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Sample records for culturable virus assay

  1. Evaluation of new transport medium for detection of herpes simplex virus by culture and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogburn, J R; Hoffpauir, J T; Cole, E; Hood, K; Michael, D; Nguyen, T; Raden, S; Raju, B; Reisinger, V; Oefinger, P E

    1994-12-01

    The transport medium Multi-Microbe Media (M4) was evaluated prospectively by culture and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of herpes simplex virus from 473 specimens. In addition, 377 specimens in Bartels Viral Transport Medium were evaluated. By using culture as a "gold standard," the ELISA sensitivity was approximately 85%, while the specificities exceeded 96% for both media.

  2. Evaluation of a multiple-cycle, recombinant virus, growth competition assay that uses flow cytometry to measure replication efficiency of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Carrie; Wang, Jiong; Jin, Xia; Planelles, Vicente; An, Dong Sung; Tallo, Amanda; Huang, Yangxin; Wu, Hulin; Demeter, Lisa M

    2006-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication efficiency or fitness, as measured in cell culture, has been postulated to correlate with clinical outcome of HIV infection, although this is still controversial. One limitation is the lack of high-throughput assays that can measure replication efficiency over multiple rounds of replication. We have developed a multiple-cycle growth competition assay to measure HIV-1 replication efficiency that uses flow cytometry to determine the relative proportions of test and reference viruses, each of which expresses a different reporter gene in place of nef. The reporter genes are expressed on the surface of infected cells and are detected by commercially available fluorescence-labeled antibodies. This method is less labor-intensive than those that require isolation and amplification of nucleic acids. The two reporter gene products are detected with similar specificity and sensitivity, and the proportion of infected cells in culture correlates with the amount of viral p24 antigen produced in the culture supernatant. HIV replication efficiencies of six different drug-resistant site-directed mutants were reproducibly quantified and were similar to those obtained with a growth competition assay in which the relative proportion of each variant was measured by sequence analysis, indicating that recombination between the pol and reporter genes was negligible. This assay also reproducibly quantified the relative fitness conferred by protease and reverse transcriptase sequences containing multiple drug resistance mutations, amplified from patient plasma. This flow cytometry-based growth competition assay offers advantages over current assays for HIV replication efficiency and should prove useful for the evaluation of patient samples in clinical trials.

  3. Lectin Enzyme Assay Detection of Viruses, Tissue Culture, and a Mycotoxin Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Deconinek, I., "A State of Lymphocyte Activation Detected by Susceptibility to Vesicular Stomatitis Virus," Immunol. Let. Vol. 2, pp 291-296 (1981). 11...44, pp 1689-1691 (1980). 17 12. Rice, J.B., Schaller, J.P., Lewis, M.G., Mathes, L.E., Hoover, E.A., and Olsen, R.G., "Infection of Feline Embryo...Adherent Cells with Feline Leukemia Virus: Feline Oncornavirus- Associated Cell Membrane Antigen Expression and Morphologic Transformation," J. Natl

  4. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  5. Comparative Evaluation of AmpliVue HSV 1+2 Assay with ELVIS Culture for Detecting Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in Clinical Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Paul A; Alkins, Brenda R; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Greene, Wallace H; Connolly, Jessica; Buchan, Blake W; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2015-12-01

    The AmpliVue HSV 1+2 assay was compared to the ELVIS HSV ID and D(3) Typing Culture System for the qualitative detection and differentiation of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 DNA in 1,351 cutaneous and mucocutaneous specimens. Compared to ELVIS, AmpliVue had sensitivities of 95.7 and 97.6% for detecting HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. Following arbitration of discordant results by an independent molecular method, the AmpliVue assay had a resolved sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 and 99.7%, respectively, for both HSV-1 and HSV-2, whereas ELVIS had a resolved sensitivity of 87.1% for HSV-1 and 84.5% for HSV-2.

  6. Primary hemocyte culture of Penaeus monodon as an in vitro model for white spot syndrome virus titration, viral and immune related gene expression and cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Seena; Mohandas, A; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2010-11-01

    Immortal cell lines have not yet been reported from Penaeus monodon, which delimits the prospects of investigating the associated viral pathogens especially white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In this context, a method of developing primary hemocyte culture from this crustacean has been standardized by employing modified double strength Leibovitz-15 (L-15) growth medium supplemented with 2% glucose, MEM vitamins (1×), tryptose phosphate broth (2.95 gl⁻¹), 20% FBS, N-phenylthiourea (0.2 mM), 0.06 μg ml⁻¹ chloramphenicol, 100 μg ml⁻¹ streptomycin and 100 IU ml⁻¹ penicillin and hemolymph drawn from shrimp grown under a bio-secured recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). In this medium the hemocytes remained viable up to 8 days. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling assay revealed its incorporation in 22 ± 7% of cells at 24h. Susceptibility of the cells to WSSV was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay using a monoclonal antibody against 28 kDa envelope protein of WSSV. A convenient method for determining virus titer as MTT(50)/ml was standardized employing the primary hemocyte culture. Expression of viral genes and cellular immune genes were also investigated. The cell culture could be demonstrated for determining toxicity of a management chemical (benzalkonium chloride) by determining its IC(50). The primary hemocyte culture could serve as a model for WSSV titration and viral and cellular immune related gene expression and also for investigations on cytotoxicity of aquaculture drugs and chemicals.

  7. Virus-binding proteins recovered from bacterial culture derived from activated sludge by affinity chromatography assay using a viral capsid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Daisuke; Matsuo, Takahiro; Omura, Tatsuo

    2004-06-01

    The contamination of water environments by pathogenic viruses has raised concerns about outbreaks of viral infectious diseases in our society. Because conventional water and wastewater treatment systems are not effective enough to inactivate or remove pathogenic viruses, a new technology for virus removal needs to be developed. In this study, the virus-binding proteins (VBPs) in a bacterial culture derived from activated sludge were successfully recovered. The recovery of VBPs was achieved by applying extracted crude proteins from a bacterial culture to an affinity column in which a custom-made peptide of capsid protein from the poliovirus type 1 (PV1) Mahoney strain (H(2)N-DNPASTTNKDKL-COOH) was immobilized as a ligand. VBPs exhibited the ability to adsorb infectious particles of PV1 Sabin 1 as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The evaluation of surface charges of VBPs with ion-exchange chromatography found that a majority of VBP molecules had a net negative charge under the conditions of affinity chromatography. On the other hand, a calculated isoelectric point implied that the viral peptide in the affinity column was also charged negatively. As a result, the adsorption of the VBPs to the viral peptide in the affinity column occurred with a strong attractive force that was able to overcome the electrostatic repulsive force. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that the isolated VBPs include a number of proteins, and their molecular masses were widely distributed but smaller than 100 kDa. Amino acid sequences of N termini of five VBPs were determined. Homology searches for the N termini against all protein sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database showed that the isolated VBPs in this study were newly discovered proteins. These VBPs that originated with bacteria in activated sludge might be stable, because they are existing in the environment of wastewater treatments. Therefore, a virus removal technology

  8. A sensitive real-time PCR based assay to estimate the impact of amino acid substitutions on the competitive replication fitness of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Holte, Sarah; Rao, Ushnal; McClure, Jan; Konopa, Philip; Swain, J Victor; Lanxon-Cookson, Erinn; Kim, Moon; Chen, Lennie; Mullins, James I

    2013-04-01

    Fixation of mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), such as those conferring drug resistance and immune escape, can result in a change in replication fitness. To assess these changes, a real-time TaqMan PCR detection assay and statistical methods for data analysis were developed to estimate sensitively relative viral fitness in competitive viral replication experiments in cell culture. Chimeric viruses with the gene of interest in an HIV-1NL4-3 backbone were constructed in two forms, vifA (native vif gene in NL4-3) and vifB (vif gene with six synonymous nucleotide differences from vifA). Subsequently, mutations of interest were introduced into the chimeric viruses in NL4-3VifA backbones, and the mutants were competed against the chimera with the isogenic viral sequence in the NL4-3VifB backbone in cell culture. In order to assess subtle fitness differences, culture supernatants were sampled longitudinally, and the viruses differentially quantified using vifA- and vifB-specific primers in real-time PCR assays. Based on an exponential net growth model, the growth rate of each virus was determined and the fitness cost of the mutation(s) distinguishing the two viruses represented as the net growth rate difference between the mutant and the native variants. Using this assay, the fitness impact of eight amino acid substitutions was quantitated at highly conserved sites in HIV-1 Gag and Env.

  9. Rapid centrifugation assay standarization for dengue virus isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Palomino, Miryam; Escuela de Biología, facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Matemáticas, Universidad Nacional federico Villarreal. Lima, Perú. Biólogo.; Gutierrez, Victoria; Centro Nacional de Salud Pública, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Biólogo.; Salas, Ramses; Laboratorio de Biotecnología, facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Matemáticas, Universidad Nacional federico Villarreal. Lima, Perú. Biólogo.

    2010-01-01

    The plate centrifugation assay was standardized for dengue virus isolation from serum samples. C6/36-HT cells were used determining the optimal values for centrifugation spin speed, inoculum, sera dilution, and incubation time. Then, 22 positive serum samples with viral isolation and viral strains of the four reference dengue virus serotypes were tested simultaneously by the standardized plate centrifugation method and the conventional tube culture. The isolations were typified by indirec...

  10. Evaluation of the suitability of six host genes as internal control in real-time RT-PCR assays in chicken embryo cell cultures infected with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Bang, Dang Duong; Handberg, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    -time RT-PCR is needed to a suitable internal control. We thus investigated the expression pattern of six chicken genes, including P-actin, 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, glyceral dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and beta-2-microglobulin, in chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures...... and GAPDH had a lower expression level in CE cell cultures. Also, beta-actin showed no significant variation in both normalized and non-normalized assays and virus dose-independent of inoculation, while other genes did. beta-Actin was further successfully used as an internal control to quantitate Bursine-2...... virus-specific RNA load in CE cell cultures. Thus, beta-actin was suggested as a suitable internal control in studying gene expression as well as virus-specific RNA load in CE cell after IBDV infection....

  11. Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Smallpox Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofi Ibrahim, M.; Kulesh, David A.; Saleh, Sharron S.; Damon, Inger K.; Esposito, Joseph J.; Schmaljohn, Alan L.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific assay for the rapid detection of smallpox virus DNA on both the Smart Cycler and LightCycler platforms. The assay is based on TaqMan chemistry with the orthopoxvirus hemagglutinin gene used as the target sequence. With genomic DNA purified from variola virus Bangladesh 1975, the limit of detection was estimated to be approximately 25 copies on both machines. The assay was evaluated in a blinded study with 322 coded samples that included genomic DNA from 48 different isolates of variola virus; 25 different strains and isolates of camelpox, cowpox, ectromelia, gerbilpox, herpes, monkeypox, myxoma, rabbitpox, raccoonpox, skunkpox, vaccinia, and varicella-zoster viruses; and two rickettsial species at concentrations mostly ranging from 100 fg/μl to 1 ng/μl. Contained within those 322 samples were variola virus DNA, obtained from purified viral preparations, at concentrations of 1 fg/μl to 1 ng/μl. On the Smart Cycler platform, 2 samples with false-positive results were detected among the 116 samples not containing variola virus tested; i.e., the overall specificity of the assay was 98.3%. On the LightCycler platform, five samples with false-positive results were detected (overall specificity, 95.7%). Of the 206 samples that contained variola virus DNA ranging in concentrations from 100 fg/μl to 1 ng/μl, 8 samples were considered negative on the Smart Cycler platform and 1 sample was considered negative on the LightCycler platform. Thus, the clinical sensitivities were 96.1% for the Smart Cycler instrument and 99.5% for the LightCycler instrument. The vast majority of these samples were derived from virus-infected cell cultures and variola virus-infected tissues; thus, the DNA material contained both viral DNA and cellular DNA. Of the 43 samples that contained purified variola virus DNA ranging in concentration from 1 fg/μl to 1 ng/μl, the assay correctly detected the virus in all 43 samples on both the Smart Cycler

  12. Comparison of fortified calf serum, serum substitutes and fetal calf serum with or without extenders for propagation of cell cultures for virus plaque assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahling, D R; Wright, B A

    1990-03-01

    Two studies comparing sewage-isolated and laboratory stock viruses were conducted to determine if alternative forms of serum or serum extenders could be used in place of fetal bovine serum without a significant loss of viral titer. In the first study, BGM cells were grown in standard MEM-L15 medium which was supplemented with Nuserum, Sigma serum replacement (CPSR-1), HyClone defined iron supplemented calf bovine serum, fetal bovine serum (FBS) or FBS supplemented with either SerXtend or Mito serum extenders. Comparison of virus titers showed that CPSR-1 gave the best overall results and was comparable to FBS. Of the serum extenders, only SerXtend improved virus recovery from sewage samples. In the second study, all sera were tested with and without SerXtend. In these experiments, SerXtend enhanced virus sensitivity of the BGM cell line grown in the HyClone serum but reduced the sensitivity of those cultured in Sigma serum. In both series, the growth of BGM cells was monitored for 12 weeks and all test products were shown to support long-term cell growth.

  13. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305 Herpes simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices...

  14. An Experiment on Standardized Cell Culture Assay in Assessing the Activities of Composite Artemisia Capillaris Tablets against Hepatitis B Virus Replication in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jin; ZHAO Yan-ling; SHAN Li-mei; HUANG Feng-jiao; XIAO Xiao-he

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To explore the activities of Composite Artemisia Capillaris Tablet (复方茵陈片,CACT) against hepatitis B virus replication in vitro. Methods: By means of radioimmunoassay (RIA), Dot blot and Southern blot, the surface and e antigen production of 2.2.15 cells, HBV DNA in 2.2.15 cell culture medium and that in 2.2.15 cells were examined respectively. Results: HBsAg, HBeAg values of 2.2.15 cells treated by CACT were lower than those of the control, the HBV DNA quantities in culture medium and in 2.2.15 cells decreased as compared with those cells with no treatment by CACT given to them. Conclusion:CACT could inhibit HBV DNA replication, showing its potential antiviral activity in hepatitis B treatment.

  15. An optimized polymerase chain reaction assay to identify avian virus vaccine contamination with Chicken anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Haitham M; Elzahed, Hanan M; Elabiare, Elham A; Badawy, Ahmed A; Yousef, Ausama A

    2011-01-01

    The use of embryonating chicken eggs in preparation of avian virus vaccines is the principle cause for contamination with Chicken anemia virus (CAV). Identification of CAV in contaminated vaccines relies on the expensive, tedious, and time-consuming practice of virus isolation in lymphoblastoid cell lines. The experience of the last 2 decades indicates that polymerase chain reaction is extending to replace most of the classic methods for detection of infectious agents. In the present report, a simple, rapid, and accurate polymerase chain reaction method for detection of CAV in poultry vaccines is described. Oligonucleotide primers homologous to highly conserved sequences of the VP1 gene were used to amplify a fragment of 676 bp. The developed assay was specific for detecting CAV from different sources, with no cross reactivity with many avian viruses. No inter- and intra-assay variations were observed. The analytical sensitivity of the test was high enough to detect 5 TCID(50) (50% tissue culture infective dose) of the virus per reaction; however, different factors related to the vaccine matrix showed considerable effects on the detection limit. In conclusion, this method may represent a suitable alternative to virus isolation for identification of CAV contamination of poultry virus vaccines.

  16. Assay of neutralizing antibody against variola virus by the degree of focus reduction on HeLa cell cultures and its application to revaccination with smallpox vaccines of various potencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, T; Shinjo, N

    1972-01-01

    A method for assaying neutralizing antibody against variola virus was established by focus counting on HeLa cell cultures. The ND(50) titre, i.e., the serum dilution endpoint to give a 50% reduction in the number of foci, was determined with excellent reproducibility.Groups of students 19-20 years of age were revaccinated by the multiple pressure method with serial 10-fold dilutions of a smallpox vaccine and their neutralizing antibody response was assayed by the focus counting assay system and was related to the local skin reactions on the seventh day after inoculation and to the potency of the vaccine administered. There was a significant rise in the antibody level even after inoculation with a vaccine whose potency was as low as 1.3 x 10(5) pock-forming units/ml. In general, the rise in the log antibody level was proportional to the diameter of the reddening, but a significant rise was found among individuals who had no detectable skin reaction. The skin reaction was greater among individuals with a lower initial antibody level when the vaccine administered had a potency lower than 1.3 x 10(6) pock-forming units/ml.

  17. PLAQUE ASSAY OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sardjono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Newcastle disease virus (NDV was isolated from a 3 months-old indigenous chicken (buras or kampung chicken which showed clinical signs of Newcastle disease (ND. For viral isolation a small part of the spleen and lung were inoculated into 10 days-old embryonated chicken eggs. The physical characteristics of the isolate (A/120 were studied. The hemagglutination of chicken red blood cell showed slow elution, thermostability of hemagglutinin at 56°C was 120 minutes. The vims was able to agglutinate horse erythrocytes but not those of sheep. The biological characteristics on mean death time (MDT of embryonated chicken egg and plaque morphology on chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF primary cell cultures were studied. The MDT was 56 hours, the isolate was velogenic NDV. There were three different plaque morphologies on CEF : 2 mm clear plaques, 1 mm clear plaques, and minute clear plaques which were visible only with microscopic examination.

  18. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device that... organism in the innoculated medium. Test results aid in the diagnosis of disease resulting from either...

  19. Cryptosporidium cell culture infectivity assay design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B J; Keegan, A R; Robinson, B S; Monis, P T

    2011-05-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium, which cause the gastrointestinal disease cryptosporidiosis, still represent a significant cause of water-borne disease worldwide. While intensive efforts have been invested in the development of techniques for parasite culture, in vitro growth has been hampered by a number of factors including low levels of infectivity as well as delayed life-cycle development and poor synchronicity. In this study we examined factors affecting the timing of contact between excysted sporozoites and target host cells and the subsequent impact of this upon the establishment of infection. We demonstrate that excystation rate impacts upon establishment of infection and that in our standard assay format the majority of sporozoites are not close enough to the cell monolayer when they are released from the oocyst to successfully establish infection. However, this can be easily overcome by centrifugation of oocysts onto the cell monolayer, resulting in approximately 4-fold increases in sporozoite attachment and subsequent infection. We further demonstrate that excystation procedures can be tailored to control excystation rate to match the assay end purpose and that excystation rate can influence data interpretation. Finally, the addition of both a centrifugation and washing step post-sporozoite attachment may be appropriate when considering the design of in vitro culture experiments for developmental analysis and stage-specific gene expression as this appears to increase the synchronicity of early developmental stages.

  20. Optimization of a micro-neutralisation assay and its application in antigenic characterisation of influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yipu; Gu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A; Whittaker, Lynne; Gregory, Victoria; Li, Xiaoyan; Metin, Simon; Cattle, Nicholas; Daniels, Rodney S; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W

    2015-06-13

    The identification of antigenic variants and the selection of influenza viruses for vaccine production are based largely on antigenic characterisation of the haemagglutinin (HA) of circulating viruses using the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. However, additional to evolution related to escape from host immunity, variants emerging as a result of propagation in different cell substrates can complicate interpretation of HI results. The objective was to develop further a micro-neutralisation (MN) assay to complement the HI assay in antigenic characterisation of influenza viruses to assess the emergence of new antigenic variants and reinforce the selection of vaccine viruses. A 96-well-plate plaque reduction MN assay based on measurement of the Infected Cell Population (ICP) using a simple imaging technique. Improvements to the plaque reduction MN assay included selection of the most suitable cell line according to virus type or subtype, and optimisation of experimental design and data quantitation. Comparisons of the results of MN and HI assays showed the importance of complementary data in determining the true antigenic relationships among recent human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and type B viruses. Our study demonstrates that the improved MN assay has certain advantages over the HI assay: it is not significantly influenced by the cell-selected amino acid substitutions in the neuraminidase (NA) of A(H3N2) viruses, and it is particularly useful for antigenic characterisation of viruses which either grow to low HA titre and/or undergo an abortive infection resulting in an inability to form plaques in cultured cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Assay optimization for molecular detection of Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Victor M; Rasche, Andrea; Baronti, Cecile; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Cadar, Daniel; Reusken, Chantal BEM; Pas, Suzan D; Goorhuis, Abraham; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Kümmerer, Beate M; Bleicker, Tobias; Brünink, Sebastian; Eschbach-Bludau, Monika; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Koopmans, Marion P; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Grobusch, Martin P; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Drosten, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the diagnostic performance of real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for Zika virus detection. Methods We compared seven published real-time RT–PCR assays and two new assays that we have developed. To determine the analytical sensitivity of each assay, we constructed a synthetic universal control ribonucleic acid (uncRNA) containing all of the assays’ target regions on one RNA strand and spiked human blood or urine with known quantities of African or Asian Zika virus strains. Viral loads in 33 samples from Zika virus-infected patients were determined by using one of the new assays. Findings Oligonucleotides of the published real-time RT–PCR assays, showed up to 10 potential mismatches with the Asian lineage causing the current outbreak, compared with 0 to 4 mismatches for the new assays. The 95% lower detection limit of the seven most sensitive assays ranged from 2.1 to 12.1 uncRNA copies/reaction. Two assays had lower sensitivities of 17.0 and 1373.3 uncRNA copies/reaction and showed a similar sensitivity when using spiked samples. The mean viral loads in samples from Zika virus-infected patients were 5 × 104 RNA copies/mL of blood and 2 × 104 RNA copies/mL of urine. Conclusion We provide reagents and updated protocols for Zika virus detection suitable for the current outbreak strains. Some published assays might be unsuitable for Zika virus detection, due to the limited sensitivity and potential incompatibility with some strains. Viral concentrations in the clinical samples were close to the technical detection limit, suggesting that the use of insensitive assays will cause false-negative results. PMID:27994281

  2. Single Assay Detection of Acute Bee Paralysis Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per

    2012-01-01

    A new RT-PCR primer pair designed to identify Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV), Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV) or Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (IAPV) of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a single assay is described. These primers are used to screen samples for ABPV, KBV, or IAPV in a single RT-PCR ......-PCR reaction saving time and money. The primers are located in the predicted overlapping gene (pog/ORFX) which is highly conserved across ABPV, KBV, IAPV and other dicistroviruses of social insects. This study has also identified the first case of IAPV in Denmark....

  3. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this...longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this assay may be used as a rapid...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour

  4. RT-PCR assay for detection of Lassa virus and related Old World arenaviruses targeting the L gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, Simon; Drosten, Christian; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Martin; Omilabu, Sunday; Hass, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; ter Meulen, Jan; Nichol, Stuart T; Schmitz, Herbert; Günther, Stephan

    2007-12-01

    This study describes an RT-PCR assay targeting the L RNA segment of arenaviruses. Conserved regions were identified in the polymerase domain of the L gene on the basis of published sequences for Lassa virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), Pichinde virus and Tacaribe virus, as well as 15 novel sequences for Lassa virus, LCMV, Ippy virus, Mobala virus and Mopeia virus determined in this study. Using these regions as target sites, a PCR assay for detection of all known Old World arenaviruses was developed and optimized. The concentration that yields 95% positive results in a set of replicate tests (95% detection limit) was determined to be 4290 copies of Lassa virus L RNA per ml of serum, corresponding to 30 copies per reaction. The ability of the assay to detect various Old World arenaviruses was demonstrated with in vitro transcribed RNA, material from infected cell cultures and samples from patients with Lassa fever and monkeys with LCMV-associated callitrichid hepatitis. The L gene PCR assay may be applicable: (i) as a complementary diagnostic test for Lassa virus and LCMV; (ii) to identify unknown Old World arenaviruses suspected as aetiological agents of disease; and (iii) for screening of potential reservoir hosts for unknown Old World arenaviruses.

  5. Pairwise growth competition assay for determining the replication fitness of human immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocheewa, Siriphan; Lanxon-Cookson, Erinn C; Liu, Yi; Swain, J Victor; McClure, Jan; Rao, Ushnal; Maust, Brandon; Deng, Wenjie; Sunshine, Justine E; Kim, Moon; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I

    2015-05-04

    In vitro fitness assays are essential tools for determining viral replication fitness for viruses such as HIV-1. Various measurements have been used to extrapolate viral replication fitness, ranging from the number of viral particles per infectious unit, growth rate in cell culture, and relative fitness derived from multiple-cycle growth competition assays. Growth competition assays provide a particularly sensitive measurement of fitness since the viruses are competing for cellular targets under identical growth conditions. There are several experimental factors to consider when conducting growth competition assays, including the multiplicity of infection (MOI), sampling times, and viral detection and fitness calculation methods. Each factor can affect the end result and hence must be considered carefully during the experimental design. The protocol presented here includes steps from constructing a new recombinant HIV-1 clone to performing growth competition assays and analyzing the experimental results. This protocol utilizes experimental parameter values previously shown to yield consistent and robust results. Alternatives are discussed, as some parameters need to be adjusted according to the cell type and viruses being studied. The protocol contains two alternative viral detection methods to provide flexibility as the availability of instruments, reagents and expertise varies between laboratories.

  6. A focus reduction neutralization assay for hepatitis C virus neutralizing antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowski Czeslaw

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim The role of humoral immunity in hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is poorly understood. Nevertheless, there is increasing interest in characterizing the neutralizing antibodies in the serum of HCV-infected patients. Focus reduction assays have been widely used to evaluate neutralizing antibody responses against a range of non-cytopathic viruses. Based on the recent development of a HCV cell culture system using the genotype 2 JFH-1-strain, we developed a focus reduction assay for HCV-neutralizing antibodies. Methods The focus reduction assay was based on a standard microneutralization assay in which immunostained foci on tissue culture plates are counted. The neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies titers of purified serum immunoglobulin samples from seventy-seven individuals were determined using a 50% focus reduction neutralization assay. Each titer was determined as the log value of the reciprocal antibody dilution that reduced the number of viral foci by 50%. IgG antibodies were first purified from each serum in order to avoid the facilitating effect of HDL on HCV entry. Results The assay's cut-off using an ELISA and RNA HCV-negative samples was found to be 1.25 log, corresponding to a dilution of 1:18. The assay was compared with a commercial HCV ELISA and exhibited specificity and sensitivity values of 100% and 96.5%, respectively, and good reproducibility (with intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation of 6.7% and 12.6%, respectively. The assay did not show any cross-reactivity with anti-HIV, anti-HBs or heterophile antibody-positive samples. The neutralizing antibodies titers were 2.13 log (1:134 for homologous samples from HCV genotype 2 infected patients harboring the same genotype as JFH-1 and 1.93 log (1:85 for heterologous samples from patients infected by genotypes other than type 2. These results confirm the presence of broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies already reported using the HCV pseudoparticles

  7. Production of plant virus inhibitor by Phytolacca americana suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, M; Hayashi, M; Tanaka, H

    1975-09-01

    The inhibitory activity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) infection was assayed with the extracts of various callus tissues derived from the intact plants. Phytolacca americana callus was selected as a producer of the virus inhibitor and its cultural conditions in suspension were examined for cell growth and the inhibitor production. A modified liquid medium containing twofold concentrations of all components in that of Murashige and Skoog plus2,4-D (1.0 mg/liter) and sucrose (6%), but without any vitamins and glycine was chosen for production of higher levels of the inhibitor. TMV infections in tobacco, bean, and tomato plants were markedly inhibited by the introduction of the disrupted whole broth of suspension cultured P. americana.

  8. Hepatitis C virus: Screening, diagnosis, and interpretation of laboratory assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekta Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 3% of the world population is infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV, a hepatotropic RNA virus, transmitted primarily via the blood route. The major modes of transmission of the virus include injection drug use, unsafe injection practices, blood transfusion etc. HCV causes chronic hepatitis in about 80% of those infected by it. The mainstay in diagnosing infection with HCV is to initially screen high risk groups for antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV. The inclusion of serum to cut-off ratio (S/CO in recent guidelines is helpful in deciding the supplemental assay to be used to confirm initially reactive screening results. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAT are used as confirmatory tools, and also to determine viral load prior to initiating treatment. Quantitative NAT has replaced qualitative assays. Genotyping is an important tool in clinical management to predict the likelihood of response and determine the optimal duration of therapy. The impact of this infection has begun to emerge in India. The problem of professional blood donation despite an existing law against it, and flourishing unsafe injection practices, are potential sources for the spread of hepatitis C in our country. All health care practitioners need to understand how to establish or exclude a diagnosis of HCV infection and to interpret the tests correctly. In the absence of a preventive or therapeutic vaccine, and also of post-exposure prophylaxis against the virus, it is imperative to diagnose infection by HCV so as to prevent hepatic insult and the ensuing complications that follow, including primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. This review aims to help blood bank staff regarding options for diagnosis and management of donors positive for HCV.

  9. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    TOSV), sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV), sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV), and Punta Toro virus (Tesh 1988, Alkan et al. 2013). These viruses pose a...SFFVA against arthropod- borne phleboviruses that are not members of the SF virus group (Heartland viruses ) or are members of the SF virus group but not...less virus in wild infected flies. The proprietary grinding solution provided with the kit will inactivate most arbo- viruses , preventing them

  10. Development and testing of a field diagnostic assay for peste des petits ruminants virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J; Fishbourne, E; Couacy-Hyman, E; Abubakar, M; Jones, B A; Frost, L; Herbert, R; Chibssa, T R; Van't Klooster, G; Afzal, M; Ayebazibwe, C; Toye, P; Bashiruddin, J; Baron, M D

    2014-10-01

    We have developed an immunochromatographic test for the diagnosis of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) under field conditions. The diagnostic assay has been tested in the laboratory and also under field conditions in Ivory Coast, Pakistan, Ethiopia and Uganda. The test is carried out on a superficial swab sample (ocular or nasal) and showed a sensitivity of 84% relative to PCR. The specificity was 95% over all nasal and ocular samples. The test detected as little as 10(3) TCID50 (50% tissue culture infectious doses) of cell culture-grown virus, and detected virus isolates representing all four known genetic lineages of peste des petits ruminants virus. Virus could be detected in swabs from animals as early as 4 days post-infection, at a time when clinical signs were minimal. Feedback from field trials was uniformly positive, suggesting that this diagnostic tool may be useful for current efforts to control the spread of PPR. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Comparison of the Luminex xTAG RVP Fast assay and the Idaho Technology FilmArray RP assay for detection of respiratory viruses in pediatric patients at a cancer hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babady, N Esther; Mead, Peter; Stiles, Jeffrey; Brennan, Carrie; Li, Haijing; Shuptar, Susan; Stratton, Charles W; Tang, Yi-Wei; Kamboj, Mini

    2012-07-01

    Respiratory viruses are increasingly recognized as serious causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. The rapid and sensitive detection of respiratory viruses is essential for the early diagnosis and administration of appropriate antiviral therapy, as well as for the effective implementation of infection control measures. We compared the performance of two commercial assays, xTAG RVP Fast (Luminex Diagnostics, Toronto, Canada) and FilmArray RVP (FA RVP; Idaho Technology, Salt Lake City, UT), in pediatric patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. These assays detect the following viruses: respiratory syncytial virus; influenza A and B viruses; parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3, and 4; human metapneumovirus; adenovirus; enterovirus-rhinovirus; coronaviruses NL63, HKU1, 229E, and OC43; and bocavirus. We tested a total of 358 respiratory specimens from 173 pediatric patients previously tested by direct fluorescence assay (DFA) and viral culture. The overall detection rate (number of positive specimens/total specimens) for viruses tested by all methods was 24% for DFA/culture, 45% for xTAG RVP Fast, and 51% for FA RVP. The agreement between the two multiplex assays was 84.5%, and the difference in detection rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Overall, the FA RVP assay was more sensitive than the xTAG RVP Fast assay and had a turnaround time of approximately 1 h. The sensitivity, simplicity, and random-access platform make FA RVP an excellent choice for laboratory on-demand service with low to medium volume.

  12. 21 CFR 866.3310 - Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. (a) Identification. HAV serological assays are devices that... tissue donors. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is “Guidance...

  13. Development of an Easy and High-Throughput Cell Assay System with a Culture Chip and an Assay Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kanako; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Baba, Yoshinobu

    High throughput cell assay is significantly important in drug screening, assessment of toxicity etc. Cell assay with a microchip is one of the candidates for high throughput cell assay. However, reported cell assay system with the microchip requires expensive apparatus for refluxing medium and investigation of optimum experimental condition for steady data. For an inexpensive, easy and high throughput cell assay, we introduce a new cell assay system combined with a culture chip and an assay chip made of poly(dimethyl siloxane). Cell culture chips enabled cell to proliferate along the microchannel without refluxing medium and permitted to prepare cell patterning easily. Also, assay chips formed concentration gradient inside the chip and allowed the cell assay with different concentrations of drug at the same time. Thus, our developed cell assay system can overcome the problems of the present cell assay and would promote the drug discovery, assessment of toxicity etc.

  14. A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balm, Michelle N D; Lee, Chun Kiat; Lee, Hong Kai; Chiu, Lily; Koay, Evelyn S C; Tang, Julian W

    2012-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.

  15. Detection of measles, mumps and rubella viruses by immuno-colorimetric assay and its application in focus reduction neutralization tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Kumbhar, Neelakshi S; Bhide, Vandana S

    2014-12-01

    Measles, mumps and rubella are vaccine-preventable diseases; however limited epidemiological data are available from low-income or developing countries. Thus, it is important to investigate the transmission of these viruses in different geographical regions. In this context, a cell culture-based rapid and reliable immuno-colorimetric assay (ICA) was established and its utility studied. Twenty-three measles, six mumps and six rubella virus isolates and three vaccine strains were studied. Detection by ICA was compared with plaque and RT-PCR assays. In addition, ICA was used to detect viruses in throat swabs (n = 24) collected from patients with suspected measles or mumps. Similarly, ICA was used in a focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT) and the results compared with those obtained by a commercial IgG enzyme immuno assay. Measles and mumps virus were detected 2 days post-infection in Vero or Vero-human signaling lymphocytic activation molecule cells, whereas rubella virus was detected 3 days post-infection in Vero cells. The blue stained viral foci were visible by the naked eye or through a magnifying glass. In conclusion, ICA was successfully used on 35 virus isolates, three vaccine strains and clinical specimens collected from suspected cases of measles and mumps. Furthermore, an application of ICA in a neutralization test (i.e., FRNT) was documented; this may be useful for sero-epidemiological, cross-neutralization and pre/post-vaccine studies. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Rapid, targeted and culture-free viral infectivity assay in drop-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Rotem, Assaf; Zhang, Huidan; Chang, Connie B; Basu, Anindita; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Koehler, Stephan A; Ren, Yukun; Lin, Jeffrey S; Pipas, James M; Feldman, Andrew B; Wobus, Christiane E; Weitz, David A

    2015-10-07

    A key viral property is infectivity, and its accurate measurement is crucial for the understanding of viral evolution, disease and treatment. Currently viral infectivity is measured using plaque assays, which involve prolonged culturing of host cells, and whose measurement is unable to differentiate between specific strains and is prone to low number fluctuation. We developed a rapid, targeted and culture-free infectivity assay using high-throughput drop-based microfluidics. Single infectious viruses are incubated in a large number of picoliter drops with host cells for one viral replication cycle followed by in-drop gene-specific amplification to detect infection events. Using murine noroviruses (MNV) as a model system, we measure their infectivity and determine the efficacy of a neutralizing antibody for different variants of MNV. Our results are comparable to traditional plaque-based assays and plaque reduction neutralization tests. However, the fast, low-cost, highly accurate genomic-based assay promises to be a superior method for drug screening and isolation of resistant viral strains. Moreover our technique can be adapted to measuring the infectivity of other pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi.

  17. Development of a high-throughput colorimetric Zika virus infection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Janis A; Harms, Mirja; Schubert, Axel; Mayer, Benjamin; Jansen, Stephanie; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe; Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas; Vapalahti, Olli; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Münch, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen that causes congenital infections which may result in birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently, no approved treatment or vaccination is available. ZIKV can be readily detected in cell culture where virally infected cells are normally stained by specific antibodies. As ZIKV regularly causes a cytopathic effect, we were wondering whether this viral property can be used to quantitatively determine viral infectivity. We here describe the use of an 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide-(MTT)-based cell viability assay that allows to determine ZIKV-induced cell death. We show that this colorimetric assay quantifies ZIKV infection over a broad range of viral dilutions in both monkey and human cells. It allows to determine inhibitory activities of antivirals that block ZIKV or to define the neutralizing antibody titers of ZIKV antisera. This MTT-based ZIKV detection assay can be evaluated by naked eye or computational tools, has a broad linear range, does not require large equipment or costly reagents, and thus represents a promising alternative to antibody-based assays, in particular in resource-poor settings. We propose to use this simple, fast, and cheap method for quantification of ZIKV neutralizing antibodies and testing of antiviral compounds.

  18. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  19. Expression of the Lassa virus nucleocapsid protein in insect cells infected with a recombinant baculovirus: application to diagnostic assays for Lassa virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, G N; Clegg, J C; Lloyd, G

    1990-01-01

    The coding region of the gene for the nucleocapsid protein of Lassa virus has been inserted into the genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) using the transfer vector pAcYM1, so that expression of the foreign DNA is under the control of the promoter of the AcNPV polyhedrin gene. Infection of cultured Spodoptera frugiperda cells with recombinant virus resulted in the synthesis of high levels of a protein that was indistinguishable from the authentic Lassa virus protein by SDS gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with a variety of specific immune sera and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The kinetics of appearance of the protein were comparable to those of polyhedrin production in wild-type AcNPV-infected cells. The recombinant material was antigenic when used in ELISA for Lassa virus-specific antibodies, reacting well with MAbs specific for the nucleocapsid protein and with sera from experimentally infected guinea-pigs. The recombinant ELISA was able to clearly distinguish sera from human cases of Lassa fever against a panel of known negative sera of African origin. Recombinant-infected insect cells were an effective substitute for mammalian cells infected with Lassa virus itself in the immunofluorescence assay for Lassa virus-specific antibodies. This system offers attractive alternatives to the use of Lassa virus-infected materials as reagents in diagnostic procedures.

  20. Characterization of the early events in dengue virus cell entry by biochemical assays and single-virus tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Waarts, Barry-Lee; van der Ende-Metselaarl, Heidi; Kuhn, Richard J.; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cell entry characteristics of dengue virus (DENV) type 2 strain SI on mosquito, BHK-15, and BS-C-1 cells. The concentration of virus particles measured by biochemical assays was found to be substantially higher than the number of infectious particles determined by

  1. Diagnosis of herpes simplex virus-1 keratitis using Giemsa stain, immunofluorescence assay, and polymerase chain reaction assay on corneal scrapings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhatullah, S; Kaza, S; Athmanathan, S; Garg, P; Reddy, S B; Sharma, S

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate three tests used routinely for the diagnosis of herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis. Methods: Corneal scrapings from 28 patients with clinically typical dendritic corneal ulcer suggestive of HSV keratitis, and 30 patients with clinically non-viral corneal ulcers, were tested by (i) Giemsa stain for multinucleated giant cells, (ii) immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for HSV-1 antigen, and (iii) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HSV-1 DNA, by investigators masked to clinical diagnosis. The control subjects were also investigated by smears and cultures for bacteria, fungus, and Acanthamoeba. Results: The specificity and positive predictive values of all three tests for the diagnosis of HSV keratitis were between 95–100%. The sensitivity of IFA and PCR was 78.6% and 81.2%, respectively, and the difference was not significant; however, their sensitivity and negative predictive value were significantly higher than Giemsa stain. Conclusions: While a combination of IFA and PCR constitute the choice of tests in clinically suspected cases of HSV keratitis, multinucleated giant cells in Giemsa stain can pre-empt testing by IFA and PCR in otherwise atypical cases of HSV keratitis. PMID:14693792

  2. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  3. Detection of Zika Virus in Desiccated Mosquitoes by Real-Time Reverse Transcription PCR and Plaque Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Harry M.

    2017-01-01

    We assayed Zika virus–infected mosquitoes stored at room temperature for <30 days for live virus by using plaque assay and virus RNA by using real-time reverse transcription PCR. Viable virus was detected in samples stored <10 days, and virus RNA was detected in samples held for 30 days. PMID:28075325

  4. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metzgar

    Full Text Available For more than four decades the cause of most type A influenza virus infections of humans has been attributed to only two viral subtypes, A/H1N1 or A/H3N2. In contrast, avian and other vertebrate species are a reservoir of type A influenza virus genome diversity, hosting strains representing at least 120 of 144 combinations of 16 viral hemagglutinin and 9 viral neuraminidase subtypes. Viral genome segment reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health and poultry production. Traditional methods to detect and differentiate influenza virus subtypes are either time-consuming and labor-intensive (culture-based or remarkably insensitive (antibody-based. Molecular diagnostic assays based upon reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR have short assay cycle time, and high analytical sensitivity and specificity. However, none of these diagnostic tests determine viral gene nucleotide sequences to distinguish strains and variants of a detected pathogen from one specimen to the next. Decision-quality, strain- and variant-specific pathogen gene sequence information may be critical for public health, infection control, surveillance, epidemiology, or medical/veterinary treatment planning. The Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM-Flu is a robust, highly multiplexed and target gene sequencing-based alternative to both traditional culture- or biomarker-based diagnostic tests. RPM-Flu is a single, simultaneous differential diagnostic assay for all subtype combinations of type A influenza viruses and for 30 other viral and bacterial pathogens that may cause influenza-like illness. These other pathogen targets of RPM-Flu may co-infect and compound the morbidity and/or mortality of patients with influenza. The informative specificity of a single RPM-Flu test represents specimen-specific viral gene sequences as determinants of virus type, A

  5. Flow Cytometry Sorting to Separate Viable Giant Viruses from Amoeba Co-culture Supernatants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Jacques Y. B.; Langlois, Thierry; Andreani, Julien; Sorraing, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier; Camoin, Laurence; La Scola, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometry has contributed to virology but has faced many drawbacks concerning detection limits, due to the small size of viral particles. Nonetheless, giant viruses changed many concepts in the world of viruses, as a result of their size and hence opened up the possibility of using flow cytometry to study them. Recently, we developed a high throughput isolation of viruses using flow cytometry and protozoa co-culture. Consequently, isolating a viral mixture in the same sample became more common. Nevertheless, when one virus multiplies faster than others in the mixture, it is impossible to obtain a pure culture of the minority population. Here, we describe a robust sorting system, which can separate viable giant virus mixtures from supernatants. We tested three flow cytometry sorters by sorting artificial mixtures. Purity control was assessed by electron microscopy and molecular biology. As proof of concept, we applied the sorting system to a co-culture supernatant taken from a sample containing a viral mixture that we couldn't separate using end point dilution. In addition to isolating the quick-growing Mimivirus, we sorted and re-cultured a new, slow-growing virus, which we named “Cedratvirus.” The sorting assay presented in this paper is a powerful and versatile tool for separating viral populations from amoeba co-cultures and adding value to the new field of flow virometry. PMID:28111619

  6. Development of a TaqMan assay for the six major genotypes of hepatitis C virus: Comparison with commercial assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engle, Ronald E; Russell, Rodney S; Purcell, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed that detects genomic RNA from reference strains representing the six major genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with equal sensitivity and accurately measured HCV RNA in JFH1 HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells. The method is indirectly calibrated to the first...

  7. Virus detection using Viro-Adembeads, a rapid capture system for viruses, and plaque assay in intentionally virus-contaminated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Ben; Kojima, Asato; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-01-01

    Intentional contamination of beverages with microbes is one type of bioterrorist threat. While bacteria and fungus can be easily collected by a centrifuge, viruses are difficult to collect from virus-contaminated beverages. In this study, we demonstrated that Viro-Adembeads, a rapid-capture system for viruses using anionic polymer-coated magnetic beads, collected viruses from beverages contaminated intentionally with vaccinia virus and human herpesvirus 8. Real-time PCR showed that the recovery rates of the contaminated viruses in green tea and orange juice were lower than those in milk and water. Plaque assay showed that green tea and orange juice cut the efficiency of vaccinia virus infection in CV-1 cells. These results suggest that the efficiency of virus detection depends on the kind of beverage being tested. Viro-Adembeads would be a useful tool for detecting viruses rapidly in virus-contaminated beverages used in a bioterrorist attack.

  8. An Improved Culture System for Virus Isolation and Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-chen XIA; Zhi-hong HU; Zhi-juan QIU; Zhong-bin MA; Hua-lin WANG; Fei DENG

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture plays an important role in virology. It provides a platform for the detection and isolation of viruses as well as for the biochemistry and molecular biology based studies of viruses. In the present work, a new system that could permits multiple (different) cell lines to be simultaneously cultured in one dish was developed. In the system, each cell line was cultured in an isolated zone in the same dish or well and the system is therefore called an isolated co-culture system. The usefulness of this novel approach for virus isolation was demonstrated using a model system based on adenovirus.

  9. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro assays as methods for measuring infectivity of tulane virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human noroviruses (HuNoV) are pathogens of significant concern, but as of current they cannot be cultured, which limits the ways in which they can be studied. Therefore, culturable viruses like feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV) and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates for Hu...

  10. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Alicia M Hanson; Shadrick, William R.; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L.; Hernandez, John J.; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Heck, Julie A.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Schoenen, Frank J.; Frick, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative. After comparing fluorescence polarization (FP), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®; Cisbio) and AlphaScreen® (Perkin Elmer) assays, an FP-based assay was chosen to screen Sigma’s Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) for c...

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus envelope-dependent cell-cell fusion: a quantitative fluorescence cytometric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Leonor; Lamoyi, Edmundo; Báez-Saldaña, Armida; Larralde, Carlos

    2002-02-01

    In vitro fusion of transfected cells expressing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope proteins gp120/gp41, with target cells expressing CD4, and a suitable chemokine coreceptor is used widely to investigate the mechanisms of molecular recognition and membrane fusion involved in the entry of the HIV genome into cells and in syncytia formation. We developed an assay that uses two different fluorescent lipophilic probes to single label each reacting cell population and flow cytometry to quantify the extent of cellular fusion after coculture. Fused cells are detected as double-fluorescent particles in this assay, therefore permitting measurement of their proportion in the total cell population. The time course and extent of HIV-glycoprotein-related cellular fusion, the optimal cell ratio, the size and cell composition of the fusion products, and the inhibition of fusion caused by soluble CD4 and anti-CXCR4 antibody 12G5 were determined. The assay was applied to measure fusion between gp120/gp41 and CD4-expressing cells growing as monolayers (HeLa/CHO fusion), as well as to suspension lymphocyte cultures (Jurkat/Jurkat fusion). The method's simple technical and minimal cell-invasive procedures, as well as its non-ambiguous automatic numerical quantification should be useful for the study of factors influencing cell-cell fusion. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent Assay for detecting of antibody to canine distemper virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarisman

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum neutralisation test (SNT has been established for evaluating canine distemper vaccination, but until now SNT was rarely used due to the need for continuous tissue culture facilities and requires 3 days to perform. For detecting antibody to canine distemper virus, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA is relatively simple and rapid seroassay. ELISA for canine immunoglobulin (Ig G antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV was developed by using Onderstepoort strain of canine distemper virus as coating antigen. Rabbit anti canine IgG labelled with horse radish peroxidase was used as the conjugate, while phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (OPD was used as the substrate. The ELISA results were then compared with the results of the SNT, using the sera of 312 random-source dogs from West Java. The two test-results had a high degree of correlation. Very few discrepancies occurred and most of these were at the lower limits of each test. When the sera were tested at 1 : 100 dilutions, there was a 95.5% agreement between the ELISA and SNT. Their sensitivity and spesificity were 83.9 and 98.4%. Titrated SNT and ELISA also were performed on sera from 7 dogs whose lifetime medical histories were known. The antibodies were inclining up after two months of post vaccination, where the titre was not in zero/lower position at the day of vaccination. However, antibody zero or low position were found at 28 days post vaccination. All of the results indicated that ELISA can be used for evaluating antibody to canine distemper virus response, replacing the SNT.

  13. ESwab challenges influenza virus propagation in cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Andersen, B; Rønn, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Although the ESwab kit (Copan, Brescia, Italy) is intended for sampling bacteria for culture, this kit is increasingly also used for virus sampling. The effect of ESwab medium on influenza virus detection by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or virus propagation...... in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell culture was investigated. The ESwab medium was suitable for viral RNA detection but not for viral propagation due to cytotoxicity. Sampling influenza viruses with ESwab challenges influenza surveillance by strongly limiting the possibility of antigenic...

  14. ESwab challenges influenza virus propagation in cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Andersen, B; Rønn, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell culture was investigated. The ESwab medium was suitable for viral RNA detection but not for viral propagation due to cytotoxicity. Sampling influenza viruses with ESwab challenges influenza surveillance by strongly limiting the possibility of antigenic......Although the ESwab kit (Copan, Brescia, Italy) is intended for sampling bacteria for culture, this kit is increasingly also used for virus sampling. The effect of ESwab medium on influenza virus detection by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or virus propagation...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  16. Development of a neutralization assay for influenza virus using an endpoint assessment based on quantitative reverse-transcription PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belete Teferedegne

    Full Text Available A microneutralization assay using an ELISA-based endpoint assessment (ELISA-MN is widely used to measure the serological response to influenza virus infection and vaccination. We have developed an alternative microneutralization assay for influenza virus using a quantitative reverse transcription PCR-based endpoint assessment (qPCR-MN in order to improve upon technical limitations associated with ELISA-MN. For qPCR-MN, infected MDCK-London cells in 96-well cell-culture plates are processed with minimal steps such that resulting samples are amenable to high-throughput analysis by downstream one-step quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR; SYBR Green chemistry with primers targeting a conserved region of the M1 gene of influenza A viruses. The growth curves of three recent vaccine strains demonstrated that the qRT-PCR signal detected at 6 hours post-infection reflected an amplification of at least 100-fold over input. Using ferret antisera, we have established the feasibility of measuring virus neutralization at 6 hours post-infection, a duration likely confined to a single virus-replication cycle. The neutralization titer for qPCR-MN was defined as the highest reciprocal serum dilution necessary to achieve a 90% inhibition of the qRT-PCR signal; this endpoint was found to be in agreement with ELISA-MN using the same critical reagents in each assay. qPCR-MN was robust with respect to assay duration (6 hours vs. 12 hours. In addition, qPCR-MN appeared to be compliant with the Percentage Law (i.e., virus neutralization results appear to be consistent over an input virus dose ranging from 500 to 12,000 TCID(50. Compared with ELISA-MN, qPCR-MN might have inherent properties conducive to reducing intra- and inter-laboratory variability while affording suitability for automation and high-throughput uses. Finally, our qRT-PCR-based approach may be broadly applicable to the development of neutralization assays for a wide variety of viruses.

  17. Establishment of recombinase polymerase amplification assay for five hemorrhagic fever-related viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-feng CAO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish a one-step recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA method for pathogen screening and rapid detection in the field targeting for five hemorrhagic fever related viruses (Zaire ebola virus, Sudan ebola virus, Marburg virus, Lassa virus and Yellow fever virus. Methods The specific nucleic acid (NA fragments of each virus were selected as target genes by genome sequence analysis, and the primers and probes for RPA assays were designed according to the sequence. A series of diluted template genes were used for RPA detection to determine the sensitivity. The hemorrhagic fever-related viral nucleic acids were used for RPA detection to determine the specificity. The amplification experiments were carried out at different temperature ranging from 37℃ to 42℃ to validate the reaction temperature range. Results The RPA reaction systems of the five hemorrhagic fever viruses could effectively amplify the target genes, the sensitivities were between 1.5×102 and 1.5×103 copies. No cross reactions existed with the other hemorrhagic fever-related viral genes. Meanwhile, RPA assay could effectively amplify the target genes at 37-42℃. Conclusion The isothermal RPA assays of five hemorrhagic fever viruses are established, which may amply target genes fast and react at a wide temperature range, and be potentially useful for in field pathogens detection. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.06.09

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Epstein-Barr Virus Load by Using a Real-Time PCR Assay

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    To measure the virus load in patients with symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections, we used a real-time PCR assay to quantify the amount of EBV DNA in blood. The real-time PCR assay could detect from 2 to over 107 copies of EBV DNA with a wide linear range. We estimated the virus load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) from patients with symptomatic EBV infections. The mean EBV-DNA copy number in the PBMNC was 103.7 copies/μg of DNA in patients with EBV-related lymphoprolif...

  19. Modification of AxSYM Human Immunodeficiency Virus Assay to Identify Recent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Korean Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Individuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Jin-Sook; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon

    2015-01-01

    To estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence using HIV avidity assays in Korea, we established a serological testing method to differentiate recent HIV infections from long-standing ones...

  20. Development and evaluation of a simple assay for Marburg virus detection using a reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaki, Yohei; Grolla, Allen; Fukuma, Aiko; Feldmann, Heinz; Yasuda, Jiro

    2010-07-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans with a high mortality rate. The rapid and accurate identification of the virus is required to appropriately provide infection control and outbreak management. Here, we developed and evaluated a one-step reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for the rapid and simple detection of MARV. By combining two sets of primers specific for the Musoke and Ravn genetic lineages, a multiple RT-LAMP assay detected MARV strains of both lineages, and no cross-reactivity with other hemorrhagic fever viruses (Ebola virus and Lassa virus) was observed. The assay could detect 10(2) copies of the viral RNA per tube within 40 min by real-time monitoring of the turbidities of the reaction mixtures. The assay was further evaluated using viral RNA extracted from clinical specimens collected in the 2005 Marburg hemorrhagic fever outbreak in Angola and yielded positive results for samples containing MARV at greater than 10(4) 50% tissue culture infective doses/ml, exhibiting 78% (14 of 18 samples positive) consistency with the results of a reverse transcription-PCR assay carried out in the field laboratory. The results obtained by both agarose gel electrophoresis and naked-eye judgment indicated that the RT-LAMP assay developed in this study is an effective tool for the molecular detection of MARV. Furthermore, it seems suitable for use for field diagnostics or in laboratories in areas where MARV is endemic.

  1. Development of an improved RT-LAMP assay for detection of currently circulating rubella viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, H; Okamoto, K; Anraku, M; Otsuki, N; Sakata, M; Icenogle, J; Zheng, Q; Kurata, T; Kase, T; Komase, K; Takeda, M; Mori, Y

    2014-10-01

    Rubella virus is the causative agent of rubella. The symptoms are usually mild, and characterized by a maculopapular rash and fever. However, rubella infection in pregnant women sometimes can result in the birth of infants with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Global efforts have been made to reduce and eliminate CRS. Although a reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for detection of rubella virus has been reported, the primers contained several mismatched nucleotides with the genomes of currently circulating rubella virus strains. In the present study, a new RT-LAMP assay was established. The detection limit of this assay was 100-1000PFU/reaction of viruses for all rubella genotypes, except for genotype 2C, which is not commonly found in the current era. Therefore, the new RT-LAMP assay can successfully detect all current rubella virus genotypes, and does not require sophisticated devices like TaqMan real-time PCR systems. This assay should be a useful assay for laboratory diagnosis of rubella and CRS.

  2. Detection of Lassa virus antigens and Lassa virus-specific immunoglobulins G and M by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Niklasson, B S; Jahrling, P B; Peters, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis of Lassa fever is desirable for the timely therapeutic intervention and implementation of strict quarantine procedures both in West Africa field hospitals where the disease is endemic and at international crossroads. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure Lassa virus antigens in viremic sera was developed in which experimentally infected monkeys were used as a model for the human disease. In this test, Lassa virus antigens in test sera were captured in wells o...

  3. Prevalence of antibodies to type A influenza virus in wild avian species using two serologic assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin D.; Luttrell, M. Page; Berghaus, Roy D.; Kistler, Whitney; Keeler, Shamus P.; Howey, Andrea; Wilcox, Benjamin; Hall, Jeffrey; Niles, Larry; Dey, Amanda; Knutsen, Gregory; Fritz, Kristen; Stallknecht, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Serologic testing to detect antibodies to avian influenza (AI) virus has been an underused tool for the study of these viruses in wild bird populations, which traditionally has relied on virus isolation and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In a preliminary study, a recently developed commercial blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) had sensitivity and specificity estimates of 82% and 100%, respectively, for detection of antibodies to AI virus in multiple wild bird species after experimental infection. To further evaluate the efficacy of this commercial bELISA and the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for AI virus antibody detection in wild birds, we tested 2,249 serum samples collected from 62 wild bird species, representing 10 taxonomic orders. Overall, the bELISA detected 25.4% positive samples, whereas the AGID test detected 14.8%. At the species level, the bELISA detected as many or more positive serum samples than the AGID in all 62 avian species. The majority of positive samples, detected by both assays, were from species that use aquatic habitats, with the highest prevalence from species in the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes. Conversely, antibodies to AI virus were rarely detected in the terrestrial species. The serologic data yielded by both assays are consistent with the known epidemiology of AI virus in wild birds and published reports of host range based on virus isolation and RT-PCR. The results of this research are also consistent with the aforementioned study, which evaluated the performance of the bELISA and AGID test on experimental samples. Collectively, the data from these two studies indicate that the bELISA is a more sensitive serologic assay than the AGID test for detecting prior exposure to AI virus in wild birds. Based on these results, the bELISA is a reliable species-independent assay with potentially valuable applications for wild bird AI surveillance.

  4. Prevalence of antibodies to type A influenza virus in wild avian species using two serologic assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin D.; Luttrell, M. Page; Berghaus, Roy D.; Kistler, Whitney; Keeler, Shamus P.; Howey, Andrea; Wilcox, Benjamin; Hall, Jeffrey; Niles, Larry; Dey, Amanda; Knutsen, Gregory; Fritz, Kristen; Stallknecht, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Serologic testing to detect antibodies to avian influenza (AI) virus has been an underused tool for the study of these viruses in wild bird populations, which traditionally has relied on virus isolation and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In a preliminary study, a recently developed commercial blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) had sensitivity and specificity estimates of 82% and 100%, respectively, for detection of antibodies to AI virus in multiple wild bird species after experimental infection. To further evaluate the efficacy of this commercial bELISA and the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for AI virus antibody detection in wild birds, we tested 2,249 serum samples collected from 62 wild bird species, representing 10 taxonomic orders. Overall, the bELISA detected 25.4% positive samples, whereas the AGID test detected 14.8%. At the species level, the bELISA detected as many or more positive serum samples than the AGID in all 62 avian species. The majority of positive samples, detected by both assays, were from species that use aquatic habitats, with the highest prevalence from species in the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes. Conversely, antibodies to AI virus were rarely detected in the terrestrial species. The serologic data yielded by both assays are consistent with the known epidemiology of AI virus in wild birds and published reports of host range based on virus isolation and RT-PCR. The results of this research are also consistent with the aforementioned study, which evaluated the performance of the bELISA and AGID test on experimental samples. Collectively, the data from these two studies indicate that the bELISA is a more sensitive serologic assay than the AGID test for detecting prior exposure to AI virus in wild birds. Based on these results, the bELISA is a reliable species-independent assay with potentially valuable applications for wild bird AI surveillance.

  5. Establishment of realtime RT-PCR assay to detect polio virus in the Acute Flaccid Paralysis laboratory surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nike Susanti

    2016-07-01

    Polio Vaccine into Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus still continue. Since 1991, WHO has developedAcute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP laboratory based surveillance. In 2014, the polioviruses identification by real-timeReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (rRT-PCR, has been introduced to National Polio Laboratory(NPL Center for Biomedical and Basic Technology of Health. The objective of the rRT-PCR application is to havefaster and better diagnostic methods to monitor the circulation and mutation of polio viruses.Methods: Isolate tested by rRT-PCR using a combination of primers and probe mentioned by WHO manual.The viral RNA is converted to cDNA using reverse transcriptase and amplified in a PCR reaction using Taqpolymerase. The PCR products are detected and identified by hybridization with specific probes. The combinationof primers and probes will result in the serotype identification and intratypic differentiation of poliovirus isolates.Results: In 2014 NPL Jakarta received 604 AFP cases through the surveillance system, five cases foundpositive for polio viruses by culture. All of the specimens were positive for polio vaccine viruses. Twocases were polio virus type P2 (40%, one cases polio virus type P1 (20%, 1 case polio virus type P3(20% and one case mix polio viruses type P1+P2 (20%.Conclusion: The real-time PCR assay was able to help the identification of polio viruses rapidly in Jakartalab. The test can be utilized for monitoring the population routinely immunized with OPV. (Health ScienceJournal of Indonesia 2016;7:27-31Keywords: ITD, Poliovirus, Identification, rRT-PCR

  6. [Cytomegalovirus isolation by conventional cell culture and shell vial assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano, M C; Videla, C M; Sánchez Puch, S; Carballal, G

    2001-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) active infection is of utmost importance for the initiation, monitoring and ending of antiviral therapy. Therefore, the presence of viral replication should be demonstrated. Isolation in tissue culture is one of the standard methods. The objective of the present paper was to compare two isolation procedures for CMV: conventional cell culture (CC) and rapid shell vial (SV) assay in human fibroblasts. A total of 584 clinical samples were studied between 1991 and 1998. CMV was isolated in 14.4% of the samples, 11.8% of which were positive by SV and 7.7% by CC. Out of 84 positive samples, concordance between both methods was observed in 36% of the cases. We found that 46% of the samples were positive only by SV, while 18% were positive only by CC. The average time required for obtaining the results by CC was 22.6 +/- 2.3 days. Out of the 69 samples positive by SV, 43% were already positive after 24 hours and the rest after 48 hours. These results indicate that SV was more sensitive and rapid than CC. The main advantage of CC, despite its time-consuming process, is the ability to recover the viral strain for both antiviral susceptibility phenotypical tests and strain characterization. Furthermore, in this study, absence of CC would have resulted in the loss of 18% of the positive diagnoses. In conclusion, simultaneous use of both methods is suggested in order to obtain a rapid result and the highest sensitivity.

  7. Development of a multiplex reverse transcription-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of garlic viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xin-xi; LEI Yan; WANG Pei; TANG Lin-fei; HE Chang-zheng; SONG Yong; XIONG Xing-yao; NIE Xian-zhou

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary screening for garlic viruses in garlic plants in Hunan, China, using existing monoplex (simplex) reverse tran-scription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) procedures detected four viruses/virus groups. These viruses/virus groups were Onion yel ow dwarf virus (OYDV), Leek yel ow stripe virus (LYSV), Shal ot latent virus (SLV) and al exiviruses (e.g., garlic viruses A, B, C, D, E, X). Sequence analysis of the projected al exivirus amplicons revealed the al exivirus in the infected garlic plants was Garlic virus D (GarV-D), which shared 92–97%sequence identities with various isolates from the world. A multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR) was therefore developed to simultaneously detect and differentiate the four viruses/virus groups. To achieve this, four primer pairs targeting al exiviruses, OYDV, LYSV and SLV were designed. The anticipated amplicon sizes are 183 bp (al exiviruses), 265 bp (OYDV), 404 bp (LYSV) and 592 bp (SLV), respectively. Al primer pairs produced virus-speciifc fragments in both simplex and multiplex formats, thus conifrming the efifcacy of the newly developed mRT-PCR for detection of these viruses. The mRT-PCR further was evaluated by applying it to garlic plant samples col ected in two geographic locations in Hunan. Al exiviruses, OYDV, LYSV and SLV were detected in 50.9, 40.3, 28.3 and 58.5%of leaf samples, respectively;and mixed infections with two or more viruses accounted for 54%of the garlic samples. The results obtained by mRT-PCR were conifrmed by simplex RT-PCR assays. In conclusion, this newly devel-oped mRT-PCR provides a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for the detection and identiifcation of major garlic viruses.

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of contagious ecthyma: comparison of different PCR protocols with virus isolation in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottaridi, Christine; Nomikou, Kiki; Lelli, Rossella; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Mangana, Olga

    2006-06-01

    A new polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid diagnosis of contagious ecthyma was designed and applied to 21 clinical samples from Greece. This assay, which detects a highly conserved gene from the parapox genome, was evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity in order to be considered as a useful diagnostic tool. A comparative study with two published PCR protocols one using primers PPP1-PPP3, PPP1-PPP4 which targets putative virion envelope gene B2L and the other using VIR1-VIR2 primers which amplifies ORF virus interferon resistant (VIR) gene, as well as cell culture virus neutralization assay was carried out. All samples tested were amplified successfully with the PCR protocol established in the laboratory. The combination of primers PPP1-PPP3 and PPP1-PPP4 in a semi-nested PCR gave a positive result in 20 of 21 samples while primers VIR1-VIR2 failed to amplify successfully 7 of 21 samples. The diagnostic value of parapox viral DNA amplification was also compared with the results of virus isolation by cell culture and was positive in three samples that the virus isolation was obtained.

  9. Comparison of a modified shell vial culture procedure with conventional mouse inoculation for rabies virus isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de los Angeles Ribas Antúnez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a neurotropic disease that is often lethal. The early diagnosis of rabies infection is important and requires methods that allow for the isolation of the virus from animals and humans. The present study compared a modified shell vial (MSV procedure using 24-well tissue culture plates with the mouse inoculation test (MIT, which is considered the gold standard for rabies virus isolation. Thirty brain samples (25 positive and 5 negative by the fluorescent antibody test obtained from different animal species at the National Institute of Hygiene Rafael Rangel in Caracas, Venezuela, were studied by the MIT and MSV assays. Nine samples (36% were positive at 24 h, 10 (40% were positive at 48 h and six (24% were positive at 72 h by the MSV assay. With the MIT assay, 76% were positive at six days post inoculation and 12% were positive at 12 and 18 days post inoculation. One sample that was negative according to the MSV assay was positive with MIT on the 12th day. The MSV procedure exhibited a sensitivity of 96.2%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value 80%. This procedure allowed for rapid rabies virus detection. MIT can be employed as an alternative method in laboratories without tissue culture facilities.

  10. Viral glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion assays using vaccinia virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Katharine N; Broder, Christopher C

    2004-01-01

    The vaccinia virus-based expression of viral envelope glycoprotein genes-derived from enveloped viruses that infect their respective host cells through a pH-independent mechanism of membrane fusion-has been a powerful tool in helping to characterize these important attachment and fusion proteins. The cellular expression of these viral envelope glycoproteins has allowed for the measurement of membrane fusion events using cell-cell fusion or syncytia formation. This method has been enhanced by the addition of a reporter-gene system to the vaccinia virus-based cell-cell fusion assay. This improvement has provided a high-throughput and quantitative aspect to this assay, which can serve as a surrogate for virus entry and is therefore ideally suited in the characterization of numerous enveloped viruses, including biological safety level-4 (BSL-4) agents. This chapter will detail the methods of the vaccinia virus-based reporter-gene fusion assay and how it may be used to characterize the fusion mediated by the BSL-4-classified Hendra and Nipah viruses.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  13. Early diagnosis of influenza virus a using surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based lateral flow assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Ji; Choo, Jae Bum [Dept. of Bionano Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sung Chul [School of Architectural Engineering, Hongik University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We report a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based lateral flow assay (LFA) kit for the rapid diagnosis of influenza virus A. Influenza virus A is highly infectious and causes acute respiratory diseases. Therefore, it is important to diagnose the virus early to prevent a pandemic and to provide appropriate treatment to the patient and vaccination of high-risk individuals. Conventional diagnostic tests, including virus cell culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction, take longer than 1 day to confirm the disease. In contrast, a commercially available rapid influenza diagnostic test can detect the infection within 30 min, but it is hard to confirm viral infection using only this test because of its low sensitivity. Therefore, the development of a rapid and simple test for the early diagnosis of influenza infection is urgently needed. To resolve these problems, we developed a SERS-based LFA kit in which the gold nanoparticles in the commercial rapid kit were replaced with SERS-active nano tags. It is possible to quantitatively detect the influenza virus A with high sensitivity by measuring the enhanced Raman signal of these SERS nano tags on the LFA strip. The limit of detection (LOD) using our proposed SERS-based LFA kit was estimated to be 1.9 × 10{sup 4} PFU/mL, which is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than the LOD determined from the colorimetric LFA kit.

  14. A sensitive in vitro assay for the detection of residual viable rabies virus in inactivated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Hitomi; Kakiuchi, Satsuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Saijo, Masayuki; Lim, Chang-Kweng

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is a viral disease transmitted through bites from rabid animals and can be prevented by vaccines. Clinically used rabies vaccines are prepared from inactivated rabies viruses grown in cell cultures or embryonated eggs. In Japan and across the world, tests that confirm complete inactivation, such as the in vivo suckling mouse assay, in which suckling mice are intracerebrally inoculated with vaccine products, are required for quality control. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based immunofluorescence assay that does not require mice for testing rabies vaccine inactivation for human use. The sensitivity of this cell-based in vitro assay was 5.7 times that of the in vivo suckling mouse assay, with a detection limit of one focus forming units per ml of test sample. This newly developed in vitro assay may replace the established in vivo suckling mouse assay for confirming viral vaccine inactivation. Copyright © 2013 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a high-throughput replicon assay for the identification of respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong-Yip, Choi-Lai; Plant, Helen; Sharpe, Paul; Fan, Jun; Rich, Kirsty; Gorseth, Elise; Yu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) drug discovery has been hindered by the lack of good chemistry starting points and would benefit from robust and convenient assays for high-throughput screening (HTS). In this paper, we present the development and optimization of a 384-well RSV replicon assay that enabled HTS for RSV replication inhibitors with a low bio-containment requirement. The established replicon assay was successfully implemented for high-throughput screening. A validation screen was performed which demonstrated high assay performance and reproducibility. Assay quality was further confirmed via demonstration of appropriate pharmacology for different classes of RSV replication tool inhibitors. RSV replicon and cytotoxicity assays were further developed into a multiplexed format that measured both inhibition of viral replication and cytotoxicity from the same well. This provided a time and cost efficient approach to support lead optimization. In summary, we have developed a robust RSV replicon assay to help expedite the discovery of novel RSV therapeutics.

  16. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile.

  17. Fibre Optic Biosensor Assay of Newcastle Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    A fluorometric sandwich immunoassay for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was developed using a fibre optic biosensor. Antibodies directed against NDV...and low baseline variation. These and other properties of the fibre optic biosensor indicate that it has the potential to serve as an on-line...continuous monitoring device of an automated or semiautomated detection system. As a part of the fibre optic biosensor development, the surface coverage of

  18. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Díaz-Badillo; María de Lourdes Muñoz; Gerardo Perez-Ramirez; Victor Altuzar; Juan Burgueño; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Alejandro Cisneros; Joel Navarrete-Espinosa; Feliciano Sanchez-Sinencio

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybrid...

  19. Screening for Recombinant Avian Leukosis Viruses in Cell Cultures Inoculated with Various Subgroups of Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) prepared from ADOL SPF embryos were co-infected with different concentration ratios of subgroups A, J and E avian leukosis virus (ALV). Inoculated cultures were screened for recombination among the ALV strains. Potential recombinant viruses were purified by limiting...

  20. Development of a two-step SYBR Green I based real time RT-PCR assay for detecting and quantifying peste des petits ruminants virus in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, Tsegalem; Thangavelu, Ardhanary

    2014-12-01

    A two-step SYBR Green I based real time RT-PCR targeting the matrix (M) gene of Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) was developed. The specificity of the assay was assessed against viral nucleic acid extracted from a range of animal viruses of clinical and structural similarities to PPRV including canine distemper virus, measles virus, bluetongue virus and Newcastle disease virus. But none of the viruses and no template control showed an amplification signal. Sensitivity of the same assay was assessed based on plasmid DNA copy number and with respect to infectivity titre. The lower detection limit achieved was 2.88 plasmid DNA copies/μl with corresponding Ct value of 35.93. Based on tissue culture infectivity titre the lower detection limits were 0.0001TCID50/ml and 1TCID50/ml for the SYBR green I based real time RT-PCR and conventional RT-PCR, respectively. The calculated coefficient of variations values for intra- and inter-assay variability were low, ranging from 0.21% to 1.83% and 0.44% to 1.97%, respectively. The performance of newly developed assay was evaluated on a total of 36 clinical samples suspected of PPR and compared with conventional RT-PCR. The SYBR Green I based real time RT-PCR assay detected PPRV in 32 (88.8%) of clinical samples compared to 19 (52.7%) by conventional RT-PCR. Thus, the two-step SYBR Green I based real time RT-PCR assay targeting the M gene of PPRV reported in this study was highly sensitive, specific and reproducible for detection and quantitation of PPRV nucleic acids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of an improved microneutralization assay for respiratory syncytial virus by automated plaque counting using imaging analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiroz Jorge

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children. Although several experimental RSV vaccines are under investigation, immuno therapy is the only treatment currently available. In assessing the immunogenicity of various vaccine formulations, a plaque reduction neutralization assay for the evaluation of RSV neutralizing antibody has been widely used. The method produces reliable results, but it is tedious and labor intensive as it relies on manual counting by laboratory personnel. To facilitate evaluation of phase II and phase III vaccine clinical trials, a more rapid, reliable and efficient neutralization assay is needed. Results An improved microneutralization assay for quantifying RSV neutralizing antibodies was developed using an ImmunoSpot® Series I Analyzer (Cellular Technology Ltd., Cleveland, OH for automated plaque counting. The method is an improvement of the established classical microneutralization assay in which immunostained plaques on transparent tissue culture plates are counted manually under a dissecting microscope. Image analyzer technology allows for fully automated counting of plaques distributed throughout an entire well. Adjustments, such as the use of opaque tissue culture plates and the TMB substrate, True Blue™ (KPL, Gaithersburg, MD, were required to adapt the assay for optimal detection of plaques by the image analyzer. The suitability and the accuracy of the method for counting RSV plaques were determined by comparative testing of a reference serum and two control sera by manual and automated counting methods. The results showed that the two methods were highly correlated (R = 0.9580 and the titers generated by them were within two-fold. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the semi-automated assay is rapid and reliable. It provides results within two fold to the classical plaque microneutralization assay and is readily

  2. The Molecular Bacterial Load Assay Replaces Solid Culture for Measuring Early Bactericidal Response to Antituberculosis Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtafya, Bariki; Phillips, Patrick P. J.; Hoelscher, Michael; Ntinginya, Elias N.; Kohlenberg, Anke; Rachow, Andrea; Rojas-Ponce, Gabriel; McHugh, Timothy D.; Heinrich, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the use of the molecular bacterial load (MBL) assay, for measuring viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum, in comparison with solid agar and liquid culture. The MBL assay provides early information on the rate of decline in bacterial load and has technical advantages over culture in either form. PMID:24871215

  3. Use of sensitive, broad-spectrum molecular assays and human airway epithelium cultures for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Pyrc

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate detection and identification of viruses causing respiratory tract infections is important for patient care and disease control. Despite the fact that several assays are available, identification of an etiological agent is not possible in ~30% of patients suffering from respiratory tract diseases. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to develop a diagnostic set for the detection of respiratory viruses with sensitivity as low as 1-10 copies per reaction. Evaluation of the assay using a training clinical sample set showed that viral nucleic acids were identified in ~76% of cases. To improve assay performance and facilitate the identification of novel species or emerging strains, cultures of fully differentiated human airway epithelium were used to pre-amplify infectious viruses. This additional step resulted in the detection of pathogens in all samples tested. Based on these results it can be hypothesized that the lack of an etiological agent in some clinical samples, both reported previously and observed in the present study, may result not only from the presence of unknown viral species, but also from imperfections in the detection methods used.

  4. Use of Sensitive, Broad-Spectrum Molecular Assays and Human Airway Epithelium Cultures for Detection of Respiratory Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Krzysztof; Gawron, Katarzyna; Zeglen, Slawomir; Karolak, Wojciech; Wojarski, Jacek; Ochman, Marek; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Bochenek, Grazyna; Sanak, Marek; Zembala, Marian; Szczeklik, Andrzej; Potempa, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection and identification of viruses causing respiratory tract infections is important for patient care and disease control. Despite the fact that several assays are available, identification of an etiological agent is not possible in ∼30% of patients suffering from respiratory tract diseases. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to develop a diagnostic set for the detection of respiratory viruses with sensitivity as low as 1–10 copies per reaction. Evaluation of the assay using a training clinical sample set showed that viral nucleic acids were identified in ∼76% of cases. To improve assay performance and facilitate the identification of novel species or emerging strains, cultures of fully differentiated human airway epithelium were used to pre-amplify infectious viruses. This additional step resulted in the detection of pathogens in all samples tested. Based on these results it can be hypothesized that the lack of an etiological agent in some clinical samples, both reported previously and observed in the present study, may result not only from the presence of unknown viral species, but also from imperfections in the detection methods used. PMID:22403676

  5. A Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Detection and Quantification of Epizootic Epitheliotropic Disease Virus (EEDV; Salmonid Herpesvirus 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenney, Gavin W; Barbash, Patricia A; Coll, John A

    2016-03-01

    Epizootic epitheliotropic disease virus (EEDV; salmonid herpesvirus [SalHV3]; family Alloherpesviridae) causes a systemic disease of juvenile and yearling Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush. No cell lines are currently available for the culture and propagation of EEDV, so primary diagnosis is limited to PCR and electron microscopy. To better understand the pervasiveness of EEDV (carrier or latent state of infection) in domesticated and wild Lake Trout populations, we developed a sensitive TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to detect the presence of the EEDV terminase gene in Lake Trout tissues. This assay was able to detect a linear standard curve over nine logs of plasmid dilution and was sensitive enough to detect single-digit copies of EEDV. The efficiency of the PCR assay was 99.4 ± 0.06% (mean ± SD), with a 95% confidence limit of 0.0296 (R(2) = 0.994). Methods were successfully applied to collect preliminary data from a number of species and water bodies in the states of Pennsylvania, New York, and Vermont, indicating that EEDV is more common in wild fish than previously known. In addition, through the development of this qPCR assay, we detected EEDV in a new salmonid species, the Cisco Coregonus artedi. The qPCR assay was unexpectedly able to detect two additional herpesviruses, the Atlantic Salmon papillomatosis virus (ASPV; SalHV4) and the Namaycush herpesvirus (NamHV; SalHV5), which both share high sequence identity with the EEDV terminase gene. With these unexpected findings, we subsequently designed three primer sets to confirm initial TaqMan qPCR assay positives and to differentiate among EEDV, ASPV, and NamHV by detecting the glycoprotein genes via SYBR Green qPCR. Received April 20, 2015; accepted November 10, 2015.

  6. Comparison of three multiplex PCR assays for the detection of respiratory viral infections: evaluation of xTAG respiratory virus panel fast assay, RespiFinder 19 assay and RespiFinder SMART 22 assay

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    Dabisch-Ruthe Mareike

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A broad spectrum of pathogens is causative for respiratory tract infections, but symptoms are mostly similar. Therefore, the identification of the causative viruses and bacteria is only feasible using multiplex PCR or several monoplex PCR tests in parallel. Methods The analytical sensitivity of three multiplex PCR assays, RespiFinder-19, RespiFinder-SMART-22 and xTAG-Respiratory-Virus-Panel-Fast-Assay (RVP, were compared to monoplex real-time PCR with quantified standardized control material. All assays include the most common respiratory pathogens. Results To compare the analytical sensitivity of the multiplex assays, samples were inoculated with 13 different quantified viruses in the range of 101 to 105 copies/ml. Concordant results were received for rhinovirus, whereas the RVP detected influenzavirus, RSV and hMPV more frequently in low concentrations. The RespiFinder-19 and the RespiFinder-SMART-22 showed a higher analytical sensitivity for adenoviruses and coronaviruses, whereas the RVP was incapable to detect adenovirus and coronavirus in concentrations of 104 copies/ml. The RespiFinder-19 and RespiFinder-SMART-22A did not detect influenzaviruses (104 copies/ml and RSV (103 copies/ml. The detection of all 13 viruses in one sample was only achieved using monoplex PCR. To analyze possible competitive amplification reactions between the different viruses, samples were further inoculated with only 4 different viruses in one sample. Compared to the detection of 13 viruses in parallel, only a few differences were found. The incidence of respiratory viruses was compared in tracheal secretion (TS samples (n = 100 of mechanically ventilated patients in winter (n = 50 and summer (n = 50. In winter, respiratory viruses were detected in 32 TS samples (64% by RespiFinder-19, whereas the detection rate with RVP was only 22%. The most frequent viruses were adenovirus (32% and PIV-2 (20%. Multiple infections were detected

  7. Development and validation of a Myxoma virus real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Sarah; Sigrist, Brigitte; Güttinger, Regula; Schelling, Claude; Hoop, Richard K; Vögtlin, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the rapid diagnosis of myxomatosis in rabbits, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific detection of Myxoma virus is described. Primers and probe were designed to amplify a 147-bp fragment within the Serp2 gene. The assay was able to detect 23 copies of a synthesized oligo indicating a reliable sensitivity. In addition, the real-time PCR did not detect the Rabbit fibroma virus used in myxomatosis vaccines. The novel PCR was shown to be able to detect Myxoma virus in fresh and paraffin-embedded rabbit tissues originating from myxomatosis cases from various regions in Switzerland.

  8. Development and validation of a Myxoma virus real-time polymerase chain reaction assay

    OpenAIRE

    Albini, S; Sigrist, B; Guttinger, R; Schelling, C; Hoop, R K; Vogtlin, A

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the rapid diagnosis of myxomatosis in rabbits, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific detection of Myxoma virus is described. Primers and probe were designed to amplify a 147-bp fragment within the Serp2 gene. The assay was able to detect 23 copies of a synthesized oligo indicating a reliable sensitivity. In addition, the real-time PCR did not detect the Rabbit fibroma virus used in myxomatosis vaccines. The novel PCR was shown to be able to detect Myxoma virus...

  9. Virus Elimination from Ornamental Plants Using in vitro Culture Techniques

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    Snežana Milošević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are responsible for numerous epidemics in different crops in all parts of the world.As a consequence of their presence great economic losses are being incurred. In addition tothe development of sensitive techniques for detection, identification and characterization ofviruses, substantial attention has also been paid to biotechnological methods for their eliminationfrom plants. In this review article, the following biotechnological in vitro culture techniquesfor virus elimination from ornamental plants are presented: meristem culture, thermotherapy,chemotherapy, cryotherapy or a combination of these methods. The plant species,as well as the type of virus determine the choice of a most suitable method. The state ofthe art in investigation of virus elimination from Impatiens sp. in Serbia is summarized.

  10. The development of a GeXP-based multiplex reverse transcription-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of sixteen human respiratory virus types/subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing standard non-molecular diagnostic methods such as viral culture and immunofluorescent (DFA are time-consuming, labor intensive or limited sensitivity. Several multiplex molecular assays are costly. Therefore, there is a need for the development of a rapid and sensitive diagnosis of respiratory viral pathogens. Methods A GeXP-based multiplex RT-PCR assay (GeXP assay was developed to detect simultaneously sixteen different respiratory virus types/subtypes. Seventeen sets of chimeric primers were used to initiate the RT-PCR, and one pair of universal primers was used for the subsequent cycles of the RT-PCR. The specificity of the GeXP assay was examined with positive controls for each virus type/subtype. The sensitivity was evaluated by performing the assay on serial ten-fold dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA of all RNA viruses and the plasmids containing the Adv and HBoV target sequence. GeXP assay was further evaluated using 126 clinical specimens and compared with Luminex xTAG RVP Fast assay. Results The GeXP assay achieved a sensitivity of 20–200 copies for a single virus and 1000 copies when all of the 16 pre-mixed viral targets were present. Analyses of 126 clinical specimens using the GeXP assay demonstrated that GeXP assay and the RVP Fast assay were in complete agreement for 109/126 (88.51% of the specimens. GeXP assay was more sensitive than the RVP Fast assay for the detection of HRV and PIV3, and slightly less sensitive for the detection of HMPV, Adv, RSVB and HBoV. The whole process of the GeXP assay for the detection of 12 samples was completed within 2.5 hours. Conclusions In conclusion, the GeXP assay is a rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, specific and high throughput method for the detection of respiratory virus infections.

  11. A novel pyrosequencing assay for the detection of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance-conferring mutations among clinical isolates of avian H7N9 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuhua; Fan, Huan; Qi, Xian; Zhu, Zheng; Guo, Xiling; Chen, Yin; Ge, Yiyue; Zhao, Kangchen; Wu, Tao; Li, Yan; Shan, Yunfeng; Zhou, Minghao; Shi, Zhiyang; Wang, Hua; Cui, Lunbiao

    2014-01-22

    A novel reassortant avian influenza A virus (H7N9) emerged in humans in Eastern China in late February 2013. All virus strains were resistant to adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine), but susceptible to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) (oseltamivir and zanamivir). One strain (A/shanghai/1/2013) contained the R294K substitution in the neuraminidase (NA) gene, indicating resistance to oseltamivir. Pyrosequencing has proven to be a useful tool in the surveillance of drug resistance in influenza A viruses. Here, we describe a reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay coupled with pyrosequencing to identify the NA residues E120, H276, and R294 (N9 numbering) of H7N9 viruses. A total of 43 specimens (26 clinical samples and 17 isolates) were tested. Only one isolate containing the E120V heterogenic mutation was detected by pyrosequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. However, this mutation was not detected in the original clinical specimen. Since virus isolation might lead to the selection of variants that might not fully represent the virus population in the clinical specimens, we suggest that using pyrosequencing to detect NAI resistance in H7N9 viruses directly from clinical specimens rather than from cultured isolates. No cross-reactions with other types of influenza virus and respiratory tract viruses were found, and this assay has a sensitivity of 100 copies of synthetic RNA for all three codons. The high sensitivity and specificity of the assay should be sufficient for the detection of positive clinical specimens. In this study, we provide a rapid and reliable method for the characterization of NAI resistance in H7N9 viruses.

  12. Pressure-driven microfluidic perfusion culture device for integrated dose-response assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based assays are widely used in the various stages of drug discovery. Advances in microfluidic systems over the past two decades have enabled them to become a powerful tool for cell-based assays to achieve both reliability and high throughput. The interface between the micro-world and macro-world is important in industrial assay processes. Therefore, microfluidic cell-based assays using pressure-driven liquid handling are an ideal platform for integrated assays. The aim of this article is to review recent advancements in microfluidic cell-based assays focusing on a pressure-driven perfusion culture device. Here, we review the development of microfluidic cell-based assay devices and discuss the techniques involved in designing a microfluidic network, device fabrication, liquid and cell manipulation, and detection schemes for pressure-driven perfusion culture devices. Finally, we describe recent progress in semiautomatic and reliable pressure-driven microfluidic cell-based assays.

  13. Development of conventional and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to detect Tembusu virus in Culex tarsalis mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petz, Lawrence N; Turell, Michael J; Padilla, Susana; Long, Lewis S; Reinbold-Wasson, Drew D; Smith, Darci R; O'Guinn, Monica L; Melanson, Vanessa R; Lee, John S

    2014-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is an important emerging arthropod-borne virus that may cause encephalitis in humans and has been isolated in regions of southeast Asia, including Malaysia, Thailand, and China. Currently, detection and identification of TMUV are limited to research laboratories, because quantitative rapid diagnostic assays for the virus do not exist. We describe the development of sensitive and specific conventional and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for detecting TMUV RNA in infected cell culture supernatant and Culex tarsalis mosquitoes. We used this assay to document the replication of TMUV in Cx. tarsalis, where titers increased 1,000-fold 5 days after inoculation. These assays resulted in the detection of virus-specific RNA in the presence of copurified mosquito nucleic acids. The use of these rapid diagnostic assays may have future applications for field pathogen surveillance and may assist in early detection, diagnosis, and control of the associated arthropod-borne pathogens. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Integrated microfluidic system for rapid detection of influenza H1N1 virus using a sandwich-based aptamer assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chih-Hung; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-08-15

    The rapid spread of influenza-associated H1N1 viruses has caused serious concern in recent years. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automatic, point-of-care devices for rapid diagnosis of the influenza virus. Conventional approaches suffer from several critical issues; notably, they are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and are characterized by relatively low sensitivity. In this work, we present a new approach for fluorescence-based detection of the influenza A H1N1 virus using a sandwich-based aptamer assay that is automatically performed on an integrated microfluidic system. The entire detection process was shortened to 30min using this chip-based system which is much faster than the conventional viral culture method. The limit of detection was significantly improved to 0.032 hemagglutination unit due to the high affinity and high specificity of the H1N1-specific aptamers. The results showed that the two-aptamer microfluidic system had about 10(3) times higher sensitivity than the conventional serological diagnosis. It was demonstrated that the developed microfluidic system may play as a powerful tool in the detection of the H1N1 virus.

  15. Analysis of variola and vaccinia virus neutralization assays for smallpox vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine M; Newman, Frances K; Davidson, Whitni B; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Yan, Lihan; Frey, Sharon E; Belshe, Robert B; Karem, Kevin L; Damon, Inger K

    2012-07-01

    Possible smallpox reemergence drives research for third-generation vaccines that effectively neutralize variola virus. A comparison of neutralization assays using different substrates, variola and vaccinia (Dryvax and modified vaccinia Ankara [MVA]), showed significantly different 90% neutralization titers; Dryvax underestimated while MVA overestimated variola neutralization. Third-generation vaccines may rely upon neutralization as a correlate of protection.

  16. 75 FR 59611 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Food and...

  17. Genomic Assays for Identification of Chikungunya Virus in Blood Donors, Puerto Rico, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Charles Y; Bres, Vanessa; Yu, Guixia; Krysztof, David; Naccache, Samia N; Lee, Deanna; Pfeil, Jacob; Linnen, Jeffrey M; Stramer, Susan L

    2015-08-01

    A newly developed transcription-mediated amplification assay was used to detect chikungunya virus infection in 3 of 557 asymptomatic donors (0.54%) from Puerto Rico during the 2014-2015 Caribbean epidemic. Viral detection was confirmed by using PCR, microarray, and next-generation sequencing. Molecular clock analysis dated the emergence of the Puerto Rico strains to early 2013.

  18. A multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for Newcastle disease virus and avian pneumovirus (Colorado strain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A; Reynolds, D L

    2000-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian pneumovirus (APV) cause Newcastle disease and rhinotracheitis respectively, in turkeys. Both of these viruses infect the respiratory system. A one-tube, multiplex, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of both NDV and Colorado strain of APV (APV-Col) was developed and evaluated. The primers, specific for each virus, were designed from the matrix protein gene of APV-Col and the fusion protein gene of NDV to amplify products of 631 and 309 nucleotides, respectively. The multiplex RT-PCR assay, for detecting both viruses simultaneously, was compared with the single-virus RT-PCR assays for its sensitivity and specificity. The specific primers amplified products of predicted size from each virus in the multiplex as well as the single-virus RT-PCR assays. The multiplex RT-PCR assay was determined to be equivalent to the single-virus RT-PCR assays for detecting both NDV and APV-Col. This multiplex RT-PCR assay proved to be a sensitive method for the simultaneous and rapid detection of NDV and APV-Col. This assay has the potential for clinical diagnostic applications.

  19. Development of a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for the detection of Sugarcane mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus in sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for detecting Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) in sugarcane. Six sets of four primers corresponding to the conserved coat protein gene were designed for each virus and their succ...

  20. Purification of cell culture-derived influenza A virus via continuous anion exchange chromatography on monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Laura M; Wolff, Michael W; Reichl, Udo

    2017-07-17

    The continuously increasing demand for potent and safe vaccines and the intensifying economic pressure on health care systems underlines the need for further optimization of vaccine manufacturing. Here, we focus on downstream processing of human influenza vaccines, investigating the purification of serum-free cell culture-derived influenza virus (A/PR/8/34 H1N1) using continuous chromatography. Therefore, quaternary amine anion exchange monoliths (CIM® QA) were characterized for their capacity to capture virus particles from animal cells cultivated in different media and their ability to separate virions from contaminating host cell proteins and DNA. The continuous chromatography was implemented as simulated moving bed chromatography (SMB) in a three zone open loop configuration with a detached high salt zone for regeneration. SMBs exploiting 10% and 50% of the monoliths' dynamic binding capacity, respectively, allowed the depletion of >98% of the DNA and >52% of the total protein. Based on the hemagglutination assay (HA assay), the virus yield was higher at 10% capacity use (89% vs. 45%). Both SMB separations resulted in a ratio of total protein to hemagglutinin antigen (based on single radial diffusion assay, SRID assay) below the required levels for manufacturing of human vaccines (less than 100µg of protein per virus strain per dose). The level of contaminating DNA was five-times lower for the 10% loading, but still exceeded the required limit for human vaccines. A subsequent Benzonase® treatment step, however, reduced the DNA contamination below 10ng per dose. Coupled to continuous cultivations for virus propagation, the establishment of integrated processes for fully continuous production of vaccines seems to be feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-culture: A quick approach for isolation of street rabies virus in murine neuroblastoma cells

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    A. Sasikalaveni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory detection of rabies in most cases is based on detection of the antigen by fluorescent antibody test, however, in weak positive cases confirmative laboratory diagnosis depends on widely accepted mouse inoculation test. Cell lines like neuroblastoma have been used to isolate the virus with greater success not only to target for diagnosis, but also for molecular studies that determine the epidemiology of the circulating street rabies strains and in studies that look at the efficiency of the developed monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the different rabies strains. Due to the recent issues in obtaining ethical permission for mouse experimentation, and also the passages required in the cell lines to isolate the virus, we report herewith a co-culture protocol using the murine neuroblastoma (MNA cells, which enable quicker isolation of street rabies virus with minimum passages. Objective: This study is not to have an alternative diagnostic assay, but an approach to produce sufficient amount of rabies virus in minimum passages by a co-culture approach in MNA cells. Materials and Methods: The MNA cells are co-cultured by topping the normal cells with infected cells every 48 h and the infectivity was followed up by performing direct fluorescent-antibody test. Results: The co-culture approach results in 100% infectivity and hence the use of live mouse for experimentation could be avoided. Conclusion: Co-culture method provides an alternative for the situations with limited sample volume and for the quicker isolation of virus which warrants the wild type strains without much modification.

  2. Optimized PCR assay for detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, Linda M; Lightner, Donald V

    2011-01-01

    A rapid PCR assay for detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was developed based on the nested PCR procedure described by Lo et al. (1996) and outlined as the recommended PCR diagnostic assay in the Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals published by the Office of International Epizootics (OIE, 2009). The optimized procedure incorporated the second step primers used in the nested WSSV PCR. By adjusting the annealing temperature and shortening the cycling times, this modified assay is substantially faster and as sensitive as the recommended OIE protocol. The modified PCR test was compared directly to the two-step nested PCR protocol and a modified nested procedure. The sensitivity of the published assay was determined by template dilutions of semi-purified WSSV virions that had been quantitated using real-time PCR for detection of WSSV. Various isolates were tested using the modified procedure, to ensure that the assay was able to detect WSSV from different geographical locations.

  3. Respiratory virus multiplex RT-PCR assay sensitivities and influence factors in hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jikui; Ma, Zhuoya; Huang, Wenbo; Li, Chengrong; Wang, Heping; Zheng, Yuejie; Zhou, Rong; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Multiplex RT-PCR assays have been widely used tools for detection and differentiation of a panel of respiratory viral pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the Qiagen ResPlex II V2.0 kit and explored factors influencing its sensitivity. Nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) specimens were prospectively collected from pediatric inpatients with lower respiratory tract infections at the time of admission in the Shenzhen Children's Hospital from May 2009 to April 2010. Total nucleic acids were extracted using the EZ1 system (Qiagen, Germany) and 17 respiratory viruses and genotypes including influenza A virus (FluA), FluB, parainfluenza virus 1 (PIV1), PIV2, PIV3, PIV4, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV), rhinoviruses (RhV), enteroviruses (EnV), human bocaviruses (hBoV), adenoviruses (AdV), four coronaviruses (229E, OC43, NL63 and HKU1), and FluA 2009 pandemic H1N1(H1N1-p) were detected and identified by the ResPlex II kit. In parallel, 16 real-time TaqMan quantitative RT-PCR assays were used to quantitatively detect each virus except for RhV. Influenza and parainfluenza viral cultures were also performed. Among the total 438 NPS specimens collected during the study period, one or more viral pathogens were detected in 274 (62.6%) and 201(45.9%) specimens by monoplex TaqMan RT-PCR and multiplex ResPlex, respectively. When results from monoplex PCR or cell culture were used as the reference standard, the multiplex PCR possessed specificities of 92.9-100.0%. The sensitivity of multiplex PCR for PIV3, hMPV, PIV1 and BoV were 73.1%, 70%, 66.7% and 55.6%, respectively, while low sensitivities (11.1%-40.0%) were observed for FluA, EnV, OC43, RSV and H1N1. Among the seven viruses/genotypes detected with higher frequencies, multiplex PCR sensitivities were correlated significantly with viral loads determined by the TaqMan RT-PCR in FluA, H1N1-p and RSV (p=0.011-0.000). The Qiagen ResPlex II multiplex RT-PCR kit possesses excellent specificity for simultaneous

  4. Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

    2007-07-26

    A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

  5. Duplex PCR assay for the detection of avian adeno virus and chicken anemia virus prevalent in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Aqib

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Avian Adeno viruses and Chicken Anemia Viruses cause serious economic losses to the poultry industry of Pakistan each year. Timely and efficient diagnosis of the viruses is needed in order to practice prevention and control strategies. In the first part of this study, we investigated broilers, breeder and Layer stocks for morbidity and mortality rates due to AAV and CAV infections and any co-infections by examining signs and symptoms typical of their infestation or post mortem examination. In the second part of the study, we developed a duplex PCR assay for the detection of AAV and CAV which is capable to simultaneously detect both the viral types prevalent in Pakistan with high sensitivity and 100% specificity.

  6. Development of Neutralization Assay Using an eGFP Chikungunya Virus

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    Cheng-Lin Deng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, a member of the Alphavirus genus, is an important human emerging/re-emerging pathogen. Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs or vaccines against CHIKV infection. Herein, we construct an infectious clone of CHIKV and an eGFP reporter CHIKV (eGFP-CHIKV with an isolated strain (assigned to Asian lineage from CHIKV-infected patients. The eGFP-CHIKV reporter virus allows for direct visualization of viral replication through the levels of eGFP expression. Using a known CHIKV inhibitor, ribavirin, we confirmed that the eGFP-CHIKV reporter virus could be used to identify inhibitors against CHIKV. Importantly, we developed a novel and reliable eGFP-CHIKV reporter virus-based neutralization assay that could be used for rapid screening neutralizing antibodies against CHIKV.

  7. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.;

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal....... (7%), and Pasteurella haemolytica (7%) were the most common bacterial agents found in the lungs. BRSV was identified using a conventional antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 (17%) animals. The established BRSV-specific RT-PCR assay yielded positive results for the same 23 animals...

  8. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal....... (7%), and Pasteurella haemolytica (7%) were the most common bacterial agents found in the lungs. BRSV was identified using a conventional antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 23 (17%) animals. The established BRSV-specific RT-PCR assay yielded positive results for the same 23 animals...

  9. Comparison of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and one rapid immunoblot assay for detection of herpes simplex virus type 2-specific antibodies in serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, J; Van Dijk, G; Niesters, H G; Van Der Meijden, W I; Osterhaus, A D

    The sensitivities and specificities of three immunoassays for the detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in serum, including the one-strip rapid immunoblot assay (RIBA; Chiron Corporation) and two indirect enzyme immunosorbent assays (EIA; Gull

  10. Cultivation of Hepatitis Virus in Tissue Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    as the feeder source and primary human hepatocytes as the feeder layer. Feeder layers are also being formed using other sensitive tissue culture lines including human diploid lung cells (WI 38) and Hela cells .

  11. Chikungunya virus isolation using simplified cell culture technique in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyndiah, M N; Pursem, V; Meetoo, G; Daby, S; Ramuth, V; Bhinkah, P; Chuttoo, R; Paratian, U

    2012-03-01

    During the chikungunya outbreak of 2005 - 2006, the only laboratory facilities available in Mauritius were virus isolation in cell culture tubes and serology. The laboratory was submerged with large numbers of blood samples. Comparative isolation was made in human embryonic lung (HEL) and VERO cells grown in 96-well plate. Culture on HEL cells was found to be more sensitive and presence of cytopathic effect (CPE) was observed earlier than in VERO cells. Out of the 18 300 blood samples inoculated on HEL, 11 165 were positive. This virus isolation method was of great help for the surveillance and control of the vectors. In cases of an outbreak a cheap, rapid and simple method of isolating chikungunya virus is described.

  12. Development of a novel real-time qPCR assay for the dual detection of canine and phocine distemper virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Linette Buxbom; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Helene

    conventional PCR assays with real-time PCR assays to obtain a uniform assay palette. The present work describes the development of a novel real-time RT-qPCR assay for the dual detection of canine and phocine distemper virus. The assay is relevant for the future detection of outbreaks of canine distemper virus...

  13. Reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of Papaya ringspot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wentao; Tuo, Decai; Yan, Pu; Yang, Yong; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV), which causes disease symptoms similar to PRSV, threaten commercial production of both non-transgenic-papaya and PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya in China. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay to detect PLDMV was developed previously. In this study, the development of another RT-LAMP assay to distinguish among transgenic, PRSV-infected and PLDMV-infected papaya by detection of PRSV is reported. A set of four RT-LAMP primers was designed based on the highly conserved region of the P3 gene of PRSV. The RT-LAMP method was specific and sensitive in detecting PRSV, with a detection limit of 1.15×10(-6)μg of total RNA per reaction. Indeed, the reaction was 10 times more sensitive than one-step RT-PCR. Field application of the RT-LAMP assay demonstrated that samples positive for PRSV were detected only in non-transgenic papaya, whereas samples positive for PLDMV were detected only in commercialized PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya. This suggests that PRSV remains the major limiting factor for non-transgenic-papaya production, and the emergence of PLDMV threatens the commercial transgenic cultivar in China. However, this study, combined with the earlier development of an RT-LAMP assay for PLDMV, will provide a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective diagnostic power to distinguish virus infections in papaya.

  14. Development and Validation of a Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Three Papaya Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yang, Yong; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV), and Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) produce similar symptoms in papaya. Each threatens commercial production of papaya on Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay was developed to detect simultaneously these three viruses by screening combinations of mixed primer pairs and optimizing the multiplex RT-PCR reaction conditions. A mixture of three specific primer pairs was used to amplif...

  15. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. PMID:26544710

  16. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Huang

    Full Text Available Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus and PCV2 (DNA virus from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29% and TGEV (11.7% preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility.

  17. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication.

  18. Multiplex RT Q-PCR assay for simultaneous quantification of three viruses used for validation of virus clearance by biopharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lute, Scott; Wang, Hua; Sanchez, Davonie; Barletta, Janet; Chen, Qi; Brorson, Kurt

    2009-10-01

    Virus removal studies are used to insure the safety of biopharmaceutical products by quantitatively estimating the viral clearance capacity by the manufacturing process. Virus quantification assays are used to measure the log(10) clearance factor of individual purification unit operations in spike recovery studies. We have developed a multiplex RT Q-PCR assay that detects and quantifies three commonly used model viruses X-MuLV, SV40, and MMV simultaneously. This RT Q-PCR multiplex assay has a 6log(10) dynamic range with a limit of detection (LOD) of approximately 1 genome copy/microL. Amplification profiles are similar to existing singleplex assays. Overall, this RT Q-PCR multiplex assay is highly quantitative, accurately identifies multiple viruses simultaneously, and may prove useful to validate viral clearance of biological products in small scale studies.

  19. Use of tissue culture techniques for producing virus-free plant in garlic and their identification through real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşkın, Hatıra; Baktemur, Gökhan; Kurul, Mehmet; Büyükalaca, Saadet

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed for comparison of meristem culture technique with shoot tip culture technique for obtaining virus-free plant, comparison of micropropagation success of two different nutrient media, and determination of effectiveness of real-time PCR assay for the detection of viruses. Two different garlic species (Allium sativum and Allium tuncelianum) and two different nutrient media were used in this experiment. Results showed that Medium 2 was more successful compared to Medium 1 for both A. tuncelianum and A. sativum (Kastamonu garlic clone). In vitro plants obtained via meristem and shoot tip cultures were tested for determination of onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) and leek yellow stripe virus (LYSV) through real-time PCR assay. In garlic plants propagated via meristem culture, we could not detect any virus. OYDV and LYSV viruses were detected in plants obtained via shoot tip culture. OYDV virus was observed in amount of 80% and 73% of tested plants for A. tuncelianum and A. sativum, respectively. LYSV virus was found in amount of 67% of tested plants of A. tuncelianum and in amount of 87% of tested plants of A. sativum in this study.

  20. Use of Tissue Culture Techniques for Producing Virus-Free Plant in Garlic and Their Identification through Real-Time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatıra Taşkın

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed for comparison of meristem culture technique with shoot tip culture technique for obtaining virus-free plant, comparison of micropropagation success of two different nutrient media, and determination of effectiveness of real-time PCR assay for the detection of viruses. Two different garlic species (Allium sativum and Allium tuncelianum and two different nutrient media were used in this experiment. Results showed that Medium 2 was more successful compared to Medium 1 for both A. tuncelianum and A. sativum (Kastamonu garlic clone. In vitro plants obtained via meristem and shoot tip cultures were tested for determination of onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV and leek yellow stripe virus (LYSV through real-time PCR assay. In garlic plants propagated via meristem culture, we could not detect any virus. OYDV and LYSV viruses were detected in plants obtained via shoot tip culture. OYDV virus was observed in amount of 80% and 73% of tested plants for A. tuncelianum and A. sativum, respectively. LYSV virus was found in amount of 67% of tested plants of A. tuncelianum and in amount of 87% of tested plants of A. sativum in this study.

  1. Rapid quantitative PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpesvirus 6 DNA in blood and other clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelmann, I.; Petzold, D. R.; Kosinska, A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Schulz, T. F.; Heim, A.

    Rapid diagnosis of human herpesvirus primary infections or reactivations is facilitated by quantitative PCRs. Quantitative PCR assays with a standard thermal cycling profile permitting simultaneous detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV),

  2. Antigenic characterisation of influenza B virus with a new microneutralisation assay: comparison to haemagglutination and sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, Filippo; Bacilieri, Sabrina; Amicizia, Daniela; Valle, Laura; Banfi, Federica; Durando, Paolo; Sticchi, Laura; Gasparini, Roberto; Icardi, Giancarlo; Crovari, Pietro

    2004-09-01

    Although the haemagglutination inhibition assay is considered the "gold standard" for antigenic characterisation of influenza viruses, some limitations of this technique are well known. A new microneutralisation assay, as a tool for antigenic characterisation of influenza B viruses, has been standardised and its performance evaluated in comparison with the haemagglutination inhibition test in the light of molecular characterisation of the haemagglutinin. Twelve B viruses belonging to the two lineages and the four sub-lineages discriminated by phylogenetic analysis of HA were tested. The microneutralisation assay clearly distinguishes viruses belonging to different lineages and, in addition, discriminates strains belonging to different sub-lineages that are poorly or not discriminated using the haemagglutination inhibition test. This new microneutralisation assay could provide a useful tool for antigenic characterisation of circulating influenza viruses and contribute, together with the haemagglutination inhibition test and sequence analysis of the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, in the choice of the strain for use in vaccine composition.

  3. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  4. Rapid molecular assays for the detection of yellow fever virus in low-resource settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Escadafal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yellow fever (YF is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The causative agent, the yellow fever virus (YFV, is found in tropical and subtropical areas of South America and Africa. Although a vaccine is available since the 1930s, YF still causes thousands of deaths and several outbreaks have recently occurred in Africa. Therefore, rapid and reliable diagnostic methods easy to perform in low-resources settings could have a major impact on early detection of outbreaks and implementation of appropriate response strategies such as vaccination and/or vector control. METHODOLOGY: The aim of this study was to develop a YFV nucleic acid detection method applicable in outbreak investigations and surveillance studies in low-resource and field settings. The method should be simple, robust, rapid and reliable. Therefore, we adopted an isothermal approach and developed a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA assay which can be performed with a small portable instrument and easy-to-use lyophilized reagents. The assay was developed in three different formats (real-time with or without microfluidic semi-automated system and lateral-flow assay to evaluate their application for different purposes. Analytical specificity and sensitivity were evaluated with a wide panel of viruses and serial dilutions of YFV RNA. Mosquito pools and spiked human plasma samples were also tested for assay validation. Finally, real-time RPA in portable format was tested under field conditions in Senegal. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay was able to detect 20 different YFV strains and demonstrated no cross-reactions with closely related viruses. The RPA assay proved to be a robust, portable method with a low detection limit (<21 genome equivalent copies per reaction and rapid processing time (<20 min. Results from real-time RPA field testing were comparable to results obtained in the laboratory, thus confirming our method is suitable for

  5. Detection of respiratory viruses using a multiplex real-time PCR assay in Germany, 2009/10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Sibylle; Forster, Johannes; Berner, Reinhard; Rücker, Gerta; Rohde, Gernot; Neumann-Haefelin, Dieter; Panning, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses and to prospectively evaluate the performance of the fast-track diagnostics (FTD) respiratory pathogens multiplex PCR assay shortly after the 2009/10 influenza pandemic. Highly sensitive monoplex real-time PCR assays served as references. Discrepant results were further analyzed by the xTAG RVP Fast assay. A total of 369 respiratory samples from children and adults were collected prospectively in Germany from December 2009 until June 2010. The sensitivity and specificity of the FTD assay after resolution of discrepant results was 92.2 % and 99.5 %, respectively. Lowest specificity of the FTD assay was observed for human bocavirus. Multiple detections were recorded in 33/369 (8.9 %) of the samples by monoplex PCR and in 43/369 (11.7 %) using the FTD assay. The most prevalent viruses were respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus. Only pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1 (2009), and not seasonal influenza virus, was detected. Viruses other than influenza virus accounted for the majority of acute respiratory infections. The FTD assay can be easily implemented in general diagnostic laboratories and facilitate the optimization of patient-management schemes.

  6. Identification of cellular proteins that interact with Newcastle Disease Virus and human Respiratory Syncytial Virus by a two-dimensional virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguera, Javier; Villar, Enrique; Muñoz-Barroso, Isabel

    2014-10-13

    Although it is well documented that the initial attachment receptors for Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) are sialic acid-containing molecules and glycosaminoglycans respectively, the exact nature of the receptors for both viruses remains to be deciphered. Moreover, additional molecules at the host cell surface might be involved in the entry mechanism. With the aim of identifying the cellular proteins that interact with NDV and RSV at the cell surface, we performed a virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA). Cell membrane lysates were separated by two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and electrotransferred to PVDF membranes, after which they were probed with high viral concentrations. NDV interacted with a Protein Disulfide Isomerase from chicken fibroblasts. In the case of RSV, we detected 15 reactive spots, which were identified as six different proteins, of which nucleolin was outstanding. We discuss the possible role of PDI and nucleolin in NDV and RSV entry, respectively.

  7. Comparison of four molecular assays for the detection of Tembusu virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Yeh, Yin-Ting; Chen, Hao; Yu, Chunmei; Gao, Xuhui; Diao, Youxiang

    2015-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) belongs to the genus Flavivirus that may cause severe egg drop in ducks. In order to evaluate the most efficient TMUV detection method, the performances of a conventional RT-PCR (C-RT-PCR), a semi-nested PCR (SN-RT-PCR), a reverse-transcriptase real-time quantitative PCR (Q-RT-PCR), and a reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) targeting the TMUV virus-specific NS5 gene were examined. In order to compare the sensitivity of these four techniques, two templates were used: (1) plasmid DNA that contained a partial region of the NS5 gene and (2) genomic RNA from TMUV-positive cell culture supernatants. The sensitivities using plasmid DNA detection by C-RT-PCR, SN-RT-PCR, Q-RT-PCR, and RT-LAMP were 2 × 10(4) copies/μL, 20 copies/μL, 2 copies/μL, and 20 copies/μL, respectively. The sensitivities using genomic RNA for the C-RT-PCR, SN-RT-PCR, Q-RT-PCR, and RT-LAMP were 100 pg/tube, 100, 10, and 100 fg/tube, respectively. All evaluated assays were specific for TMUV detection. The TMUV-specific RNA was detected in cloacal swabs from experimentally infected ducks using these four methods with different rates (52-92%), but not in the control (non-inoculated) samples. The sensitivities of RT-PCR, SN-RT-PCR, Q-RT-PCR, and RT-LAMP performed with cloacal swabs collected from suspected TMUV infected ducks within 2 weeks of severe egg-drop were 38/69 (55.1%), 52/69 (75.4%), 57/69 (82.6%), and 55/69 (79.7%), respectively. In conclusion, both RT-LAMP and Q-RT-PCR can provide a rapid diagnosis of TMUV infection, but RT-LAMP is more useful in TMUV field situations or poorly equipped laboratories.

  8. A bead-based multiplex assay for the detection of DNA viruses infecting laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, Daniela; Nicklas, Werner; Mauter, Petra; Pawlita, Michael; Schmitt, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Association (FELASA) recommends screening of laboratory rodents and biological materials for a broad variety of bacterial agents, viruses, and parasites. Methods commonly used to date for pathogen detection are neither cost-effective nor time- and animal-efficient or uniform. However, an infection even if silent alters experimental results through changing the animals' physiology and increases inter-individual variability. As a consequence higher numbers of animals and experiments are needed for valid and significant results. We developed a novel high-throughput multiplex assay, called rodent DNA virus finder (rDVF) for the simultaneous identification of 24 DNA viruses infecting mice and rats. We detected all 24 DNA viruses with high specificity and reproducibility. Detection limits for the different DNA viruses varied between 10 and 1000 copies per PCR. The validation of rDVF was done with DNA isolated from homogenised organs amplified by pathogen specific primers in one multiplex PCR. The biotinylated amplicons were detected via hybridisation to specific oligonucleotide probes coupled to spectrally distinct sets of fluorescent Luminex beads. In conclusion, rDVF may have the potential to replace conventional testing and may simplify and improve routine detection of DNA viruses infecting rodents.

  9. A bead-based multiplex assay for the detection of DNA viruses infecting laboratory rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Höfler

    Full Text Available The Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Association (FELASA recommends screening of laboratory rodents and biological materials for a broad variety of bacterial agents, viruses, and parasites. Methods commonly used to date for pathogen detection are neither cost-effective nor time- and animal-efficient or uniform. However, an infection even if silent alters experimental results through changing the animals' physiology and increases inter-individual variability. As a consequence higher numbers of animals and experiments are needed for valid and significant results. We developed a novel high-throughput multiplex assay, called rodent DNA virus finder (rDVF for the simultaneous identification of 24 DNA viruses infecting mice and rats. We detected all 24 DNA viruses with high specificity and reproducibility. Detection limits for the different DNA viruses varied between 10 and 1000 copies per PCR. The validation of rDVF was done with DNA isolated from homogenised organs amplified by pathogen specific primers in one multiplex PCR. The biotinylated amplicons were detected via hybridisation to specific oligonucleotide probes coupled to spectrally distinct sets of fluorescent Luminex beads. In conclusion, rDVF may have the potential to replace conventional testing and may simplify and improve routine detection of DNA viruses infecting rodents.

  10. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA by Duplex Scorpion Primer-based PCR Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG De-Ming孔德明; SHEN Han-Xi沈含熙; MI Huai-Feng宓怀风

    2004-01-01

    The application of a new fiuorogenic probe-based PCR assay (PCR duplex scorpion primer assay) to the detection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in human sera was described. Duplex scorpion primer is a modified variant of duplex Amplifluor, and the incorporation of a PCR stopper between probe and primer sequences improve the detection specificity and sensitivity. Combined with PCR amplification, this probe can give unambiguous positive results for the reactions initiated with more than 20 HBV molecules. In addition, the particular unimolecular probing mechanism of this probe makes the use of short target-specific probe sequence possible, which will render this probe applicable in some specific systems.

  11. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  12. Concurrent Reactivation of Herpes Simplex and Varicella Zoster Viruses Confirmed by the Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukane Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concurrent reactivation of herpes simplex and varicella zoster viruses is rare. Here, we describe the case of an elderly patient with herpes labialis and herpes zoster manifesting as a right-side facial eruption with vesicles and crusting. The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay demonstrated the presence of both herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella zoster virus in swab samples taken from the face, which was confirmed by real-time PCR, suggesting concurrent reactivation of both viruses. The use of the LAMP assay in the present case indicates its usefulness in the diagnosis of atypical herpes infections.

  13. Development of a neutralization assay for Nipah virus using pseudotype particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamin, Azaibi; Harcourt, Brian H; Lo, Michael K; Roth, James A; Wolf, Mike C; Lee, Benhur; Weingartl, Hana; Audonnet, Jean-Christophe; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2009-09-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are zoonotic paramyxoviruses capable of causing severe disease in humans and animals. These viruses require biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment. Like other paramyxoviruses, the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) can be used to detect antibodies to the surface glycoproteins, fusion (F) and attachment (G), and PRNT titers give an indication of protective immunity. Unfortunately, for NiV and HeV, the PRNT must be performed in BSL-4 containment and takes several days to complete. Thus, we have developed a neutralization assay using VSV pseudotype particles expressing the F and G proteins of NiV (pVSV-NiV-F/G) as target antigens. This rapid assay, which can be performed at BSL-2, was evaluated using serum samples from outbreak investigations and more than 300 serum samples from an experimental NiV vaccination study in swine. The results of the neutralization assays with pVSV-NiV-F/G as antigen showed a good correlation with those of standard PRNT. Therefore, this new method has the potential to be a rapid and cost-effective diagnostic method, especially in locations that lack high containment facilities, and will provide a valuable tool for basic research and vaccine development.

  14. Development of a Treatment Algorithm for Streptococci and Enterococci from Positive Blood Cultures Identified with the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Alby, Kevin; Daniels, Lindsay M.; Weber, David J; Miller, Melissa B.

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-eight blood cultures with a Gram stain result of Gram-positive cocci in pairs and/or chains were evaluated with the Nanosphere Verigene Gram-positive blood culture (BC-GP) assay. The overall concordance of the assay with culture was 89.7% (70/78 cultures), allowing for the development of a targeted treatment algorithm.

  15. Expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 recombinant thymidine kinase and its application to a rapid antiviral sensitivity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Lixin, Wang; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Iizuka, Itoe; Ogata, Momoko; Tsuji, Masanori; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Morikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Saijo, Masayuki

    2011-08-01

    Antiviral-resistant herpesvirus infection has become a great concern for immunocompromised patients. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections are treated with viral thymidine kinase (vTK)-associated drugs such as acyclovir (ACV), and most ACV-resistance (ACV(r)) is due to mutations in the vTK. The standard drug sensitivity test is usually carried out by the plaque reduction assay-based method, which requires over 10 days. To shorten the time required, a novel system was developed by the concept, in which 293T cells transiently expressing recombinant vTK derived from the test sample by transfection of the cells with an expression vector were infected with vTK-deficient and ACV(r) HSV-1 (TAR), and then cultured in a maintenance medium with or without designated concentrations of ACV, ganciclovir (GCV) and brivudine (BVdU). The replication of TAR was strongly inhibited by ACV, GCV and BVdU in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the ACV-sensitive HSV-1, whereas replication was not or slightly inhibited in cells expressing the recombinant vTK of highly resistant or intermediately resistant HSV-1, respectively. An inverse correlation was demonstrated in the 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) and inhibitory effects of these compounds on the replication of TAR among ACV(s) and ACV(r) HSV-1 clones. These results indicate that the EC(50)s of the vTK-associated drugs including ACV can be assumed by measuring the inhibitory effect of drugs in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the target virus. The newly developed antiviral sensitivity assay system for HSV-1 makes it possible to estimate EC(50) for vTK-associated drugs, when whole vTK gene is available for use by gene amplification directly from lesion's samples or from virus isolates.

  16. Diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in infants by immune complex dissociation p24 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, M O; Toedter, G; Hofheinz, D; Tetali, S; Pelton, S; Marecki, M; Brena, A; Abrams, E J; Landesman, S; Pahwa, S

    1997-01-01

    Using immune complex dissociation (ICD), we retrospectively examined serum and plasma of 206 infants aged 0 to 4 months who were perinatally exposed to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All samples were analyzed in a blinded manner. Infection status was determined based on the results of HIV culture and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classification. The overall diagnostic sensitivity of the assay was 59% (93 samples, 73 infants), and specificity was 100% (160 samples, 133 infants). When the samples were analyzed according to age, sensitivity was highest at age 1 to 2 months (17 of 21 infants, 81%). Sensitivities at other ages were 53% at 80% at 1 to 2 months of age and 100% specificity, as evaluated, up to 4 months of age.

  17. Detection of virus mRNA within infected host cells using an isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay: marine cyanophage gene expression within Synechococcus sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Matthew J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal-Mediated Amplification of RNA Technology (SMART is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology, developed for the detection of specific target sequences, either RNA (for expression or DNA. Cyanophages are viruses that infect cyanobacteria. Marine cyanophages are ubiquitous in the surface layers of the ocean where they infect members of the globally important genus Synechococcus. Results Here we report that the SMART assay allowed us to differentiate between infected and non-infected host cultures. Expression of the cyanophage strain S-PM2 portal vertex gene (g20 was detected from infected host Synechococcus sp. WH7803 cells. Using the SMART assay, we demonstrated that g20 mRNA peaked 240 – 360 minutes post-infection, allowing us to characterise this as a mid to late transcript. g20 DNA was also detected, peaking 10 hours post-infection, coinciding with the onset of host lysis. Conclusion The SMART assay is based on isothermal nucleic acid amplification, allowing the detection of specific sequences of DNA or RNA. It was shown to be suitable for differentiating between virus-infected and non-infected host cultures and for the detection of virus gene expression: the first reported use of this technology for such applications.

  18. Use of an aqueous soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay for cell growth assays in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, A H; Owen, T C; Barltrop, J A; Cory, J G

    1991-07-01

    A new tetrazolium analog of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) was evaluated as a substitute for MTT in the microculture screening assay for in vitro cell growth. This new tetrazolium compound, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2- (4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS), in the presence of phenazine methosulfate (PMS), gave a water-soluble formazan product that had an absorbance maximum at 490-500 nm in phosphate-buffered saline. The amount of colored product formed was proportional to the number of cells and the time of incubation of the cells with MTS/PMS. MTS/PMS was reactive in all the cell lines tested which included mouse leukemia L1210 cells, mouse Ehrlich tumor cells, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, and human colon tumor cells (HT-29). HT-29 and 3T3 fibroblasts reduced MTS/PMS more efficiently than they reduced MTT. Comparable to the amount of product formed from MTT, MTS/PMS gave excellent product formation. The IC50 value for pyrazoloimidazole obtained using MTS/PMS was 200 microM; for 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, the IC50 value was 0.9 nM. These values compared very favorably with the IC50 values obtained by direct cell counts. Further, the same IC50 values were obtained when the absorbances of the formazan product in the 96-well plates were determined after different times of incubation.

  19. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gagnon, David [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Gjoerup, Ole [Molecular Oncology Research Institute, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: Peter.Bullock@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  20. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Hanson, Alicia M; Shadrick, William R; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L; Hernandez, John J; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Heck, Julie A; Arnold, Leggy A; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2012-09-01

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative. After comparing fluorescence polarization (FP), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®; Cisbio) and AlphaScreen® (Perkin Elmer) assays, an FP-based assay was chosen to screen Sigma's Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) for compounds that inhibit NS3-DNA complex formation. Four LOPAC compounds inhibited the FP-based assay: aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) (IC50=1.4 μM), suramin sodium salt (IC50=3.6 μM), NF 023 hydrate (IC50=6.2 μM) and tyrphostin AG 538 (IC50=3.6 μM). All but AG 538 inhibited helicase-catalyzed strand separation, and all but NF 023 inhibited replication of subgenomic HCV replicons. A counterscreen using Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) revealed that none of the new HCV helicase inhibitors were specific for NS3h. However, when the SSB-based assay was used to analyze derivatives of another non-specific helicase inhibitor, the main component of the dye primuline, it revealed that some primuline derivatives (e.g. PubChem CID50930730) are up to 30-fold more specific for HCV NS3h than similarly potent HCV helicase inhibitors.

  1. [Fundamental and clinical evaluation of hepatitis B virus core-related antigen assay by LUMIPULSE f].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuhito; Takagi, Kazumi; Hiramatsu, Kumiko; Naganuma, Hatsue; Iida, Takayasu; Takasaka, Yoshimitsu; Mizokami, Masashi

    2006-07-01

    A sensitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) has been developed for hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigens (HBcrAg) detection. The HBcrAg is designated as the precore/core gene products including HBeAg. The aim of this study is to evaluate reproducibility of HBcrAg and correlation with HBV-DNA in serum using the automatic LUMIPULSE f to estimate an assay suitable for general laboratory use. In this study, we demonstrated that HBcrAg assay had highly intra-assay reproducible [coefficients of variation(CVs); 2.8-5.2%] and inter-assay reproducible [CVs; 3.9-9.1%]. When the cutoff value was tentatively set at 1 kU/ml, all healthy controls (HBsAg/HBV-DNA negative; n=100) and anti-HCV antibody-positive (n=50) sera were identified as negative. The assay showed a detection limit of 0.5 kU/ml using four serially diluted HBV high-titer sera, indicating higher sensitivity than HBV-DNA (transcription-mediated amplification). The HBcrAg concentration correlated positively with serum HBV-DNA (n=125, r = 0.860, p HBcrAg levels were higher in HBeAg-positive group than in HBeAg-negative group. In the natural course of HBV infection, the HBcrAg concentration usually changed in accordance with HBV-DNA levels, however during lamivudine therapy the change of HBcrAg was more gradual than that of HBV-DNA. In conclusion, HBcrAg concentration provides a reflection of HBV virus load equivalent to HBV-DNA level, and the assay therefore offers a simple method for monitoring hepatitis B patients.

  2. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Keri, Ruth A; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-01-01

    ...: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays...

  3. Evaluating the Use of Commercial West Nile Virus Antigens as Positive Controls in the Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform West Nile Virus Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, Kristen L; Savage, Harry M

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the utility of 2 types of commercially available antigens as positive controls in the Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform (RAMP®) West Nile virus (WNV) assay. Purified recombinant WNV envelope antigens and whole killed virus antigens produced positive RAMP results and either type would be useful as a positive control. Killed virus antigens provide operational and economic advantages and we recommend their use over purified recombinant antigens. We also offer practical applications for RAMP positive controls and recommendations for preparing them.

  4. Penicillinase-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarshana, M R; Reddy, D V

    1989-10-01

    A penicillinase (PNC)-based, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was standardized to detect maize mosaic virus (MMV) in sorghum leaf extracts, peanut mottle virus (PMV) in pea leaf extracts, and tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in peanut leaf extracts. Rabbit Fc-specific antibodies were conjugated with PNC by a single step glutaraldehyde bridge. Among several indicators tested, bromothymol blue (BTB) was found suitable for measuring PNC activity under simulated conditions. Two reagents, starch-iodine complex (SIC) and a mixed pH indicator, containing bromocresol purple and BTB (2:1) used earlier for the PNC-based ELISA, were compared with BTB for utilization in the PNC-based ELISA. SIC gave a slightly higher virus titre than BTB or the mixed pH indicator, but it often gave nonspecific reactions. Sodium or potassium salts of penicillin-G at 0.5-1.0 mg/ml and BTB at 0.2 mg/ml were found to be suitable as substrate-indicator mixture for PNC-based ELISA. The sensitivity of the PNC system was comparable to those of the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) systems in detecting MMV, PMV, and TSWV. The PNC conjugate could be used at a greater dilution than those of the ALP and HRP conjugates and the BTB substrate mixture was stable for at least 3 weeks at 4 degrees C. Penicillin is readily available in developing countries, and at a substantially lower cost than p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the commonly used substrate for ALP in the plate ELISA. Thus the PNC-based ELISA provides a less expensive means for assaying plant viruses by ELISA.

  5. Kesesuaian Hasil Pemeriksaan Antibodi Virus Herpes Simpleks Metode Enzyme-Linked Immunofiltration Assay dengan Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Immanuel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV infections are very common and are caused by HSV type 1 (HSV-1 and HSV type 2 (HSV-2. HSV-1 being mostly associated with orofacial disease, whereas HSV-2 is usually associated with perigenital infection. Diagnosis of HSV infection is established based on history, physical and laboratory examination. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method to detect anti-HSV has a sensitivity 93–100% and specificity 95–100%, whereas enzyme-linked immunofiltration assay (ELIFA has a sensitivity 83.36–97% and specificity 83.93–98%. The aim of this study was to assess the agreement of anti-HSV between ELIFA and ELISA methods. This study was conducted in the clinical laboratory RSUP Dr. Hasan Sadikin Bandung since January to May 2011. The study design was cross sectional. Subjects of this study were serum of patients suspected HSV infection. Statistical analysis was performed to assess Kappa agreement. A total of 66 samples were examined anti-HSV using ELIFA and ELISA method. There was good agreement between test results of anti-HSV IgM ELIFA and ELISA method (p<0.001, κ=0.621, moderate agreement between test results of anti- HSV-1 IgG ELIFA and ELISA method (p<0.001, κ=0.533, and fair agreement between test results of anti-HSV-2 IgG ELIFA and ELISA method (p=0.006, κ= 0.260. In conclusions, only the anti-HSV IgM ELIFA method has good agreement with ELISA.

  6. Evaluation of Signature Erosion in Ebola Virus Due to Genomic Drift and Its Impact on the Performance of Diagnostic Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmuga Sozhamannan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequence analyses of the 2014 Ebola Virus (EBOV isolates revealed a potential problem with the diagnostic assays currently in use; i.e., drifting genomic profiles of the virus may affect the sensitivity or even produce false-negative results. We evaluated signature erosion in ebolavirus molecular assays using an in silico approach and found frequent potential false-negative and false-positive results. We further empirically evaluated many EBOV assays, under real time PCR conditions using EBOV Kikwit (1995 and Makona (2014 RNA templates. These results revealed differences in performance between assays but were comparable between the old and new EBOV templates. Using a whole genome approach and a novel algorithm, termed BioVelocity, we identified new signatures that are unique to each of EBOV, Sudan virus (SUDV, and Reston virus (RESTV. Interestingly, many of the current assay signatures do not fall within these regions, indicating a potential drawback in the past assay design strategies. The new signatures identified in this study may be evaluated with real-time reverse transcription PCR (rRT-PCR assay development and validation. In addition, we discuss regulatory implications and timely availability to impact a rapidly evolving outbreak using existing but perhaps less than optimal assays versus redesign these assays for addressing genomic changes.

  7. Real-time PCR assays for hepatitis B virus DNA quantification may require two different targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Chang, Le; Jia, Tingting; Guo, Fei; Zhang, Lu; Ji, Huimin; Zhao, Junpeng; Wang, Lunan

    2017-05-12

    Quantification Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA plays a critical role in the management of chronic HBV infections. However, HBV is a DNA virus with high levels of genetic variation, and drug-resistant mutations have emerged with the use of antiviral drugs. If a mutation caused a sequence mismatched in the primer or probe of a commercial DNA quantification kit, this would lead to an underestimation of the viral load of the sample. The aim of this study was to determine whether commercial kits, which use only one pair of primers and a single probe, accurately quantify the HBV DNA levels and to develop an improved duplex real-time PCR assay. We developed a new duplex real-time PCR assay that used two pairs of primers and two probes based on the conserved S and C regions of the HBV genome. We performed HBV DNA quantitative detection of HBV samples and compared the results of our duplex real-time PCR assays with the COBAS TaqMan HBV Test version 2 and Daan real-time PCR assays. The target region of the discordant sample was amplified, sequenced, and validated using plasmid. The results of the duplex real-time PCR were in good accordance with the commercial COBAS TaqMan HBV Test version 2 and Daan real-time PCR assays. We showed that two samples from Chinese HBV infections underestimated viral loads when quantified by the Roche kit because of a mismatch between the viral sequence and the reverse primer of the Roche kit. The HBV DNA levels of six samples were undervalued by duplex real-time PCR assays of the C region because of mutations in the primer of C region. We developed a new duplex real-time PCR assay, and the results of this assay were similar to the results of commercial kits. The HBV DNA level could be undervalued when using the COBAS TaqMan HBV Test version 2 for Chinese HBV infections owing to a mismatch with the primer/probe. A duplex real-time PCR assay based on the S and C regions could solve this problem to some extent.

  8. Application of three duplex real-time PCR assays for simultaneous detection of human seasonal and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefańska, Ilona; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Brydak, Lidia B; Romanowska, Magdalena

    2013-08-01

    This study was performed to develop real-time PCR (qPCR) for detection of human seasonal and avian influenza viruses in duplex format. First duplex qPCR detects haemagglutinin (HA) gene of influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 and HA gene of influenza virus A(H3N2), the second reaction detects neuraminidase (NA) gene of influenza virus A(H3N2) and NA gene of influenza virus A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H5N1), and the third reaction detects HA gene of influenza A(H5N1) and nonstructural protein gene of influenza B virus. Primers and probes were designed using multiple alignments of target gene sequences of different reference strains. Assays were optimised for identical thermocycling conditions. Their specificity was confirmed by conventional PCR and monoplex qPCR with nucleic acids isolated from different influenza viruses and other respiratory pathogens. Plasmid constructs with a fragment of specific gene were used to assess sensitivity of the assay. The limit of detection ranged from 27 to 96 cDNA copies/reaction. Clinical specimens (n = 107) have been tested using new assays, immunofluorescence and monoplex qRT-PCR. It has been shown that developed assays have been capable of rapid and accurate simultaneous detection and differentiation of influenza viruses. They are more sensitive than immunofluorescence and at least as sensitive as monoplex qRT-PCR.

  9. Field Evaluation of a Deployable RT-PCR Assay System for Real-Time Identification of Dengue Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    strains of dengue serotypes 1-4, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, and St. Louis encephalitis viruses as well as dengue virus infected...JA, Pyke A, Smith GA. Single rapid TaqMan fluorogenic probe based PCR assay that detects all four dengue serotypes . J Med Virol. 2002 April; 66(4

  10. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  11. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, S-H; Tsai, M-H; Lin, C-W [Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Wufeng, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yang, T-C; Chuang, P-H [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, I-S; Lu, H-C [Nanotechnology Research Center, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wan Lei; Lin, Y-J [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lai, C-H [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: cwlin@mail.cmu.edu.tw

    2008-10-08

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  12. Hepatitis B virus infection and replication in primarily cultured human fetal hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Lin; Qun Chen; Li-Ye Yang; Wen-Yu Li; Xi-Biao Cao; Jiao-Ren Wu; You-Peng Peng; Mo-Rui Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the infection and replication of hepatitis B virus(HBV)in primarily cultured human fetal hepatocytes(HFHs).METHODS:The human fetal hepatocytes were cultured in serum-free medium,HBV-positive serum was added into the medium to study the susceptibility of hepatocytes to HBV infection.The supernatant was collected for ELISA assay of HBsAg and HBeAg,and quantitative fluorescence PCR for HBV-DNA assay daily.Albumin and HBcAg,CK8 and CK18 expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry in cultured hepatocytes.Content of lactate dehydrogenate(LDH)was measured to find out the integrity of the cell membrane.RESULTS:A stable hepatocyte culture system was established.HBV could infect the hepatocytes and replicate,and HBcAg expression could be detected by immunohistochemistry in hepatocyte-like cells.HBV-DNA in the supernatant could be detected from d 2 to d 18 and HBsAg and HBeAg were positive on d 3-d 18 after HBV infection.HBV in medium increased from d 0 to d 6 and subsequently decreased as the cells were progressively loosing their hepatocyte phenotypes.CONCLUSION:HBV could infect human fetal hepatocytes and replicate.This in vitro model allowed a detailed Study on early events associated with human HBV entry into cells and subsequent replication.

  13. Cell culture systems for the hepatitis C virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gilles Duverlie; Czeslaw Wychowski

    2007-01-01

    Since the discovery of HCV in 1989, the lack of a cell culture system has hampered research progress on this important human pathogen. No robust system has been obtained by empiric approaches, and HCV cell culture remained hypothetical until 2005. The construction of functional molecular clones has served as a starting point to reconstitute a consensus infectious cDNA that was able to transcribe infectious HCV RNAs as shown by intrahepatic inoculation in a chimpanzee. Other consensus clones have been selected and established in a human hepatoma cell line as replicons, i.e. self-replicating subgenomic or genomic viral RNAs. However, these replicons did not support production of infectious virus. Interestingly, some full-length replicons could be established without adaptive mutations and one of them was able to replicate at very high levels and to release virus particles that are infectious in cell culture and in vivo. This new cell culture system represents a major breakthrough in the HCV field and should enable a broad range of basic and applied studies to be achieved.

  14. A phenotypic assay to identify Chikungunya virus inhibitors targeting the nonstructural protein nsP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Lupan, Alexandru; Desprès, Philippe; Thoret, Sylviane; Pamlard, Olivier; Dubois, Joëlle; Guillou, Catherine; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène

    2013-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted pathogen responsible for an acute infection of abrupt onset, characterized by high fever, polyarthralgia, myalgia, headaches, chills, and rash. In 2006, CHIKV was responsible for an epidemic outbreak of unprecedented magnitude in the Indian Ocean, stressing the need for therapeutic approaches. Since then, we have acquired a better understanding of CHIKV biology, but we are still missing active molecules against this reemerging pathogen. We recently reported that the nonstructural nsP2 protein of CHIKV induces a transcriptional shutoff that allows the virus to block cellular antiviral response. This was demonstrated using various luciferase-based reporter gene assays, including a trans-reporter system where Gal4 DNA binding domain is fused to Fos transcription factor. Here, we turned this assay into a high-throughput screening system to identify small molecules targeting nsP2-mediated shutoff. Among 3040 molecules tested, we identified one natural compound that partially blocks nsP2 activity and inhibits CHIKV replication in vitro. This proof of concept suggests that similar functional assays could be developed to target other viral proteins mediating a cellular shutoff and identify innovative therapeutic molecules.

  15. Immunofluorescence assay method to detect dengue virus in Paniai-Papua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucipto, Teguh Hari; Ahwanah, Nur Laila Fitriati; Churrotin, Siti; Matake, Norifumi; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Soegijanto, Soegeng

    2016-03-01

    The dengue viruses (DENV), which include in the family Flaviviridae and the genus Flavivirus, was endemic in tropical areas and had been transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti. An increasing number of immigrants from endemic areas to the non-endemic areas have emphasized the need for a simple and reliable test for the diagnosis of dengue virus infection. The purpose of this study was to detect the dengue virus by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in the general population at Paniai-Papua. The results obtained from this study had showed a significantly better discrimination for DENV specific IgG antibodies. A total of 158 samples, 116 samples were IgG antibodies positive and 42 samples were negative. The conclusion of this study, Papua is not only a malaria endemic area, but also dengue virus infections were detected by IFA method. Therefore, the IFA can be used as an important diagnostic tool, which is a quick and an easy way to test samples from immigrants who come to the non-endemic areas.

  16. Markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Lindhardt, B O; Lauritzen, E;

    1989-01-01

    A total of 228 stored serum samples from 140 high risk individuals was examined for serological markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, and HIV antigen assay. All the samples were negative in first generation enzyme...

  17. Use of Existing Diagnostic Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Detection of Ebola Virus RNA in Semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, James; Higgs, Elizabeth S; Adams, Rick D; Jahrling, Peter B; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-04-15

    Sexual transmission of Ebola virus in Liberia has now been documented and associated with new clusters in regions previously declared Ebola free. Assays that have Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) and are routinely used to detect Ebola virus RNA in whole blood and plasma specimens at the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research were tested for their suitability in detecting the presence of Ebola virus RNA in semen. Qiagen AVL extraction protocols, as well as the Ebola Zaire Target 1 and major groove binder quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays, were demonstrably suitable for this purpose and should facilitate epidemiologic investigations, including those involving long-term survivors of Ebola.

  18. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Díaz-Badillo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  19. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  20. Comparison of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and one rapid immunoblot assay for detection of herpes simplex virus type 2-specific antibodies in serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groen (Jan); G. van Dijk (Grietje); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); W.I. van der Meijden (Willem); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe sensitivities and specificities of three immunoassays for the detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in serum, including the one-strip rapid immunoblot assay (RIBA; Chiron Corporation) and two indirect enzyme

  1. Isolation of eastern equine encephalitis virus in A549 and MRC-5 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor, E A; Josephson, S L

    1999-07-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) has been diagnosed either serologically or by virus isolation. Until now, the recovery of EEE virus has been delegated to reference laboratories with the expertise and resources needed to amplify the virus in a susceptible vertebrate host and/or to isolate and identify the virus in cell culture. We report a case in which EEE virus was recovered directly from a patient's cerebrospinal fluid in A549 and MRC-5 cell cultures. Many clinical virology laboratories routinely use these cells to recover adenovirus, herpes simplex virus, and enterovirus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of EEE virus in A549 cell culture. This report demonstrates the possibility of recovery of EEE virus in cell culture without the necessity of bioamplification or maintaining unusual cell lines.

  2. Radiometric macrophage culture assay for rapid evaluation of antileprosy activity of rifampin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, A.; Seshadri, P.S.; Prasad, H.K.; Sathish, M.; Nath, I.

    1983-10-01

    The antileprosy effect of rifampin was evaluated by a newly developed rapid in vitro assay wherein 31 human-derived strains and 1 armadillo-derived strain of Mycobacterium leprae were maintained for 2 and 3 weeks, respectively, in murine and human macrophages in the presence of (3H)thymidine. Of these strains, 27 showed significant incorporation of the radiolabel in cultures of live bacilli as compared with control cultures of heat-killed bacilli of the same strain. Consistent and significant inhibition of (3H)thymidine uptake was observed in M. leprae resident cultures with 3 to 200 ng of rifampin per ml as compared with similar cultures without the drug. In general, an increase in percent inhibition was seen from 3 to 20 ng/ml, with marginal increases at 40, 50, and 100 ng/ml. M. leprae strains appear to be remarkably susceptible to this drug in the in vitro assay.

  3. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Yellow Fever Virus and Application in Antigen Detection and IgM Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adungo, Ferdinard; Yu, Fuxun; Kamau, David; Inoue, Shingo; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Sang, Rosemary; Mwau, Matilu; Morita, Kouichi

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute hemorrhagic viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa and South America. The major challenge in YF disease detection and confirmation of outbreaks in Africa is the limited availability of reference laboratories and the persistent lack of access to diagnostic tests. We used wild-type YF virus sequences to generate recombinant envelope protein in an Escherichia coli expression system. Both the recombinant protein and sucrose gradient-purified YF vaccine virus 17D (YF-17D) were used to immunize BALB/c mice to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Eight MAbs were established and systematically characterized by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The established MAbs showed strong reactivity with wild-type YF virus and recombinant protein with no detectable cross-reactivity to dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. Epitope mapping showed strong binding of three MAbs to amino acid positions 1 to 51, while two MAbs mapped to amino acid positions 52 to 135 of the envelope protein. The remaining three MAbs did not show reactivity to envelope fragments. The established MAbs exert no neutralization against wild-type YF and 17D viruses (titer of <10 for both strains). The applicability of MAbs 8H3 and 3F4 was further evaluated using IgM capture ELISA. A total of 49 serum samples were analyzed, among which 12 positive patient and vaccinee samples were correctly identified. Using serum samples that were 2-fold serially diluted, the IgM capture ELISA was able to detect all YF-positive samples. Furthermore, MAb-based antigen detection ELISA enabled the detection of virus in culture supernatants containing titers of about 1,000 focus-forming units.

  4. VAPA, an innovative "virus-acquisition phenotyping assay" opens new horizons in research into the vector-transmission of plant viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martinière

    Full Text Available Host-to-host transmission--a key step in plant virus infection cycles--is ensured predominantly by vectors, especially aphids and related insects. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of virus acquisition, which is critical to vector-transmission, might help to design future virus control strategies, because any newly discovered molecular or cellular process is a potential target for hampering viral spread within host populations. With this aim in mind, an aphid membrane-feeding assay was developed where aphids transmitted two non-circulative viruses [cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and turnip mosaic virus] from infected protoplasts. In this assay, virus acquisition occurs exclusively from living cells. Most interestingly, we also show that CaMV is less efficiently transmitted by aphids in the presence of oryzalin--a microtubule-depolymerising drug. The example presented here demonstrates that our technically simple "virus-acquisition phenotyping assay" (VAPA provides a first opportunity to implement correlative studies relating the physiological state of infected plant cells to vector-transmission efficiency.

  5. VAPA, an innovative "virus-acquisition phenotyping assay" opens new horizons in research into the vector-transmission of plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Macia, Jean-Luc; Bagnolini, Guillaume; Jridi, Chiraz; Bak, Aurélie; Blanc, Stéphane; Drucker, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Host-to-host transmission--a key step in plant virus infection cycles--is ensured predominantly by vectors, especially aphids and related insects. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms of virus acquisition, which is critical to vector-transmission, might help to design future virus control strategies, because any newly discovered molecular or cellular process is a potential target for hampering viral spread within host populations. With this aim in mind, an aphid membrane-feeding assay was developed where aphids transmitted two non-circulative viruses [cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and turnip mosaic virus] from infected protoplasts. In this assay, virus acquisition occurs exclusively from living cells. Most interestingly, we also show that CaMV is less efficiently transmitted by aphids in the presence of oryzalin--a microtubule-depolymerising drug. The example presented here demonstrates that our technically simple "virus-acquisition phenotyping assay" (VAPA) provides a first opportunity to implement correlative studies relating the physiological state of infected plant cells to vector-transmission efficiency.

  6. In vivo neutralization assays by monoclonal antibodies against white spot syndrome virus in crayfish (Cambarus proclarkii)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yinan; ZHAN Wenbin; XING Jing; JIANG Yousheng

    2008-01-01

    The neutralizing activities of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) (2D2,2B2,1D2,1DS,1C2,4A1,6A4 and 6B4) were analyzed by in vivo experiments.Gills from WSSV-infected shrimp were homogenized and ten-fold serially diluted by PBS,and then incubated with MAbs (hybridoma culture supernatant),respectively.The mixture of WSSV and MAbs were injected into crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).Mter challenge,the death rates of crayfish were counted to determine the neutralizing activities of MAbs.At the same time,the mixture of myeloma culture supernatant and WSSV or PBS was served as positive or negative control,respectively.The results showed that,at each virus dilution,the mean time to death of the crayfish injected with MAb-treated virus was significantly longer than that in the positive control,though they all showed 100% mortality within 25 d,and meanwhile,few crayfish died in the negative control.Among the eight MAbs,2D2,2B2,1D2 and 1DS,especially the former two,delayed the mortality significantly,and 1C2,4Al and 6A4 delayed the mortality as well but not so efficiently,while MAb 6B4 was efficient only when the virus concentration increased.The results indicated that the anti-WSSV MAbs can neutralize WSSV in different virus dilutions.

  7. Development and evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of lymphocystis disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiong; Yue, Zhiqin; Liu, Hong; Liang, Chengzhu; Zheng, Xiaolong; Zhao, Yuran; Chen, Xiao; Xiao, Xizhi; Chen, Changfu

    2010-02-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed for the detection of lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV). A set of five specific primers, two inner and two outer primers and a loop primer, were designed on the basis of the major capsid protein gene of LCDV. The reaction time and temperatures were optimized for 60 min at 63 degrees C, respectively. LAMP amplification products were detected by a ladder-like appearance on agarose gel electrophoresis or a naked-eye inspection of a color change in the reaction tube by addition of SYBR Green I. The assay was specific for LCDV, and there was no cross-reactivity with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) or six other Iridoviridae viruses (epizootic hematopoietic necrosis virus, EHNV; tiger frog virus, TFV; Bohle iridovirus, BIV; soft-shelled turtle iridovirus, STIV; infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus, ISKNV; red sea bream iridovirus, RSIV). The detection limit of the LAMP assay was 15 fg, which was similar to that of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 10-fold higher than the conventional PCR. The LAMP assay was evaluated using 109 clinical samples, and the results indicated the suitability and simplicity of the test as a rapid, field diagnostic tool for detection of LCDV. The LCDV LAMP assay has potential for early diagnosis of LCDV infection.

  8. Peroxidase-linked assay for detection of antibodies against bovine leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Clarissa C; Nunes, Cristina F; Finger, Paula F; Siedler, Bianca S; Dummer, Luana; de Lima, Marcelo; Leite, Fábio P L; Fischer, Geferson; Vargas, Gilberto D'A; Hübner, Silvia de O

    2013-01-01

    A peroxidase linked assay (PLA) was designed to screen bovine sera for the presence of specific antibodies against bovine leukosis virus (BLV). Out of 201 samples of bovine sera analyzed, 52.2% were considered positive by PLA, 26.4% by AGID, and 38.9% by ELISA. Western blotting analyses excluded 27 samples found to be positive by PLA. PLA showed 100% of sensitivity when compared with AGID and ELISA. Specificity was 64.8% and 78%, respectively (kappa coefficients were 0.70 and 0.83). These findings indicate that PLA can be used as an alternative method for the diagnosis of BLV infection in cattle.

  9. Evaluation of a Commercial SD Dengue Virus NS1 Antigen Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Kit for Early Diagnosis of Dengue Virus Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Seok Mui; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2010-01-01

    Early definitive diagnosis of dengue virus infection may help in the timely management of dengue virus infection. We evaluated the Standard Diagnostics (SD, South Korea) dengue virus nonstructural protein NS1 antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (SD dengue NS1 Ag ELISA) for the detection of dengue virus NS1 antigen in patients' sera, using a total of 399 serum samples in a comparison with real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, an in-house IgM capture (MAC)-ELISA, and a hemagglutinatio...

  10. RAPID DETECTION OF RESPIRATORY VIRUSES USING MIXTURES OF MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES ON SHELL VIAL CULTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIRM, J; LUIJT, DS; PASTOOR, GW; MANDEMA, JM; SCHRODER, FP

    1992-01-01

    Eleven hundred and thirty-three clinical specimens submitted to the laboratory for diagnosis of respiratory virus infections were tested by direct immunofluorescence (DIF) for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), by shell vial culture, and by conventional cell culture. The shell vial cultures were sta

  11. RAPID DETECTION OF RESPIRATORY VIRUSES USING MIXTURES OF MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES ON SHELL VIAL CULTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIRM, J; LUIJT, DS; PASTOOR, GW; MANDEMA, JM; SCHRODER, FP

    1992-01-01

    Eleven hundred and thirty-three clinical specimens submitted to the laboratory for diagnosis of respiratory virus infections were tested by direct immunofluorescence (DIF) for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), by shell vial culture, and by conventional cell culture. The shell vial cultures were sta

  12. Benefit of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Assay in Prediction of Therapeutic Response to Interferon and Ribavirin Combination Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) ...

  13. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-05

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Genes transactivated by hepatitis C virus core protein, a microarray assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Liu; Shu-Lin Zhang; Jun Cheng; Yan Liu; Lin Wang; Qing Shao; Jian Zhang; Shu-Mei Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the new target genes transactivated by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein and to elucidate the pathogenesis of HCV infection.METHODS: Reverse transcribed cDNA was subjected tomicroarray assay. The coding gene transactivated by HCV core protein was cloned and analyzed with bioinformatics methods.RESULTS: The expressive vector of pcDNA3.1(-)-core was constructed and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing and approved correct. mRNA was purified from HepG2 and HepG2 cells transfected with pcDNA3.1(-)-core, respectively. The cDNA derived was subjected to microarray assay. A new gene namedHCTP4 was cloned with molecular biological method in combination with bioinformatics method.CONCLUSION: HCV core is a potential transactivator.Microarray is an efficient and convenient method for analysis of differentially expressed genes.

  15. Latex immunoagglutination assay for bovine viral diarrhea virus utilizing forward light scattering in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Brian C.; Song, Jae-Young; Han, Jin-Hee; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2008-02-01

    We have investigated the utilization of particle agglutination assays using forward light scattering measurements in a microfluidic device towards detecting viral particles. The model viral target was bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Highly carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (510 nm) were coated with anti-BVDV monoclonal antibodies. This solution was in turn used to detect live modified BVDV. This assay was first performed in a two well slide for proof of concept and then in a simple y-channel microfluidic device with optical fibers arranged in a close proximity setup. Particle immunoagglutination was detected through static light scattering measurements taken at 45° to incident light. In the microfluidic device, modified live BVDV was detected with a detection limit of 0.5 TCID 50 mL -1.

  16. Respiratory Virus Multiplex RT-PCR Assay Sensitivities and Influence Factors in Hospitalized Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jikui Deng; Zhuoya Ma; Wenbo Huang; Chengrong Li; Heping Wang; Yuejie Zheng; Rong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Multiplex RT-PCR assays have been widely used tools for detection and differentiation of a panel of respiratory viral pathogens.In this study,we evaluated the Qiagen ResPlex Ⅱ V2.0 kit and explored factors influencing its sensitivity.Nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) specimens were prospectively collected from pediatric inpatients with lower respiratory tract infections at the time of admission in the Shenzhen Children's Hospital from May 2009 to April 2010.Total nucleic acids were extracted using the EZ1 system (Qiagen,Germany) and 17 respiratory viruses and genotypes including influenza A virus (FluA),FluB,parainfluenza virus 1 (PIV1),PIV2,PIV3,PIV4,respiratory syncytial virus (RSV),human metapneumovirus (hMPV),rhinoviruses (RhV),enteroviruses (EnV),human bocaviruses (hBoV),adenoviruses (AdV),four coronaviruses (229E,OC43,NL63 and HKU1),and FluA 2009 pandemic H1N1(H1N1-p) were detected and identified by the ResPlex Ⅱ kit.In parallel,16 real-time TaqMan quantitative RT-PCR assays were used to quantitatively detect each virus except for RhV.Influenza and parainfluenza viral cultures were also performed.Among the total 438 NPS specimens collected during the study period,one or more viral pathogens were detected in 274 (62.6%) and 201(45.9%) specimens by monoplex TaqMan RT-PCR and multiplex ResPlex,respectively.When results from monoplex PCR or cell culture were used as the reference standard,the multiplex PCR possessed specificities of 92.9-100.0%.The sensitivity of multiplex PCR for PIV3,hMPV,PIV1 and BoV were 73.1%,70%,66.7% and 55.6%,respectively,while low sensitivities (11.1%-40.0%) were observed for FluA,EnV,OC43,RSV and H1N1.Among the seven viruses/genotypes detected with higher frequencies,multiplex PCR sensitivities were correlated significantly with viral loads determined by the TaqMan RT-PCR in F luA,H 1N 1-p and RSV (p=0.011-0.000).The Qiagen ResPlex Ⅱ multiplex RT-PCR kit possesses excellent specificity for simultaneous detection of 17

  17. In vivo virus growth competition assays demonstrate equal fitness of fish rhabdovirus strains that co-circulate in aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, R.M.; Garver, K.A.; Ranson, J.C.; Wargo, A.R.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    A novel virus growth competition assay for determining relative fitness of RNA virus variants in vivo has been developed using the fish rhabdovirus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We have conducted assays with IHNV isolates designated B, C, and D, representing the three most common genetic subtypes that co-circulate in Idaho trout farm aquaculture. In each assay, groups of 30 fish were immersed in a 1:1 mixture of two genotypes of IHNV, and then held in individual beakers for a 72 h period of in vivo competitive virus replication. Progeny virus populations in each fish were analyzed for the presence and proportion of each viral genotype. In two independent assays of the B:C isolate pair, and two assays of the B:D pair, all fish were co-infected and there was a high level of fish-to-fish variation in the ratio of the two competing genotypes. However, in each assay the average ratio in the 30-fish group was not significantly different from the input ratio of 1:1, indicating equal or nearly equal viral fitness on a host population basis, under the conditions tested. ?? 2008.

  18. In vivo virus growth competition assays demonstrate equal fitness of fish rhabdovirus strains that co-circulate in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Ryan M; Garver, Kyle A; Ranson, Judith C; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2008-11-01

    A novel virus growth competition assay for determining relative fitness of RNA virus variants in vivo has been developed using the fish rhabdovirus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We have conducted assays with IHNV isolates designated B, C, and D, representing the three most common genetic subtypes that co-circulate in Idaho trout farm aquaculture. In each assay, groups of 30 fish were immersed in a 1:1 mixture of two genotypes of IHNV, and then held in individual beakers for a 72h period of in vivo competitive virus replication. Progeny virus populations in each fish were analyzed for the presence and proportion of each viral genotype. In two independent assays of the B:C isolate pair, and two assays of the B:D pair, all fish were co-infected and there was a high level of fish-to-fish variation in the ratio of the two competing genotypes. However, in each assay the average ratio in the 30-fish group was not significantly different from the input ratio of 1:1, indicating equal or nearly equal viral fitness on a host population basis, under the conditions tested.

  19. Package of NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc virus and its application in the neutralization assay for NDV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Bin; Liu, Peixin; Li, Tao; Si, Wei; Xiu, Jinsheng; Liu, Henggui

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is a member of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily and can infect most species of birds. It has been a great threat for the poultry industry all around the world. In this report, we successfully produced infectious pseudotyped pNL4-3-Luc-R(-)E(-) (HIV-Luc) viruses with the HN and F envelope proteins of NDV. Further investigation revealed the cytoplasmic domains of HN and F, especially HN, plays a significant role in the infection efficiency of these pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses. Replacement of, or direct fusion to the cytoplasmic domain of the HN protein by that of vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) could greatly enhance or destroy the infective potential of HN and F-pseudotyped (NDV-pseudotyped) HIV-Luc virus. We further established a novel neutralization assay to evaluate neutralizing antibodies against NDV with the NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses. Comparative neutralization data indicate that the results determined by using the NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses are as reliable as those by the conventional virus-neutralization assay (VN test) with native NDV. Moreover, the results show that the novel neutralization assay is more sensitive than the VN test.

  20. Development of a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of dengue and chikungunya viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilia, D; Kakade, M; Alagarasu, K; Patil, J; Salunke, A; Parashar, D; Shah, P S

    2015-01-01

    Dengue and chikungunya viruses co-circulate and cause infections that start with similar symptoms but progress to radically different outcomes. Therefore, an early diagnostic test that can differentiate between the two is needed. A single-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that can simultaneously detect and quantitate RNA of all dengue virus (DENV) serotypes and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). The sensitivity was 100 % for DENV and 95.8 % for CHIKV, whilst the specificity was 100 % for both viruses when compared with conventional RT-PCR. The detection limit ranged from 1 to 50 plaque-forming units. The assay was successfully used for differential diagnosis of dengue and chikungunya in Pune, where the viruses co-circulate.

  1. Lymphoid organ cell culture system from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius) as a platform for white spot syndrome virus and shrimp immune-related gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, S; Jayesh, P; Sudheer, N S; Poulose, G; Mohandas, A; Philip, R; Singh, I S Bright

    2012-05-01

    Shrimp cell lines are yet to be reported and this restricts the prospects of investigating the associated viral pathogens, especially white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In this context, development of primary cell cultures from lymphoid organs was standardized. Poly-l-lysine-coated culture vessels enhanced growth of lymphoid cells, while the application of vertebrate growth factors did not, except insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Susceptibility of the lymphoid cells to WSSV was confirmed by immunofluoresence assay using monoclonal antibody against the 28 kDa envelope protein of WSSV. Expression of viral and immune-related genes in WSSV-infected lymphoid cultures could be demonstrated by RT-PCR. This emphasizes the utility of lymphoid primary cell culture as a platform for research in virus-cell interaction, virus morphogenesis, up and downregulation of shrimp immune-related genes, and also for the discovery of novel drugs to combat WSSV in shrimp culture.

  2. Accurate detection and quantification of the fish viral hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv) with a two-color fluorometric real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Lindsey R; Willey, James C; Palsule, Vrushalee V; Yeo, Jiyoun; Shepherd, Brian S; Crawford, Erin L; Stepien, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv) is one of the world's most serious fish pathogens, infecting >80 marine, freshwater, and estuarine fish species from Eurasia and North America. A novel and especially virulent strain - IVb - appeared in the Great Lakes in 2003, has killed many game fish species in a series of outbreaks in subsequent years, and shut down interstate transport of baitfish. Cell culture is the diagnostic method approved by the USDA-APHIS, which takes a month or longer, lacks sensitivity, and does not quantify the amount of virus. We thus present a novel, easy, rapid, and highly sensitive real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assay that incorporates synthetic competitive template internal standards for quality control to circumvent false negative results. Results demonstrate high signal-to-analyte response (slope = 1.00±0.02) and a linear dynamic range that spans seven orders of magnitude (R(2) = 0.99), ranging from 6 to 6,000,000 molecules. Infected fishes are found to harbor levels of virus that range to 1,200,000 VHSv molecules/10(6) actb1 molecules with 1,000 being a rough cut-off for clinical signs of disease. This new assay is rapid, inexpensive, and has significantly greater accuracy than other published qRT-PCR tests and traditional cell culture diagnostics.

  3. Accurate detection and quantification of the fish viral hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv with a two-color fluorometric real-time PCR assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey R Pierce

    Full Text Available Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus (VHSv is one of the world's most serious fish pathogens, infecting >80 marine, freshwater, and estuarine fish species from Eurasia and North America. A novel and especially virulent strain - IVb - appeared in the Great Lakes in 2003, has killed many game fish species in a series of outbreaks in subsequent years, and shut down interstate transport of baitfish. Cell culture is the diagnostic method approved by the USDA-APHIS, which takes a month or longer, lacks sensitivity, and does not quantify the amount of virus. We thus present a novel, easy, rapid, and highly sensitive real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR assay that incorporates synthetic competitive template internal standards for quality control to circumvent false negative results. Results demonstrate high signal-to-analyte response (slope = 1.00±0.02 and a linear dynamic range that spans seven orders of magnitude (R(2 = 0.99, ranging from 6 to 6,000,000 molecules. Infected fishes are found to harbor levels of virus that range to 1,200,000 VHSv molecules/10(6 actb1 molecules with 1,000 being a rough cut-off for clinical signs of disease. This new assay is rapid, inexpensive, and has significantly greater accuracy than other published qRT-PCR tests and traditional cell culture diagnostics.

  4. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus p7 membrane channels in a liposome-based assay system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    StGelais, Corine; Tuthill, Tobias J; Clarke, Dean S; Rowlands, David J; Harris, Mark; Griffin, Stephen

    2007-10-01

    Chemotherapy for patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is ineffective in over 50% of cases, generating a high demand for new drug targets. The p7 protein of HCV displays membrane channel activity in vitro and is essential for replication in vivo though its precise role in the virus life cycle is unknown. p7 channel activity can be specifically inhibited by several classes of compounds, making this protein an attractive candidate for drug development, though techniques used to date in characterising this protein are unsuited to compound library screening. Here we describe an assay for the channel forming ability of p7 based on the release of a fluorescent indicator from liposomes. We show that recombinant p7 from genotype 1b HCV causes a dose-dependent release of dye when mixed with liposomes and that this property is enhanced at acidic pH. We demonstrate that this activity is due to the formation of a size-selective pore rather than non-specific disruption of liposomes and that activity can be blocked by amantadine and several other compounds, validating it as a measure of p7 channel function. This system provides the first convenient in vitro assay for exploiting p7 as a therapeutic target.

  5. Simian varicella virus open reading frame 63/70 expression is required for efficient virus replication in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazeau, Elizabeth; Wellish, Mary; Kaufer, Benedict B.; Tischer, B. Karsten; Gray, Wayne; Zhou, Fuchun; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Hanlon, Teri; Golive, Anjani; Hall, Travis; Nair, Sreekala; Owens, Gregory P.; Mueller, Niklaus H.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Gilden, Don

    2011-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) open reading frame (ORF) 63, duplicated in the virus genome as ORF 70, is homologous to varicella zoster virus ORF 63/70. Transfection of bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing the wild-type SVV genome and mutants with stop codons in ORF 70, in both ORFs 63 and 70 and the repaired virus DNA sequences into Vero cells produced a cytopathic effect (CPE). The onset of CPE was much slower with the double-mutant transfectants (10 days vs. 3 days) and plaques were smaller. While SVV ORF 63 is not required for replication in culture, its expression leads to robust virus replication. PMID:21479719

  6. Development of a GeXP-multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of six cattle viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhixun; Xie, Zhiqin; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Liji; Huang, Li; Luo, Sisi; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Jiabo; Pang, Yaoshan

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), Bluetongue virus (BTV), Vesicular stomatitis Virus (VSV), Bovine viral diarrheal (BVDV), Bovine rotavirus (BRV), and Bovine herpesvirus 1 (IBRV) are common cattle infectious viruses that cause a great economic loss every year in many parts of the world. A rapid and high-throughput GenomeLab Gene Expression Profiler (GeXP) analyzer-based multiplex PCR assay was developed for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of these six cattle viruses. Six pairs of chimeric primers consisting of both the gene-specific primer and a universal primer were designed and used for amplification. Then capillary electrophoresis was used to separate the fluorescent labeled PCR products according to the amplicons size. The specificity of GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was examined with samples of the single template and mixed template of six viruses. The sensitivity was evaluated using the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay on serial 10-fold dilutions of ssRNAs obtained via in vitro transcription. To further evaluate the reliability, 305 clinical samples were tested by the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay. The results showed that the corresponding virus specific fragments of genes were amplified. The detection limit of the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was 100 copies/μL in a mixed sample of ssRNAs containing target genes of six different cattle viruses, whereas the detection limit for the Gexp-mono PCR assay for a single target gene was 10 copies/μL. In detection of viruses in 305 clinical samples, the results of GeXP were consistent with simplex real-time PCR. Analysis of positive samples by sequencing demonstrated that the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay had no false positive samples of nonspecific amplification. In conclusion, this GeXP-multiplex PCR assay is a high throughput, specific, sensitive, rapid and simple method for the detection and differentiation of six cattle viruses. It is an effective tool that can be applied for the rapid differential diagnosis of clinical

  7. Characterization of an efficient dengue virus replicon for development of assays of discovery of small molecules against dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi-Chen; Tsai, Ming-Han; Hu, Han-Shu; Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Ren-Huang; Wu, Szu-Huei; Lin, Hui-Mei; Song, Jen-Shin; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Yueh, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a public health threat to approximately 40% of the global population. At present, neither licensed vaccines nor effective therapies exist, and the mechanism of viral RNA replication is not well understood. Here, we report the development of efficient Renilla luciferase reporter-based DENV replicons that contain the full-length capsid sequence for transient and stable DENV RNA replication. A comparison of the transient and stable expression of this RNA-launched replicon to replicons containing various deletions revealed dengue replicon containing entire mature capsid RNA element has higher replicon activity. An efficient DNA-launched DENV replicon, pCMV-DV2Rep, containing a full-length capsid sequence, was created and successfully applied to evaluate the potency of known DENV inhibitors. Stable cell lines harboring the DENV replicon were easily established by transfecting pCMV-DV2Rep into BHK21 cells. Steady and high replicon reporter signals were observed in the stable DENV replicon cells, even after 30 passages. The stable DENV replicon cells were successfully used to determine the potency of known DENV inhibitors. A high-throughput screening assay based on stable DENV replicon cells was evaluated and shown to have an excellent Z' factor of 0.74. Altogether, the development of our efficient DENV replicon system will facilitate the study of virus replication and the discovery of antiviral compounds.

  8. In vitro propagation of plant virus using different forms of plant tissue culture and modes of culture operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Sharon M-H; Doran, Pauline M

    2009-09-10

    Plant virus accumulation was investigated in vitro using three different forms of plant tissue culture. Suspended cells, hairy roots and shooty teratomas of Nicotiana benthamiana were infected with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) using the same initial virus:biomass ratio. Viral infection did not affect tissue growth or morphology in any of the three culture systems. Average maximum virus concentrations in hairy roots and shooty teratomas were similar and about an order of magnitude higher than in suspended cells. Hairy roots were considered the preferred host because of their morphological stability in liquid medium and relative ease of culture. The average maximum virus concentration in the hairy roots was 0.82+/-0.14 mg g(-1) dry weight; viral coat protein represented a maximum of approximately 6% of total soluble protein in the biomass. Virus accumulation in hairy roots was investigated further using different modes of semi-continuous culture operation aimed at prolonging the root growth phase and providing nutrient supplementation; however, virus concentrations in the roots were not enhanced compared with simple batch culture. The relative infectivity of virus in the biomass declined by 80-90% during all the cultures tested, irrespective of the form of plant tissue used or mode of culture operation. Hairy root cultures inoculated with a transgenic TMV-based vector in batch culture accumulated green fluorescent protein (GFP); however, maximum GFP concentrations in the biomass were relatively low at 39 microg g(-1) dry weight, probably due to genetic instability of the vector. This work highlights the advantages of using hairy roots for in vitro propagation of TMV compared with shooty teratomas and suspended plant cells, and demonstrates that batch root culture is more effective than semi-continuous operations for accumulation of high virus concentrations in the biomass.

  9. Study on persistent infection of Japanese encephalitis virus Beijing-1 strain in serum-free Sf9 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun; Lee, Su Jeen; Park, Jin Yong; Park, Yong Wook; Kim, Hyun Sung; Kang, Heui-Yun; Hur, Byung-Ki; Ryu, Yeon-Woo; Han, Sang In; Kim, Jong Su

    2004-03-01

    Sf9 cells have obvious advantages for the conventional production technology of vaccine. They are useful tools for high concentration and large-scale cultures. Sf9 cells were grown to maximal concentration, 8 x 10(6) cells/ml in a 500ml spinner flask, with a doubling time at the exponentially growing phase of 24.5 hours, using serum-free media. To explore the ability of Sf9 cells to be infected by the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus Beijing-1 strain, Sf9 cells were infected with the virus. By 4-5 days post-infection, 10-15% of the Sf9 cells showed cytopathic effect (CPE), from granularity to the formation of syncytia and multinucleated giant cells continuously observed over a period of 35 days. Positive fluorescent reactions were detected in 30-40% of cells infected with the JE virus Beijing-1 strain, and the uninfected Sf9 cells were completely negative. Virus particles, propagated in Sf9 and Vero cells, were concentrated by sedimentation on 40% trehalose cushions by ultracentrifugation, and showed identical patterns of viral morphogenesis. Complete virus particles, 40 to 50 nm in diameter, were observed, and JE virus envelope (E) proteins, at 53 kDa, were found in the western blot analysis to the anti-JE virus E protein monoclonal antibody and reacted as a magenta band in the same position to the glycoprotein staining. To evaluate whether the infectious virus was produced in Sf9 cells inoculated with the JE virus Beijing-1 stain, Sf9 cells were inoculated with the virus, and sample harvested every 5 days. The titers of the JE virus Beijing-1 strain rose from 1.0 x 10(5) to 1.5 x 10(6) pfu/ml. The infected Sf9 cells could be sub-cultured in serum-free medium, with no change in the plaque sizes formed by the JE virus Beijing-1 strain in the plaque assay. It is suggested that the ability of the JE virus Beijing-1 strain to infect Sf9 cells in serum-free media will provide a useful insect cell system, where the JE virus replication, cytopathogenicity and vaccine

  10. Rapid detection of peste des petits ruminants virus by a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Bao, Jingyue; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhiliang; Wang, Junwei; Gong, Mingxia; Liu, Chunju; Li, Jinming

    2010-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is the causative agent of peste des petits ruminants (PPR), an economically important viral disease of small ruminants. In this report, a one-step, single-tube, reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for the detection of PPRV. A set of six LAMP primers were designed based on the matrix gene sequence of PPRV to amplify the target RNA by incubation at 63°C for 60min with Bst DNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase. The amplified products could be observed by the naked eye. The specificity of the RT-LAMP assay was validated by amplifying eight strains of PPRV isolated in different geographical areas. No cross-reactivity with other related viruses, including rinderpest virus, canine distemper virus and measles virus, was detected. The sensitivity of the assay was similar to that of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and 10-fold higher than that of conventional RT-PCR. Twenty clinical samples were evaluated by the RT-LAMP assay, and the results were consistent with those of real-time RT-PCR. As a simple, rapid and accurate detection method, this RT-LAMP assay has important potential applications in the clinical diagnosis of PPR and the surveillance of PPRV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested.

  12. Development and application of multiplex PCR assays for detection of virus-induced respiratory disease complex in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIEWBANG, Chutchai; RUNGSIPIPAT, Anudep; POOVORAWAN, Yong; TECHANGAMSUWAN, Somporn

    2016-01-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease complex (CIRDC) viruses have been detected in dogs with respiratory illness. Canine influenza virus (CIV), canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2) and canine herpesvirus 1 (CaHV-1), are all associated with the CIRDC. To allow diagnosis, two conventional multiplex polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were developed to simultaneously identify four RNA and two DNA viruses associated with CIRDC. The two multiplex PCR assays were then validated on 102 respiratory samples collected from 51 dogs with respiratory illness by sensitivity and specificity determination in comparison to conventional simplex PCR and a rapid three-antigen test kit. All six viruses were detected in either individual or multiple infections. The developed multiplex PCR assays had a >87% sensitivity and 100% specificity compared to their simplex counterpart. Compared to the three-antigen test kit, the multiplex PCR assays yielded 100% sensitivity and more than 83% specificity for detection of CAdV-2 and CDV, but not for CIV. Therefore, the developed multiplex PCR modalities were able to simultaneously diagnose a panel of CIRDC viruses and facilitated specimen collection through being suitable for use of nasal or oral samples. PMID:27628592

  13. Optimization of an enzyme-linked lectin assay suitable for rapid antigenic characterization of the neuraminidase of human influenza A(H3N2) viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.B. Westgeest (Kim); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); M.I. Spronken (Monique); J. Gao (Jin); L. Couzens (Laura); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.C. Eichelberger (Maryna); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); M.T. de Graaf (Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAntibodies to neuraminidase (NA), the second most abundant surface protein of the influenza virus, contribute to protection against influenza virus infection. Although traditional and miniaturized thiobarbituric acid (TBA) neuraminidase inhibition (NI) assays have been successfully used

  14. A combination of serological assays to detect human antibodies to the avian influenza A H7N9 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Dong

    Full Text Available Human infection with avian influenza A H7N9 virus was first identified in March 2013 and represents an ongoing threat to public health. There is a need to optimize serological methods for this new influenza virus. Here, we compared the sensitivity and specificity of the hemagglutinin inhibition (HI, microneutralization (MN, and Western blot (WB assays for the detection of human antibodies against avian influenza A (H7N9 virus. HI with horse erythrocytes (hRBCs and a modified MN assay possessed greater sensitivity than turkey erythrocytes and the standard MN assay, respectively. Using these assays, 80% of tested sera from confirmed H7N9 cases developed detectable antibody to H7N9 after 21 days. To balance sensitivity and specificity, we found serum titers of ≥20 (MN or 160 (HI samples were most effective in determining seropositive to H7N9 virus. Single serum with HI titers of 20-80 or MN titer of 10 could be validated by each other or WB assay. Unlike serum collected from adult or elderly populations, the antibody response in children with mild disease was low or undetectable. These combinations of assays will be useful in case diagnosis and serologic investigation of human cases.

  15. Rapid and highly informative diagnostic assay for H5N1 influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Pourmand

    Full Text Available A highly discriminative and information-rich diagnostic assay for H5N1 avian influenza would meet immediate patient care needs and provide valuable information for public health interventions, e.g., tracking of new and more dangerous variants by geographic area as well as avian-to-human or human-to-human transmission. In the present study, we have designed a rapid assay based on multilocus nucleic acid sequencing that focuses on the biologically significant regions of the H5N1 hemagglutinin gene. This allows the prediction of viral strain, clade, receptor binding properties, low- or high-pathogenicity cleavage site and glycosylation status. H5 HA genes were selected from nine known high-pathogenicity avian influenza subtype H5N1 viruses, based on their diversity in biologically significant regions of hemagglutinin and/or their ability to cause infection in humans. We devised a consensus pre-programmed pyrosequencing strategy, which may be used as a faster, more accurate alternative to de novo sequencing. The available data suggest that the assay described here is a reliable, rapid, information-rich and cost-effective approach for definitive diagnosis of H5N1 avian influenza. Knowledge of the predicted functional sequences of the HA will enhance H5N1 avian influenza surveillance efforts.

  16. A rapid profiling assay for avian leukosis virus subgroup E proviruses in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Katherine; McLean, Nancy; Benkel, Bernhard F

    2014-03-01

    Endogenous retroviral elements (ERVs) are prolific components of the genomes of complex species, typically occupying more sequence space than do essential, protein-encoding genes. Much of what we know today about the structure and function, as well as the evolution and pathogenic potential, of ERVs was fleshed out over several decades during the last century using the avian leukosis virus subgroup E-related (ALVE) family of endogenous retroviruses of chickens as a model system. A critical enabling factor in the elucidation of ALVE structure and function is the ability to detect and unambiguously identify specific ALVE proviral elements and to develop accurate element profiles for individual chickens under study. Currently, the most common approach for ALVE locus detection involves element-specific PCR assays carried out using primers that target host DNA near the insertion site of the provirus (i.e., the upstream and downstream flanks of the unoccupied site). Here we describe a new approach for proviral detection that exploits restriction enzyme sites in flanking DNA to develop ALVE element profiles more rapidly than with assays currently in use. Moreover, unlike element-specific PCR tests, the "profiling" assay detects novel ALVEs for which insertion sites have not yet been identified as well as previously characterized elements.

  17. [The preparation phosprenyl suppresses diarrhea and cattle infectious rhinotracheitis virus multiplication in sensitive cell cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozherelkov, S V; Belousova, R V; Danilov, L L; Deeva, A V; Mal'tsev, S D; Narovlianskiĭ, A N; Sanin, A V; Pronin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Fosprenil suppressed the multiplication of cattle diarrhea virus in calf coronary vessel cell culture. Added to the culture of infected cells in a dose of 200 mg, the drug decreased the virus titer 30-fold in comparison with infected control cultures. Antiviral activity of fosprenil towards infective rhinotracheitis virus multiplication was still higher: in a dose of 100 mg it decreased the virus titer in fetal calf lung culture 100-fold in comparison with the control. Moreover, the cytopathogenic effects of the viruses in infected cultures were 24-48 h delayed under the effect of fosprenil in comparison with infected control cultures. These results recommend fosprenil for the treatment of cattle viral diseases.

  18. Establishment of a cell-based assay system for hepatitis C virus serine protease and its primary applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Mao; Shui-Yun Lan; Yun-Wen Hu; Li Xiang; Zheng-Hong Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To establish an efficient, sensitive, cell-based assay system for NS3 serine protease in an effort to study further the property of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and develop new antiviral agents.METHOOS: We constructed pCI-neo-NS3/4A-SEAP chimeric plasmid, in which the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) was fused in-frame to the downstream of NS4A/4B cleavage site. The protease activity of NS3 was reflected by the activity of SEAP in the culture media of transient or stable expression cells. Stably expressing cell lines were obtained by G418 selection. Pefabloc SC, a potent irreversible serine protease inhibitor, was used to treat the stably expressing cell lines to assess the system for screening NS3 inhibitors. To compare the activity of serine proteases from 1b and 1a, two chimeric clones were constructed and introduced into both transient and stable expression systems.RESULTS: The SEAP activity in the culture media could be detected in both transient and stable expression systems,and was apparently decreased after Pefabloc SC treatment.In both transient and stable systems, NS3/4A-SEAP chimeric gene from HCV genotype 1b produced higher SEAP activity in the culture media than that from 1a.CONCLUSION: The cell-based system is efficient and sensitive enough for detection and comparison of NS3 protease activity, and screening of anti-NS3 inhibitors. The functional difference between NS3/4A from 1a and 1b subtypes revealed by this system provides a clue for further investigations.

  19. Comparison of a commercial ELISA and an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay to detect antibodies directed against porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nodelijk, G.; Wensvoort, G.; Kroese, B.; Leengoed, van L.A.M.G.; Colijn, E.; Verheijden, J.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    A commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV) was compared to an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA). Serum samples used were collected from pigs experimentally infected with

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of immunocytochemical assay for detection of Dengue virus 3 infection in mosquito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Widiastuti

    2012-07-01

    early warning  sign  for  the  risk  of  transmission  in  an area. Laboratory  tests  for  dengue  virus  infection  on mosquitoes  include  isolation  of  the  virus,  Polymerase Chain Reaction  (PCR  and  Direct  Fluorescent-Antibody (DFA  requires  a  high  level  of  technical  skill, expensive equipment,  and  time-consuming.  A  method based  on  immunocytochemical  (IC  using  monoclonal antibody DSSE10 has several advantages. This study aimed to evaluate sensitivity and specificity IC assay compared with Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR as gold standard to detect Dengue Virus (DENV-3 infections in mosquito Aedes aegypti.Methods: An experimental study was conducted in laboratory of Medical Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM in May 2009 until October 2010. A total of 22 artificially-infected adult Ae.  aegypti  mosquitoes  of  DENV 3  were  used  as  infectious  samples  and  35  non-infected adult  Ae.  aegypti mosquitoes  were  used  as  normal  ones. The  IC  Streptavidin  Biotin  Peroxidase  Complex  (SBPC assay  using monoclonal antibody DSSE10 was applied in mosquito head squash to detect Dengue virus antigen. RT-PCR as a gold standard was applied in mosquito thorax.Results:  The  kappa  value  showed  a  good  agreement between  two  observers  (kappa  value  0.63.  IC could detect dengue virus antigen as sensitive as RT-PCR (sensitivity 100%. But IC was less specific than RT-PCR (specificity 91% because some false positive results were found in this method.Conclusion: The IC method has a high sensitivity and high specificity compared with RT-PCR. This IC method may  be useful  for  virological  surveillance  of  dengue  infected Aedes  mosquitoes.  (Health  Science  Indones 2011;2:87-91. 

  1. Aciclovir resistance among indian strains of Herpes simplex virus as determined using a dye uptake assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to aciclovir (ACV among Herpes simplex virus (HSV isolates is increasingly being reported in the literature particularly in immunocompromised patients. However, there is only limited data available from India despite widespread use of ACV in our hospital. A cross-sectional study was hence conducted to determine the aciclovir (ACV susceptibility of HSV 1 and 2 isolates using a dye uptake (DU assay. This study showed a 3.0% prevalence of ACV resistance among HSV-1 strains (2/66, median IC 50 0.098 µg/mL while in HSV-2 strains, it was 7.8% (5/64, median IC 50 0.195 µg/mL. The IC 50 for the HSV-1 and HSV-2 strains resistant to ACV was greater than or equal to 6.25 µg/mL.

  2. Cell culture-Taqman PCR assay for evaluation of Cryptosporidium parvum disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Alexandra R; Fanok, Stella; Monis, Paul T; Saint, Christopher P

    2003-05-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum represents a challenge to the water industry and a threat to public health. In this study, we developed a cell culture-quantitative PCR assay to evaluate the inactivation of C. parvum with disinfectants. The assay was validated by using a range of disinfectants in common use in the water industry, including low-pressure UV light (LP-UV), ozone, mixed oxidants (MIOX), and chlorine. The assay was demonstrated to be reliable and sensitive, with a lower detection limit of a single infectious oocyst. Effective oocyst inactivation was achieved (>2 log(10) units) with LP-UV (20 mJ/cm(2)) or 2 mg of ozone/liter (for 10 min). MIOX and chlorine treatments of oocysts resulted in minimal effective disinfection, with disinfection systems for drinking water and recycled water.

  3. Microfluidic assay for simultaneous culture of multiple cell types on surfaces or within hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoojin; Han, Sewoon; Jeon, Jessie S.; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Sudo, Ryo; Kamm, Roger D.; Chung, Seok

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple but robust microfluidic assay combining three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. The microfluidic platform comprises hydrogel incorporating chambers between surface-accessible microchannels. Using this platform, well-defined biochemical and biophysical stimuli can be applied to multiple cell types interacting over distances of experiments can run for up to several weeks. PMID:22678430

  4. Effects of Multivitamins and Known Teratogens on Chick Cardiomyocytes Micromass Culture Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Memon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: This study aimed to find out whether the chick cardiomyocyte micromass (MM system could be employed to predict the teratogenecity of common environmental factors. Different multivitamins and over the counter drugs were used in this study.   Materials and Methods: White Leghorn 5-day-old embryo hearts were dissected and trypsinized to produce a cardiomyocyte cell suspension in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium. The cultures were incubated at 370C in 5% CO2 in air, and observations were made at 24, 48 and 144 hr, for the detection of cell beating. Cellular viability was assessed using the resazurin assay and cell protein content was assessed by the kenacid blue assay. It was observed that while not affecting total cell number folic acid, vitamin C, sodium fluoride and ginseng did not significantly reduced cell activity and beating. However cadmium chloride significantly reduced the beating, cell viability and cell protein content in micromass cultures. Results: The results demonstrate the potential of the chick cardiomyocyte MM culture assay to identify teratogens/embryotoxins that alter morphology and function, which may result in either teratogenic outcome or cytotoxicity. Conclusion: This could form part of a screen for developmental toxicity related to cardiac function

  5. Application of a seven-target pyrosequencing assay to improve the detection of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant Influenza A(H3N2) viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Daisuke; Okomo-Adhiambo, Margaret; Mishin, Vasiliy P; Guo, Zhu; Xu, Xiyan; Villanueva, Julie; Fry, Alicia M; Stevens, James; Gubareva, Larisa V

    2015-04-01

    National U.S. influenza antiviral surveillance incorporates data generated by neuraminidase (NA) inhibition (NI) testing of isolates supplemented with NA sequence analysis and pyrosequencing analysis of clinical specimens. A lack of established correlates for clinically relevant resistance to NA inhibitors (NAIs) hinders interpretation of NI assay data. Nonetheless, A(H3N2) viruses are commonly monitored for moderately or highly reduced inhibition in the NI assay and/or for the presence of NA markers E119V, R292K, and N294S. In 2012 to 2013, three drug-resistant A(H3N2) viruses were detected by NI assay among isolates (n = 1,424); all showed highly reduced inhibition by oseltamivir and had E119V. In addition, one R292K variant was detected among clinical samples (n = 1,024) by a 3-target pyrosequencing assay. Overall, the frequency of NAI resistance was low (0.16% [4 of 2,448]). To screen for additional NA markers previously identified in viruses from NAI-treated patients, the pyrosequencing assay was modified to include Q136K, I222V, and deletions encompassing residues 245 to 248 (del245-248) and residues 247 to 250 (del247-250). The 7-target pyrosequencing assay detected NA variants carrying E119V, Q136, and del245-248 in an isolate from an oseltamivir-treated patient. Next, this assay was applied to clinical specimens collected from hospitalized patients and submitted for NI testing but failed cell culture propagation. Of the 27 clinical specimens tested, 4 (15%) contained NA changes: R292K (n = 2), E119V (n = 1), and del247-250 (n = 1). Recombinant NAs with del247-250 or del245-248 conferred highly reduced inhibition by oseltamivir, reduced inhibition by zanamivir, and normal inhibition by peramivir and laninamivir. Our results demonstrated the benefits of the 7-target pyrosequencing assay in conducting A(H3N2) antiviral surveillance and testing for clinical care. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. A multicellular spheroid array to realize spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisawa, Yu-suke; Takagi, Airi; Nashimoto, Yuji; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel multicellular spheroid culture system that facilitates the easy preparation and culture of a spheroid microarray for the long-term monitoring of cellular activity. A spheroid culture device with an array of pyramid-like microholes was constructed in a silicon chip that was equipped with elastomeric microchannels. A cell suspension was introduced via the microfluidic channel into the microstructure that comprised silicon microholes and elastomeric microwells. A single spheroid can be formed and localized precisely within each microstructure. Since the culture medium could be replaced via the microchannels, a long-term culture (of approximately 2 weeks) is available on the chip. Measurement of albumin production in the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) showed that the liver-specific functions were maintained for 2 weeks. Based on the cellular respiratory activity, the cellular viability of the spheroid array on the chip was evaluated using scanning electrochemical microscopy. Responses to four different chemical stimulations were simultaneously detected on the same chip, thus demonstrating that each channel could be evaluated independently under various stimulation conditions. Our spheroid culture system facilitated the understanding of spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a single chip, thus functioning as a useful drug-screening device for cancer and liver cells.

  7. A Neuronal and Astrocyte Co-Culture Assay for High Content Analysis of Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, Janet L; Redpath, Stella; Ball, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    High Content Analysis (HCA) assays combine cells and detection reagents with automated imaging and powerful image analysis algorithms, allowing measurement of multiple cellular phenotypes within a single assay. In this study, we utilized HCA to develop a novel assay for neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity assessment represents an important part of drug safety evaluation, as well as being a significant focus of environmental protection efforts. Additionally, neurotoxicity is also a well-accepted in vitro marker of the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Recently, the application of HCA to neuronal screening has been reported. By labeling neuronal cells with βIII-tubulin, HCA assays can provide high-throughput, non-subjective, quantitative measurements of parameters such as neuronal number, neurite count and neurite length, all of which can indicate neurotoxic effects. However, the role of astrocytes remains unexplored in these models. Astrocytes have an integral role in the maintenance of central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis, and are associated with both neuroprotection and neurodegradation when they are activated in response to toxic substances or disease states. GFAP is an intermediate filament protein expressed predominantly in the astrocytes of the CNS. Astrocytic activation (gliosis) leads to the upregulation of GFAP, commonly accompanied by astrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. This process of reactive gliosis has been proposed as an early marker of damage to the nervous system. The traditional method for GFAP quantitation is by immunoassay. This approach is limited by an inability to provide information on cellular localization, morphology and cell number. We determined that HCA could be used to overcome these limitations and to simultaneously measure multiple features associated with gliosis - changes in GFAP expression, astrocyte hypertrophy, and astrocyte proliferation - within a single assay. In co-culture

  8. A neuronal and astrocyte co-culture assay for high content analysis of neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, Janet L; Redpath, Stella; Ball, Andrew J

    2009-05-05

    High Content Analysis (HCA) assays combine cells and detection reagents with automated imaging and powerful image analysis algorithms, allowing measurement of multiple cellular phenotypes within a single assay. In this study, we utilized HCA to develop a novel assay for neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity assessment represents an important part of drug safety evaluation, as well as being a significant focus of environmental protection efforts. Additionally, neurotoxicity is also a well-accepted in vitro marker of the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Recently, the application of HCA to neuronal screening has been reported. By labeling neuronal cells with betaIII-tubulin, HCA assays can provide high-throughput, non-subjective, quantitative measurements of parameters such as neuronal number, neurite count and neurite length, all of which can indicate neurotoxic effects. However, the role of astrocytes remains unexplored in these models. Astrocytes have an integral role in the maintenance of central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis, and are associated with both neuroprotection and neurodegradation when they are activated in response to toxic substances or disease states. GFAP is an intermediate filament protein expressed predominantly in the astrocytes of the CNS. Astrocytic activation (gliosis) leads to the upregulation of GFAP, commonly accompanied by astrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. This process of reactive gliosis has been proposed as an early marker of damage to the nervous system. The traditional method for GFAP quantitation is by immunoassay. This approach is limited by an inability to provide information on cellular localization, morphology and cell number. We determined that HCA could be used to overcome these limitations and to simultaneously measure multiple features associated with gliosis - changes in GFAP expression, astrocyte hypertrophy, and astrocyte proliferation - within a single assay. In co-culture

  9. A novel high-throughput vaccinia virus neutralization assay and preexisting immunity in populations from different geographic regions in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30-55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT. Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6% in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. CONCLUSION: A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in

  10. A Novel High-Throughput Vaccinia Virus Neutralization Assay and Preexisting Immunity in Populations from Different Geographic Regions in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Nie, Jianhui; Zhu, Rong; Gao, Dongying; Song, Aijing; Meng, Shufang; Xu, Xuemei; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    Background Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT) resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. Methodology/Principal Findings A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV) neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc) was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30–55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6%) in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. Conclusion A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in Beijing and Anhui

  11. A novel high-throughput vaccinia virus neutralization assay and preexisting immunity in populations from different geographic regions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Nie, Jianhui; Zhu, Rong; Gao, Dongying; Song, Aijing; Meng, Shufang; Xu, Xuemei; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT) resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV) neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc) was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30-55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6%) in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in Beijing and Anhui provinces of China.

  12. Analytical Performance Characteristics of the Cepheid GeneXpert Ebola Assay for the Detection of Ebola Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Pinsky

    Full Text Available The recently developed Xpert® Ebola Assay is a novel nucleic acid amplification test for simplified detection of Ebola virus (EBOV in whole blood and buccal swab samples. The assay targets sequences in two EBOV genes, lowering the risk for new variants to escape detection in the test. The objective of this report is to present analytical characteristics of the Xpert® Ebola Assay on whole blood samples.This study evaluated the assay's analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, inclusivity and exclusivity performance in whole blood specimens. EBOV RNA, inactivated EBOV, and infectious EBOV were used as targets. The dynamic range of the assay, the inactivation of virus, and specimen stability were also evaluated. The lower limit of detection (LoD for the assay using inactivated virus was estimated to be 73 copies/mL (95% CI: 51-97 copies/mL. The LoD for infectious virus was estimated to be 1 plaque-forming unit/mL, and for RNA to be 232 copies/mL (95% CI 163-302 copies/mL. The assay correctly identified five different Ebola viruses, Yambuku-Mayinga, Makona-C07, Yambuku-Ecran, Gabon-Ilembe, and Kikwit-956210, and correctly excluded all non-EBOV isolates tested. The conditions used by Xpert® Ebola for inactivation of infectious virus reduced EBOV titer by ≥6 logs.In summary, we found the Xpert® Ebola Assay to have high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of EBOV in whole blood. It offers ease of use, fast turnaround time, and remote monitoring. The test has an efficient viral inactivation protocol, fulfills inclusivity and exclusivity criteria, and has specimen stability characteristics consistent with the need for decentralized testing. The simplicity of the assay should enable testing in a wide variety of laboratory settings, including remote laboratories that are not capable of performing highly complex nucleic acid amplification tests, and during outbreaks where time to detection is critical.

  13. Comparison of cell-based and PCR-based assays as methods for measuring infectivity of Tulane virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lei; Yang, David; Wang, Dapeng; Tian, Peng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used Tulane virus (TV) as a surrogate for HuNoV to evaluate for correlation between two cell-based assays and three PCR-based assays. Specifically, the cell-based plaque and TCID50 assays measure for infectious virus particles, while the PCR-based RNase exposure, porcine gastric mucin in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR), and antibody in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR) assays measure for an amplicon within encapsidated viral genome. Ten batches of viral stocks ranging from 3.41 × 10(5) to 6.67 × 10(6) plaque forming units (PFUs) were used for side by side comparison with PFU as a reference. The results indicate that one PFU was equivalent to 6.69 ± 2.34 TCID50 units, 9.75 ± 10.87 RNase-untreated genomic copies (GCs), 2.87 ± 3.05 RNase-treated GCs, 0.07 ± 0.07 PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs, and 0.52 ± 0.39 Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs. We observed that while the cell-based assays were consistent with each other, the TCID50 assay was more sensitive than the plaque assay. In contrast, the PCR-based assays were not always consistent with the cell-based assays. The very high variations in GCs as measured by both ISC-RT-qPCR assays made them difficult to correlate against the relatively small variations (<20-fold) in the PFUs or TCID50 units as measured by the cell-based assays.

  14. The development of a qualitative real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of hepatitis C virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, A.; Crowley, B.; Niesters, H.; Herra, C.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) represents a favourable option for the detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV). A real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay was developed as a qualitative diagnostic screening method for the detection of HCV using the ABI PRISM 7500 Sequence Detection

  15. The development of a qualitative real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of hepatitis C virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, A.; Crowley, B.; Niesters, H.; Herra, C.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) represents a favourable option for the detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV). A real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay was developed as a qualitative diagnostic screening method for the detection of HCV using the ABI PRISM 7500 Sequence Detection

  16. Quantitative multiplex assay for simultaneous detection and identification of Indiana and New Jersey serotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Fernandez, Jovita;

    2005-01-01

    In order to establish a rapid and reliable system for the detection of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we developed a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay for the detection, quantification, and differentiation of the major serotypes, VSV Indiana and VSV New Jersey, using a closed...

  17. Characterization of an infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) virus carrier cell culture with resistance to superinfection with heterologous viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Inmaculada; Galiana, Antonio; Falcó, Alberto; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2011-04-21

    A state of persistence of a non susceptible fish cell line with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was established in vitro by experimental infection. The persistently infected culture showed sustained production of infectious virus and could be continuously passaged for months. A distinct feature of this culture is that only a very small fraction of the cells harbours virus replication, in contrast to other reported IPNV-persistently infected cells from salmonid fish, where nearly all the cells express viral antigens. In spite of the small number of detectable IPNV-infected cells, the carrier culture shows resistance to superinfection with homologous as well as heterologous viruses. Temperature shift-up experiments indicate that viral interference is due to continuous replication of IPNV in the culture. Quantitation of Mx gene expression suggested that the interference phenomenon could be mediated by the activation of the interferon (IFN) system. However, conditioned medium from the IPNV-infected cell cultures only marginally protected other cells against VHSV infection, indicating that other type I IFN-independent mechanism may be underlying the resistance of the persistently infected culture to infection with heterologous viruses. Our study defines a novel in vitro model of IPNV persistence and contributes to the understanding of the widespread distribution of aquabirnaviruses in marine and fresh water environments by establishing a carrier state in non susceptible fish species.

  18. Porcine deltacoronavirus infection: Etiology, cell culture for virus isolation and propagation, molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwonil; Hu, Hui; Saif, Linda J

    2016-12-02

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) (family Coronaviridae, genus Deltacoronavirus) is a novel swine enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes acute diarrhea/vomiting, dehydration and mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. PDCoV diarrhea was first reported in the US in early 2014, concurrently with co-circulation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) (family Coronaviridae, genus Alphacoronavirus). The origin of PDCoV in pigs and also its sudden emergence or route of introduction into the US still remains unclear. In the US, since 2013-2014, the newly emerged PDCoV and PEDV have spread nationwide, causing a high number of pig deaths and significant economic impacts. The current US PDCoV strains are enteropathogenic and infect villous epithelial cells of the entire small and large intestines although the jejunum and ileum are the primary sites of infection. Similar to PEDV infections, PDCoV infections also cause acute, severe atrophic enteritis accompanied by transient viremia (viral RNA) that leads to severe diarrhea and/or vomiting, followed by dehydration as the potential cause of death in nursing piglets. At present, differential diagnosis of PDCoV, PEDV, and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is essential to control viral diarrheas in US swine. Cell culture-adapted US PDCoV (TC-PDCoV) strains have been isolated and propagated by us and in several other laboratories. TC-PDCoV strains will be useful to develop serologic assays and to evaluate if serial cell-culture passage attenuates TC-PDCoV as a potential vaccine candidate strain. A comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of epidemic PDCoV strains is currently needed to prevent and control the disease in affected regions and to develop an effective vaccine. This review focuses on the etiology, cell culture isolation and propagation, molecular epidemiology, disease mechanisms and pathogenesis of PDCoV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion.

  20. Chick ex ovo culture and ex ovo CAM assay: how it really works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohle, Daniel S; Pasa, Susanne D; Gustmann, Sebastian; Laub, Markus; Wissler, Josef H; Jennissen, Herbert P; Dünker, Nicole

    2009-11-30

    Chicken eggs in the early phase of breeding are between in vitro and in vivo systems and provide a vascular test environment not only to study angiogenesis but also to study tumorigenesis. After the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) has developed, its blood vessel network can be easily accessed, manipulated and observed and therefore provides an optimal setting for angiogenesis assays. Since the lymphoid system is not fully developed until late stages of incubation, the chick embryo serves as a naturally immunodeficient host capable of sustaining grafted tissues and cells without species-specific restrictions. In addition to nurturing developing allo- and xenografts, the CAM blood vessel network provides a uniquely supportive environment for tumor cell intravasation, dissemination, and vascular arrest and a repository where arrested cells extravasate to form micro metastatic foci. For experimental purposes, in most of the recent studies the CAM was exposed by cutting a window through the egg shell and experiments were carried out in ovo, resulting in significant limitations in the accessibility of the CAM and possibilities for observation and photo documentation of effects. When shell-less cultures of the chick embryo were used(1-4), no experimental details were provided and, if published at all, the survival rates of these cultures were low. We refined the method of ex ovo culture of chick embryos significantly by introducing a rationally controlled extrusion of the egg content. These ex ovo cultures enhance the accessibility of the CAM and chick embryo, enabling easy in vivo documentation of effects and facilitating experimental manipulation of the embryo. This allows the successful application to a large number of scientific questions: (1) As an improved angiogenesis assay(5,6), (2) an experimental set up for facilitated injections in the vitreous of the chick embryo eye(7-9), (3) as a test environment for dissemination and intravasation of dispersed tumor

  1. Analytical Performance Characteristics of the Cepheid GeneXpert Ebola Assay for the Detection of Ebola Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Sahoo, Malaya K.; Sandlund, Johanna; Kleman, Marika; Kulkarni, Medha; Grufman, Per; Nygren, Malin; Kwiatkowski, Robert; Baron, Ellen Jo; Tenover, Fred; Denison, Blake; Higuchi, Russell; Van Atta, Reuel; Beer, Neil Reginald; Carrillo, Alda Celena; Naraghi-Arani, Pejman; Mire, Chad E.; Ranadheera, Charlene; Grolla, Allen; Lagerqvist, Nina; Persing, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The recently developed Xpert® Ebola Assay is a novel nucleic acid amplification test for simplified detection of Ebola virus (EBOV) in whole blood and buccal swab samples. The assay targets sequences in two EBOV genes, lowering the risk for new variants to escape detection in the test. The objective of this report is to present analytical characteristics of the Xpert® Ebola Assay on whole blood samples. Methods and Findings This study evaluated the assay’s analytical sensitivity, analytical specificity, inclusivity and exclusivity performance in whole blood specimens. EBOV RNA, inactivated EBOV, and infectious EBOV were used as targets. The dynamic range of the assay, the inactivation of virus, and specimen stability were also evaluated. The lower limit of detection (LoD) for the assay using inactivated virus was estimated to be 73 copies/mL (95% CI: 51–97 copies/mL). The LoD for infectious virus was estimated to be 1 plaque-forming unit/mL, and for RNA to be 232 copies/mL (95% CI 163–302 copies/mL). The assay correctly identified five different Ebola viruses, Yambuku-Mayinga, Makona-C07, Yambuku-Ecran, Gabon-Ilembe, and Kikwit-956210, and correctly excluded all non-EBOV isolates tested. The conditions used by Xpert® Ebola for inactivation of infectious virus reduced EBOV titer by ≥6 logs. Conclusion In summary, we found the Xpert® Ebola Assay to have high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of EBOV in whole blood. It offers ease of use, fast turnaround time, and remote monitoring. The test has an efficient viral inactivation protocol, fulfills inclusivity and exclusivity criteria, and has specimen stability characteristics consistent with the need for decentralized testing. The simplicity of the assay should enable testing in a wide variety of laboratory settings, including remote laboratories that are not capable of performing highly complex nucleic acid amplification tests, and during outbreaks where time to detection

  2. Production System of Virus-free Apple Plants Using Heat Treatment and Shoot Tip CultureShoot Tip Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunsup Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In worldwide, viral diseases of apple plants has caused the serious problems like reduced production and malformation of fruits. Also, the damages of apple plants by virus and/or viroid infection (Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus, Apple stem grooving virus, Apple mosaic virus, and Apple scar skin viroid were reported in Korea. However there is few report about the protection approach against the infection by apple viruses. Therefore, this paper introduced the experimental protocol for the development of virus-free apple cultivars (Danhong, Hongan, Saenara, Summerdream. Apple plants were treated at 37oC for 4 weeks and shoot tips were cultured in vitro. After heat treatment, the detection of apple viruses was performed by RT-PCR using virusspecific detection primers in new apple cultivars. With the heat treatments followed by in vitro shoot tip culture, the proportion of virus-free stocks of ‘Danhong’, ‘Hongan’, ‘Saenara’, and ‘Summerdream’ was 28%, 16%, 12%, and 12%, respectively. Taken together, this approach can be a good tool for production of virus-free apple stocks.

  3. Duplex Real-Time RT-PCR Assays for the Detection and Typing of Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viarouge, Cyril; Breard, Emmanuel; Zientara, Stephan; Vitour, Damien; Sailleau, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) may cause severe clinical episodes in some species of deer and sometimes in cattle. Laboratory diagnosis provides a basis for the design and timely implementation of disease control measures. There are seven distinct EHDV serotypes, VP2 coding segment 2 being the target for serotype specificity. This paper reports the development and validation of eight duplex real-time RT-PCR assays to simultaneously amplify the EHDV target (S9 for the pan-EHDV real-time RT-PCR assay and S2 for the serotyping assays) and endogenous control gene Beta-actin. Analytical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, inter- and intra-assay variation and efficiency were evaluated for each assay. All were shown to be highly specific and sensitive. PMID:26161784

  4. Different sensitivities of cultured mammalian cells towards aphidicolin-enhanced DNA effects in the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Bausinger, Julia

    2016-06-01

    The comet assay in combination with the polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin (APC) has been used to measure DNA excision repair activity, DNA repair kinetics and individual DNA repair capacity. Since APC can enhance genotoxic effects of mutagens measured by the comet assay, this approach has been proposed for increasing the sensitivity of the comet assay in human biomonitoring. The APC-modified comet assay has mainly been performed with human blood and it was shown that it not only enhances the detection of DNA damage repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER) but also damage typically repaired by base excision repair (BER). Recently, we reported that in contrast to blood leukocytes, A549 cells (a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line) seem to be insensitive towards the repair-inhibiting action of APC. To further elucidate the general usefulness of the APC-modified comet assay for studying repair in cultured mammalian cells, we comparatively investigated further cell lines (HeLa, TK6, V79). DNA damage was induced by BPDE (benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide) and MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) in the absence and presence of APC (3 or 15μM). APC was either added for 2h together with the mutagen or cells were pre-incubated for 30min with APC before the mutagen was added. The results indicate that the cell lines tested differ fundamentally with regard to their sensitivity and specificity towards the repair-inhibiting effect of APC. The actual cause for these differences is still unclear but potential molecular explanations are discussed. Irrespective of the underlying mechanism(s), our study revealed practical limitations of the use of the APC-modified comet assay.

  5. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus infections in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K W; Chueh, L L; Wang, M H; Huang, Y T; Fang, B H; Chang, C Y; Fang, M C; Chou, J Y; Hsieh, S C; Wan, C H

    2013-04-01

    Mouse parvoviruses are among the most prevalent infectious pathogens in contemporary mouse colonies. To improve the efficiency of routine screening for mouse parvovirus infections, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the VP gene was developed. The assay detected minute virus of mice (MVM), mouse parvovirus (MPV) and a mouse housekeeping gene (α-actin) and was able to specifically detect MVM and MPV at levels as low as 50 copies. Co-infection with the two viruses with up to 200-fold differences in viral concentrations can easily be detected. The multiplex PCR assay developed here could be a useful tool for monitoring mouse health and the viral contamination of biological materials.

  6. Rapid Molecular Detection of Zika Virus in Acute-Phase Urine Samples Using the Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed; Faye, Oumar; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Patriota, João Veras; Giorgi, Ricardo Rodrigues; Patel, Pranav; Böhlken-Fascher, Susanne; Landt, Olfert; Niedrig, Matthias; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade; Czerny, Claus Peter; Sall, Amadou A.; Weidmann, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Background: Currently the detection of Zika virus (ZIKV) in patient samples is done by real-time RT-PCR. Samples collected from rural area are sent to highly equipped laboratories for screening. A rapid point-of-care test is needed to detect the virus, especially at low resource settings. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this report, we describe the development of a reverse transcription isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay for the identification of ZIKV. RT-RPA assay was portable, sensitive (21 RNA molecules), and rapid (3-15 minutes). No cross-reactivity was detected to other flaviviruses, alphaviruses and arboviruses. Compared to real-time RT-PCR, the diagnostic sensitivity was 92%, while the specificity was 100%. Conclusions/Significance: The developed assay is a promising platform for rapid point of need detection of ZIKV in low resource settings and elsewhere (e.g. during mass gathering). PMID:28239513

  7. Development of Lentivirus-Based Reference Materials for Ebola Virus Nucleic Acid Amplification Technology-Based Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiuzzo, Giada; Ashall, James; Doris, Kathryn S; MacLellan-Gibson, Kirsty; Nicolson, Carolyn; Wilkinson, Dianna E; Harvey, Ruth; Almond, Neil; Anderson, Robert; Efstathiou, Stacey; Minor, Philip D; Page, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The 2013-present Ebola virus outbreak in Western Africa has prompted the production of many diagnostic assays, mostly based on nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAT). The calibration and performance assessment of established assays and those under evaluation requires reference materials that can be used in parallel with the clinical sample to standardise or control for every step of the procedure, from extraction to the final qualitative/quantitative result. We have developed safe and stable Ebola virus RNA reference materials by encapsidating anti sense viral RNA into HIV-1-like particles. The lentiviral particles are replication-deficient and non-infectious due to the lack of HIV-1 genes and Envelope protein. Ebola virus genes were subcloned for encapsidation into two lentiviral preparations, one containing NP-VP35-GP and the other VP40 and L RNA. Each reference material was formulated as a high-titre standard for use as a calibrator for secondary or internal standards, and a 10,000-fold lower titre preparation to serve as an in-run control. The preparations have been freeze-dried to maximise stability. These HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials were suitable for use with in-house and commercial quantitative RT-PCR assays and with digital RT-PCR. The HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials are stable at up to 37°C for two weeks, allowing the shipment of the material worldwide at ambient temperature. These results support further evaluation of the HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials as part of an International collaborative study for the establishment of the 1st International Standard for Ebola virus RNA.

  8. Development and validation of a multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of three papaya viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yang, Yong; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2014-10-21

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV), and Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) produce similar symptoms in papaya. Each threatens commercial production of papaya on Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay was developed to detect simultaneously these three viruses by screening combinations of mixed primer pairs and optimizing the multiplex RT-PCR reaction conditions. A mixture of three specific primer pairs was used to amplify three distinct fragments of 613 bp from the P3 gene of PRSV, 355 bp from the CP gene of PLDMV, and 205 bp from the CP gene of PapMV, demonstrating the assay's specificity. The sensitivity of the multiplex RT-PCR was evaluated by showing plasmids containing each of the viral target genes with 1.44 × 103, 1.79 × 103, and 1.91 × 102 copies for the three viruses could be detected successfully. The multiplex RT-PCR was applied successfully for detection of three viruses from 341 field samples collected from 18 counties of Hainan Island, China. Rates of single infections were 186/341 (54.5%), 93/341 (27.3%), and 3/341 (0.9%), for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively; 59/341 (17.3%) of the samples were co-infected with PRSV and PLDMV, which is the first time being reported in Hainan Island. This multiplex RT-PCR assay is a simple, rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective method for detecting multiple viruses in papaya and can be used for routine molecular diagnosis and epidemiological studies in papaya.

  9. Plaque morphology of Teschen disease viruses and certain pig enteroviruses in primary pig kidney monolayer cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardiri, A H

    1968-04-01

    Plaque patterns and diameters of four virulent strains and one tissue culture mutant of Teschen disease virus were compared with six pig enteroviruses isolated in the United States. They are described as they were produced in primary pig kidney monolayer cultures. Reproducible plaques, with similar characteristics and class-types of each of the viruses tested were obtained with the application of a 45-minute virus adsorption time. Their morphologic characteristics and the proportion in which the plaque types appeared may assist in the differentiation of these virus strains.

  10. Heat-transfer-method-based cell culture quality assay through cell detection by surface imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Khorshid, Mehran; Somers, Veerle; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Diliën, Hanne; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Cleij, Thomas J; Thoelen, Ronald; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    Previous work has indicated that surface imprinted polymers (SIPs) allow for highly specific cell detection through macromolecular cell imprints. The combination of SIPs with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique has led to the development of a selective, label-free, low-cost, and user-friendly cell detection assay. In this study, the breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 is used to assess the potential of the platform for monitoring the quality of a cell culture in time. For this purpose, we show that the proposed methodology is able to discriminate between the original cell line (adherent growth, ZR-75-1a) and a descendant cell line (suspension growth, ZR-75-1s). Moreover, ZR-75-1a cells were cultured for a prolonged period of time and analyzed using the heat-transfer method (HTM) at regular time intervals. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermal resistance (Rth) signal decays after a certain number of cell culture passages. This can likely be attributed to a compromised quality of the cell culture due to cross-contamination with the ZR-75-1s cell line, a finding that was confirmed by classical STR DNA profiling. The cells do not express the same functional groups on their membrane, resulting in a weaker bond between cell and imprint, enabling cell removal by mechanical friction, provided by flushing the measuring chamber with buffer solution. These findings were further confirmed by HTM and illustrate that the biomimetic sensor platform can be used as an assay for monitoring the quality of cell cultures in time.

  11. Nucleoprotein-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(indirect ELISA) for detecting antibodies specific to Ebola virus and Marbug virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi; Huang; Youjie; Zhu; Mengshi; Yang; Zhenqing; Zhang; Donglin; Song; Zhiming; Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full-length nucleoproteins from Ebola and Marburg viruses were expressed as His-tagged recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli and nucleoprotein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays(ELISAs) were established for the detection of antibodies specific to Ebola and Marburg viruses. The ELISAs were evaluated by testing antisera collected from rabbit immunized with Ebola and Marburg virus nucleoproteins. Although little cross-reactivity of antibodies was observed in antiEbola virus nucleoprotein rabbit antisera, the highest reactions to immunoglobulin G(Ig G) were uniformly detected against the nucleoprotein antigens of homologous viruses. We further evaluated the ELISA’s ability to detect antibodies to Ebola and Marburg viruses using human sera samples collected from individuals passing through the Guangdong port of entry. With a threshold set at the mean plus three standard deviations of average optical densities of sera tested, the ELISA systems using these two recombinant nucleoproteins have good sensitivity and specificity. These results demonstrate the usefulness of ELISA for diagnostics as well as ecological and serosurvey studies of Ebola and Marburg virus infection.

  12. Nucleoprotein-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (indirect ELISA) for detecting antibodies specific to Ebola virus and Marbug virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Zhu, Youjie; Yang, Mengshi; Zhang, Zhenqing; Song, Donglin; Yuan, Zhiming

    2014-12-01

    Full-length nucleoproteins from Ebola and Marburg viruses were expressed as His-tagged recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli and nucleoprotein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were established for the detection of antibodies specific to Ebola and Marburg viruses. The ELISAs were evaluated by testing antisera collected from rabbit immunized with Ebola and Marburg virus nucleoproteins. Although little cross-reactivity of antibodies was observed in anti-Ebola virus nucleoprotein rabbit antisera, the highest reactions to immunoglobulin G (IgG) were uniformly detected against the nucleoprotein antigens of homologous viruses. We further evaluated the ELISA's ability to detect antibodies to Ebola and Marburg viruses using human sera samples collected from individuals passing through the Guangdong port of entry. With a threshold set at the mean plus three standard deviations of average optical densities of sera tested, the ELISA systems using these two recombinant nucleoproteins have good sensitivity and specificity. These results demonstrate the usefulness of ELISA for diagnostics as well as ecological and serosurvey studies of Ebola and Marburg virus infection.

  13. Simultaneous detection and quantitation of Chikungunya, dengue and West Nile viruses by multiplex RT-PCR assays and dengue virus typing using high resolution melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naze, F; Le Roux, K; Schuffenecker, I; Zeller, H; Staikowsky, F; Grivard, P; Michault, A; Laurent, P

    2009-12-01

    Chikungunya (CHIKV), Dengue (DENV) and West Nile (WNV) viruses are arthropod-borne viruses that are able to emerge or re-emerge in many regions due to climatic changes and increase in travel. Since these viruses produce similar clinical signs it is important for physicians and epidemiologists to differentiate them rapidly. A molecular method was developed for their detection and quantitation in plasma samples and a DENV typing technique were developed. The method consisted in performing two multiplex real-time one-step RT-PCR assays, to detect and quantify the three viruses. Both assays were conducted in a single run, from a single RNA extract containing a unique coextracted and coamplified composite internal control. The quantitation results were close to the best detection thresholds obtained with simplex RT-PCR techniques. The differentiation of DENV types was performed using a High Resolution Melting technique. The assays enable the early diagnosis of the three arboviruses during viremia, including cases of coinfection. The method is rapid, specific and highly sensitive with a potential for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological surveillance. A DENV positive sample can be typed conveniently using the High Resolution Melting technique using the same apparatus.

  14. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchita Das

    Full Text Available CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR. The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively. The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  15. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S.; Mirza, Aashiq H.; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R.; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K.; Olson, Victoria A.; Larone, Davise H.; Spitzer, Eric D.; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M.

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus). PMID:26381398

  16. Development of field-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays for detection of Chikungunya and O'nyong-nyong viruses in mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darci R; Lee, John S; Jahrling, Jordan; Kulesh, David A; Turell, Michael J; Groebner, Jennifer L; O'Guinn, Monica L

    2009-10-01

    Chikungunya (CHIK) and O'nyong-nyong (ONN) are important emerging arthropod-borne diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these two viruses in mosquitoes has not been evaluated, and the effects of extraneous mosquito tissue on assay performance have not been tested. Additionally, no real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay exists for detecting ONN virus (ONNV) RNA. We describe the development of sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR assays for detecting CHIK and ONN viral RNA in mosquitoes, which have application for field use. In addition, we compared three methods for primer/probe design for assay development by evaluating their sensitivity and specificity. This comparison resulted in development of virus-specific assays that could detect less than one plaque-forming unit equivalent of each of the viruses in mosquitoes. The use of these assays will aid in arthropod-borne disease surveillance and in the control of the associated diseases.

  17. Application of speckle dynamics for studying metabolic activity of cell cultures with herpes virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, A. P.; Bakharev, A. A.; Malygin, A. S.; Mikhaylova, J. A.; Borodin, E. M.; Poryvayeva, A. P.; Glinskikh, N. P.

    2014-05-01

    The report considers the results of the experiments in which digital values of light intensity I and the image area correlation index η values were recorded on a real-time basis for one or two days. Three cell cultures with viruses along with intact cultures were investigated. High correlation of dependence of η values on time t values was demonstrated for three cultures. The η=η(t) and I=I(t) dependences for cells with and without viruses differ considerably. It was shown that the presence of viruses could be determined as early as ten minutes after measurements were started.

  18. Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth and look-alike disease viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindson, B J; Baker, B R; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Reid, S M; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; King, D P

    2007-09-18

    A high-throughput multiplexed assay (Multiplex Version 1.0) was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRTPCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

  19. Quantitative determination of VEGF165 in cell culture medium by aptamer sandwich based chemiluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Siwen; He, Ziyi; Mao, Sifeng; Jie, Mingsha; Yi, Linglu; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2017-08-15

    In this work, we have developed a sensitive and selective chemiluminescence (CL) assay for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165) quantitative detection based on two specific VEGF165 binding aptamers (Apt). VEGF is a predominant biomarker in cancer angiogenesis, and sensitive detection method of VEGF are highly demanded for both academic study and clinical diagnosis of multiple cancers. In our experiment, VEGF165 was captured in a sandwich structure assembled by two binding aptamers, one capture aptamer was immobilized on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and another VEGF-binding aptamer was labeled by biotin for further phosphatase conjunction. After Apt-VEGF-Apt sandwich was formed on MBs surface, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was modified to the second aptamer to catalyze CL reaction. By applying 4-methoxy-4-(3-phosphatephenyl)-spiro-(1,2-dioxetane-3,2-adamantane) (AMPPD) as CL substrate, strong signal intensity was achieved. VEGF165 content as low as 1ng/mL was detected in standard spiked samples by our assay, and linear range of working curve was confirmed from 1 to 20ng/mL. Then our method was successfully applied for cell culture medium analysis and on-chip hypoxic HepG2-HUVEC co-culture model study with excellent accuracy equal to ELISA Kit. Our developed assay demonstrated an outstanding performance in VEGF165 quantification and may be further extended to clinical testing of important biomarkers as well as probing microchip cell culture model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A hybrid stochastic-deterministic computational model accurately describes spatial dynamics and virus diffusion in HIV-1 growth competition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Taina; Gibson, Richard; Leitner, Thomas; Miller, Melanie A; Arts, Eric J; Somersalo, Erkki; Calvetti, Daniela

    2012-11-01

    We present a new hybrid stochastic-deterministic, spatially distributed computational model to simulate growth competition assays on a relatively immobile monolayer of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), commonly used for determining ex vivo fitness of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The novel features of our approach include incorporation of viral diffusion through a deterministic diffusion model while simulating cellular dynamics via a stochastic Markov chain model. The model accounts for multiple infections of target cells, CD4-downregulation, and the delay between the infection of a cell and the production of new virus particles. The minimum threshold level of infection induced by a virus inoculum is determined via a series of dilution experiments, and is used to determine the probability of infection of a susceptible cell as a function of local virus density. We illustrate how this model can be used for estimating the distribution of cells infected by either a single virus type or two competing viruses. Our model captures experimentally observed variation in the fitness difference between two virus strains, and suggests a way to minimize variation and dual infection in experiments.

  1. Development of a Luminex-Based DIVA Assay for Serological Detection of African Horse Sickness Virus in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Matamoros, A; Nieto-Pelegrín, E; Beck, C; Rivera-Arroyo, B; Lecollinet, S; Sailleau, C; Zientara, S; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2016-08-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is considered a fatal re-emergent vector-borne disease of horses. In the absence of any effective treatment for AHS, vaccination remains the most effective form of disease control. The new generation of vaccines, such as one based on purified, inactivated AHS virus (AHSV, serotype 4), which does not induce antibodies against non-structural protein 3 (NS3), enables the development of diagnostic methods that differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA assays). As detecting AHS in AHSV-free countries may lead to restrictions on international animal movements and thereby cause significant economic damage, these DIVA assays are crucial for reducing movement restrictions. In this article, we describe a Luminex-based multiplex assay for DIVA diagnosis of AHS, and we validate it in a duplex format to detect antibodies against structural protein 7 (VP7) and NS3 in serum samples from horses vaccinated with inactivated AHSV4 vaccine or infected with a live virus of the same serotype. Results of the Luminex-based assay for detecting anti-NS3 antibodies showed good positive correlation with results from an in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thus, the Luminex-based technique described here may allow multiplex DIVA antibody detection in a single sample in less than 2 h, and it may prove adaptable for the development of robust, multiplex serological assays.

  2. Additional survey on genotoxicity of natural anthraquinones in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Yoshimi, N; Iwata, H; Tanaka, T; Kawai, K; Sankawa, U

    1988-08-01

    Genotoxicity of fungal anthraquinones of islandicin, iridoskyrin and (-) rubroskyrin, and a colorant of insect origin, cochineal and its component, carminic acid, an anthraquinone, was examined in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test. The results were compared with that of versicolorin A, an anthraquinone with bisfuran ring, which had been proved to be genotoxic on this assay. All of these anthraquinones, differently from versicolorin A did not show clear response of DNA repair. The results suggest that these agents are not genotoxic carcinogens.

  3. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE EVIDENCE OF VIRUS INFECTION IN CULTURED MARINE FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Electron microscope investigation on the red sea bream (Pagrosomus major), bastard halibut (Paralichthys olivaceus) and stone flounder (Kareius bicoloratus) in North China revealed virus infection in the bodies of the dead and diseased fish. These viruses included the lymphocystis disease virus (LDV), parvovirus, globular virus, and a kind of baculavirus which was not discovered and reported before and is now tentatively named baculavirus of stone flounder (Kareius bicoloratus).

  4. Validation of a monoclonal antibody-based immunofluorescent assay to detect Burkholderia pseudomallei in blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulsuk, Adul; Paksanont, Suporn; Sangchankoom, Adisak; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Phunpang, Rungnapa; Jutrakul, Yaowaruk; Chantratita, Narisara; West, T Eoin

    2017-01-22

    Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the cause of melioidosis, using routine methods takes several days. Use of a monoclonal antibody-based immunofluorescent assay (IFA) on positive blood cultures may speed diagnosis. We tested the diagnostic accuracy of the IFA on 545 blood cultures positive for Gram-negative organisms at Udon Thani Hospital, Thailand, between June 2015 and August 2016. Sensitivity of the IFA was 100% and specificity was 99.6%. The median decrease in time to pathogen identification between the IFA result and routine methods was 28 h (IQR 25-51), p<0.0001. The IFA accurately expedites the diagnosis of melioidosis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Development of a streamlined rat whole embryo culture assay for classifying teratogenic potential of pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cindy; Cao, June; Kenyon, James R; Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Gong, Lei; Augustine-Rauch, Karen

    2012-06-01

    This study describes a novel rat whole embryo culture (rWEC) teratogenicity assay that applies a simplified experimental design and statistical prediction model, resulting in reduced animal requirements and increased throughput with low prediction error rate for classifying teratogenic potential of compounds. A total of 70 compounds (38 teratogens and 32 nonteratogens) were evaluated, and the prediction model was generated from a dataset of 59 compounds. The rWEC assay requires only one test concentration (1μM) and three structural endpoints (group average morphological scores of spinal cord, heart, and number of somite pairs), which are used in a recursive partition model for classifying teratogenic liability. The model fitting concordance between the WEC assay and in vivo outcome was 83% with a standard deviation (SD) of 4.9%. The predictivity for future compounds was evaluated by using two statistical methods. Fivefold cross-validation estimated the predictivity of this model at 73% (SD 5.8%). A second estimation of predictivity was obtained from an independent test set of 11 compounds that were not used to build the prediction model and reached 82% (SD 11.6%). The overall estimate for prediction concordance is 74% (SD 5.2%). There is no statistically significant difference (p value > 0.50) in the predictivity between this model and the model supporting European Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods WEC assay with predictivity of 80% (SD 10.6%). Overall, the streamlined WEC assay is estimated to reduce animal use and operational costs by more than 50%. It substantially improves results turnaround with no loss of predictivity.

  6. Multicenter Evaluation of Meridian Bioscience HSV 1&2 Molecular Assay for Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 from Clinical Cutaneous and Mucocutaneous Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faron, Matthew L; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Patel, Anami; Beqa, Safedin H; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Kohn, Debra; Leber, Amy L; Mayne, Donna; Northern, William I; Buchan, Blake W

    2016-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes acute and relapsing symptoms characterized by ulcerative lesions. Laboratory diagnosis of HSV in cutaneous or mucocutaneous lesions has historically been performed with the use of viral cell culture systems; however, these tests are laborious and suffer decreased sensitivity for advanced-stage lesions. The recent availability of FDA-cleared moderately complex assays has resulted in the increased use of molecular diagnostics for the routine detection of HSV in superficial swab specimens. We performed a clinical evaluation of the recently FDA-cleared illumigene HSV 1&2 loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati OH) for the detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in cutaneous and mucocutaneous swab specimens. A total of 1,153 clinical swab specimens were collected and tested at 7 different clinical centers. Each specimen was tested for the presence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 using the illumigene assay, and results were compared to those of the enzyme-linked virus-inducible system (ELVIS) as the reference method. Overall, the illumigene assay demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 94.8% and 95.5%, respectively, for the detection of HSV-1. Detection of HSV-2 was similar, with a sensitivity of 98.9% and a specificity of 95.5%. Discrepant analysis was performed using an alternative molecular test (AmpliVue HSV1+2 assay; Quidel Molecular, San Diego, CA) on 91/99 specimens that were recorded as false positive (FP) or false negative (FN) compared to the reference method. In total, 57/78 (73%) FP and 9/13 (69%) FN illumigene results were supported by the AmpliVue result. The illumigene HSV 1&2 assay demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to detect and differentiate HSV in clinical specimens and identified 57 additional specimens that were positive for HSV compared to culture. The use of LAMP eliminates the need for the cycling of temperatures and provides results in less than 60 min

  7. Development and evaluation of TaqMan real-time PCR assay for detection of beak and feather disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černíková, Lenka; Vitásková, Eliška; Nagy, Alexander

    2017-03-02

    Psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD) is one of the most significant viral diseases in psittacine birds. The aim of the presented study was to develop a highly specific and sensitive TaqMan real-time PCR assay for universal detection of beak and feather disease virus (BFDV). Primers and a hydrolysis probe were selected on the highly conserved regions belonging to the ORF1 of the BFDV genome which were identified by aligning 814 genomic sequences downloaded from the GenBank database. The evaluation of the reaction parameters suggested a reaction efficiency of 97.1%, with consistent detection of 10(1) virus copies/μl of nucleic acid extract. The low values of standard deviation and coefficient of variation indicate a high degree of reproducibility and repeatability. The diagnostic applicability of the assay was proven on 36 BFDV positive and 107 negative specimens of psittacine origin representing 28 species. The assay showed a 100% ability to detect distinct genetic variants of the virus. Our data suggest that the presented TaqMan real-time PCR represents a specific, sensitive and reliable assay facilitating the molecular detection of BFDV.

  8. Lyophilized standards for the calibration of real time PCR assay for hepatitis C virus RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lu-nan; WU Jian-min; DENG Wei; SHEN Zi-yu; CHEN Wen-xiang; LI Jin-ming

    2006-01-01

    Background Since October 1997, an international standard for hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleic acid amplification technology assay, 96/790, has been available. We compared a series of lyophilized standards with known HCV RNA concentrations against the international standard in fluorescence quantitative PCR detection.Methods A series of lyophilized sera were calibrated by ROCHE COBAS AMPLICOR HCV Monitor test against the international standard and sent to various manufacturers to analyse the samples using their own kits.Then calibration curves from the series were compared with that obtained from the external standard calibration curve with the manufacture's series.Results The standard calibration curve with the series of lyophilized serum showed an excellent correlation(R2>0.98), slope and intercept that were similar to those from the manufacture's series. When the standard calibration curve from the series of lyophilized standards were used to define the values of the given sample,lower coefficients of variation between kits from different manufactures were obtained.Conclusion The results showed that the lyophilized standards could be used to setup the standard calibration curve for clinical HCV RNA quantitative PCR detection.

  9. Sandwich-dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Yanlong; Wang, Huiguo; Jin, Jinhua; Li, Wenzhe

    2013-10-01

    A sandwich-dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot ELISA) was developed for the detection of canine distemper virus (CDV). In 56 dogs suspected to have CD the rates of detection of CDV antigen in samples of blood lymphocytes and palpebral conjunctiva by dot ELISA and ELISA were, respectively, 91% (49/54) and 81% (44/54) for the lymphocyte samples and 88% (28/32) and 75% (24/32) for the conjunctival samples. The CDV detection limits were 10 ng/50 μL for dot ELISA and 40 ng/50 μL for ELISA. The reliability of dot ELISA relative to electron microscopy was 96% with 22 samples: all 21 samples in which CDV particles were observed by electron microscopy yielded positive results with dot ELISA; the single sample in which particles were not observed yielded false-positive results with dot ELISA. The results indicate that the dot ELISA developed can serve as a reliable rapid diagnostic test in suspected cases of CD and also be useful for epidemiologic surveillance of the disease.

  10. Development of an equine-tropic replication-competent lentivirus assay for equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Daniel C; Bannister, Richard; Leroux-Carlucci, Marie A; Evans, Nerys E; Miskin, James E; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2012-10-01

    The release of lentiviral vectors for clinical use requires the testing of vector material, production cells, and, if applicable, ex vivo-transduced cells for the presence of replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). Vectors derived from the nonprimate lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have been directly administered to patients in several clinical trials, with no toxicity observed to date. Because EIAV does not replicate in human cells, and because putative RCLs derived from vector components within human vector production cells would most likely be human cell-tropic, we previously developed an RCL assay using amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) as a surrogate positive control and human cells as RCL amplification/indicator cells. Here we report an additional RCL assay that tests for the presence of theoretical "equine-tropic" RCLs. This approach provides further assurance of safety by detecting putative RCLs with an equine cell-specific tropism that might not be efficiently amplified by the human cell-based RCL assay. We tested the ability of accessory gene-deficient EIAV mutant viruses to replicate in a highly permissive equine cell line to direct our choice of a suitable EIAV-derived positive control. In addition, we report for the first time the mathematical rationale for use of the Poisson distribution to calculate minimal infectious dose of positive control virus and for use in monitoring assay positive/spike control failures in accumulating data sets. No RCLs have been detected in Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant RCL assays to date, further demonstrating that RCL formation is highly unlikely in contemporary minimal lentiviral vector systems.

  11. Longitudinal study of the detection of Bluetongue virus in bull semen and comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xingnian; Davis, Rodney J; Walsh, Susan J; Melville, Lorna F; Kirkland, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a significant impediment to the global movement of bovine semen. Repeat testing of blood from donor animals is specified in the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) Manual for the export of semen from regions where BTV may be present. Screening of blood or semen samples has usually been carried out by virus isolation (VI) either by inoculation of chicken embryos followed by passage onto insect and mammalian cell cultures or in vivo inoculation of sheep followed by serology to detect seroconversion. Direct testing of semen for BTV would enable earlier release of semen samples and avoid repeat testing of the donor, as well as provide an option for releasing batches of semen that were collected without certification of the donor. Quantitative (real-time) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays overcome most of the limitations of other methods and have the potential to provide higher sensitivity. The present study compared 5 qRT-PCR assays, including 2 commercially available kits, for the detection of BTV in semen serially collected from 8 bulls over a period of 90 days after experimental infection. The results of the study show that at least one of the qRT-PCR assays is extremely reproducible and has both very high sensitivity and specificity to reliably detect all available serotypes. The preferred qRT-PCR gave consistently superior results to VI, sheep inoculation, and conventional RT-PCR. Therefore, the assay can be recommended for the screening of bovine semen for freedom from BTV.

  12. Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) extract exhibits atropine-sensitive activity in a cultured cardiomyocyte assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Satin; Long, Shannon R; Proteau, Philip J; Filtz, Theresa M

    2009-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) plant extract is used as a herbal alternative medicine for the prevention and treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it was shown that hawthorn extract preparations caused negative chronotropic effects in a cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocyte assay, independent of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. The aim of this study was to further characterize the effect of hawthorn extract to decrease the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis that hawthorn is acting via muscarinic receptors, the effect of hawthorn extract on atrial versus ventricular cardiomyocytes in culture was evaluated. As would be expected for activation of muscarinic receptors, hawthorn extract had a greater effect in atrial cells. Atrial and/or ventricular cardiomyocytes were then treated with hawthorn extract in the presence of atropine or himbacine. Changes in the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes revealed that both muscarinic antagonists significantly attenuated the negative chronotropic activity of hawthorn extract. Using quinuclidinyl benzilate, L-[benzylic-4,4'-(3)H] ([(3)H]-QNB) as a radioligand antagonist, the effect of a partially purified hawthorn extract fraction to inhibit muscarinic receptor binding was quantified. Hawthorn extract fraction 3 dose-dependently inhibited [(3)H]-QNB binding to mouse heart membranes. Taken together, these findings suggest that decreased contraction frequency by hawthorn extracts in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes may be mediated via muscarinic receptor activation.

  13. Immuno disc assay for screening duck hepatitis B surface antigen in serum, liver tissue and cultured hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. de Wilde (G.); R.A. Heijtink

    1993-01-01

    textabstractAn immuno disc assay (IDA) for semi-quantitative analysis of the surface antigen (DHBsAg) of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is described. Unpurified antigen preparations were adsorbed onto punched-out nitrocellulose membrane discs. Rabbit antiserum raised against serum-derived

  14. A Novel Detection Platform for Shrimp White Spot Syndrome Virus Using an ICP11-Dependent Immunomagnetic Reduction (IMR) Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Chen; Ho, Chia-Shin; Yang, Che-Chuan; Chang, Yun-Tsui; Chang, Jui-Feng; Li, Chun-Yuan; Cheng, Cheng-Shun; Huang, Jiun-Yan; Lee, Yen-Fu; Hsu, Ming-Hung; Lin, Feng-Chun; Wang, Hao-Ching; Lo, Chu-Fang; Yang, Shieh-Yueh; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Shrimp white spot disease (WSD), which is caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), is one of the world's most serious shrimp diseases. Our objective in this study was to use an immunomagnetic reduction (IMR) assay to develop a highly sensitive, automatic WSSV detection platform targeted against ICP11 (the most highly expressed WSSV protein). After characterizing the magnetic reagents (Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles coated with anti ICP11), the detection limit for ICP11 protein using IMR was approximately 2 x 10(-3) ng/ml, and the linear dynamic range of the assay was 0.1~1 x 10(6) ng/ml. In assays of ICP11 protein in pleopod protein lysates from healthy and WSSV-infected shrimp, IMR signals were successfully detected from shrimp with low WSSV genome copy numbers. We concluded that this IMR assay targeting ICP11 has potential for detecting the WSSV.

  15. Comparison of Roche MONITOR and Organon Teknika NucliSens assays to quantify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, P; Fiscus, S A; Smith, R M; Shepard, R; Johnson, B; Nicotera, J; Harris, V L; Clough, L A; McKinsey, J; Haas, D W

    2001-04-01

    We compared Roche MONITOR and Organon Teknika NucliSens assays for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Results of 282 assays were highly correlated (r = 0.826), with MONITOR values being 0.29 +/- 0.4 log(10) copies/ml (mean +/- standard deviation) values. Both assays can reliably quantify HIV-1 RNA in CSF.

  16. Development and Validation of a Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Three Papaya Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decai Tuo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV, Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV, and Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV produce similar symptoms in papaya. Each threatens commercial production of papaya on Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay was developed to detect simultaneously these three viruses by screening combinations of mixed primer pairs and optimizing the multiplex RT-PCR reaction conditions. A mixture of three specific primer pairs was used to amplify three distinct fragments of 613 bp from the P3 gene of PRSV, 355 bp from the CP gene of PLDMV, and 205 bp from the CP gene of PapMV, demonstrating the assay’s specificity. The sensitivity of the multiplex RT-PCR was evaluated by showing plasmids containing each of the viral target genes with 1.44 × 103, 1.79 × 103, and 1.91 × 102 copies for the three viruses could be detected successfully. The multiplex RT-PCR was applied successfully for detection of three viruses from 341 field samples collected from 18 counties of Hainan Island, China. Rates of single infections were 186/341 (54.5%, 93/341 (27.3%, and 3/341 (0.9%, for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively; 59/341 (17.3% of the samples were co-infected with PRSV and PLDMV, which is the first time being reported in Hainan Island. This multiplex RT-PCR assay is a simple, rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective method for detecting multiple viruses in papaya and can be used for routine molecular diagnosis and epidemiological studies in papaya.

  17. Development of a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the rapid diagnosis of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakauchi, Mina; Takayama, Ikuyo; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tashiro, Masato; Kageyama, Tsutomu

    2014-08-01

    A genetic diagnosis system for detecting avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection using reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) technology was developed. The RT-LAMP assay showed no cross-reactivity with seasonal influenza A (H3N2 and H1N1pdm09) or influenza B viruses circulating in humans or with avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses. The sensitivity of the RT-LAMP assay was 42.47 copies/reaction. Considering the high specificity and sensitivity of the assay for detecting the avian influenza A (H7N9) virus and that the reaction was completed within 30 min, the RT-LAMP assay developed in this study is a promising rapid diagnostic tool for avian influenza A (H7N9) virus infection.

  18. Development of a SYBR Green quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection and quantification of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Kirkpatrick, Naomi C; Coppo, Mauricio; Lee, Sang-Won; Devlin, Joanne M; Markham, Philip F; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2011-06-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis is an acute viral respiratory disease of chickens with a worldwide distribution. Sensitive detection of the causative herpesvirus is particularly important because it can persist in the host at a very low copy number and be transmitted to other birds. Quantification of viral genome copy number is also useful for clinical investigations and experimental studies. In the study presented here, a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed using SYBR Green chemistry and the viral gene UL15a to detect and quantify infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in ILTV-inoculated chicken embryos or naturally infected birds. The specificity of the assay was confirmed using a panel of viral and bacterial pathogens of poultry. The sensitivity of the assay was compared with two conventional PCR assays, virus titration and an antigen-detecting enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The qPCR developed in this study was highly sensitive and specific, and has potential for quantification of ILTV in tissues from naturally and experimentally infected birds and embryos.

  19. Evaluation of the RNAi Constructs ability to Confer Resistance against Yellow Mosaic Viruses by Transient Silencing Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Kumari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV, a bipartite legume infecting geminivirus that causes considerable yield losses in South-East Asia. Pathogen derived resistance (PDR in plants is a very effective approach to acquire resistance against viral infections. Extrinsic expression of RNAi constructs targeting viral infective proteins is one of the effective scenarios to silence viral infectivity. In the present study, we tested the efficacy of three intron-spliced hairpin RNAi constructs which prepared by targeting the Coat Protein (CP/AV1, Replication initiation protein (Rep/AC1 and Intergenic region (IR of Soybean isolate of MYMIV (MYMIV-Sb in respect of reducing the virus DNA accumulation. In planta transient assay method were used to introduce the RNAi constructs in cowpea seedlings. This approach gave up to 80 % of protection to cowpea plants against virus infection. Only 15-20 % disease symptoms were observed in RNAi constructs inoculated cowpea plants. Among three constructs, RNAi-Rep construct showed maximum efficacy when compared with RNAi-CP and RNAi-IR. Results obtained in this study confirmed that at transient level, introduction of virus gene in form of hairpin RNAi construct (against the virus emerged as an effective strategy to control spreading the virus.

  20. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-03-01

    The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest to date. There is no cure or treatment for this deadly disease; therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostics to accurately detect Ebola. Current RT-PCR assays lack sensitive and reliable positive controls. To address this critical need, we devised a bio-inspired positive control for use in RT-PCR diagnostics: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays. Here, we report the bioengineering and validation of this probe.

  1. Real time TaqMan RT-PCR assay for the detection of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongyun, Chen; Wenjun, Zhao; Qinsheng, Gu; Qing, Chen; Shiming, Lin; Shuifang, Zhu

    2008-05-01

    A real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was developed for efficient detection of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV). The method was designed to use a duo-primer system with a TaqMan probe targeting the conserved sequence in 3' noncoding region (NCR) of CGMMV to detect isolates of this virus collected in China. The sensitivity of the real time RT-PCR assay was 0.13 pg of total RNA or 50 molecules of RNA transcripts. This level of sensitivity indicated that the one step real time RT-PCR developed in the present study could be used for routine testing assays. The real time RT-PCR method could assist in the implementation of quarantine measures for prevention and control of the disease caused by CGMMV.

  2. Alchemy: A web 2.0 real-time quality assurance platform for human immunodeficiency Virus, hepatitis C Virus, and BK Virus quantitation assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Agosto-Arroyo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular diagnostics laboratory faces the challenge of improving test turnaround time (TAT. Low and consistent TATs are of great clinical and regulatory importance, especially for molecular virology tests. Laboratory information systems (LISs contain all the data elements necessary to do accurate quality assurance (QA reporting of TAT and other measures, but these reports are in most cases still performed manually: a time-consuming and error-prone task. The aim of this study was to develop a web-based real-time QA platform that would automate QA reporting in the molecular diagnostics laboratory at our institution, and minimize the time expended in preparing these reports. Methods: Using a standard Linux, Nginx, MariaDB, PHP stack virtual machine running atop a Dell Precision 5810, we designed and built a web-based QA platform, code-named Alchemy. Data files pulled periodically from the LIS in comma-separated value format were used to autogenerate QA reports for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV quantitation, hepatitis C virus (HCV quantitation, and BK virus (BKV quantitation. Alchemy allowed the user to select a specific timeframe to be analyzed and calculated key QA statistics in real-time, including the average TAT in days, tests falling outside the expected TAT ranges, and test result ranges. Results: Before implementing Alchemy, reporting QA for the HIV, HCV, and BKV quantitation assays took 45–60 min of personnel time per test every month. With Alchemy, that time has decreased to 15 min total per month. Alchemy allowed the user to select specific periods of time and analyzed the TAT data in-depth without the need of extensive manual calculations. Conclusions: Alchemy has significantly decreased the time and the human error associated with QA report generation in our molecular diagnostics laboratory. Other tests will be added to this web-based platform in future updates. This effort shows the utility of informatician

  3. Development of an immuno-based colorimetric assay for white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyprasert-Thananimit, Suchera; Saleedang, Akrapon; Deachamag, Panchalika; Waiyapoka, Thanyaporn; Neulplub, Maitee; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major cause of infectious disease in cultured shrimp. A fast and reliable method for detecting and monitoring the amount of WSSV during farming would be extremely useful. This work describes a sandwich immunoassay that uses anti-GST-VP26, a WSSV-binding protein (WBP), and modified streptavidin magnesphere paramagnetic particles (SMPPs) to develop the technique. The WBP was immobilized on SMPPs and later bound to different copies of WSSV. The binding was detected using anti-GST-VP26 conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. This enzymatic reaction successfully changed the test solution to a concentration-dependent yellow color that was measured at 405 nm. The sensitivity of this method was between 1.6 × 10(4) and 1.6 × 10(7) copies µL(-1) of WSSV. In this study, the color for detection and semiquantitative analysis is easily observed and measured and can lead to the development of a test kit for screening WSSV during shrimp farming.

  4. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  5. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  6. Rapid Detection/pathotyping of Newcastle disease virus isolates in clinical samples using real time polymerase chain reaction assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Abdul Wajid, Muhammad Wasim, Tahir Yaqub, Shafqat F Rehmani, Tasra Bibi, Nadia Mukhtar, Javed Muhammad, Umar Bacha, Suliman Qadir Afridi, Muhammad Nauman Zahid, Zia u ddin, Muhammad Zubair Shabbir, Kamran Abbas & Muneer Ahmad ### Abstract In the present protocol we describe the real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay for the rapid detection/pathotyping of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isoaltes in clinical samples. Fusion gene and matrix ...

  7. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of avian influenza virus subtypes H5 and H7 antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Ajjouri, Gitte; Handberg, Kurt; Slomka, Marek J.; Coward, Vivien J; Cherbonnel, Martine; Jestin, Véronique; Lind, Peter; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Avian influenza virus (AIV) subtypes H5 and H7 attracts particular attention because of the risk of their potential pathogenicity in poultry. The haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is widely used as subtype specific test for serological diagnostics despite the laborious nature of this method. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) are being explored as an alternative test method.H5 and H7 specific monoclonal antibodies were experimentally raised and used in the d...

  8. Seroprevalence of Japanese encephalitis virus using competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA) in pigs in East Sumba, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Annytha Detha; Diana A. Wuri; Ketut Santhia

    2015-01-01

    Japanese Encephalitis (JE), a vector-borne zoonotic viral disease, is mostly prevalent in Asian countries. The objective of this study was to investigate the occurence of JE virus (JEV) among pigs in East Sumba, Indonesia. Blood samples (n=52) were randomly collected from 52 apparantly healthy pigs where pig population was high in East Sumba. The samples were subjected for seroprevalence study for the presence of antibodies against JEV using competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (C-EL...

  9. Evaluation of a single-tube fluorogenic RT-PCR assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in clinical samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakhverdyan, Mikhayil; Hägglund, Sara; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2005-01-01

    , antigen ELISA (Ag-ELISA) and virus isolation (VI). Interspersed negative control samples, samples from healthy animals and eight symptomatically or genetically related viruses were all negative, confirming a high specificity of the assay. Taken together, the data indicated that the fRT-PCR assay can...... understanding of the virus. In this study, a BRSV fluorogenic reverse transcription PCR (fRT-PCR) assay, based on TaqMan principle, was developed and evaluated on a large number of clinical samples, representing various cases of natural and experimental BRSV infections. By using a single-step closed-tube format...

  10. Performance of the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture assay for rapid detection of bacteria and resistance determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodémont, Magali; De Mendonça, Ricardo; Nonhoff, Claire; Roisin, Sandrine; Denis, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    Nonduplicate blood cultures that were positive for Gram-negative bacilli (n = 125) were tested by the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay; 117 (90.7%) isolates were members of the panel. For identification and resistance markers, the agreements with routine methods were 97.4% (114/117) and 92.3% (12/13). The BC-GN assay is a rapid and accurate tool for the detection of pathogens from blood cultures and could be integrated alongside conventional systems to enable faster patient management, but the clinical benefits should be further evaluated.

  11. Identification of viral suppressors of RNAi by a reporter assay in Drosophila S2 cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleef, K.W. van; Mierlo, J.T. van; Beek, M. van den; Rij, R.P. van

    2011-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway plays an important role in antiviral immunity in insects. To -counteract the RNAi-mediated immune response of their hosts, several insect viruses, such as Flock house virus, Drosophila C virus, and Cricket paralysis virus, encode potent viral suppressors of RNAi (

  12. Identification of viral suppressors of RNAi by a reporter assay in Drosophila S2 cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleef, K.W. van; Mierlo, J.T. van; Beek, M. van den; Rij, R.P. van

    2011-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway plays an important role in antiviral immunity in insects. To -counteract the RNAi-mediated immune response of their hosts, several insect viruses, such as Flock house virus, Drosophila C virus, and Cricket paralysis virus, encode potent viral suppressors of RNAi (

  13. Development of a real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Barry; Chamberlain, John; Logue, Christopher H; Cook, Nicola; Bruce, Christine; Dowall, Stuart D; Hewson, Roger

    2012-09-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a virulent tick-borne disease with a case fatality rate ranging from 10-50% for tick-borne transmission, and up to 80% for nosocomial transmission. Human cases have been reported in over 30 countries across Europe, Asia, and Africa. It appears to be spreading to new areas with several countries reporting their first human cases of CCHF disease within the past 10 years. We report a novel real-time RT-PCR assay designed to amplify a conserved region of the CCHF virus S segment. It is capable of detecting strains from all 7 groups of CCHF, including the AP92 strain that until recently represented a lineage of strains that were not associated with human disease. The limit of detection of the assay is 5 copies of target RNA, and the assay shows no cross-reactivity with other viruses from within the same genus, or with viruses causing similar human disease.

  14. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci directly from positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 10(3) CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene.

  15. Development of a novel real-time qPCR assay for the dual detection of canine and phocine distemper virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Linette Buxbom; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Helene

    In a commercial diagnostic setting streamlining and optimization is an important factor when the goal is to provide high quality diagnostic results while remaining competitive. In the PCR diagnostics unit at DTU National Veterinary Institute part of this optimization programme is to replace...... conventional PCR assays with real-time PCR assays to obtain a uniform assay palette. The present work describes the development of a novel real-time RT-qPCR assay for the dual detection of canine and phocine distemper virus. The assay is relevant for the future detection of outbreaks of canine distemper virus...... bp in the Phosphoprotein (P) gene of the distemper virus genome. The dynamic range and PCR efficiency (E) was experimentally determined using 10-fold dilutions of a specially designed distemper DNA-oligo in addition to extracted RNA from clinical samples. E of the real-time assay was shown to range...

  16. Comparative Pathogenicity of Liver Homogenate and Cell Culture Propagated Hydropericardium Syndrome Virus in Broiler Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ahmad, S. Zaman1, M. H. Mushtaq*, A. A. Anjum1 and M. Akram1

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative pathogenicity of liver homogenate and cell culture propagated agents of hydropericardium syndrome was studied in broiler birds. In Experiment I, 25-day-old while in experiment II, broiler birds at different ages were inoculated through different routes. In Experiment I, liver homogenate caused 64% mortality through intramuscular route and 33.33% mortality through oral route. The cell culture propagated HPS virus caused 60 and 13.33% mortality in broiler birds through intramuscular and oral routes, respectively. In Experiment II, none of the day-old-chicks died when challenged with liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus through S/C and oral route. The liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus caused higher mortality in different age groups of broiler birds through s/c route compared to oral route. The values of hemoglobin (Hb and packed cell volume (PCV showed highly significant (P<0.05 reduction indicating anemia. The values of Hb and PCV of the broiler birds inoculated with infectious liver homogenate were significantly lower as compared to birds inoculated with cell culture propagated HPS virus. The results indicated that the liver homogenate is more pathogenic than cell culture propagated HPS virus. These changes may be due to adoptability of the original FAdVs (fowl adenovirus after continued passages in the culture of chicken embryo liver cells. Importance of this study in vaccine production is also discussed.

  17. Evaluation on Sensitivity of the Human Sperm Motility Assay for Detecting Endotoxin in Culture Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI; Wen-hong ZHANG; Kang-shou YAO

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the sensitivity of the human sperm motility assay for detecting endotoxin in culture medium Materials & Methods Motile sperm were separated and exposed to different concentrations of endotoxin (0.5 ng/mL, 1 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, 1 000 ng/mL, 10 000 ng/mL, and 50 000 ng/mL), and sperm motility was determined after incubation. Effects of endotoxin on sperm motility in media without albumin were also examined. In addition, at the same concentrations of endotoxin (0.5 ng/mL, 1 ng/mL, and 10 ng/mL), the sensitivity of the human sperm motility assay was compared to those of 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryo bioassays.Results At levels of 0.5 ng/mL~1 000 ng/mL endotoxin in media with 2 mg/mL albumin, sperm did not show significant change in motility during 24 h of incubation when compared with the control (P>0.05). However, the sperm motility was significantly inhibited at endotoxin dosages of 10 000 and 50 000 ng/mL. In the absence of albumin supplementation, at endotoxin levels of 50 000 ng/mL, and 1 000 ng/mL, there was a marked decrease in sperm motility compared with the control after 2 h or 8 h of incubation, respectively (P<0.01). In media containing 0.5 ng/mL and 1 ng/mL endotoxin, 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryos had significantly reduced developmental rates in all developmental stages, and at the level of 10 ng/mL, the development of the embryos was arrested.Conclusion The human sperm motility assay could detect high levels of endotoxin in culture medium but its sensitivity to endotoxin would be inferior to that of the 1-cell or 2-cell mouse embryo bioassay. In the absence of albumin supplementation, the sensitivity of the sperm motility assay could be improved.

  18. In Vitro Assays for RNA Binding and Protein Priming of Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel N; Jones, Scott A; Hu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase synthesizes the viral DNA genome from the pre-genomic RNA (pgRNA) template through reverse transcription. Initiation of viral DNA synthesis is accomplished via a novel protein priming mechanism, so named because the polymerase itself acts as a primer, whereby the initiating nucleotide becomes covalently linked to a tyrosine residue on the viral polymerase. Protein priming, in turn, depends on specific recognition of the packaging signal on pgRNA called epsilon. These early events in viral DNA synthesis can now be dissected in vitro as described here.The polymerase is expressed in mammalian cells and purified by immunoprecipitation. The purified protein is associated with host cell factors, is enzymatically active, and its priming activity is epsilon dependent. A minimal epsilon RNA construct from pgRNA is co-expressed with the polymerase in cells. This RNA binds to and co-immunoprecipitates with the polymerase. Modifications can be made to either the epsilon RNA or the polymerase protein by manipulating the expression plasmids. Also, the priming reaction itself can be modified to assay for the initiation or subsequent DNA synthesis during protein priming, the susceptibility of the polymerase to chemical inhibitors, and the precise identification of the DNA products upon their release from the polymerase. The identity of associated host factors can also be evaluated. This protocol closely mirrors our current understanding of the RNA binding and protein priming steps of the HBV replication cycle, and it is amenable to modification. It should therefore facilitate both basic research and drug discovery.

  19. Susceptibility of testicular cell cultures of crab, Scylla serrata (Forskal) to white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashikumar, Anumol; Desai, P V

    2013-03-01

    Testicular cell culture of crab, Scylla serrata (Forskal) was used to study the effects of White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). We are showing the susceptibility of cell culture of crabs to WSSV. The proliferating cell culture of testes were maintained for more than 4 months in a medium prepared from L15 and crab saline supplemented with epidermal growth factor. The cell cultures inoculated with different concentrations of virus showed distinct cytopathic effects such as change in cell appearance, shrinkage and cell lysis. WSSV infection of cultured cells was confirmed by Nested PCR technique. The incorporation of viral DNA in cultured cells was shown by RAPD profile generated using 10-mer primers. The controls that were not exposed to WSSV did not show cytopathic effects. This work shows the usefulness of proliferating testicular cell culture for studying WSSV infection using molecular tools. Thus, this report gains significance as it opens new vistas for diagnostics and drugs for WSSV.

  20. Combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody detection assay does not improve diagnosis for seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Juan A; Castillo, Inmaculada; Pardo, Margarita; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Carreño, Vicente

    2006-12-01

    A combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody assay was evaluated for 115 seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection. The assay was reactive in one patient and negative to weakly reactive in three others (all four gave indeterminate results by supplemental assay) but failed to detect HCV in the remaining patients. Despite increased sensitivity the combined assay does not improve serodiagnosis of occult HCV infection.

  1. Combined Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Antigen-Antibody Detection Assay Does Not Improve Diagnosis for Seronegative Individuals with Occult HCV Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroga, Juan A.; Castillo, Inmaculada; Pardo, Margarita; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; CARREÑO, VICENTE

    2006-01-01

    A combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody assay was evaluated for 115 seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection. The assay was reactive in one patient and negative to weakly reactive in three others (all four gave indeterminate results by supplemental assay) but failed to detect HCV in the remaining patients. Despite increased sensitivity the combined assay does not improve serodiagnosis of occult HCV infection.

  2. Susceptibility of primary culture neurons from rats of different ages to encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Weiping; Ikegami, Hisashi; Nakayama, Yumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Katayama, Kei-ichi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Doi, Kunio

    2003-10-01

    The changes in susceptibility of neurons to the D variant of EMC virus (EMC-D) (10(6) PFU/well) were investigated in developing hippocampal primary cultures from postnatal days of 1, 7, and 56 Fischer 344 rats (P1, P7, and P56) for up to 12 h after infection (12 HAI). The virus titer of primary culture neurons increased at 1 HAI, decreased at 2 HAI, increased at 3 HAI, peaked at 8 HAI, and decreased at 12 HAI in all age groups. The titers at 1 and 8 HAI were lowest in P56 cultures. The virus titer of neurons was always higher than that of culture media, especially at 1 HAI, in P1 cultures, whereas the former was lower than the latter from 2 to 3 HAI in P7 cultures and from 2 to 4 HAI in P56 cultures, respectively. Signals of viral RNA detected by in situ hybridization were first observed in the peripheral cytoplasm of neurons at 1 HAI in P1 and P7 cultures and at 4 HAI in P56 cultures, respectively. The signals spread to a large or whole area of cytoplasm and also to processes thereafter. The number of viral RNA-positive neurons and the amount of signals decreased with age. The present results indicated that the susceptibility of primary culture neurons to EMC-D decreased with age but viral replication still occurred in P56 cultures.

  3. Comparison of in vitro cell culture and a mouse assay for measuring infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Paul A; Marshall, Marilyn M; Mead, Jan R; Johnson, Anne M; Korich, Dick G; Rosen, Jeffrey S; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the "gold standard," mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  4. Analytical performance of the Alere™ i Influenza A&B assay for the rapid detection of influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazzo, Cristina; Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Sanbonmatsu-Gámez, Sara; Pedrosa-Corral, Irene; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José; Navarro-Marí, José-María

    The analytical performance of the new Alere™ i Influenza A&B kit (AL-Flu) assay, based on isothermal nucleic acids amplification, was evaluated and compared with an antigen detection method, SD Bioline Influenza Virus Antigen Test (SDB), and an automated real-time RT-PCR, Simplexa™ Flu A/B & VRS Direct assay (SPX), for detection of influenza viruses. An "in-house" RT-PCR was used as the reference method. Sensitivity of AL-Flu, SDB, and SPX was 71.7%, 34.8%, and 100%, respectively. Specificity was 100% for all techniques. The turnaround time was 13min for AL-Flu, 15min for SDB, and 75min for SPX. The Alere™ i Influenza A&B assay is an optimal point-of-care assay for influenza diagnosis in clinical emergency settings, and is more sensitive and specific than antigen detection methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Seroprevalence of anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV in a Korean population: comparison of two commercial anti-HEV assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hyun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV has emerged as an important cause of epidemic and sporadic acute viral hepatitis worldwide. This study investigated the seroprevalence of anti-HEV in a Korean population and compared the performance of two commercially available anti-HEV assays. Methods A total 147 health-check examinees were randomly sampled as matched to the age- and sex- adjusted standard population based on the Korean National Census of 2007. Serum immunoglobulin G anti-HEV was determined by using the Genelabs assay (Genelabs, Singapore and the Wantai assay (Wantai, Beijing, China. Results The overall anti-HEV seroprevalence was 23.1% (95% CI, 16.1-30.1% using the Wantai assay and 14.3% (95% CI, 8.3-20.3% using the Genelabs assay. Only 12 samples (8.1% were positive for anti-HEV as measured by both assays; agreement between the two assays was poor (kappa value of 0.315. The anti-HEV seroprevalence increased with age from 2% and 3% in the people younger than 20-years-of-age to 34.6% and 42.3% in those over 59-years-of-age by the Genelabs and Wantai assay, respectively. Conclusions The HEV seroprevalence in Korean population is about 20% overall, with seroprevalence increasing in this population with increasing age. There was poor concordance in the results of the Genelabs and Wantai assays, which warrants further study concerning a reliable diagnostic test for the diagnosis of hepatitis E.

  6. Sensitivity of solid culture, broth culture, and real-time PCR assays for milk and colostrum samples from Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-infectious dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Emilie; McKenna, Shawn; Chaffer, Marcelo; Keefe, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) can be shed in feces, milk, and colostrum. The goal of this study was to assess assays that detect MAP in these sample types, including effects of lactation stage or season. Understanding the performance of these assays could improve how they are used, limiting the risk of infection to calves. Forty-six previously confirmed MAP-positive cows from 7 Atlantic Canadian dairy farms were identified for colostrum sampling and monthly sampling of milk and feces over a 12-mo period. Samples were assayed for MAP using solid culture, broth culture, and direct real-time PCR (qPCR). Across assay types, test sensitivity when applied to milk samples averaged 25% of that when applied to fecal samples. For colostrum samples, sensitivity depended on assay type, with sensitivity of qPCR being approximately 46% of that in feces. Across sample types, sensitivity of qPCR was higher than that of the other assays. Sensitivity of qPCR, when applied to milk samples, was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. Summer was also the season with highest agreement between milk and fecal samples collected within the same month. Our results suggest that qPCR would detect more cows shedding MAP in their milk and colostrum than solid or broth culture assays, particularly during the summer, thus providing better management information to limit exposure of calves to this infectious organism.

  7. A novel cell-based assay to measure activity of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Gomez, Javier; Ahmad, Fahim; Rodriguez, Efrain; Saeed, Mohammad F., E-mail: saeed@southernresearch.org

    2016-09-15

    The encephalitic alphaviruses encode nsP2 protease (nsP2pro), which because of its vital role in virus replication, represents an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. To facilitate the discovery of nsP2 inhibitors we have developed a novel assay for quantitative measurement of nsP2pro activity in a cell-based format. The assay is based on a substrate fusion protein consisting of eGFP and Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) linked together by a small peptide containing a VEEV nsp2pro cleavage sequence. The expression of the substrate protein in cells along with recombinant nsP2pro results in cleavage of the substrate protein resulting in extracellular release of free Gluc. The Gluc activity in supernatants corresponds to intracellular nsP2pro-mediated substrate cleavage; thus, providing a simple and convenient way to quantify nsP2pro activity. Here, we demonstrate potential utility of the assay in identification of nsP2pro inhibitors, as well as in investigations related to molecular characterization of nsP2pro. - Highlights: • A novel cell-based assay to measure VEEV nsP2 protease activity was developed. • Assay utility was demonstrated for antiviral screening. • .The assay also proved to be useful in basic mechanistic studies of nsP2 protease.

  8. Ocular irritation reversibility assessment for personal care products using a porcine corneal culture assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Douglas A; Avalos, Javier; Kaufman, Lewis E; Simion, F Anthony; Cerven, Daniel R

    2011-04-01

    Personal care product manufacturers have used a broad spectrum of alternative ocular irritation assays during the past two decades because these tests do not require the use of live animals, they provide reliable predictive data, and they are relatively inexpensive to conduct. To complement these assays, the ex vivo Porcine Corneal Opacity Reversibility Assay (PorCORA) was recently developed using a corneal culture model to predict reversibility of ocular irritants. Three commercially available consumer products (a shampoo, a hair color glaze, and a hair colorant system containing 12% hydrogen peroxide) were each tested in two PorCORA study replicates in order to assess potential ocular damage reversibility for surfactant-, propylene carbonate-, and peroxide-based formulations, respectively. Under the exaggerated, in vitro study conditions, the surfactant-based shampoo may cause irreversible porcine corneal damage (histological changes in the epithelial squamous cell and/or basal cell layers), whereas the hair color glaze and 12% hydrogen peroxide product caused fully reversible ocular irritation (microscopic changes only in the superficial squamous cell layer). The hair color glaze and peroxide product results correlate with established in vivo data for similar compounds, but the shampoo results contradicted previous BCOP results (expected to be only a mild irritant). Therefore, although the PorCORA protocol shows promise in predicting the extent and reversibility of potential ocular damage caused by accidental consumer eye exposure to personal care products, the contradictory results for the surfactant-based shampoo indicate that more extensive validation testing of the PorCORA is necessary to definitively establish the protocol's reliability as a Draize test replacement.

  9. Establishment of a simple assay in vitro for hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease based on recombinant substrate and single—Chain protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-BinGuan; Yi-GangTong; Hai-TaoWang; Gui-XinDu; Li-HuaHou

    2002-01-01

    AIM:To establish a simple and convenient assay in vitro for the Hepatitis C virus NS3 serine prtease based on the recombinant protease and substrate,and to evaluate its feasibility in screening the enzyme inhibitors.

  10. Establishment and preliminary application of Dengue virus envelope domain Ⅲ IgG antibody capture enzyme-linked immuno-absorbent assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡冬梅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish a highly sensitive and specific assay to detect Dengue virus(DENV) envelope protein domainⅢ(EDⅢ) IgG antibody,and to explore its value in the diagnosis and seroepidemiological survey of dengue

  11. Quantitative serology assays for determination of antibody responses to Ebola virus glycoprotein and matrix protein in nonhuman primates and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Grolla, Allen; Audet, Jonathan; He, Shihua; Kobinger, Gary; Unfer, Robert C; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad; Holtsberg, Frederick W

    2016-02-01

    The West Africa Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak has reached unprecedented magnitude and caused worldwide concerns for the spread of this deadly virus. Recent findings in nonhuman primates (NHPs) demonstrate that antibodies can be protective against EVD. However, the role of antibody response in vaccine-mediated protection is not fully understood. To address these questions quantitative serology assays are needed for measurement of the antibody response to key Ebola virus (EBOV) proteins. Serology enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA's), using a reference detection antibody, were developed in order to standardize the quantitation of antibody levels in vaccinated NHPs or in humans exposed to EBOV or immunized with an EBOV vaccine. Critical reagents were generated to support the development of the serology ELISAs. Recombinant EBOV matrix protein (VP40) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Two variants of the glycoprotein (GP), the ectodomain lacking the transmembrane domain (GPΔTM), and an engineered GP lacking the mucin-like domain (GPΔmuc) were expressed and purified from mammalian cell systems. Using these proteins, three ELISA methods were developed and optimized for reproducibility and robustness, including stability testing of critical reagents. The assay was used to determine the antibody response against VP40, GPΔTM, and GPΔmuc in a NHP vaccine study using EBOV virus-like particles (VLP) vaccine expressing GP, VP40 and the nucleoprotein. Additionally, these ELISAs were used to successfully detect antibody responses to VP40, GPΔTM and GPΔmuc in human sera from EBOV infected individuals.

  12. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by beta-galactosidase alpha-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  13. Clinical Evaluation of a Single-Tube Multiple RT-PCR Assay for the Detection of 13 Common Virus Types/Subtypes Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    Full Text Available Respiratory viruses are among the most important causes of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially for infants and young children. In the past years, a few commercial multiplex RT-PCR assays have been used to detect respiratory viruses in spite of the high cost. In the present study, an improved single-tube multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of 13 respiratory viruses was evaluated and compared with a previously reported two-tube assay as the reference method using clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates samples. Of 310 prospectively tested respiratory specimens selected from children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness, 226 (72.90%, 226/310 and 214 (69.03%, 214/310 positive for one or more viruses were identified by the single-tube and the two-tube assays, respectively, with combined test results showing good concordance (Kappa value = 0.874. Individually, the single-tube assay for adenovirus (Adv, human metapneumovirus (HMPV, human rhinovirus (HRV, parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV1, parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3 and parainfluenza virus type 4 (PIV4 showed the significantly superior sensitivities to those of the two-tube assay. No false positives were found. In conclusion, our results demonstrates the one-tube assay revealed significant improvements over the two-tube assay in terms of the better sensitivity, more accurate quality control, less nonspecific amplification, more cost-effective and shorter turn-around time and will be a valuable tool for routine surveillance of respiratory virus infection in China.

  14. Detection of the Pandemic H1N1/2009 Influenza A Virus by a Highly Sensitive Quantitative Real-time Reverse-transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yang; Guoliang Mao; Yujun Liu; Yuan-Chuan Chen; Chengjing Liu; Jun Luo; Xihan Li

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay with specific primers recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) has been widely used successfully for detection and monitoring of the pandemic H1N 1/2009 influenza A virus.In this study,we report the design and characterization of a novel set of primers to be used in a qRT-PCR assay for detecting the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus.The newly designed primers target three regions that are highly conserved among the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of the pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and are different from those targeted by the WHO-recommended primers.The qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers are highly specific,and as specific as the WHO-recommended primers for detecting pandemic H1N1/2009 viruses and other influenza viruses including influenza B viruses and influenza A viruses of human,swine,and raccoon dog origin.Furthermore,the qRT-PCR assays with the newly designed primers appeared to be at least 10-fold more sensitive than those with the WHO-recommended primers as the detection limits of the assays with our primers and the WHO-recommended primers were 2.5 and 25 copies of target RNA per reaction,respectively.When tested with 83 clinical samples,32 were detected to be positive using the qRT-PCR assays with our designed primers,while only 25 were positive by the assays with the WHO-recommended primers.These results suggest that the qRT-PCR system with the newly designed primers represent a highly sensitive assay for diagnosis of the pandemic H1N1/2009 virus infection.

  15. A Miniaturized Glycan Microarray Assay for Assessing Avidity and Specificity of Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C; de Vries, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinins recognize sialic acids on the cell surface as functional receptors to gain entry into cells. Wild waterfowl are the natural reservoir for IAV, but IAV can cross the species barrier to poultry, swine, horses and humans. Avian viruses recognize sialic acid attach

  16. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  17. Application of a sensitive, specific and controlled real-time PCR assay to surveillance indicates a low prevalence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in wild herring, Clupea harengus L., in Scottish waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejusova, I; McKay, P; Bland, F; Snow, M

    2010-10-01

    Surveillance data on the distribution of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in the North Sea (UK), targeting Atlantic herring in areas with previous virus detection, were obtained from research cruises conducted during 2005. The sensitive molecular approach of real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was applied alongside a newly developed endogenous positive control assay specific for herring (elongation factor 1α) to ensure integrity of template. Three hundred and five pools from 1937 individual herring were tested, and no evidence of VHSV in association with wild Atlantic herring was detected. Samples were obtained from Scottish waters where marine aquaculture is conducted. The results confirm that previous tissue culture studies have most likely not significantly underestimated the prevalence of carrier herring in this area. The significance of migratory species such as herring as a reservoir species for VHSV, with the potential to translocate virus genotypes between geographical areas, is discussed.

  18. Dissection and culture of mouse dopaminergic and striatal explants in three-dimensional collagen matrix assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ewoud R E; Morello, Francesca; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Midbrain dopamine (mdDA) neurons project via the medial forebrain bundle towards several areas in the telencephalon, including the striatum(1). Reciprocally, medium spiny neurons in the striatum that give rise to the striatonigral (direct) pathway innervate the substantia nigra(2). The development of these axon tracts is dependent upon the combinatorial actions of a plethora of axon growth and guidance cues including molecules that are released by neurites or by (intermediate) target regions(3,4). These soluble factors can be studied in vitro by culturing mdDA and/or striatal explants in a collagen matrix which provides a three-dimensional substrate for the axons mimicking the extracellular environment. In addition, the collagen matrix allows for the formation of relatively stable gradients of proteins released by other explants or cells placed in the vicinity (e.g. see references 5 and 6). Here we describe methods for the purification of rat tail collagen, microdissection of dopaminergic and striatal explants, their culture in collagen gels and subsequent immunohistochemical and quantitative analysis. First, the brains of E14.5 mouse embryos are isolated and dopaminergic and striatal explants are microdissected. These explants are then (co)cultured in collagen gels on coverslips for 48 to 72 hours in vitro. Subsequently, axonal projections are visualized using neuronal markers (e.g. tyrosine hydroxylase, DARPP32, or βIII tubulin) and axon growth and attractive or repulsive axon responses are quantified. This neuronal preparation is a useful tool for in vitro studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of mesostriatal and striatonigral axon growth and guidance during development. Using this assay, it is also possible to assess other (intermediate) targets for dopaminergic and striatal axons or to test specific molecular cues.

  19. Development of a novel quantitative real-time RT-PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of all serotypes of Foot-and-mouth disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; de Stricker, K.;

    2003-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) spreads extremely fast and the need for rapid and robust diagnostic virus detection systems was obvious during the recent European epidemic. Using a novel real-time RT-PCR system based on primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET) we present here an assay targeting...

  20. Development and validation of an indirect Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay for the detection of antibodies against Schmallenberg virus in blood samples from ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der H.M.J.F.; Bouwstra, R.J.; Mars, M.H.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Wellenberg, G.J.; Maanen, van C.

    2013-01-01

    To detect Schmallenberg virus (SBV) infections in ruminants and to perform SBV epidemiological studies a cost-effective serological test is required. For these purposes an indirect whole virus Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for detection of SBV specific antibodies in ruminant blood sample

  1. Quantitative analysis of particles, genomes and infectious particles in supernatants of haemorrhagic fever virus cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedlund Kjell-Olof

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on the replication of viral haemorrhagic fever viruses is not readily available and has never been analysed in a comparative approach. Here, we compared the cell culture growth characteristics of haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFV, of the Arenaviridae, Filoviridae, Bunyaviridae, and Flavivridae virus families by performing quantitative analysis of cell culture supernatants by (i electron microscopy for the quantification of virus particles, (ii quantitative real time PCR for the quantification of genomes, and (iii determination of focus forming units by coating fluorescent antibodies to infected cell monolayers for the quantification of virus infectivity. The comparative analysis revealed that filovirus and RVFV replication results in a surplus of genomes but varying degrees of packaging efficiency and infectious particles. More efficient replication and packaging was observed for Lassa virus, and Dengue virus resulting in a better yield of infectious particles while, YFV turned out to be most efficient with only 4 particles inducing one FFU. For Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV a surplus of empty shells was observed with only one in 24 particles equipped with a genome. The complete particles turned out to be extraordinarily infectious.

  2. Detection of seasonal H3N2 influenza A virus by type-specific TaqMan minor groove binder probe assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruixue; Schwartzman, Louis M.; Memoli, Matthew J.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the emergence of the pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus in 2009, seasonal H3N2 viruses continue to co-circulate in the population, and may even predominate in the coming influenza season. We describe a specific minor groove binder Taqman assay for H3N2 viruses with a detection limit of 16.5 standard DNA copies. PMID:21429691

  3. Diagnosis of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus infection in dairy goats by ELISA, PCR and Viral Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneum, S; Rukkwamsuk, T

    2017-03-01

    For preventive and control strategies of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus (CAEV) infection in dairy goats, performance of the available diagnostic tests was described as one of the most important and necessary aspects. The study aimed at evaluating the diagnostic test performance, including PCR, ELISA and viral culture, for CAEV infection in dairy goats in Thailand. Blood samples of 29 dairy goats from five low- to medium-prevalence herds and one very low-prevalence herd were collected for PCR and ELISA methods. The performance of these two diagnostic methods was evaluated by comparing with cytopathic effects (CPE) in the co-cultivation of CAEV and primary synovial cells. Results indicated that sensitivity, specificity were, respectively, 69.6%, 100%, for PCR; and 95.7%, 83.3% for ELISA. The PCR assay tended to have lower sensitivity and higher specificity than ELISA. When multiple tests were applied, parallel testing provided sensitivity and specificity of 98.7% and 83.3%, while series testing showed sensitivity and specificity of 66.6% and 100% respectively. These results indicated that combination of ELISA and PCR provided some advantages and possibly offered optimal methods to detect CAEV-infected goats. Kappa value of the agreement between PCR and ELISA test was 0.34, indicating fair agreement. Regarding the possibility of antigenic variation between CAEV strains used in both PCR and ELISA assays, the actual circulating CAEV strain should be reviewed in order to develop and enhance the diagnostic tests using the CAE viral antigens derived from specific local strains of Thailand.

  4. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Ferreira Barreto-Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient’s blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible.

  5. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira; Barth, Ortrud Monika; Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes da; Santos, Carolina Cardoso; Santos, Aline da Silva; F, Joaquim Batista; Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo de

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient's blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible.

  6. Ultrastructure of Zika virus particles in cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira; Barth, Ortrud Monika; da Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes; Santos, Carolina Cardoso; Santos, Aline da Silva; F, Joaquim Batista; de Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has infected thousands of Brazilian people and spread to other American countries since 2015. The introduction of ZIKV brought a strong impact to public health in Brazil. It is of utmost importance to identify a susceptible cell line that will enable the isolation and identification of the virus from patient samples, viral mass production, and testing of drug and vaccine candidates. Besides real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction diagnosis for detecting the viral genome, virus isolation in cell lines was useful in order to study the structure of the viral particle and its behaviour inside cells. Analysis of ZIKV infected cell lines was achieved using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Blood was obtained from a Brazilian patient during the first days after presenting with signs of the disease, and ZIKV from the patient’s blood was isolated in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Afterwards, Vero cells were inoculated with the viral suspension, fixed six days after inoculation, embedded in polymers, and ultra-thin cut. Like dengue viruses, this flavivirus showed numerous virus particles present inside cellular vesicles thereby confirming the susceptibility of the Vero cell line to ZIKV replication. TEM is a unique technique available to make the virus visible. PMID:27581122

  7. Analysis of Oseltamivir Resistance Substitutions in Influenza Virus Glycoprotein Neuraminidase using a Lentivirus-Based Surrogate Assay System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer Tisoncik-Go; Katie S Cordero; Lijun Rong

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus poses a great threat to global health,and oseltamivir (trade marked as Tamiflu),which targets influenza surface glycoprotein neuraminidase (NA),is used clinically as a major anti-influenza treatment.However,certain substitutions in NA can render an influenza virus resistant to this drug.In this study,using a lentiviral pseudotyping system,which alleviates the safety concerns of studying highly pathogenic influenza viruses such as avian influenza H5N 1,that utilizes influenza surface glycoproteins (hemagglutinin or HA,and NA) and an HIV-core combined with a luciferase reporter gene as a surrogate assay,we first assessed the functionality of NA by measuring pseudovirion release in the absence or presence of oseltamivir.We demonstrated that oseltamivir displays a dose-dependent inhibition on NA activity.In contrast,a mutant NA (H274Y) is more resistant to oseltamivir treatment.In addition,the effects of several previously reported substitution NA mutants were examined as well.Our results demonstrate that this lentivirus-based pseudotyping system provides a quick,safe,and effective way to assess resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors.And we believe that as new mutations appear in influenza isolates,their impact on the effectiveness of current and future anti-NA can be quickly and reliably evaluated by this assay.

  8. ViriChip: a solid phase assay for detection and identification of viruses by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettikadan, Saju R.; Johnson, James C.; Vengasandra, Srikanth G.; Muys, James; Henderson, Eric

    2004-03-01

    Bionanotechnology can be viewed as the integration of tools and concepts in nanotechnology with the attributes of biomolecules. We report here on an atomic force microscopy-immunosensor assay (AFMIA) that couples AFM with solid phase affinity capture of biological entities for the rapid detection and identification of group B coxsackievirus particles. Virus identification is based on type-specific immunocapture and the morphological properties of the captured viruses as obtained by the AFM. Representatives of the six group B coxsackieviruses have been specifically captured from 1 µl volumes of clarified cell lysates, body fluids and environmental samples. Concentration and kinetic profiles for capture indicate that detection is possible at 103 TCID50 µl-1 and the dynamic range of the assay spans three logs. The results demonstrate that the melding of a nanotechnological tool (AFM) with biotechnology (solid phase immunocapture of virus particles) can create a clinically relevant platform, useful for the detection and identification of enterovirus particles in a variety of samples.

  9. An evaluation of a novel chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture assay with two teratogens/embryotoxins associated with heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Helena S; Clothier, Richard H; Pratten, Margaret

    2007-10-01

    This study was aimed at determining whether the chick cardiomyocyte micromass (MM) system could be employed to predict the teratogenicity/embryotoxicity of exogenous chemicals. Two documented teratogens/embryotoxins, sodium valproate (the sodium salt of valproic acid; VPA) and all-trans retinoic acid (tRA), were used in the initial phase of the study. White Leghorn 5-day-old embryo hearts were dissociated to produce a cardiomyocyte suspension in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium. Cultures were incubated at 37 degrees C in 5% CO(2) in air, and observations were made every 24 hours over 5 days, for the detection of beating. Culture viability was assessed by using the resazurin reduction assay for determining culture activity and the kenacid blue assay for determining cell number. It was found that tRA significantly reduced cell activity and beating, whilst not affecting total cell number. VPA up to 500 microM induced no cytotoxicity in the MM cardiomyocyte cultures, whilst all the VPA concentrations tested reduced beating. The results demonstrate the potential of the chick cardiomyocyte MM culture assay to identify teratogens/embryotoxins that alter functionality, which may result in a teratogenic outcome, whilst not causing cytotoxicity (direct embryotoxicity). This could form part of a screen for developmental toxicity related to cardiac function, whilst limb cultures and brain cultures based on the same system could be relevant to teratogenic effects on those tissues.

  10. Estandarización del método de centrifugación en placa para el aislamiento del virus dengue Rapid centrifugation assay standarization for dengue virus isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryam Palomino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Se estandarizó el método de centrifugación en placa, para el aislamiento del virus dengue a partir de muestras de suero humano. Se utilizó la línea celular C6/36-HT determinándose los valores óptimos de velocidad de centrifugación, volumen de inóculo, dilución de suero y tiempo de incubación. Posteriormente, 22 muestras de suero con aislamiento viral positivo y cepas referenciales de los cuatro serotipos del virus dengue, fueron procesadas simultáneamente por el método de centrifugación en placa y el método convencional de cultivo en tubo, los aislamientos fueron tipificados mediante inmunofluorescencia indirecta empleando anticuerpos monoclonales. Se optimizó el método de centrifugación en placa inoculando 200 μL de diluciσn de suero 1/20, centrifugaciσn a 1600 rpm/30 min, presentando sensibilidad de 95,5% a cinco dνas postinoculación. Se concluye que el método de centrifugación en placa mejora el porcentaje de aislamiento, con significativa reducción en tiempo de aislamiento del virus dengue.The plate centrifugation assay was standardized for dengue virus isolation from serum samples. C6/36-HT cells were used determining the optimal values for centrifugation spin speed, inoculum, sera dilution, and incubation time. Then, 22 positive serum samples with viral isolation and viral strains of the four reference dengue virus serotypes were tested simultaneously by the standardized plate centrifugation method and the conventional tube culture. The isolations were typified by indirect immunofluorescent test using monoclonal antibodies. The plate centrifugation method was optimized to 200 μL of inoculum, dilution of sera 1/20, centrifugation speed at 1600 rpm/30 min, and sensitivity of 95,5% after 5 days post-inoculation. We concluded that the plate centrifugation method increased dengue virus isolation, with a significant reduction of the time of isolation for dengue virus.

  11. Development and assessment of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for quantification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloukas, A; Paraskevis, D; Haida, C; Sypsa, V; Hatzakis, A

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies showed that high levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA are associated with a faster progression to AIDS, an increased risk of death, and a higher risk of HIV RNA rebound in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. Our objective was to develop and assess a highly sensitive real-time multiplex PCR assay for the quantification of HIV-1 DNA (RTMP-HIV) based on molecular beacons. HIV-1 DNA quantification was carried out by RTMP in a LightCycler 2.0 apparatus. HIV-1 DNA was quantified in parallel with CCR5 as a reference gene, and reported values are numbers of HIV-1 DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The clinical sensitivity of the assay was assessed for 115 newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected individuals. The analytical sensitivity was estimated to be 12.5 copies of HIV-1 DNA per 10(6) PBMCs, while the clinical sensitivity was 100%, with levels ranging from 1.23 to 4.25 log(10) HIV-1 DNA copies/10(6) PBMCs. In conclusion, we developed and assessed a new RTMP-HIV assay based on molecular beacons, using a LightCycler 2.0 instrument. This multiplex assay has comparable sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy to single real-time PCR assays.

  12. The diagnosis of proventricular dilatation disease: use of a Western blot assay to detect antibodies against avian Borna virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Itamar; Gray, Patricia; Mirhosseini, Negin; Payne, Susan; Hoppes, Sharman; Honkavuori, Kirsi S; Briese, Thomas; Turner, Debra; Tizard, Ian

    2010-07-14

    Avian Borna virus (ABV) has recently been shown to be the causal agent of proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) a lethal neurologic disease of captive psittacines and other birds. An immunoblot assay was used to detect the presence of antibodies against avian Borna virus in the serum of affected birds. A lysate from ABV-infected duck embryo fibroblasts served as a source of antigen. The assay was used to test for the presence of antibodies to ABV in 117 birds. Thirty of these birds had biopsy or necropsy-confirmed proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), while the remaining 87 birds were apparently healthy or were suffering from diseases other than PDD. Sera from 27 of the 30 PDD cases (90%) contained antibodies to ABV. Seventy-three (84%) of the apparently "healthy" birds were seronegative. Additionally, sera from seven macaws and one parrot trapped in the Peruvian Amazon were seronegative. Positive sera recognized the bornaviral nucleoprotein (N-protein). While the presence of antibodies to ABV largely corresponded with the development of clinical PDD, 14 apparently healthy normal birds possessed detectable antibodies to ABV. The existence of a carrier state was confirmed when 13 of 15 apparently healthy cockatiels were shown by PCR to have detectable ABV RNA in their feces. Western blot assays may be of significant assistance in diagnosing proventricular dilatation disease. Many apparently healthy birds may however be seronegative while, at the same time, shedding ABV in their feces. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A multiplex real-time PCR panel assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of 12 common swine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiju; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Qin; Das, Amaresh; Ma, Guiping; Xu, Lu; Sun, Qing; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Jia, Wei; Liu, Yanhua; Anderson, Gary; Bai, Jianfa; Shi, Jishu

    2016-10-01

    Mixed infection with different pathogens is common in swine production systems especially under intensive production conditions. Quick and accurate detection and differentiation of different pathogens are necessary for epidemiological surveillance, disease management and import and export controls. In this study, we developed and validated a panel of multiplex real-time PCR/RT-PCR assays composed of four subpanels, each detects three common swine pathogens. The panel detects 12 viruses or viral serotypes, namely, VSV-IN, VSV-NJ, SVDV, CSFV, ASFV, FMDV, PCV2, PPV, PRV, PRRSV-NA, PRRSV-EU and SIV. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) and PCR amplification efficiencies of all singular and triplex real-time PCR reactions are within the acceptable range. Comparison between singular and triplex real-time PCR assays of each subpanel indicates that there is no significant interference on assay sensitivities caused by multiplexing. Specificity tests on 226 target clinical samples or 4 viral strains and 91 non-target clinical samples revealed that the real-time PCR panel is 100% specific, and there is no cross amplification observed. The limit of detection of each triplex real-time PCR is less than 10 copies per reaction for DNA, and less than 16 copies per reaction for RNA viruses. The newly developed multiplex real-time PCR panel also detected different combinations of co-infections as confirmed by other means of detections.

  14. Hepatitis E Virus Produced from Cell Culture Has a Lipid Envelope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qi

    Full Text Available The absence of a productive cell culture system hampered detailed analysis of the structure and protein composition of the hepatitis E virion. In this study, hepatitis E virus from a robust HEV cell culture system and from the feces of infected monkeys at the peak of virus excretion was purified by ultra-centrifugation. The common feature of the two samples after ultracentrifugation was that the ORF2 protein mainly remained in the top fractions. The ORF2 protein from cell culture system was glycosylated, with an apparent molecular weight of 88 kDa, and was not infectious in PLC/PRF/5 cells. The ORF2 protein in this fraction can bind to and protect HEV RNA from digestion by RNase A. The RNA-ORF2 product has a similar sedimentation coefficient to the virus from feces. The viral RNA in the cell culture supernatant was mainly in the fraction of 1.15 g/cm3 but that from the feces was mainly in the fraction of 1.21 g/cm3. Both were infectious in PLC/PRF/5 cells. And the fraction in the middle of the gradient (1.06 g/cm3 from the cell culture supernatant,but not that from the feces, also has ORF2 protein and HEV RNA but was not infectious in PLC/PRF/5.The infectious RNA-rich fraction from the cell culture contained ORF3 protein and lipid but the corresponding fraction from feces had no lipid and little ORF3 protein. The lipid on the surface of the virus has no effect on its binding to cells but the ORF3 protein interferes with binding. The result suggests that most of the secreted ORF2 protein is not associated with HEV RNA and that hepatitis E virus produced in cell culture differs in structure from the virus found in feces in that it has a lipid envelope.

  15. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L; Koenning, Stephen R; Davis, Eric L; Opperman, Charles H; Lommel, Steven A; Mitchum, Melissa G; Sit, Tim L

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  16. Genotyping hepatitis C viruses from Southeast Asia by a novel line probe assay that simultaneously detects core and 5′ untranslated regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Noppornpanth (Suwanna); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); E. Sablon (Erwin); K. de Nys (Kathy); T.X. Lien (Truong Xuang); J. Brouwer (Jan); M. van Brussel (Marianne); S.L. Smits (Saskia); Y. Poovorawan (Yong); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHepatitis C viruses (HCVs) display a high level of sequence diversity and are currently divided into six genotypes. A line probe assay (LiPA), which targets the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the HCV genome, is widely used for genotyping. However, this assay cannot distinguish many ge

  17. Evaluation of two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) to assess PEDV transmission in growing pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April 2013 a porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) epidemic began in the United States. As part of the response, real-time RT-PCR assays to detect PEDV were developed by several Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories. This study evaluated RT-PCR PEDV assays that detect the N gene (gN) and S gene (gS...

  18. Detection of infectious bursal disease virus in various lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens by different reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabell, Susanne; Handberg, Kurt; Kusk, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, including two recently developed strain-specific assays, were employed for detection of ribonucleic acid (RNA) from three different IBDV strains in bursa tissue samples from experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens. The virus strains...

  19. A thiopurine drug inhibits West Nile virus production in cell culture, but not in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yin Lim

    Full Text Available Many viruses within the Flavivirus genus cause significant disease in humans; however, effective antivirals against these viruses are not currently available. We have previously shown that a thiopurine drug, 6-methylmercaptopurine riboside (6MMPr, inhibits replication of distantly related viruses within the Flaviviridae family in cell culture, including bovine viral diarrhea virus and hepatitis C virus replicon. Here we further examined the potential antiviral effect of 6MMPr on several diverse flaviviruses. In cell culture, 6MMPr inhibited virus production of yellow fever virus, dengue virus-2 (DENV-2 and West Nile virus (WNV in a dose-dependent manner, and DENV-2 was significantly more sensitive to 6MMPr treatment than WNV. We then explored the use of 6MMPr as an antiviral against WNV in an immunocompetent mouse model. Once a day treatment of mice with 0.5 mg 6MMPr was just below the toxic dose in our mouse model, and this dose was used in subsequent studies. Mice were treated with 6MMPr immediately after subcutaneous inoculation with WNV for eight consecutive days. Treatment with 6MMPr exacerbated weight loss in WNV-inoculated mice and did not significantly affect mortality. We hypothesized that 6MMPr has low bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS and examined the effect of pre-treatment with 6MMPr on viral loads in the periphery and CNS. Pre-treatment with 6MMPr had no significant effect on viremia or viral titers in the periphery, but resulted in significantly higher viral loads in the brain, suggesting that the effect of 6MMPr is tissue-dependent. In conclusion, despite being a potent inhibitor of flaviviruses in cell culture, 6MMPr was not effective against West Nile disease in mice; however, further studies are warranted to reduce the toxicity and/or improve the bioavailability of this potential antiviral drug.

  20. Establishment of a simple assay in vitro for hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease based on recombinant substrate and single-chain protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Xin Du; Li-Hua Hou; Rong-Bin Guan; Yi-Gang Tong; Hai-Tao Wang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To establish a simple and convenient assay in vitro for the Hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease based on the recombinant protease and substrate, and to evaluate its feasibility in screening the enzyme inhibitors. METHODS: Based on the crystallographic structure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) serine protease, a novel single-chain serine protease was designed, in which the central sequence of cofactor NS4A was linked to the N-terminus of NS3 serine protease domain via a flexible linker GSGS. The fusion gene was obtained by two-step PCR that was carried out with three primers and then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and the recombinant clone was verified by DNA sequencing. The single-chain recombinant protease was expressed when the E.coliwas induced with IPTG and the expression conditions were optimized to produce large amount of soluble protease. The recombinant substrate NS5ab that covers the cleavage point NS5A/B was also expressed in E.coli. Both of the protease and substrate were purified by using Ni-NTA agarose metal affinity resin, then they were mixed together in a specific buffer, and the mixture was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The cleavage system was used to evaluate some compounds for their inhibitory activity on serine protease.RESULTS: The single-chain recombinant protease was overexpressed as soluble protein when the E. coliwas induced at a low dosage of IPTG (0.2 mM) and cultured at a low temperature (15℃). The protease was purified by using Ni-NTA agarose metal affinity resin (the purity is over 95 %).The recombinant substrate NS5ab was expressed in an insoluble form and could refold successfully after purification and dialysis. A simple and convenient assay in vitro was established, in which the purified single-chain serine protease could cleave the recombinant substrate NS5ab into two fragments that were visualized by SDS-PAGE. PMSF had an effect on inhibiting activity of serine protease, while EDTA had not.CONCLUSION: A simple

  1. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi R. Verrier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis D virus (HDV infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments.

  2. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Schuster, Catherine; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments. PMID:27657111

  3. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Lam; Gulati, Neetu M.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest to date. There is no cure or treatment for this deadly disease; therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostics to accurately detect Ebola. Current RT-PCR assays lack sensitive and reliable positive controls. To address this critical need, we devised a bio-inspired positive control for use in RT-PCR diagnostics: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but sta...

  4. BOVINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS INFECTION IN TAIWAN : EVALUATION OF THE ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY AND AGAR GEL IMMUNODIFFUSION TEST

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Chun-Tshen

    1991-01-01

    I evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test simultaneously for the detection of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) antibodies. Total 1,293 serum samples were tested for ELISA and AGID test and the results were compared. The results of ELISA and AGID agreed by 1,156 out of 1,293 (89.4%). All of AGID-positive 356 sera were positive by ELISA. However, of 451 ELISA-positive sera, 95 sera were either negative or equivocal by AGID test. Eleven animals ...

  5. Development of Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assays for the Detection of Punta Toro Virus and Pichinde Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    agarose (Lonza, Basel, Switzerland) and a secondary overlay containing 5% 109 neutral red (Life Technologies, Grand Isle, NY). Vero E6 cells were...et al., 1992), and these inhibitors can carry through RNA 190 preparation methods, affecting real-time RT-PCR results and impacting assay sensitivity

  6. Use of the Novel INNO-LiPA Line Probe Assay for Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Variants That Confer Resistance to Entecavir Therapy▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardi, Rosendo; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Tabernero, David; Homs, Maria; Schaper, Melanie; Esteban, Rafael; Buti, Maria

    2009-01-01

    A line probe assay (INNO-LiPA DR, version 3) for the detection of hepatitis B virus mutations that confer resistance to entecavir therapy was evaluated. The INNO-LiPA DR assay is a highly sensitive assay that is easily applicable for the detection and monitoring of entecavir resistance-conferring mutations and is more sensitive than sequencing for the detection of mixed sequences. PMID:19052182

  7. Specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza A virus in field specimens by a one-step RT-PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Sanjay

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous outbreaks of the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A in Asia has resulted in an urgent effort to improve current diagnostics to aid containment of the virus and lower the threat of a influenza pandemic. We report here the development of a PCR-based assay that is highly specific for the H5N1 avian influenza A virus. Methods A one-step reverse-transcription PCR assay was developed to detect the H5N1 avian influenza A virus. The specificity of the assay was shown by testing sub-types of influenza A virus and other viral and bacterial pathogens; and on field samples. Results Validation on 145 field specimens from Vietnam and Malaysia showed that the assay was specific without cross reactivity to a number of other infuenza strains as well as human respiratory related pathogens. Detection was 100% from allantoic fluid in H5N1 positive samples, suggesting it to be a reliable sampling source for accurate detection. Conclusion The assay developed from this study indicates that the primers are specific for the H5N1 influenza virus. As shown by the field tested results, this assay would be highly useful as a diagnostic tool to help identify and control influenza epidemics.

  8. Development of multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for simultaneous detection of clostero-, badna- and mandari-viruses along with huanglongbing bacterium in citrus trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Ram Prasnna; Baranwal, V K

    2016-09-01

    Citrus trees harbor a large number of viral and bacterial pathogens. Citrus yellow vein clearing virus (CYVCV), Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV), Citrus yellow mosaic virus (CYMV), Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and a bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLa) associated with huanglongbing (HLB) disease, the most prevalent pathogens in citrus orchards of different regions in India and are responsible for debilitating citriculture. For detection of these viral and bacterial pathogens a quick, sensitive and cost effective detection method is required. With this objective a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection of four viruses and a bacterium in citrus. Several sets of primers were designed for each virus based on the retrieved reference sequences from the GenBank. A primer pair published previously was used for greening bacterium. Each pair of primers was evaluated for their sensitivity and differentiation by simplex and mPCR. The constant amplified products were identified on the basis of molecular size in mPCR and were compared with standard PCR. The amplicons were cloned and results were confirmed with sequencing analysis. The mPCR assay was validated using naturally infected field samples for one or more citrus viruses and the huanglongbing bacterium. The mPCR assay developed here will aid in the production of virus free planting materials and rapid indexing for certification of citrus budwood programme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel assay of competitively differentiated polymerase chain reaction for screening point mutation of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Mou Peng; Xue-Juan Chen; Jian-Guo Li; Lin Gu; Yang-Su Huang; Zhi-Liang Gao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Point mutation, one of the commonest gene mutations,is the most important molecular pathogenesis of cancer and chronic infection. The commonest methods for detection of point mutation are based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These techniques, however, cannot be used in large scale screening since they are neither accurate nor simple.For this reason, this study established a novel method of competitively differentiated PCR (CD-PCR) for screening point mutation in clinical practice.METHODS: Two competitively differentiated primers for mutant-type and wild-type templates respectively with an identically complemented region in 3′ end except for last 2base pairs and a different non-complemented region in 5′end were designed. Thus, competitive amplification might be carried out at a lower annealing temperature at first, and then differentiated amplification at a higher annealing temperature when primers could not combine with initial templates. The amplification was performed in one-tube.The products of CD-PCR were detected using microplate hybridization assay. CD-PCR was evaluated by detecting G1896A variant of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in form of recombinant plasmids and in sera from patients with hepatitis B, and compared with allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) and competitive AS-PCR.RESULTS: CD-PCR was successfully established. It could clearly distinguish wild-type and mutant-type plasmid DNA of G1896A variant when the amount of plasmid DNA was between 102-108copies/reaction, while for AS-PCR and competitive AS-PCR, the DNA amount was between 102-104copies/reaction. CD-PCR could detect one copy of G1896A variant among 10-100 copies of wild-type plasmid DNA. The specificity of CD-PCR was higher than those of AS-PCR and competitive AS-PCR in the detection of HBV G1896A variant in sera from patients with hepatitis B. CD-PCR was independent of the amount of HBV DNA in serum. HBV G1896A variant was more often found in HBeAg (-) patients with a lower level of

  10. Erythrocytic malaria growth or invasion inhibition assays with emphasis on suspension culture GIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, J David; Moch, J Kathleen; Smoot, Douglas S

    2002-01-01

    Erythrocytic cycle malaria parasite growth or invasion inhibition assays (GIA) compare the effects of various test and control substances on malaria parasite growth in erythrocytes or invasion into erythrocytes in vitro. Although inhibitions by antimalarial drugs in vitro correlate well with drug protective levels required in vivo, as yet there are too few data to know how well inhibitions by antibodies in vitro correlate with the types and degrees of immune protection in vivo. Antibody-mediated GIA is frequently complicated by parasite strain-specific inhibitions, as well as nonspecific inhibitory factors generated in sera collected or stored under nonoptimal conditions. In this chapter, we describe methods for collecting and processing sera, for using different strains of parasite, and a simplified method for staining parasite DNA with Hoechst dye 33342 before quantitating parasites using ultraviolet (UV)-excited flow cytometry. We also describe a new type of GIA using suspension cultures in a 48-well plate. Critical to this method is enclosing the plate in a gassed, heat-sealed plastic bag, which, being low mass, can easily be rested at a 13.5 degrees angle on a rotor platform (114 rpm with 1-in. displacement) to produce gentle pulsatile waves of media in each well. The suspension GIA, which, relative to the static GIA, increased inhibition by one antibody and decreased inhibition by another (Table 1), may better simulate in vivo blood flow and may thus better predict in vivo efficacy.

  11. Radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell culture applying the comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Vieira, Daniel P.; Okazaki, Kayo; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: van.biologa@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S., E-mail: aurcruz@ial.sp.gov.br [Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a defense polyphenol, synthesized naturally by a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. In vines this substance is found in elevated concentration. Thus, resveratrol is present in grape juice and wines, especially red wine. Red wines are the best dietary source of resveratrol.The protective effects performed by resveratrol during the process of cell damage, produced by oxidative effects of free radicals, are anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-carcinogenic activity, prevent or inhibit degenerative diseases, decrease incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol is considered as a radiosensitizing compound. The aim of this work was study in vitro the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells applying the comet assay to evaluate the cellular damage and its repair capacity. In this study RD cells culture was irradiated by gamma radiation at 50 Gy and 100 Gy doses and the used resveratrol concentrations was from 15 μM to 60 μM. The protective and radioprotective effects were observed at 15 μM and 30 μM resveratrol concentrations. The resveratrol concentration of 60 μM showed cytotoxic effect to RD tumor cells and with gamma radiation presence this concentration showed no statistically significant radiosensitizing effects. (author)

  12. Artifacts by marker enzyme adsorption on nanomaterials in cytotoxicity assays with tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Kolle, Susanne N.; Hasenkamp, Laura-Carolin; Böser, Alexander; Vogel, Sandra; von Vacano, Bernhard; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We used precision cut lung slices (PCLS) to study the cytotoxicity of cobalt ferrite nanomaterials with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilization. Using mitochondrial activity as an indicator of cytotoxicity (WST-1 assay) increasing concentrations of cobalt ferrite nanomaterial caused increasing levels of cytotoxicity in PCLS irrespective of BSA stabilization. However, there was no increase in released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels caused by BSA stabilized nanomaterial indicating concentration depended cytotoxictiy. Moreover, non-stabilized nanomaterial caused a decrease of background LDH levels in the PCLS culture supernatant confirmed by complementary methods. Direct characterization of the protein corona of extracted nanomaterial shows that the LDH decrease is due to adsorption of LDH onto the surface of the non-stabilized nanomaterial, correlated with strong agglomeration. Preincubation with serum protein blocks the adsorption of LDH and stabilizes the nanomaterial at low agglomeration. We have thus demonstrated the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials in PCLS does not correlate with disrupted membrane integrity followed by LDH release. Furthermore, we found that intracellular enzymes such as the marker enzyme LDH are able to bind onto surfaces of nanomaterial and thereby adulterate the detection of toxic effects. A replacement of BSA by LDH or a secondary LDH-on-BSA-corona were not observed, confirming earlier indications that the protein corona exchange rate are slow or vanishing on inorganic nanomaterial. Thus, the method(s) to assess nanomaterial-mediated effects have to be carefully chosen based on the cellular effect and possible nano-specific artifacts.

  13. Improving anticancer drug development begins with cell culture: misinformation perpetrated by the misuse of cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Alan

    2017-01-31

    The high failure rate of anticancer drug discovery and development has consumed billions of dollars annually. While many explanations have been provided, I believe that misinformation arising from inappropriate cell-based screens has been completely over-looked. Most cell culture experiments are irrelevant to how drugs are subsequently administered to patients. Usually, drug development focuses on growth inhibition rather than cell killing. Drugs are selected based on continuous incubation of cells, then frequently administered to the patient as a bolus. Target identification and validation is often performed by gene suppression that inevitably mimics continuous target inhibition. Drug concentrations in vitro frequently far exceed in vivo concentrations. Studies of drug synergy are performed at sub-optimal concentrations. And the focus on a limited number of cell lines can misrepresent the potential efficacy in a patient population. The intent of this review is to encourage more appropriate experimental design and data interpretation, and to improve drug development in the area of cell-based assays. Application of these principles should greatly enhance the successful translation of novel drugs to the patient.

  14. Productive homologous and non-homologous recombination of hepatitis C virus in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Galli, Andrea; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    . In addition, recombination is an important regulatory mechanism of cytopathogenicity for the related pestiviruses. Here we describe recombination of HCV RNA in cell culture leading to production of infectious virus. Initially, hepatoma cells were co-transfected with a replicating JFH1ΔE1E2 genome (genotype 2a......) lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a), which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13-36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6...

  15. Direct comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF assay with liquid and solid mycobacterial culture for quantification of early bactericidal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayigire, X.A.; Friedrich, S.O.; Venter, A.; Dawson, R.; Gillespie, S.H.; Boeree, M.J.; Heinrich, N.; Hoelscher, M.; Diacon, A.H.; Aarnoutse, R.

    2013-01-01

    The early bactericidal activity of antituberculosis agents is usually determined by measuring the reduction of the sputum mycobacterial load over time on solid agar medium or in liquid culture. This study investigated the value of a quantitative PCR assay for early bactericidal activity determinatio

  16. Molecular Epidemiological Investigation of Infectious Hypodermal and Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus and Taura Syndrome Virus in Penaeus Vannamei Cultured in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV) are two important shrimp viruses in cultured shrimp in America. These two viruses were transmitted to China at the beginning of the 21st century. In this study, 214 shrimp samples of Penaeus vannamei were collected from seven different areas of China and tested by PCR for IHHNV and TSV infection. The results showed that there were a high prevalence of IHHNV (65.42%) and low prevalence of TSV (3.27%) in the tested samples. Several samples were found to be co-infected with these two viruses. A 3 kb fragment of 7 positive IHHNV samples and a structure protein region (ORF2) of three TSV positive samples were amplified and sequenced. The sequence comparison indicated that both IHHNV and TSV sequenced in China have a low genetic variations compared with the prototype IHHNV and TSV from Hawaii. Phylogenetic analysis showed that TSV isolates were clustered into two groups, Asia and America group, which was genetically correlated to geographic distribution.

  17. Adaptive mutations allow establishment of JFH1-based cell culture systems for hepatitis C virus genotype 4A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    transmembrane domain (.alpha.), in the cytoplasmic part (.beta.) or at the NS2/NS3 cleavage site (y). Following transfection of Huh7.5 cells with RNA transcripts, infectious viruses were produced in the ED43/JFH1-.beta. and -y cultures only. Compared to the 2a control virus, production of infectious viruses...

  18. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin Barfred; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within...... adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals....

  19. Development of novel triplex single-step real-time PCR assay for detection of Hepatitis Virus B and C simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Shantanu; Jain, Amita; Jain, Bhawana

    2016-05-01

    Multiplex RT-PCR assays are widely used tools for detection of hepatitis viruses, but none of them provide quality check of sample. In the present study we developed a single-step triplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) with sample quality check, by using β-actin as housekeeping gene. The primers and probes were self-designed and assay was standardized. Assay was also destined to quantitate copy numbers of HBV and HCV. This novel assay was sensitive, specific, and reproducible for detection of HBV and HCV in serum/plasma. The assay also detected all genotypes of HBV and HCV. The detection limit was 60 IU/mL for HBV and 20 IU/mL for HCV. This assay is the first assay developed on single-step platform for nucleic acid detection of HBV and HCV with an extra edge over all other assays by providing inbuilt check for quality of sample.

  20. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Pohjala

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2, obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs. The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV, their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate

  1. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjala, Leena; Utt, Age; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Aleksei; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; Tammela, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2), obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs). The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV), their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate models for anti

  2. Comparative performances of serologic and molecular assays for detecting human T lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Rodrigues Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study evaluated several techniques currently available (commercial kits and in-house assays for diagnosing human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 in two groups of patients enrolled at HIV/AIDS specialized care services in São Paulo: Group 1 (G1, n = 1608, 1237 male/371 female, median age 44.3 years old, majority using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; G2, n = 1383, 930 male/453 female, median age of 35.6 years old, majority HAART naïve. Enzyme immunoassays [(EIA Murex and Gold ELISA] were employed for human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 screening; Western blotting (WB, INNO-LIA (LIA, real-time PCR pol (qPCR, and nested-PCR-RFLP (tax were used to confirm infection. Samples were considered human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 positive when there was reactivity using at least one of the four confirmatory assays. By serological screening, 127/2991 samples were positive or borderline, and human T lymphotropic virus infection was confirmed in 108 samples (three EIA-borderline: 56 human T lymphotropic virus type 1 [G1 (27 + G2 (29]; 45 human T lymphotropic virus type 2 [G1 (21 + G2 (24]; one human T lymphotropic virus type 1 + human T lymphotropic virus type 2 (G2; six human T lymphotropic virus [G1 (2 + G2 (4]. Although there were differences in group characteristics, human T lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 prevalence was similar [3.1% (G1 and 4.2% (G2, p = 0.113]. The overall sensitivities of LIA, WB, qPCR, and PCR-RFLP were 97.2%, 82.4%, 68.9%, and 68.4%, respectively, with some differences among groups, likely due to the stage of human T lymphotropic virus infection and/or HAART duration. Indeterminate immunoblotting results were detected in G2, possibly due to the seroconversion period. Negative results in molecular assays could be explained by the use of HAART, the occurrence of defective provirus and/or the low circulating proviral load. In conclusion, when determining the human T

  3. Cost-effectiveness of detection of intestinal amebiasis by using serology and specific-amebic-antigen assays among persons with or without human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sui-Yuan; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Ji, Dar-Der; Lo, Yi-Chun; Wu, Cheng-Hsin; Wu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Wen-Chun; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2008-09-01

    Among 345 persons who underwent indirect hemagglutination (IHA) serological assays and assays of specific amebic antigens in their stool samples, 24 of 36 (66.7%) who were seropositive for Entamoeba histolytica had intestinal amebiasis as determined by antigen assays compared with 2 of 309 (0.2%) who were seronegative (odds ratio, 307; 95% confidence interval, 64.9 to 1,451). The estimated cost to detect a case of intestinal amebiasis by serology followed by antigen assays ($52) could be reduced by 74.3% and 69.9%, respectively, compared with the costs of the concurrent use of both assays ($202) and the antigen assays alone ($173). Our finding suggests that IHA assays followed by specific-amebic-antigen assays can be cost-effective in the diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis among persons with or without human immunodeficiency virus infection who are at risk for E. histolytica infection.

  4. Analysis of adult otitis media: polymerase chain reaction versus culture for bacteria and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liederman, E M; Post, J C; Aul, J J; Sirko, D A; White, G J; Buchman, C A; Ehrlich, G D

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have identified bacterial and viral genomic sequences in culture-negative pediatric middle ear effusions. To evaluate this technique in adults, 19 effusions were analyzed to compare bacterial and viral culture and PCR detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and adenovirus. Effusions from 4 subjects positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were analyzed by PCR for HIV virus. Three of 19 effusions were culture-positive for bacteria, and 0 of 19 for viruses. Fifteen of 19 effusions were PCR-positive for bacterial genomic sequences, and 0 of 19 for adenovirus. Thirteen of 15 PCR-positive specimens demonstrated S pneumoniae, 5 of 15 H influenzae, and 0 of 13 M catarrhalis. All 4 effusions from HIV-positive subjects were PCR-positive for HIV. No effusion was culture-positive and PCR-negative. These results confirm that culture-negative middle ear effusions contain genomic sequences from bacterial pathogens. Finding of HIV RNA and DNA in effusion from HIV-positives suggests replicating virus in this fluid.

  5. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Fucus vesiculosus extract on cultured human lymphocytes using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide Leite-Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fucales, Fucaceae was screened for its protective activity using doxorubicin-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. In this study, we assessed the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of three different concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 of F. vesiculosus aqueous extract using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays. Treatment of human lymphocyte cultures with 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 F. vesiculosus aqueous extract had no effect on the chromosome aberration frequency or on the extent of DNA damage detected by the Comet assay. The antigenotoxic effects of the extract were tested in human lymphocyte cultures treated with 15 µg mL-1 of doxorubicin, either alone or combined with the different concentrations of the extract, which was added to the cultures before, simultaneously with or after the doxorubicin. Only when lymphocytes were pre-treated with extract there was a reduction in doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations and DNA damage as detected by the Comet assay. These results demonstrate that F. vesiculosus aqueous extract is not genotoxic in cultured human lymphocytes and indicate that when added to lymphocyte cultures before doxorubicin it has antigenotoxic activity against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage.

  6. Rapid in vitro detection of HIV-1-specific antibody secretion by cells-culture with virus antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Caterino-de-Araujo

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes an alternative method for in vitro detection of HIV-1 -specific antibody secretion in 24h of culture employing as stimulant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells the disrupted inactivated whole virus adsorbed onto microwells in a commercial ELISA kit plates. The results obtained from this technique have showed high sensitivity and specificity since it was capable of detecting HIV-1 infection early after birth. There were neither false-positivity nor false-negativity when blood samples obtained from HIV-1 seronegative asymptomatic individuals, and HIV-1 seropositive adult patients were analized. This rapid, low cost, simple, highly sensitive and specific assay can be extremely useful for early diagnosis of pediatric HIV infection.

  7. Accurate non-invasive image-based cytotoxicity assays for cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brouwer Jaap

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CloneSelect™ Imager system is an image-based visualisation system for cell growth assessment. Traditionally cell proliferation is measured with the colorimetric MTT assay. Results Here we show that both the CloneSelect Imager and the MTT approach result in comparable EC50 values when assaying the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and oxaliplatin on various cell lines. However, the image-based technique was found non-invasive, considerably quicker and more accurate than the MTT assay. Conclusions This new image-based technique has the potential to replace the cumbersome MTT assay when fast, unbiased and high-throughput cytotoxicity assays are requested.

  8. Development of a polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of pseudorabies virus in clinical samples

    OpenAIRE

    Lester J Pérez; Heidy Díaz de Arce

    2009-01-01

    Aujeszky's disease, also known as pseudorabies causes severe economic losses in swine industry and affects the pig husbandry all over the world. The conventional diagnostic procedure is time-consuming and false-negative results may occur in submissions from latently infected animals. The development, optimization and evaluation of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay are presented for the diagnosis of pseudorabies infection. This assay was based on the amplification of a highly conserved v...

  9. Exploring the dark side of MTT viability assay of cells cultured onto electrospun PLGA-based composite nanofibrous scaffolding materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ruiling; Shen, Mingwu; Cao, Xueyan; Guo, Rui; Tian, Xuejiao; Yu, Jianyong; Shi, Xiangyang

    2011-07-21

    One major method used to evaluate the biocompatibility of porous tissue engineering scaffolding materials is MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The MTT cell viability assay is based on the absorbance of the dissolved MTT formazan crystals formed in living cells, which is proportional to the number of viable cells. Due to the strong dye sorption capability of porous scaffolding materials, we propose that the cell viability determined from the MTT assay is likely to give a false negative result. In this study, we aim to explore the effect of the adsorption of MTT formazan on the accuracy of the viability assay of cells cultured onto porous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers, HNTs (halloysite nanotubes)/PLGA, and CNTs (multiwalled carbon nanotubes)/PLGA composite nanofibrous mats. The morphology of electrospun nanofibers and L929 mouse fibroblasts cultured onto the nanofibrous scaffolds were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The viability of cells proliferated for 3 days was evaluated through the MTT assay. In the meantime, the adsorption of MTT formazan onto the same electrospun nanofibers was evaluated and the standard concentration-absorbance curve was obtained in order to quantify the contribution of the adsorbed MTT formazan during the MTT cell viability assay. We show that the PLGA, and the HNTs- or CNTs-doped PLGA nanofibers display appreciable MTT formazan dye sorption, corresponding to 35.6-50.2% deviation from the real cell viability assay data. The better dye sorption capability of the nanofibers leads to further deviation from the real cell viability. Our study gives a general insight into accurate MTT cytotoxicity assessment of various porous tissue engineering scaffolding materials, and may be applicable to other colorimetric assays for analyzing the biological properties of porous scaffolding materials.

  10. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) is a widely used test for the presence of a cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro. This measure is used to test for infection with intracellular pathogens or for validating vaccine efficacy, and it is a widely used test for both human as well as cattle. However, there is no consensus whether to use whole blood cultures or purified PBMCs for the assay, and both cell populations are being used and results compared. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare different culture settings using immune cells from previously vaccinated calves, and to shed light on external factors that could influence the read out in terms of IFN-γ levels. It was found that optimal culture conditions varied between individual animals; when polyclonal activated, cells from whole blood cultures were most responsive, but when activated specifically, the optimal cell concentration/population varied with whole blood, 10×10(6)cells/ml PBMC and 5×10(6)cells/ml PBMC being the highest performing conditions. A further investigation of the distribution of cell populations in PBMCs compared to whole blood was conducted, and a significant (pcultures from five calves. Six plates (a-f) were tested and no significant difference in absolute levels of IFN-γ was detected in the six plates when cells were polyclonal and specifically activated. However, we observed a significant (pculture population, the concentration of cells being cultured, and the plastic ware used for the in vitro culture. These findings stress the importance of documenting the precise assay conditions when publishing results of in vitro IFN-γ release assays.

  11. Development of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay as a simple detection method of Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus in chrysanthemum and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Fukuta, Shiro; Matsumoto, Yuho; Hasegawa, Toru; Kojima, Hiroko; Hotta, Makiko; Miyake, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    For a simple and rapid detection of Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV) from chrysanthemum and tomato, a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed. A primer set designed to the genome sequences of CSNV worked most efficiently at 63°C and could detect CSNV RNA within 12min by fluorescence monitoring using an isothermal DNA amplification and fluorescence detection device. The result of a specificity test using seven other viruses and one viroid-infectable chrysanthemum or tomato showed that the assay could amplify CSNV specifically, and a sensitivity comparison showed that the RT-LAMP assay was as sensitive as the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The RT-LAMP assay using crude RNA, extracted simply, could detect CSNV. Overall, the RT-LAMP assay was found to be a simple, specific, convenient, and time-saving method for CSNV detection.

  12. Real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of cauliflower mosaic virus to complement the 35S screening assay for genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Katarina; Ravnikar, Maja; Zel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina; Toplak, Natasa

    2005-01-01

    Labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is now in place in many countries, including the European Union, in order to guarantee the consumer's choice between GM and non-GM products. Screening of samples is performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of regulatory sequences frequently introduced into genetically modified plants. Primers for the 35S promoter from Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) are those most frequently used. In virus-infected plants or in samples contaminated with plant material carrying the virus, false-positive results can consequently occur. A system for real-time PCR using a TaqMan minor groove binder probe was designed that allows recognition of virus coat protein in the sample, thus allowing differentiation between transgenic and virus-infected samples. We measured the efficiency of PCR amplification, limits of detection and quantification, range of linearity, and repeatability of the assay in order to assess the applicability of the assay for routine analysis. The specificity of the detection system was tested on various virus isolates and plant species. All 8 CaMV isolates were successfully amplified using the designed system. No cross-reactivity was detected with DNA from 3 isolates of the closely related Carnation etched ring virus. Primers do not amplify plant DNA from available genetically modified maize and soybean lines or from different species of Brassicaceae or Solanaceae that are natural hosts for CaMV. We evaluated the assay for different food matrixes by spiking CaMV DNA into DNA from food samples and have successfully amplified CaMV from all samples. The assay was tested on rapeseed samples from routine GMO testing that were positive in the 35S screening assay, and the presence of the virus was confirmed.

  13. Susceptibility of human lymphoid tissue cultured ex vivo to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV infection.

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    Marta Curriu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was generated after a recombination event between two endogenous murine leukemia viruses during the production of a prostate cancer cell line. Although the associations of the XMRV infection with human diseases appear unlikely, the XMRV is a retrovirus of undefined pathogenic potential, able to replicate in human cells in vitro. Since recent studies using animal models for infection have yielded conflicting results, we set out an ex vivo model for XMRV infection of human tonsillar tissue to determine whether XMRV produced by 22Rv1 cells is able to replicate in human lymphoid organs. Tonsil blocks were infected and infection kinetics and its pathogenic effects were monitored RESULTS: XMRV, though restricted by APOBEC, enters and integrates into the tissue cells. The infection did not result in changes of T or B-cells, immune activation, nor inflammatory chemokines. Infectious viruses could be recovered from supernatants of infected tonsils by reinfecting DERSE XMRV indicator cell line, although these supernatants could not establish a new infection in fresh tonsil culture, indicating that in our model, the viral replication is controlled by innate antiviral restriction factors. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the replication-competent retrovirus XMRV, present in a high number of laboratories, is able to infect human lymphoid tissue and produce infectious viruses, even though they were unable to establish a new infection in fresh tonsillar tissue. Hereby, laboratories working with cell lines producing XMRV should have knowledge and understanding of the potential biological biohazardous risks of this virus.

  14. Caveolin-1 influences human influenza A virus (H1N1 multiplication in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemgård Gun-Viol

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The threat of recurring influenza pandemics caused by new viral strains and the occurrence of escape mutants necessitate the search for potent therapeutic targets. The dependence of viruses on cellular factors provides a weak-spot in the viral multiplication strategy and a means to interfere with viral multiplication. Results Using a motif-based search strategy for antiviral targets we identified caveolin-1 (Cav-1 as a putative cellular interaction partner of human influenza A viruses, including the pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1 strains of swine origin circulating from spring 2009 on. The influence of Cav-1 on human influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 virus replication was determined in inhibition and competition experiments. RNAi-mediated Cav-1 knock-down as well as transfection of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant results in a decrease in virus titre in infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK, a cell line commonly used in basic influenza research as well as in virus vaccine production. To understand the molecular basis of the phenomenon we focussed on the putative caveolin-1 binding domain (CBD located in the lumenal, juxtamembranal portion of the M2 matrix protein which has been identified in the motif-based search. Pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that caveolin-1 binds to M2. The data suggest, that Cav-1 modulates influenza virus A replication presumably based on M2/Cav-1 interaction. Conclusion As Cav-1 is involved in the human influenza A virus life cycle, the multifunctional protein and its interaction with M2 protein of human influenza A viruses represent a promising starting point for the search for antiviral agents.

  15. Measles Virus IgG Avidity Assay for Use in Classification of Measles Vaccine Failure in Measles Elimination Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Philip; Bellini, William J.

    2012-01-01

    In regions where endemic measles virus has been eliminated, diagnostic assays are needed to assist in correctly classifying measles cases irrespective of vaccination status. A measles IgG avidity assay was configured using a commercially available measles-specific IgG enzyme immunoassay by modifying the protocol to include three 5-min washes with diethylamine (60 mM; pH 10.25) following serum incubation; serum was serially diluted, and the results were expressed as the end titer avidity index. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used for evaluation and validation and to establish low (≤30%) and high (≥70%) end titer avidity thresholds. Analysis of 319 serum specimens expected to contain either high- or low-avidity antibodies according to clinical and epidemiological data indicated that the assay is highly accurate, with an area under the curve of 0.998 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.978 to 1.000), sensitivity of 91.9% (95% CI, 83.2% to 97.0%), and specificity of 98.4% (95% CI, 91.6% to 100%). The assay is rapid (measles cases with low-avidity results; both were IgM-positive samples. Additionally, 11 patients (15 samples) with modified measles who were found to have high-avidity IgG results were classified as secondary vaccine failures; one sample with an intermediate-avidity result was not interpretable. In elimination settings, measles IgG avidity assays can complement existing diagnostic tools in confirming unvaccinated acute cases and, in conjunction with adequate clinical and epidemiologic investigation, aid in the classification of vaccine failure cases. PMID:22971778

  16. Inhibitors of the influenza A virus M2 proton channel discovered using a high-throughput yeast growth restoration assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna D Balgi

    Full Text Available The M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus is the target of the anti-influenza drugs amantadine and rimantadine. The effectiveness of these drugs has been dramatically limited by the rapid spread of drug resistant mutations, mainly at sites S31N, V27A and L26F in the pore of the channel. Despite progress in designing inhibitors of V27A and L26F M2, there are currently no drugs targeting these mutated channels in clinical trials. Progress in developing new drugs has been hampered by the lack of a robust assay with sufficient throughput for discovery of new active chemotypes among chemical libraries and sufficient sensitivity to provide the SAR data essential for their improvement and development as drugs. In this study we adapted a yeast growth restoration assay, in which expression of the M2 channel inhibits yeast growth and exposure to an M2 channel inhibitor restores growth, into a robust and sensitive high-throughput screen for M2 channel inhibitors. A screen of over 250,000 pure chemicals and semi-purified fractions from natural extracts identified 21 active compounds comprising amantadine, rimantadine, 13 related adamantanes and 6 non-adamantanes. Of the non-adamantanes, hexamethylene amiloride and a triazine derivative represented new M2 inhibitory chemotypes that also showed antiviral activity in a plaque reduction assay. Of particular interest is the fact that the triazine derivative was not sufficiently potent for detection as an inhibitor in the traditional two electrode voltage clamp assay for M2 channel activity, but its discovery in the yeast assay led to testing of analogues of which one was as potent as amantadine.

  17. Analytical and clinical performance of the CDC real time RT-PCR assay for detection and typing of dengue virus.

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    Gilberto A Santiago

    Full Text Available Dengue is an acute illness caused by the positive-strand RNA dengue virus (DENV. There are four genetically distinct DENVs (DENV-1-4 that cause disease in tropical and subtropical countries. Most patients are viremic when they present with symptoms; therefore, RT-PCR has been increasingly used in dengue diagnosis. The CDC DENV-1-4 RT-PCR Assay has been developed as an in-vitro diagnostic platform and was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for detection of dengue in patients with signs or symptoms of mild or severe dengue. The primers and probes of this test have been designed to detect currently circulating strains of DENV-1-4 from around the world at comparable sensitivity. In a retrospective study with 102 dengue cases confirmed by IgM anti-DENV seroconversion in the convalescent sample, the RT-PCR Assay detected DENV RNA in 98.04% of the paired acute samples. Using sequencing as a positive indicator, the RT-PCR Assay had a 97.92% positive agreement in 86 suspected dengue patients with a single acute serum sample. After extensive validations, the RT-PCR Assay performance was highly reproducible when evaluated across three independent testing sites, did not produce false positive results for etiologic agents of other febrile illnesses, and was not affected by pathological levels of potentially interfering biomolecules. These results indicate that the CDC DENV-1-4 RT-PCR Assay provides a reliable diagnostic platform capable for confirming dengue in suspected cases.

  18. Volatile organic compounds generated by cultures of bacteria and viruses associated with respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Qader, Amir; Lieberman, David; Shemer Avni, Yonat; Svobodin, Natali; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Sagi, Orli; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory infections (RI) can be viral or bacterial in origin. In either case, the invasion of the pathogen results in production and release of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The present study examines the VOCs released from cultures of five viruses (influenza A, influenza B, adenovirus, respiratory syncitial virus and parainfluenza 1 virus), three bacteria (Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae and Legionella pneumophila) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolated colonies. Our results demonstrate the involvement of inflammation-induced VOCs. Two significant VOCs were identified as associated with infectious bacterial activity, heptane and methylcyclohexane. These two VOCs have been linked in previous studies to oxidative stress effects. In order to distinguish between bacterial and viral positive cultures, we performed principal component analysis including peak identity (retention time) and VOC concentration (i.e. area under the peak) revealing 1-hexanol and 1-heptadecene to be good predictors.

  19. The elimination of viruses from garlic (Allium sativum L. plants by thermotherapy and meristem tip culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek S. Szyndel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of virus free garlic plants from totally cvs Jana, Mera and ecotype Zamojski was attempted by means of thermotherapy and meristem tip culture. The cloves and the aerial bulbils after hot air treatment in a growth chamber at 36ºC for 30-35 days or at 26-28ºC for 3-4 months in greenhouse were used to meristem tip culture on M. S. medium. In the 26-28ºC treatment 19.5 % of meristerns produced plants and 22.5 % of these were virus free. In the 36ºC treatment 14.5 % of the meristems developed into plantlets and 34.6 % of them were virus free. The plantlets were indexed by "sap-dip" electron microscopy methods.

  20. Trichoderma L-Lysine-α-Oxidase Producer Strain Culture Fluid Inhibits Impatiens Necrotic Spot Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, I P; Shneider, Yu A; Karimova, E V

    2016-01-01

    A method for PCR diagnosis of impatiens necrotic spot virus is developed. Concentrated culture fluid with active L-lysine-α-oxidase (0.54 U/ml) from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai fungus producer strain F-180 inhibits vitally hazardous impatiens necrotic spot phytovirus.

  1. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, J.B.; Wahl, A.S.; Freund, S.; Genzel, Y.; Reichl, U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus

  2. THE GROWTH OF JAPANESE AND WEST NILE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES IN TISSUE CULTURES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    extinguishing it with a homologous immune serum. In the HeLa cells a specific cytopathogenic effect was registered after six cultural passages of the strain R...1. The cytopathogenic effect was retained in subinoculation. The West Nile encephalitis virus induced a cytopathogenic effect in the HeLa cells from

  3. Detection of egg drop syndrome virus antigen or genome by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinakar Raj, G; Sivakumar, S; Matheswaran, K; Chandrasekhar, M; Thiagarajan, V; Nachimuthu, K

    2003-10-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against an Indian isolate of egg drop syndrome (EDS) virus and characterized. Four hybridoma clones were secreting mAbs that bound to a 100 kDa protein, presumably the hexon protein. These mAbs were found to cross-react with two other Indian isolates of EDS virus and to the reference UK 127 strain. Three of these mAbs were mapped to the same epitope compared with the other mAb (F8), which bound to a different epitope. An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) was developed using the F8 mAbs as capture antibody and polyclonal chicken serum against EDS virus as detection antibody. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the EDS viral genome. Following experimental infection of oestrogen-treated chickens with EDS virus, cloacal swabs, oviduct, uterus and spleen were collected at different days post-infection and used in both AC-ELISA and PCR, directly and after a single passage in embryonated duck eggs. The sensitivity and specificity of antigen detection by AC-ELISA or PCR was 95% and 98%, respectively. For diagnosis of EDS viral infections, PCR is recommended due to its ease and the lack of requirement of prepared reagents such as mAbs or conjugates. We recommend that PCR be performed directly on boiled tissue homogenates. Any negative samples may be passaged in embryonated duck eggs and the allantoic fluids tested by PCR before a conclusive negative diagnosis is given.

  4. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Directly from Positive Blood Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylo...

  5. Combination of Culture, Antigen and Toxin Detection, and Cytotoxin Neutralization Assay for Optimal Clostridium difficile Diagnostic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J Alfa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been a growing interest in developing an appropriate laboratory diagnostic algorithm for Clostridium difficile, mainly as a result of increases in both the number and severity of cases of C difficile infection in the past decade. A C difficile diagnostic algorithm is necessary because diagnostic kits, mostly for the detection of toxins A and B or glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH antigen, are not sufficient as stand-alone assays for optimal diagnosis of C difficile infection. In addition, conventional reference methods for C difficile detection (eg, toxigenic culture and cytotoxin neutralization [CTN] assays are not routinely practiced in diagnostic laboratory settings.

  6. Robust and persistent replication of the genotype 6a hepatitis C virus replicon in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei; Peng, Betty; Chan, Katie; Gong, Ruoyu; Yang, Huiling; Delaney, William; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-05-01

    Genotype 6 (GT6) hepatitis C virus (HCV) is prevalent in Southeast Asia and southern China, where it can constitute up to 50% of HCV infections. Despite this, no direct-acting antivirals are approved to treat GT6 HCV infection, and no cell culture systems have been described. In this study, we aimed to develop a GT6 HCV subgenomic replicon to facilitate the identification and development of new HCV therapies with pan-genotype activity. A subgenomic replicon cDNA encoding a GT6a consensus sequence plus an NS5A amino acid substitution (S232I) was synthesized. Electroporation of RNA encoding the GT6a replicon into Huh-7-derived cells consistently yielded 20 to 100 stable replicon colonies. Genotypic analyses of individual replicon colonies revealed new adaptive mutations across multiple viral nonstructural proteins. The E30V and K272R mutations in NS3 and the K34R mutation in NS4A were observed most frequently and were confirmed to enhance GT6a replicon replication in the presence of the NS5A amino acid substitution S232I. These new adaptive mutations allowed establishment of robust luciferase-encoding GT6a replicons for reproducible quantification of HCV replication, and the luciferase-encoding replicons enabled efficient determinations of antiviral activity for HCV inhibitors in a 384-well assay format. While nucleoside/nucleotide NS5B inhibitors and cyclophilin A inhibitors had similar antiviral activities against both GT6a and GT1b replicons, some nonnucleoside NS5B inhibitors, NS3 protease inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors had less antiviral activity against GT6a replicons. In conjunction with other genotype replicons, this robust GT6a replicon system will aid in the development of pan-genotypic HCV regimens.

  7. Chick ex ovo culture and ex ovo CAM assay: how it really works

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dohle, Daniel S; Pasa, Susanne D; Gustmann, Sebastian; Laub, Markus; Wissler, Josef H; Jennissen, Herbert P; Dünker, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    .... After the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) has developed, its blood vessel network can be easily accessed, manipulated and observed and therefore provides an optimal setting for angiogenesis assays...

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a Vero cell culture-derived whole-virus H7N9 vaccine in mice and guinea pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Wodal

    Full Text Available A novel avian H7N9 virus with a high case fatality rate in humans emerged in China in 2013. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate Vero cell culture-derived whole-virus H7N9 vaccine in small animal models.Antibody responses induced in immunized DBA/2J mice and guinea pigs were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition (HI, microneutralization (MN, and neuraminidase inhibition (NAi assays. T-helper cell responses and IgG subclass responses in mice were analyzed by ELISPOT and ELISA, respectively. Vaccine efficacy against lethal challenge with wild-type H7N9 virus was evaluated in immunized mice. H7N9-specific antibody responses induced in mice and guinea pigs were compared to those induced by a licensed whole-virus pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09 vaccine.The whole-virus H7N9 vaccine induced dose-dependent H7N9-specific HI, MN and NAi antibodies in mice and guinea pigs. Evaluation of T-helper cell responses and IgG subclasses indicated the induction of a balanced Th1/Th2 response. Immunized mice were protected against lethal H7N9 challenge in a dose-dependent manner. H7N9 and H1N1pdm09 vaccines were similarly immunogenic.The induction of H7N9-specific antibody and T cell responses and protection against lethal challenge suggest that the Vero cell culture-derived whole-virus vaccine would provide an effective intervention against the H7N9 virus.

  9. Screening of Dengue virus antiviral activity of marine seaweeds by an in situ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cristine Koishi

    Full Text Available Dengue is a significant public health problem worldwide. Despite the important social and clinical impact, there is no vaccine or specific antiviral therapy for prevention and treatment of dengue virus (DENV infection. Considering the above, drug discovery research for dengue is of utmost importance; in addition natural marine products provide diverse and novel chemical structures with potent biological activities that must be evaluated. In this study we propose a target-free approach for dengue drug discovery based on a novel, rapid, and economic in situ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the screening of a panel of marine seaweed extracts. The in situ ELISA was standardized and validated for Huh7.5 cell line infected with all four serotypes of DENV, among them clinical isolates and a laboratory strain. Statistical analysis showed an average S/B of 7.2 and Z-factor of 0.62, demonstrating assay consistency and reliability. A panel of fifteen seaweed extracts was then screened at the maximum non-toxic dose previously determined by the MTT and Neutral Red cytotoxic assays. Eight seaweed extracts were able to reduce DENV infection of at least one serotype tested. Four extracts (Phaeophyta: Canistrocarpus cervicornis, Padina gymnospora; Rhodophyta: Palisada perforate; Chlorophyta: Caulerpa racemosa were chosen for further evaluation, and time of addition studies point that they might act at an early stage of the viral infection cycle, such as binding or internalization.

  10. A Novel Method of Safely Measuring Influenza Virus Aerosol Using Antigen-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Performance Evaluation of Protective Clothing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Okaue, Akira; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Hamamoto, Itsuki; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Currently, threats caused by pathogens are serious public health problems worldwide. Protective clothing is essential when one is treating infected patients or dealing with unknown pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the performance of protective clothing against pathogens. In Japan, some methods for evaluating the performance of protective clothing have been established in the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). However, a test method against virus aerosols has not been established. Because there is a risk of infection from a live virus during the test, it is necessary to devise a safe method for the virus-aerosol-based test. Here, we propose a new method of safely measuring virus aerosols for the performance evaluation of protective clothing materials. To ensure safety, an inactivated virus was used. As a model virus, the influenza virus was selected owing to the proper small diameter of the virus particles. To quantitatively measure the particle-amount of the inactivated influenza virus, we developed an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeting the M1 protein. Furthermore, we evaluated two materials using our method. Significant differences in the protection performance against the virus aerosol were observed between different sample materials, thereby confirming the applicability of our new method for performance evaluation.

  11. Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis

  12. Baculovirus-mediated promoter assay and transcriptional analysis of white spot syndrome virus orf427 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is an important pathogen of the penaeid shrimp with high mortalities. In previous reports, Orf427 of WSSV is characterized as one of the three major latency-associated genes of WSSV. Here, we were interested to analyze the promoter of orf427 and its expression during viral pathogenesis. Results in situ hybridization revealed that orf427 was transcribed in all the infected tissues during viral lytic infection and the translational product can be detected from the infected shrimp. A time-course RT-PCR analysis indicated that transcriptional products of orf427 could only be detected after 6 h post virus inoculation. Furthermore, a baculovirus-mediated promoter analysis indicated that the promoter of orf427 failed to express the EGFP reporter gene in both insect SF9 cells and primary shrimp cells. Conclusion Our data suggested that latency-related orf427 might not play an important role in activating virus replication from latent phase due to its late transcription during the lytic infection.

  13. Investigation of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus in Sudan using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa H. Halfawi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This seroprevalence study was carried out to detect anti Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus (CAEV antibodies in goat sera in five States in the Sudan during 2009 and 2010. Materials and Methods: In this study, four hundred and thirty two sera samples collected from five States in the Sudan were screened for anti-CAE virus antibodies using a commercial competitive ELISA (cELISA kit. Results: Out of 432 samples, 25 (5.8% tested positive using ELISA. The highest prevalence was recorded in El-gazira State (19%, whereas in Kassala State the prevalence was 10.7%, Khartoum State (0.92% and no positive antibodies were found in Northern and River Nile. Conclusion: The information obtained in this study showed that the disease spread to other states in the Sudan beside Khartoum state. Therefore, further epizootiological investigation on CAEV and Maedi Visna Virus at the country level is important to monitor its spread and determine its economic impact in the Sudan, while better control on imported animals for genetic improvement must be instituted. [Vet World 2013; 6(8.000: 558-562

  14. Cultured corneas show dendritic spread and restrict herpes simplex virus infection that is not observed with cultured corneal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Neel; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Agelidis, Alex; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Mangano, Kyle; Patel, Shrey; Tekin, Sati Zeynep; Shukla, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) causes life-long morbidities in humans. While fever blisters are more common, occasionally the cornea is infected resulting in vision loss. A very intriguing aspect of HSV-1 corneal infection is that the virus spread is normally restricted to only a small fraction of cells on the corneal surface that connect with each other in a dendritic fashion. Here, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the susceptibility of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells to HSV-1 infection, we infected HCE cells at three different dosages of HSV-1 and measured the outcomes in terms of viral entry, gene and protein expression, viral replication and cytokine induction. In cultured cells, infectivity and cytokine induction were observed even at the minimum viral dosage tested, while a more pronounced dose-restricted infectivity was seen in ex vivo cultures of porcine corneas. Use of fluorescent HSV-1 virions demonstrated a pattern of viral spread ex vivo that mimics clinical findings. We conclude that HCE cell cultures are highly susceptible to infection whereas the cultured corneas demonstrate a higher ability to restrict the infection even in the absence of systemic immune system. The restriction is helped in part by local interferon response and the unique cellular architecture of the cornea. PMID:28198435

  15. Improvement and optimization of a multiplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection and typing of Vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Kate; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Velazques-Salinas, Lauro; Clavijo, Alfonso

    2010-05-01

    An improvement to a previously reported real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) assay for the detection of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is described. Results indicate that the new assay is capable of detecting a panel of genetically representative strains of VSV present in North, Central, and South America. The assay is specific for VSV and allows for simultaneous differentiation between Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus and Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus. This real-time RT-PCR is able to detect current circulating strains of VSV and can be used for rapid diagnosis of VSV and differentiation of VSV from other vesicular diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease.

  16. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    . However, there is no consensus whether to use whole blood cultures or purified PBMCs for the assay, and both cell populations are being used and results compared. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare different culture settings using immune cells from previously vaccinated calves, and to shed...... light on external factors that could influence the read out in terms of IFN-γ levels. It was found that optimal culture conditions varied between individual animals; when polyclonal activated, cells from whole blood cultures were most responsive, but when activated specifically, the optimal cell...... concentration/population varied with whole blood, 10 × 106 cells/ml PBMC and 5 × 106 cells/ml PBMC being the highest performing conditions. A further investigation of the distribution of cell populations in PBMCs compared to whole blood was conducted, and a significant (p

  17. Comparison of two commercial broadrange PCR and sequencing assays for identification of bacteria in culture-negative clinical samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavnsbjerg, Camilla; Frimodt-Moller, Niels; Moser, Claus Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Background Culturing has long been the gold standard for detecting aetiologic agents in bacterial infections. In some cases, however, culturing fails to detect the infection. To further investigate culture-negative samples, amplification and subsequent sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is often...... applied. The aim of the present study was to compare the current method used at our Department of Clinical Microbiology, based on the MicroSeq ID system (Applied Biosystems, USA) with the Universal Microbe Detection (UMD) SelectNA kit (Molzym, Germany). Methods 76 culture-negative samples were first...... in a real-time PCR and sequenced. Results 22 of 76 samples (28.9%) were positive for bacteria with the UMD SelectNA, which was significantly more (p = 0.0055) than the MicroSeq ID where 11 of 76 samples (14.5%) were positive. The UMD SelectNA assay identified more relevant bacterial pathogens than the Micro...

  18. A highly sensitive and selective diagnostic assay based on virus nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Seung; Cho, Moon Kyu; Lee, Eun Jung; Ahn, Keum-Young; Lee, Kyung Eun; Jung, Jae Hun; Cho, Yunjung; Han, Sung-Sik; Kim, Young Keun; Lee, Jeewon

    2009-04-01

    Early detection of the protein marker troponin I in patients with a higher risk of acute myocardial infarction can reduce the risk of death from heart attacks. Most troponin assays are currently based on the conventional enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and have detection limits in the nano- and picomolar range. Here, we show that by combining viral nanoparticles, which are engineered to have dual affinity for troponin antibodies and nickel, with three-dimensional nanostructures including nickel nanohairs, we can detect troponin levels in human serum samples that are six to seven orders of magnitude lower than those detectable using conventional enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. The viral nanoparticle helps to orient the antibodies for maximum capture of the troponin markers. High densities of antibodies on the surfaces of the nanoparticles and nanohairs lead to greater binding of the troponin markers, which significantly enhances detection sensitivities. The nickel nanohairs are re-useable and can reproducibly differentiate healthy serum from unhealthy ones. We expect other viral nanoparticles to form similar highly sensitive diagnostic assays for a variety of other protein markers.

  19. Comparison of peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization assays with culture-based matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for the identification of bacteria and yeasts from blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, A; Martinelli, M; Motta, F; Larini, S; Arcangeletti, M C; Medici, M C; Chezzi, C; De Conto, F

    2014-08-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) is a molecular diagnostic tool for the rapid detection of pathogens directly from liquid media. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate PNA FISH assays in comparison with culture-based matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification, as a reference method, for both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures, during a 1-year investigation. On the basis of the Gram stain microscopy results, four different PNA FISH commercially available assays were used ('Staphylococcus aureus/CNS', 'Enterococcus faecalis/OE', 'GNR Traffic Light' and 'Yeasts Traffic Light' PNA FISH assays, AdvanDx). The four PNA FISH assays were applied to 956 positive blood cultures (921 for bacteria and 35 for yeasts) and 11 CSF cultures. Among the 921 blood samples positive for bacteria, PNA FISH gave concordant results with MALDI-TOF MS in 908/921 (98.64%) samples, showing an agreement of 99.4% in the case of monomicrobial infections. As regards yeasts, the PNA FISH assay showed a 100% agreement with the result obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. When PNA FISH assays were tested on the 11 CSF cultures, the results agreed with the reference method in all cases (100%). PNA FISH assays provided species identification at least one work-day before the MALDI-TOF MS culture-based identification. PNA FISH assays showed an excellent efficacy in the prompt identification of main pathogens, yielding a significant reduction in reporting time and leading to more appropriate patient management and therapy in cases of sepsis and severe infections.

  20. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  1. Development of Conventional and Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays to Detect Tembusu Virus in Culex tarsalis Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-11

    appropri- ate preventive measures can be taken to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with infection with these pathogens. Development of...field-based real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays for rapid detection of virus-infected mos- quitoes would be a great assistance to preventive ...specimens were propagated in primary duck embryo, C6/36 ( Aedes albopictus), or Vero (African green monkey kidney) cells to produce stock viruses for

  2. Development and evaluation of a SYBR green-based real time RT-PCR assay for detection of the emerging avian influenza A (H7N9 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhu

    Full Text Available Most recently a novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus emerged in China and has been associated with lots of human infection and fatal cases. Genetic analysis of the viral genome revealed that this reassortant virus might be better adapted to humans than other avian influenza viruses. Molecular diagnostic methods are thus urgently needed in public health laboratories. In this study, a SYBR green-based one-step real time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR was developed to detect the novel H7N9 virus. The primer pairs on the basis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase gene sequences of H7N9 viruses amplified subtype-specific fragments with Tm values of 80.77±0.06°C for H7 and 81.20±0.17°C for N9 respectively. The standard curves showed a dynamic linear range across 6 log units of RNA copy number (10(6 to 10(1 copies/ µl with a detection limit of 10 copies per reaction for both H7 and N9 assays by using serial ten-fold diluted in-vitro transcribed viral RNA. In addition, no cross-reactivity was observed with seasonal H1N1, H1N1 pdm09, H3N2, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses as well as other human respiratory viruses. When the assay was further evaluated in H7N9 virus infected clinical samples, positive amplification signals were obtained in all of the specimens with the accordance between H7 and N9 assays. Therefore, the established SYBR green-based real time RT-PCR assay could provide a rapid, sensitive, specific and reliable alternative approach with lower costs for high throughput screening of suspected samples from humans, animals and environments in first line public health laboratories.

  3. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. C. Dohmen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  4. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohmen, Amy J. C., E-mail: a.dohmen@nki.nl [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Swartz, Justin E. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Willems, Stefan M. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Spijker, René [Medical library, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1100 DE (Netherlands); Dutch Cochrane Centre, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Neefjes, Jacques [Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Zuur, Charlotte L. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands)

    2015-08-28

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  5. Single strain isolation method for cell culture-adapted hepatitis C virus by end-point dilution and infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Sugiyama

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV culture system has enabled us to clarify the HCV life cycle and essential host factors for propagation. However, the virus production level of wild-type JFH-1 (JFH-1/wt is limited, and this leads to difficulties in performing experiments that require higher viral concentrations. As the cell culture-adapted JFH-1 has been reported to have robust virus production, some mutations in the viral genome may play a role in the efficiency of virus production. In this study, we obtained cell culture-adapted virus by passage of full-length JFH-1 RNA-transfected Huh-7.5.1 cells. The obtained virus produced 3 log-fold more progeny viruses as compared with JFH-1/wt. Several mutations were identified as being responsible for robust virus production, but, on reverse-genetics analysis, the production levels of JFH-1 with these mutations did not reach the level of cell culture-adapted virus. By using the single strain isolation method by end-point dilution and infection, we isolated two strains with additional mutations, and found that these strains have the ability to produce more progeny viruses. On reverse-genetics analysis, the strains with these additional mutations were able to produce robust progeny viruses at comparable levels as cell culture-adapted JFH-1 virus. The strategy used in this study will be useful for identifying strains with unique characteristics, such as robust virus production, from a diverse population, and for determining the responsible mutations for these characteristics.

  6. Benefit of hepatitis C virus core antigen assay in prediction of therapeutic response to interferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. HCV core Ag negativity could predict SVR on day 1 (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 85.0%, accuracy = 86.4%), whereas RNA negativity could predict SVR on day 7 (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 87.2%, accuracy = 88.6%). None of the patients who had detectable serum core Ag or RNA on day 14 achieved SVR (specificity = 100%). The predictive accuracy on day 14 was higher by RNA negativity (93.2%) than that by core Ag negativity (75.0%). The combined predictive criterion of both viral load decline during the first 24 h and basal viral load was also predictive for SVR; the sensitivities of Lumipulse-Ag and Amplicor-M were 45.5 and 47.6%, respectively, and the specificity was 100%. Amplicor-M had better predictive accuracy than Lumipulse-Ag in 2-week disappearance tests because it had better sensitivity. On the other hand, estimates of kinetic parameters were similar regardless of the detection method. Although the correlations between Lumipulse-Ag and Amplicor-M were good both before and 24 h after IFN administration, HCV core Ag seemed to be relatively lower 24 h after IFN administration than before administration. Lumipulse-Ag seems to be useful for detecting the HCV concentration during IFN therapy; however, we still need to understand the characteristics of the assay.

  7. Development of a new resequencing pathogen microarray based assay for detection of broad-spectrum respiratory tract viruses in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Shen

    Full Text Available A Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM is a single, highly multiplexed assay for detecting and differentiating similarly related pathogens by using closely overlapping probe sets to determine a target organism's nucleotide sequence. In this study, a new RPM (RPM-IVDC1 that consisted of 224-bp detector tiles corresponding to 9 influenza A subtypes, 11 rhinoviruses, 28 enteroviruses and 38 other respiratory viruses was developed and optimized to provide individual and simultaneous detection sensitivities ranging from 15 to 750 genomic copies for 16 common respiratory pathogens. A total of 110 consecutive patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP admitted to 5 district general hospitals in Beijing during a 1-year period were assessed using the new assay. Among the children (under age 5 and adult patients (above age 18, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and rhinovirus (RV were the most common etiological agents, respectively, which is consistent with reference assays. Atypical pathogens that may cause CAP-like illness, including rubella virus, measles virus, influenza type C virus, human herpesvirus (HHV were also detected. The results show the capability of RPM-IVDC1 for the accurate detection and identification of multiple virus types, which may be of significant use in epidemic surveillance and outbreak investigations of atypical pathogens.

  8. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of dengue virus serotypes 1-4, Japanese encephalitis virus, and West Nile virus by a combined reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Jianhua

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid identification and differentiation of mosquito-transmitted flaviviruses in acute-phase sera of patients and field-caught vector mosquitoes are important for the prediction and prevention of large-scale epidemics. Results We developed a flexible reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP unit for the detection and differentiation of dengue virus serotypes 1-4 (DENV1-4, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, and West Nile virus (WNV. The unit efficiently amplified the viral genomes specifically at wide ranges of viral template concentrations, and exhibited similar amplification curves as monitored by a real-time PCR engine. The detection limits of the RT-LAMP unit were 100-fold higher than that of RT-PCR in 5 of the six flaviviruses. The results on specificity indicated that the six viruses in the assay had no cross-reactions with each other. By examining 66 viral strains of DENV1-4 and JEV, the unit identified the viruses with 100% accuracy and did not cross-react with influenza viruses and hantaviruses. By screening a panel of specimens containing sera of 168 patients and 279 pools of field-caught blood sucked mosquitoes, results showed that this unit is high feasible in clinical settings and epidemiologic field, and it obtained results 100% correlated with real-time RT-PCR. Conclusions The RT-LAMP unit developed in this study is able to quickly detect and accurately differentiate the six kinds of flaviviruses, which makes it extremely feasible for screening these viruses in acute-phase sera of the patients and in vector mosquitoes without the need of high-precision instruments.

  9. Metabolic response of environmentally isolated microorganisms to industrial effluents: Use of a newly described cell culture assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferebee, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    An environmental application using a microtiter culture assay to measure the metabolic sensitivity of microorganisms to petrochemical effluents will be tested. The Biomedical Operations and Research Branch at NASA JSC has recently developed a rapid and nondestructive method to measure cell growth and metabolism. Using a colorimetric procedure the uniquely modified assay allows the metabolic kinetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to be measured. Use of such an assay if adapted for the routine monitoring of waste products, process effluents, and environmentally hazardous substances may prove to be invaluable to the industrial community. The microtiter method as described will be tested using microorganisms isolated from the Galveston Bay aquatic habitat. The microbial isolates will be identified prior to testing using the automated systems available at JSC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cadmium, and lead will provide control toxic chemicals. The toxicity of industrial effluent from two industrial sites will be tested. An effort will be made to test the efficacy of this assay for measuring toxicity in a mixed culture community.

  10. Analysis of Ebola Virus and VLP Release Using an Immunocapture Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    vaccine efficacy. While other viral pro- teins such as VP40, VP24, VP30, and VP35 expressed by a Venezuelan encephalitis virus (VEE)-based replicon are...VLP release was also achieved by VP30 (Fig. 6). While mouse studies have shown some protective effect by Ebola VP35 expressed in replicons , VP35 is...vaccines based upon alphavirus replicons protect guinea pigs and nonhuman primates. Virology 251 (1), 28–37. uang, Y., Xu, L., Sun, Y., Nabel, G.J

  11. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwon Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections.

  12. Development and evaluation of tailored specific real-time RT-PCR assays for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotypes circulating in East Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachanek-Bankowska, Katarzyna; Mero, Herieth R.; Wadsworth, Jemma

    2016-01-01

    the VP1-coding region that share high intra-lineage identity, but do not cross-react with FMD viruses from other serotypes that circulate in the region. These serotype-specific assays operate with the same thermal profile as the pan-diagnostic tests making it possible to run them in parallel to produce...... methods mainly rely either on antigen detection ELISAs or nucleotide sequencing approaches. This report describes the development of a panel of serotype-specific real-time RT-PCR assays (rRT-PCR) tailored to detect FMDV lineages currently circulating in East Africa. These assays target sequences within...... CT values comparable to the pan-diagnostic test detecting the 3D-coding region. These assays were evaluated alongside the established pan-specific molecular test using field samples and virus isolates collected from Tanzania, Kenya and Ethiopia that had been previously characterised by nucleotide...

  13. Rapid detection of sacbrood virus (SBV by one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Long Yang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sacbrood virus (SBV primarily infects honeybee broods, and in order to deal with the problem cost effective detection methods are required. Findings A one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP assay was developed for the rapid identification of SBV. The data demonstrated that, in a simple water bath, SBV RNA could be detected as early as 20 min at 65°C, and a positive amplification reaction was visible to the naked eye due to a color change brought on by the addition of nucleic acid stain SYBR Green. Conclusions The current study presents a method for the rapid and simple detection of SBV by RT-LAMP with high sensitivity and analytic specificity.

  14. Seroprevalence of Japanese encephalitis virus using competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA in pigs in East Sumba, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annytha Detha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Japanese Encephalitis (JE, a vector-borne zoonotic viral disease, is mostly prevalent in Asian countries. The objective of this study was to investigate the occurence of JE virus (JEV among pigs in East Sumba, Indonesia. Blood samples (n=52 were randomly collected from 52 apparantly healthy pigs where pig population was high in East Sumba. The samples were subjected for seroprevalence study for the presence of antibodies against JEV using competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA. Results showed that 53% (n=28/52 blood samples from the pigs contained antibodies against JEV. This finding is suggestive that the JEV is circulating among pig population in East Sumba, Indonesia. The data may help in designing control strategies of the JEV in the East Sumba, Indonesia.

  15. [Nursing-home-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia--comparison of sputum cultures with Binax NOW Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary antigen assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikimaru, Toru; Nishiyama, Mamoru; Yonemitsu, Junko; Nagabuchi, Masako; Shimada, Akiko; Koga, Takeharu; Aizawa, Hisamichi

    2008-11-01

    To clarify the clinical significance of Pneumococcal pneumonia in nursing-home-acquired pneumonia, we examined the positive disease rate of using sputum cultures and the Binax NOW Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary antigen assay in 154 nursing-home patients with pneumonia. These included 54 males and 100 females with a mean age of 86.2 years. Bacteriological findings for sputum culture in 130 patients showed Streptococcus pneumoniae to be cultured in 11 cases (8%). In 72 in whom the Streptococcus pneumoniae-urinary antigen test (Binax NOW) was done, the urinary-antigen-positive rate (26/72 ; 36%) was higher than the culture positive rate for S. pneumoniae. Both examinations were done in 64 patients, among whom 5 in whom S. pneumoniae was cultured also had positive results for the urinary antigen test. Almost half of those undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastroscopy (PEG) tube nutrition had positive results for the urinary antigen test, but not all such patients had positive cultures for S. pneumoniae. Although the culture-positive rate for S. pneumoniae in sputum was low, we concluded that S. pneumoniae was frequently linked to nursing-home-acquired pneumonia, especially in "total-care" patients.

  16. Stable lentiviral transformation of CHO cells for the expression of the hemagglutinin H5 of avian influenza virus in suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaín González Pose

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus H5N1 has caused extensive damage worldwide among poultry and humans. Effective expression systems are needed for the production of viral proteins required for monitoring this devastating disease. The present study deals with the establishment of a stable expression system for the hemagglutinin H5 (HAH5 of avian influenza virus using CHO cells in suspension culture transduced with a recombinant lentiviral vector. The synthetic gene coding the HAH5 protein was inserted in a lentiviral vector with the aim of performing a stable transduction of CHO cells. After the selection of recombinant clones, the one with the highest expression level was adapted to suspension culture and the HAH5 protein was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from the culture supernatant. There were no significant differences when this protein, purified or direct from the culture supernatant of CHO or SiHa cells, was utilized in an immunologic assay using positive and negative sera as reference. It was also demonstrated that the HAH5 protein in its purified form is able to bind anti-HAH5 antibodies generated with proper and non-proper folded proteins. The results demonstrate that the CHO cell line stably transduced with a lentiviral vector coding the sequence of the HAH5 protein and cultured in suspension can be a suitable expression system to obtain this protein for diagnostic purpose in a consistent and reliable manner.

  17. The impact of polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection of hepatitis C virus infection in a hemodialysis unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Magdi M; Mooij, Jaap M; Hegazy, Mohamed S; Bamaga, Mohammed S

    2007-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is most often diagnosed by detection of antibodies against the virus (HCV Ab). However, it has been reported that some HCV Ab negative patients test positive for HCV-RNA. Over a study period of 30 months, all patients on hemodialysis at the Al Hada Armed Forces Hospital in Taif, Saudi Arabia were tested monthly for HCV Ab and twice per year for HCV-RNA. HCV Ab was tested by a third generation microparticle enzyme immunoassay (MEIA), and HCV-RNA by a qualitative hepatitis-RNA assay, second version (COBAS Amplicor PCR), which was recently introduced in the Molecular Pathology Laboratory of our hospital. Of the 180 patients studied, 34 (18.9%) had positive HCV Ab, and of the 146 HCV Ab negative patients, five patients tested positive for HCV-RNA (3.42%). Our study further finds that, when applying HCV Ab testing only, some patients with HCV viremia may be undetected. For better HCV infection control, routine HCV-RNA testing of dialysis patients should be considered, particularly in areas where the infection is common and in units applying isolation policies.

  18. Label free checkerboard assay to determine overlapping epitopes of Ebola virus VP-40 antibodies using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George P; Liu, Jinny L; Zabetakis, Dan; Legler, Patricia M; Goldman, Ellen R

    2017-03-01

    Immunoassay formats, in which antibodies provide sensitivity and specificity, are often utilized to provide rapid and simple diagnostic tests. Surface plasmon resonance is frequently used to evaluate the suitability of antibodies by determining binding kinetics to agents or surrogate antigens. We used SPR to evaluate a number of commercial monoclonal antibodies as well as single domain antibodies produced in-house. All the antibodies targeted the Ebola virus viral protein 40 (VP40). We determined the ability of each antibody to bind to immobilized VP40, and ensured they did not bind Ebola glycoprotein or the nucleoprotein. A subset of the monoclonal antibodies was immobilized to characterize antigen capture in solution. It can be advantageous to utilize antibodies that recognize distinct epitopes when choosing reagents for detection and diagnostic assays. We determined the uniqueness of the epitope recognized by the anti-VP40 antibodies using a checkerboard format that exploits the 6×6 array of interactions monitored by the Bio-Rad ProteOn XPR36 SPR instrument. The results demonstrate the utility of surface plasmon resonance to characterize monoclonal and recombinant antibodies. Additionally, the analysis presented here enabled the identification of pairs of anti-VP40 antibodies which could potentially be utilized in sandwich type immunoassays for the detection of Ebola virus.

  19. Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and virus neutralization test for detection of antibodies to avian pneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahalaf, A N; Halvorson, D A; Saif, Y M

    2002-01-01

    Two different whole-virus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), developed in Ohio (OH) with APV/Minnesota/turkey/2a/97 and in Minnesota (MN) with APV/Colorado/turkey/97, and the virus neutralization (VN) test were used to test 270 turkey serum samples from 27 Minnesota turkey flocks for avian pneumovirus (APV) antibodies. In addition, 77 turkey serum samples and 128 ostrich serum samples from Ohio were tested. None of the turkey samples from Ohio had antibodies to APV by the VN test and OH ELISA. The ostrich samples were only tested with the VN test and were all negative for antibodies to APV. For the Minnesota serum samples, 107, 115, and 120 were positive by the VN test, the OH ELISA, and the MN ELISA, respectively. The Kappa values of 0.938 and 0.825 showed excellent agreement between the VN test and the OH ELISA and the MN ELISA, respectively, for detection of antibodies to the APV. The OH ELISA and MN ELISA had sensitivities of 1.0 and 0.953, specificities of 0.950 and 0.889, and accuracies of 0.970 and 0.914, respectively. Our results indicate that the 3 methods are sensitive and specific for diagnosis of the APV infection.

  20. Universal detection of hepatitis E virus by two real-time PCR assays: TaqMan and Primer-Probe Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyarmati, Péter; Mohammed, Nahla; Norder, Helene; Blomberg, Jonas; Belák, Sándor; Widén, Frederik

    2007-12-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of food- and waterborne diseases in countries with poor sanitation. Furthermore, travellers to such countries are also at risk of contracting the virus. Noteworthily, during the last decade an increasing number of non-travel-related cases were recorded even in countries with high sanitary standards. An alternative, direct route of infection, from animals to humans (zoonotic transmission) is suspected to be the cause of recent cases of hepatitis E. In order to provide rapid and sensitive methods for detecting the virus in various hosts, two real-time PCR methods were developed and compared: a TaqMan and Primer-Probe Energy Transfer (PriProET) assay. These highly sensitive novel methods provide valuable diagnostic tools to investigate zoonotic transmission, to detect the virus in the food chain and in research related to the potential of hepatitis E virus to cross the species barrier. The results show that the two novel PCR assays are robust, highly sensitive and specific for broad range detection of the four genotypes of HEV. Compared to PriProET, the TaqMan assay appears to perform slightly better, with higher fluorescence values for positive samples. However, the PriProET has the benefit of better tolerating the point mutations in the target nucleic acids. Thus, it provides a more powerful tool to detect new virus variants. These new molecular diagnostic assays are practical tools that can be employed in the area of public health, for disease diagnosis and for tracking outbreaks. In basic research the methods provide new tools to study HEV biology, including virus-host interactions and transmission between various host species.

  1. The statistical performance of an MCF-7 cell culture assay evaluated using generalized linear mixed models and a score test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey deCastro, B; Neuberg, Donna

    2007-05-30

    Biological assays often utilize experimental designs where observations are replicated at multiple levels, and where each level represents a separate component of the assay's overall variance. Statistical analysis of such data usually ignores these design effects, whereas more sophisticated methods would improve the statistical power of assays. This report evaluates the statistical performance of an in vitro MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN) by identifying the optimal generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) that accurately represents the assay's experimental design and variance components. Our statistical assessment found that 17beta-oestradiol cell culture assay data were best modelled with a GLMM configured with a reciprocal link function, a gamma error distribution, and three sources of design variation: plate-to-plate; well-to-well, and the interaction between plate-to-plate variation and dose. The gamma-distributed random error of the assay was estimated to have a coefficient of variation (COV) = 3.2 per cent, and a variance component score test described by X. Lin found that each of the three variance components were statistically significant. The optimal GLMM also confirmed the estrogenicity of five weakly oestrogenic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs 17, 49, 66, 74, and 128). Based on information criteria, the optimal gamma GLMM consistently out-performed equivalent naive normal and log-normal linear models, both with and without random effects terms. Because the gamma GLMM was by far the best model on conceptual and empirical grounds, and requires only trivially more effort to use, we encourage its use and suggest that naive models be avoided when possible. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L.; Koenning, Stephen R.; Davis, Eric L.; Opperman, Charles H.; Lommel, Steven A.; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Sit, Tim L.

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation. PMID:28141854

  3. In vitro androgenetic cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L., H. albus L. and alkaloid content assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wesołwska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L. and H. albus L. anthers were initiated which resulted in obtaining androgenectic plants and callus cultures. The leaves of these pants and the callus cultures were subjected to analysis (TLC, GC for the presence of alkaloids, derivatives of tropane. In the studied material, alkaloids of different qualitative and quantitative composition from that of ground-grown plants were found.

  4. Comparison of quantitative RT-PCR with cell culture to detect viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) IVb infections in the Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Kristine M; Casey, Rufina N; Groocock, Geoffrey H; Getchell, Rodman G; Bowser, Paul R; Casey, James W

    2010-03-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is an important pathogen of cultured and wild fish in marine and freshwater environments. A new genotype, VHSV IVb, was isolated from a fish collected from the Great Lakes in 2003. Since the first isolation, VHSV IVb has been confirmed in 28 species, signaling the early invasion and continued spread of this Office International des Epizooties-reportable agent. For surveillance of this virus in both wild and experimental settings, we have developed a rapid and sensitive one-step quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay that amplifies a 100-base-pair conserved segment from both the genomic negative strand and the mRNA positive strand of the nucleoprotein (N) gene of VHSV IVb. This assay is linear over seven orders of magnitude, with an analytical capability of detecting a single copy of viral RNA and reproducibility at 100 copies. The assay is approximately linear with RNA input from 50 to 1000 ng per assay and works equally well with RNA prepared from a column-based or phenol-chloroform-based method. In wild-caught fish, 97% of the cases were found to be more than three orders of magnitude more sensitive using qRT-PCR than using cell culture. Of the 1,428 fish from the Great Lakes region tested in 2006 and 2007, 24% were positive by qRT-PCR whereas only 5% were positive by cell culture. All of the fish that were positive by cell culture were also positive by qRT-PCR. Importantly, qRT-PCR sensitivity is comparable to that of cell culture detection when comparing VHSV viral RNA levels with viral titer stocks, confirming that the high qRT-PCR signals obtained with diagnostic samples are due to the accumulation of N gene mRNA by transcriptional attenuation. The qRT-PCR assay is particularly valuable for rapid and high-throughput prescreening of fish before confirmatory testing by cell culture or sequencing tissue-derived amplicons and especially in detecting infection in fish that do not show clinical

  5. Use of hydrophilic extra-viral domain of canine distemper virus H protein for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ki-hyun; Kim, Jeongmi; Yoo, Hyun-ah; Kim, Dae-hee; Park, Seung-yong; Song, Chang-seon; Choi, In-soo; Lee, Joong-bok

    2014-12-01

    Simple methods for measuring the levels of serum antibody against canine distemper virus (CDV) would assist in the effective vaccination of dogs. To develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for CDV, we expressed hydrophilic extra-viral domain (HEVD) protein of the A75/17-CDV H gene in a pET 28a plasmid-based Escherichia (E.) coli vector system. Expression was confirmed by dot and Western blotting. We proposed that detection of E. coli-expressed H protein might be conformation- dependent because intensities of the reactions observed with these two methods varied. The H gene HEVD protein was further purified and used as an antigen for an ELISA. Samples from dogs with undetectable to high anti-CDV antibody titers were analyzed using this HEVD-specific ELISA and a commercial CDV antibody detection kit (ImmunoComb). Levels of HEVD antigenicity measured with the assays and immunochromatography correlated. These data indicated that the HEDV protein may be used as antigen to develop techniques for detecting antibodies against CDV.

  6. Serotype specific primers and gel-based RT-PCR assays for 'typing' African horse sickness virus: identification of strains from Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender S Maan

    Full Text Available African horse sickness is a devastating, transboundary animal disease, that is 'listed' by the Office International des Epizooties (OIE. Although attenuated, inactivated and subunit vaccines have been developed for African horse sickness virus (AHSV, these are serotype-specific and their effective deployment therefore relies on rapid and reliable identification of virus type. AHSV serotype is controlled by the specificity of interactions between neutralising antibodies, and components of the outer-capsid, particularly protein VP2 (encoded by AHSV genome segment 2 (Seg-2. We report the development and evaluation of novel gel based reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR assays targeting AHSV Seg-2, which can be used to very significantly increase the speed and reliability of detection and identification (compared to virus neutralisation tests of the nine serotypes of AHSV. Primer sets were designed targeting regions of Seg-2 that are conserved between strains within each of the AHSV serotype (types 1 to 9. These assays were evaluated using multiple AHSV strains from the orbivirus reference collection at IAH (www.reoviridae.org/dsRNA_virus_proteins/ReoID/AHSV-isolates.htm. In each case the Seg-2 primers showed a high level of specificity and failed to cross-amplify the most closely related heterologous AHSV types, or other related orbiviruses (such as bluetongue virus (BTV, or equine encephalosis virus (EEV. The assays are rapid and sensitive, and can be used to detect and type viral RNA in blood, tissue samples, or cultivated viral suspensions within 24 h. They were used to identify AHSV strains from recent outbreaks in sub-Saharan African countries. These methods also generate cDNAs suitable for sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of Seg-2, identifying distinct virus lineages within each virus-type and helping to identify strain movements/origins. The RT-PCR methods described here provide a robust and versatile tool for rapid and specific detection

  7. A new permanent cell line derived from the bank vole (Myodes glareolus as cell culture model for zoonotic viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzog Sibylle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 60% of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, with three-fourths derived from wild animals. Many of these zoonotic diseases are transmitted by rodents with important information about their reservoir dynamics and pathogenesis missing. One main reason for the gap in our knowledge is the lack of adequate cell culture systems as models for the investigation of rodent-borne (robo viruses in vitro. Therefore we established and characterized a new cell line, BVK168, using the kidney of a bank vole, Myodes glareolus, the most abundant member of the Arvicolinae trapped in Germany. Results BVK168 proved to be of epithelial morphology expressing tight junctions as well as adherence junction proteins. The BVK168 cells were analyzed for their infectability by several arbo- and robo-viruses: Vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, cowpox virus, Sindbis virus, Pixuna virus, Usutu virus, Inkoo virus, Puumalavirus, and Borna disease virus (BDV. The cell line was susceptible for all tested viruses, and most interestingly also for the difficult to propagate BDV. Conclusion In conclusion, the newly established cell line from wildlife rodents seems to be an excellent tool for the isolation and characterization of new rodent-associated viruses and may be used as in vitro-model to study properties and pathogenesis of these agents.

  8. Evaluation of a PCR assay on overgrown environmental samples cultured for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Sabogal, Juan C; Labrecque, Olivia; Paré, Julie; Fairbrother, Julie-Hélène; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Wellemans, Vincent; Fecteau, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the definitive antemortem test method for paratuberculosis. Microbial overgrowth is a challenge for MAP culture, as it complicates, delays, and increases the cost of the process. Additionally, herd status determination is impeded when noninterpretable (NI) results are obtained. The performance of PCR is comparable to fecal culture, thus it may be a complementary detection tool to classify NI samples. Our study aimed to determine if MAP DNA can be identified by PCR performed on NI environmental samples and to evaluate the performance of PCR before and after the culture of these samples in liquid media. A total of 154 environmental samples (62 NI, 62 negative, and 30 positive) were analyzed by PCR before being incubated in an automated system. Growth was confirmed by acid-fast bacilli stain and then the same PCR method was again applied on incubated samples, regardless of culture and stain results. Change in MAP DNA after incubation was assessed by converting the PCR quantification cycle (Cq) values into fold change using the 2(-ΔCq) method (ΔCq = Cq after culture - Cq before culture). A total of 1.6% (standard error [SE] = 1.6) of the NI environmental samples had detectable MAP DNA. The PCR had a significantly better performance when applied after culture than before culture (p = 0.004). After culture, a 66-fold change (SE = 17.1) in MAP DNA was observed on average. Performing a PCR on NI samples improves MAP culturing. The PCR method used in our study is a reliable and consistent method to classify NI environmental samples.

  9. A simple colony-formation assay in liquid medium, termed 'tadpoling', provides a sensitive measure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Aaron Z; Koshland, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Here we describe the first high-throughput amenable method of quantifying Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability. Current high-throughput methods of assessing yeast cell viability, such as flow cytometry and SGA analysis, do not measure the percentage viability of a culture but instead measure cell vitality or colony fitness, respectively. We developed a method, called tadpoling, to quantify the percentage viability of a yeast culture, with the ability to detect as few as one viable cell amongst ~10(8) dead cells. The most important feature of this assay is the exploitation of yeast colony formation in liquid medium. Utilizing a microtiter dish, we are able to observe a range of viability of 100% to 0.0001%. Comparison of tadpoling to the traditional plating method to measure yeast culture viability reveals that, for the majority of Saccharomyces species analyzed there is no significant difference between the two methods. In comparison to flow cytometry using propidium iodide, the high-throughput method of measuring yeast culture viability, tadpoling is much more accurate at culture viabilities viability.

  10. Quantamatrix Multiplexed Assay Platform system for direct detection of bacteria and antibiotic resistance determinants in positive blood culture bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H Y; Uh, Y; Kim, S; Lee, H

    2017-05-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of the causative pathogens of bloodstream infections (BSIs) is crucial for initiating appropriate antimicrobial therapy, which decreases the related morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a newly developed multiplexed, bead-based bioassay system, the Quantamatrix Multiplexed Assay Platform (QMAP) system, obtained directly from blood culture bottles, to simultaneously detect the presence of bacteria and identify the genes for antibiotic resistance. The QMAP system was used to evaluate 619 blood culture bottles from patients with BSIs and to compare the results of conventional culture methods. Using conventional bacterial cultures as the reference standard, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the QMAP system for detection of bacterial pathogens in positive blood culture (PBC) samples were 99.8% (n=592, 95% CI 0.9852-1.000, p system for identification of the genes for antibiotic resistance were 99.4% (n=158, 95% CI 0.9617-0.9999, p system takes about 3 hr, while culture methods can take 48-72 hr. Therefore, analysis using the QMAP system is rapid and reliable for characterizing causative pathogens in BSIs. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Virus replication cycle of white spot syndrome virus in secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; De Gryse, Gaëtan M A; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Van Tuan, Vo; Van Thuong, Khuong; Bossier, Peter; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-09-01

    The replication cycle of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was investigated in secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ of Litopenaeus vannamei. The secondary cells formed a confluent monolayer at 24 h post-reseeding, and this monolayer could be maintained for 10 days with a viability of 90 %. Binding of WSSV to cells reached a maximum (73 ± 3 % of cells and 4.84 ± 0.2 virus particles per virus-binding cell) at 120 min at 4 °C. WSSV entered cells by endocytosis. The co-localization of WSSV and early endosomes was observed starting from 30 min post-inoculation (p.i.). Double indirect immunofluorescence staining showed that all cell-bound WSSV particles entered these cells in the period between 0 and 60 min p.i. and that the uncoating of WSSV occurred in the same period. After 1 h inoculation at 27 °C, the WSSV nucleocapsid protein VP664 and envelope protein VP28 started to be synthesized in the cytoplasm from 1 and 3 h p.i., and were transported into nuclei from 3 and 6 h p.i., respectively. The percentage of cells that were VP664- and VP28-positive in their nuclei peaked (50 ± 4 %) at 12 h p.i. Quantitative PCR showed that WSSV DNA started to be synthesized from 6 h p.i. In vivo titration of the supernatants showed that the progeny WSSV were released from 12 h p.i. and peaked at 18 h p.i. In conclusion, the secondary cell cultures from the lymphoid organ were proven to be ideal for examination of the replication cycle of WSSV.

  12. Evaluation of the nanosphere verigene gram-positive blood culture assay with the VersaTREK blood culture system and assessment of possible impact on selected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Stacy G; Ciurca, Jane; Smith, Geremy; John, Jeffrey; Lee, Francesca; Doern, Christopher D; Gander, Rita M

    2013-12-01

    The Verigene Gram-positive blood culture (BC-GP) assay (Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL) is a molecular method for the rapid identification of Gram-positive organisms and resistance markers directly from blood culture bottles. A total of 148 VersaTREK REDOX 1 40-ml aerobic bottles demonstrating Gram-positive bacteria were tested. Results were compared with those from conventional biochemical and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) identifications. We obtained isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (24), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (14), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) (17), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis (MSSE) (9), other coagulase-negative staphylococci (19), Streptococcus salivarius (5), Streptococcus parasanguinis (2), Streptococcus sanguinis (1), Streptococcus cristatus (1), the Streptococcus bovis group (5), Streptococcus agalactiae (9), the Streptococcus anginosus group (1), Streptococcus pneumoniae (6), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE FCM) (16), vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis (3), Aerococcus viridans (2), Bacillus (6), Corynebacterium (8), Lactobacillus (2), Micrococcus (2), Neisseria mucosa (1), Escherichia coli (3), Candida tropicalis (1), Propionibacterium (1), and Rothia (1). Overall agreement with the culture results was 95%. A total of 137 of 138 (99%) monomicrobial cultures were concordant. We tested 9 polymicrobial samples and found 33% agreement. A chart review of 31 patients with MRSA, MSSA, or VRE demonstrated that the Nanosphere BC-GP assay might have led to more appropriate antibiotic selection for these patients an average of 42 h earlier. Additionally, contact isolation could have been initiated an average of 37 h earlier for patients with MRSA or VRE. The BC-GP assay may have a positive impact on patient care, health care costs, and antibiotic stewardship.

  13. Diagnostic Performance of Five Assays for Anti-Hepatitis E Virus IgG and IgM in a Large Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Norder, Heléne; Karlsson, Marie; Mellgren, Åsa; Konar, Jan; Sandberg, Elisabeth; Lasson, Anders; Castedal, Maria; Magnius, Lars; Lagging, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Determination of anti-hepatitis E virus (anti-HEV) antibodies is still enigmatic. There is no gold standard, and results obtained with different assays often diverge. Herein, five assays were compared for detection of anti-HEV IgM and IgG. Serum samples from 500 Swedish blood donors and 316 patients, of whom 136 had suspected HEV infection, were analyzed. Concordant results for IgM and IgG with all assays were obtained only for 71% and 70% of patients with suspected hepatitis E, respectively....

  14. Development and laboratory evaluation of a real-time PCR assay for detecting viruses and bacteria of relevance for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edin, Alicia; Granholm, Susanne; Koskiniemi, Satu; Allard, Annika; Sjöstedt, Anders; Johansson, Anders

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia may present with similar clinical symptoms, regardless of viral or bacterial cause. Diagnostic assays are needed to rapidly discriminate between causes, because this will guide decisions on appropriate treatment. Therefore, a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay with duplex reactions targeting eight bacteria and six viruses was developed. Technical performance was examined with linear plasmids. Upper and lower respiratory tract specimens were used to compare the qPCR assay with standard microbiological methods. The limit of detection was 5 to 20 DNA template copies with approximately 1000-fold differences in concentrations of the two competing templates. SDs for positive controls were 95% for M. pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza A virus; whereas it was only 56% for Haemophilus influenzae. Multiple microbial agents were identified in 19 of 44 sputum and 19 of 50 nasopharynx specimens. We conclude that in parallel qPCR detection of the targeted respiratory bacteria and viruses is feasible. The results indicate good technical performance of the assay in clinical specimens.

  15. Establishment of a novel one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid identification of RNA from the severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haihong; Zhang, Lei; Shen, Guangqiang; Feng, Cen; Wang, Xinying; Yan, Jie; Zhang, Yanjun

    2013-12-01

    As an emerging infectious disease, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) infection has been found in many areas of China. Suitable laboratory diagnostic method is urgently needed in clinical detections and epidemiological investigations. In this study, a modified, low-cost and rapid visualized one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) method for the detection of RNA from the SFTSV has been established. In order to avoid the risk of aerosol contamination and facilitate the naked eye to observe, a microcrystalline wax-dye capsule wrapping the highly sensitive DNA fluorescence dye SYBR Green I was added to the RT-LAMP reaction tube before the initiation of the assay. The detection limit of the established RT-LAMP assay was 10 fg template RNA per reaction mixture. The RT-LAMP assay was confirmed to be high specific to SFTSV, and no cross-reaction was found with the detection of the Chikungunya fever virus, Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome virus (HFRSV), and Dengue fever virus. The assay was then applied for the detection of SFTSV RNA in 32 clinical serum samples and showed 94.4% consistence with the detection results of the real-time RT-PCR. The whole process, from sample preparation to result reporting, can be completed within 2h. This adapted, cost efficient and quick visualized RT-LAMP method is feasible for SFTSV field diagnosis in resource-limited field settings.

  16. Challenges for bovine viral diarrhoea virus antibody detection in bulk milk by antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays due to changes in milk production levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foddai, Alessandro; Enøe, Claes; Stockmarr, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) is considered eradicated from Denmark. Currently, very few (if any) Danish cattle herds could be infected with BVD virus (BVDV). The Danish antibody blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been successfully used during the Danish BVD eradica...

  17. Development of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of an emerging potyvirus: tomato necrotic stunt virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato necrotic stunt virus (ToNStV) is an emerging potyvirus that causes severe stunting to the infected tomato plants. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for a sensitive detection of ToNStV. The sensitivity of RT-LAMP was comparable to th...

  18. Evaluation of a new antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of bovine leukemia virus infection in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monti, G.E.; Frankena, K.; Engel, B.; Buist, W.; Tarabla, H.D.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a new blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (designated M108 for milk and S108 for serum samples) for detecting bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle. Milk, serum, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-blood samples were collecte

  19. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T

    2013-01-01

    as control antibody. Without antibodies this system is suitable for analyses of natural killer cell activity. In optimization of the assay we have used effector lymphocytes from healthy donors. The most effective effector cells are CD56(+) cells. CD8(+) T cells also express CD107a in ADCC. Using the adapted......Damage of target cells by cytotoxicity, either mediated by specific lymphocytes or via antibody-dependent reactions, may play a decisive role in causing the central nervous system (CNS) lesions seen in multiple sclerosis (MS). Relevant epitopes, antibodies towards these epitopes and a reliable...... assay are all mandatory parts in detection and evaluation of the pertinence of such cytotoxicity reactions. We have adapted a flow cytometry assay detecting CD107a expression on the surface of cytotoxic effector cells to be applicable for analyses of the effect on target cells from MS patients...

  20. Immunological assays for chemokine detection in in-vitro culture of CNS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Supriya D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we review the various methods currently in use for determining the expression of chemokines by CNS cells in vitro. Chemokine detection assays are used in conjuction with one another to provide a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines which is necessary for correct data interpretation of a specific observed biological effect. The methods described include bioassays for soluble chemokine receptors, RNA extraction, RT-PCR, Real - time quantitative PCR, gene array analysis, northern blot analysis, Ribonuclease Protection assay, Flow cytometry, ELISPOT, western blot analysis, and ELISA. No single method of analysis meets the criteria for a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines, therefore more than one assay might be necessary for correct data interpretation, a choice that is based on development of a scientific rationale for the method with emphasis on the reliability and relevance of the method.

  1. Capsid proteins from field strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus confer a pathogenic phenotype in cattle on an attenuated, cell-culture-adapted virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Kakker, Naresh K.; Barbezange, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Chimeric foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDVs) have been generated from plasmids containing full-length FMDV cDNAs and characterized. The parental virus cDNA was derived from the cell-culture-adapted O1Kaufbeuren B64 (O1K B64) strain. Chimeric viruses, containing capsid coding sequences derived...... cells than the rescued parental O1K B64 virus. The two chimeric viruses displayed the expected antigenicity in serotype-specific antigen ELISAs. Following inoculation of each virus into cattle, the rescued O1K B64 strain proved to be attenuated whereas, with each chimeric virus, typical clinical signs...... from the O/UKG/34/2001 or A/Turkey 2/2006 field viruses, were constructed using the backbone from the O1K B64 cDNA, and viable viruses (O1K/O-UKG and O1K/A-Tur, respectively) were successfully rescued in each case. These viruses grew well in primary bovine thyroid cells but grew less efficiently in BHK...

  2. Highly efficient full-length hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (strain TN) infectious culture system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Jensen, Sanne B

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of end stage liver disease worldwide. In the United States, most HCV-related disease is associated with genotype 1 infection, which remains difficult to treat. Drug and vaccine development was hampered by inability to culture......) culture systems in Huh7.5 cells. Here, we developed a highly efficient genotype 1a (strain TN) full-length culture system. We initially found that the LSG substitutions conferred viability to an intergenotypic recombinant composed of TN 5' untranslated region (5'UTR)-NS5A and JFH1 NS5B-3'UTR; recovered...... with 8 changes (designated TN cell-culture derived, TNcc) replicated efficiently and released infectious particles of ∼5 log(10) focus-forming units per mL; passaged TNcc did not require additional changes. IFN-α and directly acting antivirals targeting the HCV protease, NS5A, and NS5B, each inhibited...

  3. Control of MRSA infection and colonisation in an intensive care unit by GeneOhm MRSA assay and culture methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the major nosocomial pathogens. Due to the diffusion of MRSA strains in both hospital and community settings, prevention and control strategies are receiving increased attention. Approximately 25% to 30% of the population is colonised with S. aureus and 0.2% to 7% with MRSA. The BD GeneOhm MRSA real-time PCR assay offers quicker identification of MRSA-colonised patients than do culture methods. Methods Ninety-five patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of Pavia (Italy) for a period > 24 h were screened for MRSA colonisation with both the culture method and the GeneOhm assay. Results Of the 246 nasal swabs collected from 95 patients, 36 samples were found to be positive by both methods (true-positive). 30% of colonised patients had developed the MRSA infection. Conclusion Our results show that the GeneOhm MRSA assay is a valuable diagnostic tool for detecting MRSA quickly in nasal swabs. This study confirms that colonisation represents a high risk factor for MRSA infection, and that good MRSA surveillance in an Intensive Care Unit is therefore an excellent way to prevent MRSA infection. PMID:19703294

  4. Control of MRSA infection and colonisation in an intensive care unit by GeneOhm MRSA assay and culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Claudia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the major nosocomial pathogens. Due to the diffusion of MRSA strains in both hospital and community settings, prevention and control strategies are receiving increased attention. Approximately 25% to 30% of the population is colonised with S. aureus and 0.2% to 7% with MRSA. The BD GeneOhm MRSA real-time PCR assay offers quicker identification of MRSA-colonised patients than do culture methods. Methods Ninety-five patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of Pavia (Italy for a period > 24 h were screened for MRSA colonisation with both the culture method and the GeneOhm assay. Results Of the 246 nasal swabs collected from 95 patients, 36 samples were found to be positive by both methods (true-positive. 30% of colonised patients had developed the MRSA infection. Conclusion Our results show that the GeneOhm MRSA assay is a valuable diagnostic tool for detecting MRSA quickly in nasal swabs. This study confirms that colonisation represents a high risk factor for MRSA infection, and that good MRSA surveillance in an Intensive Care Unit is therefore an excellent way to prevent MRSA infection.

  5. Development of tailored real-time RT-PCR assays for the detection and differentiation of serotype O, A and Asia-1 foot-and-mouth disease virus lineages circulating in the Middle East

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reid, Scott M.; Mioulet, Valerie; Knowles, Nick J.

    2014-01-01

    transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays using primer/probe sets designed from the VP1 coding region of the virus genomes were developed for the specific detection of serotype O, A and Asia-1 FMD viruses (FMDVs) circulating in the Middle East. These assays were evaluated using representative...... three primer/probe sets detected the RNA from homotypic viruses and no cross-reactivity was observed with heterotypic viruses. Similar results were obtained using both single- and multiplex assay formats. Using plasmid standards, the minimum detection level of these tests was found to be lower than two...

  6. Development and validation of a multiplex, real-time RT PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of classical and African swine fever viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Felicity J; Hofmann, Martin A; King, Donald P; Drew, Trevor W; Crooke, Helen R

    2013-01-01

    A single-step, multiplex, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was developed for the simultaneous and differential laboratory diagnosis of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) alongside an exogenous internal control RNA (IC-RNA). Combining a single extraction methodology and primer and probe sets for detection of the three target nucleic acids CSFV, ASFV and IC-RNA, had no effect on the analytical sensitivity of the assay and the new triplex RT-PCR was comparable to standard PCR techniques for CSFV and ASFV diagnosis. After optimisation the assay had a detection limit of 5 CSFV genome copies and 22 ASFV genome copies. Analytical specificity of the triplex assay was validated using a panel of viruses representing 9 of the 11 CSFV subgenotypes, at least 8 of the 22 ASFV genotypes as well as non-CSFV pestiviruses. Positive and negative clinical samples from animals infected experimentally, due to field exposure or collected from the UK which is free from both swine diseases, were used to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for detection of both viruses. The diagnostic sensitivity was 100% for both viruses whilst diagnostic specificity estimates were 100% for CSFV detection and 97.3% for ASFV detection. The inclusion of a heterologous internal control allowed identification of false negative results, which occurred at a higher level than expected. The triplex assay described here offers a valuable new tool for the differential detection of the causative viruses of two clinically indistinguishable porcine diseases, whose geographical occurrence is increasingly overlapping.

  7. Development and validation of a multiplex, real-time RT PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of classical and African swine fever viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity J Haines

    Full Text Available A single-step, multiplex, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was developed for the simultaneous and differential laboratory diagnosis of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV and African swine fever virus (ASFV alongside an exogenous internal control RNA (IC-RNA. Combining a single extraction methodology and primer and probe sets for detection of the three target nucleic acids CSFV, ASFV and IC-RNA, had no effect on the analytical sensitivity of the assay and the new triplex RT-PCR was comparable to standard PCR techniques for CSFV and ASFV diagnosis. After optimisation the assay had a detection limit of 5 CSFV genome copies and 22 ASFV genome copies. Analytical specificity of the triplex assay was validated using a panel of viruses representing 9 of the 11 CSFV subgenotypes, at least 8 of the 22 ASFV genotypes as well as non-CSFV pestiviruses. Positive and negative clinical samples from animals infected experimentally, due to field exposure or collected from the UK which is free from both swine diseases, were used to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for detection of both viruses. The diagnostic sensitivity was 100% for both viruses whilst diagnostic specificity estimates were 100% for CSFV detection and 97.3% for ASFV detection. The inclusion of a heterologous internal control allowed identification of false negative results, which occurred at a higher level than expected. The triplex assay described here offers a valuable new tool for the differential detection of the causative viruses of two clinically indistinguishable porcine diseases, whose geographical occurrence is increasingly overlapping.

  8. GFP-based fluorescence assay for CAG repeat instability in cultured human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz A Santillan

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries.

  9. Comparison of real-time PCR and antigen assays for detection of hepatitis E virus in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is recognized as an emerging and often undiagnosed disease in industrialized countries, with asymptomatic infections actually occurring in blood donors. Sensitive detection of HEV-RNA is crucial for diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression. We evaluated the analytical sensitivity and performance of three HEV RT-PCR assays (RealStar HEV reverse transcription-PCR [RT-PCR], hepatitis@ceeramTools, and ampliCube HEV RT-PCR) for screening of individuals for HEV infections (ID-nucleic acid amplification technology [ID-NAT]) and for blood donor pool screening (minipool-NAT [MP-NAT]). RNA was extracted using NucliSens easyMAG (ID-NAT) and a high-volume extraction protocol (4.8 ml, chemagic Viral 5K, MP-NAT). Three NAT assays were evaluated for ID-NAT but only two assays for MP-NAT due to inhibition of the ampliCube HEV RT-PCR kit using the corresponding RNA extract. Assays provided good analytical sensitivity, ranging from 37.8 to 180.1 IU/ml (ID-NAT) and from 4.7 to 91.2 IU/ml (MP-NAT). The applicability of HEV antigen (HEV-Ag) screening was compared to that of RT-PCR screening and detection of HEV-IgM antibodies using seroconversion panels of 10 HEV genotype 3-infected individuals. Four individuals revealed a positive HEV-Ag detection result, with corresponding viremias ranging from 1.92 E + 03 to 2.19 E + 05 IU/ml, while the progression of HEV-Ag followed that of HEV viremia. The other six individuals showed no presence of HEV-Ag although the corresponding viremias were also in the range of >1.0 E + 03. Anti-HEV-IgM antibodies were detectable in seven donors; one donor presented parallel positivities of HEV-Ag and anti-HEV IgM. The evaluated NAT methods present powerful tools providing sensitive HEV detection. Application of HEV-Ag or anti-HEV IgM screening is currently inferior for the early detection of HEV infection due to the decreased sensitivity compared to NAT methods.

  10. Relative analytical sensitivity of donor nucleic acid amplification technology screening and diagnostic real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for detection of Zika virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mars; Lanteri, Marion C; Bakkour, Sonia; Deng, Xutao; Galel, Susan A; Linnen, Jeffrey M; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Lanciotti, Robert S; Rios, Maria; Gallian, Pierre; Musso, Didier; Levi, José E; Sabino, Ester C; Coffey, Lark L; Busch, Michael P

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has spread rapidly in the Pacific and throughout the Americas and is associated with severe congenital and adult neurologic outcomes. Nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) assays were developed for diagnostic applications and for blood donor screening on high-throughput NAT systems. We distributed blinded panels to compare the analytical performance of blood screening relative to diagnostic NAT assays. A 25-member, coded panel (11 half-log dilutions of a 2013 French Polynesia ZIKV isolate and 2015 Brazilian donor plasma implicated in transfusion transmission, and 3 negative controls) was sent to 11 laboratories that performed 17 assays with 2 to 12 replicates per panel member. Results were analyzed for the percentage reactivity at each dilution and by probit analysis to estimate the 50% and 95% limits of detection (LOD50 and LOD95 , respectively). Donor-screening NAT assays that process approximately 500 µL of plasma into amplification reactions were comparable in sensitivity (LOD50 and LOD95 , 2.5 and 15-18 copies/mL) and were approximately 10-fold to 100-fold more sensitive than research laboratory-developed and diagnostic reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction tests that process from 10 to 30 µL of plasma per amplification. Increasing sample input volume assayed with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays increased the LODs by 10-fold to 30-fold. Blood donor-screening ZIKV NAT assays demonstrate similar excellent sensitivities to assays currently used for screening for transfusion-transmitted viruses and are substantially more sensitive than most other laboratory-developed and diagnostic ZIKV reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays. Enhancing sensitivities of laboratory-developed and diagnostic assays may be achievable by increasing sample input. © 2017 AABB.

  11. A Rapid Field-Deployable Reverse Transcription-Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Sensitive and Specific Detection of Bluetongue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambagala, A; Pahari, S; Fisher, M; Lee, P-Y A; Pasick, J; Ostlund, E N; Johnson, D J; Lung, O

    2017-04-01

    Bluetongue is a non-contagious, haemorrhagic, Culicoides-borne disease of ruminants. The causative agent, bluetongue virus (BTV), is a member of the Orbivirus genus of the Reoviridae family. So far, 26 BTV serotypes have been identified worldwide. The global distribution of bluetongue has been expanding, and rapid detection of BTV, preferably in the field, is critical for timely implementation of animal movement restrictions and vector control measures. To date, many laboratory-based, molecular assays for detection of BTV have been developed. These methods require the samples to be shipped to a central laboratory with sophisticated instruments and highly skilled technicians to perform the assays, conduct analyses and interpret the results. Here, we report the development and evaluation of a rapid, portable, user-friendly, pan-BTV reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay that can potentially be used in low-resource field conditions. The total length of the assay was <60 min, and at the end of the assay, the results were automatically displayed as '+' or '-' without the need for data interpretation. The RT-iiPCR assay detected 36 BTV isolates and two in vitro transcribed RNA samples representing all 26 BTV serotypes. The assay did not cross-react with other animal viruses tested, including two closely related orbiviruses. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was as low as nine copies of in vitro transcribed double-stranded BTV RNA. Analysis of BTV-infected whole blood samples showed that the BTV RT-iiPCR assay was as sensitive as real-time RT-PCR. The assay can potentially be used for rapid screening of animals for BTV in routine diagnostics and for monitoring bluetongue outbreaks both in ruminants and in Culicoides vectors in the field and in the laboratory.

  12. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay: Rapid, Sensitive and Culture-Independent Identification of Bacteria and Candida in Blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metzgar

    Full Text Available Bloodstream infection (BSI and sepsis are rising in incidence throughout the developed world. The spread of multi-drug resistant organisms presents increasing challenges to treatment. Surviving BSI is dependent on rapid and accurate identification of causal organisms, and timely application of appropriate antibiotics. Current culture-based methods used to detect and identify agents of BSI are often too slow to impact early therapy and may fail to detect relevant organisms in many positive cases. Existing methods for direct molecular detection of microbial DNA in blood are limited in either sensitivity (likely the result of small sample volumes or in breadth of coverage, often because the PCR primers and probes used target only a few specific pathogens. There is a clear unmet need for a sensitive molecular assay capable of identifying the diverse bacteria and yeast associated with BSI directly from uncultured whole blood samples. We have developed a method of extracting DNA from larger volumes of whole blood (5 ml per sample, amplifying multiple widely conserved bacterial and fungal genes using a mismatch- and background-tolerant PCR chemistry, and identifying hundreds of diverse organisms from the amplified fragments on the basis of species-specific genetic signatures using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS. We describe the analytical characteristics of the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay and compare its pre-clinical performance to current standard-of-care methods in a collection of prospectively collected blood specimens from patients with symptoms of sepsis. The assay generated matching results in 80% of culture-positive cases (86% when common contaminants were excluded from the analysis, and twice the total number of positive detections. The described method is capable of providing organism identifications directly from uncultured blood in less than 8 hours.The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay is not available in the United States.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of acyclovir and/or human amniotic membrane on herpes virus culture and quantitative virus inactivity by real-time polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Aylin Kantarci

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the permeability of amniotic membrane in herpes virus cell culture to acyclovir with real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.METHODS: Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK cell culture and Bovine Herpes Virus (BHV1 type 1 were used in the study. Cell cultures were grouped into two on the basis of herpes virus inoculation. Each group was sub-grouped into three. Amniotic membrane (V-HAM, acyclovir (V-A, and amniotic membrane and acyclovir (V-HAM-A were applied to these subgroup cultures, respectively. After the application of the membrane and the drug, the cultures were evaluated at 24 and 48h for cytopathic effect positive (CPE+ with a tissue culture microscope. In the CPE (+ samples, the DNA was extracted for viral DNA analysis by RT-PCR.RESULTS: In control cultures without herpes virus CPE was not detected. Besides, amniotic membrane and acyclovir did not have cytotoxic effect on cell cultures. CPE were detected in Bovine Herpesvirus type-1 inoculated cell cultures after amniotic membrane and/or acyclovir application. DNA analysis with RT-PCR indicated that Cycle threshold (Ct values were lower in the BHV1 and membrane applied group (amniotic membrane group< acyclovir group< membrane and acyclovir group. This showed that membrane did not have antiviral effect. The membrane and acyclovir cell culture groups with high Ct values indicated that membrane was permeable and had a low barrier effect to drug,CONCLUSION: In our in-vitro study, we found that amniotic membrane, which can be used in the treatment of corneal diseases, did not have antiviral effect. Besides, we detected that amniotic membrane was permeable to acyclovir in BHV-1 inoculated MDBK cell culture. However, more studies are necessary to investigate the quantitative effects of amniotic membrane and acyclovir.

  14. Evaluation of the effects of acyclovir and/or human amniotic membrane on herpes virus culture and quantitative virus inactivity by real-time polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feride; Aylin; Kantarci; Ali; Reza; Faraji; Aykut; Ozkul; Fikret; Akata

    2014-01-01

    ·AIM: To investigate the permeability of amniotic membrane in herpes virus cell culture to acyclovir with real time polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).·METHODS: Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney(MDBK) cell culture and Bovine Herpes Virus(BHV1) type 1 were used in the study. Cell cultures were grouped into two on the basis of herpes virus inoculation. Each group was sub-grouped into three. Amniotic membrane(V-HAM),acyclovir(V-A), and amniotic membrane and acyclovir(V-HAM-A) were applied to these subgroup cultures,respectively. After the application of the membrane and the drug, the cultures were evaluated at 24 and 48 h for cytopathic effect positive(CPE +) with a tissue culture microscope. In the CPE(+) samples, the DNA was extracted for viral DNA analysis by RT-PCR.·RESULTS: In control cultures without herpes virus CPE was not detected. Besides, amniotic membrane and acyclovir did not have cytotoxic effect on cell cultures.CPE were detected in Bovine Herpesvirus type-1inoculated cell cultures after amniotic membrane and/or acyclovir application. DNA analysis with RT-PCR indicated that Cycle threshold(Ct) values were lower in the BHV1 and membrane applied group(amniotic membrane group < acyclovir group < membrane and acyclovir group). This showed that membrane did not have antiviral effect. The membrane and acyclovir cell culture groups with high Ct values indicated thatmembrane was permeable and had a low barrier effect to drug.·CONCLUSION: In our in-vitro study, we found that amniotic membrane, which can be used in the treatment of corneal diseases, did not have antiviral effect. Besides,we detected that amniotic membrane was permeable to acyclovir in BHV-1 inoculated MDBK cell culture.However, more studies are necessary to investigate the quantitative effects of amniotic membrane and acyclovir.

  15. Smallpox and pan-orthopox virus detection by real-time 3'-minor groove binder TaqMan assays on the roche LightCycler and the Cepheid smart Cycler platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesh, David A; Baker, Robert O; Loveless, Bonnie M; Norwood, David; Zwiers, Susan H; Mucker, Eric; Hartmann, Chris; Herrera, Rafael; Miller, David; Christensen, Deanna; Wasieloski, Leonard P; Huggins, John; Jahrling, Peter B

    2004-02-01

    We designed, optimized, and extensively tested several sensitive and specific real-time PCR assays for rapid detection of both smallpox and pan-orthopox virus DNAs. The assays are based on TaqMan 3'-minor groove binder chemistry and were performed on both the rapid-cycling Roche LightCycler and the Cepheid Smart Cycler platforms. The hemagglutinin (HA) J7R, B9R, and B10R genes were used as targets for the variola virus-specific assays, and the HA and DNA polymerase-E9L genes were used as targets for the pan-orthopox virus assays. The five orthopox virus assays were tested against a panel of orthopox virus DNAs (both genomic and cloned) at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The results indicated that each assay was capable of detecting both the appropriate cloned gene and genomic DNA. The assays showed no cross-reactivity to the 78 DNAs in the USAMRIID bacterial cross-reactivity panel. The limit of detection (LOD) of each assay was determined to be between 12 and 25 copies of target DNA. The assays were also run against a blind panel of DNAs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on both the LightCycler and the Smart Cycler. The panel consisted of eight different variola virus isolates, five non-variola virus orthopox virus isolates, two varicella-zoster virus isolates, and one herpes simplex virus isolate. Each sample was tested in triplicate at 2.5 ng, 25 pg, 250 fg, and 2.5 fg, which represent 1.24 x 10(7), 1.24 x 10(5), 1.24 x 10(3), and 1.24 x 10(1) genome equivalents, respectively. The results indicated that each of the five assays was 100% specific (no false positives) when tested against both the USAMRIID panels and the CDC blind panel. With the CDC blind panel, the LightCycler was capable of detecting 96.2% of the orthopox virus DNAs and 93.8% of the variola virus DNAs. The Smart Cycler was capable of detecting 92.3% of the orthopox virus DNAs and between 75 and 93.8% of the variola virus DNAs

  16. Smallpox and pan-Orthopox Virus Detection by Real-Time 3′-Minor Groove Binder TaqMan Assays on the Roche LightCycler and the Cepheid Smart Cycler Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesh, David A.; Baker, Robert O.; Loveless, Bonnie M.; Norwood, David; Zwiers, Susan H.; Mucker, Eric; Hartmann, Chris; Herrera, Rafael; Miller, David; Christensen, Deanna; Wasieloski, Leonard P.; Huggins, John; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2004-01-01

    We designed, optimized, and extensively tested several sensitive and specific real-time PCR assays for rapid detection of both smallpox and pan-orthopox virus DNAs. The assays are based on TaqMan 3′-minor groove binder chemistry and were performed on both the rapid-cycling Roche LightCycler and the Cepheid Smart Cycler platforms. The hemagglutinin (HA) J7R, B9R, and B10R genes were used as targets for the variola virus-specific assays, and the HA and DNA polymerase-E9L genes were used as targets for the pan-orthopox virus assays. The five orthopox virus assays were tested against a panel of orthopox virus DNAs (both genomic and cloned) at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The results indicated that each assay was capable of detecting both the appropriate cloned gene and genomic DNA. The assays showed no cross-reactivity to the 78 DNAs in the USAMRIID bacterial cross-reactivity panel. The limit of detection (LOD) of each assay was determined to be between 12 and 25 copies of target DNA. The assays were also run against a blind panel of DNAs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on both the LightCycler and the Smart Cycler. The panel consisted of eight different variola virus isolates, five non-variola virus orthopox virus isolates, two varicella-zoster virus isolates, and one herpes simplex virus isolate. Each sample was tested in triplicate at 2.5 ng, 25 pg, 250 fg, and 2.5 fg, which represent 1.24 × 107, 1.24 × 105, 1.24 × 103, and 1.24 × 101 genome equivalents, respectively. The results indicated that each of the five assays was 100% specific (no false positives) when tested against both the USAMRIID panels and the CDC blind panel. With the CDC blind panel, the LightCycler was capable of detecting 96.2% of the orthopox virus DNAs and 93.8% of the variola virus DNAs. The Smart Cycler was capable of detecting 92.3% of the orthopox virus DNAs and between 75 and 93.8% of the variola virus DNAs. However

  17. Borna disease virus infection perturbs energy metabolites and amino acids in cultured human oligodendroglia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Borna disease virus is a neurotropic, non-cytolytic virus that has been widely employed in neuroscientific research. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with Borna disease viral infection. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying its mode of action remains unclear. METHODOLOGY: Human oligodendroglia cells infected with the human strain Borna disease virus Hu-H1 and non-infected matched control cells were cultured in vitro. At day 14 post-infection, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 28 independent intracellular samples from Borna disease virus-infected cells (n = 14 and matched control cells (n = 14. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was performed to demonstrate that the whole metabonomic patterns enabled discrimination between the two groups, and further statistical testing was applied to determine which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between the two groups. FINDINGS: Metabonomic profiling revealed perturbations in 23 metabolites, 19 of which were deemed individually significant: nine energy metabolites (α-glucose, acetate, choline, creatine, formate, myo-inositol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pyruvate, succinate and ten amino acids (aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine, valine. Partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated that the whole metabolic patterns enabled statistical discrimination between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Borna disease viral infection perturbs the metabonomic profiles of several metabolites in human oligodendroglia cells cultured in vitro. The findings suggest that Borna disease virus manipulates the host cell's metabolic network to support viral replication and proliferation.

  18. Sensitive Detection and Simultaneous Discrimination of Influenza A and B Viruses in Nasopharyngeal Swabs in a Single Assay Using Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jikun; Vemula, Sai Vikram; Lin, Corinna; Tan, Jiying; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Wang, Xue; Mbondji-wonje, Christelle; Ye, Zhiping; Landry, Marie L.; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Reassortment of 2009 (H1N1) pandemic influenza virus (pdH1N1) with other strains may produce more virulent and pathogenic forms, detection and their rapid characterization is critical. In this study, we reported a “one-size-fits-all” approach using a next-generation sequencing (NGS) detection platform to extensively identify influenza viral genomes for diagnosis and determination of novel virulence and drug resistance markers. A de novo module and other bioinformatics tools were used to generate contiguous sequence and identify influenza types/subtypes. Of 162 archived influenza-positive patient specimens, 161(99.4%) were positive for either influenza A or B viruses determined using the NGS assay. Among these, 135(83.3%) were A(H3N2), 14(8.6%) were A(pdH1N1), 2(1.2%) were A(H3N2) and A(pdH1N1) virus co-infections and 10(6.2%) were influenza B viruses. Of the influenza A viruses, 66.7% of A(H3N2) viruses tested had a E627K mutation in the PB2 protein, and 87.8% of the influenza A viruses contained the S31N mutation in the M2 protein. Further studies demonstrated that the NGS assay could achieve a high level of sensitivity and reveal adequate genetic information for final laboratory confirmation. The current diagnostic platform allows for simultaneous identification of a broad range of influenza viruses, monitoring emerging influenza strains with pandemic potential that facilitating diagnostics and antiviral treatment in the clinical setting and protection of the public health. PMID:27658193

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF GLUCOSE TRANSPORTER-1 AND ITS FUNCTIONAL ASSAY IN MOUSE GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS CULTURED IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章精; 刘志红; 刘栋; 黎磊石

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the role of glucose transporter-l (GLUT1) in the glucose uptake of glomerular mesangial cells. Methods. Cultured C57/SJL mouse mesangial cells were used in the study. The expression of GLUT1 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The expression of GLUT1 protein was detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. The uptake of glucose and its kinetics were determined by 2-deoxy-[3H] -D-glucose uptake. Results. Both GLUT1 mRNA and protein were found in mouse glomerular mesangial cells. 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake and kinetics assay showed that this glucose transporter had high affinity for glucose and the glucose uptake specificity was further confirmed by phloretin. Conclusion. Functional GLUT1 did present in mouse mesangial cells cultured in vitro and it might be the predominant transporter mediated the uptake of glucose into mesangial cells.

  20. Propagation of Brazilian Zika virus strains in static and suspension cultures using Vero and BHK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolay, Alexander; Castilho, Leda R; Reichl, Udo; Genzel, Yvonne

    2017-03-23

    The recent spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas and the Pacific has reached alarming levels in more than 60 countries. However, relatively little is known about the disease on a virological and epidemiological level and its consequences for humans. Accordingly, a large demand for in vitro derived Brazilian ZIKV material to support in vitro and in vivo studies has arisen. However, a prompt supply of ZIKV and ZIKV antigens cannot be guaranteed as the production of this virus typically using Vero or C6/36 cell lines remains challenging. Here we present a production platform based on BHK-21 suspension (BHK-21SUS) cells to propagate Brazilian ZIKV at larger quantities in perfusion bioreactors. Scouting experiments performed in tissue culture flasks using adherent BHK-21 and Vero cells have demonstrated similar permissivity and virus yields for four different Brazilian ZIKV isolates. The cell-specific yield of infectious virus particles varied between respective virus strains (1-48PFU/cell), and the ZIKV isolate from the Brazilian state Pernambuco (ZIKV(PE)) showed to be a best performing isolate for both cell lines. However, infection studies of BHK-21SUS cells with ZIKV(PE) in shake flasks resulted in poor virus replication, with a maximum titer of 8.9×10(3)PFU/mL. Additional RT-qPCR measurements of intracellular and extracellular viral RNA levels revealed high viral copy numbers within the cell, but poor virus release. Subsequent cultivation in a perfusion bioreactor using an alternating tangential flow filtration system (ATF) under controlled process conditions enabled cell concentrations of about 1.2×10(7)cells/mL, and virus titers of 3.9×10(7)PFU/mL. However, while the total number of infectious virus particles was increased, the cell-specific yield (3.3PFU/cell) remained lower than determined in adherent cell lines. Nevertheless, the established perfusion process allows to provide large amounts of ZIKV material for research and is a first step towards

  1. Substrate profiling of tobacco etch virus protease using a novel fluorescence-assisted whole-cell assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kostallas

    Full Text Available Site-specific proteolysis of proteins plays an important role in many cellular functions and is often key to the virulence of infectious organisms. Efficient methods for characterization of proteases and their substrates will therefore help us understand these fundamental processes and thereby hopefully point towards new therapeutic strategies. Here, a novel whole-cell in vivo method was used to investigate the substrate preference of the sequence specific tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp. The assay, which utilizes protease-mediated intracellular rescue of genetically encoded short-lived fluorescent substrate reporters to enhance the fluorescence of the entire cell, allowed subtle differences in the processing efficiency of closely related substrate peptides to be detected. Quantitative screening of large combinatorial substrate libraries, through flow cytometry analysis and cell sorting, enabled identification of optimal substrates for TEVp. The peptide, ENLYFQG, identical to the protease's natural substrate peptide, emerged as a strong consensus cleavage sequence, and position P3 (tyrosine, Y and P1 (glutamine, Q within the substrate peptide were confirmed as being the most important specificity determinants. In position P1', glycine (G, serine (S, cysteine (C, alanine (A and arginine (R were among the most prevalent residues observed, all known to generate functional TEVp substrates and largely in line with other published studies stating that there is a strong preference for short aliphatic residues in this position. Interestingly, given the complex hydrogen-bonding network that the P6 glutamate (E is engaged in within the substrate-enzyme complex, an unexpectedly relaxed residue preference was revealed for this position, which has not been reported earlier. Thus, in the light of our results, we believe that our assay, besides enabling protease substrate profiling, also may serve as a highly competitive platform for directed evolution of

  2. [Visual detection of H1 subtype and identification of N1, N2 subtype of avian influenza virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi; Xie, Zhi-Xun; Guo, Jie; Zhou, Chen-Yu; Liu, Jia-Bo; Pang, Yao-Shan; Deng, Xian-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Qin; Xie, Li-Ji; Fan, Qing; Luo, Si-Si

    2013-03-01

    In order to visually detect H1, N1 and N2 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV), three reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assays were developed. According to the sequences of AIV gene available in GenBank, three degenerate primer sets specific to HA gene of H1 subtype AIV, NA gene of N1 and N2 subtype AIV were designed, and the reaction conditions were optimized. The results showed that all the assays had no cross-reaction with other subtype AIV and other avian respiratory pathogens, and the detection limit was higher than that of conventional RT-PCR. These assays were performed in water bath within 50 minutes. Without opening tube, the amplification result could be directly determined by inspecting the color change of reaction system as long as these assays were fin-ished. Fourteen specimens of H1N1 subtype and eight specimens of H1N2 subtype of AIV were identified from the 120 clinical samples by RT-LAMP assays developed, which was consistent with that of virus isolation. These results suggested that the three newly developed RT-LAMEP assays were simple, specific and sensitive and had potential for visual detection of H1, N1 and N2 subtype of AIV in field.

  3. Adaptive mutations allow establishment of JFH1-based cell culture systems for hepatitis C virus genotype 4A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    transmembrane domain (.alpha.), in the cytoplasmic part (.beta.) or at the NS2/NS3 cleavage site (y). Following transfection of Huh7.5 cells with RNA transcripts, infectious viruses were produced in the ED43/JFH1-.beta. and -y cultures only. Compared to the 2a control virus, production of infectious viruses...... was significantly delayed. However, in subsequent passages efficient spread of infection and high HCV RNA titers were obtained. Infectivity titers were approximately 10-fold lower than for the 2a control virus. Sequence analysis of recovered 4a/2a recombinants from 3 serial passages and subsequent reverse genetic...

  4. Zinc oxide tetrapods inhibit herpes simplex virus infection of cultured corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Neil; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Hadigal, Satvik; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Adelung, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Infection of the human cornea by herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) can cause significant vision loss. The purpose of this study was to develop an ex vivo model to visualize viral growth and spread in the cornea. The model was also used to analyze cytokine production and study the antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods. Methods A β-galactosidase-expressing recombinant virus, HSV-1(KOS)tk12, was used to demonstrate the ability of the virus to enter and develop blue plaques on human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells and corneal tissues. Freshly obtained porcine corneas were cultured and then scratched before infection with HSV-1(KOS)tk12. The blue plaques on the corneas were imaged using a stereomicroscope. Western blot analysis for HSV-1 proteins was performed to verify HSV-1 infection of the cornea. Using the ex vivo model, zinc oxide tetrapods were tested for their anti-HSV-1 potential, and a cytokine profile was developed to assess the effects of the treatment. Results Cultured corneas and the use of β-galactosidase-expressing HSV-1(KOS)tk12 virus can provide an attractive ex vivo model to visualize and study HSV-1 entry and spread of the infection in tissues. We found that unlike cultured HCE cells, which demonstrated nearly 100% infectivity, HSV-1 infection of the cultured cornea was more restrictive and took longer to develop. We also found that the zinc oxide tetrapod–shaped nano- and microstructures inhibited HSV infection of the cultured cells, as well as the cultured corneas. The cytokine profile of the infected samples was consistent with previous studies of HSV-1 corneal infection. Conclusions The ability to visualize HSV-1 growth and spread in corneal tissues can provide new details about HSV-1 infection of the cornea and the efficacy of new cornea-specific antiviral drug candidates. The ex vivo model also demonstrates antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods and adequately portrays the drug delivery issues that cornea-specific treatments

  5. Lyophilisation of influenza, rabies and Marburg lentiviral pseudotype viruses for the development and distribution of a neutralisation -assay-based diagnostic kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Stuart T; Wright, Edward; Scott, Simon D; Temperton, Nigel J

    2014-12-15

    Pseudotype viruses (PVs) are chimeric, replication-deficient virions that mimic wild-type virus entry mechanisms and can be safely employed in neutralisation assays, bypassing the need for high biosafety requirements and performing comparably to established serological assays. However, PV supernatant necessitates -80°C long-term storage and cold-chain maintenance during transport, which limits the scope of dissemination and application throughout resource-limited laboratories. We therefore investigated the effects of lyophilisation on influenza, rabies and Marburg PV stability, with a view to developing a pseudotype virus neutralisation assay (PVNA) based kit suitable for affordable global distribution. Infectivity of each PV was calculated after lyophilisation and immediate reconstitution, as well as subsequent to incubation of freeze-dried pellets at varying temperatures, humidities and timepoints. Integrity of glycoprotein structure following treatment was also assessed by employing lyophilised PVs in downstream PVNAs. In the presence of 0.5M sucrose-PBS cryoprotectant, each freeze-dried pseudotype was stably stored for 4 weeks at up to 37°C and could be neutralised to the same potency as unlyophilised PVs when employed in PVNAs. These results confirm the viability of a freeze-dried PVNA-based kit, which could significantly facilitate low-cost serology for a wide portfolio of emerging infectious viruses.

  6. Adeno-associated Virus Mediated LacZ Gene Transfect to Cultured Human Iris Pigment Epithelium Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Zhang; Shibo Tang; Yan Luo; Xiaoling Liang; Jing Ma; Shaofen Lin

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of adeno-associated virus mediated gene transfection tocultured human iris pigment epithelium (IPE) cells in vitro.Methods: Recombinant replication deficient adeno-associated viruses (AAV) expressingLacZ gene were produced without helper virus. The LacZ gene was transduced into culturedhuman IPE cells.Results: Cultured human IPE cells stained positively anticytokeratin, The titer ofrAAV-LacZ was 2.1 × 108 virus particles/ml, 42% cultured human IPE cells expressedβ-galactosidase 7 days after transfection and 67% after 14 days.Conclusions: Recombined AAV produced without helper virus can transfer a foreign geneinto human IPE cells with high efficiency in vitro.

  7. Polymer-based mesh as supports for multi-layered 3D cell culture and assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Karen A; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron D; Ngo, Philip M; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM)-that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells-layer-by-layer-within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis-(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format.

  8. Tropism and Infectivity of Influenza Virus, Including Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Virus, in Ferret Tracheal Differentiated Primary Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Maines, Taronna R.; Belser, Jessica A.; Gustin, Kortney M.; Pekosz, Andrew; Zaki, Sherif R.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Tropism and adaptation of influenza viruses to new hosts is partly dependent on the distribution of the sialic acid (SA) receptors to which the viral hemagglutinin (HA) binds. Ferrets have been established as a valuable in vivo model of influenza virus pathogenesis and transmission because of similarities to humans in the distribution of HA receptors and in clinical signs of infection. In this study, we developed a ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture model that consisted of a layered epithelium structure with ciliated and nonciliated cells on its apical surface. We found that human-like (α2,6-linked) receptors predominated on ciliated cells, whereas avian-like (α2,3-linked) receptors, which were less abundant, were presented on nonciliated cells. When we compared the tropism and infectivity of three human (H1 and H3) and two avian (H1 and H5) influenza viruses, we observed that the human influenza viruses primarily infected ciliated cells and replicated efficiently, whereas a highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus (A/Vietnam/1203/2004) replicated efficiently within nonciliated cells despite a low initial infection rate. Furthermore, compared to other influenza viruses tested, VN/1203 virus replicated more efficiently in cells isolated from the lower trachea and at a higher temperature (37°C) compared to a lower temperature (33°C). VN/1203 virus infection also induced higher levels of immune mediator genes and cell death, and virus was recovered from the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. This ferret tracheal differentiated primary epithelial cell culture system provides a valuable in vitro model for studying cellular tropism, infectivity, and the pathogenesis of influenza viruses. PMID:23255802

  9. Comparison of Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay and real time RT-PCR for the detection of respiratory viruses in adults with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Prades, Yara; Ruiz, Mauricio; Pizarro, Rolando; Rossi, Patricio; Lizama, Luis; Garmendia, María Luisa; Meza, Angela; Larrañaga, Carmen; Avendaño, Luis F

    2016-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the third cause of death worldwide. Viruses are frequently detected in adult CAP. Highly sensitive diagnostic techniques should be used due to poor viral shedding. Different sampling methods can affect viral detection, being necessary to establish the optimal type of sample for identifying respiratory viruses in adults. The detection rates of respiratory viruses by Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay, real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) (Sacace®), and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in adult CAP were performed in nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) and aspirates (NPA) from 179 hospitalized adults. Positivity was 47.5% for Luminex®, 42.5% for rtRT-PCR (P = 0.3), and 2.7% for IFA (2.7%) (P viruses in 112 NPA and 35 (34.3%) and 31 (30.4%) in 102 NPS, respectively (P viruses in CAP adults. Both molecular techniques yielded better results with nasopharyngeal aspirate than swabs.

  10. Real-time RT-PCR assay to differentiate clades of H5N1 avian influenza viruses circulating in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Z; Jones, J; Creanga, A; Ferdinand, K; Inui, K; Gerloff, N; Davis, C T; Nguyen, T; Donis, R O

    2013-11-01

    Continued circulation and geographical expansion of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus have led to the emergence of numerous clades in Vietnam. Although viral RNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis are the gold standard for H5N1 HA clade designation, limited sequencing capacity in many laboratories precludes rapid H5N1 clade identification and detection of novel viruses. Therefore, a Taqman real-time RT-PCR assay for rapid differentiation of the four major H5N1 clades detected in Vietnam was developed. Using HA sequence alignments of clades 1.1, 2.3.2.1, 2.3.4, and 7 viruses, primers and FAM-labeled probes were designed to target conserved regions characteristic of each clade. The assay was optimized and evaluated using circulating clades of H5N1 collected in Vietnam from 2007 to 2012 and shown to be both sensitive and specific for the differentiation of the four H5N1 clades. The assay provides a useful tool for screening of large specimen collections for HA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis and for the rapid identification of molecular clade signatures to support outbreak investigations and surveillance activities. Finally, this assay may be useful to monitor for the emergence of novel or variant clades of H5N1 in Vietnam in the future or in other countries where these particular clades may circulate.

  11. Establishment of one-step SYBR green-based real time-PCR assay for rapid detection and quantification of chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phui San; Ng, Mary Mah Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2010-01-21

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus and one of the prevalent re-emerging arbovirus in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. It produces a spectrum of illness ranging from inapparent infection to moderate febrile illness as well as severe arthralgia or arthritis affecting multiple joints. In this study, a quantitative, one-step real-time SYBR Green-based RT-PCR system for the non-structural protein 2 (nsP2) of CHIKV that can quantify a wide range of viral RNA concentrations was developed. Comparisons between the conventional semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay, immunofluorescence detection method and the one-step SYBR Green-based RT-PCR assay in the detection of CHIKV infection revealed much rapid and increase sensitivity of the latter method. Furthermore, this newly developed assay was validated by in vitro experiments in which ribavirin, a well-known RNA virus inhibitor, showed a dose-dependent inhibition of virus replication on cells that was assessed by viral infectivity and viral RNA production. Our results demonstrate the potential of this newly developed one-step SYBR Green I-based RT-PCR assay may be a useful tool in rapid detection of CHIKV and monitoring the extent of viral replication possibly in patients' samples.

  12. Second generation of pseudotype-based serum neutralization assay for Nipah virus antibodies: sensitive and high-throughput analysis utilizing secreted alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; Barr, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV), Paramyxoviridae, Henipavirus, is classified as a biosafety level (BSL) 4 pathogen, along with the closely related Hendra virus (HeV). A novel serum neutralization test was developed for measuring NiV neutralizing antibodies under BSL2 conditions using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and pseudotyped with NiV F/G proteins (VSV-NiV-SEAP). A unique characteristic of this novel assay is the ability to obtain neutralization titers by measuring SEAP activity in supernatant using a common ELISA plate reader. This confers a remarkable advantage over the first generation of NiV-pseudotypes expressing green fluorescent protein or luciferase, which require expensive and specific measuring equipment. Using panels of NiV- and HeV-specific sera from various species, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay demonstrated neutralizing antibody status (positive/negative) consistent with that obtained by conventional live NiV test, and gave higher antibody titers than the latter. Additionally, when screening sixty-six fruit bat sera at one dilution, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay produced identical results to the live NiV test and only required a very small amount (2μl) of sera. The results suggest that this novel VSV-NiV-SEAP assay is safe, useful for high-throughput screening of sera using an ELISA plate reader, and has high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Establishment of one-step SYBR green-based real time-PCR assay for rapid detection and quantification of chikungunya virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Justin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne alphavirus and one of the prevalent re-emerging arbovirus in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa, and Central and South America. It produces a spectrum of illness ranging from inapparent infection to moderate febrile illness as well as severe arthralgia or arthritis affecting multiple joints. In this study, a quantitative, one-step real-time SYBR Green-based RT-PCR system for the non-structural protein 2 (nsP2 of CHIKV that can quantify a wide range of viral RNA concentrations was developed. Comparisons between the conventional semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay, immunofluorescence detection method and the one-step SYBR Green-based RT-PCR assay in the detection of CHIKV infection revealed much rapid and increase sensitivity of the latter method. Furthermore, this newly developed assay was validated by in vitro experiments in which ribavirin, a well-known RNA virus inhibitor, showed a dose-dependent inhibition of virus replication on cells that was assessed by viral infectivity and viral RNA production. Our results demonstrate the potential of this newly developed one-step SYBR Green I-based RT-PCR assay may be a useful tool in rapid detection of CHIKV and monitoring the extent of viral replication possibly in patients' samples.

  14. [Sixty years ago, cell cultures finally permitted the poliomyelitis virus to multiply easily].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastel, Claude

    2009-01-01

    In 1949, three American virologists, John F. Enders, Thomas H. Weller and Frederick C. Robbins, from the Harvard Medical Scholl and working at the Children's Medical Centre, Boston, Mass., have provoked a true revolution in Virology. Here, they have succeeded in readily multiplying the three poliomyelitis viruses in vitro, in non-nervous cells cultures. A few years afterwards (1954), they were collectively honoured by the Nobel Prize of Physiology and Medicine. This discovery not only has quickly led to the production of efficient poliomyelitis vaccines (J. E. Salk, 1953; A. B. Sabin, 1955) but also has permitted to easily isolate a number of already known viruses (measles, rubella, mumps, herpes simplex and herpes zoster) or until then totally unknown viruses (adenovirus, echovirus, cytomegalovirus). These progresses have significantly contributed to improve diagnosis, sanitary surveillance and vaccinal prophylaxis of human and animal viral diseases. Moreover, the cells cultures techniques have also benefited to other domains of fundamental Biology, such as cellular biology, genetics, cancerology, biology of the reproduction and regenerative medicine as well.

  15. Virus diseases risk-factors associated with shrimp farming practices in rice-shrimp and intensive culture systems in Mekong Delta Viet Nam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duc, P.M.; Tuyet Hoa, T.T.; Nguyen Thanh Phuong,; Bosma, R.H.; Huynh V., Hien; Tran N., Tuan

    2015-01-01

    In Mekong Delta, viral infection, including white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), monodon baculovirus (MBV), heptopancreatic parvovirus (HPV), infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) and gill-associated nidovirus (GAV) frequently infect cultured shrimp starting at the postlarvae

  16. Virus diseases risk-factors associated with shrimp farming practices in rice-shrimp and intensive culture systems in Mekong Delta Viet Nam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duc, P.M.; Tuyet Hoa, T.T.; Nguyen Thanh Phuong,; Bosma, R.H.; Huynh V., Hien; Tran N., Tuan

    2015-01-01

    In Mekong Delta, viral infection, including white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), monodon baculovirus (MBV), heptopancreatic parvovirus (HPV), infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) and gill-associated nidovirus (GAV) frequently infect cultured shrimp starting at the postlarvae s

  17. Limits of diagnostic accuracy of anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies detection by ELISA and immunoblot assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, Anatoly P; Kuzin, Stanislav N; Golosova, Tatiana V; Shalunova, Nina V; Malyshev, Nikolai A; Sadikova, Natalia V; Vavilova, Lubov M; Somova, Anna V; Musina, Elena E; Ivanova, Maria V; Kipor, Tatiana T; Timonin, Igor M; Kuzina, Lubov E; Godkov, Mihail A; Bajenov, Alexei I; Nesterenko, Vladimir G

    2002-07-01

    When human sera samples are tested for anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies using different ELISA kits as well as immunoblot assay kits discrepant results often occur. As a result the diagnostics of HCV infection in such sera remains unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to define the limits of HCV serodiagnostics. Overall 7 different test kits of domestic and foreign manufacturers were used for the sampled sera testing. Preliminary comparative study, using seroconversion panels PHV905, PHV907, PHV908 was performed and reference kit was chosen (Murex anti-HCV version 4) as the most sensitive kit on the base of this study results. Overall 1640 sera samples have been screened using different anti-HCV ELISA kits and 667 of them gave discrepant results in at least two kits. These sera were then tested using three anti-HCV ELISA kits (first set of 377 samples) or four anti-HCV ELISA kits (second set of 290 samples) at the conditions of reference laboratory. In the first set 17.2% samples remained discrepant and in the second set - 13.4%. "Discrepant" sera were further tested in RIBA 3.0 and INNO-LIA immunoblot confirmatory assays, but approximately 5-7% of them remained undetermined after all the tests. For the samples with signal-to-cutoff ratio higher than 3.0 high rate of result consistency by reference, ELISA routing and INNO-LIA immunoblot assay was observed. On the other hand the results of tests 27 "problematic" sera in RIBA 3.0 and INNO-LIA were consistent only in 55.5% cases. Analysis of the antigen spectrum reactive with antibodies in "problematic" sera, demonstrated predominance of Core, NS3 and NS4 antigens for sera, positive in RIBA 3.0 and Core and NS3 antigens for sera, positive in INNO-LIA. To overcome the problem of undetermined sera, methods based on other principles, as well as alternative criteria of HCV infection diagnostics are discussed.

  18. Lithium chloride inhibits the coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sally M; Tarpey, Ian; Rothwell, Lisa; Kaiser, Pete; Hiscox, Julian A

    2007-04-01

    The avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a major economic pathogen of domestic poultry that, despite vaccination, causes mortality and significant losses in production. During replication of the RNA genome there is a high frequency of mutation and recombination, which has given rise to many strains of IBV and results in the potential for new and emerging strains. Currently the live-attenuated vaccine gives poor cross-strain immunity. Effective antiviral agents may therefore be advantageous in the treatment of IBV. Lithium chloride (LiCl) is a potent inhibitor of the DNA virus herpes simplex virus but not RNA viruses. The effect of LiCl on the replication of IBV was examined in cell culture using two model cell types; Vero cells, an African Green monkey kidney-derived epithelial cell line; and DF-1 cells, an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblast cell line. When treated with a range of LiCl concentrations, IBV RNA and protein levels and viral progeny production were reduced in a dose-dependent manner in both cell types, and the data indicated that inhibition was a cellular rather than a virucidal effect. Host cell protein synthesis still took place in LiCl-treated cells and the level of a standard cellular housekeeping protein remained unchanged, indicating that the effect of LiCl was specifically against IBV.

  19. Development of a reliable assay protocol for identification of diseases (RAPID)-bioactive amplification with probing (BAP) for detection of Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Young; Hsu, Chia-Jen; Chen, Heng-Ju; Chulu, Julius L C; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2008-07-27

    Due to appearance of new genotypes of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with no cross-protection and with vaccine strains, some outbreaks have been reported in Taiwan that caused significant damage to the poultry industry. A reliable assay protocol, (RAPID)-bioactive amplification with probing (BAP), for detection of NDV that uses a nested PCR and magnetic bead-based probe to increase sensitivity and specificity, was developed. Primers and probes were designed based on the conserved region of the F protein-encoding gene sequences of all NDV Taiwan isolates. The optimal annealing temperature for nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify the gene was 61 degrees C and optimal hybridization occurred when buffer 1x SSC and 0.5% SDS were used at 50 degrees C. The sensitivity of RAPID-BAP was 1 copy/microl for standard plasmids and 10 copy/mul for transcribed F protein-encoding gene of NDV with comparable linearity (R(2)=0.984 versus R(2)=0.99). This sensitivity was superior to that of other techniques currently used. The assay was also highly specific because the negative controls, including classical swine fever virus, avian influenza virus, avian reovirus, and infectious bursa disease virus could not be detected. Thirty-four field samples were tested using conventional RT-PCR, nested RT-PCR, real-time quantitative RT-PCR, and RAPID-BAP assay and the positive rates were 24%, 30%, 41%, and 53%, respectively. The developed assay allows for rapid, correct, and sensitive detection of NDV and fulfils all of the key requirements for clinical applicability. It could reliably rule out false negative results from antibody-based assays and also facilitate a rapid diagnosis in the early phase of the disease for emergency quarantine that may help prevent large-scale outbreaks.

  20. Rapid detection of equine influenza virus H3N8 subtype by insulated isothermal RT-PCR (iiRT-PCR) assay using the POCKIT™ Nucleic Acid Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Tiwari, Ashish; Skillman, Ashley; Nam, Bora; Chambers, Thomas M; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ma, Li-Juan; Yang, Pai-Chun; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Equine influenza (EI) is an acute, highly contagious viral respiratory disease of equids. Currently, equine influenza virus (EIV) subtype H3N8 continues to be the most important respiratory pathogen of horses in many countries around the world. The need to achieve a rapid diagnosis and to implement effective quarantine and movement restrictions is critical in controlling the spread of EIV. In this study, a novel, inexpensive and user-friendly assay based on an insulated isothermal RT-PCR (iiRT-PCR) method on the POCKIT™, a field-deployable device, was described and validated for point-of-need detection of EIV-H3N8 in clinical samples. The newly established iiRT-PCR assay targeting the EIV HA3 gene was evaluated for its sensitivity using in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA, as well as ten-fold serial dilutions of RNA extracted from the prototype H3N8 strain A/equine/Miami/1/63. Inclusivity and exclusivity panels were tested for specificity evaluation. Published real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays targeting the NP and HA3 genes were used as the reference standards for comparison of RNA extracted from field strains and from nasal swab samples collected from experimentally infected horses, respectively. Limit of detection with a 95% probability (LoD95%) was estimated to be 11copies of IVT RNA. Clinical sensitivity analysis using RNA prepared from serial dilutions of a prototype EIV (Miami 1/63/H3N8) showed that the iiRT-PCR assay was about 100-fold more sensitive than the rRT-PCR assay targeting the NP gene of EIV subtype H3N8. The iiRT-PCR assay identified accurately fifteen EIV H3N8 strains and two canine influenza virus (CIV) H3N8 strains, and did not cross-react with H6N2, H7N7, H1N1 subtypes or any other equine respiratory viral pathogens. Finally, 100% agreement was found between the iiRT-PCR assay and the universal influenza virus type A rRT-PCR assay in detecting the EIV A/equine/Kentucky/7/07 strain in 56 nasal swab samples collected from experimentally inoculated

  1. Fluorescence assay for mitochondrial permeability transition in cardiomyocytes cultured in a microtiter plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marie Louise Muff; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Treiman, Marek

    2008-01-01

    by MPTP, as evidenced by inhibition in the presence of cyclosporin A (0.2-2 microM) and facilitation by pH 6.2. Delta F due to Delta Psi m-dissipating agent carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) or alamethicin (10 microM) was insensitive to either pH or cyclosporin A. Inhibition of Ca......(2+)-induced (but not of FCCP- or alamethicin-induced) Delta F by glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3 beta) antagonist SB216763 and adenosine, acting at the level of intracellular signaling and plasma membrane receptors, respectively, is shown to illustrate potential applications of this assay...

  2. An investigation of genital ulcers in Jackson, Mississippi, with use of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay: high prevalence of chancroid and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, K J; Weiss, J B; Webb, R M; Levine, W C; Lewis, J S; Orle, K A; Totten, P A; Overbaugh, J; Morse, S A; Currier, M M; Fishbein, M; St Louis, M E

    1998-10-01

    In 1994, an apparent outbreak of atypical genital ulcers was noted by clinicians at the sexually transmitted disease clinic in Jackson, Mississippi. Of 143 patients with ulcers tested with a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, 56 (39%) were positive for Haemophilus ducreyi, 44 (31%) for herpes simplex virus, and 27 (19%) for Treponema pallidum; 12 (8%) were positive for > 1 organism. Of 136 patients tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by serology, 14 (10%) were HIV-seropositive, compared with none of 200 patients without ulcers (P genital ulcers and HIV infection in this population highlights the urgency of preventing genital ulcers in the southern United States.

  3. Comparison of the artus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PCR kit and the Abbott RealTime EBV assay for measuring plasma EBV DNA loads in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, Víctor; Solano, Carlos; Giménez, Estela; Navarro, David

    2017-02-24

    The ability of the artus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PCR kit and the Abbott RealTime EBV PCR assay to detect and quantify plasma EBV DNAemia was compared. The agreement between these assays was 95.8%. The EBV DNA loads measured by the two assays significantly correlated (P=< 0.0001).

  4. The rat whole embryo culture assay using the Dysmorphology Score system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cindy; Panzica-Kelly, Julie; Augustine-Rauch, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The rat whole embryo culture (WEC) system has been used extensively for characterizing teratogenic properties of test chemicals. In this chapter, we describe the methodology for culturing rat embryos as well as a new morphological score system, the Dysmorphology Score (DMS) system for assessing morphology of mid gestation (gestational day 11) rat embryos. In contrast to the developmental stage focused scoring associated with the Brown and Fabro score system, this new score system assesses the respective degree of severity of dysmorphology, which delineates normal from abnormal morphology of specific embryonic structures and organ systems. This score system generates an approach that allows rapid identification and quantification of adverse developmental findings, making it conducive for characterization of compounds for teratogenic properties and screening activities.

  5. Development and evaluation of a four-tube real time multiplex PCR assay covering fourteen respiratory viruses, and comparison to its corresponding single target counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.R. Jansen; J. Schinkel; S. Koekkoek; D. Pajkrt; M. Beld; M.D. de Jong; R. Molenkamp

    2011-01-01

    Multiplex real time PCR is increasingly used to diagnose respiratory viruses and has shown to be superior to traditional methods, like culture and antigen detection. However, comprehensive data on sensitivity, specificity and performance of the multiplex PCR compared to the single target PCR's is li

  6. Histopathological Observation of Lymphocystis Disease and Lymphocystis Disease Virus (LCDV) Detection in Cultured Diseased Sebastes schlegeli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lymphocystis nodules occurring in the cultured sting fish Sebastes schlegeli were observed under light and electron microscope. Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) in the tissues of diseased fish was detected with indirect immunofluorescence test (IFAT). Results showed that lymphocystis cells had overly irregular nuclei, basophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies with virions budding from the surface, and hyaline capsules outside the cell membrane. Numerous virus particles about 200 nm in diameter scattered in the cytoplasm, electron-dense particles 70-80nm in diameter filled in perinuclear cisterna, and membrane-enveloped particles with electron-dense core of 70-80 nm appeared around cellular nucleus. IFAT using monoclonal antibody against LCDV from Paralichthys olivaceus revealed that specific green fluorescence was present in the cytoplasm of lymphocystis cells, epithelium of stomach, gill lamellae, and muscular fibers under epidermis of S. schlegeli, just as that in the cytoplasm of lymphocystis cells of P. olivaceus, suggesting the presence of LCDV in these tissues.

  7. A STUDY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS IN HUMAN AND ANIMAL TISSUE CULTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tick-borne encephalitis virus is successfully reproduced in tissue cultures of the human embryo, HeLa cells , monkey and dog kidney tissue, skin...tissue and the HeLa cells . A cytopathogenic effect is registered regularly in the cultures of human skin-muscle and kidney tissued on the 2nd-4th day...the embryonic skin-muscle tissue of the white rat. The virus’s cytopathogenic effect is not developed in cultures of human lung tissue, HeLa cells , monkey

  8. Alternative methods to determine infectivity of Tulane virus: a surrogate for human norovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culturable animal caliciviruses are widely-used as surrogates for human norovirus (HuNoV), which can not replicate in cells. The infectivity of a culturable virus was traditionally determined by plaque assay and/or 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay, both of which are time-consuming ...

  9. Detection, differentiation, and VP1 sequencing of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and type 3 by a 1-step duplex reverse-transcription PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, X J; Cheng, A C; Wang, M S; Jia, R Y; Zhu, D K; Chen, S; Liu, M F; Liu, F; Chen, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is an infectious pathogen causing fatal duck viral hepatitis in ducklings. Although both the inactivated vaccines and live attenuated vaccines have been used to protect ducklings, DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 still cause significant serious damage to the duck industry in China and South Korea. For rapid detection, differentiation, and epidemic investigation of DHAV in China, a genotype-specific 1-step duplex reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay was established in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of the developed RT-PCR assay was evaluated with nucleic acids extracted from 2 DHAV reference strains, and 9 other infectious viruses and bacteria. The genotype-specific primers amplified different size DNA fragments encompassing the complete VP1 gene of the DHAV-1 or DHAV-3. The assay detected the liver samples collected from experimentally infected ducklings and dead ducklings collected from different regions of China. Sequence analysis of these DNA fragments indicated that VP1 sequences of DHAV-1 can be used to distinguish wild type and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis of VP1 sequences indicated that the developed RT-PCR assay can be used for epidemic investigation of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. The developed RT-PCR assay can be used as a specific molecular tool for simultaneous detection, differentiation, and sequencing the VP1 gene of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which can be used for understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. A probe-free four-tube real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of twelve enteric viruses and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Niu, Peihua; Hong, Yanying; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Jingyun; Ma, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    We aim to develop a multiplex real-time PCR assay to detect the most common pathogens causing community outbreaks of diarrhea. Four reaction systems of fluorescence dye-based real-time PCR assay were performed to amplify genes of norovirus, sapovirus, rotavirus, astrovirus, adenovirus, Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, and Shigella spp. PCR products of each pathogen were identified by characteristic peaks in melting curves. The assay was able to achieve detection limit of 50 copies/reaction for each individual virus target, and 140-500CFU/mL for each individual bacterium target. A total of 122 clinical specimens from hospitalized children with acute diarrhea were used to evaluate the assay. The clinical sensitivity was very similar to that of reference methods. Norovirus genogroup II revealed the highest detectable rate (45/122, 36.9%). Coinfection was found in 28 out of 122 (23%) clinical specimens. This assay proved to be a cost-effective, sensitive and reliable method for simultaneous detection of enteric viruses and bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Migratory properties of cultured olfactory ensheathing cells by single-cell migration assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-hui Huang; Ying Wang; Li Cao; Zhi-da Su; Yan-ling Zhu; Yi-zhang Chen; Xiao-bing Yuan; Cheng He

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique type of glial cells that have axonal growth-promoting properties. OEC transplantation has emerged as a promising experimental therapy of axonal injuries and demyelinating diseases. However, some fundamental cellular properties of OECs remain unclear. In this study, we found that the distinct OEC subpopulations exhibited different migratory properties based on time-lapse imaging of single isolated cells, possibly due to their different cytoskeletal organizations. Moreover, OEC subpopulations displayed different attractive migratory responses to a gradient of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in single-cell migration assays. Finally, we found that OEC subpopulations transformed into each other spontaneously. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that distinct OEC subpopulations display different migratory properties in vitro and provide new evidence to support the notion of OECs as a single cell type with malleable functional phenotypes.

  12. Evaluation of two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits for the detection of serum antibodies against Akabane virus in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelberger, Reinhold; McFadden, Andrew M J; Kirkland, Peter D; Hannah, Michaela J; Orr, Della; Bueno, Rudolfo; Swainsbury, Richard; Keen, Denise; Jenner, Judy; French, Jennifer; Pigott, Clive J

    2013-09-01

    In New Zealand, an arbovirus surveillance program has been operating for more than 20 years, which includes testing of cattle with the Akabane virus neutralization test. With the aim to replace this laborious test by an easier-to-perform enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 2 commercial ELISA kits, ELISA-1 from France (originally from Australia) and ELISA-2 from Japan, were compared, using 334 serum samples from noninfected New Zealand cattle, and 548 serum samples from naturally infected cattle herds in Australia. Diagnostic specificities for the test methods were high, ranging from 99.4% to 100%. The diagnostic sensitivities varied considerably between the test methods and differed from the values reported by the manufacturers (94% for each ELISA). The diagnostic sensitivities relative to the virus neutralization test (n = 378) were 96.0% for ELISA-1 or 98.9% when suspect samples were included, and 78.0% for ELISA-2. Differences in the commercial ELISA kits may be explained by the presence of other Simbu serogroup viruses in Australian cattle herds, causing cross-reactions in ELISA-1. Both commercial ELISA kits would be fit for purpose and could replace the virus neutralization test for Akabane virus surveillance in New Zealand. ELISA-1 may be able to detect other Simbu serogroup viruses, should they be present. The current study shows that despite comparable ELISA test characteristics given by the manufacturers, evaluation on the target population revealed marked differences in the ELISA kits test methods' characteristics.

  13. Simultaneous detection of five enteric viruses associated with gastroenteritis by use of a PCR assay: a single real-time multiplex reaction and its clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yixiang; Fang, Lin; Shi, Xiaolu; Zhang, Hailong; Li, Yinghui; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Chen, Qingliang; Li, Hui; Zhou, Li; Hu, Qinghua

    2014-04-01

    We developed a highly sensitive reverse transcription and multiplex real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay that can identify five viruses, including six genogroups, in a single reaction: norovirus genogroups I and II; sapovirus genogroups I, II, IV, and V; human rotavirus A; adenovirus serotypes 40 and 41; and human astrovirus. In comparison to monoplex rtPCR assays, the sensitivities and specificities of the multiplex rtPCR ranged from 75% to 100% and from 99% to 100%, respectively, evaluated on 812 clinical stool specimens.

  14. Comparative analysis of cultural isolation and PCR based assay for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in food and faecal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harkanwaldeep Singh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the efficacy of polymerase chain reaction (PCR based on mapA gene of C. jejuni was tested for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in naturally infected as well as spiked faecal and food samples of human and animal origin. Simultaneously, all the samples were subjected to the cultural isolation of organism and biochemical characterization. The positive samples resulted in the amplification of a DNA fragment of size ~589 bp in PCR assay whereas the absence of such amplicon in DNA extracted from E. coli, Listeria, Salmonella and Staphylococcus confirmed the specificity of the primers. Of randomly collected 143 faecal samples comprising human diarrheic stools (43, cattle diarrheic faeces (48 and poultry faecal swabs (52 only 4, 3 and 8, respectively, could be detected by isolation whereas 6, 3 and 10, respectively, were found positive by PCR. However, among food samples viz. beef (30, milk (35, cheese (30, only one beef sample was detected both by culture as well as PCR. Additionally, PCR was found to be more sensitive for C. jejuni detection in spiked faecal and food samples (96.1% each as relative to culture isolation which could detect the organism in 86.7% and 80% samples, respectively. The results depicted the superior efficacy of PCR for rapid screening of samples owing to its high sensitivity, specificity and automation potential.

  15. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Z.; Liao, Q.; Hu, Y.; You, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhao, Y. [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-08-10

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid