culture, independent of the primate lineage.

  2. Analysis of CHO cells metabolic redistribution in a glutamate-based defined medium in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, C; Illanes, A; Casablancas, A; Gámez, X; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, C

    2001-01-01

    The effect of glutamine replacement by glutamate and the balance between glutamate and glucose metabolism on the redistribution of t-PA-producing recombinant CHO cells metabolism is studied in a series of glucose shift down and shift up experiments in continuous culture. These experiments reveal the existence of multiple steady states, and experimental data are used to perform metabolic flux analysis to gain a better insight into cellular metabolism and its redistribution. Regulation of glucose feed rate promotes a higher efficiency of glucose and nitrogen source utilization, with lower production of metabolic byproducts, but this reduces t-PA specific production rate. This reduction under glucose limitation can be attributed to the fact that the cells are forced to efficiently utilize the carbon and energy source for growth, impairing the production of dispensable metabolites. It is, therefore, the combination of growth rate and carbon and energy source availability that determines the level of t-PA production in continuous culture.

  3. ELEMENTS FOR A SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF HERITAGE POLICIES IN SOUTH BRAZIL: CULTURE, TOURISM AND DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Manoel Dias da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the contemporary condition of heritage policies in cities tumbled by official organ tipping considering in sociological perspective, the multiple mediations that affect the social goals deposited in them. The theoretical and empirical analysis presented, culture, tourism and development in shape important for the design of a theoretical approach to the phenomenon interpretative elements. The author concludes that, ambivalently, such policies intersect with social processes of identity affirmation of individuals and groups in the heritage landscape of cultural productions and at the same time, with narratives that allow the heritage of the place "resource" to programs of social development and revitalization of tourism and economic circuits in the region.

  4. Statistical analysis of clone formation in cultures of human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, N P; Vinogradova, M S; Volkov, I K; Voronina, E S; Kuleshov, N P

    2011-08-01

    We performed a statistical analysis of clone formation from aneuploid cells (chromosomes 6, 8, 11, X) in cultures of bone marrow-derived human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells by spontaneous level of aneuploidy at different terms of culturing (from 2 to 19 cell cycles). It was found that the duration of cell cycle increased from 65.6 h at passages 2-3 to 164.5 h at passage 12. The expected ratio of aneuploid cells was calculated using modeled 5, 10, 20 and 30% selective preference in reproduction. The size of samples for detecting 10, 25, and 50% increased level of aneuploidy was calculated. The presented principles for evaluation of aneuploid clone formation may be used to distinguish clones of any abnormal cells.

  5. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E

    2013-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including in-depth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions.

  6. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M.; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including indepth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions. PMID:24527744

  7. Mapping Cultural Ecosystem Services in Vilnius using Hot-Spot Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Depellegrin, Daniel; Egarter-Vigl, Lukas; Oliva, Marc; Misiune, Ieva; Keesstra, Saskia; Estebaranz, Ferran; Cerda, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Cultural services in urban areas are very important to promote tourism activities and develop the economy. These activities are fundamental for the sustainability of the urban areas since can represent an important monetary source. However, one of the major threats to the sustainability of cultural services is the high amount of visitants that can lead to a degradation of the services provided (Depellegrin et al., 2016). Mapping the potential of cultural ecosystems services is fundamental to assess the capacity that the territory have to provide it. Previous works used land use classification to identify the ecosystem services potential, and revealed to be a good methodology to attribute to each type of land use a specific capacity (Burkhard et al., 2008). The objective of this work is to map the cultural services in Vilnius area using a hot-spot analysis. Ecosystem services potential was assessed using the matrix developed by Burkhard et al. (2009), which ranks ES capacity from 0= no capacity to 5=very high relevant capacity to a different land use type. The results showed that with the exception of Cultural Heritage ecosystem services that had a random pattern (Z-score=0.62, pTourism (Z-score=4.02, pTourism ecosystem services had the maximum spatial correlation at the distance of 5125.12 m, Landscape Aesthetics at 3495.70 m, Knowledge Systems at 5218.66 m, Religious and Spiritual at 3495.70 m, Cultural Heritage at 6746.17 m and Natural Heritage at 6205.82 m. This showed that the cultural services studied have a different spatial correlation. References Burkhard B, Kroll F, Müller F, Windhorst W. 2009. Landscapes' capacities to provide ecosystem services- a concept for land-cover based assessments. Landscape Online. 15, 1-22. Depellegrin, D.A., Pereira, P., Misiune, I., Egarter-Vigl, L. Mapping Ecosystem Services potential in Lithuania. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 23, 441-455.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of secondary dental root canal infections: a combination of culture and culture-independent approaches reveals new insights.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Carola Anderson

    Full Text Available Persistence of microorganisms or reinfections are the main reasons for failure of root canal therapy. Very few studies to date have included culture-independent methods to assess the microbiota, including non-cultivable microorganisms. The aim of this study was to combine culture methods with culture-independent cloning methods to analyze the microbial flora of root-filled teeth with periradicular lesions. Twenty-one samples from previously root-filled teeth were collected from patients with periradicular lesions. Microorganisms were cultivated, isolated and biochemically identified. In addition, ribosomal DNA of bacteria, fungi and archaea derived from the same samples was amplified and the PCR products were used to construct clone libraries. DNA of selected clones was sequenced and microbial species were identified, comparing the sequences with public databases. Microorganisms were found in 12 samples with culture-dependent and -independent methods combined. The number of bacterial species ranged from 1 to 12 in one sample. The majority of the 26 taxa belonged to the phylum Firmicutes (14 taxa, followed by Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. One sample was positive for fungi, and archaea could not be detected. The results obtained with both methods differed. The cloning technique detected several as-yet-uncultivated taxa. Using a combination of both methods 13 taxa were detected that had not been found in root-filled teeth so far. Enterococcus faecalis was only detected in two samples using culture methods. Combining the culture-dependent and -independent approaches revealed new candidate endodontic pathogens and a high diversity of the microbial flora in root-filled teeth with periradicular lesions. Both methods yielded differing results, emphasizing the benefit of combined methods for the detection of the actual microbial diversity in apical periodontitis.

  9. Explaining state-to-state differences in seat belt use: A multivariate analysis of cultural variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Lisa J; Eby, David W; Dasgupta, Kohinoor; Yang, Yang; Nair, Vijayan N; Pollock, Stephen M

    2012-07-01

    There is considerable variation in seat belt use within the United States despite extensive evidence that the use of seat belts saves lives. Previous studies have identified some important factors that affect belt use rates, including gender, age, race, vehicle type, seat-belt enforcement laws, and amount of fine for belt-use law violation. In this study, we examined the influence of additional socio-demographic factors on state-level use rates: education (percentage of high school educated population), racial composition (percentage White), median household income, political leaning (percentage Democrat), and a measure of religiosity. These variables, which collectively characterize the 'culture' of a state, have received little attention in seat-belt studies. The paper reports results from a multiple regression analysis of data from the 2008 Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). Many of the use rate patterns in FARS data were consistent with those found in other data sets, suggesting that conclusions based on FARS data are likely to hold for the population-at-large. Of the five cultural factors considered in the study, three were identified as important in explaining the differences in seat belt use at the state level: religiosity, race (percentage White), and political leaning (percentage Democrat). The other two variables - income and education - were not significant. Hold-out analyses confirmed that this conclusion was consistent across different subsets of data. The findings from this study are preliminary and have to be confirmed on other data sets. Nevertheless, they demonstrate the potential usefulness of cultural factors in explaining state-to-state variation in seat belt use rates. If factors such as religiosity are indeed important, they can be used to develop culturally appropriate programs for increasing belt use.

  10. Studying the existence and attributes of consensus on psychological concepts by a cognitive psychological model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oravecz, Zita; Faust, Katherine; Batchelder, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Psychological research can take a variety of directions while building on theoretical concepts that are commonly shared among the population of researchers. We investigate the question of how agreement or consensus on basic scientific concepts can be measured. Our approach to the problem is based...... on a state-of-the-art cognitive psychometric technique, implemented in the theoretical framework of Cultural Consensus Theory (CCT). With this approach, consensus-based answers for questions exploring shared knowledge can be derived while basic factors of the human decision making process are accounted for...... of the individual, and is typically not a developmental change." The general goal of the paper is to demonstrate the utility of the CCT based approach as a method for investigating what current, working definitions of scientific concepts are....

  11. Evaluating the 2008 consensus conference on genetically modified foods in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mei-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Genetically modified foods have become one of the most popular topics for deliberative exercises involving ordinary citizens worldwide. This paper examines the Taiwanese consensus conference on GM foods held in June 2008, and the implications and limitations of the public deliberations. The consensus conference facilitated multiparty dialogues and enhanced citizens' knowledge, and affected their attitudes. This study demonstrates the ways contextual factors have influenced the outcome of the citizens' deliberative practices, including the government's conventional technocratic decision-making style, the strong influence of the U.S. government, the political and technological culture, the government's framing of economic development concerns, and a lack of pressure from civil society to compel the government to formally respond to their concerns. The consensus conference had a limited effect on policy decision-making, and seemed to serve as a socio-political experiment.

  12. Spatial Integration Analysis of Provincial Historical and Cultural Heritage Resources Based on Geographic Information System (gis) — a Case Study of Spatial Integration Analysis of Historical and Cultural Heritage Resources in Zhejiang Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W.; Zhang, J.; Wu, Q.; Chen, J.; Huo, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, T.

    2017-08-01

    In China historical and cultural heritage resources include historically and culturally famous cities, towns, villages, blocks, immovable cultural relics and the scenic spots with cultural connotation. The spatial distribution laws of these resources are always directly connected to the regional physical geography, historical development and historical traffic geography and have high research values. Meanwhile, the exhibition and use of these resources are greatly influenced by traffic and tourism and other plans at the provincial level, and it is of great realistic significance to offer proposals on traffic and so on that are beneficial to the exhibition of heritage resources based on the research of province distribution laws. This paper takes the spatial analysis of Geographic Information System (GIS) as the basic technological means and all historical and cultural resources in China's Zhejiang Province as research objects, and finds out in the space the accumulation areas and accumulation belts of Zhejiang Province's historic cities and cultural resources through overlay analysis and density analysis, etc. It then discusses the reasons of the formation of these accumulation areas and accumulation belts by combining with the analysis of physical geography and historical geography and so on, and in the end, linking the tourism planning and traffic planning at the provincial level, it provides suggestions on the exhibition and use of accumulation areas and accumulation belts of historic cities and cultural resources.

  13. Actionable Cultural Understanding for Support to Tactical Operations (ACUSTO): The Effect of Data Quality on Spatial Analysis Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    intelligence analysis ( Satyanarayana and Yogendran 2009), including socio-cultural factors are all with in the realm of GIS. These applications are... Satyanarayana , P., and S. Yogendran. 2009. Military Applications of GIS. IIC Technologies Private Limited, Hyderabad, India, Unpublished Manuscript

  14. Electron Microscopy Studies, Surface Analysis and Microbial Culturing Experiments on a Depth Profile Through Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski, J. K. W.; Steele, A.; Westall, F.; Griffin, C.; Whitby, C.; Avci, R.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Combined electron microscopy studies and culturing experiments have shown that Nakhla became contaminated with recent terrestrial microorganisms. Additional surface analysis detected an as yet unknown organic species which may represent a biomarker.

  15. Introduction: experts and consensus in social science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans; C. Martini

    2014-01-01

    The ideals of science as objectivity and consensus are - unsurprisingly - not so easy to attain in scientific practice. Science is ultimately a product of individual scientists with their own personal backgrounds and experiences, and there is no unique methodology to de-personalize and objectify kno

  16. ESMO consensus conference on malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladetto, M; Buske, C; Hutchings, M;

    2016-01-01

    into three working groups; each group focused on one of these areas in order to address four clinically relevant questions relating to that topic. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, each working group developed...

  17. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roila, Fausto; Warr, David; Hesketh, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: An update of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute and delayed emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy published after the last MASCC/ESMO antiemetic consensus conference in 2009 has been carried out. METHODS: A systematic literature search using PubMed from Janua...

  18. Beyond the Consensus View: Whole Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allchin, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The "consensus view" on the nature of science (NOS) is now outmoded. To help frame an enduring alternative, one should attend first to the "why" of NOS education. Functional, or civic, scientific literacy is foundational. Acknowledging a need for consumers and citizens to assess the reliability of scientific claims in personal…

  19. Discontinuities and hysteresis in quantized average consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceragioli, Francesca; Persis, Claudio De; Frasca, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    We consider continuous-time average consensus dynamics in which the agents’ states are communicated through uniform quantizers. Solutions to the resulting system are defined in the Krasowskii sense and are proven to converge to conditions of ‘‘practical consensus’’. To cope with undesired chattering

  20. Distributed Estimation using Bayesian Consensus Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-06

    performance,” in 48th IEEE Conf. Decision Control, (Shanghai, China), pp. 7036–7042, December 2009. [18] M. H. DeGroot , Probability and Statistics...programming,” Autonomous Robots, vol. 16, pp. 49–79, January 2004. [24] M. H. DeGroot , “Reaching a consensus,” J. Amer. Statistical Assoc., vol. 69