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Sample records for culturable bacterial species

  1. Bacterial Wound Culture

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    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  2. Detection of bacterial species involved in perimplantitis concerned with cultural and RT-PCR

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    Marcello Gatti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants offer new treatment options for edentulous either partially or completely, now represent a viable alternative to conventional fixed protheses. Dental implants are colonized by a flora dominated by Gram-positive facultative aerobic, while in patients with bone loss and formation of pockets peri-implant diseases was found a significant difference in the composition of microflora, bacteria, Gram-negative anaerobes in particular Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola (Spirochetes, Tannerella forsythensis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia as interim black-pigmented bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, often in high concentrations. Aims. The purpose of this study was to identify those at risk of perimplantitis using 2 techniques: RT-PCR examination of trade and culture. The results were compared taking into consideration the advantages and disadvantages of both methods. Materials and methods.We studied 24 patients (14 women and 10 men, aged, women between 43 and 76 years, with an average of 63.8 + / - 10.9 years, men between 45 and 88 years with a average of 64.3 years + / - 12.5 years. Was performed a double levy of sub-gingival plaque at multiple sites that had an implant CAL (clinical attachment level> 4mm in order to assess the microbiological identification with the two techniques: Examining culture and Real-Time PCR of Commerce ( Gum-Sunstar that identifies 4 bacterial species: A. actinomycetemcomitans (A.a., P.gingivalis (P.g., T.forsythensis (T.f., and T.denticola (T.d.. Results. All patients studied were positive to both tests with charger high: the consideration of tenure, with CFU / ml > 105, was positive in 66.6% of samples by:T.f., and P.g., in 12.5% for A.a., while T.d. not been sought by examining culture, the RT-PCR was positive, with high loads, in 95.8% of samples for T.f., in 79.1% for P.g., in 12.5% for A.a. and 20.8% for T.d.The test crop showed the presence of even P.intermedia in 91

  3. Culturable bacterial communities associated to Brazilian Oscarella species (Porifera: Homoscleromorpha) and their antagonistic interactions.

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    Laport, Marinella Silva; Bauwens, Mathieu; de Oliveira Nunes, Suzanne; Willenz, Philippe; George, Isabelle; Muricy, Guilherme

    2017-04-01

    Sponges offer an excellent model to investigate invertebrate-microorganism interactions. Furthermore, bacteria associated with marine sponges represent a rich source of bioactive metabolites. The aim of this study was to characterize the bacteria inhabiting a genus of sponges, Oscarella, and their potentiality for antimicrobial production. Bacterial isolates were recovered from different Oscarella specimens, among which 337 were phylogenetically identified. The culturable community was dominated by Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, and Vibrio was the most frequently isolated genus, followed by Shewanella. When tested for antimicrobial production, bacteria of the 12 genera isolated were capable of producing antimicrobial substances. The majority of strains were involved in antagonistic interactions and inhibitory activities were also observed against bacteria of medical importance. It was more pronounced in some isolated genera (Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Photobacterium, Shewanella and Vibrio). These findings suggest that chemical antagonism could play a significant role in shaping bacterial communities within Oscarella, a genus classified as low-microbial abundance sponge. Moreover, the identified strains may contribute to the search for new sources of antimicrobial substances, an important strategy for developing therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This study was the first to investigate the diversity and antagonistic activity of bacteria isolated from Oscarella spp. It highlights the biotechnological potential of sponge-associated bacteria.

  4. Peracetic acid treatment generates potent inactivated oral vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacterial species

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    Kathrin eMoor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 1010 peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principal, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency.

  5. Diversity and distribution of culturable lactic acid bacterial species in Indonesian Sayur Asin

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    Wibowo Mangunwardoyo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB play important roles in processing of Sayur Asin (spontaneously fermented mustard. Unfortunately, information about LAB in Indonesian Sayur Asin, prepared by traditional manufactures which is important as baseline data for maintenance of food quality and safety, is unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the diversity and distribution of culturable lactic acid bacteria in Sayur Asin of Indonesia.Materials and Methods: Four Sayur Asin samples (fermentation liquor and fermented mustard were collected at harvesting times (3-7 days after fermentation from two traditional manufactures in Tulung Agung (TA and Kediri (KDR, East Java provinces, Indonesia. LAB strains were isolated by using MRS agar method supplemented with 1% CaCO3 and characterized morphologically. Identification of the strains was performed basedon 16S rDNA analysis and the phylogenetic tree was drawn to understand the phylogenetic relationship of the collected strains.Results: Different profiles were detected in total count of the plates, salinity and pH of fermenting liquor of Sayur Asin in TA and KDR provinces. A total of 172 LAB isolates were successfully isolated and identified based on their 16S rDNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of 27 representative LAB strains from Sayur Asin showed that these strains belonged to 5 distinct species namely Lactobacilus farciminis (N=32, L. fermentum (N=4, L. namurensis (N=15, L. plantarum (N=118 and L. parafarraginis (N=1. Strains D5-S-2013 and B4-S-2013 showed a close phylogenetic relationship with L. composti and L. paralimentarius, respectively where as the sequence had slightly lower similarity of lower than 99%, suggesting that they may be classified into novel species and need further investigation due to exhibition of significant differences in their nucleotide sequences. Lactobacillus plantarum was found being dominant in all sayur asin samples.Conclusion: Lactobacilli were

  6. Bacterial species associated with traditional starter cultures used for fermented bamboo shoot production in Manipur state of India.

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    Jeyaram, K; Romi, W; Singh, Th Anand; Devi, A Ranjita; Devi, S Soni

    2010-09-30

    Soidon is a non-salted acidic fermented food prepared from the succulent bamboo shoot tip of Schizostachyum capitatum Munro by using a traditional liquid starter called "soidon mahi" in Manipur state of India. In this study, 163 bacterial isolates associated with this starter samples were identified and their population distribution was investigated by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), 16S rDNA sequencing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. This acidic starter (pH 4.5+/-0.15) was dominated by a characteristic association of Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) together. The population distribution of dominant species were Bacillus subtilis 29.3%, Bacillus cereus 35.7%, Bacillus pumilus 2.6%, Lactobacillus brevis 9.6%, Lactobacillus plantarum 5.1%, Carnobacterium sp. 11.9%, Enterococcus faecium 1.2% and Pseudomonas fluorescens 4.6%. Alarming population load (10(6)-10(7)cfu/ml) of B. cereus in 87% of starter samples studied should raise concern regarding biosafety of soidon consumption. PCR amplification of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region and ITS-RFLP profiles revealed a high diversity with eight subgroups in B. subtilis, five subgroups in B. cereus and three subgroups in L. brevis isolates. The most abundant B. subtilis subgroup IB.1 distributed in most of the samples showed very less clonal variability during RAPD analysis. The molecular methods used in this study identified the dominant strains of Bacillus and LAB distributed in most of the starter samples. These dominant strains of B. subtilis, L. brevis and L. plantarum would allow for developing a defined starter culture for the production of quality soidon.

  7. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

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    AH Movahedian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI broth according to standard method. From the 1680 neonates 36% had positive blood culture for Pseudomans aeruginosa, 20.7% for Coagulase negative Staphylococci, and 17% for Klebsiella spp. Gram-negative organisms accounted for 72.1% of all positive cultures. The overall mortality rate was 19.8% (22 /111 of whom 63.6% (14 /22 were preterm. Pseudomona aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. showed a high degree of resistance to commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin, gentamicin as well as third generation cephalosporins. Continued local surveillance studies are urged to monitor emerging antimicrobial resistance and to guide interventions to minimize its occurrence.

  8. Characterization of culturable vaginal Lactobacillus species among women with and without bacterial vaginosis from the United States and India: a cross-sectional study.

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    Madhivanan, Purnima; Raphael, Eva; Rumphs, Alnecia; Krupp, Karl; Ravi, Kavitha; Srinivas, Vijaya; Arun, Anjali; Reingold, Arthur L; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Riley, Lee W

    2014-07-01

    Lactobacillus species play an integral part in the health of the vaginal microbiota. We compared vaginal Lactobacillus species in women from India and the USA with and without bacterial vaginosis (BV). Between July 2009 and November 2010, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 40 women attending a women's health clinic in Mysore, India, and a sexually transmitted diseases clinic in San Francisco, USA. Women were diagnosed with BV using Amsel's criteria and the Nugent score. Lactobacillus 16S rDNA was sequenced to speciate the cultured isolates. Ten Indian and 10 US women without BV were compared with an equal number of women with BV. Lactobacilli were isolated from all healthy women, but from only 10% of Indian and 50% of US women with BV. 16S rDNA from 164 Lactobacillus colonies was sequenced from healthy women (126 colonies) and women with BV (38 colonies). Seven cultivable Lactobacillus species were isolated from 11 Indian women and nine species from 15 US women. The majority of Lactobacillus species among Indian women were L. crispatus (25.0%), L. jensenii (25.0%) and L. reuteri (16.7%). Among US women, L. crispatus (32.0%), L. jensenii (20.0%) and L. coleohominis (12.0%) predominated. L. jensenii and L. crispatus dominated the vaginal flora of healthy Indian and US women. Indian women appeared to have a higher percentage of obligate heterofermentative species, suggesting the need for a larger degree of metabolic flexibility and a more challenging vaginal environment. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Novel approach for the ammonium removal by simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and denitrification using a novel bacterial species co-culture.

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    Angar, Yassmina; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Djelali, Nacer-Eddine; Khemili-Talbi, Souad

    2016-03-01

    Agricultural activities lead excessive emission of ammonia nitrogen in the environment and can profoundly interfere the equilibrium of the natural ecosystems leading to their contamination. Actually, the biological purification of wastewaters is the most adopted technique thanks to its several advantages such as high performance and low energy consumption. For this reason, two novel strains of Alcaligenes sp. S84S3 and Proteus sp. S19 genus were isolated from an activated sludge and applied in the treatment of ammonium and nitrite in aqueous solution. Under the optimum operating conditions of temperature (30 °C), pH (7), carbon substrate (2 g/L of glucose) and duration of incubation time (69 h), the strain Alcaligenes sp. S84S3 could oxidize 65% of the ammonium as high as 272.72 mg-NH4(+)/L. Moreover, during 48 h, the nitrate reduction rate performed by the strain Proteus S19 was about 99 % without production of nitrite intermediate (negligible concentration). Moreover, the coculture of the strains Alcaligenes sp. S84S3 and Proteus sp. S19 could eliminate 65.83% of the ammonium ions without production of toxic forms of nitrogen oxides during a short time of incubation (118 h) at the same operational conditions with providing the aeration in the first treatment phase. The coculture of our isolated strains is assumed to have a good potential for nitrification and denitrification reactions applied in the treatment of wastewater containing ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. As a result, we can consider that the mixed culture is a practical method in the treatment of high-strength ammonium wastewater with reducing of sludge production.

  10. Multiple bacterial species reside in chronic wounds

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    Gjødsbøl, Kristine; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    species present were identified. More than one bacterial species were detected in all the ulcers. The most common bacteria found were Staphylococcus aureus (found in 93.5% of the ulcers), Enterococcus faecalis (71.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (52.2%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (45.7%), Proteus...

  11. Evaluation of culture techniques and bacterial cultures from uroliths.

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    Perry, Leigh A; Kass, Philip H; Johnson, Dee L; Ruby, Annette L; Shiraki, Ryoji; Westropp, Jodi L

    2013-03-01

    The association between urolithiasis and growth of bacteria in the urine or urolith has not been recently evaluated in the past 15 years, and the effects of antimicrobial administration on urolith cultures have not been reported. As well, laboratory techniques for urolith cultures have not been critically evaluated. The objectives of the current study were to 1) report bacterial isolates from uroliths and their association with signalment, urolith composition, antimicrobial use, and urine cultures and 2) evaluate laboratory techniques for urolith cultures. For the first objective, a retrospective search of bacterial isolates cultured from uroliths submitted to the laboratory as well as the signalment, urine culture results, and antimicrobial use were recorded. For the second objective, 50 urolith pairs were cultured by washing each urolith either 1or 4 times and culturing the core. Five hundred twenty canine and 168 feline uroliths were reviewed. Struvite-containing uroliths had an increased prevalence of a positive culture compared to nonstruvite-containing uroliths (P culture results and previous antimicrobial administration was found (P = 0.41). Eighteen percent of cases with negative urine cultures had positive urolith cultures. There was no significant difference in core culture results whether the urolith was washed 1 or 4 times (P = 0.07). Urolith culture outcome was not always influenced by previous antimicrobial administration, and bacterial culture of a urolith may not yield the same results as those obtained from the urine. The modified protocol, which requires less time and expense for urolith cultures, may be an acceptable alternative.

  12. Current and past strategies for bacterial culture in clinical microbiology.

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    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Edouard, Sophie; Pagnier, Isabelle; Mediannikov, Oleg; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    A pure bacterial culture remains essential for the study of its virulence, its antibiotic susceptibility, and its genome sequence in order to facilitate the understanding and treatment of caused diseases. The first culture conditions empirically varied incubation time, nutrients, atmosphere, and temperature; culture was then gradually abandoned in favor of molecular methods. The rebirth of culture in clinical microbiology was prompted by microbiologists specializing in intracellular bacteria. The shell vial procedure allowed the culture of new species of Rickettsia. The design of axenic media for growing fastidious bacteria such as Tropheryma whipplei and Coxiella burnetii and the ability of amoebal coculture to discover new bacteria constituted major advances. Strong efforts associating optimized culture media, detection methods, and a microaerophilic atmosphere allowed a dramatic decrease of the time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture. The use of a new versatile medium allowed an extension of the repertoire of archaea. Finally, to optimize the culture of anaerobes in routine bacteriology laboratories, the addition of antioxidants in culture media under an aerobic atmosphere allowed the growth of strictly anaerobic species. Nevertheless, among usual bacterial pathogens, the development of axenic media for the culture of Treponema pallidum or Mycobacterium leprae remains an important challenge that the patience and innovations of cultivators will enable them to overcome. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Exometabolomic Profiling of Bacterial Cultures

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    Honoré, Anders Hans

    was required to maintain a diacetyl concentration sufficient for the antifungal effect. Over time, the concentration of diacetyl decreased and mold developed similar to an acidified un‐inoculated medium. Besides diacetyl, production of lactic acid and other 2‐hydroxy acids contributed weakly to the antifungal......) and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii (PAB A). The strategy was to investigate the effect of the composition of exometabolome of the co‐culture on mold growth. A biological model system was developed in order to have a simplified system for studying the growth of bacteria and the subsequent effect...... on mold growth represented by two strains of Penicillium (manuscript III). Characterization of mold growth was performed by a spectral clustering algorithm on data from multispectral imaging (manuscript VI). Untargeted analysis of the exometabolome was performed on liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry...

  14. Prevalent bacterial species and novel phylotypes in advanced noma lesions.

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    Paster, B J; Falkler Jr, W A; Enwonwu, C O; Idigbe, E O; Savage, K O; Levanos, V A; Tamer, M A; Ericson, R L; Lau, C N; Dewhirst, F E

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial diversity in advanced noma lesions using culture-independent molecular methods. 16S ribosomal DNA bacterial genes from DNA isolated from advanced noma lesions of four Nigerian children were PCR amplified with universally conserved primers and spirochetal selective primers and cloned into Escherichia coli. Partial 16S rRNA sequences of approximately 500 bases from 212 cloned inserts were used initially to determine species identity or closest relatives by comparison with sequences of known species or phylotypes. Nearly complete sequences of approximately 1,500 bases were obtained for most of the potentially novel species. A total of 67 bacterial species or phylotypes were detected, 25 of which have not yet been grown in vitro. Nineteen of the species or phylotypes, including Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus spp., and the opportunistic pathogens Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Ochrobactrum anthropi were detected in more than one subject. Other known species that were detected included Achromobacter spp., Afipia spp., Brevundimonas diminuta, Capnocytophaga spp., Cardiobacterium sp., Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium spp., Gemella haemoylsans, and Neisseria spp. Phylotypes that were unique to noma infections included those in the genera Eubacterium, Flavobacterium, Kocuria, Microbacterium, and Porphyromonas and the related Streptococcus salivarius and genera Sphingomonas and TREPONEMA: Since advanced noma lesions are infections open to the environment, it was not surprising to detect species not commonly associated with the oral cavity, e.g., from soil. Several species previously implicated as putative pathogens of noma, such as spirochetes and Fusobacterium spp., were detected in at least one subject. However, due to the limited number of available noma subjects, it was not possible at this time to associate specific species with the disease.

  15. Bacterial communities of two ubiquitous Great Barrier Reef corals reveals both site- and species-specificity of common bacterial associates.

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    E Charlotte E Kvennefors

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral-associated bacteria are increasingly considered to be important in coral health, and altered bacterial community structures have been linked to both coral disease and bleaching. Despite this, assessments of bacterial communities on corals rarely apply sufficient replication to adequately describe the natural variability. Replicated data such as these are crucial in determining potential roles of bacteria on coral. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE of the V3 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA was used in a highly replicated approach to analyse bacterial communities on both healthy and diseased corals. Although site-specific variations in the bacterial communities of healthy corals were present, host species-specific bacterial associates within a distinct cluster of gamma-proteobacteria could be identified, which are potentially linked to coral health. Corals affected by "White Syndrome" (WS underwent pronounced changes in their bacterial communities in comparison to healthy colonies. However, the community structure and bacterial ribotypes identified in diseased corals did not support the previously suggested theory of a bacterial pathogen as the causative agent of the syndrome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to employ large numbers of replicated samples to assess the bacterial communities of healthy and diseased corals, and the first culture-independent assessment of bacterial communities on WS affected Acroporid corals on the GBR. Results indicate that a minimum of 6 replicate samples are required in order to draw inferences on species, spatial or health-related changes in community composition, as a set of clearly distinct bacterial community profiles exist in healthy corals. Coral bacterial communities may be both site and species specific. Furthermore, a cluster of gamma-proteobacterial ribotypes may represent a group of specific common coral and marine

  16. Oviposition Attractancy of Bacterial Culture Filtrates: response of Culex quinquefasciatus

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    S Poonam

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Oviposition attractants could be used for monitoring as well as controlling mosquitoes by attracting them to lay eggs at chosen sites. In the present study, culture filtrates of seven bacterial species were tested for their attractancy against gravid females of Culex quinquefasciatus. When their oviposition active indices (OAI were studied, the culture filtrates of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens exhibited oviposition attractancy (OAI = >0.3 at 100 ppm and the OAI were respectively 0.70 and 0.47. Culture filtrates of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis (wild type, B. t. var. israelensis (mutant and B. sphaericus showed attractancy at 2000 ppm with OAI of respectively 0.71, 0.59 and 0.68. However, the OAI of B. megaterium as well as Azospirillum brasilense was 0.13 (at 2000 ppm, which was less than 0.3 required to be considered them as attractants. When the oviposition attractancy of the bacterial culture filtrates were compared with that of a known oviposition attractant, p-cresol (at 10 ppm, the culture filtrates of B. t. var. israelensis (wild type and B. cereus were found to be more active than p-cresol, respectively with 64.2 and 54.3% oviposition.

  17. Successful culture techniques for Helicobacter species: general culture techniques for Helicobacter pylori.

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    Whitmire, Jeannette M; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-01-01

    Half of the world's population is persistently infected with Helicobacter pylori. The chronicity of this infection ultimately elicits clinical manifestations ranging from gastritis and peptic ulcers to adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Laboratory research following the initial observations of Helicobacter species was greatly hindered by an inability to isolate and culture the bacteria. Thus, the ability to culture bacterial species from this genus is an extremely important step in expanding clinical knowledge and development of therapies. This chapter describes successful techniques for culturing H. pylori on selective horse blood agar media and in Brucella broth liquid media. Additionally, the specific growth requirements of other Helicobacter species are noted.

  18. Multiple bacterial species reside in chronic wounds

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    Gjødsbøl, Kristine; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the bacterial profile of chronic venous leg ulcers and the importance of the profile to ulcer development. Patients with persisting venous leg ulcers were included and followed for 8 weeks. Every second week, ulcer samples were collected and the bacterial s...

  19. The presence of embedded bacterial pure cultures in agar plates stimulate the culturability of soil bacteria

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    Burmølle, Mette; Johnsen, Kaare; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed Mohamad Abdel F

    2009-01-01

    Traditional methods for bacterial cultivation recover only a small fraction of bacteria from all sorts of natural environments, and attempts have been made to improve the bacterial culturability. Here we describe the development of a cultivation method, based on the embedment of pure bacterial cu...

  20. Combinations of bacterial species in endodontic infections

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    Peters, LB; Wesselink, P.R.; van Winkelhoff, AJ

    2002-01-01

    Aim This study was undertaken to investigate combinations of bacteria found in root-canal infections of teeth with periapical bone destruction without clinical signs and symptoms. Methodology Endodontic samples from 58 root canals were cultured anaerobically and microorganisms were counted and ident

  1. [Time bacterial growth in blood cultures in neonates].

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    Mendoza, Luis; Osorio, Miguel; Fernández, Marisol; Henao, Claudia; Arias, Martha; Mendoza, Laura; Manzano, Stefania; Varela, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. To detect the time when the bacterial growth curve is evidenced in the blood sample inoculated blood cultures and comparing the times of bacterial growth between Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria, among the types of neonatal sepsis and identifying microorganisms more often isolated from preterm and term. A descriptive study. 114 positive blood cultures from 1,932 blood cultures taken from 01-May-2010 and 31-May-2014 were evaluated. Data were analyzed with Stata(®) 11.0. 5.9% of blood cultures had bacterial growth. The median and interquartile range of Gram negative times of bacterial growth was 11h (10-13h), for Gram positive coagulase-negative Staphylococcus different (CoNS) 12h (12-18h) and CoNS 42h (36-44h). 95.8% of Gram positive and 96% of Gram negative, were the times of bacterial growth≤24h incubation, whereas the 100% CoNS was positive≤62h of incubation. 100% of sepsis by Gram negative and Gram positive no CoNS and 90% of those caused by CoNS are identified in blood cultures in 48h, so we can conclude that to rule out sepsis, an incubation period of 48h in blood cultures is sufficient. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial acquisition in juveniles of several broadcast spawning coral species.

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    Koty H Sharp

    Full Text Available Coral animals harbor diverse microorganisms in their tissues, including archaea, bacteria, viruses, and zooxanthellae. The extent to which coral-bacterial associations are specific and the mechanisms for their maintenance across generations in the environment are unknown. The high diversity of bacteria in adult coral colonies has made it challenging to identify species-specific patterns. Localization of bacteria in gametes and larvae of corals presents an opportunity for determining when bacterial-coral associations are initiated and whether they are dynamic throughout early development. This study focuses on the early onset of bacterial associations in the mass spawning corals Montastraea annularis, M. franksi, M. faveolata, Acropora palmata, A. cervicornis, Diploria strigosa, and A. humilis. The presence of bacteria and timing of bacterial colonization was evaluated in gametes, swimming planulae, and newly settled polyps by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using general eubacterial probes and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The coral species investigated in this study do not appear to transmit bacteria via their gametes, and bacteria are not detectable in or on the corals until after settlement and metamorphosis. This study suggests that mass-spawning corals do not acquire, or are not colonized by, detectable numbers of bacteria until after larval settlement and development of the juvenile polyp. This timing lays the groundwork for developing and testing new hypotheses regarding general regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial colonization and infection of corals, and how interactions among bacteria and juvenile polyps influence the structure of bacterial assemblages in corals.

  3. Bacterial acquisition in juveniles of several broadcast spawning coral species.

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    Sharp, Koty H; Ritchie, Kim B; Schupp, Peter J; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Paul, Valerie J

    2010-05-28

    Coral animals harbor diverse microorganisms in their tissues, including archaea, bacteria, viruses, and zooxanthellae. The extent to which coral-bacterial associations are specific and the mechanisms for their maintenance across generations in the environment are unknown. The high diversity of bacteria in adult coral colonies has made it challenging to identify species-specific patterns. Localization of bacteria in gametes and larvae of corals presents an opportunity for determining when bacterial-coral associations are initiated and whether they are dynamic throughout early development. This study focuses on the early onset of bacterial associations in the mass spawning corals Montastraea annularis, M. franksi, M. faveolata, Acropora palmata, A. cervicornis, Diploria strigosa, and A. humilis. The presence of bacteria and timing of bacterial colonization was evaluated in gametes, swimming planulae, and newly settled polyps by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using general eubacterial probes and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The coral species investigated in this study do not appear to transmit bacteria via their gametes, and bacteria are not detectable in or on the corals until after settlement and metamorphosis. This study suggests that mass-spawning corals do not acquire, or are not colonized by, detectable numbers of bacteria until after larval settlement and development of the juvenile polyp. This timing lays the groundwork for developing and testing new hypotheses regarding general regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial colonization and infection of corals, and how interactions among bacteria and juvenile polyps influence the structure of bacterial assemblages in corals.

  4. Antibiogram of bacterial species isolated from canine pyometra

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    Madhu Swamy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present work was to ascertain the bacterial flora causing pyometra in female dogs and their antibiotic sensitivity. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted to determine the antibiogram of bacterial species isolated from 20 female dogs diagnosed with pyometra. The vaginal discharge was collected by sterile swab and streaked smoothly over Mueller Hinton medium and sensitivity towards antibiotics was determined by measuring the zone of inhibition using a Hi-media scale. Results: The antobiogram showed that Gentamicin was the most sensitive (85% antibiotic followed by Enrofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin and Amoxicillin (65%, 65% and 55%, respectively. The isolates were most resistant to Oxytetracycline (85% followed by Tetracycline, Ampicillin, Chloramphenicol, Cloxacillin and Erythromycin (80%, 80%, 75%, 70% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: Gentamicin was found to be most effective antibiotic against the bacterial species isolated from canine pyometra. [Vet World 2013; 6(8.000: 546-549

  5. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing-Controlled Virulence Factors and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Culture Extract from Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus Using a Rat Model of Chronic Lung Infection

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    Saad Musbah Alasil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a key regulator of virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Microorganisms that inhabit soil are of strategic importance in the discovery of compounds with anti-QS properties. The objective of the study was to test the culture extract of a taxonomically novel species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI for its inhibitory effects on the QS-controlled virulence factors and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. The Paenibacillus sp. culture extract was used to test its anti-QS effects on the LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyoverdin production, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa as well as evaluate its therapeutic effects on lung bacteriology, pathology, hematological profile, and serum antibody responses of experimental animals in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Results showed significant decrease in the activities of QS-controlled LasA protease, LasB elastase pyoverdin, and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa caused by the culture extract. Moreover, the extract significantly prolonged the survival times of rats and facilitated the clearance of biofilm infections from infected lungs. In conclusion, the antiquorum sensing effects of culture extract from a novel species of Paenibacillus provide new insights to combat biofilm-associated infections.

  6. Antioxidant treatments counteract the non-culturability of bacterial endophytes isolated from legume nodules.

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    Muresu, Rosella; Tondello, Alessandra; Polone, Elisa; Sulas, Leonardo; Baldan, Barbara; Squartini, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    In many wild legumes, attempts to cultivate nodule bacteria fail. We hypothesized that the limited culturability could be related to injury from oxidative stress caused by disruption of plant tissues during isolation. To test that, we isolated bacteria from nodules of Hedysarum spinosissimum and Tetragonolobus purpureus using buffers supplemented with scavenging systems to prevent damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatments included the following: antioxidants (glutathione, ascorbate, EDTA) or enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase), tested either as modified squashing buffers or added in plates. Some combinations yielded dramatic increases of culturability. Different endophytes were found, including additional Rhizobiaceae that were not the primary symbiont and were unable to nodulate. Their H2O2 tolerance in broth culture showed differences consistent with the unequal culturability observed. In wild legumes species, ROS generation during extraction appears to be a major factor limiting microbiota isolation, and protocols presented here significantly improve the recovery of culturable bacterial endophytes from plants.

  7. Bacterial community in sclerotia of Cenococcum species and soil in sub-alpine forest, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonoyama, Y.; Narisawa, K.; Ohta, H.; Watanabe, M.

    2009-04-01

    Species of Cenococcum, ectomycorrhizal fungi, may be particularly abundant in cold- or nutrient-stressed habitats. The fungus is easily recognized by its jet-black hyphae, and distinct compact masses of fungal mycelium called sclerotia. They are hard, black, comparatively smooth and mostly spherical. Sclerotia are formed in rhizosphere and can provide sufficient inoculums for several years. The purpose of this study is to investigate bacterial community inside sclerotia, with an interest on contribution of sclerotia to microbial diversity in rhizosphere. To investigate bacterial community inside of the fungal sclerotia by 16S rDNA gene clone library, several hundred of sclerotia (ca. 1g) were collected from sub-alpine forest soil in central Japan. Furthermore, three sclerotium grains were applied to investigate internal bacteria community by culture method. The isolated bacterial strains were then proceeded to determine their 16S rDNA partial sequences. The predominant group determined by clone library analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA genes with DNA from the sclerotia was Acidobacteria in both sclerotia and soil. Bacterial community of sclerotia showed higher diversity compared to soil. On the contrary, bacterial flora isolated from single sclerotium differed each other. Additionally, the bacterial community was composed by limited species of related genus.

  8. PCR-Based Multiple Species Cell Counting for In Vitro Mixed Culture.

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    Ruijie Huang

    Full Text Available Changes of bacterial profiles in microbial communities are strongly associated with human health. There is an increasing need for multiple species research in vitro. To avoid high cost or measurement of a limited number of species, PCR-based multiple species cell counting (PCR-MSCC has been conceived. Species-specific sequence is defined as a unique sequence of one species in a multiple species mixed culture. This sequence is identified by comparing a random 1000 bp genomic sequence of one species with the whole genome sequences of the other species in the same artificial mixed culture. If absent in the other genomes, it is the species-specific sequence. Species-specific primers were designed based on the species-specific sequences. In the present study, ten different oral bacterial species were mixed and grown in Brain Heart Infusion Yeast Extract with 1% sucrose for 24 hours. Biofilm was harvested and processed for DNA extraction and q-PCR amplification with the species-specific primers. By comparing the q-PCR data of each species in the unknown culture with reference cultures, in which the cell number of each species was determined by colony forming units on agar plate, the cell number of that strain in the unknown mixed culture was calculated. This technique is reliable to count microorganism numbers that are less than 100,000 fold different from other species within the same culture. Theoretically, it can be used in detecting a species in a mixed culture of over 200 species. Currently PCR-MSCC is one of the most economic methods for quantifying single species cell numbers, especially for the low abundant species, in a multiple artificial mixed culture in vitro.

  9. PCR-Based Multiple Species Cell Counting for In Vitro Mixed Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruijie; Zhang, Junjie; Yang, X Frank; Gregory, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Changes of bacterial profiles in microbial communities are strongly associated with human health. There is an increasing need for multiple species research in vitro. To avoid high cost or measurement of a limited number of species, PCR-based multiple species cell counting (PCR-MSCC) has been conceived. Species-specific sequence is defined as a unique sequence of one species in a multiple species mixed culture. This sequence is identified by comparing a random 1000 bp genomic sequence of one species with the whole genome sequences of the other species in the same artificial mixed culture. If absent in the other genomes, it is the species-specific sequence. Species-specific primers were designed based on the species-specific sequences. In the present study, ten different oral bacterial species were mixed and grown in Brain Heart Infusion Yeast Extract with 1% sucrose for 24 hours. Biofilm was harvested and processed for DNA extraction and q-PCR amplification with the species-specific primers. By comparing the q-PCR data of each species in the unknown culture with reference cultures, in which the cell number of each species was determined by colony forming units on agar plate, the cell number of that strain in the unknown mixed culture was calculated. This technique is reliable to count microorganism numbers that are less than 100,000 fold different from other species within the same culture. Theoretically, it can be used in detecting a species in a mixed culture of over 200 species. Currently PCR-MSCC is one of the most economic methods for quantifying single species cell numbers, especially for the low abundant species, in a multiple artificial mixed culture in vitro.

  10. Panamanian frog species host unique skin bacterial communities

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    Lisa K. Belden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrates, including amphibians, host diverse symbiotic microbes that contribute to host disease resistance. Globally, and especially in montane tropical systems, many amphibian species are threatened by a chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, that causes a lethal skin disease. Bd therefore may be a strong selective agent on the diversity and function of the microbial communities inhabiting amphibian skin. In Panamá, amphibian population declines and the spread of Bd have been tracked. In 2012, we completed a field survey in Panamá to examine frog skin microbiota in the context of Bd infection. We focused on three frog species and collected two skin swabs per frog from a total of 136 frogs across four sites that varied from west to east in the time since Bd arrival. One swab was used to assess bacterial community structure using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and to determine Bd infection status, and one was used to assess metabolite diversity, as the bacterial production of anti-fungal metabolites is an important disease resistance function. The skin microbiota of the three Panamanian frog species differed in OTU (operational taxonomic unit, ~bacterial species community composition and metabolite profiles, although the pattern was less strong for the metabolites. Comparisons between frog skin bacterial communities from Panamá and the US suggest broad similarities at the phylum level, but key differences at lower taxonomic levels. In our field survey in Panamá, across all four sites, only 35 individuals (~26% were Bd infected. There was no clustering of OTUs or metabolite profiles based on Bd infection status and no clear pattern of west-east changes in OTUs or metabolite profiles across the four sites. Overall, our field survey data suggest that different bacterial communities might be producing broadly similar sets of metabolites across frog hosts and sites. Community structure and function may not be as tightly coupled in

  11. Antimicrobial effect of probiotics on bacterial species from dental plaque.

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    Zambori, Csilla; Morvay, Attila Alexandru; Sala, Claudia; Licker, Monica; Gurban, Camelia; Tanasie, Gabriela; Tirziu, Emil

    2016-03-31

    The antimicrobial role of probiotic Lactobacillus casei subspecies casei DG (L. casei DG) and of the mix culture of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium BB-12 was tested on species of Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Pasteurella, and Neisseria genera from supragingival sites from dogs with dental disease of different breed, age, sex, weight, and diet. The research was conducted on these four genera because of their importance in zoonotic infections after dog bites. Species from Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Pasteurella, and Neisseria genera were isolated and identified. To test the antimicrobial efficacy of L. casei DG and the mixed culture of probiotic L. acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BB-12 on the pathogenic species, the agar overlay method was used. L. casei DG had a bactericidal effect on all analyzed species isolated from Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Pasteurella, and Neisseria genera after 24 hours of incubation. The mixed probiotic culture made up of L. acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium BB-12 species had no bactericidal effect on the species of Staphylococcus and Streptococcus genera, which were resistant. However, it had a bacteriostatic effect on several species of Pasteurella and Neisseria genera. This work highlights the antimicrobial potential of probiotics in vitro, demonstrating that the probiotic L. casei DG has a bactericidal effect on all analyzed species isolated from dental plaque and that the mix culture of probiotic L. acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium BB-12 has only a bacteriostatic effect.

  12. Identification of Bacterial Species in Kuwaiti Waters Through DNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.

    2017-01-01

    With an objective of identifying the bacterial diversity associated with ecosystem of various Kuwaiti Seas, bacteria were cultured and isolated from 3 water samples. Due to the difficulties for cultured and isolated fecal coliforms on the selective agar plates, bacterial isolates from marine agar plates were selected for molecular identification. 16S rRNA genes were successfully amplified from the genome of the selected isolates using Universal Eubacterial 16S rRNA primers. The resulted amplification products were subjected to automated DNA sequencing. Partial 16S rDNA sequences obtained were compared directly with sequences in the NCBI database using BLAST as well as with the sequences available with Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

  13. Applicability of an in-House Saponin-Based Extraction Method in Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Species in Positively Flagged Blood Cultures

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    Jung-Yien Chien

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We used an in-house saponin-based extraction method to evaluate the performance of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS system for the identification of bacteria and fungi in 405 positively flagged blood culture bottles. Results obtained from MALDI-TOF/MS were compared with those obtained using conventional phenotypic identification methods. Of the 405 positively flagged blood culture bottles, 365 showed monomicrobal growth and were correctly identified to the species (72.1% or genus (89.6% level using the Bruker Biotyper system. The remaining 40 positively flagged blood culture bottles showed polymicrobial growth. Of them, 82.5% (n=33 of the isolates were correctly identified to the species level and 92.5% (n=37 to the genus level using the Bruker Biotyper system. The overall accuracy of identification to the genus level in flagged blood cultures was 89.5% for Gram-positive organisms, 93.5% for Gram-negative pathogens and 71.9% for fungi. Confidence scores were 1.500 for 307 (75.8% bottles, 1.700 for 249 (61.5% bottles and 2.000 for 142 (35.1% bottles. None of the yeast cultures yielded scores 1.700. Using an identification-score cutoff of 1.500, the MALDI Biotyper correctly identified 99.2% of Gram-positive bacteria, 97.6% of Gram-negative bacteria and 100% of yeast isolates to the genus level and 77.6% of Gram-positive bacteria, 87.1% of Gram-negative bacteria and 100.0% of yeast isolates to the species level. The overall rate of identification using our protocol was 89.9% (364/405 for genus level identification and 73.1% (296/405 for species level identification. Yeast isolates yielded the lowest confidence scores, which compromised the accuracy of identification. Further optimization of the protein extraction procedure in positive blood cultures is needed to improve the rate of identification.

  14. Candidate Species Selection: Cultural and Photosynthetic Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Cultural information is provided for a data base that will be used to select candidate crop species for a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). Lists of food crops which will satisfy most nutritional requirements of humans and also fit within the scope of cultural restrictions that logically would apply to a closed, regenerating system were generated. Cultural and environmental conditions that will allow the most rapid production of edible biomass from candidate species in the shortest possible time are identified. Cultivars which are most productive in terms of edible biomass production by (CE) conditions, and which respond to the ever-closed approach to optimization realized by each shortened production cycle are selected. The experimental approach with lettuce was to grow the crop hydroponically in a growth chamber and to manipulate such variables as light level and duration, day/night temperature, and nutrient form and level in the solution culture.

  15. Selection of bacterial wilt-resistant tomato through tissue culture.

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    Toyoda, H; Shimizu, K; Chatani, K; Kita, N; Matsuda, Y; Ouchi, S

    1989-06-01

    Bacterial wilt-resistant plants were obtained using a tomato tissue culture system. A virulent strain ofPseudomonas solanacearum secreted some toxic substances into the culture medium. Leaf explant-derived callus tissues which were resistant to these toxic substances in the culture filtrate were selectedin vitro and regenerated into plants. These plants expressed bacterial wilt resistance at the early infection stage to suppress or delay the growth of the inoculated bacteria. On the other hand, complete resistance was obtained in self-pollinated progeny of regenerants derived from non-selected callus tissues. These plants showed a high resistance when inoculated with this strain, and were also resistant when planted in a field infested with a different strain of the pathogen.

  16. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Two Bornean Nepenthes Species with Differences in Nitrogen Acquisition Strategies.

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    Sickel, Wiebke; Grafe, T Ulmar; Meuche, Ivonne; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Keller, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes have been studied for over a century, but surprisingly little is known about associations with microorganisms. The two species Nepenthes rafflesiana and Nepenthes hemsleyana differ in their pitcher-mediated nutrient sources, sequestering nitrogen from arthropod prey and arthropods as well as bat faeces, respectively. We expected bacterial communities living in the pitchers to resemble this diet difference. Samples were taken from different parts of the pitchers (leaf, peristome, inside, outside, digestive fluid) of both species. Bacterial communities were determined using culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Bacterial richness and community structure were similar in leaves, peristomes, inside and outside walls of both plant species. Regarding digestive fluids, bacterial richness was higher in N. hemsleyana than in N. rafflesiana. Additionally, digestive fluid communities were highly variable in structure, with strain-specific differences in community composition between replicates. Acidophilic taxa were mostly of low abundance, except the genus Acidocella, which strikingly reached extremely high levels in two N. rafflesiana fluids. In N. hemsleyana fluid, some taxa classified as vertebrate gut symbionts as well as saprophytes were enriched compared to N. rafflesiana, with saprophytes constituting potential competitors for nutrients. The high variation in community structure might be caused by a number of biotic and abiotic factors. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were present in both study species, which might provide essential nutrients to the plant at times of low prey capture and/or rare encounters with bats.

  17. Heavy metals species affect fungal-bacterial synergism during the bioremediation of fluoranthene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Kui; Ding, Ning; Peterson, Eric Charles; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    The co-occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with heavy metals (HMs) is very common in contaminated soils, but the influence of HMs on fungal-bacterial synergism during PAH bioremediation has not been investigated. The bioremediation of fluoranthene-contaminated sand using co-cultures of Acremonium sp. P0997 and Bacillus subtilis showed increases of 109.4 and 9.8 % in degradation compared to pure bacterial and fungal cultures, respectively, removing 64.1 ± 1.4 % fluoanthene in total. The presence of Cu(2+) reduced fluoranthene removal to 53.7 ± 1.7 %, while inhibiting bacterial growth, and reducing translocation of bacteria on fungal hyphae by 49.5 %, in terms of the bacterial translocation ratio. Cu(2+) reduced bacterial diffusion by 46.8 and 31.9 %, as reflected by D (a bulk random motility diffusional coefficient) and D eff (the effective one-dimensional diffusion coefficient) compared to the control without HM supplementation, respectively. However, Mn(2+) resulted in a 78.2 ± 1.9 % fluoranthene degradation, representing an increase of 21.9 %, while enhancing bacterial growth and bacterial translocation on fungal hyphae, showing a 12.0 % increase in translocation ratio, with no observable impact on D and D eff. Hence, the presence of HMs has been shown to affect fungal-bacterial synergism in PAH degradation, and this effect differs with HM species.

  18. Seasonal and altitudinal changes of culturable bacterial and yeast diversity in Alpine forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Luís; Sannino, Ciro; Turchetti, Benedetta; Buzzini, Pietro; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-11-01

    The effect of altitude and season on abundance and diversity of the culturable heterotrophic bacterial and yeast community was examined at four forest sites in the Italian Alps along an altitude gradient (545-2000 m). Independently of altitude, bacteria isolated at 0 °C (psychrophiles) were less numerous than those recovered at 20 °C. In autumn, psychrophilic bacterial population increased with altitude. The 1194 bacterial strains were primarily affiliated with the classes Alpha-, Beta-, Gammaproteobacteria, Spingobacteriia and Flavobacteriia. Fifty-seven of 112 operational taxonomic units represented potential novel species. Strains isolated at 20 °C had a higher diversity and showed similarities in taxa composition and abundance, regardless of altitude or season, while strains isolated at 0 °C showed differences in community composition at lower and higher altitudes. In contrast to bacteria, yeast diversity was season-dependent: site- and altitude-specific effects on yeast diversity were only detected in spring. Isolation temperature affected the relative proportions of yeast genera. Isolations recovered 719 strains, belonging to the classes Dothideomycetes, Saccharomycetes, Tremellomycetes and Mycrobotryomycetes. The presence of few dominant bacterial OTUs and yeast species indicated a resilient microbial population that is not affected by season or altitude. Soil nutrient contents influenced significantly abundance and diversity of culturable bacteria, but not of culturable yeasts.

  19. Characterization of Cellulolytic Bacterial Cultures Grown in Different Substrates

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    Mohamed Idris Alshelmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine aerobic cellulolytic bacterial cultures were obtained from the Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Culture (DSMZ and the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC. The objectives of this study were to characterize the cellulolytic bacteria and to determine the optimum moisture ratio required for solid state fermentation (SSF of palm kernel cake (PKC. The bacteria cultures were grown on reconstituted nutrient broth, incubated at 30∘C and agitated at 200 rpm. Carboxymethyl cellulase, xylanase, and mannanase activities were determined using different substrates and after SSF of PKC. The SSF was conducted for 4 and 7 days with inoculum size of 10% (v/w on different PKC concentration-to-moisture ratios: 1 : 0.2, 1 : 0.3, 1 : 0.4, and 1 : 0.5. Results showed that Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 1067 DSMZ, Bacillus megaterium 9885 ATCC, Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus 10248 DSMZ, and Paenibacillus polymyxa 842 ATCC produced higher enzyme activities as compared to other bacterial cultures grown on different substrates. The cultures mentioned above also produced higher enzyme activities when they were incubated under SSF using PKC as a substrate in different PKC-to-moisture ratios after 4 days of incubation, indicating that these cellulolytic bacteria can be used to degrade and improve the nutrient quality of PKC.

  20. Differing prevalence and diversity of bacterial species in fetal membranes from very preterm and term labor.

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    Hannah E Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrauterine infection may play a role in preterm delivery due to spontaneous preterm labor (PTL and preterm prolonged rupture of membranes (PPROM. Because bacteria previously associated with preterm delivery are often difficult to culture, a molecular biology approach was used to identify bacterial DNA in placenta and fetal membranes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used broad-range 16S rDNA PCR and species-specific, real-time assays to amplify bacterial DNA from fetal membranes and placenta. 74 women were recruited to the following groups: PPROM <32 weeks (n = 26; 11 caesarean; PTL with intact membranes <32 weeks (n = 19; all vaginal birth; indicated preterm delivery <32 weeks (n = 8; all caesarean; term (n = 21; 11 caesarean. 50% (5/10 of term vaginal deliveries were positive for bacterial DNA. However, little spread was observed through tissues and species diversity was restricted. Minimal bacteria were detected in term elective section or indicated preterm deliveries. Bacterial prevalence was significantly increased in samples from PTL with intact membranes [89% (17/19 versus 50% (5/10 in term vaginal delivery p = 0.03] and PPROM (CS [55% (6/11 versus 0% (0/11 in term elective CS, p = 0.01]. In addition, bacterial spread and diversity was greater in the preterm groups with 68% (13/19 PTL group having 3 or more positive samples and over 60% (12/19 showing two or more bacterial species (versus 20% (2/10 in term vaginal deliveries. Blood monocytes from women with PTL with intact membranes and PPROM who were 16S bacterial positive showed greater level of immune paresis (p = 0.03. A positive PCR result was associated with histological chorioamnionitis in preterm deliveries. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Bacteria are found in both preterm and term fetal membranes. A greater spread and diversity of bacterial species were found in tissues of women who had very preterm births. It is unclear to what extent the greater bacterial prevalence

  1. [Finding of the bacterial species Edwardsiella tarda in the aquarium fish Betta splendens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladík, P; Prouza, A; Vítovec, J

    1983-01-01

    A case of the mass occurrence of a disease in the aquarium fish species Betta splendens is described; morphologically the disease was characterized by the finding of large dermal changes located mainly in the dorsal part and by miliary granulomata in liver, spleen and kidneys. The granulomata consisted of epitheloid light cells with centrally located necrosis. Gram-negative bacteria with morphological and biochemical characteristics corresponding to the bacterial species Edwardsiella tarda were isolated from the kidneys, liver and from the dermal lesion. The characteristics of the strains isolated by us were compared with the reference Edwardsiella strain (Bth 1/64) obtained from the Czechoslovak collection of type cultures, Prague.

  2. Diazotrophic potential among bacterial communities associated with wild and cultivated Agave species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgarennes, Damaris; Garrido, Etzel; Torres-Gomez, Miryam J; Peña-Cabriales, Juan J; Partida-Martinez, Laila P

    2014-12-01

    Agaves are major biotic resources in arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Despite their ecological, economical and cultural relevance, many aspects of the microbial communities associated with agaves are still unknown. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities associated with two Agave species by 16S rRNA- Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting and sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of biotic and abiotic factors in the structure of the bacterial communities. In parallel, we isolated and characterized diazotrophic bacteria associated with agaves, as Agave soils are characterized by their low nitrogen content. Our results demonstrate that in Agave, the structure of prokaryotic assemblages was mostly influenced by the community group, where the soil, episphere, and endosphere were clearly distinct. Proteobacteria (γ and α), Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria were the dominant phyla. Bacterial communities in the episphere of agaves were mainly influenced by the host species, whereas in the endosphere were affected by the season. Fifteen bacterial taxa were common and abundant in the endosphere of both Agave species during the dry season. Notably, some of the confirmed diazotrophic strains belonged to this group, suggesting a possible beneficial role in planta.

  3. Bacterial community composition associated with freshwater algae: species specificity vs. dependency on environmental conditions and source community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigemann, Falk; Hilt, Sabine; Salka, Ivette; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-03-01

    We studied bacterial associations with the green alga Desmodesmus armatus and the diatom Stephanodiscus minutulus under changing environmental conditions and bacterial source communities, to evaluate whether bacteria-algae associations are species-specific or more generalized and determined by external factors. Axenic and xenic algae were incubated in situ with and without allelopathically active macrophytes, and in the laboratory with sterile and nonsterile lake water and an allelochemical, tannic acid (TA). Bacterial community composition (BCC) of algae-associated bacteria was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), nonmetric multidimensional scaling, cluster analyses, and sequencing of DGGE bands. BCC of xenic algal cultures of both species were not significantly affected by changes in their environment or bacterial source community, except in the case of TA additions. Species-specific interactions therefore appear to overrule the effects of environmental conditions and source communities. The BCC of xenic and axenic D. armatus cultures subjected to in situ bacterial colonization, however, had lower similarities (ca. 55%), indicating that bacterial precolonization is a strong factor for bacteria-algae associations irrespective of environmental conditions and source community. Our findings emphasize the ecological importance of species-specific bacteria-algae associations with important repercussions for other processes, such as the remineralization of nutrients, and organic matter dynamics. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Culture Media and Individual Hosts Affect the Recovery of Culturable Bacterial Diversity from Amphibian Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Daniel; Walke, Jenifer B; Gajewski, Zachary; Becker, Matthew H; Swartwout, Meredith C; Belden, Lisa K

    2017-01-01

    One current challenge in microbial ecology is elucidating the functional roles of the large diversity of free-living and host-associated bacteria identified by culture-independent molecular methods. Importantly, the characterization of this immense bacterial diversity will likely require merging data from culture-independent approaches with work on bacterial isolates in culture. Amphibian skin bacterial communities have become a recent focus of work in host-associated microbial systems due to the potential role of these skin bacteria in host defense against the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which is associated with global amphibian population declines and extinctions. As there is evidence that some skin bacteria may inhibit growth of Bd and prevent infection in some cases, there is interest in using these bacteria as probiotic therapy for conservation of at-risk amphibians. In this study, we used skin swabs from American toads (Anaxyrus americanus) to: (1) assess the diversity and community structure of culturable amphibian skin bacteria grown on high and low nutrient culture media, (2) determine which culture media recover the highest proportion of the total skin bacterial community of individual toads relative to culture-independent data, and (3) assess whether the plated communities from the distinct media types vary in their ability to inhibit Bd growth in in-vitro assays. Overall, we found that culture media with low nutrient concentrations facilitated the growth of more diverse bacterial taxa and grew distinct communities relative to media with higher nutrient concentrations. Use of low nutrient media also resulted in culturing proportionally more of the bacterial diversity on individual toads relative to the overall community defined using culture-independent methods. However, while there were differences in diversity among media types, the variation among individual hosts was greater than variation among media types, suggesting that

  5. Integration of culture-based and molecular analysis of a complex sponge-associated bacterial community.

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    Naomi F Montalvo

    Full Text Available The bacterial communities of sponges have been studied using molecular techniques as well as culture-based techniques, but the communities described by these two methods are remarkably distinct. Culture-based methods describe communities dominated by Proteobacteria, and Actinomycetes while molecular methods describe communities dominated by predominantly uncultivated groups such as the Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, and Acidimicrobidae. In this study, we used a wide range of culture media to increase the diversity of cultivable bacteria from the closely related giant barrel sponges, Xestospongia muta collected from the Florida Keys, Atlantic Ocean and Xestospongia testudinaria, collected from Indonesia, Pacific Ocean. Over 400 pure cultures were isolated and identified from X. muta and X. testudinaria and over 90 bacterial species were represented. Over 16,000 pyrosequences were analyzed and assigned to 976 OTUs. We employed both cultured-based methods and pyrosequencing to look for patterns of overlap between the culturable and molecular communities. Only one OTU was found in both the molecular and culturable communities, revealing limitations inherent in both approaches.

  6. Isolation, cultivation, purification and identification of bacterial species from microfauna of soil

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    Amna Ali

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Abstract:
    Soil is an excellent source of unknown microorganisms since bacteria, algae, protozoans, yeasts, moulds, and microscopic worms are routinely found in this environment. Therefore, soil is a medium in which life is sustained in a fragile biological balance. Bacteria play an important role in nutritional chains that are an important part of biological balance. In the present study, four different soil samples were collected from the rhizosphere of i Sapota zapotilla, ii Eucalyptus species, iii Ficus religiosa from Lahore and iv soil from Changa manga, Pakistan. A Total of 28 bacterial species were isolated and classified in the period between November 2008 and December 2009. All species were cultured on recommended media for verification of biochemical characteristics. The results showed that at least fifteen Gram-positive bacterial species were present in samples and these were considered as the major group constituting the bacterial population strains

  7. Bacterial diversity associated with wild caught Anopheles mosquitoes from Dak Nong Province, Vietnam using culture and DNA fingerprint.

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    Chung Thuy Ngo

    Full Text Available Microbiota of Anopheles midgut can modulate vector immunity and block Plasmodium development. Investigation on the bacterial biodiversity in Anopheles, and specifically on the identification of bacteria that might be used in malaria transmission blocking approaches, has been mainly conducted on malaria vectors of Africa. Vietnam is an endemic country for both malaria and Bancroftian filariasis whose parasitic agents can be transmitted by the same Anopheles species. No information on the microbiota of Anopheles mosquitoes in Vietnam was available previous to this study.The culture dependent approach, using different mediums, and culture independent (16S rRNA PCR - TTGE method were used to investigate the bacterial biodiversity in the abdomen of 5 Anopheles species collected from Dak Nong Province, central-south Vietnam. Molecular methods, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to characterize the microbiota.The microbiota in wild-caught Anopheles was diverse with the presence of 47 bacterial OTUs belonging to 30 genera, including bacterial genera impacting Plasmodium development. The bacteria were affiliated with 4 phyla, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, the latter being the dominant phylum. Four bacterial genera are newly described in Anopheles mosquitoes including Coxiella, Yersinia, Xanthomonas, and Knoellia. The bacterial diversity per specimen was low ranging from 1 to 4. The results show the importance of pairing culture and fingerprint methods to better screen the bacterial community in Anopheles mosquitoes.Sampled Anopheles species from central-south Vietnam contained a diverse bacterial microbiota that needs to be investigated further in order to develop new malaria control approaches. The combination of both culture and DNA fingerprint methods allowed a thorough and complementary screening of the bacterial community in Anopheles mosquitoes.

  8. Bacterial Diversity Associated with Wild Caught Anopheles Mosquitoes from Dak Nong Province, Vietnam Using Culture and DNA Fingerprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Chung Thuy; Aujoulat, Fabien; Veas, Francisco; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Manguin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Background Microbiota of Anopheles midgut can modulate vector immunity and block Plasmodium development. Investigation on the bacterial biodiversity in Anopheles, and specifically on the identification of bacteria that might be used in malaria transmission blocking approaches, has been mainly conducted on malaria vectors of Africa. Vietnam is an endemic country for both malaria and Bancroftian filariasis whose parasitic agents can be transmitted by the same Anopheles species. No information on the microbiota of Anopheles mosquitoes in Vietnam was available previous to this study. Method The culture dependent approach, using different mediums, and culture independent (16S rRNA PCR – TTGE) method were used to investigate the bacterial biodiversity in the abdomen of 5 Anopheles species collected from Dak Nong Province, central-south Vietnam. Molecular methods, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to characterize the microbiota. Results and Discussion The microbiota in wild-caught Anopheles was diverse with the presence of 47 bacterial OTUs belonging to 30 genera, including bacterial genera impacting Plasmodium development. The bacteria were affiliated with 4 phyla, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, the latter being the dominant phylum. Four bacterial genera are newly described in Anopheles mosquitoes including Coxiella, Yersinia, Xanthomonas, and Knoellia. The bacterial diversity per specimen was low ranging from 1 to 4. The results show the importance of pairing culture and fingerprint methods to better screen the bacterial community in Anopheles mosquitoes. Conclusion Sampled Anopheles species from central-south Vietnam contained a diverse bacterial microbiota that needs to be investigated further in order to develop new malaria control approaches. The combination of both culture and DNA fingerprint methods allowed a thorough and complementary screening of the bacterial community in Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:25747513

  9. Culture-independent analysis of bacterial diversity in a child-care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Sara

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Child-care facilities appear to provide daily opportunities for exposure and transmission of bacteria and viruses. However, almost nothing is known about the diversity of microbial contamination in daycare facilities or its public health implications. Recent culture-independent molecular studies of bacterial diversity in indoor environments have revealed an astonishing diversity of microorganisms, including opportunistic pathogens and many uncultured bacteria. In this study, we used culture and culture-independent methods to determine the viability and diversity of bacteria in a child-care center over a six-month period. Results We sampled surface contamination on toys and furniture using sterile cotton swabs in four daycare classrooms. Bacteria were isolated on nutrient and blood agar plates, and 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from unique (one of a kind colony morphologies for species identification. We also extracted DNA directly from nine representative swab samples taken over the course of the study from both toy and furniture surfaces, and used "universal" 16S rRNA gene bacterial primers to create PCR-based clone libraries. The rRNA gene clones were sequenced, and the sequences were compared with related sequences in GenBank and subjected to phylogenetic analyses to determine their evolutionary relationships. Culturing methods identified viable bacteria on all toys and furniture surfaces sampled in the study. Bacillus spp. were the most commonly cultured bacteria, followed by Staphylococcus spp., and Microbacterium spp. Culture-independent methods based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, on the other hand, revealed an entirely new dimension of microbial diversity, including an estimated 190 bacterial species from 15 bacterial divisions. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses determined that the clone libraries were dominated by a diverse set of sequences related to Pseudomonas spp., as well as uncultured

  10. Patterns of Gut Bacterial Colonization in Three Primate Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Erin A.; Rodrigo, Allen; Yoder, Anne D.

    2015-01-01

    Host fitness is impacted by trillions of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract that facilitate development and are inextricably tied to life history. During development, microbial colonization primes the gut metabolism and physiology, thereby setting the stage for adult nutrition and health. However, the ecological rules governing microbial succession are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the relationship between host lineage, captive diet, and life stage and gut microbiota characteristics in three primate species (infraorder, Lemuriformes). Fecal samples were collected from captive lemur mothers and their infants, from birth to weaning. Microbial DNA was extracted and the v4 region of 16S rDNA was sequenced on the Illumina platform using protocols from the Earth Microbiome Project. Here, we show that colonization proceeds along different successional trajectories in developing infants from species with differing dietary regimes and ecological profiles: frugivorous (fruit-eating) Varecia variegata, generalist Lemur catta, and folivorous (leaf-eating) Propithecus coquereli. Our analyses reveal community membership and succession patterns consistent with previous studies of human infants, suggesting that lemurs may serve as a useful model of microbial ecology in the primate gut. Each lemur species exhibits distinct species-specific bacterial diversity signatures correlating to life stages and life history traits, implying that gut microbial community assembly primes developing infants at species-specific rates for their respective adult feeding strategies. PMID:25970595

  11. Patterns of gut bacterial colonization in three primate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A McKenney

    Full Text Available Host fitness is impacted by trillions of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract that facilitate development and are inextricably tied to life history. During development, microbial colonization primes the gut metabolism and physiology, thereby setting the stage for adult nutrition and health. However, the ecological rules governing microbial succession are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the relationship between host lineage, captive diet, and life stage and gut microbiota characteristics in three primate species (infraorder, Lemuriformes. Fecal samples were collected from captive lemur mothers and their infants, from birth to weaning. Microbial DNA was extracted and the v4 region of 16S rDNA was sequenced on the Illumina platform using protocols from the Earth Microbiome Project. Here, we show that colonization proceeds along different successional trajectories in developing infants from species with differing dietary regimes and ecological profiles: frugivorous (fruit-eating Varecia variegata, generalist Lemur catta, and folivorous (leaf-eating Propithecus coquereli. Our analyses reveal community membership and succession patterns consistent with previous studies of human infants, suggesting that lemurs may serve as a useful model of microbial ecology in the primate gut. Each lemur species exhibits distinct species-specific bacterial diversity signatures correlating to life stages and life history traits, implying that gut microbial community assembly primes developing infants at species-specific rates for their respective adult feeding strategies.

  12. Desulfovibrio bacterial species are increased in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Debate persists regarding the role of Desulfovibrio subspecies in ulcerative colitis. Combined microscopic and molecular techniques enable this issue to be investigated by allowing precise enumeration of specific bacterial species within the colonic mucous gel. The aim of this study was to combine laser capture microdissection and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine Desulfovibrio copy number in crypt-associated mucous gel in health and in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Colonic mucosal biopsies were harvested from healthy controls (n = 19) and patients with acute (n = 10) or chronic (n = 10) ulcerative colitis. Crypt-associated mucous gel was obtained by laser capture microdissection throughout the colon. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA and Desulfovibrio copy number\\/mm were obtained by polymerase chain reaction at each locus. Bacterial copy numbers were interrogated for correlation with location and disease activity. Data were evaluated using a combination of ordinary linear methods and linear mixed-effects models to cater for multiple interactions. RESULTS: Desulfovibrio positivity was significantly increased in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis at multiple levels within the colon, and after normalization with total bacterial signal, the relative Desulfovibrio load was increased in acute colitis compared with controls. Desulfovibrio counts did not significantly correlate with age, disease duration, or disease activity but interlevel correlations were found in adjacent colonic segments in the healthy control and chronic ulcerative colitis groups. CONCLUSION: The presence of Desulfovibrio subspecies is increased in ulcerative colitis and the data presented suggest that these bacteria represent an increased percentage of the colonic microbiome in acute ulcerative colitis.

  13. Bacterial growth rates are influenced by cellular characteristics of individual species when immersed in electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessaro, Lucas W E; Murugan, Nirosha J; Persinger, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) have negative effects on the rate of growth of bacteria. In the present study, two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative species were exposed to six magnetic field conditions in broth cultures. Three variations of the 'Thomas' pulsed frequency-modulated pattern; a strong-static "puck" magnet upwards of 5000G in intensity; a pair of these magnets rotating opposite one another at ∼30rpm; and finally a strong dynamic magnetic field generator termed the 'Resonator' with an average intensity of 250μT were used. Growth rate was discerned by optical density (OD) measurements every hour at 600nm. ELF-EMF conditions significantly affected the rates of growth of the bacterial cultures, while the two static magnetic field conditions were not statistically significant. Most interestingly, the 'Resonator' dynamic magnetic field increased the rates of growth of three species (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli), while slowing the growth of one (Serratia marcescens). We suggest that these effects are due to individual biophysical characteristics of the bacterial species.

  14. Detection of Blood Culture Bacterial Contamination using Natural Language Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Michael E.; FitzHenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J.; Brown, Steven H.; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Dittus, Robert S.; Elkin, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%. PMID:20351890

  15. Detection of blood culture bacterial contamination using natural language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Michael E; Fitzhenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J; Brown, Steven H; Fielstein, Elliot M; Dittus, Robert S; Elkin, Peter L

    2009-11-14

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%.

  16. Diversity of culturable bacterial endophytes of saffron in Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tanwi; Kaul, Sanjana; Dhar, Manoj K

    2015-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus) is a medicinally important plant. The Kashmir valley (J&K, India) emblematizes one of the major and quality saffron producing areas in the world. Nonetheless, the area has been experiencing a declining trend in the production of saffron during the last decade. Poor disease management is one of the major reasons for declining saffron production in the area. Endophytes are known to offer control against many diseases of host plant. During the present study, culturable bacterial endophytes were isolated from saffron plant, identified and assessed for plant growth promoting activities. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis grouped the fifty-four bacterial isolates into eleven different taxa, viz. Bacillus licheniformis, B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. humi, B. pumilus, Paenibacillus elgii, B. safensis, Brevibacillus sp., Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus hominis and Enterobacter cloacae. The results were also supported with the identification based on BIOLOG system. B. licheniformis was the dominant endophyte in both leaves and corms of saffron. 81 % isolates showed lipase activity, 57 % cellulase, 48 % protease, 38 % amylase, 33 % chitinase and 29 % showed pectinase activity. 24 % of the isolates were phosphate solublizers, 86 % showed siderophore production and 80 % phytohormone production potential. The present repository of well characterized bacterial endophytes of saffron, have plant growth promoting potential which can be explored further for their respective roles in the biology of the saffron plant.

  17. Effect of isolate of ruminal fibrolytic bacterial culture supplementation on fibrolytic bacterial population and survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes

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    Brishketu Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bacterial culture supplementation on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as on survivability of inoculated bacterial strain in lactating Murrah buffaloes kept on high fibre diet. Materials and Methods: Fibrolytic bacterial strains were isolated from rumen liquor of fistulated Murrah buffaloes and live bacterial culture were supplemented orally in treatment group of lactating Murrah buffaloes fed on high fibre diet to see it's effect on ruminal fibrolytic bacterial population as well as to see the effect of survivability of the inoculated bacterial strain at three different time interval in comparison to control group. Results: It has been shown by real time quantification study that supplementation of bacterial culture orally increases the population of major fibre degrading bacteria i.e. Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Ruminococcus albus as well as Fibrobacter succinogenes whereas there was decrease in secondary fibre degrading bacterial population i.e. Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens over the different time periods. However, the inoculated strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens survived significantly over the period of time, which was shown in stability of increased inoculated bacterial population. Conclusion: The isolates of fibrolytic bacterial strains are found to be useful in increasing the number of major ruminal fibre degrading bacteria in lactating buffaloes and may act as probiotic in large ruminants on fibre-based diets. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 14-17

  18. Extensive Identification of Bacterial Riboflavin Transporters and Their Distribution across Bacterial Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gutiérrez-Preciado

    Full Text Available Riboflavin, the precursor for the cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide, is an essential metabolite in all organisms. While the functions for de novo riboflavin biosynthesis and riboflavin import may coexist in bacteria, the extent of this co-occurrence is undetermined. The RibM, RibN, RfuABCD and the energy-coupling factor-RibU bacterial riboflavin transporters have been experimentally characterized. In addition, ImpX, RfnT and RibXY are proposed as riboflavin transporters based on positional clustering with riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RBP genes or conservation of the FMN riboswitch regulatory element. Here, we searched for the FMN riboswitch in bacterial genomes to identify genes encoding riboflavin transporters and assessed their distribution among bacteria. Two new putative riboflavin transporters were identified: RibZ in Clostridium and RibV in Mesoplasma florum. Trans-complementation of an Escherichia coli riboflavin auxotroph strain confirmed the riboflavin transport activity of RibZ from Clostridium difficile, RibXY from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, ImpX from Fusobacterium nucleatum and RfnT from Ochrobactrum anthropi. The analysis of the genomic distribution of all known bacterial riboflavin transporters revealed that most occur in species possessing the RBP and that some bacteria may even encode functional riboflavin transporters from two different families. Our results indicate that some species possess ancestral riboflavin transporters, while others possess transporters that appear to have evolved recently. Moreover, our data suggest that unidentified riboflavin transporters also exist. The present study doubles the number of experimentally characterized riboflavin transporters and suggests a specific, non-accessory role for these proteins in riboflavin-prototrophic bacteria.

  19. Validation of hierarchical cluster analysis for identification of bacterial species using 42 bacterial isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebremedhin, Meron; Yesupriya, Shubha; Luka, Janos; Crane, Nicole J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential advantages of the use of Raman spectroscopy in the biomedical field due to its rapidity and noninvasive nature. In this study, Raman spectroscopy is applied as a method for differentiating between bacteria isolates for Gram status and Genus species. We created models for identifying 28 bacterial isolates using spectra collected with a 785 nm laser excitation Raman spectroscopic system. In order to investigate the groupings of these samples, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was implemented. In addition, cluster analyses of the isolates were performed using various data types consisting of, biochemical tests, gene sequence alignment, high resolution melt (HRM) analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility tests of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and degree of antimicrobial resistance (SIR). In order to evaluate the ability of these models to correctly classify bacterial isolates using solely Raman spectroscopic data, a set of 14 validation samples were tested using the PLSDA models and consequently the HCA models. External cluster evaluation criteria of purity and Rand index were calculated at different taxonomic levels to compare the performance of clustering using Raman spectra as well as the other datasets. Results showed that Raman spectra performed comparably, and in some cases better than, the other data types with Rand index and purity values up to 0.933 and 0.947, respectively. This study clearly demonstrates that the discrimination of bacterial species using Raman spectroscopic data and hierarchical cluster analysis is possible and has the potential to be a powerful point-of-care tool in clinical settings.

  20. Bacterial flora and antimicrobial resistance in raw frozen cultured seafood imported to Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Uddin, Gazi M; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Guardabassi, Luca; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2013-03-01

    Intensified aquaculture includes the use of antimicrobials for disease control. In contrast to the situation in livestock, Escherichia coli and enterococci are not part of the normal gastrointestinal flora of fish and shrimp and therefore not suitable indicators of antimicrobial resistance in seafood. In this study, the diversity and phenotypic characteristics of the bacterial flora in raw frozen cultured and wild-caught shrimp and fish were evaluated to identify potential indicators of antimicrobial resistance. The bacterial flora cultured on various agar media at different temperatures yielded total viable counts of 4.0 × 10(4) to 3.0 × 10(5) CFU g(-1). Bacterial diversity was indicated by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 84 isolates representing different colony types; 24 genera and 51 species were identified. Pseudomonas spp. (23% of isolates), Psychrobacter spp. (17%), Serratia spp. (13%), Exiguobacterium spp. (7%), Staphylococcus spp. (6%), and Micrococcus spp. (6%) dominated. Disk susceptibility testing of 39 bacterial isolates to 11 antimicrobials revealed resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, erythromycin, and third generation cephalosporins. Resistance to third generation cephalosporins was found in Pseudomonas, a genus naturally resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics, and in Staphylococcus hominis. Half of the isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. Results indicate that identification of a single bacterial resistance indicator naturally present in seafood at point of harvest is unlikely. The bacterial flora found likely represents a processing rather than a raw fish flora because of repeated exposure of raw material to water during processing. Methods and appropriate indicators, such as quantitative PCR of resistance genes, are needed to determine how antimicrobials used in aquaculture affect resistance of bacteria in retailed products.

  1. Periodic Colony Formation by Bacterial Species Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Itoh, Hiroto; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the periodic colony growth of bacterial species Bacillus subtilis. A colony grows cyclically with the interface repeating an advance (migration phase) and a rest (consolidation phase) alternately on a surface of semi-solid agar plate under appropriate environmental conditions, resulting in a concentric ring-like colony. It was found from macroscopic observations that the characteristic quantities for the periodic growth such as the migration time, the consolidation time and the terrace spacing do not depend so much on nutrient concentration Cn, but do on agar concentration Ca. The consolidation time was a weakly increasing function of Ca, while the migration time and the terrace spacing were, respectively, weakly and strongly decreasing function of Ca. Overall, the cycle (migration-plus-consolidation) time seems to be constant, and does not depend so much on both Cn and Ca. Microscopically, bacterial cells inside the growing front of a colony keep increasing their population during both migration and consolidation phases. It was also confirmed that their secreting surfactant called surfactin does not affect their periodic growth qualitatively, i.e., mutant cells which cannot secrete surfactin produce a concentric ring-like colony. All these results suggest that the diffusion of the nutrient and the surfactin are irrelevant to their periodic growth.

  2. Comparison of culture-dependent and -independent methods for bacterial community monitoring during Montasio cheese manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Lisa; Maifreni, Michela; Bartolomeoli, Ingrid; Martino, Maria Elena; Novelli, Enrico; Frigo, Francesca; Marino, Marilena; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    The microbial community in milk is of great importance in the manufacture of traditional cheeses produced using raw milk and natural cultures. During milk curdling and cheese ripening, complex interactions occur in the microbial community, and accurate identification of the microorganisms involved provides essential information for understanding their role in these processes and in flavor production. Recent improvements in molecular biological methods have led to their application to food matrices, and thereby opened new perspectives for the study of microbial communities in fermented foods. In this study, a description of microbial community composition during the manufacture and ripening of Montasio cheese was provided. A combined approach using culture-dependent and -independent methods was applied. Culture-dependent identification was compared with 16S clone libraries sequencing data obtained from both DNA and reverse-transcribed RNA (cDNA) amplification and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays developed to detect and quantify specific bacterial species/genera (Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp.). S. thermophilus was the predominant LAB species throughout the entire ripening period of Montasio cheese. The culture-independent method demonstrates the relevant presence of Pseudomonas spp. and Lactococcus piscium at the beginning of ripening. The culture-dependent approach and the two culture-independent approaches produced complementary information, together generating a general view of cheese microbial ecology.

  3. Association between Gallbladder Ultrasound Findings and Bacterial Culture of Bile in 70 Cats and 202 Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Policelli Smith, R.; Gookin, J. L.; Smolski, W.; Di Cicco, M.F.; M. Correa; Seiler, G.S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bacterial cholecystitis often is diagnosed by combination of gallbladder ultrasound (US) findings and positive results of bile culture. The value of gallbladder US in determining the likelihood of bile bacterial infection in cats and dogs with suspected biliary disease is unknown. Hypothesis/Objectives To determine the value of gallbladder US in predicting bile bacterial culture results, identify most common bacterial isolates from bile, and describe complications after cholecystoc...

  4. In vitro culture of previously uncultured oral bacterial phylotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hayley; Rybalka, Alexandra; Moazzez, Rebecca; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Wade, William G

    2015-12-01

    Around a third of oral bacteria cannot be grown using conventional bacteriological culture media. Community profiling targeting 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenomics methods have proved valuable in revealing the complexity of the oral bacterial community. Studies investigating the role of oral bacteria in health and disease require phenotypic characterizations that are possible only with live cultures. The aim of this study was to develop novel culture media and use an in vitro biofilm model to culture previously uncultured oral bacteria. Subgingival plaque samples collected from subjects with periodontitis were cultured on complex mucin-containing agar plates supplemented with proteose peptone (PPA), beef extract (BEA), or Gelysate (GA) as well as on fastidious anaerobe agar plus 5% horse blood (FAA). In vitro biofilms inoculated with the subgingival plaque samples and proteose peptone broth (PPB) as the growth medium were established using the Calgary biofilm device. Specific PCR primers were designed and validated for the previously uncultivated oral taxa Bacteroidetes bacteria HOT 365 and HOT 281, Lachnospiraceae bacteria HOT 100 and HOT 500, and Clostridiales bacterium HOT 093. All agar media were able to support the growth of 10 reference strains of oral bacteria. One previously uncultivated phylotype, Actinomyces sp. HOT 525, was cultivated on FAA. Of 93 previously uncultivated phylotypes found in the inocula, 26 were detected in in vitro-cultivated biofilms. Lachnospiraceae bacterium HOT 500 was successfully cultured from biofilm material harvested from PPA plates in coculture with Parvimonas micra or Veillonella dispar/parvula after colony hybridization-directed enrichment. The establishment of in vitro biofilms from oral inocula enables the cultivation of previously uncultured oral bacteria and provides source material for isolation in coculture.

  5. Efficacy of two sperm preparation techniques in reducing non-specific bacterial species from human semen

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    Prabath K Abeysundara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Artificial reproductive techniques using seminal preparations with bacteria may cause pelvic inflammatory disease and its sequalae. Aims: To assess efficacy of two sperm preparation techniques to clear bacteria and the effect of bacteriospermia on sperm recovery rates. Settings and Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among males of subfertile couples. Subjects and Methods: Semen samples were randomly allocated into swim-up method (group S, n = 68 and density gradient method (group D, n = 50 for sperm preparation. Seminal fluid analysis and bacterial cultures were performed in each sample before and after sperm preparation. Statistical Analysis: McNemar′s chi-squared test and independent samples t-test in SPSS version 16.0 were used. Results: Organisms were found in 86 (72.88% out of 118 samples, before sperm preparation; Streptococcus species (n = 40, 46.51% of which 14 were Group D Streptococcus species, Coagulase negative Staphylococcus species (n = 17, 19.76%, Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13, 15.11%, Coliform species (n = 11, 12.79% of which 09 were Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium species (n = 5, 5.81%. There was a statistically significant reduction of culture positive samples in raw vs. processed samples; in group S, 49 (72.05% vs. 16 (23.52% and in group D, 37 (74% vs. 18 (36%. In group S and D, mean (SD recovery rates of culture positive vs. culture negative samples were 39.44% (SD-14.02 vs. 44.22% (SD-22.38, P = 0.39 and 52.50% (SD-37.16 vs. 49.58% (SD-40.32, P = 0.82 respectively. Conclusions: Both sperm preparation methods significantly reduced bacteria in semen, but total clearance was not achieved. Sperm recovery rate was not affected by bacteriospermia.

  6. Crude oil biodegradation by a mixed bacterial culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hamme, J.D.

    2000-07-01

    Mixed cultures with broad substrate specificity usually form the basis for biological methods used for the remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated wastes. Bow River crude oil was used as a model substrate for the study of microbe-microbe and microbe-substrate interactions in batch fermentation systems. Substrate availability limited the mixed-bacterial culture due to hydrocarbon insolubility. A method of improving biodegradation through the use of chemical surfactants was tested. A hydrophile-lipophile balance of 13 led to optimum enhancement at supra-critical micellization concentrations not exceeding a critical level, as indicated by the results of a detailed study with nonylphenol ethoxylates. A broad variety of trypticase soy agar-culturable bacteria was contained in the culture. Initially, Pseudomonas Flavimonas and Stenotrophomonas spp. dominated in the fermentations with different hydrocarbon mixtures. The lag time of Stenotrophomonas sp. and exposure to Bow River saturates selected for an Acinetobacter calcoacetius strain were increased by a chemical surfactant. Following prolonged incubation, a greater variety of mainly non-hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated in each case. Low molecular weight volatile hydrocarbons were degraded in closed systems and the greatest activity from the culture occurred against the saturate and aromatic fractions. To monitor volatile hydrocarbon degradation in live cultures at 30 degrees Celsius, a rapid and sensitive solid phase microextraction methodology was developed. Only the cultures grown on crude oil in sealed flasks, or in open flasks amended with yeast extract retained their volatile hydrocarbon-degrading capabilities. Correlated with reduced proportions of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in biodegradation flasks, metabolic capacity decreased with inoculum age. The degradation hierarchy and chemical surfactant effects were confirmed by pure and co-culture studies. The presence of a chemical surfactant

  7. The importance of the viable but non-culturable state in human bacterial pathogens

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    Laam eLi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial species have been found to exist in a viable but non-culturable (VBNC state since its discovery in 1982. VBNC cells are characterized by a loss of culturability on routine agar, which impairs their detection by conventional plate count techniques. This leads to an underestimation of total viable cells in environmental or clinical samples, and thus poses a risk to public health. In this review, we present recent findings on the VBNC state of human bacterial pathogens. The characteristics of VBNC cells, including the similarities and differences to viable, culturable cells and dead cells, and different detection methods are discussed. Exposure to various stresses can induce the VBNC state, and VBNC cells may be resuscitated back to culturable cells under suitable stimuli. The conditions that trigger the induction of the VBNC state and resuscitation from it are summarized and the mechanisms underlying these two processes are discussed. Last but not least, the significance of VBNC cells and their potential influence on human health are also reviewed.

  8. Protozoa Drive the Dynamics of Culturable Biocontrol Bacterial Communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Stella Müller

    Full Text Available Some soil bacteria protect plants against soil-borne diseases by producing toxic secondary metabolites. Such beneficial biocontrol bacteria can be used in agricultural systems as alternative to agrochemicals. The broad spectrum toxins responsible for plant protection also inhibit predation by protozoa and nematodes, the main consumers of bacteria in soil. Therefore, predation pressure may favour biocontrol bacteria and contribute to plant health. We analyzed the effect of Acanthamoeba castellanii on semi-natural soil bacterial communities in a microcosm experiment. We determined the frequency of culturable bacteria carrying genes responsible for the production of the antifungal compounds 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG, pyrrolnitrin (PRN and hydrogen cyanide (HCN in presence and absence of A. castellanii. We then measured if amoebae affected soil suppressiveness in a bioassay with sugar beet seedlings confronted to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Amoebae increased the frequency of both DAPG and HCN positive bacteria in later plant growth phases (2 and 3 weeks, as well as the average number of biocontrol genes per bacterium. The abundance of DAPG positive bacteria correlated with disease suppression, suggesting that their promotion by amoebae may enhance soil health. However, the net effect of amoebae on soil suppressiveness was neutral to slightly negative, possibly because amoebae slow down the establishment of biocontrol bacteria on the recently emerged seedlings used in the assay. The results indicate that microfaunal predators foster biocontrol bacterial communities. Understanding interactions between biocontrol bacteria and their predators may thus help developing environmentally friendly management practices of agricultural systems.

  9. Protozoa Drive the Dynamics of Culturable Biocontrol Bacterial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maren Stella; Scheu, Stefan; Jousset, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Some soil bacteria protect plants against soil-borne diseases by producing toxic secondary metabolites. Such beneficial biocontrol bacteria can be used in agricultural systems as alternative to agrochemicals. The broad spectrum toxins responsible for plant protection also inhibit predation by protozoa and nematodes, the main consumers of bacteria in soil. Therefore, predation pressure may favour biocontrol bacteria and contribute to plant health. We analyzed the effect of Acanthamoeba castellanii on semi-natural soil bacterial communities in a microcosm experiment. We determined the frequency of culturable bacteria carrying genes responsible for the production of the antifungal compounds 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin (PRN) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in presence and absence of A. castellanii. We then measured if amoebae affected soil suppressiveness in a bioassay with sugar beet seedlings confronted to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Amoebae increased the frequency of both DAPG and HCN positive bacteria in later plant growth phases (2 and 3 weeks), as well as the average number of biocontrol genes per bacterium. The abundance of DAPG positive bacteria correlated with disease suppression, suggesting that their promotion by amoebae may enhance soil health. However, the net effect of amoebae on soil suppressiveness was neutral to slightly negative, possibly because amoebae slow down the establishment of biocontrol bacteria on the recently emerged seedlings used in the assay. The results indicate that microfaunal predators foster biocontrol bacterial communities. Understanding interactions between biocontrol bacteria and their predators may thus help developing environmentally friendly management practices of agricultural systems.

  10. Bacterial Responses to Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal: Reactive Electrophilic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Park, Chankyu

    2017-01-01

    Glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MG), belonging to α-oxoaldehydes, are produced by organisms from bacteria to humans by glucose oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation. Since glyoxals contain two adjacent reactive carbonyl groups, they are referred to as reactive electrophilic species (RES), and are damaging to proteins and nucleotides. Therefore, glyoxals cause various diseases in humans, such as diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, from which all living organisms need to be protected. Although the glyoxalase system has been known for some time, details on how glyoxals are sensed and detoxified in the cell have not been fully elucidated, and are only beginning to be uncovered. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on bacterial responses to glyoxal, and specifically focus on the glyoxal-associated regulators YqhC and NemR, as well as their detoxification mediated by glutathione (GSH)-dependent/independent glyoxalases and NAD(P)H-dependent reductases. Furthermore, we will address questions and future directions. PMID:28106725

  11. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups.

  12. Bacterial persistence induced by salicylate via reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiebin; El Meouche, Imane; Dunlop, Mary J.

    2017-01-01

    Persisters are phenotypic variants of regular cells that exist in a dormant state with low metabolic activity, allowing them to exhibit high tolerance to antibiotics. Despite increasing recognition of their role in chronic and recalcitrant infections, the mechanisms that induce persister formation are not fully understood. In this study, we find that salicylate can induce persister formation in Escherichia coli via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Salicylate-induced ROS cause a decrease in the membrane potential, reduce metabolism and lead to an increase in persistence. These effects can be recovered by culturing cells in the presence of a ROS quencher or in an anaerobic environment. Our findings reveal that salicylate-induced oxidative stress can lead to persistence, suggesting that ROS, and their subsequent impact on membrane potential and metabolism, may play a broad role in persister formation. PMID:28281556

  13. Combination of culture-independent and culture-dependent molecular methods for the determination of bacterial community of iru, a fermented Parkia biglobosa seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewumi, Gbenga A; Oguntoyinbo, Folarin A; Keisam, Santosh; Romi, Wahengbam; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    In this study, bacterial composition of iru produced by natural, uncontrolled fermentation of Parkia biglobosa seeds was assessed using culture-independent method in combination with culture-based genotypic typing techniques. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed similarity in DNA fragments with the two DNA extraction methods used and confirmed bacterial diversity in the 16 iru samples from different production regions. DNA sequencing of the highly variable V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes obtained from PCR-DGGE identified species related to Bacillus subtilis as consistent bacterial species in the fermented samples, while other major bands were identified as close relatives of Staphylococcus vitulinus, Morganella morganii, B. thuringiensis, S. saprophyticus, Tetragenococcus halophilus, Ureibacillus thermosphaericus, Brevibacillus parabrevis, Salinicoccus jeotgali, Brevibacterium sp. and uncultured bacteria clones. Bacillus species were cultured as potential starter cultures and clonal relationship of different isolates determined using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) combined with 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR amplification, restriction analysis (ITS-PCR-RFLP), and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR). This further discriminated B. subtilis and its variants from food-borne pathogens such as B. cereus and suggested the need for development of controlled fermentation processes and good manufacturing practices (GMP) for iru production to achieve product consistency, safety quality, and improved shelf life.

  14. Combination of culture-independent and culture-dependent molecular methods for the determination of bacterial community of iru, a fermented Parkia biglobosa seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbenga Adedeji Adewumi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bacterial composition of iru produced by natural, uncontrolled fermentation of Parkia biglobosa seeds was assessed using culture-independent method in combination with culture-based genotypic typing techniques. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE revealed similarity in DNA fragments with the two DNA extraction methods used and confirmed bacterial diversity in the sixteen iru samples from different production regions. DNA sequencing of the highly variable V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes obtained from PCR-DGGE identified species related to Bacillus subtilis as consistent bacterial species in the fermented samples, while other major bands were identified as close relatives of Staphylococcus vitulinus, Morganella morganii, B. thuringiensis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Tetragenococcus halophilus, Ureibacillus thermosphaericus, Brevibacillus parabrevis, Salinicoccus jeotgali, Brevibacterium sp. and Uncultured bacteria clones. Bacillus species were cultured as potential starter cultures and clonal relationship of different isolates determined using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA combined with 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS PCR amplification, restriction analysis (ITS-PCR-RFLP and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR. This further discriminated Bacillus subtilis and its variants from food-borne pathogens such as Bacillus cereus and suggested the need for development of controlled fermentation processes and good manufacturing practices (GMP for iru production to achieve product consistency, safety quality and improved shelf life.

  15. The Molecular Bacterial Load Assay Replaces Solid Culture for Measuring Early Bactericidal Response to Antituberculosis Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtafya, Bariki; Phillips, Patrick P. J.; Hoelscher, Michael; Ntinginya, Elias N.; Kohlenberg, Anke; Rachow, Andrea; Rojas-Ponce, Gabriel; McHugh, Timothy D.; Heinrich, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the use of the molecular bacterial load (MBL) assay, for measuring viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum, in comparison with solid agar and liquid culture. The MBL assay provides early information on the rate of decline in bacterial load and has technical advantages over culture in either form. PMID:24871215

  16. Individual growth detection of bacterial species in an in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabenski, L; Maisch, T; Santarelli, F; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G

    2014-11-01

    Most in vitro studies on the antibacterial effects of antiseptics have used planktonic bacteria in monocultures. However, this study design does not reflect the in vivo situation in oral cavities harboring different bacterial species that live in symbiotic relationships in biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a simple in vitro polymicrobial model consisting of only three bacterial strains of different phases of oral biofilm formation to simulate in vivo oral conditions. Therefore, we studied the biofilm formation of Actinomyces naeslundii (An), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) on 96-well tissue culture plates under static anaerobic conditions using artificial saliva according to the method established by Pratten et al. that was supplemented with 1 g l(-1) sucrose. Growth was separately determined for each bacterial strain after incubation periods of up to 72 h by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and live/dead staining. Presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) was visualized by Concanavalin A staining. Increasing incubation times of up to 72 h showed adhesion and propagation of the bacterial strains with artificial saliva formulation. An and Ef had significantly higher growth rates than Fn. Live/dead staining showed a median of 49.9 % (range 46.0-53.0 %) of living bacteria after 72 h of incubation, and 3D fluorescence microscopy showed a three-dimensional structure containing EPS. An in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model was established to better simulate oral conditions and had the advantage of providing the well-controlled experimental conditions of in vitro testing.

  17. Bacterial species and their associations with acute and chronic mastitis in suckler ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E M; Willis, Z N; Blakeley, M; Lovatt, F; Purdy, K J; Green, L E

    2015-10-01

    Acute mastitis in suckler ewes is often detected because of systemic signs such as anorexia or lameness, whereas chronic mastitis, characterized by intramammary abscesses with no systemic disease, is typically detected when ewes are inspected before mating. The aims of the current study were to identify the species and strains of culturable bacteria associated with acutely diseased, chronically diseased, and unaffected mammary glands to investigate whether species and strains vary by state. To investigate acute mastitis, 28 milk samples were obtained from both glands of 14 ewes with acute mastitis in one gland only. To investigate chronic mastitis, 16 ovine udders were obtained from 2 abattoirs; milk was aspirated from the 32 glands where possible, and the udders were sectioned to expose intramammary abscesses, which were swab sampled. All milk and swab samples were cultured aerobically. In total, 37 bacterial species were identified, 4 from acute mastitis, 26 from chronic mastitis, and 8 from apparently healthy glands. In chronic mastitis, the overall coincidence index of overlap of species detected in intramammary abscesses and milk was 0.60, reducing to 0.36 within individual glands, indicating a high degree of species overlap in milk and abscesses overall, but less overlap within specific glands. Staphylococcus aureus was detected frequently in all sample types; it was isolated from 10/14 glands with acute mastitis. In 5 ewes, closely related strains were present in both affected and unaffected glands. In chronic mastitis, closely related Staphylococcus aureus strains were detected in milk and abscesses from the same gland. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diversity, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of culturable bacterial endophyte communities in Aloe vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsanya, Mushafau Adewale; Goh, Joo Kheng; Lim, Siew Ping; Ting, Adeline Su Yien

    2015-12-01

    Twenty-nine culturable bacterial endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized tissues (root, stem and leaf) of Aloe vera and molecularly characterized to 13 genera: Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Pantoea, Chryseobacterium, Sphingobacterium, Aeromonas, Providencia, Cedecea, Klebsiella, Cronobacter, Macrococcus and Shigella. The dominant genera include Bacillus (20.7%), Pseudomonas (20.7%) and Enterobacter (13.8%). The crude and ethyl acetate fractions of the metabolites of six isolates, species of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Chryseobacterium and Shigella, have broad spectral antimicrobial activities against pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pyogenes and Candida albicans, with inhibition zones ranging from 6.0 ± 0.57 to 16.6 ± 0.57 mm. In addition, 80% of the bacterial endophytes produced 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) with scavenging properties of over 75% when their crude metabolites were compared with ascorbic acid (92%). In conclusion, this study revealed for the first time the endophytic bacteria communities from A. vera (Pseudomonas hibiscicola, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Enterobacter ludwigii, Bacillus anthracis) that produce bioactive compounds with high DPPH scavenging properties (75-88%) and (Bacillus tequilensis, Pseudomonas entomophila, Chryseobacterium indologenes, Bacillus aerophilus) that produce bioactive compounds with antimicrobial activities against bacterial pathogens. Hence, we suggest further investigation and characterization of their bioactive compounds.

  19. Isolation and characterization of culturable seed-associated bacterial endophytes from gnotobiotically grown Marama bean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimwamurombe, Percy Maruwa; Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Marama bean (Tylosema esculentum) is an indigenous non-nodulating legume to the arid agro-ecological parts of Southern Africa. It is a staple food for the Khoisan and Bantu people from these areas. It is intriguing how it is able to synthesize the high-protein content in the seeds since its natural habitat is nitrogen deficient. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of seed transmittable bacterial endophytes that may have growth promoting effects, which may be particularly important for the harsh conditions. Marama bean seeds were surface sterilized and gnotobiotically grown to 2 weeks old seedlings. From surface-sterilized shoots and roots, 123 distinct bacterial isolates were cultured using three media, and identified by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Phylogenetic analyses of 73 putative endophytes assigned them to bacterial species from 14 genera including Proteobacteria (Rhizobium, Massilia, Kosakonia, Pseudorhodoferax, Caulobacter, Pantoea, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium), Firmicutes (Bacillus), Actinobacteria (Curtobacterium, Microbacterium) and Bacteroidetes (Mucilaginibacter, Chitinophaga). Screening for plant growth-promoting activities revealed that the isolates showed production of IAA, ACC deaminase, siderophores, endoglucanase, protease, AHLs and capacities to solubilize phosphate and fix nitrogen. This is the first report that marama bean seeds may harbor endophytes that can be cultivated from seedlings; in this community of bacteria, physiological characteristics that are potentially plant growth promoting are widespread.

  20. Non-random species loss in bacterial communities reduces antifungal volatile production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, W H Gera; Garbeva, Paolina; Hordijk, Cornelis; Hundscheid, P J; Gunnewiek, Paulien J A Klein; Van Agtmaal, Maaike; Kuramae, Eiko E; De Boer, Wietse

    2015-08-01

    The contribution of low-abundance microbial species to soil ecosystems is easily overlooked because there is considerable overlap between metabolic abilities (functional redundancy) of dominant and subordinate microbial species. Here we studied how loss of less abundant soil bacteria affected the production of antifungal volatiles, an important factor in the natural control of soil-borne pathogenic fungi. We provide novel empirical evidence that the loss of soil bacterial species leads to a decline in the production of volatiles that suppress root pathogens. By using dilution-to-extinction for seven different soils we created bacterial communities with a decreasing number of species and grew them under carbon-limited conditions. Communities with high bacterial species richness produced volatiles that strongly reduced the hyphal growth of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. For most soil origins loss of bacterial species resulted in loss of antifungal volatile production. Analysis of the volatiles revealed that several known antifungal compounds were only produced in the more diverse bacterial communities. Our results suggest that less abundant bacterial species play an important role in antifungal volatile production by soil bacterial communities and, consequently, in the natural suppression of soil-borne pathogens.

  1. Polyphasic Approach to Bacterial Dynamics during the Ripening of Spanish Farmhouse Cheese, Using Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods▿

    OpenAIRE

    Martín-Platero, Antonio M.; Valdivia, Eva; Maqueda, Mercedes; Martín-Sánchez,Inés; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of the microbial population during ripening of Cueva de la Magahá cheese using a combination of classical and molecular techniques. Samples taken during ripening of this Spanish goat's milk cheese in which Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus were used as starter cultures were analyzed. All bacterial isolates were clustered by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, species-specific PCR, and multiplex PCR...

  2. Universal Probe Library based real-time PCR for rapid detection of bacterial pathogens from positive blood culture bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Ding-Xia; Zhou, Qiming; Liu, Chao-Jun; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2014-03-01

    A set of real-time PCR based assays using the locked nucleic acid probes from Roche Universal ProbeLibrary were developed for rapid detection of eight bacterial species from positive blood culture bottles. Four duplex real-time PCR reactions targeting to one Gram-positive bacterium and one Gram-negative bacterium were optimized for species identification according to Gram stain results. We also included mecA-specific primers and probes in the assays to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The analytical sensitivity was in the range of 1-10 CFU per PCR reaction mixture. The specificity and cross reactivity of the assay was validated by 28 ATCC reference strains and 77 negative blood culture specimens. No cross-reactivity was observed in these samples thus demonstrating 100 % specificity. 72 previously characterized clinical isolates were tested by the real-time PCR assay and validated the accuracy and feasibility of the real-time PCR assay. Furthermore, 55 positive blood culture samples were tested using real-time PCR and 50 (90.9 %) of them were identified as the same species as judged by biochemical analysis. In total, real-time PCR showed 98.2 % consistent to that of traditional methods. Real-time PCR can be used as a supplement for early detection of the frequently-occurred pathogens from the positive blood cultures.

  3. Diversity of Vaginal Lactic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in 15 Algerian Pregnant Women with and without Bacterial Vaginosis by using Culture Independent Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioua, Souad; Abdi, Akila; Fhoula, Imène; Bringel, Françoise; Boudabous, Abdelatif; Ouzari, Imene Hadda

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is the most common lower genital tract disorder among women of reproductive age (pregnant and non-pregnant) and a better knowledge of Lactobacillus species richness in healthy and infected vaginal microbiota is needed to efficiently design better probiotic products to promote the maintenance of normal flora which will help prevent bacterial vaginosis. To evaluate and compare the diversity of lactic acid bacterial species in pregnant women with and without BV. A pilot study was carried out during November-2014 to March-2015 in University Badji Mokhtar, Annaba, Algeria. Vaginal swabs were collected from 15 pregnant women aged between 19 and 35 years (mean 27.6 years; n=15) living in the East of Algeria visiting Gynecology service, hospital Abdallah Nouaouria- El bouni, Annaba. Vaginal samples were gram-stained, and scored by the Nugent method. The cohort included cases of women with healthy "normal" vaginal flora, infected flora with bacterial vaginosis and women with "intermediate" flora. The vaginal LAB community from pregnant women was identified by culture independent method based on Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), with the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A majority of LAB affiliated to the genus Lactobacillus was found in "normal" and "intermediate" flora (87.5% and 43.75% respectively), while a majority of LAB affiliated to the genus Enterococcus was identified in women with bacterial vaginosis and intermediate flora (60% and 46.75% respectively). Our results showed that the presence of Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus delbruekii promotes stability of the vaginal microbiota. This result confirms the findings of previous studies suggesting that the occurrence of predominant Lactobacillus negatively correlates with bacterial vaginosis incidence and their current use as probiotics. Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus delbruekii can be defined as critical for defense of the vagina. In addition, Enterococcus feacalis can be

  4. Reductive dechlorination of methoxychlor by bacterial species of environmental origin: evidence for primary biodegradation of methoxychlor in submerged environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsuma, Koji; Masuda, Minoru

    2012-02-29

    Methoxychlor [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane] is an organochlorine insecticide that undergoes dechlorination in natural submerged environments. We investigated the ability to dechlorinate this compound in seven environmental bacterial species ( Aeromonas hydrophila , Enterobacter amnigenus , Klebsiella terrigena , Bacillus subtilis , Achromobacter xylosoxidans , Acinetobacter calcoaceticus , and Mycobacterium obuense ) and the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli as a positive control. In R2A broth at 25 °C under aerobic, static culture, all species except Ach. xylosoxidans were observed to convert methoxychlor to dechlorinated methoxychlor [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane]. The medium was aerobic at first, but bacterial growth resulted in the consumption of oxygen and generated microaerobic and weakly reductive conditions. Replacement of the headspace of the culture tubes with nitrogen gas was found to decrease the dechlorination rate. Our findings suggest that extensive bacterial species ubiquitously inhabiting the subsurface water environment play an important role in the primary dechlorination of methoxychlor.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolates directly from spiked blood culture media with Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekter, H E; Orelio, C C; Morsink, M C; Tektas, S; Vis, B; Te Witt, R; van Leeuwen, W B

    2017-01-01

    Patients suffering from bacterial bloodstream infections have an increased risk of developing systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which can result in rapid deterioration of the patients' health. Diagnostic methods for bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests are time-consuming. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy would be able to rapidly provide an antimicrobial susceptibility profile from bacteria isolated directly from positive blood cultures. First, bacterial strains (n = 133) were inoculated in tryptic soy broth and incubated in the presence or absence of antibiotics for 5 h. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Subsequently, a selection of strains was isolated from blood cultures and analyzed similarly. VITEK®2 technology and broth dilution were used as the reference methods. Raman spectra from 67 antibiotic-susceptible strains showed discriminatory spectra in the absence or at low concentrations of antibiotics as compared to high antibiotic concentrations. For 66 antibiotic-resistant strains, no antimicrobial effect was observed on the bacterial Raman spectra. Full concordance with VITEK®2 data and broth dilution was obtained for the antibiotic-susceptible strains, 68 % and 98 %, respectively, for the resistant strains. Discriminative antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) profiles were obtained for all bacterial strains isolated from blood cultures, resulting in full concordance with the VITEK®2 data. It can be concluded that Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial species isolated from a positive blood culture bottle within 5 h. Although Raman spectroscopy is cheap and rapid, further optimization is required, to fulfill a great promise for future AST profiling technology development.

  6. Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Based on Secreted, Species-Specific, Bacterial Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shih-Jung; Tapley, Asa; Adamson, John; Little, Tessa; Urbanowski, Michael; Cohen, Keira; Pym, Alexander; Almeida, Deepak; Dorasamy, Afton; Layre, Emilie; Young, David C; Singh, Ravesh; Patel, Vinod B; Wallengren, Kristina; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Moody, D Branch; Bishai, William

    2015-12-01

    Improved biomarkers are needed for tuberculosis. To develop tests based on products secreted by tubercle bacilli that are strictly associated with viability, we evaluated 3 bacterial-derived, species-specific, small molecules as biomarkers: 2 mycobactin siderophores and tuberculosinyladenosine. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrated the presence of 1 or both mycobactins and/or tuberculosinyladenosine in serum and whole lung tissues from infected mice and sputum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or lymph nodes from infected patients but not uninfected controls. Detection of the target molecules distinguished host infection status in 100% of mice with both serum and lung as the target sample. In human subjects, we evaluated detection of the bacterial small molecules (BSMs) in multiple body compartments in 3 patient cohorts corresponding to different forms of tuberculosis. We detected at least 1 of the 3 molecules in 90%, 71%, and 40% of tuberculosis patients' sputum, CSF, and lymph node samples, respectively. In paucibacillary forms of human tuberculosis, which are difficult to diagnose even with culture, detection of 1 or more BSM was rapid and compared favorably to polymerase chain reaction-based detection. Secreted BSMs, detectable in serum, warrant further investigation as a means for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with tuberculosis.

  7. Crustose coralline algal species host distinct bacterial assemblages on their surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Jennifer M; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Paul, Valerie J

    2015-11-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are important components of many marine ecosystems. They aid in reef accretion and stabilization, create habitat for other organisms, contribute to carbon sequestration and are important settlement substrata for a number of marine invertebrates. Despite their ecological importance, little is known about the bacterial communities associated with CCA or whether differences in bacterial assemblages may have ecological implications. This study examined the bacterial communities on four different species of CCA collected in Belize using bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA. CCA were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Actinomycetes. At the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level, each CCA species had a unique bacterial community that was significantly different from all other CCA species. Hydrolithon boergesenii and Titanoderma prototypum, CCA species that facilitate larval settlement in multiple corals, had higher abundances of OTUs related to bacteria that inhibit the growth and/or biofilm formation of coral pathogens. Fewer coral larvae settle on the surfaces of Paragoniolithon solubile and Porolithon pachydermum. These CCA species had higher abundances of OTUs related to known coral pathogens and cyanobacteria. Coral larvae may be able to use the observed differences in bacterial community composition on CCA species to assess the suitability of these substrata for settlement and selectively settle on CCA species that contain beneficial bacteria.

  8. Evaluation of postmortem bacterial migration using culturing and real-time quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomisto, Sari; Karhunen, Pekka J; Vuento, Risto; Aittoniemi, Janne; Pessi, Tanja

    2013-07-01

    Postmortem bacteriology can be a valuable tool for evaluating deaths due to bacterial infection or for researching the involvement of bacteria in various diseases. In this study, time-dependent postmortem bacterial migration into liver, mesenteric lymph node, pericardial fluid, portal, and peripheral vein was analyzed in 33 autopsy cases by bacterial culturing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). None suffered or died from bacterial infection. According to culturing, pericardial fluid and liver were the most sterile samples up to 5 days postmortem. In these samples, multigrowth and staphylococci were not or rarely detected. RT-qPCR was more sensitive and showed higher bacterial positivity in all samples. Relative amounts of intestinal bacterial DNA (bifidobacteria, bacteroides, enterobacter, clostridia) increased with time. Sterility of blood samples was low during the studied time periods (1-7 days). The best postmortem microbiological sampling sites were pericardial fluid and liver up to 5 days after death.

  9. “Lachnoclostridium touaregense,” a new bacterial species isolated from the human gut microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    M. Tidjani Alou; S. Khelaifia; B. La Scola; Cassir, N.

    2016-01-01

    We report the main characteristics of “Lachnoclostridium touaregense” strain Marseille-P2415T (= CSUR P2415 = DSM 102219), a new bacterial species isolated from the gut microbiota of a healthy young girl from Niger.

  10. ‘Lachnoclostridium massiliosenegalense’, a new bacterial species isolated from the human gut microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    M. Tidjani Alou; J.-C. Lagier; B. La Scola; Cassir, N.

    2016-01-01

    We report the main characteristics of ‘Lachnoclostridium massiliosenegalense’ strain mt23T (=CSUR P299 =DSM 102084), a new bacterial species isolated from the gut microbiota of a healthy young girl from Senegal.

  11. Effects of Host Plant Factors on the Bacterial Communities Associated with Two Whitefly Sibling Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming-Ming; Guo, Lei; Tao, Yun-Li; Zhang, You-Jun; Wan, Fang-Hao; Chu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although discrepancy in the specific traits and ecological characteristics of Bemisia tabaci between species are partially attributed to the B. tabaci-associated bacteria, the factors that affect the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacteria are not well-understood. We used the metagenomic approach to characterize the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community because the approach is an effective tool to identify the bacteria. To investigate the effects of the host plant and a virus, tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), on the bacterial communities of B. tabaci sibling species B and Q, we analyzed the bacterial communities associated with whitefly B and Q collected from healthy cotton, healthy tomato, and TYLCV-infected tomato. The analysis used miseq-based sequencing of a variable region of the bacterial 16S rDNA gene. For the bacteria associated with B. tabaci, we found that the influence of the host plant species was greater than that of the whitefly cryptic species. With further analysis of host plants infected with the TYLCV, the virus had no significant effects on the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community. The effects of different plant hosts and TYLCV-infection on the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacterial communities were successfully analyzed in this study. To explain why B. tabaci sibling species with different host ranges differ in performance, the analysis of the bacterial community may be essential to the explanation.

  12. Confocal Raman microscopy for identification of bacterial species in biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Implemented through a confocal microscope, Raman spectroscopy has been used to distinguish between biofilm samples of two common oral bacteria species, Streptococcus sanguinis and mutans, which are associated with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Biofilms of these species are studied as a model of dental plaque. A prediction model has been calibrated and validated using pure biofilms. This model has been used to identify the species of transferred and dehydrated samples (much like a plaque scraping) as well as hydrated biofilms in situ. Preliminary results of confocal Raman mapping of species in an intact two-species biofilm will be shown.

  13. Anti-bacterial susceptibility patterns of blood culture isolates at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-bacterial susceptibility patterns of blood culture isolates at a referral ... their antimicrobial sensitivity patterns to guide anti-biotic prescription in these settings. ... higher growth rates occurring in the neonatal and paediatric age groups than ...

  14. Costs and benefits of bacterial culturing and pathogen reduction in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.P.; van der Poel, C.L.; Buskens, E.; Bonneux, L.; Bonsel, G.J.; van Hout, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial contamination is a life-threatening risk of blood transfusion, especially with platelet (PLT) transfusions. Bacterial culturing (BCU) of PLTs as well as pathogen reduction (PRT) reduce the likelihood of such contamination. The cost-effectiveness (CE) of these interventions was

  15. Analysis of bacterial community in bulking sludge using culture-dependent and -independent approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Decai Jin; Ping Wang; Zhihui Bai; Xinxin Wang; Hong Peng; Rong Qi; Zhisheng Yu; Guoqiang Zhuang

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial community of a bulking sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant with anoxic-anaerobic-oxic process was investigated by combination of cultivation and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis for understanding the causes of bulking.A total of 28 species were obtained from 63 isolates collected from six culture media.The most cultivable species belonged to γ-Proteobacteria including Klebsiella sp.,Pseudomonas sp.,Aeromonas sp.and Acinetobacter sp.Further analysis of these strains by repetitive sequence based on polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) technology showed that rep-PCR yielded discriminatory banding patterns within the same genus using REP and BOX primer sets.While the culture-independent assessment revealed that β-Proteobacteria was the dominant group in the bulking sample.Sequence analysis revealed that the highest proportion (14.7%) of operational taxonomic units was 98% similar to Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis,which is used to remove phosphorous from wastewater.Our results indicated that combining different approaches can produce complementary information,thus generate a more accurate view of microbial community in bulking sludge.

  16. Composition, richness and nonrandom assembly of culturable bacterial-microfungal communities in floral nectar of Mediterranean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Herrera, Carlos M

    2013-03-01

    The recent upsurge of interest in the role of floral nectar as a habitat for microorganisms has led to some detailed analyses of nectarivorous yeasts. In contrast, very little is known on the occurrence and diversity of nectar-dwelling bacteria, and bacterial-fungal interactions within nectar remain unexplored. In this work, we studied both the culturable bacteria and microfungi found in the floral nectar of wild Mediterranean plants. In general, bacteria and yeasts were found coexisting in nectar more often than would be expected by chance, and such positive association persisted after accounting for phylogenetic nonindependence of the plant species surveyed. Metschnikowia species were confirmed as the main fungal components of nectar communities, and Acinetobacter was identified as the main bacterial taxa. Finally, individual Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) were found to co-occur less frequently than predicted by random expectations. There existed, however, some pairwise associations between OTUs that seemed to account for the general pattern of positive bacteria-yeasts coexistence. We conclude that the culturable communities of nectar microorganisms associated with wild Mediterranean plants are nonrandom assemblages of bacterial and yeast species. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease in a comparative coral species framework.

    KAUST Repository

    Roder, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened throughout the world. A major factor contributing to their decline is outbreaks and propagation of coral diseases. Due to the complexity of coral-associated microbe communities, little is understood in terms of disease agents, hosts and vectors. It is known that compromised health in corals is correlated with shifts in bacterial assemblages colonizing coral mucus and tissue. However, general disease patterns remain, to a large extent, ambiguous as comparative studies over species, regions, or diseases are scarce. Here, we compare bacterial assemblages of samples from healthy (HH) colonies and such displaying signs of White Plague Disease (WPD) of two different coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) from the same reef in Koh Tao, Thailand, using 16S rRNA gene microarrays. In line with other studies, we found an increase of bacterial diversity in diseased (DD) corals, and a higher abundance of taxa from the families that include known coral pathogens (Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Vibrionaceae). In our comparative framework analysis, we found differences in microbial assemblages between coral species and coral health states. Notably, patterns of bacterial community structures from HH and DD corals were maintained over species boundaries. Moreover, microbes that differentiated the two coral species did not overlap with microbes that were indicative of HH and DD corals. This suggests that while corals harbor distinct species-specific microbial assemblages, disease-specific bacterial abundance patterns exist that are maintained over coral species boundaries.

  18. Bacterial community structure in the rhizosphere of three cactus species from semi-arid highlands in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Garrido, J Félix; Montiel-Lugo, Daniel; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Torres-Cortes, Gloria; Millán, Vicenta; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo C

    2012-05-01

    The nature reserve of Tehuacan-Cuicatlan in central Mexico is known for its diversity and endemism mainly in cactus plants. Although the xerophytic flora is reasonably documented, the bacterial communities associated with these species have been largely neglected. We assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities in bulk (non-rhizospheric) soil and the rhizosphere of three cactus plant species: Mammillaria carnea, Opuntia pilifera and Stenocereus stellatus, approached using cultivation and molecular techniques, considering the possible effect of dry and rainy seasons. Cultivation-dependent methods were focused on putative N(2)-fixers and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria, in the two media tested the values obtained for dry season samples grouped together regardless of the sample type (rhizospheric or non-rhizospheric), these groups also included the non-rhizospheric sample for rainy season, on each medium. These CFU values were smaller and significantly different from those obtained on rhizospheric samples from rainy season. Genera composition among isolates of the rhizospheric samples was very similar for each season, the most abundant taxa being α-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Interestingly, the genus Ochrobactrum was highly represented among rhizospheric samples, when cultured in N-free medium. The structure of the bacterial communities was approached with molecular techniques targeting partial 16S rRNA sequences such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and serial analysis of ribosomal sequence tags. Under these approaches, the most represented bacterial phyla were Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The first two were also highly represented when using isolation techniques.

  19. Interactions between Lactobacillus crispatus and Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)-Associated Bacterial Species in Initial Attachment and Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, António; Jefferson, Kimberly Kay; Cerca, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Certain anaerobic bacterial species tend to predominate the vaginal flora during bacterial vaginosis (BV), with Gardnerella vaginalis being the most common. However, the exact role of G. vaginalis in BV has not yet been determined. The main goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that G. vaginalis is an early colonizer, paving the way for intermediate (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum) and late colonizers (e.g., Prevotella bivia). Theoretically, in order to function as an early colonizer, species would need to be able to adhere to vaginal epithelium, even in the presence of vaginal lactobacilli. Therefore, we quantified adherence of G. vaginalis and other BV-associated bacteria to an inert surface pre-coated with Lactobacillus crispatus using a new Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. We found that G. vaginalis had the greatest capacity to adhere in the presence of L. crispatus. Theoretically, an early colonizer would contribute to the adherence and/or growth of additional species, so we next quantified the effect of G. vaginalis biofilms on the adherence and growth of other BV-associated species by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) technique. Interestingly, G. vaginalis derived a growth benefit from the addition of a second species, regardless of the species. Conversely, G. vaginalis biofilms enhanced the growth of P. bivia, and to a minor extent of F. nucleatum. These results contribute to our understanding of BV biofilm formation and the progression of the disorder. PMID:23739678

  20. Culturable bacterial diversity from the chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill. phyllosphere and antagonism against the fungi causing the chestnut blight and ink diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Valverde

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The phyllosphere supports a large and complex bacterial community that varies both across plant species and geographical locations. Phyllosphere bacteria can have important effects on plant health. The sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill. is an economically important tree species affected worldwide by the fungal pathogens Cryphonectria parasitica and Phytophthora cinnamomi. We examined the culturable phyllosphere bacterial community of the sweet chestnut at two nearby locations in Central Spain in order to know its geographical variability and to explore its potential as source of biological control agents against these two pathogenic fungi. The bacterial diversity at strain level was high but it varied significantly between locations; however, phylotype richness and diversity were more comparable. The isolates were affiliated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Most of them were members of recognized bacterial species, with a notable proportion of representative of the genera Dietzia and Lonsdalea, but a small fraction of the strains revealed the existence of several potential novel species or even genera. Antagonism tests showed the occurrence in the chestnut phyllosphere of bacterial strains potentially useful as biological control agents against the two pathogenic fungi, some of which belong to species never before described as fungal antagonists. Chestnut phyllosphere, therefore, contains a great diversity of culturable bacteria and may represent an untapped source of potential biocontrol agents against the fungi causing blight and ink diseases of this tree species.

  1. Evaluation of a PCR for detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in mixed bacterial cultures from tonsils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, T.; Ahrens, Peter; Nielsen, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    A PCR for the detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was evaluated. All of 102 field isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae reacted in the PCR by amplification of a 985 bp product. No PCR amplification product was observed when examining strains of A. ureae, A. capsulatus, A. hominis, A. equuli, A...... strains of A. lignieresii. The lower detection limit of the PCR test was 10(3) A. pleuropneumoniae CFU/PCR test tube and was not affected by addition of 10(6) E. coli CFU/PCR test tube. Mixed bacterial cultures from tonsils of 101 pigs from 9 different herds were tested by culture and by PCR using four...... mixed bacterial cultures. Tonsil cultures from 50 pigs from an A. pleuropneumoniae-negative herd did not react in the PCR. The results show that PCR on mixed bacterial cultures from tonsils may be a highly sensitive method for the detection of A. pleuropneumoniae in pig herds....

  2. Electrical response of culture media during bacterial growth on a paper-based device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimongkon, Tithimanan; Buerkle, Marius; Nakamura, Akira; Enomae, Toshiharu; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Fukuda, Nobuko

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we evaluated the feasibility of a paper-based bacterial detection system. The paper served as a substrate for the measurement electrodes and the culture medium. Using a printing technique, we patterned gold electrodes onto the paper substrate and applied Luria broth (LB) agar gel as a culture medium on top of the electrodes. As the first step towards the development of a bacterial detection system, we determined changes in the surface potential during bacterial growth and monitored these changes over 24 h. This allowed us to correlate changes in the surface potential with the different growth phases of the bacteria.

  3. Comparative Genomics of Facultative Bacterial Symbionts Isolated from European Orius Species Reveals an Ancestral Symbiotic Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorui Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pest control in agriculture employs diverse strategies, among which the use of predatory insects has steadily increased. The use of several species within the genus Orius in pest control is widely spread, particularly in Mediterranean Europe. Commercial mass rearing of predatory insects is costly, and research efforts have concentrated on diet manipulation and selective breeding to reduce costs and improve efficacy. The characterisation and contribution of microbial symbionts to Orius sp. fitness, behaviour, and potential impact on human health has been neglected. This paper provides the first genome sequence level description of the predominant culturable facultative bacterial symbionts associated with five Orius species (O. laevigatus, O. niger, O. pallidicornis, O. majusculus, and O. albidipennis from several geographical locations. Two types of symbionts were broadly classified as members of the genera Serratia and Leucobacter, while a third constitutes a new genus within the Erwiniaceae. These symbionts were found to colonise all the insect specimens tested, which evidenced an ancestral symbiotic association between these bacteria and the genus Orius. Pangenome analyses of the Serratia sp. isolates offered clues linking Type VI secretion system effector–immunity proteins from the Tai4 sub-family to the symbiotic lifestyle.

  4. Culturable bacterial microbiota of the stomach of Helicobacter pylori positive and negative gastric disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Yalda; Dieye, Yakhya; Poh, Bee Hoon; Ng, Chow Goon; Loke, Mun Fai; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2014-01-01

    Human stomach is the only known natural habitat of Helicobacter pylori (Hp), a major bacterial pathogen that causes different gastroduodenal diseases. Despite this, the impact of Hp on the diversity and the composition of the gastric microbiota has been poorly studied. In this study, we have analyzed the culturable gastric microbiota of 215 Malaysian patients, including 131 Hp positive and 84 Hp negative individuals that were affected by different gastric diseases. Non-Hp bacteria isolated from biopsy samples were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based biotyping and 16SrRNA sequencing. The presence of Hp did not significantly modify the diversity of the gastric microbiota. However, correlation was observed between the isolation of Streptococci and peptic ulcer disease. In addition, as a first report, Burkholderia pseudomallei was also isolated from the gastric samples of the local population. This study suggested that there may be geographical variations in the diversity of the human gastric microbiome. Geographically linked diversity in the gastric microbiome and possible interactions between Hp and other bacterial species from stomach microbiota in pathogenesis are proposed for further investigations.

  5. Culturable Bacterial Microbiota of the Stomach of Helicobacter pylori Positive and Negative Gastric Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human stomach is the only known natural habitat of Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a major bacterial pathogen that causes different gastroduodenal diseases. Despite this, the impact of Hp on the diversity and the composition of the gastric microbiota has been poorly studied. In this study, we have analyzed the culturable gastric microbiota of 215 Malaysian patients, including 131 Hp positive and 84 Hp negative individuals that were affected by different gastric diseases. Non-Hp bacteria isolated from biopsy samples were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based biotyping and 16SrRNA sequencing. The presence of Hp did not significantly modify the diversity of the gastric microbiota. However, correlation was observed between the isolation of Streptococci and peptic ulcer disease. In addition, as a first report, Burkholderia pseudomallei was also isolated from the gastric samples of the local population. This study suggested that there may be geographical variations in the diversity of the human gastric microbiome. Geographically linked diversity in the gastric microbiome and possible interactions between Hp and other bacterial species from stomach microbiota in pathogenesis are proposed for further investigations.

  6. Association between Lactobacillus species and bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria, and bacterial vaginosis scores in pregnant Japanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Hideto

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV, the etiology of which is still uncertain, increases the risk of preterm birth. Recent PCR-based studies suggested that BV is associated with complex vaginal bacterial communities, including many newly recognized bacterial species in non-pregnant women. Methods To examine whether these bacteria are also involved in BV in pregnant Japanese women, vaginal fluid samples were taken from 132 women, classified as normal (n = 98, intermediate (n = 21, or BV (n = 13 using the Nugent gram stain criteria, and studied. DNA extracted from these samples was analyzed for bacterial sequences of any Lactobacillus, four Lactobacillus species, and four BV-related bacteria by PCR with primers for 16S ribosomal DNA including a universal Lactobacillus primer, Lactobacillus species-specific primers for L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. gasseri, and L. iners, and BV-related bacterium-specific primers for BVAB2, Megasphaera, Leptotrichia, and Eggerthella-like bacterium. Results The prevalences of L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri were significantly higher, while those of BVAB2, Megasphaera, Leptotrichia, and Eggerthella-like bacterium were significantly lower in the normal group than in the BV group. Unlike other Lactobacillus species, the prevalence of L. iners did not differ between the three groups and women with L. iners were significantly more likely to have BVAB2, Megasphaera, Leptotrichia, and Eggerthella-like bacterium. Linear regression analysis revealed associations of BVAB2 and Megasphaera with Nugent score, and multivariate regression analyses suggested a close relationship between Eggerthella-like bacterium and BV. Conclusion The BV-related bacteria, including BVAB2, Megasphaera, Leptotrichia, and Eggerthella-like bacterium, are common in the vagina of pregnant Japanese women with BV. The presence of L. iners may be correlated with vaginal colonization by these BV-related bacteria.

  7. Influence Of Used Bacterial Culture On Zinc And Aluminium Bioleaching From Printed Circuit Boards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrazikova Anna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioleaching processes were used to solubilize metals (Cu, Ni, Zn and Al from printed circuit boards (PCBs. In this study, a PCBs-adapted pure culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, pure culture of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and PCBs-adapted mixed culture of A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans were used for recovery of the metals. The study showed that the mixed bacterial culture has the greatest potential to dissolve metals. The maximum metal bioleaching efficiencies were found to be 100, 92, 89 and 20% of Cu, Ni, Zn and Al, respectively. The mixed culture revealed higher bacterial stability. The main factor responsible for high metal recovery was the ability of the mixed culture to maintain the low pH during the whole process. The pure culture of A. thiooxidans had no significant effect on metal bioleaching from PCBs.

  8. Bacterial Contaminants of Poultry Meat: Sources, Species, and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, Amélie; Tresse, Odile; Zagorec, Monique

    2017-08-25

    With the constant increase in poultry meat consumption worldwide and the large variety of poultry meat products and consumer demand, ensuring the microbial safety of poultry carcasses and cuts is essential. In the present review, we address the bacterial contamination of poultry meat from the slaughtering steps to the use-by-date of the products. The different contamination sources are identified. The contaminants occurring in poultry meat cuts and their behavior toward sanitizing treatments or various storage conditions are discussed. A list of the main pathogenic bacteria of concern for the consumer and those responsible for spoilage and waste of poultry meat is established.

  9. Bacterial endophyte communities of three agricultural important grass species differ in their response towards management regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemheuer, Franziska; Kaiser, Kristin; Karlovsky, Petr; Daniel, Rolf; Vidal, Stefan; Wemheuer, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are critical for plant growth and health. However, compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophyte communities towards agricultural practices are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed the influence of fertilizer application and mowing frequency on bacterial endophytes in three agriculturally important grass species. For this purpose, we examined bacterial endophytic communities in aerial plant parts of Dactylis glomerata L., Festuca rubra L., and Lolium perenne L. by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes over two consecutive years. Although management regimes influenced endophyte communities, observed responses were grass species-specific. This might be attributed to several bacteria specifically associated with a single grass species. We further predicted functional profiles from obtained 16S rRNA data. These profiles revealed that predicted abundances of genes involved in plant growth promotion or nitrogen metabolism differed between grass species and between management regimes. Moreover, structural and functional community patterns showed no correlation to each other indicating that plant species-specific selection of endophytes is driven by functional rather than phylogenetic traits. The unique combination of 16S rRNA data and functional profiles provided a holistic picture of compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophytes in agricultural relevant grass species towards management practices. PMID:28102323

  10. Bacterial endophyte communities of three agricultural important grass species differ in their response towards management regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemheuer, Franziska; Kaiser, Kristin; Karlovsky, Petr; Daniel, Rolf; Vidal, Stefan; Wemheuer, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are critical for plant growth and health. However, compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophyte communities towards agricultural practices are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed the influence of fertilizer application and mowing frequency on bacterial endophytes in three agriculturally important grass species. For this purpose, we examined bacterial endophytic communities in aerial plant parts of Dactylis glomerata L., Festuca rubra L., and Lolium perenne L. by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes over two consecutive years. Although management regimes influenced endophyte communities, observed responses were grass species-specific. This might be attributed to several bacteria specifically associated with a single grass species. We further predicted functional profiles from obtained 16S rRNA data. These profiles revealed that predicted abundances of genes involved in plant growth promotion or nitrogen metabolism differed between grass species and between management regimes. Moreover, structural and functional community patterns showed no correlation to each other indicating that plant species-specific selection of endophytes is driven by functional rather than phylogenetic traits. The unique combination of 16S rRNA data and functional profiles provided a holistic picture of compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophytes in agricultural relevant grass species towards management practices.

  11. Arthrobacter Species as a Prey Cell Reservoir for Nonobligate Bacterial Predators in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    species as a prey cell reservoir for nonobligate bacterial predators in soil. Can. J. Microbiol. 35 : 559--564, tine investigation at etc entreprise sur...8217 .Stieprom tice ~s species and Bad//uhs instead of’ A. glohifrbrmis. to provide 1 .0 mng/g soil did not nivoie from the soil did not interfecre because

  12. A new mathematical model of bacterial interactions in two-species oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bénédicte; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Bronsard, Julie; Ginguené, Franck; Meuric, Vincent; Mahé, Fabrice; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis are bacterial inflammatory diseases, where the bacterial biofilms present on the tooth-supporting tissues switch from a healthy state towards a pathogenic state. Among bacterial species involved in the disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis has been shown to induce dysbiosis, and to induce virulence of otherwise healthy bacteria like Streptococcus gordonii. During biofilm development, primary colonizers such as S. gordonii first attach to the surface and allow the subsequent adhesion of periodontal pathogens such as P. gingivalis. Interactions between those two bacteria have been extensively studied during the adhesion step of the biofilm. The aim of the study was to understand interactions of both species during the growing phase of the biofilm, for which little knowledge is available, using a mathematical model. This two-species biofilm model was based on a substrate-dependent growth, implemented with damage parameters, and validated thanks to data obtained on experimental biofilms. Three different hypothesis of interactions were proposed and assayed using this model: independence, competition between both bacteria species, or induction of toxicity by one species for the other species. Adequacy between experimental and simulated biofilms were found with the last hypothetic mathematical model. This new mathematical model of two species bacteria biofilms, dependent on different substrates for growing, can be applied to any bacteria species, environmental conditions, or steps of biofilm development. It will be of great interest for exploring bacterial interactions in biofilm conditions.

  13. A new mathematical model of bacterial interactions in two-species oral biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bénédicte; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Bronsard, Julie; Ginguené, Franck; Meuric, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis are bacterial inflammatory diseases, where the bacterial biofilms present on the tooth-supporting tissues switch from a healthy state towards a pathogenic state. Among bacterial species involved in the disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis has been shown to induce dysbiosis, and to induce virulence of otherwise healthy bacteria like Streptococcus gordonii. During biofilm development, primary colonizers such as S. gordonii first attach to the surface and allow the subsequent adhesion of periodontal pathogens such as P. gingivalis. Interactions between those two bacteria have been extensively studied during the adhesion step of the biofilm. The aim of the study was to understand interactions of both species during the growing phase of the biofilm, for which little knowledge is available, using a mathematical model. This two-species biofilm model was based on a substrate-dependent growth, implemented with damage parameters, and validated thanks to data obtained on experimental biofilms. Three different hypothesis of interactions were proposed and assayed using this model: independence, competition between both bacteria species, or induction of toxicity by one species for the other species. Adequacy between experimental and simulated biofilms were found with the last hypothetic mathematical model. This new mathematical model of two species bacteria biofilms, dependent on different substrates for growing, can be applied to any bacteria species, environmental conditions, or steps of biofilm development. It will be of great interest for exploring bacterial interactions in biofilm conditions. PMID:28253369

  14. Comparative molecular analysis of bacterial species associated with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Iuliis, V; Ursi, S; Di Tommaso, L M; Caruso, M; Marino, A; D Ercole, S; Caputi, S; Sinjari, B; Festa, F; Macri, M; Martinotti, S; Vitullo, G; Toniato, E

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disorder affecting the supporting teeth structures, including gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing loss of connective tissue, reabsorption of alveolar bone and formation of periodontal pockets. The aim of this study is to find a correlation between bacterial growth and periodontal disease. Fifty-seven patients aged between 21 and 65 years, median age 46 years, were enrolled. According to gingival pocket depth, ranging from 3 to 7 mm, patients were divided into two groups: the first (30 patients, 53%) with deep pockets ³ 5 mm and the second (27 patients, 47%) less than 5 mm. The samples taken were processed for microbiological analysis by absolute quantitative real-time Taq-Man technique. Patients affected by periodontal disease were 32 (56%) and patients with gingival bleeding were 35 (61%). This data showed that the presence, the type and the bacterial load in gingival pockets were strongly correlated with gingival depth, periodontal disease and gingival bleeding. Quantitative microbiological analysis is a key point to improve patient compliance, allowing to choose the specific antibiotic treatment. avoiding antibiotic resistance and ensuring the successful outcome of therapy for periodontal disease.

  15. Multi-species bacterial biofilm and intracellular infection in otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornton Ruth B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria which are metabolically active yet unable to be cultured and eradicated by antibiotic treatment are present in the middle ear effusion of children with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME and recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM. These observations are suggestive of biofilm presence or intracellular sequestration of bacteria and may play a role in OM pathogenesis. The aim of this project is to provide evidence for the presence of otopathogenic bacteria intracellularly or within biofilm in the middle ear mucosa of children with COME or rAOM. Methods Middle ear mucosal biopsies from 20 children with COME or rAOM were examined for otopathogenic bacteria (either in biofilm or located intracellularly using transmission electron microscopy (TEM or species specific fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. One healthy control biopsy from a child undergoing cochlear implant surgery was also examined. Results No bacteria were observed in the healthy control sample. In 2 of the 3 biopsies imaged using TEM, bacteria were observed in mucus containing vacuoles within epithelial cells. Bacterial species within these could not be identified and biofilm was not observed. Using FISH with CLSM, bacteria were seen in 15 of the 17 otitis media mucosal specimens. In this group, 11 (65% of the 17 middle ear mucosal biopsies showed evidence of bacterial biofilm and 12 demonstrated intracellular bacteria. 52% of biopsies were positive for both biofilm and intracellular bacteria. At least one otopathogen was identified in 13 of the 15 samples where bacteria were present. No differences were observed between biopsies from children with COME and those with rAOM. Conclusion Using FISH and CLSM, bacterial biofilm and intracellular infection with known otopathogens are demonstrated on/in the middle ear mucosa of children with COME and/or rAOM. While their role in disease pathogenesis remains to be

  16. Transcriptional responses of Treponema denticola to other oral bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Juni; McHardy, Ian H; Simanian, Emil J; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-01-01

    The classic organization by Socransky and coworkers categorized the oral bacteria of the subgingival plaque into different complexes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are grouped into the red complex that is highly correlated with periodontal disease. Socransky's work closely associates red with orange complex species such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia but not with members of the other complexes. While the relationship between species contained by these complexes is in part supported by their ability to physically attach to each other, the physiological consequences of these interactions and associations are less clear. In this study, we employed T. denticola as a model organism to analyze contact-dependent responses to interactions with species belonging to the same complex (P. gingivalis and T. forsythia), the closely associated orange complex (using F. nucleatum and P. intermedia as representatives) and the unconnected yellow complex (using Streptococcus sanguinis and S. gordonii as representatives). RNA was extracted from T. denticola alone as well as after pairwise co-incubation for 5 hrs with representatives of the different complexes, and the respective gene expression profiles were determined using microarrays. Numerous genes related to motility, metabolism, transport, outer membrane and hypothetical proteins were differentially regulated in T. denticola in the presence of the tested partner species. Further analysis revealed a significant overlap in the affected genes and we identified a general response to the presence of other species, those specific to two of the three complexes as well as individual complexes. Most interestingly, many predicted major antigens (e.g. flagella, Msp, CTLP) were suppressed in responses that included red complex species indicating that the presence of the most closely associated species induces immune-evasive strategies. In summary, the data presented here provide

  17. Transcriptional responses of Treponema denticola to other oral bacterial species.

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    Juni Sarkar

    Full Text Available The classic organization by Socransky and coworkers categorized the oral bacteria of the subgingival plaque into different complexes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are grouped into the red complex that is highly correlated with periodontal disease. Socransky's work closely associates red with orange complex species such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia but not with members of the other complexes. While the relationship between species contained by these complexes is in part supported by their ability to physically attach to each other, the physiological consequences of these interactions and associations are less clear. In this study, we employed T. denticola as a model organism to analyze contact-dependent responses to interactions with species belonging to the same complex (P. gingivalis and T. forsythia, the closely associated orange complex (using F. nucleatum and P. intermedia as representatives and the unconnected yellow complex (using Streptococcus sanguinis and S. gordonii as representatives. RNA was extracted from T. denticola alone as well as after pairwise co-incubation for 5 hrs with representatives of the different complexes, and the respective gene expression profiles were determined using microarrays. Numerous genes related to motility, metabolism, transport, outer membrane and hypothetical proteins were differentially regulated in T. denticola in the presence of the tested partner species. Further analysis revealed a significant overlap in the affected genes and we identified a general response to the presence of other species, those specific to two of the three complexes as well as individual complexes. Most interestingly, many predicted major antigens (e.g. flagella, Msp, CTLP were suppressed in responses that included red complex species indicating that the presence of the most closely associated species induces immune-evasive strategies. In summary, the data

  18. Association between Gallbladder Ultrasound Findings and Bacterial Culture of Bile in 70 Cats and 202 Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policelli Smith, R; Gookin, J L; Smolski, W; Di Cicco, M F; Correa, M; Seiler, G S

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial cholecystitis often is diagnosed by combination of gallbladder ultrasound (US) findings and positive results of bile culture. The value of gallbladder US in determining the likelihood of bile bacterial infection in cats and dogs with suspected biliary disease is unknown. To determine the value of gallbladder US in predicting bile bacterial culture results, identify most common bacterial isolates from bile, and describe complications after cholecystocentesis in cats and dogs with suspected hepatobiliary disease. Cats (70) and dogs (202) that underwent an abdominal US and submission of bile for culture were included in the study. A cross-sectional study design was used to determine the association of gallbladder US abnormalities and the results of bile cultures, and complications of cholecystocentesis. Abnormal gallbladder US had high sensitivity (96%) but low specificity (49%) in cats with positive and negative results of bile bacterial culture, respectively. Cats with normal gallbladder US findings were unlikely to have positive bile bacterial culture (negative predictive value of 96%). Gallbladder US had lower sensitivity (81%), specificity (31%), positive predictive value (20%), and negative predictive value (88%) in dogs. The most common bacterial isolates were of enteric origin, the prevalence being higher in cats. Incidence of complications after cholecystocentesis was 3.4%. Gallbladder US has a high negative predictive value for bile culture results in cats. This modality is less predictive of infection in dogs. Percutaneous US-guided cholecystocentesis has a low complication rate. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. A duplex PCR-based assay for measuring the amount of bacterial contamination in a nucleic acid extract from a culture of free-living protists.

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    Alan O Marron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cultures of heterotrophic protists often require co-culturing with bacteria to act as a source of nutrition. Such cultures will contain varying levels of intrinsic bacterial contamination that can interfere with molecular research and cause problems with the collection of sufficient material for sequencing. Measuring the levels of bacterial contamination for the purposes of molecular biology research is non-trivial, and can be complicated by the presence of a diverse bacterial flora, or by differences in the relative nucleic acid yield per bacterial or eukaryotic cell. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a duplex PCR-based assay that can be used to measure the levels of contamination from marine bacteria in a culture of loricate choanoflagellates. By comparison to a standard culture of known target sequence content, the assay can be used to quantify the relative proportions of bacterial and choanoflagellate material in DNA or RNA samples extracted from a culture. We apply the assay to compare methods of purifying choanoflagellate cultures prior to DNA extraction, to determine their effectiveness in reducing bacterial contamination. Together with measurements of the total nucleic acid concentration, the assay can then be used as the basis for determining the absolute amounts of choanoflagellate DNA or RNA present in a sample. CONCLUSIONS: The assay protocol we describe here is a simple and relatively inexpensive method of measuring contamination levels in nucleic acid samples. This provides a new way to establish quantification and purification protocols for molecular biology and genomics in novel heterotrophic protist species. Guidelines are provided to develop a similar protocol for use with any protistan culture. This assay method is recommended where qPCR equipment is unavailable, where qPCR is not viable because of the nature of the bacterial contamination or starting material, or where prior sequence information is insufficient

  20. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the bacterial microbiota of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) cultured in earthen ponds in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakingking, Rolando; Palma, Peter; Usero, Roselyn

    2015-02-01

    The quantity and composition of the bacterial microbiota in the rearing water, sediment, gills and intestines of tilapia Oreochromis niloticus collected every 2 weeks from Day 30 to Day 120 after stocking for grow-out culture in 6 earthen brackish water ponds in the Philippines were examined. The total heterotrophic aerobic bacterial counts obtained in the water, sediment, gills and intestines of tilapia ranged from 10(3) to 10(4) c.f.u. ml(-1), 10(3)-10(5), 10(5)-10(7) and 10(4)-10(7) c.f.u. g(-1), respectively. In terms of composition, a total of 20 bacterial genera and 31 species were identified with the preponderance of gram-negative bacteria constituting 84 % of all bacterial isolates examined. Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus spp., Plesiomonas shigelloides, Shewanella putrefaciens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Staphylococcus spp. and Vibrio cholerae were the dominant bacteria identified in the gills and intestine of tilapia. These bacteria also dominated in the pond sediment and rearing water, except for the nil isolation of S. putrefaciens and V. cholerae in the water samples examined, indicating that resident bacteria in the pond water and sediment congruently typify the composition of bacterial microbiota in the gills and intestine of tilapia which under stressful conditions may propel the ascendance of disease epizootics.

  1. Large scale MALDI-TOF MS based taxa identification to identify novel pigment producers in a marine bacterial culture collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafsnes, Marit H; Dybwad, Marius; Brunsvik, Anders; Bruheim, Per

    2013-03-01

    A challenge in the rational exploitation of microbial culture collections is to avoid superfluous testing of replicas. MALDI-TOF MS has been shown to be an efficient dereplication tool as it can be used to discriminate between bacterial isolates at the species level. A bacterial culture collection of more than 10,000 heterotrophic marine bacterial isolates from sea-water surface layers of the Norwegian Trondheimsfjord and neighbouring coastal areas has been established. A sub-collection of pigmented isolates was earlier screened for novel carotenoids with UVA-Blue light absorbing properties. This was a comprehensive analytical task and it was observed that a significant number of extracts with identical pigment profile were recovered. Hence, this study was undertaken to explore the use of MALDI-TOF MS as a dereplication tool to quickly characterize the bacterial collection. Furthermore, LC-DAD-MS analysis of pigment profiles was performed to check if pigment profile diversity was maintained among isolates kept after the potential MALDI-TOF MS selection step. Four hundred isolates comprising both pigmented and non-pigmented isolates were used for this study. The resulting MALDI-TOF MS dendrogram clearly identified a diversity of different taxa and these were supported by the pigment profile clustering, thus linking the pigment production as species-specific properties. Although one exception was found, it can be concluded that MALDI-TOF MS dereplication is a promising pre-screening tool for more efficient screening of microbial culture collection containing pigments with potential novel properties.

  2. Oral toxicity of bacterial toxins against thrips species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Visser, J.H.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The oral toxicity of excretion products of several Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus strains was tested on two thrips species: Frankliniella occidentalis and Thrips tabaci. Out of 46 Photorhabdus isolates and 6 Xenorhabdus isolates only 6 North American P. temperata isolates were toxic to the thrips spec

  3. Oral toxicity of bacterial toxins against thrips species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Visser, J.H.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The oral toxicity of excretion products of several Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus strains was tested on two thrips species: Frankliniella occidentalis and Thrips tabaci. Out of 46 Photorhabdus isolates and 6 Xenorhabdus isolates only 6 North American P. temperata isolates were toxic to the thrips

  4. Semen and urine culture in the diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Zegarra Montes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of semen and urine culture in the diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 70 consecutive men suspected of having chronic bacterial prostatitis along with 17 asymptomatic controls, we obtained urine and semen cultures followed 1 week later by the Meares and Stamey test, our reference standard. The interpretation of each of the cultures was blind to the results of other tests. RESULTS: 139 men were referred for evaluation of chronic bacterial prostatitis and 70 received all tests. Additionally, 17 control men volunteered to participate. The Meares and Stamey Test was positive in 69 (79% patients. The semen culture had a sensitivity of 45% and a specificity of 94%. The likelihood ratio associated with a positive semen culture was 8.1 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.2 to 55.3; the likelihood ratio associated with a negative semen culture was 0.6 (95% CI 0.5 to 0.7. The urine culture had a sensitivity of 4% and a specificity of 100%. The likelihood ratio of a positive urine culture was infinity and of a negative urine culture was 0.96 (95% CI 0.9 to 1. CONCLUSIONS: While a positive semen culture in a symptomatic patient may suffice to select and start antibiotic treatment against chronic bacterial prostatitis, a negative culture does not rule out the condition. Urine cultures alone are not useful for diagnosing CBP. The Meares and Stamey test remains important for the diagnosis of CBP in practice.

  5. Systematic determination of the mosaic structure of bacterial genomes: species backbone versus strain-specific loops

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    Gendrault-Jacquemard A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public databases now contain multitude of complete bacterial genomes, including several genomes of the same species. The available data offers new opportunities to address questions about bacterial genome evolution, a task that requires reliable fine comparison data of closely related genomes. Recent analyses have shown, using pairwise whole genome alignments, that it is possible to segment bacterial genomes into a common conserved backbone and strain-specific sequences called loops. Results Here, we generalize this approach and propose a strategy that allows systematic and non-biased genome segmentation based on multiple genome alignments. Segmentation analyses, as applied to 13 different bacterial species, confirmed the feasibility of our approach to discern the 'mosaic' organization of bacterial genomes. Segmentation results are available through a Web interface permitting functional analysis, extraction and visualization of the backbone/loops structure of documented genomes. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we performed a precise analysis of the mosaic organization of three E. coli strains and functional characterization of the loops. Conclusion The segmentation results including the backbone/loops structure of 13 bacterial species genomes are new and available for use by the scientific community at the URL: http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/mosaic.

  6. Effects of antibiotic on the bacterial microflora in two commercially important catfish species, Clarias batrachus and Heteropneustes fossilis in Bangladesh

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    Md. Shahdat Hossain

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effects of a widely used antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC on the bacterial microflora in two catfish species under artificial culture conditions in the laboratory. Methods: The experiment was conducted in the Faculty of Fisheries, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202. The fish were reared in six aquaria (size 37 cm×30 cm×60 cm where three aquaria served as replicates of the antibiotic treatment groups and the remaining three aquaria served as an untreated control group. Each aquarium was stocked with 25 fish on an average body weight 15 g. OTC was administered to the fish in the treatment groups at the rate of 2 g/kg in-feed twice daily upto ad libitum, whereas fish in the untreated control groups were given the same feed without antibiotics for 20 d. During the experiment, bacterial loads were estimated as colony forming unit (CFU/g by every alternate day in the aquarium water, gills, skin and intestine of fish. Results: The administration of OTC in feed resulted in gradual decrease of bacterial loads in the gills, intestine and skin of the two catfish species tested. In contrast, the bacterial loads remain unchanged or slightly increased in the control groups not fed with OTC. Water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH and total hardness were found to be within suitable range in the test aquaria but not in control aquarium throughout the experimental period. Conclusions: The results of this experiment showed that in-feed antibiotic OTC for a period of 20 d reduced the bacterial loads in the gills, intestines and skin of treated fish.

  7. Effects of antibiotic on the bacterial microflora in two commercially important catfish species, Clarias batrachus and Heteropneustes fossilis in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Shahdat Hossain; Md Rajib Sharker; Syed Ariful Haque; Md Shaheed Reza; Md Anwar Hossain Mondal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of a widely used antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC) on the bacterial microflora in two catfish species under artificial culture conditions in the laboratory. Methods:The experiment was conducted in the Faculty of Fisheries, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202. The fish were reared in six aquaria (size 37 cmí30 cmí60 cm) where three aquaria served as replicates of the antibiotic treatment groups and the remaining three aquaria served as an untreated control group. Each aquarium was stocked with 25 fish on an average body weight 15 g. OTC was administered to the fish in the treatment groups at the rate of 2 g/kg in-feed twice daily upto ad libitum, whereas fish in the untreated control groups were given the same feed without antibiotics for 20 d. During the experiment, bacterial loads were estimated as colony forming unit (CFU/g) by every alternate day in the aquarium water, gills, skin and intestine of fish. Results:The administration of OTC in feed resulted in gradual decrease of bacterial loads in the gills, intestine and skin of the two catfish species tested. In contrast, the bacterial loads remain unchanged or slightly increased in the control groups not fed with OTC. Water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH and total hardness were found to be within suitable range in the test aquaria but not in control aquarium throughout the experimental period. Conclusions:The results of this experiment showed that in-feed antibiotic OTC for a period of 20d reduced the bacterial loads in the gills, intestines and skin of treated fish.

  8. Application of methods for identifying broiler chicken gut bacterial species linked with increased energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Valeria A; Ophel-Keller, Kathy; Loo, Maylene; Hughes, Robert J

    2008-02-01

    A high-throughput microbial profiling tool based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was developed to monitor the poultry gut microbiota in response to dietary manipulations. Gut microbial communities from the duodena, jejuna, ilea, and ceca of 48 birds fed either a barley control diet or barley diet supplemented with exogenous enzymes for degrading nonstarch polysaccharide were characterized by using multivariate statistical methods. Analysis of samples showed that gut microbial communities varied significantly among gut sections, except between the duodenum and jejunum. Significant diet-associated differences in gut microbial communities were detected within the ileum and cecum only. The dissimilarity in bacterial community composition between diets was 73 and 66% within the ileum and cecum, respectively. Operational taxonomic units, representing bacterial species or taxonomically related groups, contributing to diet-associated differences were identified. Several bacterial species contributed to differences between diet-related gut microbial community composition, with no individual bacterial species contributing more than 1 to 5% of the total. Using canonical analysis of principal coordinates biplots, we correlated differences in gut microbial community composition within the ileum and cecum to improved performance, as measured by apparent metabolizable energy. This is the first report that directly links differences in the composition of the gut microbial community with improved performance, which implies that the presence of specific beneficial and/or absence of specific detrimental bacterial species may contribute to the improved performance in these birds.

  9. A highly precise and portable genome engineering method allows comparison of mutational effects across bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyerges, Ákos; Csörgő, Bálint; Nagy, István; Bálint, Balázs; Bihari, Péter; Lázár, Viktória; Apjok, Gábor; Umenhoffer, Kinga; Bogos, Balázs; Pósfai, György; Pál, Csaba

    2016-03-01

    Currently available tools for multiplex bacterial genome engineering are optimized for a few laboratory model strains, demand extensive prior modification of the host strain, and lead to the accumulation of numerous off-target modifications. Building on prior development of multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), our work addresses these problems in a single framework. Using a dominant-negative mutant protein of the methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) system, we achieved a transient suppression of DNA repair in Escherichia coli, which is necessary for efficient oligonucleotide integration. By integrating all necessary components into a broad-host vector, we developed a new workflow we term pORTMAGE. It allows efficient modification of multiple loci, without any observable off-target mutagenesis and prior modification of the host genome. Because of the conserved nature of the bacterial MMR system, pORTMAGE simultaneously allows genome editing and mutant library generation in other biotechnologically and clinically relevant bacterial species. Finally, we applied pORTMAGE to study a set of antibiotic resistance-conferring mutations in Salmonella enterica and E. coli. Despite over 100 million y of divergence between the two species, mutational effects remained generally conserved. In sum, a single transformation of a pORTMAGE plasmid allows bacterial species of interest to become an efficient host for genome engineering. These advances pave the way toward biotechnological and therapeutic applications. Finally, pORTMAGE allows systematic comparison of mutational effects and epistasis across a wide range of bacterial species.

  10. Comparison of main lactobacillus species between healthy women and women with bacterial vaginosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Dong-hui; L(U) Zhi; SU Jian-rong

    2009-01-01

    Background The normal microbial flora of the vagina plays an important role in preventing genital and urinary tract infections in women. Thus an accurate understanding of the composition and ecology of the ecosystem is important to understanding the etiology of these diseases. This study aimed to compare the characteristics of main lactobacillus species between healthy women and women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) by quantitative culture and PCR methods.Main lactobacillus species include L. Crispatus , L. Gassed, L. Jensenii and L. Iners.Methods A total of 150 Women attending Gynecology Outpatient Clinic of Beijing Friendship Hospital, were diagnosed as having BV because three or more of the following criteria were met (standard of Amsel's composite criteria):homogeneous discharge, elevated vaginal pH (pH >4.5), production of amines, and presence of "clue" cells. Those with less than three of the criteria were considered as healthy. Simultaneously, smears were made of vaginal fluid and Gram stained, then were assessed qualitatively as normal (grade Ⅰ), intermediate (grade Ⅱ), or consistent with BV (grade Ⅲ).Gardnerella vaginalis were identified by using Vitek 2 Compact and PCR methods. Lactobacillus species were identified by PCR methods. Gardnerella vaginalis and lactobacilli colony counts were determined by calculating the most number of colonies of each species in the appropriate plates (colonies between 10 and 300), corrected by the dilution of the sample in the plates, and multiplied by 10 (to account for plating 100 μl), in order to get colony forming units per milliliter of vaginal secretion.Results BV was diagnosed in 31% (46/150) patients using the composite criteria, the remainder being regarded as healthy. The majority of patients with BV had a smear assessed as grade Ⅲ (91%, 42/46) and minority of them had a smear assessed as grade Ⅱ (9%, 4/46). The majority of healthy women had a smear assessed as grade Ⅰ (64%, 67/104).Smears assessed as

  11. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase purified from an alkaline-stressed bacterial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rety, Stephane; Deschamps, Patrick; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Tryptophanase is a bacterial enzyme involved in the degradation of tryptophan to indole, pyruvate and ammonia, which are compounds that are essential for bacterial survival. Tryptophanase is often overexpressed in stressed cultures. Large amounts of endogenous tryptophanase were purified from Escherichia coli BL21 strain overexpressing another recombinant protein. Tryptophanase was crystallized in space group P6522 in the apo form without pyridoxal 5'-phosphate bound in the active site.

  12. Effect of species, breed, and age on bacterial load in bovine and bubaline semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrahas Sannat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of species, breed and age on bacterial load in fresh and frozen semen of Cattle and Buffalo bull. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 56 cow and 10 buffalo bulls stationed at Central Semen Station Anjora, Durg (Chhattisgarh. Impact of breeds on bacterial load in semen was assessed using six breeds of cattle viz. Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi, Tharparkar, Jersey and Holstein Friesian (HF cross. Cow bulls were categorized into four different groups based on their age ( 6 years to study variation among age groups. Bacterial load was measured in fresh and frozen semen samples from these bulls using the standard plate count (SPC method and count was expressed as colony forming unit (CFU per ml of semen. Results: Higher bacterial load was reported in fresh (2.36 × 104 ± 1943 CFU/ml and frozen (1.00 × 10 ± 90 CFU/ml semen of cow bulls as compared to buffalo bulls (1.95 × 104 ± 2882 and 7.75 × 102 ± 160 CFU/ml in fresh and frozen semen, respectively. Jersey bull showed significantly higher bacterial count (p < 0.05 both in fresh (4.07 × 104 ± 13927 CFU/ ml and frozen (1.92 × 103 ± 178 CFU/ml semen followed by HF cross, Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi and Tharparkar bull. Bulls aged < 4 years and more than 6 years yielded increased bacterial load in their semen. Although a minor variation was reported between species and among age groups, no significant differences were measured. Conclusion: Bacterial load in semen did not differ significantly between species and age groups; however significant variation was reported among different breeds. Bulls of Jersey breed showed significantly higher bacterial load in semen as compared to the crossbred and indigenous bull.

  13. Protist predation can favour cooperation within bacterial species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Diggle, Stephen P.; Buckling, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Here, we studied how protist predation affects cooperation in the opportunistic pathogen bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which uses quorum sensing (QS) cell-to-cell signalling to regulate the production of public goods. By competing wild-type bacteria with QS mutants (cheats), we show that a functioning QS system confers an elevated resistance to predation. Surprisingly, cheats were unable to exploit this resistance in the presence of cooperators, which suggests that resistance does not appear to result from activation of QS-regulated public goods. Instead, elevated resistance of wild-type bacteria was related to the ability to form more predation-resistant biofilms. This could be explained by the expression of QS-regulated resistance traits in densely populated biofilms and floating cell aggregations, or alternatively, by a pleiotropic cost of cheating where less resistant cheats are selectively removed from biofilms. These results show that trophic interactions among species can maintain cooperation within species, and have further implications for P. aeruginosa virulence in environmental reservoirs by potentially enriching the cooperative and highly infective strains with functional QS system. PMID:23945212

  14. Molecular characterization of some lignicolous species from fungal culture collection

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    Stević Nevena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture collections of microorganisms, including fungi, are strain deposits recognised as Biological Resource Centers (BRCs with a great importance in science, industry and education. Their objective is to preserve the purity, viability and genomic integrity of every single strain as a member of such collection. Since improvement of molecular methods nowadays brought many novel approaches in manipulation with strains of microorganisms, they can also be useful for characterization of existing stored strains. ITS1 region in nuclear DNA is preferred barcoding marker for taxon identification, which can be explained by its great inter-species variability. This paper presents results from analysing ITS1 region sequences (17 obtained from fungal DNA of culture collection of autochthonous, lignicolous genera Piptoporus, Pleurotus, Ganoderma and Schizophyllum cultured on malt agar plates for 14 days at 25°C. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool was used for comparison with online databases, while alignment of sequences was made with MEGA 5.10 software. Morphological determination of species or genus was confirmed for 13 cultures, while the others were disproved. The resulting alignment indicated small intra-species variability of ITS1 region and pointed to it as an ideal marker for verification of fungal culture collections' authenticity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43002 and by the Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development, Vojvodina, Serbia APV 114-4513592/2013-03: Molecular and phenotypic diversity of taxa of economical and epidemiological importance, and endangered and endemic species in Europe

  15. Gut bacterial community structure of two Australian tropical fruit fly species (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narit Thaochan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The community structure of the alimentary tract bacteria of two Australian fruit fly species, Bactrocera cacuminata (Hering and Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt, was studied using a molecular cloning method based on the 16S rRNA gene. Differences in the bacterial community structure were shown between the crops and midguts of the two species and sexes of each species. Proteobacteria was the dominant bacterial phylum in the flies, especially bacteria in the order Gammaproteobacteria which was prominent in all clones. The total bacterial community consisted of Proteobacteria (more than 75% of clones, except in the crop of B. cacuminata where more than 50% of clones belonged to Firmicutes. Firmicutes gave the number of the secondary community structure in the fly’s gut. Four orders, Alpha-, Beta-, Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria and the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were found in both fruit fly species, while the order Epsilonproteobacteria and the phylum Bacteroidetes were found only in B. tryoni. Two phyla, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes, were rare and less frequent in the flies. There was a greater diversity of bacteria in the crop of the two fruit fly species than in the midgut. The midgut of B. tryoni females and the midgut of B. cacuminata males had the lowest bacterial diversity.

  16. Identification of different bacterial species in biofilms using confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is used to discriminate between different species of bacteria grown in biofilms. Tests are performed using two bacterial species, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans, which are major components of oral plaque and of particular interest due to their association with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Dehydrated biofilms of these species are studied as a simplified model of dental plaque. A prediction model based on principal component analysis and logistic regression is calibrated using pure biofilms of each species and validated on pure biofilms grown months later, achieving 96% accuracy in prospective classification. When biofilms of the two species are partially mixed together, Raman-based identifications are achieved within ~2 μm of the boundaries between species with 97% accuracy. This combination of spatial resolution and predication accuracy should be suitable for forming images of species distributions within intact two-species biofilms.

  17. Anti-bacterial effect of Mentha spicata L. essential oil on eight standard species of gastrointestinal pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Majid Zare Bidaki; Mina Arab; Mohtarame Khazaei; Ehsan Afkar

    2014-01-01

    .... We aimed to study antibacterial effects of Mentha spicata L essential oil on 8 standard bacterial species including Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  18. Yeast and bacterial diversity along a transect in an acidic, As-Fe rich environment revealed by cultural approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavat, François; Lett, Marie-Claire; Lièvremont, Didier

    2013-10-01

    Acid mine drainages (AMDs) are often thought to harbour low biodiversity, yet little is known about the diversity distribution along the drainages. Using culture-dependent approaches, the microbial diversity from the Carnoulès AMD sediment was investigated for the first time along a transect showing progressive environmental stringency decrease. In total, 20 bacterial genera were detected, highlighting a higher bacterial diversity than previously thought. Moreover, this approach led to the discovery of 16 yeast species, demonstrating for the first time the presence of this important phylogenetic group in this AMD. All in all, the location of the microbes along the transect helps to better understand their distribution in a pollution gradient.

  19. Assessing variation in bacterial composition between the rhizospheres of two mangrove tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Newton C. M.; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; Pires, Ana C. C.; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Angela; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda C. S.; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to determine to what extent roots from the common mangrove tree species Avicennia schaueriana and Laguncularia racemosa are able to impose a selective force on the composition of sediment bacterial communities in mangrove intertidal sediments using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments (V4 hyper-variable region). The novel results showed that root systems of A. schaueriana and L. racemosa are associated with increased bacterial dominance, lower richness and compositional shifts of sediment bacterial communities. The proportion of OTUs (operational taxonomc units) belonging to the orders Rhizobiales and Vibrionales were enriched in rhizosphere samples from both plant species and sulphur-reducing bacteria (SRB) belonging to the order Desulfobacterales and Desulfuromonadales were enriched in the rhizosphere of A. schaueriana. In addition, Clostridium and Vibrio populations were more abundant in different mangrove rhizospheres. A. schaueriana and L. racemosa roots appear to be able to impose a selective force on the composition of mangrove sediment bacterial communities and this phenomenon appears to be plant species specific. Our findings provide new insights into the potential ecological roles of bacterial guilds in plant-microbe interactions and may aid rhizoengineering approaches for replanting impacted mangrove areas.

  20. Evaluation of Bacterial & Fungal Culture Practices in School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, J. Scott

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of activities may be undertaken in elementary and secondary school science laboratories as part of regular curricular activities or optional classroom activities, including science fair projects. Among these is the culturing of microorganisms such as bacteria or fungi. There are various potential educational opportunities associated…

  1. Bacterial diversity determination using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiasian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mud volcanoes are taken into consideration by geologists and oil industry experts have given their association with oil and gas reserves and methane greenhouse gas production in hydrosphere and atmosphere. Gomishan mud volcano phenomenon in the southeastern edge of the Caspian Sea, given its oil and gas resources, has been studied by some geologists in terms of geology and tectonics but not in terms of microbiology. Accordingly, it seems necessary to study this phenomenon from the perspective of microbiology in order to identify prokaryotes living in this area. Prokaryotes diversity in Mud volcano has been studied by cultivation techniques, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes. Total cell abundance in the mud volcano from 1×101-6×101per milliliter was determined by 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole direct count. The detectable proportion of Archaea to Bacteria in the community by FISH was one to five. High viable counts (1 – 3 × 106 were obtained in culture media. A total of 122 isolates were obtained, 46 colonies were selected based on primarily morphological and physiological traits, and their 16S rRNA sequences were determined. The isolated genera included Halomonas (20%, Arthrobacter (5%, Kocuria (5%, Thalassobacillus (5%, Marinobacter (20%, Paracoccus (5%, Roseovarius (5%, Jeotgalicoccus (5%, Bacillus (15%, and Staphylococcus (15%. Regarding DGGE analysis, selected bands were obtained from the gels, reamplified and sequenced. Overall, 75% of the bacterial sequences were related to Rahnella and 25% related to Serratia.

  2. ‘Tidjanibacter massiliensis’ gen. nov., sp. nov., a new bacterial species isolated from human colon

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    M. Mailhe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the summary of main characteristics of Tidjanibacter massiliensis strain Marseille-P3084T, a new bacterial species isolated from the liquid sample of the colon of a patient with a history of irritable bowel syndrome.

  3. Tissue culture of three species of Laurencia complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Songdong; Wu, Xunjian; Yan, Binlun; He, Lihong

    2010-05-01

    To establish a micropropagation system of three Laurencia complex species ( Laurencia okamurai, Laurencia tristicha, and Chondrophycus undulatus) by tissue culture techniques, we studied the regeneration characteristics and optimal culture conditions of axenic algal fragments cultured on solid medium and in liquid medium. Regeneration structures were observed and counted regularly under a reverse microscope to investigate the regeneration process, polarity and optimal illumination, and temperature and salinity levels. The results show that in most cultures of the three species, we obtained bud regeneration on solidified medium with 0.5% agar and in liquid medium. Rhizoid-like regeneration was filamentous and developed from the lower cut surface of fragments in L. okamurai, but was discoid and developed from the apical back side of bud regeneration in L. tristicha and C. undulatus. Regeneration polarity was localized to the apical part of algal fronds in all three species, and on fragments cut from the basal part of algae buds could develop from both the upper and the lower cut surfaces. Buds could develop from both the medullary and the cortical portions in L. okamurai and C. undulatus, while in L. tristicha, buds only emerged from the cortex. The optimal culture conditions for L. okamurai were 4 500 lx, 20°C and 35 (salinity); for C. undulatus, 4 500 lx, 20°C and 30; and for L. tristicha, 4 500 lx, 25°C and 30.

  4. Laboratory-Cultured Strains of the Sea Anemone Exaiptasia Reveal Distinct Bacterial Communities

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera Sarrias, Marcela

    2017-05-02

    Exaiptasia is a laboratory sea anemone model system for stony corals. Two clonal strains are commonly used, referred to as H2 and CC7, that originate from two genetically distinct lineages and that differ in their Symbiodinium specificity. However, little is known about their other microbial associations. Here, we examined and compared the taxonomic composition of the bacterial assemblages of these two symbiotic Exaiptasia strains, both of which have been cultured in the laboratory long-term under identical conditions. We found distinct bacterial microbiota for each strain, indicating the presence of host-specific microbial consortia. Putative differences in the bacterial functional profiles (i.e., enrichment and depletion of various metabolic processes) based on taxonomic inference were also detected, further suggesting functional differences of the microbiomes associated with these lineages. Our study contributes to the current knowledge of the Exaiptasia holobiont by comparing the bacterial diversity of two commonly used strains as models for coral research.

  5. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of blood cultures from cattle clinically suspected of bacterial endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houe, Hans; Eriksen, L.; Jungersen, Gregers;

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the number of blood culture-positive cattle among 215 animals clinically suspected of having bacterial endocarditis. For animals that were necropsied, the sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of the diagnosis of endocarditis were calculated on the basis...

  6. Speciation of vanadium in oilsand coke and bacterial culture by high performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. Sherry [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Le, X. Chris [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada); Analytical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G3 (Canada)], E-mail: xc.le@ualberta.ca

    2007-10-17

    A simple and sensitive method for the speciation of vanadium(III), (IV), and (V) was developed by using high performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS). The EDTA-complexed vanadium species were separated on a strong anion exchange column with an eluent containing 2 mM EDTA, 3% acetonitrile, and 80 mM ammonium bicarbonate at pH 6. Each analysis was complete in 5 min. The detection limits were 0.6, 0.7 and 1.0 {mu}g L{sup -1} for V(III), V(IV), and V(V), respectively. The method was applied to coke pore water samples from an oilsand processing/upgrading site in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada and to Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 bacterial cultures incubated with V(V). In the coke pore water samples, V(IV) and V(V) were found to be the major species. For the first time, V(III) was detected in the bacterial cultures incubated with V(V)

  7. Diversity of bacterial species in the nasal cavity of sheep in the highlands of Ethiopia and first report of Histophilus somni in the country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Biruk; Sisay Tessema, Tesfaye; Tefera, Genene

    2013-06-01

    A study was conducted to isolate bacterial species/pathogens from the nasal cavity of apparently healthy and pneumonic sheep. Nasal swabs were collected aseptically, transported in tryptose soya broth and incubated for 24 h. Then, each swab was streaked onto chocolate and blood agar for culture. Bacterial species were identified following standard bacteriological procedures. Accordingly, a total of 1,556 bacteria were isolated from 960 nasal swabs collected from three different highland areas of Ethiopia, namely Debre Berhan, Asella, and Gimba. In Debre Berhan, 140 Mannheimia haemolytica, 81 Histophilus somni, 57 Staphylococcus species, and 52 Bibersteinia trehalosi were isolated. While from Gimba M. haemolytica, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and H. somni were isolated at rates of 25.2, 15.9, 11.4, and 5.9 %, respectively, of the total 647 bacterial species. In Asella from 352 bacterial species isolated, 93 (26.4 %) were M. haemolytica, 48 (13.6 %) were Staphylococcus species, 26 (7.4 %) were B. trehalosi, and 17 (4.8 %) H. somni were recognized. Further identification and characterization using BIOLOG identification system Enterococcus avium and Sphingomonas sanguinis were identified at 100 % probability, while, H. somni and Actinobacillus lignerisii were suggested by the system. The study showed that a variety of bacterial species colonize the nasal cavity of the Ethiopian highland sheep with variable proportion between healthy and pneumonic ones. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation of H. somni, an important pathogen in cattle, from the respiratory tract of a ruminant species in the country.

  8. A robust universal method for extraction of genomic DNA from bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashpaz, Sina; Khani, Sajjad; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Barar, Jaleh; Vahed, Sepideh Zununi; Azarbaijani, Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2010-01-01

    The intactness of DNA is the keystone of genome-based clinical investigations, where rapid molecular detection of life-threatening bacteria is largely dependent on the isolation of high-quality DNA. Various protocols have been so far developed for genomic DNA isolation from bacteria, most of which have been claimed to be reproducible with relatively good yields of high-quality DNA. Nonetheless, they are not fully applicable to various types of bacteria, their processing cost is relatively high, and some toxic reagents are used. The routine protocols for DNA extraction appear to be sensitive to species diversity, and may fail to produce high-quality DNA from different species. Such protocols remain time-consuming and tedious, thus to resolve some of these impediments, we report development of a very simple, rapid, and high-throughput protocol for extracting of high-quality DNA from different bacterial species. Based upon our protocol, interfering phenolic compounds were removed from extraction using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and RNA contamination was precipitated using LiCI. The UV spectrophotometric and gel electrophoresis analysis resulted in high A260/A280 ratio (>1.8) with high intactness of DNA. Subsequent evaluations were performed using some quality-dependent techniques (e.g., RAPD marker and restriction digestions). The isolated DNA from 9 different bacterial species confirmed the accuracy of this protocol which requires no enzymatic processing and accordingly its low-cost making it an appropriate method f r large-scale DNA isolation fromvarious bacterial species.

  9. Bacterial species associated with sound and Botrytis-infected grapes from a Greek vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisiotou, Aspasia A; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Iliopoulos, Vassilios; Cocolin, Luca; Nychas, George-John E

    2011-02-28

    Grape bacterial microbiota plays central roles in the quality of grapes and wine, yet its diversity remains poorly described. In the present study, bacterial species associated with sound and Botrytis-infected grapes of two cultivars originating from the same vineyard were assessed. Isolates were identified by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and sequence analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene. Comparable counts were recorded between Botrytis-infected and sound grape samples. In all cases, the majority of isolates belonged to different species of Enterobacteriaceae. The dominant species in the vineyard was Klebsiella oxytoca that was found in different combinations with Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter spp., Erwinia sp., Pantoea dispersa, Tatumella ptyseos or other species. In fermenting musts, those populations declined while other species evolved, like Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterobacter ludwigii. Populations in botrytised samples persisted longer during spontaneous fermentations. Present study suggests that bacterial diversity on grapes may be wider than previously described. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. One-day workflow scheme for bacterial pathogen detection and antimicrobial resistance testing from blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Wendy L J; Beuving, Judith; Verbon, Annelies; Wolffs, Petra F G

    2012-07-09

    Bloodstream infections are associated with high mortality rates because of the probable manifestation of sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock(1). Therefore, rapid administration of adequate antibiotic therapy is of foremost importance in the treatment of bloodstream infections. The critical element in this process is timing, heavily dependent on the results of bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Both of these parameters are routinely obtained by culture-based testing, which is time-consuming and takes on average 24-48 hours(2, 4). The aim of the study was to develop DNA-based assays for rapid identification of bloodstream infections, as well as rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The first assay is a eubacterial 16S rDNA-based real-time PCR assay complemented with species- or genus-specific probes(5). Using these probes, Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli as well as Gram-positive bacteria including Staphylococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Streptococcus pneumoniae could be distinguished. Using this multiprobe assay, a first identification of the causative micro-organism was given after 2 h. Secondly, we developed a semi-molecular assay for antibiotic susceptibility testing of S. aureus, Enterococcus spp. and (facultative) aerobe Gram-negative rods(6). This assay was based on a study in which PCR was used to measure the growth of bacteria(7). Bacteria harvested directly from blood cultures are incubated for 6 h with a selection of antibiotics, and following a Sybr Green-based real-time PCR assay determines inhibition of growth. The combination of these two methods could direct the choice of a suitable antibiotic therapy on the same day (Figure 1). In conclusion, molecular analysis of both identification and antibiotic susceptibility offers a faster alternative for pathogen detection and could improve the diagnosis of

  11. Surface-motility induction, attraction and hitchhiking between bacterial species promote dispersal on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagai, Efrat; Dvora, Reut; Havkin-Blank, Tal; Zelinger, Einat; Porat, Ziv; Schulz, Stefan; Helman, Yael

    2014-05-01

    The ability to move on solid surfaces provides ecological advantages for bacteria, yet many bacterial species lack this trait. We found that Xanthomonas spp. overcome this limitation by making use of proficient motile bacteria in their vicinity. Using X. perforans and Paenibacillus vortex as models, we show that X. perforans induces surface motility, attracts proficient motile bacteria and 'rides' them for dispersal. In addition, X. perforans was able to restore surface motility of strains that lost this mode of motility under multiple growth cycles in the lab. The described interaction occurred both on agar plates and tomato leaves and was observed between several xanthomonads and motile bacterial species. Thus, suggesting that this motility induction and hitchhiking strategy might be widespread and ecologically important. This study provides an example as to how bacteria can rely on the abilities of their neighboring species for their own benefit, signifying the importance of a communal organization for fitness.

  12. Biodegradation of malathion and evaluation of kinetic parameters using three bacterial species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Geed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of three different bacterial species for biodegradation of malathion and its secondary products have been investigated. The concentration range of malathion under investigation was 25–200 mg⋅L−1. It has been observed that Pseudomonas putida was found to be most efficient for degradation of malathion. The removal of malathion was 72% at its concentration of 125 mg⋅L−1. The optimum parameters were studied for all three bacterial species in batch mode. The average values of Ks and μmax were obtained for all these species for degradation of malathion. Results indicate that P. putida has high degradation potential than Rhodoccocus rhodochrous and Sphingomonas sp. The degradation of P. putida was maximum at concentration of 125 mg⋅L−1, pH and temperature at 7 ± 0.2, 80 °C respectively. Metabolites were obtained using GCMS analysis.

  13. The bacterial species challenge: making sense of genetic and ecological diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Christophe; Alm, Eric J; Polz, Martin F; Spratt, Brian G; Hanage, William P

    2009-02-06

    The Bacteria and Archaea are the most genetically diverse superkingdoms of life, and techniques for exploring that diversity are only just becoming widespread. Taxonomists classify these organisms into species in much the same way as they classify eukaryotes, but differences in their biology-including horizontal gene transfer between distantly related taxa and variable rates of homologous recombination-mean that we still do not understand what a bacterial species is. This is not merely a semantic question; evolutionary theory should be able to explain why species exist at all levels of the tree of life, and we need to be able to define species for practical applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine. Recent studies have emphasized the need to combine genetic diversity and distinct ecology in an attempt to define species in a coherent and convincing fashion. The resulting data may help to discriminate among the many theories of prokaryotic species that have been produced to date.

  14. Studies on interaction of colloidal silver nanoparticles (SNPs) with five different bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S Sudheer; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N

    2011-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are being increasingly used in many consumer products like textile fabrics, cosmetics, washing machines, food and drug products owing to its excellent antimicrobial properties. Here we have studied the adsorption and toxicity of SNPs on bacterial species such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus barbaricus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The influence of zeta potential on the adsorption of SNPs on bacterial cell surface was investigated at acidic, neutral and alkaline pH and with varying salt (NaCl) concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 M). The survival rate of bacterial species decreased with increase in adsorption of SNPs. Maximum adsorption and toxicity was observed at pH 5, and NaCl concentration of 0.5 M, there by resulting in less toxicity. The zeta potential study suggests that, the adsorption of SNPs on the cell surface was related to electrostatic force of attraction. The equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption process were also studied. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms fitted well to the Langmuir model. The kinetics of adsorption fitted best to pseudo-first-order. These findings form a basis for interpreting the interaction of nanoparticles with environmental bacterial species.

  15. Impact of lime, nitrogen and plant species on bacterial community structure in grassland microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Nabla; Brodie, Eoin; Connolly, John; Clipson, Nicholas

    2004-10-01

    A microcosm-based approach was used to study impacts of plant and chemical factors on the bacterial community structure of an upland acidic grassland soil. Seven perennial plant species typical of both natural, unimproved (Nardus stricta, Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina and F. rubra) and fertilized, improved (Holcus lanatus, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens) grasslands were either left unamended or treated with lime, nitrogen, or lime plus nitrogen in a 75-day glasshouse experiment. Lime and nitrogen amendment were shown to have a greater effect on microbial activity, biomass and bacterial ribotype number than plant species. Liming increased soil pH, microbial activity and biomass, while decreasing ribotype number. Nitrogen addition decreased soil pH, microbial activity and ribotype number. Addition of lime plus nitrogen had intermediate effects, which appeared to be driven more by lime than nitrogen. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis revealed that lime and nitrogen addition altered soil bacterial community structure, while plant species had little effect. These results were further confirmed by multivariate redundancy analysis, and suggest that soil lime and nitrogen status are more important controllers of bacterial community structure than plant rhizosphere effects.

  16. Frequency of isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from blood culture, Gondar University teaching hospital, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jemal; Kebede, Yenew

    2008-04-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality, with up to one-quarter of affected patients dying as a result of their infection. Up-to-date information on blood culture isolates and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern is very important as guide for immediate prescription of antimicrobial agents and monitoring of emergence of drug resistant strains. To determine the frequency of blood culture isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of isolates in Gondar University teaching hospital. This was retrospective analysis of records of blood culture results for febrile patients seen at Gondar University teaching hospital, bacteriology section from March 2001 to April 2005. During the four years period, blood cultures were done for a total of 472 febrile patients. Among these, 233 (49.4%) were females and 239 (50.6%) were males. The median age was 20.5 years (age range of 2 hours to 78 years). Out of these, total of 114 bacterial strains were isolated with culture positivity rate of 24.2%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated with the highest frequency in 38 (33.3%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus in 34 (29.8%), Salmonella species other than Salmonella typhi in 12 (10.5%), Klebsiella species in 10 (8.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae in 6 (5.3%), Salmonella typhi in 4 (3.5%), Enterobacter species in 3 (2.6%), Escherichia coli in 2 (1.7%). The gram positive and gram negative bacteria constituted 80 (70.2%) and 34 (29.8%) of the culture isolates, respectively. Culture positivity rates vary as for neonates, 63% (17 out of 27);followed by 25.6% (36 out of 141) in children and 20% (61 out of 304) in adults. The isolates especially gram negative bacteria showed multiple drug resistance, to Ampicillin and penicillin. However, ciprofloxacin is fairly effective against both gram negative and gram positive isolates. An effective documented data may serve as a guide for initial empirical treatment of bloodstream infections

  17. Distribution of periodontopathic bacterial species in Japanese children with developmental disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoto Hirotoshi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments in molecular biological techniques have enabled rapid detection of periodontopathic bacterial species in clinical specimens. Accumulated evidence suggests that detection of specific bacterial species enables identification of subjects at high risk for the onset of periodontitis. We investigated the distribution of 10 selected periodontopathic bacterial species in dental plaque specimens obtained from children with disabilities who were attending daycare centers. Methods A total of 187 children (136 boys, 51 girls aged 1-6 years old and diagnosed with such disabilities as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and autism, participated in the study. Subgingival dental plaque specimens were collected from the buccal side of the maxillary left second primary molar after a clinical examination. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the specimens and PCR analyses were carried out to detect 10 selected periodontopathic species using specific primers for each. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to analyze the correlations among clinical parameters and the detected species. Results The most frequently detected species was Capnocytophaga sputigena (28.3%, followed by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (20.9% and Campylobacter rectus (18.2%. Eikenella corrodens, Capnocytophaga ochracea, and Prevotella nigrescence were detected in approximately 10% of the specimens, whereas Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia were rarely found, and Porphyromonas gingivalis was not detected in any of the subjects. The total numbers of detected species were positively correlated with the age of the subjects. There were 10 subjects with positive reactions for T. denticola and/or T. forsythia, in whom the total number of bacterial species was significantly higher as compared to the other subjects. Furthermore, subjects possessing C. rectus showed significantly greater values for periodontal pocket

  18. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from urine culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toka Özer, Türkan; Durmaz, Süleyman; Yula, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    Candida spp. are the most common opportunistic mycosis worldwide. Although Candida albicans is the most common cause of urinary tract infections, the frequency of non-albicans Candida species is increasing with common use of antifungal in the prophylaxis and treatment. This may lead to difficulties in treatment. Antifungal tests should be applied with identification of species for effective treatment. In this study, identification of Candida species isolated from urine culture and investigation of susceptibility of these strains to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole was aimed. In this study, 58 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures at Osmaniye State Hospital between January 2012 and April 2013 were included. Urine culture and antifungal susceptibility tests were applied. Incidence rate of Candida spp. was determined as C. albicans (56.9%), Candida glabrata (20.6%), Candida tropicalis (10.3%), Candida parapsilosis (7%), Candida krusei (3.4%), Candida kefyr (1.8%). Most of the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole. Twenty three (39.7%) Candida strains were isolated from internal medical branches and Intensive Care Unit and 12 (20.6%) from the Surgical Medical Branches. C. albicans and C. glabrata species were isolated most frequently as a candiduria factor in this hospital between January 2012 and April 2013. The analysis of antifungal susceptibility profile shows no significant resistance to antifungals. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The culture of Tilapia species in tropical and subtropical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maeseneer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Although since long known by African fishermen it is only in the last 40 years that Tilapia has been recognized as one of the most promising groups of fish species for culture. The initial successes for culture in Central Africa were followed by several failures mainly because of excessive breeding and early sexual maturity in shallow waterbodies as ponds. From the present knowledge it appears that tilapia has a great future for increasing the productivity in unmanaged environments as man-made lakes and reservoirs primarily destined for the production of hydro-electricity. Careful stocking of paddies and irrigation canals can solve a number of biological problems associated with them and provide an additional though valuable high-protein food source. Great future offers also the culture of tilapia in traditional pond culture especially in polyculture with members of the carp family, mullets and waterfowl in areas of the tropical and subtropical belt. In coastal ponds T, mossambica is a valuable species for sanitary reasons. The culture of tilapia in small farm ponds often meets with failure owing to excessive breeding and stunting unless the all-male technique can be applied through government input and encouragement. As a rule this type of production will be the least attractive. Although Tilapia spp. do not achieve the largest individu al growth their tolerance towards adverse conditions and their acceptance of a wide variety of foodstuffs, primarily waste products from agriculture, their resistance to diseases and (at least in some species their tolerance of crowded environments make them suitable subject for cultures in raceways, circular tanks and cages. Through heavy inputs of water and pelletized feeds nearly incredible annual yields as 2 000 tonnes per ha of water surface (1 and more were realized. This means that this type of production surpasses by far any other known form of animal husbandry but it needs high technological input (thus

  20. The effects of micronutrient deficiencies on bacterial species from the human gut microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibberd, Matthew C. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research; Wu, Meng [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology; Rodionov, Dmitry A. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation). A.A. Kharkevich Inst. for Information Transmission Problems; Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Li, Xiaoqing [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Cheng, Jiye [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Researc; Griffin, Nicholas W. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Researc; Barratt, Michael J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Researc; Giannone, Richard J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Hettich, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Osterman, Andrei L. [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States); Gordon, Jeffrey I. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Researc

    2017-05-17

    Micronutrient deficiencies afflict two billion people. And while the impact of these imbalances on host biology has been studied extensively, much less is known about their effects on the developing or adult gut microbiota. Thus, we established a community of 44 cultured, sequenced human gut-derived bacterial species in gnotobiotic mice and fed the animals a defined, micronutrient-sufficient diet, followed by a derivative diet devoid of vitamin A, folate, iron or zinc, followed by return to the sufficient diet. Acute vitamin A deficiency had the largest effect on community structure and meta-transcriptome, with Bacteroides vulgatus, a prominent responder, increasing its abundance in the absence of vitamin A, and manifesting transcriptional changes involving various metabolic pathways. Applying retinol selection to a library of 30,300 B. vulgatus transposon mutants revealed that disruption of acrR abrogated retinol sensitivity. Genetic complementation studies, microbial RNA-Seq, and transcription factor binding assays disclosed that AcrR functions as a repressor of an adjacent AcrAB-TolC efflux system plus other members of its regulon. Retinol efflux measurements in wild-type, acrR-mutant, and complemented acrR mutant strains, plus treatment with a pharmacologic inhibitor of the efflux system, revealed that AcrAB-TolC is a determinant of retinol and bile acid sensitivity. We associated acute vitamin A deficiency with altered bile acid metabolism in vivo, raising the possibility that retinol, bile acid metabolites, and AcrAB-TolC interact to influence the fitness of B. vulgatus and perhaps other microbiota members. This type of preclinical model can help develop mechanistic insights about and more effective treatment strategies for micronutrient deficiencies.

  1. Growth promotion of Lactuca sativa in response to volatile organic compounds emitted from diverse bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincheira, Paola; Venthur, Herbert; Mutis, Ana; Parada, Maribel; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    Agrochemicals are currently used in horticulture to increase crop production. Nevertheless, their indiscriminate use is a relevant issue for environmental and legal aspects. Alternative tools for reducing fertilizers and synthetic phytohormones are being investigated, such as the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as growth inducers. Some soil bacteria, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus, stimulate Arabidopsis and tobacco growth by releasing VOCs, but their effects on vegetables have not been investigated. Lactuca sativa was used as model vegetable to investigate bacterial VOCs as growth inducers. We selected 10 bacteria strains, belonging to Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Serratia genera that are able to produce 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (acetoin), a compound with proven growth promoting activity. Two-day old-seedlings of L. sativa were exposed to VOCs emitted by the selected bacteria grown in different media cultures for 7 days. The results showed that the VOCs released from the bacteria elicited an increase in the number of lateral roots, dry weight, root growth and shoot length, depending on the media used. Three Bacillus strains, BCT53, BCT9 and BCT4, were selected according to its their growth inducing capacity. The BCT9 strain elicited the greatest increases in dry weight and primary root length when L. sativa seedlings were subjected to a 10-day experiment. Finally, because acetoin only stimulated root growth, we suggest that other volatiles could be responsible for the growth promotion of L. sativa. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that bacteria volatiles can be used as growth-inducers as alternative or complementary strategies for application in horticulture species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Antibiotics on Bacterial Species Composition and Metabolic Activities in Chemostats Containing Defined Populations of Human Gut Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Dorothy F.; Macfarlane, George T.

    2013-01-01

    The composition and metabolic activities of the human colonic microbiota are modulated by a number of external factors, including diet and antibiotic therapy. Changes in the structure and metabolism of the gut microbiota may have long-term consequences for host health. The large intestine harbors a complex microbial ecosystem comprising several hundreds of different bacterial species, which complicates investigations on intestinal physiology and ecology. To facilitate such studies, a highly simplified microbiota consisting of 14 anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic organisms (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Clostridium butyricum, C. perfringens, C. bifermentans, C. innocuum, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus acidophilus) was used in this investigation. Ampicillin [9.2 μg (ml culture)−1] was added to two chemostats operated at different dilution rates (D; 0.10 h−1 and 0.21 h−1), and metronidazole [76.9 μg (ml culture)−1] was added to a third vessel (D = 0.21 h−1). Perturbations in bacterial physiology and metabolism were sampled over a 48-h period. Lactobacillus acidophilus and C. bifermentans populations did not establish in the fermentors under the imposed growth conditions. Ampicillin resulted in substantial reductions in bacteroides and C. perfringens populations at both dilution rates. Metronidazole strongly affected bacteroides communities but had no effect on bifidobacterial communities. The bacteriostatic effect of ampicillin on bifidobacterial species was growth rate dependent. Several metabolic activities were affected by antibiotic addition, including fermentation product formation and enzyme synthesis. The growth of antibiotic-resistant bifidobacteria in the large bowel may enable them to occupy ecological niches left vacant after antibiotic administration, preventing

  3. Bacterial community analysis in chlorpyrifos enrichment cultures via DGGE and use of bacterial consortium for CP biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Shamsa; Sultan, Sikander; Kertesz, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CP) has been used extensively since the 1960s for insect control. However, its toxic effects on mammals and persistence in environment necessitate its removal from contaminated sites, biodegradation studies of CP-degrading microbes are therefore of immense importance. Samples from a Pakistani agricultural soil with an extensive history of CP application were used to prepare enrichment cultures using CP as sole carbon source for bacterial community analysis and isolation of CP metabolizing bacteria. Bacterial community analysis (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) revealed that the dominant genera enriched under these conditions were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Stenotrophomonas, along with lower numbers of Sphingomonas, Agrobacterium and Burkholderia. Furthermore, it revealed that members of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, α- and γ-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were present at initial steps of enrichment whereas β-Proteobacteria appeared in later steps and only Proteobacteria were selected by enrichment culturing. However, when CP-degrading strains were isolated from this enrichment culture, the most active organisms were strains of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Pseudomonas mendocina and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These strains degraded 6-7.4 mg L(-1) day(-1) of CP when cultivated in mineral medium, while the consortium of all four strains degraded 9.2 mg L(-1) day(-1) of CP (100 mg L(-1)). Addition of glucose as an additional C source increased the degradation capacity by 8-14 %. After inoculation of contaminated soil with CP (200 mg kg(-1)) disappearance rates were 3.83-4.30 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for individual strains and 4.76 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for the consortium. These results indicate that these organisms are involved in the degradation of CP in soil and represent valuable candidates for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils and waters.

  4. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Marciano, R. S.; Guimarães, O. R.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

  5. Vision Marker-Based In Situ Examination of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyukwang; Choi, Duckyu; Lim, Hwijoon; Kim, Hyeongkeun; Jeon, Jessie S.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of bacterial growth in liquid media is an essential process in determining antibiotic susceptibility or the level of bacterial presence for clinical or research purposes. We have developed a system, which enables simplified and automated detection using a camera and a striped pattern marker. The quantification of bacterial growth is possible as the bacterial growth in the culturing vessel blurs the marker image, which is placed on the back of the vessel, and the blurring results in a decrease in the high-frequency spectrum region of the marker image. The experiment results show that the FFT (fast Fourier transform)-based growth detection method is robust to the variations in the type of bacterial carrier and vessels ranging from the culture tubes to the microfluidic devices. Moreover, the automated incubator and image acquisition system are developed to be used as a comprehensive in situ detection system. We expect that this result can be applied in the automation of biological experiments, such as the Antibiotics Susceptibility Test or toxicity measurement. Furthermore, the simple framework of the proposed growth measurement method may be further utilized as an effective and convenient method for building point-of-care devices for developing countries. PMID:27999349

  6. Intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases: from bacterial community structure and functions to species of pathophysiological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Thomas; Desmarchelier, Charles; Haller, Dirk; Gérard, Philippe; Rohn, Sascha; Lepage, Patricia; Daniel, Hannelore

    2014-07-01

    The trillions of bacterial cells that colonize the mammalian digestive tract influence both host physiology and the fate of dietary compounds. Gnotobionts and fecal transplantation have been instrumental in revealing the causal role of intestinal bacteria in energy homeostasis and metabolic dysfunctions such as type-2 diabetes. However, the exact contribution of gut bacterial metabolism to host energy balance is still unclear and knowledge about underlying molecular mechanisms is scant. We have previously characterized cecal bacterial community functions and host responses in diet-induced obese mice using omics approaches. Based on these studies, we here discuss issues on the relevance of mouse models, give evidence that the metabolism of cholesterol-derived compounds by gut bacteria is of particular importance in the context of metabolic disorders and that dominant species of the family Coriobacteriaceae are good models to study these functions.

  7. Coral-associated bacterial diversity is conserved across two deep-sea Anthothela species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Stephanie N.; Kellogg, Christina A.; France, Scott C; Clostio, Rachel W; Brooke, Sandra D.; Ross, Steve W.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-water corals, similar to tropical corals, contain diverse and complex microbial assemblages. These bacteria provide essential biological functions within coral holobionts, facilitating increased nutrient utilization and production of antimicrobial compounds. To date, few cold-water octocoral species have been analyzed to explore the diversity and abundance of their microbial associates. For this study, 23 samples of the family Anthothelidae were collected from Norfolk (n = 12) and Baltimore Canyons (n = 11) from the western Atlantic in August 2012 and May 2013. Genetic testing found that these samples comprised two Anthothela species (Anthothela grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) and Alcyonium grandiflorum. DNA was extracted and sequenced with primers targeting the V4-V5 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene using 454 pyrosequencing with GS FLX Titanium chemistry. Results demonstrated that the coral host was the primary driver of bacterial community composition. Al. grandiflorum, dominated by Alteromonadales and Pirellulales had much higher species richness, and a distinct bacterial community compared to Anthothela samples. Anthothela species (A. grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) had very similar bacterial communities, dominated by Oceanospirillales and Spirochaetes. Additional analysis of core-conserved bacteria at 90% sample coverage revealed genus level conservation across Anthothela samples. This core included unclassified Oceanospirillales, Kiloniellales, Campylobacterales, and genus Spirochaeta. Members of this core were previously recognized for their functional capabilities in nitrogen cycling and suggest the possibility of a nearly complete nitrogen cycle within Anthothela species. Overall, many of the bacterial associates identified in this study have the potential to contribute to the acquisition and cycling of nutrients within the coral holobiont.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor Listeriolysin O favors bacterial growth in co-culture with the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis, causes protozoan encystment and promotes bacterial survival inside cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermolaeva Svetlana A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is widely spread in the nature. L. monocytogenes was reported to be isolated from soil, water, sewage and sludge. Listeriolysin O (LLO is a L. monocytogenes major virulence factor. In the course of infection in mammals, LLO is required for intracellular survival and apoptosis induction in lymphocytes. In this study, we explored the potential of LLO to promote interactions between L. monocytogenes and the ubiquitous inhabitant of natural ecosystems bacteriovorous free-living ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Results Wild type L. monocytogenes reduced T. pyriformis trophozoite counts and stimulated encystment. The effects were observed starting from 48 h of co-incubation. On the day 14, trophozoites were eliminated from the co-culture while about 5 × 104 cells/ml remained in the axenic T. pyriformis culture. The deficient in the LLO-encoding hly gene L. monocytogenes strain failed to cause mortality among protozoa and to trigger protozoan encystment. Replenishment of the hly gene in the mutant strain restored toxicity towards protozoa and induction of protozoan encystment. The saprophytic non-haemolytic species L. innocua transformed with the LLO-expressing plasmid caused extensive mortality and encystment in ciliates. During the first week of co-incubation, LLO-producing L. monocytogenes demonstrated higher growth rates in association with T. pyriformis than the LLO-deficient isogenic strain. At latter stages of co-incubation bacterial counts were similar for both strains. T. pyriformis cysts infected with wild type L. monocytogenes caused listerial infection in guinea pigs upon ocular and oral inoculation. The infection was proved by bacterial plating from the internal organs. Conclusions The L. monocytogenes virulence factor LLO promotes bacterial survival and growth in the presence of bacteriovorous ciliate T. pyriformis. LLO is responsible for L. monocytogenes

  9. Novel and unexpected bacterial diversity in an arsenic-rich ecosystem revealed by culture-dependent approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delavat François

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs are extreme environments characterized by very acid conditions and heavy metal contaminations. In these ecosystems, the bacterial diversity is considered to be low. Previous culture-independent approaches performed in the AMD of Carnoulès (France confirmed this low species richness. However, very little is known about the cultured bacteria in this ecosystem. The aims of the study were firstly to apply novel culture methods in order to access to the largest cultured bacterial diversity, and secondly to better define the robustness of the community for 3 important functions: As(III oxidation, cellulose degradation and cobalamine biosynthesis. Results Despite the oligotrophic and acidic conditions found in AMDs, the newly designed media covered a large range of nutrient concentrations and a pH range from 3.5 to 9.8, in order to target also non-acidophilic bacteria. These approaches generated 49 isolates representing 19 genera belonging to 4 different phyla. Importantly, overall diversity gained 16 extra genera never detected in Carnoulès. Among the 19 genera, 3 were previously uncultured, one of them being novel in databases. This strategy increased the overall diversity in the Carnoulès sediment by 70% when compared with previous culture-independent approaches, as specific phylogenetic groups (e.g. the subclass Actinobacteridae or the order Rhizobiales were only detected by culture. Cobalamin auxotrophy, cellulose degradation and As(III-oxidation are 3 crucial functions in this ecosystem, and a previous meta- and proteo-genomic work attributed each function to only one taxon. Here, we demonstrate that other members of this community can also assume these functions, thus increasing the overall community robustness. Conclusions This work highlights that bacterial diversity in AMDs is much higher than previously envisaged, thus pointing out that the AMD system is functionally more robust than expected

  10. [Effect of culture media on surface and enzymatic activity in Klebsiella species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostacká, A

    2002-08-01

    The effect of three complex media (KM) [Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB), brain heart infusion (MSI) and proteose peptone (PP)] and one mineral medium (MM) on surface and enzyme activities of five strains Klebsiella species was studied. Klebsiella oxytoca and Klebsiella ornithinolytica had a marked hydrophobic character after growth in MHB, MSI and MM, Klebsiella terrigena only in PP. K. oxytoca and K. ornithinolytica had a higher motility after cultivation in KM compared with MM, the motility of K. terrigena was not affected. The lipolytic activity of all tested strains was highest after growth in MSI and PP. The composition of culture medium affected bacterial parameters tested to a different extent depending on the species.

  11. Usefulness of the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system for identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Km; Yuen, KY; Que, TI; Woo, GKS; Fung, Amy; Yip, KT; Woo, PCY; Ng, KHL; Lau, SKP

    2006-01-01

    Using full 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing as the gold standard, 20 non-duplicating anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures were analysed by the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system. The MicroSeq system successfully identified 13 of the 20 isolates. Four and three isolates were misidentified at the genus and species level, respectively. Although the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system is better than three commercially available ...

  12. Usefulness of the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system for identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, S.K.P.; Ng, K H L; Woo, P C Y; Yip, K‐t; Fung, A M Y; Woo, G K S; Chan, K‐m; Que, T‐L

    2006-01-01

    Using full 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing as the gold standard, 20 non‐duplicating anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures were analysed by the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system. The MicroSeq system successfully identified 13 of the 20 isolates. Four and three isolates were misidentified at the genus and species level, respectively. Although the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system is better than three commercially available ...

  13. Simplified Protocol for Carba NP Test for Enhanced Detection of Carbapenemase Producers Directly from Bacterial Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasteran, Fernando; Tijet, Nathalie; Melano, Roberto G; Corso, Alejandra

    2015-12-01

    We compared carbapenemase detection among 266 Gram-negative bacilli (161 carbapenemase producers) using the Carba NP tests issued by the CLSI (CNPt-CLSI) and a novel protocol (CNPt-direct) designed for carbapenemase detection direct from bacterial cultures (instead of bacterial extracts required by the CLSI tests). The specificities were comparable (100%), but the CNPt-direct was more sensitive (98% versus 84%). The CNPt-direct was easier to perform due to the direct use of colonies and offered a more robust detection of carbapenemase producers. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Plant-associated bacterial populations on native and invasive plant species: comparisons between 2 freshwater environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olapade, Ola A; Pung, Kayleigh

    2012-06-01

    Plant-microbial interactions have been well studied because of the ecological importance of such relationships in aquatic systems. However, general knowledge regarding the composition of these biofilm communities is still evolving, partly as a result of several confounding factors that are attributable to plant host properties and to hydrodynamic conditions in aquatic environments. In this study, the occurrences of various bacterial phylogenetic taxa on 2 native plants, i.e., mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum L.) and cow parsnip (Heracleum maximum Bartram), and on an invasive species, i.e., garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb.) Cavara & Grande), were quantitatively examined using nucleic acid staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The plants were incubated in triplicates for about a week within the Kalamazoo River and Pierce Cedar Creek as well as in microcosms. The bacterial groups targeted for enumeration are known to globally occur in relatively high abundance and are also ubiquitously distributed in freshwater environments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of the bacterioplankton assemblages revealed that the majority of bacterial cells that hybridized with the different probes were similar between the 2 sites. In contrast, the plant-associated populations while similar on the 3 plants incubated in Kalamazoo River, their representations were highest on the 2 native plants relative to the invasive species in Pierce Cedar Creek. Overall, our results further suggested that epiphytic bacterial assemblages are probably under the influences of and probably subsequently respond to multiple variables and conditions in aquatic milieus.

  15. [Use of transport medium in sputum bacterial culture examination of lower airway infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Masato; Kitaguchi, Sayako; Ichihashi, Hideo; Tsuji, Fumio; Ohmori, Takashi; Haraguchi, Ryuta; Tohda, Yuji

    2006-06-01

    Our medical institution does not have a bacterial culture facility, requiring outsourcing of bacterial culture tests. Due to the time elapsed from the time of specimen collection to culturing, the identification of causative bacteria in respiratory tract infections tends to be difficult. We therefore used transport medium for sputum bacteria examinations. Expectorated purulent or purulent-mucous sputum specimens were collected from 32 patients with lower respiratory tract infection. We divided each of the sputum specimens into the two treatment groups: transport medium (Seedswab gamma2) ndar and stad disinfection container. Paired samples prepared from each patient were sent out for bacterial culture together. The time elapsed from collection to delivery to the lab were as follows: day 0 (same day, n = 14 patients), day 1 (n = 15), day 2 (n = 2), and day 3 (n = 1). The identified causative bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 6 patients), Haemophilus influenzae (n =5), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 4), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 2), Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 2), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1), and Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 1). Samples prepared by each of the two methods gave similar results. The utility of transport medium for examination of general bacteria for lower airway infection from sputum samples was not demonstrated. The rate of detection of bacteria decreased, when the transport of samples was delayed. Therefore, we need to send the sputum specimens as quickly as possible.

  16. Trends of Bacterial Keratitis Culture Isolates in Jerusalem; a 13- Years Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Michael; Wajnsztajn, Denise; Rosin, Boris; Block, Colin; Solomon, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the trends in pathogens and antibacterial resistance of corneal culture isolates in infectious keratitis during a period of 13 years at Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center. Methods A Retrospective analysis of bacterial corneal isolates was performed during the months of January 2002 to December 2014 at Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center. Demographics, microbiological data and antibiotic resistance and sensitivity were collected. Results A total of 943 corneal isolates were analyzed during a 13 year period. A total of 415 positive bacterial cultures and 37 positive fungal cultures were recovered, representing 48% of the total cultures. The Annual incidence was 34.78 ± 6.54 cases. The most common isolate was coagulase-negative staphylococcus (32%), which had a significant decrease in trend throughout the study period (APC = -8.1, p = 0.002). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) appears to have a decrease trend (APC = -31.2, P = 0.5). There was an increase in the resistance trend of coagulase-negative staphylococci to penicillin (APC = 5.0, P = keratitis. There was no significant change in the annual incidence of cases of bacterial keratitis seen over the past 13 years. Keratitis caused by MRSA appeared to decrease in contrast to the reported literature. PMID:27893743

  17. Preparation of a blood culture pellet for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxatto, Antony; Prod'hom, Guy; Durussel, Christian; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-10-15

    Bloodstream infections and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The successful outcome of patients suffering from bacteremia depends on a rapid identification of the infectious agent to guide optimal antibiotic treatment. The analysis of Gram stains from positive blood culture can be rapidly conducted and already significantly impact the antibiotic regimen. However, the accurate identification of the infectious agent is still required to establish the optimal targeted treatment. We present here a simple and fast bacterial pellet preparation from a positive blood culture that can be used as a sample for several essential downstream applications such as identification by MALDI-TOF MS, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion assay or automated AST systems and by automated PCR-based diagnostic testing. The performance of these different identification and AST systems applied directly on the blood culture bacterial pellets is very similar to the performance normally obtained from isolated colonies grown on agar plates. Compared to conventional approaches, the rapid acquisition of a bacterial pellet significantly reduces the time to report both identification and AST. Thus, following blood culture positivity, identification by MALDI-TOF can be reported within less than 1 hr whereas results of AST by automated AST systems or disc diffusion assays within 8 to 18 hr, respectively. Similarly, the results of a rapid PCR-based assay can be communicated to the clinicians less than 2 hr following the report of a bacteremia. Together, these results demonstrate that the rapid preparation of a blood culture bacterial pellet has a significant impact on the identification and AST turnaround time and thus on the successful outcome of patients suffering from bloodstream infections.

  18. RT-PCR–DGGE Analysis to Elucidate the Dominant Bacterial Species of Industrial Spanish-Style Green Table Olive Fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Cabello, Antonio; Bautista-Gallego, Joaquín; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cocolin, Luca; Jiménez-Díaz, Rufino; Arroyo-López, Francisco N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the dominant bacterial species metabolically active through the industrial production of Spanish-style Manzanilla and Gordal olives. For this purpose, samples (brines and fruits) obtained at 0, 15, and 90 fermentation days were analyzed by a culture-independent approach to determine viable cells by reverse transcription of RNA and further PCR-DGGE analysis, detecting at least 7 different species. Vibrio vulnificus, Lactobacillus plantarum group, and Lactobacillus parafarraginis were present in samples from both cultivars; Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and Halolactobacillus halophilus were detected only in Gordal samples, while Staphylococcus sp. was exclusively found at the onset of Manzanilla fermentations. Physicochemical data showed a typical fermentation profile while scanning electron microscopy confirmed the in situ biofilm formation on the olive epidermis. Different Bacillus, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus species, not detected during the fermentation process, were also found in the solid marine salt used by the industry for preparation of brines. Elucidation of these non-lactic acid bacteria species role during fermentation is then an appealingly challenge, particularly regarding safety issues. PMID:27582739

  19. Bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt: related species and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study risk factors, contributing factors of bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt, test the isolated species sensitive to some therapeutic agents, and to investigate the air-borne bacteria and fungi in opthalmology operating rooms. Methods: Thirty one cases of endophthalmitis were clinically diagnosed and microbiologically studied. Indoor air-borne bacteria and fungi inside four air-conditioned operating rooms in the Ophthalmology Department at Assiut University...

  20. Biodegradation of crude oil by a defined co-culture of indigenous bacterial consortium and exogenous Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kaiyun; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xueping; Hu, Xiaoxin; Cao, Liya; Yuan, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study biodegradation of crude oil by defined co-cultures of indigenous bacterial consortium and exogenous Bacillus subtilis. Through residual oil analysis, it is apparent that the defined co-culture displayed a degradation ratio (85.01%) superior to indigenous bacterial consortium (71.32%) after 7days of incubation when ratio of inoculation size of indigenous bacterial consortium and Bacillus subtilis was 2:1. Long-chain n-alkanes could be degraded markedly by Bacillus subtilis. Result analysis of the bacterial community showed that a decrease in bacterial diversity in the defined co-culture and the enrichment of Burkholderiales order (98.1%) degrading hydrocarbons. The research results revealed that the promising potential of the defined co-culture for application to degradation of crude oil.

  1. Effects of viruses on bacterial functions under contrasting nutritional conditions for four species of bacteria isolated from Hong Kong waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Xu, Jie; Harrison, Paul J.; He, Lei; Yin, Kedong

    2015-09-01

    Free living viruses are ubiquitous in marine waters and concentrations are usually several times higher than the bacterial abundance. These viruses are capable of lysing host bacteria and therefore, play an important role in the microbial loop in oligotrophic waters. However, few studies have been conducted to compare the role of viruses in regulating bacterial abundance and heterotrophic activities between natural oligotrophic waters and anthropogenic influenced eutrophic waters. In this study, we examined viral effects on bacterial functions of four single bacterial species incubated with natural viral assemblages in seawater samples from eutrophic and oligotrophic waters. The viral-lysis of bacteria was significantly higher in eutrophic than oligotrophic waters. This suggests that viruses were capable of controlling bacterial abundance, respiration and production in the eutrophic waters. Cellular bacterial respiration and production was higher with viruses than without viruses, which was more evident in the oligotrophic waters. These results indicate that viruses can slow down bacterial consumption of oxygen and reduce bacteria-induced eutrophication effects in anthropogenic eutrophic waters, but switch to the role of sustaining the bacterial population when nutrients are limiting. There were bacterial species differences in resisting viral attack, which can influence the dominance and biodiversity of bacterial species in coastal waters.

  2. Effects of viruses on bacterial functions under contrasting nutritional conditions for four species of bacteria isolated from Hong Kong waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Xu, Jie; Harrison, Paul J; He, Lei; Yin, Kedong

    2015-09-25

    Free living viruses are ubiquitous in marine waters and concentrations are usually several times higher than the bacterial abundance. These viruses are capable of lysing host bacteria and therefore, play an important role in the microbial loop in oligotrophic waters. However, few studies have been conducted to compare the role of viruses in regulating bacterial abundance and heterotrophic activities between natural oligotrophic waters and anthropogenic influenced eutrophic waters. In this study, we examined viral effects on bacterial functions of four single bacterial species incubated with natural viral assemblages in seawater samples from eutrophic and oligotrophic waters. The viral-lysis of bacteria was significantly higher in eutrophic than oligotrophic waters. This suggests that viruses were capable of controlling bacterial abundance, respiration and production in the eutrophic waters. Cellular bacterial respiration and production was higher with viruses than without viruses, which was more evident in the oligotrophic waters. These results indicate that viruses can slow down bacterial consumption of oxygen and reduce bacteria-induced eutrophication effects in anthropogenic eutrophic waters, but switch to the role of sustaining the bacterial population when nutrients are limiting. There were bacterial species differences in resisting viral attack, which can influence the dominance and biodiversity of bacterial species in coastal waters.

  3. Assessing Bacterial Diversity in the Rhizosphere of Thymus zygis Growing in the Sierra Nevada National Park (Spain through Culture-Dependent and Independent Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pascual

    Full Text Available Little is known of the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of wild plant species found in natural settings. The rhizosphere bacterial community associated with wild thyme, Thymus zygis L., plants was analyzed using cultivation, the creation of a near-full length 16S rRNA gene clone library and 454 amplicon pyrosequencing. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes. Although each approach gave a different perspective of the bacterial community, all classes/subclasses detected in the clone library and the cultured bacteria could be found in the pyrosequencing datasets. However, an exception caused by inconclusive taxonomic identification as a consequence of the short read length of pyrotags together with the detection of singleton sequences which corresponded to bacterial strains cultivated from the same sample highlight limitations and considerations which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting amplicon datasets. Amplicon pyrosequencing of replicate rhizosphere soil samples taken a year later permit the definition of the core microbiome associated with Thymus zygis plants. Abundant bacterial families and predicted functional profiles of the core microbiome suggest that the main drivers of the bacterial community in the Thymus zygis rhizosphere are related to the nutrients originating from the plant root and to their participation in biogeochemical cycles thereby creating an intricate relationship with this aromatic plant to allow for a feedback ecological benefit.

  4. Assessing Bacterial Diversity in the Rhizosphere of Thymus zygis Growing in the Sierra Nevada National Park (Spain) through Culture-Dependent and Independent Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; Blanco, Silvia; García-López, Marina; García-Salamanca, Adela; Bursakov, Sergey A; Genilloud, Olga; Bills, Gerald F; Ramos, Juan L; van Dillewijn, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Little is known of the bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of wild plant species found in natural settings. The rhizosphere bacterial community associated with wild thyme, Thymus zygis L., plants was analyzed using cultivation, the creation of a near-full length 16S rRNA gene clone library and 454 amplicon pyrosequencing. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria), Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes. Although each approach gave a different perspective of the bacterial community, all classes/subclasses detected in the clone library and the cultured bacteria could be found in the pyrosequencing datasets. However, an exception caused by inconclusive taxonomic identification as a consequence of the short read length of pyrotags together with the detection of singleton sequences which corresponded to bacterial strains cultivated from the same sample highlight limitations and considerations which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting amplicon datasets. Amplicon pyrosequencing of replicate rhizosphere soil samples taken a year later permit the definition of the core microbiome associated with Thymus zygis plants. Abundant bacterial families and predicted functional profiles of the core microbiome suggest that the main drivers of the bacterial community in the Thymus zygis rhizosphere are related to the nutrients originating from the plant root and to their participation in biogeochemical cycles thereby creating an intricate relationship with this aromatic plant to allow for a feedback ecological benefit.

  5. BOX-PCR-based identification of bacterial species belonging to Pseudomonas syringae: P. viridiflava group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abi S.A. Marques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic characteristics and genetic fingerprints of a collection of 120 bacterial strains, belonging to Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato group, P. viridiflava and reference bacteria were evaluated, with the aim of species identification. The numerical analysis of 119 nutritional characteristics did not show patterns that would help with identification. Regarding the genetic fingerprinting, the results of the present study supported the observation that BOX-PCR seems to be able to identify bacterial strains at species level. After numerical analyses of the bar-codes, all pathovars belonging to each one of the nine described genomospecies were clustered together at a distance of 0.72, and could be separated at genomic species level. Two P. syringae strains of unknown pathovars (CFBP 3650 and CFBP 3662 and the three P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains were grouped in two extra clusters and might eventually constitute two new species. This genomic species clustering was particularly evident for genomospecies 4, which gathered P. syringae pvs. atropurpurea, coronafaciens, garçae, oryzae, porri, striafaciens, and zizaniae at a noticeably low distance.

  6. Polyphasic approach to bacterial dynamics during the ripening of Spanish farmhouse cheese, using culture-dependent and -independent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Platero, Antonio M; Valdivia, Eva; Maqueda, Mercedes; Martín-Sánchez, Inés; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel

    2008-09-01

    We studied the dynamics of the microbial population during ripening of Cueva de la Magahá cheese using a combination of classical and molecular techniques. Samples taken during ripening of this Spanish goat's milk cheese in which Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus were used as starter cultures were analyzed. All bacterial isolates were clustered by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, species-specific PCR, and multiplex PCR. Our results indicate that the majority of the 225 strains isolated and enumerated on solid media during the ripening period were nonstarter lactic acid bacteria, and Lactobacillus paracasei was the most abundant species. Other Lactobacillus species, such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus parabuchneri, were also detected at the beginning and end of ripening, respectively. Non-lactic-acid bacteria, mainly Kocuria and Staphylococcus strains, were also detected at the end of the ripening period. Microbial community dynamics determined by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis provided a more precise estimate of the distribution of bacteria and enabled us to detect Lactobacillus curvatus and the starter bacteria S. thermophilus and L. lactis, which were not isolated. Surprisingly, the bacterium most frequently found using culture-dependent analysis, L. paracasei, was scarcely detected by this molecular approach. Finally, we studied the composition of the lactobacilli and their evolution by using length heterogeneity PCR.

  7. Reactive oxygen species mediated bacterial biofilm inhibition via zinc oxide nanoparticles and their statistical determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Dwivedi

    Full Text Available The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼ 10-15 nm has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM. The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods.

  8. Optimizing culture medium for meristem tissue culture of several Saccharum species and commercial hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optimal range of medium nutrients and plant growth regulators (PGR) was investigated for in vitro culture of diverse sugarcane species and cultivars. Macro-nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K), were essential for growth of leaf primordia. Although the best concentration of ...

  9. Culture-dependent and -independent molecular analysis of the bacterial community within uranium ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ekramul; Sar, Pinaki

    2011-08-01

    The bacterial community structure within a uranium ore was investigated using culture-dependent and -independent clone library analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA genes. The major aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and identified, and their resistance to uranium and other heavy metals was characterized. Together with near neutral pH, moderate organic carbon content, elevated U and other heavy metals (V, Ni, Mn, Cu, etc.), the ore showed high microbial counts and phylotype richness. The bacterial community mainly consisted of uncultured Proteobacteria, with the predominance of γ - over β - and α -subdivisions, along with Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. A phylogenetic study revealed that nearly one-third of the community was affiliated to as yet uncultured and unidentified bacteria having a closer relationship to Pseudomonas. Lineages of Burkholderiaceae and Moraxellaceae were relatively more abundant in the total community, while genera affiliated to Xanthomonadaceae and Microbacteriaceae and Exiguobacterium were detected in the culturable fraction. More than 50% of the bacterial isolates affiliated to Stenotrophomonas, Microbacterium, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas and Enterobacter showed resistance to uranium and other heavy metals. The study showed for the first time that uranium ore harbors major bacterial groups related to organisms having a wide range of environmentally significant functional attributes, and the most abundant members are possibly new groups/taxa. These findings provide new insights into U-ore geomicrobiology that could be useful in biohydrometallurgy and bioremediation applications.

  10. Investigation of the bacterial communities associated with females of Lutzomyia sand fly species from South America.

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    Mauricio R V Sant'Anna

    Full Text Available Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of Leishmania that are acquired by the female sand fly during blood feeding on an infected mammal. Leishmania parasites develop exclusively in the gut lumen during their residence in the insect before transmission to a suitable host during the next blood feed. Female phlebotomine sand flies are blood feeding insects but their life style of visiting plants as well as animals, and the propensity for larvae to feed on detritus including animal faeces means that the insect host and parasite are exposed to a range of microorganisms. Thus, the sand fly microbiota may interact with the developing Leishmania population in the gut. The aim of the study was to investigate and identify the bacterial diversity associated with wild adult female Lutzomyia sand flies from different geographical locations in the New World. The bacterial phylotypes recovered from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries obtained from wild caught adult female Lutzomyia sand flies were estimated from direct band sequencing after denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of bacterial 16 rRNA gene fragments. These results confirm that the Lutzomyia sand flies contain a limited array of bacterial phylotypes across several divisions. Several potential plant-related bacterial sequences were detected including Erwinia sp. and putative Ralstonia sp. from two sand fly species sampled from 3 geographically separated regions in Brazil. Identification of putative human pathogens also demonstrated the potential for sand flies to act as vectors of bacterial pathogens of medical importance in addition to their role in Leishmania transmission.

  11. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, Joke A M; Molenaar, Douwe; van der Helm, Jannie J; Caspers, Martien P M; de Kat Angelino-Bart, Alie; Schuren, Frank H J; Speksnijder, Adrianus G C L; Westerhoff, Hans V; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Boon, Mathilde E; Reid, Gregor; de Vries, Henry J C; Kort, Remco

    2016-04-23

    To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition profiles and evaluate indicators for BV using three molecular methods. Evaluation of indicators for BV was carried out by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V5-V7 region, a tailor-made 16S rRNA oligonucleotide-based microarray, and a PCR-based profiling technique termed IS-profiling, which is based on fragment variability of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. An inventory of vaginal bacterial species was obtained from 40 females attending a Dutch sexually transmitted infection outpatient clinic, of which 20 diagnosed with BV (Nugent score 7-10), and 20 BV negative (Nugent score 0-3). Analysis of the bacterial communities by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed two clusters in the BV negative women, dominated by either Lactobacillus iners or Lactobacillus crispatus and three distinct clusters in the BV positive women. In the former, there was a virtually complete, negative correlation between L. crispatus and L. iners. BV positive subjects showed cluster profiles that were relatively high in bacterial species diversity and dominated by anaerobic species, including Gardnerella vaginalis, and those belonging to the Families of Lachnospiraceae and Leptotrichiaceae. Accordingly, the Gini-Simpson index of species diversity, and the relative abundance Lactobacillus species appeared consistent indicators for BV. Under the conditions used, only the 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing method was suitable to assess species diversity, while all three molecular composition profiling methods were able to indicate Lactobacillus abundance in the vaginal microbiota. An affordable and simple molecular test showing a depletion of the genus Lactobacillus in combination with an increased species diversity of vaginal

  12. Bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus by employing alternative culture media

    OpenAIRE

    Jozala,Angela Faustino; Pértile, Renata Aparecida Nedel; Santos, Carolina Alves dos; Ebinuma, Valéria de Carvalho Santos; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Gama, F. M.; Pessoa Júnior, Adalberto

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is used in different fields as a biological material due to its unique properties. Despite there being many BC applications, there still remain many problems associated with bioprocess technology, such as increasing productivity and decreasing production cost. New technologies that use waste from the food industry as raw materials for culture media promote economic advantages because they reduce environmental pollution and stimulate new research for science sustainabi...

  13. Culture-independent analysis of bacterial diversity in a child-care facility

    OpenAIRE

    Tin Sara; Lee Lesley; Kelley Scott T

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Child-care facilities appear to provide daily opportunities for exposure and transmission of bacteria and viruses. However, almost nothing is known about the diversity of microbial contamination in daycare facilities or its public health implications. Recent culture-independent molecular studies of bacterial diversity in indoor environments have revealed an astonishing diversity of microorganisms, including opportunistic pathogens and many uncultured bacteria. In this stud...

  14. Microbial activity of soil with sulfentrazone associated with phytoremediator species and inoculation with a bacterial consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Augusta Diniz Melo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Phytostimulation plays a key role in the process of rhizodegradation of herbicides in soil. Additionally, bio-enhancement associated with phytoremediation may increase the efficiency of the decontamination process of soils with herbicides. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the biomass and microbial activity of soil contaminated with sulfentrazone and cultivated with phytoremediator species plus a bacterial consortium. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, carried out with a 2 × 4 × 4 completely randomized factorial design with 4 replications. The first factor consisted of the presence or absence of bio-enhancement with a bacterial consortium composed of Pseudomonas bacteria; the second factor consisted of a monoculture or mixed cultivation of 2 phytoremediator species Canavalia ensiformis and Helianthus annuus, besides the absence of cultivation; the third factor was made up by the bio-remediation time (25, 45, 65, and 85 days after thinning. Uncultivated soils displayed low values of microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient as well as high values of metabolic quotient throughout the bio-remediation time, indicating the importance of cultivating phytoremediator species for the stimulation of soil microbiota. Bio-enhancement with the bacterial consortium, in general, promoted an increase in the microbial biomass and activity of soil contaminated with sulfentrazone. In the presence of the bacterial consortium, Canavalia ensiformis stimulated a greater activity of associated microbiota and supported a higher microbial biomass. Phytoremediation associated with microbial bio-enhancement are thus promising techniques for the bio-remediation for soils contaminated with sulfentrazone. This technique enhances the biomass and activity of soil microorganisms.

  15. Diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis: Role of tween 80 and triton X in ascitic fluid cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver, portal hypertension with hepatic encephalopathy and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP was admitted in an obtunded condition. Attempts at delineating the aetiology of the SBP using conventional cultures as well as automated systems were not successful. The use of non-anionic surfactant agents such as Tween 80-incorporated blood agar and Triton X treatment of the specimens facilitated the growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae from the ascitic fluid, which otherwise would have been concluded to represent culture-negative neutrocytic ascites. Thus, the use of the aforementioned agents could be explored in elucidating the aetiology of body cavity infections when conventional methods fail.

  16. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachere, Evelyne; Kouzayha, Achraf; Saulnier, Denis; Gayet, Nicolas; Guezennec, Jean

    2015-06-11

    Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L) with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w) acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures.

  17. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachere, Evelyne; Kouzayha, Achraf; Saulnier, Denis; Gayet, Nicolas; Guezennec, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L) with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w) acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures. PMID:26110895

  18. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Simon-Colin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures.

  19. Exploiting bacterial peptide display technology to engineer biomaterials for neural stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Lauren E; Dane, Karen Y; Daugherty, Patrick S; Healy, Kevin E; Schaffer, David V

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells are often cultured on substrates that present extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins; however, the heterogeneous and poorly defined nature of ECM proteins presents challenges both for basic biological investigation of cell-matrix investigations and translational applications of stem cells. Therefore, fully synthetic, defined materials conjugated with bioactive ligands, such as adhesive peptides, are preferable for stem cell biology and engineering. However, identifying novel ligands that engage cellular receptors can be challenging, and we have thus developed a high throughput approach to identify new adhesive ligands. We selected an unbiased bacterial peptide display library for the ability to bind adult neural stem cells (NSCs), and 44 bacterial clones expressing peptides were identified and found to bind to NSCs with high avidity. Of these clones, four contained RGD motifs commonly found in integrin binding domains, and three exhibited homology to ECM proteins. Three peptide clones were chosen for further analysis, and their synthetic analogs were adsorbed on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) or grafted onto an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) for cell culture. These three peptides were found to support neural stem cell self-renewal in defined medium as well as multi-lineage differentiation. Therefore, bacterial peptide display offers unique advantages to isolate bioactive peptides from large, unbiased libraries for applications in biomaterials engineering.

  20. Diamagnetic levitation enhances growth of liquid bacterial cultures by increasing oxygen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Camelia E; Larkin, Oliver J; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R; Eaves, Laurence; Rees, Catherine E D; Hill, Richard J A

    2011-03-06

    Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to reproduce aspects of weightlessness, on the Earth. We used a superconducting magnet to levitate growing bacterial cultures for up to 18 h, to determine the effect of diamagnetic levitation on all phases of the bacterial growth cycle. We find that diamagnetic levitation increases the rate of population growth in a liquid culture and reduces the sedimentation rate of the cells. Further experiments and microarray gene analysis show that the increase in growth rate is owing to enhanced oxygen availability. We also demonstrate that the magnetic field that levitates the cells also induces convective stirring in the liquid. We present a simple theoretical model, showing how the paramagnetic force on dissolved oxygen can cause convection during the aerobic phases of bacterial growth. We propose that this convection enhances oxygen availability by transporting oxygen around the liquid culture. Since this process results from the strong magnetic field, it is not present in other weightless environments, e.g. in Earth orbit. Hence, these results are of significance and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena.

  1. Application of Biomaterials and Inkjet Printing to Develop Bacterial Culture System

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    Tithimanan Srimongkon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We created an automated bioassay system based on inkjet printing. Compared to conventional manual bacterial culture systems our printing approach improves the quality as well as the processing speed. A hydrophobic/hydrophilic pattern as a container supporting a culture medium was built on filter paper using a toluene solution of polystyrene for hydrophobization, followed by toluene printing to create several hydrophilic areas. As culture media we used a novel poly(vinyl alcohol based hydrogel and a standard calcium alginate hydrogel. The poly(vinyl alcohol hydrogel was formed by physical crosslinking poly(vinyl alcohol with adipic acid dihydrazide solutions. The conditions of poly(vinyl alcohol gelation were optimized for inkjet printability and the optimum mixture ratio was determined. The calcium alginate hydrogel was formed by chemical reaction between sodium alginate and CaCl2 solutions. Together with nutrients both hydrogel solutions were successfully printed on paper by means of the modified inkjet printer. The amount of each solution was demanded simply by outputting CMYK values. In the last step bacterial cells were printed on both hydrogel media. For both media we achieved a stable bacteria growth which was confirmed by microscopical imaging of the developed bacterial colonies.

  2. Clinical significance of Bacillus species isolated from blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, D J; Saviteer, S M; Rutala, W A; Thomann, C A

    1989-06-01

    To determine the clinical significance of blood isolates of Bacillus, we reviewed all blood cultures obtained at North Carolina Memorial Hospital between 1981 and 1985. Over the five-year study period the number of patients (incidence per 10,000 hospital admissions) from whom Bacillus was isolated increased from 4.97 in 1981 to 12.5 in 1985. The incidence per 1,000 blood cultures also increased from 1.12 in 1981 to 2.33 in 1985. Review of the medical records of 78 of the 95 patients (82%) with positive cultures allowed retrospective classification of five isolates (6.4%) as clinically significant, 33 isolates (42.3%) as possibly significant, and 40 isolates (51.3%) as nonsignificant. Underlying diseases in patients with clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia included burn trauma in two, leukemia in one, carcinoma in one, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in one. All isolates judged to be clinically significant and the majority of possibly significant isolates were B cereus. We conclude that the isolation of Bacillus species from blood cultures is clinically significant in 5% to 10% of cases, that the incidence of Bacillus bacteremia is increasing, and that burn trauma should be added to the list of conditions known to predispose to clinically significant Bacillus bacteremia.

  3. Korean indigenous bacterial species with valid names belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyung Sook; Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Ji Hee; Kang, Joo Won; Kim, Dae In; Lee, Ji Hee; Seong, Chi Nam

    2016-12-01

    , Gyeonggi, Jeonnam, Daejeon, and Chungnam. A large number of novel actinobacterial species continue to be discovered since the Korean government is encouraging the search for new bacterial species and researchers are endeavoring to find out novel strains from extreme or untapped environments.

  4. What Makes a Bacterial Species Pathogenic?:Comparative Genomic Analysis of the Genus Leptospira.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick E Fouts

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis, caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira, is a globally widespread, neglected and emerging zoonotic disease. While whole genome analysis of individual pathogenic, intermediately pathogenic and saprophytic Leptospira species has been reported, comprehensive cross-species genomic comparison of all known species of infectious and non-infectious Leptospira, with the goal of identifying genes related to pathogenesis and mammalian host adaptation, remains a key gap in the field. Infectious Leptospira, comprised of pathogenic and intermediately pathogenic Leptospira, evolutionarily diverged from non-infectious, saprophytic Leptospira, as demonstrated by the following computational biology analyses: 1 the definitive taxonomy and evolutionary relatedness among all known Leptospira species; 2 genomically-predicted metabolic reconstructions that indicate novel adaptation of infectious Leptospira to mammals, including sialic acid biosynthesis, pathogen-specific porphyrin metabolism and the first-time demonstration of cobalamin (B12 autotrophy as a bacterial virulence factor; 3 CRISPR/Cas systems demonstrated only to be present in pathogenic Leptospira, suggesting a potential mechanism for this clade's refractoriness to gene targeting; 4 finding Leptospira pathogen-specific specialized protein secretion systems; 5 novel virulence-related genes/gene families such as the Virulence Modifying (VM (PF07598 paralogs proteins and pathogen-specific adhesins; 6 discovery of novel, pathogen-specific protein modification and secretion mechanisms including unique lipoprotein signal peptide motifs, Sec-independent twin arginine protein secretion motifs, and the absence of certain canonical signal recognition particle proteins from all Leptospira; and 7 and demonstration of infectious Leptospira-specific signal-responsive gene expression, motility and chemotaxis systems. By identifying large scale changes in infectious (pathogenic and intermediately

  5. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ye; DeBolt, Seth; Dreyer, Jamin; Scott, Delia; Williams, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon, and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root, and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and five phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50–64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application. PMID:26217348

  6. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ye; DeBolt, Seth; Dreyer, Jamin; Scott, Delia; Williams, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon, and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root, and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and five phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50-64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application.

  7. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye eXia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and 5 phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50%-64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application.

  8. Model for the feedback control system of bacterial growth. II. Growth in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleecken, S

    1989-12-07

    A mathematical model is developed that describes substrate limited bacterial growth in a continuous culture and that is based upon the conceptual framework elaborated in a previous paper for describing the feedback control system of cell growth [S. Bleecken, (1988). J. theor. Biol. 133, 37.] Central to the theory are the ideas that the limiting substrate is converted into low molecular weight building blocks of macromolecular synthesis which again are converted into biomass (RNA and protein) and that the rates of RNA and protein synthesis are controlled by the intracellular concentration of building blocks. It is shown that a continuous culture can be simulated by two interconnected feedback control systems the actuating signals of which are limiting substrate concentration and the intracellular concentration of building blocks, respectively. Three types of steady-states are found to appear in a continuous culture, besides the well-known stable steady-state of the whole culture there exist two batchlike steady-states of the biotic part of the culture which are metastable. The model is used to analyse the steady-states and their stability properties as well as the dynamic responses of biomass, RNA, protein, building block and substrate concentrations to changes in environmental conditions. Especially the inoculation of a continuous culture and the effects of step changes in dilution rate, inlet substrate concentration and growth temperature are studied in detail. Relations between the growth behaviour of a single cell and that of a continuous culture are derived. The RNA to protein ratio is introduced as a rough measure of the physiological state of cells and it is shown that a cell reacts to environmental changes with a simple pattern of basic responses in growth rate and physiological state. There are reasons to assume that the model presented is the minimal version of a structured model of bacterial growth and represents an optimum compromise between biological

  9. Bacterial Contamination of CT Equipment: Use of ATP Detection and Culture Results to Target Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, John; Burch, Debborah; Kucharski, Cheryl; Young, Carol; Kazerooni, Ella A; Davenport, Matthew S

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the use of an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) monitoring system to minimize surface contamination on inpatient computed tomography (CT) scanners. The bore, table, and wrap of two quaternary care inpatient CT scanners (load/scanner: ~ 30-40 CT examinations/day) were assayed with bacterial cultures and an ATP detection system during six prospective iterative plan-do-check-act improvement cycles from January 6, 2016 to October 12, 2016. Per-cycle sampling was for eight consecutive weekdays. ATP detection was expressed as relative light units (RLUs) through a luciferase reaction, with >350 RLU considered contaminated per manufacturer recommendations. Culture swabs were placed into 6.5% NaCl broth, a Staphylococcus enrichment broth, and incubated aerobically at 37°C for 48 hours. Positive broths were plated to chromogenic Staphylococcus media. Culture rates (Fisher exact test) and RLU values (Mann-Whitney U test) were compared. In Cycle 1, both culture results and median RLU values indicated the wrap was the most contaminated item (positive culture rate: 63% [10/16], median RLU interquartile range: 173 [IQR: 56-640]); however, RLU values were not predictive of per-sample culture results (P = .36). Following iterative improvements, RLU values at Cycle 6 were significantly lower than at peak (P = .02-.04) and within manufacturer's recommendations: all samples: 45 (IQR: 16-87), bore: 26 (IQR: 0-51), table: 68 (IQR: 21-89), wrap: 47 (IQR: 38-121). The Velcro wrap is the most contaminated item on a CT scanner, and special processes may be needed to ensure adequate cleansing. ATP detection is a crude surrogate for bacterial culture results but benefits from speed, reduced cost, and greater statistical power. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Life history correlates of fecal bacterial species richness in a wild population of the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benskin, Clare McW H; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger W; Mainwaring, Mark C; Wilson, Kenneth; Hartley, Ian R

    2015-02-01

    Very little is known about the normal gastrointestinal flora of wild birds, or how it might affect or reflect the host's life-history traits. The aim of this study was to survey the species richness of bacteria in the feces of a wild population of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus and to explore the relationships between bacterial species richness and various life-history traits, such as age, sex, and reproductive success. Using PCR-TGGE, 55 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified in blue tit feces. DNA sequencing revealed that the 16S rRNA gene was amplified from a diverse range of bacteria, including those that shared closest homology with Bacillus licheniformis, Campylobacter lari, Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp. For adults, there was a significant negative relationship between bacterial species richness and the likelihood of being detected alive the following breeding season; bacterial richness was consistent across years but declined through the breeding season; and breeding pairs had significantly more similar bacterial richness than expected by chance alone. Reduced adult survival was correlated with the presence of an OTU most closely resembling C. lari; enhanced adult survival was associated with an OTU most similar to Arthrobacter spp. For nestlings, there was no significant change in bacterial species richness between the first and second week after hatching, and nestlings sharing the same nest had significantly more similar bacterial richness. Collectively, these results provide compelling evidence that bacterial species richness was associated with several aspects of the life history of their hosts.

  11. Bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus by employing alternative culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozala, Angela Faustino; Pértile, Renata Aparecida Nedel; dos Santos, Carolina Alves; de Carvalho Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Gama, Francisco Miguel; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is used in different fields as a biological material due to its unique properties. Despite there being many BC applications, there still remain many problems associated with bioprocess technology, such as increasing productivity and decreasing production cost. New technologies that use waste from the food industry as raw materials for culture media promote economic advantages because they reduce environmental pollution and stimulate new research for science sustainability. For this reason, BC production requires optimized conditions to increase its application. The main objective of this study was to evaluate BC production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus using industry waste, namely, rotten fruits and milk whey, as culture media. Furthermore, the structure of BC produced at different conditions was also determined. The culture media employed in this study were composed of rotten fruit collected from the disposal of free markets, milk whey from a local industrial disposal, and their combination, and Hestrin and Schramm media was used as standard culture media. Although all culture media studied produced BC, the highest BC yield-60 mg/mL-was achieved with the rotten fruit culture. Thus, the results showed that rotten fruit can be used for BC production. This culture media can be considered as a profitable alternative to generate high-value products. In addition, it combines environmental concern with sustainable processes that can promote also the reduction of production cost.

  12. Bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt:related species and risk factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AA Gharamah; AM Moharram; MA Ismail; AK AL-Hussaini

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study risk factors, contributing factors of bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt, test the isolated species sensitive to some therapeutic agents, and to investigate the air-borne bacteria and fungi in opthalmology operating rooms. Methods: Thirty one cases of endophthalmitis were clinically diagnosed and microbiologically studied. Indoor air-borne bacteria and fungi inside four air-conditioned operating rooms in the Ophthalmology Department at Assiut University Hospitals were also investigated. The isolated microbes from endophthalmitis cases were tested for their ability to produce some extracellular enzymes including protease, lipase, urease, phosphatase and catalase. Also the ability of 5 fungal isolates from endophthalmitis origin to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to some therapeutic agents were studied. Results: Results showed that bacteria and fungi were responsihle for infection in 10 and 6 cases of endophthalmitis, respectively and only 2 cases produced a mixture of bacteria and fungi. Trauma was the most prevalent risk factor of endophthalmitis where 58.1% of the 31 cases were due to trauma. In ophthalmology operating rooms, different bacterial and fungal species were isolated. 8 bacterial and 5 fungal isolates showed their ability to produce enzymes while only 3 fungal isolates were able to produce mycotoxins. Terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. Conclusions: The ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and mycotoxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues. Microbial contamination of operating rooms with air-borne bacteria and fungi in the present work may be a source of postoperative endophthalmitis.

  13. Isolation of a lead tolerant novel bacterial species, Achromobacter sp. TL-3: assessment of bioflocculant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Neha; Subudhi, Sanjukta; Lal, Banwari; Devi, Arundhuti

    2013-11-01

    Lead is one of the four heavy metals that has a profound damaging effects on human health. In the recent past there has been an increasing global concern for development of sustainable bioremediation technologies for detoxification of lead contaminant. Present investigation highlights for lead biosorption by a newly isolated novel bacterial species; Achromobacter sp. TL-3 strain, isolated from activated sludge samples contaminated with heavy metals (collected from oil refinery, Assam, North-East India). For isolation of lead tolerant bacteria, sludge samples were enriched into Luria Broth medium supplemented separately with a range of lead nitrate; 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250 and 1500 ppm respectively. The bacterial consortium that could tolerate 1500 ppm of lead nitrate was selected further for purification of lead tolerant bacterial isolates. Purified lead tolerant bacterial isolates were then eventually inoculated into production medium supplemented with ethanol and glycerol as carbon and energy source to investigate for bioflocculant production. Bioflocculant production was estimated by monitoring the potential of lead tolerant bacterial isolate to flocculate Kaolin clay in presence of 1% CaCl2. Compared to other isolates, TL-3 isolate demonstrated for maximum bioflocculant activity of 95% and thus was identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. TL3 isolate revealed maximum homology (98%) with Achromobacter sp. and thus designated as Achromobacter sp. TL-3. Bioflocculant activity of TL-3 isolate was correlated with the change in pH and growth. Achromobacter sp. TL-3 has significant potential for lead biosorption and can be effectively employed for detoxification of lead contaminated waste effluents/waste waters.

  14. Bacterial degradation of synthetic and kraft lignin by axenic and mixed culture and their metabolic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ram; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2013-11-01

    Pulp paper mill effluent has high pollution load due to presence of lignin and its derivatives as major colouring and polluting constituents. In this study, two lignin degrading bacteria IITRL1 and IITRSU7 were isolated and identified as Citrobacter freundii (FJ581026) and Citrobacter sp. (FJ581023), respectively. In degradation study by axenic and mixed culture, mixed bacterial culture was found more effective compared to axenic culture as it decolourized 85 and 62% of synthetic and kraft lignin whereas in axenic conditions, bacterium IITRL1 and IITRSU7 decolourized 61 and 64% synthetic and 49 and 54% kraft lignin, respectively. Further, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 71, 58% TOC; 78, 53% AOX; 70, 58% COD and 74, 58% lignin from synthetic and kraft lignin, respectively. The ligninolytic enzyme was characterized as manganese peroxidase by SDS-PAGE yielding a single band of 43 KDa. The HPLC analysis of degraded samples showed reduction as well as shifting of peaks compared to control indicating the degradation as well as transformation of compounds. Further, in GC-MS analysis of synthetic and kraft lignin degraded samples, hexadecanoic acid was found as recalcitrant compounds while 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-phenol and pentachloro-phenol were detected as new metabolites.

  15. Biodegradation of Palm Kernel Cake by Cellulolytic and Hemicellulolytic Bacterial Cultures through Solid State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Idris Alshelmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Four cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic bacterial cultures were purchased from the Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Culture (DSMZ and the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC. Two experiments were conducted; the objective of the first experiment was to determine the optimum time period required for solid state fermentation (SSF of palm kernel cake (PKC, whereas the objective of the second experiment was to investigate the effect of combinations of these cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic bacteria on the nutritive quality of the PKC. In the first experiment, the SSF was lasted for 12 days with inoculum size of 10% (v/w on different PKC to moisture ratios. In the second experiment, fifteen combinations were created among the four microbes with one untreated PKC as a control. The SSF lasted for 9 days, and the samples were autoclaved, dried, and analyzed for proximate analysis. Results showed that bacterial cultures produced high enzymes activities at the 4th day of SSF, whereas their abilities to produce enzymes tended to be decreased to reach zero at the 8th day of SSF. Findings in the second experiment showed that hemicellulose and cellulose was significantly P<0.05 decreased, whereas the amount of reducing sugars were significantly P<0.05 increased in the fermented PKC (FPKC compared with untreated PKC.

  16. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  17. Metagenomic analysis of two important, but difficult to culture soil borne bacterial phyla, the Acidobacteria and the Verrucomicrobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kielak, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Based on phylogenetic marker genes, such as 16S rRNA genes, it is clear that numerous bacterial lineages exist that appear to be quite common in the environment, yet poorly characterized and underrepresented in culture. Two of the most common bacterial phyla in soils that fall into this category are

  18. Bacterial siderophores efficiently provide iron to iron-starved tomato plants in hydroponics culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzki, W; Gutierrez Mañero, F J; Algar, E; Lucas García, J A; García-Villaraco, A; Ramos Solano, B

    2013-09-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements for a proper plant development. Providing plants with an accessible form of iron is crucial when it is scant or unavailable in soils. Chemical chelates are the only current alternative and are highly stable in soils, therefore, posing a threat to drinking water. The aim of this investigation was to quantify siderophores produced by two bacterial strains and to determine if these bacterial siderophores would palliate chlorotic symptoms of iron-starved tomato plants. For this purpose, siderophore production in MM9 medium by two selected bacterial strains was quantified, and the best was used for biological assay. Bacterial culture media free of bacteria (S) and with bacterial cells (BS), both supplemented with Fe were delivered to 12-week-old plants grown under iron starvation in hydroponic conditions; controls with full Hoagland solution, iron-free Hoagland solution and water were also conducted. Treatments were applied twice along the experiment, with a week in between. At harvest, plant yield, chlorophyll content and nutritional status in leaves were measured. Both the bacterial siderophore treatments significantly increased plant yield, chlorophyll and iron content over the positive controls with full Hoagland solution, indicating that siderophores are effective in providing Fe to the plant, either with or without the presence of bacteria. In summary, siderophores from strain Chryseobacterium C138 are effective in supplying Fe to iron-starved tomato plants by the roots, either with or without the presence of bacteria. Based on the amount of siderophores produced, an effective and economically feasible organic Fe chelator could be developed.

  19. Mineral Types and Tree Species Determine the Functional and Taxonomic Structures of Forest Soil Bacterial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Y; Nicolitch, O; Turpault, M-P; Uroz, S

    2017-03-01

    mineralogy influences the diversity, structure, and function of soil bacterial communities in relation to the soil conditions is crucial to better understanding the relative role of the soil bacterial communities in nutrient cycling and plant nutrition in nutrient-poor environments. The present study determined in detail the diversity and structure of bacterial communities associated with different mineral types incubated for 2.5 years in the soil under different tree species using cultivation-dependent and -independent analyses. Our data showed an enrichment of specific bacterial taxa on the minerals, specifically on the most weathered minerals, suggesting that they play key roles in mineral weathering and nutrient cycling in nutrient-poor forest ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. CULTURE DESCRIPTION OF SOME SPONTANEOUS LIGNICOLOUS MACROMYCETES SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BALAEŞ TIBERIUS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 24 species of lignicolous macromycetes from 4 taxonomic families and 2 orders, Class Agaricomycetes, Phyllum Basidiomycota, have been analyzed. The cultural characters of these isolates had been observed, some of them being little studied till now. The dikaryotic mycelium from the trama of the sporoms was used for the isolation purpose. The fungal isolates were cultivated onto malt extract-agar media (malt extract 20g l-1 and incubated at 25 °C, in the dark, for 6 weeks. The cultures were observed directly and using a Nikon stereomicroscope in order to measure the growth rhythm and to observe the changes of the colonies: edge, surface, reverse, shape, colour, smell, presence or absence of the exudates. After 6 weeks from the inoculation, microscopic slides were made in order to investigate the types of hyphae, the colour and the structure of the mycelium and to note the presence of particular elements: cuticle, chlamydospors, arthrospores, conidia, and basidia. We noticed that the analyzed species present similar characters but also significant differences between them.

  1. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    OpenAIRE

    Koop, G.; Dik, N; Nielen, M; Lipman, L. J. A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms, 3 bulk milk samples were collected at intervals of 2 wk. The samples were cultured for SPC, coliform count, and staphylococcal count and for the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, SCC ...

  2. Potential of Some Fungal and Bacterial Species in Bioremediation of Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms including fungi and bacteria have been reported to extract heavy metals from wastewater through bioaccumulation and biosorption. An attempt was, therefore, made to isolate bacteria and fungi from sites contaminated with heavy metals for higher tolerance and removal from wastewater. Bacterial and fungal isolates were obtained from the samples collected from Karnal, Ambala and Yamunanagar districts of Haryana using enrichment culture technique. Bacterial and fungal isolates with tolerant up to 100 ppm concentration of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr were tested for their removal from liquid media containing 50 ppm concentration of Pb, Cd and Cr each. Five fungi (Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspegillus nidulans, Aspergillus flavus, Rhizopus arrhizus, Trichoderma viride were also included in this study. Fungi Aspergillus nidulans, Rhizopus arrhizus and Trichoderma viride showed maximum uptake capacity of 25.67 mg/g for Pb, 13.15 mg/g for Cd and 2.55 mg/g of Cr, respectively. The maximum uptake capacity of tolerant bacterial isolates - BPb12 and BPb16, BCd5 and BCr14 were observed to be ~ 45 mg/g for Pb, 2.12 mg/g for Cd and 3.29 mg/g for Cr, respectively. This indicated the potential of these identified fungi and bacteria as biosorbent for removal of high concentration metals from wastewater and industrial effluents.

  3. Determination of bacterial load in house dust using qPCR, chemical markers and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkkäinen, Päivi M; Valkonen, Maria; Hyvärinen, Anne; Nevalainen, Aino; Rintala, Helena

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we developed two novel qPCR-assays for the detection of bacteria in house dust; one that determines the total bacterial amount and another that detects Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria separately. The methods were tested in silico and in vitro with microbial strains and vacuum cleaner dust samples, and validated in relation to culture and chemical marker analysis. We also compared the results of these three types of methods (qPCR, culture and chemical marker analysis) in 211 house dust samples from farming and non-farming environments. Microbial concentrations determined by the new qPCR assays (median 7.2 x 10(5) cell equivalents mg(-1)) were about two orders of magnitude higher than concentrations obtained by culture (median 6.7 x 10(3) cfu mg(-1)). The median concentration of muramic acid was 25.67 ng mg(-1) and that of 3-hydroxy fatty acids, expressed as LPS(10-16) was 26.14 pg mg(-1). Correlations between qPCR and chemical markers were moderate, while correlations between culture and qPCR and chemical markers were low to moderate. All the methods used in this study showed that the microbial concentrations are statistically significantly higher (p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney) in farming than non-farming environments.As a conclusion, all tested methods can be used for determining the bacterial load in dust samples, but none of the methods was superior to the others. The results obtained with these methods represent different aspects of bacterial exposure and therefore the results are not expected to be identical with each other.

  4. Development of species-specific primers for detection of Streptococcus mutans in mixed bacterial samples

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhou; Saxena, Deepak; Caufield, Page W.; Ge, Yao; Wang, Minqi; Li, Yihong

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the major microbial pathogen associated with dental caries in children. The objectives of this study were to design and evaluate species-specific primers for the identification of S. mutans. Validation of the best primer set, Sm479F/R, was performed using 7 S. mutans reference strains, 48 ATCC non-S. mutans strains, 92 S. mutans clinical isolates, DNA samples of S. mutans-S. sobrinus or S. mutans-S. sanguinis, and mixed bacterial DNA of saliva samples from 33 18-month-...

  5. Metabolites from the Fungal Endophyte Aspergillus austroafricanus in Axenic Culture and in Fungal-Bacterial Mixed Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Weaam; El-Neketi, Mona; Lewald, Laura-Isabell; Orfali, Raha S; Lin, Wenhan; Rehberg, Nidja; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Daletos, Georgios; Proksch, Peter

    2016-04-22

    The endophytic fungus Aspergillus austroafricanus isolated from leaves of the aquatic plant Eichhornia crassipes was fermented axenically on solid rice medium as well as in mixed cultures with Bacillus subtilis or with Streptomyces lividans. Chromatographic analysis of EtOAc extract of axenic cultures afforded two new metabolites, namely, the xanthone dimer austradixanthone (1) and the sesquiterpene (+)-austrosene (2), along with five known compounds (3-7). Austradixanthone (1) represents the first highly oxygenated heterodimeric xanthone derivative. When A. austroafricanus was grown in mixed cultures with B. subtilis or with S. lividans, several diphenyl ethers (8-11) including the new austramide (8) were induced up to 29-fold. The structures of new compounds were unambiguously elucidated using 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy, HRESIMS, and chemical derivatization. Compound 7 exhibited weak cytotoxicity against the murine lymphoma L5178Y cell line (EC50 is 12.6 μM). In addition, compounds 9 and 10, which were enhanced in mixed fungal/bacterial cultures, proved to be active against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 700699) with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 25 μM each (6.6 μg/mL), whereas compound 11 revealed moderate antibacterial activity against B. subtilis 168 trpC2 with an MIC value of 34.8 μM (8 μg/mL).

  6. Culture-independent bacterial community analysis of the salty-fermented fish paste products of Thailand and Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marui, Junichiro; Boulom, Sayvisene; Panthavee, Wanchai; Momma, Mari; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Saito, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    A bacterial community analysis, using a culture-independent method (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis), detected 17 species of bacteria including species of the genera Tetragenococcus, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Weissella Halanaerobium, Clostridium, and Sphingomonas in a traditional salty-fermented fish paste known as pla-ra or pa-daek in Thailand and Laos, which is used as a storage-stable multi-purpose seasoning. The representative genus of lactic acid bacteria seemed to vary in the 10 products collected from Thailand and Laos. Tetragenococci were common in products from central Thailand and Vientiane in Laos which had salinities of not less than 11% and pH values ranging from 5.6 to 6.1. However, lactobacilli were common in products from northern Thailand which had the lowest salinities (8.3-8.6%) and pH values (4.5-4.8) of all the samples examined. Two Lactobacillus and one Tetragenococcus species were detected in one product from northeastern Thailand containing 10% salt. These results suggest that salinity in pla-ra/pa-daek is an important determinant of the representative genus of lactic acid bacteria such as, Tetragenococcus or Lactobacillus. Additionally, differences in the acidity between these two groups seemed to be related to the production of d-/l-lactic acid in the lactic acid bacteria in each product. This is the first study to report a correlation between bacterial community structure and taste components in pla-ra/pa-daek products from various regions. This scientific work on a traditional fermented food will be useful in helping local producers meet differing consumer preferences in various regions.

  7. Hydroxytyrosol from tyrosol using hydroxyphenylacetic acid-induced bacterial cultures and evidence of the role of 4-HPA 3-hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Amouric, Agnès; Comte, Alexia; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Lorquin, Jean

    2009-12-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HTyr) is a potent natural antioxidant found in olive mill wastewaters. Bacterial conversion of 4-tyrosol (2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol) to HTyr was reported in a limited number of bacterial species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we studied this conversion, taking as a model the newly isolated Halomonas sp. strain HTB24. It was first hypothesized that the enzyme responsible for 4-tyrosol hydroxylation in HTyr was a 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid 3-hydroxylase (HPAH, EC 1.14.13.3), previously known to convert 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA) into 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPA) in P. aeruginosa. Cloning and expression of hpaB (oxygenase component) and hpaC (reductase component) genes from P. aeruginosa confirmed this hypothesis. Furthermore, using cultures of HTB24 containing 4-tyrosol, it was shown that 4-HPA accumulation preceded 4-tyrosol hydroxylation. We further demonstrated that the synthesis of HPAH activity was induced by 4-HPA, with the latter compound being formed from 4-tyrosol oxidation by aryl-dehydrogenases. Interestingly, similar results were obtained with other 4-HPA-induced bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus and other Halomonas, thus demonstrating general hydroxylating activity of 4-tyrosol by the HPAH enzyme. E. coli W did not have aryl-dehydrogenase activity and hence were unable to oxidize 4-tyrosol to 4-HPA and HTyr to 3,4-DHPA, making this bacterium a good candidate for achieving better HTyr production.

  8. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  9. Bacterial Species and Biochemical Characteristic Investigations of Nostoc flagelliforme Concentrates during its Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lifang; Lv, Hexin; Zhen, Jing; Jiang, Shengping; Jia, Shiru; Shen, Shigang; Gao, Lu; Dai, Yujie

    2016-04-28

    Preservation of fresh algae plays an important role in algae seed subculture and aquaculture. The determination and examination of the changes of cell viability, composition, and bacterial species during storage would help to take suitable preservation methods to prolong the preservation time of fresh algae. Nostoc flagelliforme is a kind of edible cyanobacterium with important herbal and dietary values. This article investigated the changes of bacterial species and biochemical characteristics of fresh N. flagelliforme concentrate during natural storage. It was found that the viability of cells decreased along with the storage time. Fourteen bacteria strains in the algae concentrate were identified by PCR-DGGE and were grouped into four phyla, including Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Among them, Enterococcus viikkiensis may be a concern in the preservation. Eleven volatile organic compounds were identified from N. flagelliforme cells, in which geosmin could be treated as an indicator of the freshness of N. flagelliforme. The occurrence of indole compound may be an indicator of the degradation of cells.

  10. Comparative genomics of non-pseudomonal bacterial species colonising paediatric cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L. Ormerod

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetic disorder cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting condition affecting ∼70,000 people worldwide. Targeted, early, treatment of the dominant infecting species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has improved patient outcomes; however, there is concern that other species are now stepping in to take its place. In addition, the necessarily long-term antibiotic therapy received by these patients may be providing a suitable environment for the emergence of antibiotic resistance. To investigate these issues, we employed whole-genome sequencing of 28 non-Pseudomonas bacterial strains isolated from three paediatric patients. We did not find any trend of increasing antibiotic resistance (either by mutation or lateral gene transfer in these isolates in comparison with other examples of the same species. In addition, each isolate contained a virulence gene repertoire that was similar to other examples of the relevant species. These results support the impaired clearance of the CF lung not demanding extensive virulence for survival in this habitat. By analysing serial isolates of the same species we uncovered several examples of strain persistence. The same strain of Staphylococcus aureus persisted for nearly a year, despite administration of antibiotics to which it was shown to be sensitive. This is consistent with previous studies showing antibiotic therapy to be inadequate in cystic fibrosis patients, which may also explain the lack of increasing antibiotic resistance over time. Serial isolates of two naturally multi-drug resistant organisms, Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, revealed that while all S. maltophilia strains were unique, A. xylosoxidans persisted for nearly five years, making this a species of particular concern. The data generated by this study will assist in developing an understanding of the non-Pseudomonas species associated with cystic fibrosis.

  11. Comparison of bacterial culture and 16S rRNA community profiling by clonal analysis and and pyrosequencing for the characterisation of the caries-associated microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin eSchulze-Schweifing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Culture-independent analyses have greatly expanded knowledge regarding the composition of complex bacterial communities including those associated with oral diseases. A consistent finding from such studies, however, has been the under-reporting of members of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, five pairs of broad range primers targeting 16S rRNA genes were used in clonal analysis of 6 samples collected from tooth lesions involving dentine in subjects with active caries. Samples were also subjected to cultural analysis and pyrosequencing by means of the 454 platform. A diverse bacterial community of 229 species-level taxa was revealed by culture and clonal analysis, dominated by representatives of the genera Prevotella, Lactobacillus, Selenomonas and Streptococcus. The five most abundant species were: Lactobacillus gasseri, Prevotella denticola, Alloprevotella tannerae, S. mutans and Streptococcus sp. HOT 070, which together made up 31.6 % of the sequences. Two samples were dominated by lactobacilli, while the remaining samples had low numbers of lactobacilli but significantly higher numbers of Prevotella species. The different primer pairs produced broadly similar data but proportions of the phylum Bacteroidetes were significantly higher when primer 1387R was used. All of the primer sets underestimated the proportion of Actinobacteria compared to culture. Pyrosequencing analysis of the samples was performed to a depth of sequencing of 4293 sequences per sample which were identified to 264 species-level taxa, and resulted in significantly higher coverage estimates than the clonal analysis. Pyrosequencing, however, also underestimated the relative abundance of Actinobacteria compared to culture.

  12. Novel Perspectives on the Characterization of Species-Dependent Optical Signatures of Bacterial Colonies by Digital Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalewicz, Igor; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Krauze, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    The use of light diffraction for the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial colonies was a significant breakthrough with widespread implications for the food industry and clinical practice. We previously confirmed that optical sensors for bacterial colony light diffraction can be used for bacterial identification. This paper is focused on the novel perspectives of this method based on digital in-line holography (DIH), which is able to reconstruct the amplitude and phase properties of examined objects, as well as the amplitude and phase patterns of the optical field scattered/diffracted by the bacterial colony in any chosen observation plane behind the object from single digital hologram. Analysis of the amplitude and phase patterns inside a colony revealed its unique optical properties, which are associated with the internal structure and geometry of the bacterial colony. Moreover, on a computational level, it is possible to select the desired scattered/diffracted pattern within the entire observation volume that exhibits the largest amount of unique, differentiating bacterial features. These properties distinguish this method from the already proposed sensing techniques based on light diffraction/scattering of bacterial colonies. The reconstructed diffraction patterns have a similar spatial distribution as the recorded Fresnel patterns, previously applied for bacterial identification with over 98% accuracy, but they are characterized by both intensity and phase distributions. Our results using digital holography provide new optical discriminators of bacterial species revealed in one single step in form of new optical signatures of bacterial colonies: digital holograms, reconstructed amplitude and phase patterns, as well as diffraction patterns from all observation space, which exhibit species-dependent features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial colony analysis via digital holography and our study represents an innovative approach

  13. Novel Perspectives on the Characterization of Species-Dependent Optical Signatures of Bacterial Colonies by Digital Holography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Buzalewicz

    Full Text Available The use of light diffraction for the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial colonies was a significant breakthrough with widespread implications for the food industry and clinical practice. We previously confirmed that optical sensors for bacterial colony light diffraction can be used for bacterial identification. This paper is focused on the novel perspectives of this method based on digital in-line holography (DIH, which is able to reconstruct the amplitude and phase properties of examined objects, as well as the amplitude and phase patterns of the optical field scattered/diffracted by the bacterial colony in any chosen observation plane behind the object from single digital hologram. Analysis of the amplitude and phase patterns inside a colony revealed its unique optical properties, which are associated with the internal structure and geometry of the bacterial colony. Moreover, on a computational level, it is possible to select the desired scattered/diffracted pattern within the entire observation volume that exhibits the largest amount of unique, differentiating bacterial features. These properties distinguish this method from the already proposed sensing techniques based on light diffraction/scattering of bacterial colonies. The reconstructed diffraction patterns have a similar spatial distribution as the recorded Fresnel patterns, previously applied for bacterial identification with over 98% accuracy, but they are characterized by both intensity and phase distributions. Our results using digital holography provide new optical discriminators of bacterial species revealed in one single step in form of new optical signatures of bacterial colonies: digital holograms, reconstructed amplitude and phase patterns, as well as diffraction patterns from all observation space, which exhibit species-dependent features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial colony analysis via digital holography and our study represents an

  14. Cheating fosters species co-existence in well-mixed bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Anne; Fredrik Inglis, R; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2017-01-06

    Explaining the enormous biodiversity observed in bacterial communities is challenging because ecological theory predicts that competition between species occupying the same niche should lead to the exclusion of less competitive community members. Competitive exclusion should be particularly strong when species compete for a single limiting resource or live in unstructured habitats that offer no refuge for weaker competitors. Here, we describe the 'cheating effect', a form of intra-specific competition that can counterbalance between-species competition, thereby fostering biodiversity in unstructured habitats. Using experimental communities consisting of the strong competitor Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and its weaker counterpart Burkholderia cenocepacia (BC), we show that co-existence is impossible when the two species compete for a single limiting resource, iron. However, when introducing a PA cheating mutant, which specifically exploits the iron-scavenging siderophores produced by the PA wild type, we found that biodiversity was preserved under well-mixed conditions where PA cheats could outcompete the PA wild type. Cheating fosters biodiversity in our system because it creates strong intra-specific competition, which equalizes fitness differences between PA and BC. Our study identifies cheating - typically considered a destructive element - as a constructive force in shaping biodiversity.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 6 January 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.195.

  15. Dancing for food in the deep sea: bacterial farming by a new species of Yeti crab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Thurber

    Full Text Available Vent and seep animals harness chemosynthetic energy to thrive far from the sun's energy. While symbiont-derived energy fuels many taxa, vent crustaceans have remained an enigma; these shrimps, crabs, and barnacles possess a phylogenetically distinct group of chemosynthetic bacterial epibionts, yet the role of these bacteria has remained unclear. We test whether a new species of Yeti crab, which we describe as Kiwa puravida n. sp, farms the epibiotic bacteria that it grows on its chelipeds (claws, chelipeds that the crab waves in fluid escaping from a deep-sea methane seep. Lipid and isotope analyses provide evidence that epibiotic bacteria are the crab's main food source and K. puravida n. sp. has highly-modified setae (hairs on its 3(rd maxilliped (a mouth appendage which it uses to harvest these bacteria. The ε- and γ- proteobacteria that this methane-seep species farms are closely related to hydrothermal-vent decapod epibionts. We hypothesize that this species waves its arm in reducing fluid to increase the productivity of its epibionts by removing boundary layers which may otherwise limit carbon fixation. The discovery of this new species, only the second within a family described in 2005, stresses how much remains undiscovered on our continental margins.

  16. Are nasopharyngeal cultures useful in diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Colborn, D Kathleen; Kearney, Diana H; Jeong, Jong H; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Barbadora, Karen A; Bowen, A'delbert; Flom, Lynda L; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis can be challenging because symptoms of acute sinusitis and an upper respiratory tract infection (URI) overlap. A rapid test, if accurate in differentiating sinusitis from URI, could be helpful in the diagnostic process. We examined the utility of nasopharyngeal cultures in identifying the subgroup of children with a clinical diagnosis of acute sinusitis who are least likely to benefit from antimicrobial therapy (those with completely normal sinus radiographs). Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 204 children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis. All children had sinus X-rays at the time of diagnosis. To determine if negative nasopharyngeal culture results could reliably identify the subgroup of children with normal radiographs, we calculated negative predictive values and negative likelihood ratios. Absence of pathogens in the nasopharynx was not helpful in identifying this low-risk subgroup.

  17. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-09-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry.

  18. A novel approach for estimating growth phases and parameters of bacterial population in batch culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Huaiqiang; LIU; Yuqing; LIU; Bo; GAO; Peiji

    2006-01-01

    Using mathematical analysis, a new method has been developed for studying the growth kinetics of bacterial populations in batch culture. First, sampling data were smoothed with the spline interpolation method. Second, the instantaneous rates were derived by numerical differential techniques and finally, the derived data were fitted with the Gaussian function to obtain growth parameters. We named this the Spline-Numerical-Gaussian or SNG method. This method yielded more accurate estimates of the growth rates of bacterial populations and new parameters. It was possible to divide the growth curve into four different but continuous phases based on changes in the instantaneous rates. The four phases are the accelerating growth phase, the constant growth phase, the decelerating growth phase and the declining phase. Total DNA content was measured by flow cytometry and varied depending on the growth phase. The SNG system provides a very powerful tool for describing the kinetics of bacterial population growth. The SNG method avoids the unrealistic assumptions generally used in the traditional growth equations.

  19. Exploring the bacterial microbiota associated with native South American species of Aphis (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, J D; Ortego, J

    2014-06-01

    Aphids harbor a variety of bacterial endosymbionts, including the obligate symbiont Buchnera aphidicola and diverse facultative symbionts. The former supplies its host with essential amino acids. The latter are not indispensable for insect survival, but often improve their host's fitness. To date, the study of such associations was restricted to aphids of Holarctic origin. The bacterial microbiota of seven Aphis species from Argentina was investigated. The presence of B. aphidicola was assessed by specific PCR. Additional symbionts were identified through PCR with eubacterial universal primers, cloning, and sequencing of nearly complete 16S rRNA gene, intergenic spacer region, and partial 23S rRNA gene and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Infection with B. aphidicola was confirmed in every species analyzed. The facultative symbiont Serratia symbiotica was detected in Aphis malalhuina Mier Durante, Nieto Nafría & Ortego, 2003, Aphis senecionicoides Blanchard, 1944, and Aphis schinifoliae Blanchard, 1939, while Hamiltonella defensa was identified in Aphis mendocina Mier Durante, Ortego & Nieto Nafría, 2006. Arsenophonus sp. was found infecting Aphis melosae Mier Durante & Ortego, 1999, and a new, undescribed Aphis sp. In Aphis danielae Remaudière, 1994, no facultative symbionts could be recorded. When analyzing the highly conserved 16S rRNA gene, the phylogenetic tree grouped the S. symbiotica, H. defensa, and Arsenophonus isolates into three well-defined clusters showing little variability among clones corresponding to the same aphid host species. This article reports for the first time the endosymbionts associated with aphids native to South America. Despite their geographic origin, the qualitative composition of their microbiota revealed no evident differences from that described for aphids in the Northern Hemisphere.

  20. Spatial and Species Variations in Bacterial Communities Associated with Corals from the Red Sea as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, O. O.

    2012-08-03

    Microbial associations with corals are common and are most likely symbiotic, although their diversity and relationships with environmental factors and host species remain unclear. In this study, we adopted a 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing technique to investigate the bacterial communities associated with three stony Scleractinea and two soft Octocorallia corals from three locations in the Red Sea. Our results revealed highly diverse bacterial communities in the Red Sea corals, with more than 600 ribotypes detected and up to 1,000 species estimated from a single coral species. Altogether, 21 bacterial phyla were recovered from the corals, of which Gammaproteobacteria was the most dominant group, and Chloroflexi, Chlamydiae, and the candidate phylum WS3 were reported in corals for the first time. The associated bacterial communities varied greatly with location, where environmental conditions differed significantly. Corals from disturbed areas appeared to share more similar bacterial communities, but larger variations in community structures were observed between different coral species from pristine waters. Ordination methods identified salinity and depth as the most influential parameters affecting the abundance of Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter in the corals. On the other hand, bacteria such as Chloracidobacterium and Endozoicomonas were more sensitive to the coral species, suggesting that the host species type may be influential in the associated bacterial community, as well. The combined influences of the coral host and environmental factors on the associated microbial communities are discussed. This study represents the first comparative study using tag-pyrosequencing technology to investigate the bacterial communities in Red Sea corals.

  1. Bacterial community analysis of cypermethrin enrichment cultures and bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Shamsa; Sultan, Sikander; Kertesz, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Cypermethrin is widely used for insect control; however, its toxicity toward aquatic life requires its complete removal from contaminated areas where the natural degradation ability of microbes can be utilized. Agricultural soil with extensive history of CM application was used to prepare enrichment cultures using cypermethrin as sole carbon source for isolation of cypermethrin degrading bacteria and bacterial community analysis using PCR-DGGE of 16 S rRNA gene. DGGE analysis revealed that dominant members of CM enrichment culture were associated with α-proteobacteria followed by γ-proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. Three potential CM-degrading isolates identified as Ochrobactrum anthropi JCm1, Bacillus megaterium JCm2, and Rhodococcus sp. JCm5 degraded 86-100% of CM (100 mg L(-1) ) within 10 days. These isolates were also able to degrade other pyrethroids, carbofuran, and cypermethrin degradation products. Enzyme activity assays revealed that enzymes involved in CM-degradation were inducible and showed activity when strains were grown on cypermethrin. Degradation kinetics of cypermethrin (200 mg kg(-1)) in soils inoculated with isolates JCm1, JCm2, and JCm5 suggested time-dependent disappearance of cypermethrin with rate constants of 0.0516, 0.0425, and 0.0807 d(-1), respectively, following first order rate kinetics. The isolated bacterial strains were among dominant genera selected under CM enriched conditions and represent valuable candidates for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils and waters.

  2. Relationship between the Presence of Bartonella Species and Bacterial Loads in Cats and Cat Fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) under Natural Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Harrus, Shimon

    2015-08-15

    Cats are considered the main reservoir of three zoonotic Bartonella species: Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae, and Bartonella koehlerae. Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) have been experimentally demonstrated to be a competent vector of B. henselae and have been proposed as the potential vector of the two other Bartonella species. Previous studies have reported a lack of association between the Bartonella species infection status (infected or uninfected) and/or bacteremia levels of cats and the infection status of the fleas they host. Nevertheless, to date, no study has compared the quantitative distributions of these bacteria in both cats and their fleas under natural conditions. Thus, the present study explored these relationships by identifying and quantifying the different Bartonella species in both cats and their fleas. Therefore, EDTA-blood samples and fleas collected from stray cats were screened for Bartonella bacteria. Bacterial loads were quantified by high-resolution melt real-time quantitative PCR assays. The results indicated a moderate correlation between the Bartonella bacterial loads in the cats and their fleas when both were infected with the same Bartonella species. Moreover, a positive effect of the host infection status on the Bartonella bacterial loads of the fleas was observed. Conversely, the cat bacterial loads were not affected by the infection status of their fleas. Our results suggest that the Bartonella bacterial loads of fleas are positively affected by the presence of the bacteria in their feline host, probably by multiple acquisitions/accumulation and/or multiplication events.

  3. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part A-Monocyclic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-08-01

    Present study focused on the screening of bacterial consortium for biodegradation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (MAH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Target compounds in the present study were naphthalene, acenaphthene, phenanthrene (PAHs), and benzene (MAH). Microbial consortia enriched with the above target compounds were used in screening experiments. Naphthalene-enriched consortium was found to be the most efficient consortium, based on its substrate degradation rate and its ability to degrade other aromatic pollutants with significantly high efficiency. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order benzene > naphthalene > acenaphthene > phenanthrene. Chryseobacterium and Rhodobacter were discerned as the predominant species in naphthalene-enriched culture. They are closely associated to the type strain Chryseobacterium arthrosphaerae and Rhodobacter maris, respectively. Single substrate biodegradation studies with naphthalene (PAH) and benzene (MAH) were carried out using naphthalene-enriched microbial consortium (NAPH). Phenol and 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde were identified as the predominant intermediates during benzene and naphthalene degradation, respectively. Biodegradation of toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene, phenol, and indole by NAPH was also investigated. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate biodegradation kinetics for benzene, whereas multiple substrate biodegradation model was able to simulate biodegradation kinetics for naphthalene.

  4. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaul Rajinder

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia

  5. The cross-species prediction of bacterial promoters using a support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towsey, Michael; Timms, Peter; Hogan, James; Mathews, Sarah A

    2008-10-01

    Due to degeneracy of the observed binding sites, the in silico prediction of bacterial sigma(70)-like promoters remains a challenging problem. A large number of sigma(70)-like promoters has been biologically identified in only two species, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. In this paper we investigate the issues that arise when searching for promoters in other species using an ensemble of SVM classifiers trained on E. coli promoters. DNA sequences are represented using a tagged mismatch string kernel. The major benefit of our approach is that it does not require a prior definition of the typical -35 and -10 hexamers. This gives the SVM classifiers the freedom to discover other features relevant to the prediction of promoters. We use our approach to predict sigma(A) promoters in B. subtilis and sigma(66) promoters in Chlamydia trachomatis. We extended the analysis to identify specific regulatory features of gene sets in C. trachomatis having different expression profiles. We found a strong -35 hexamer and TGN/-10 associated with a set of early expressed genes. Our analysis highlights the advantage of using TSS-PREDICT as a starting point for predicting promoters in species where few are known.

  6. Hot topic: Bovine milk samples yielding negative or nonspecific results in bacterial culturing--the possible role of PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism in mastitis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, K; Wimmer, M; Huber-Schlenstedt, R; Fehlings, K; Hölzel, C S; Bauer, J

    2012-01-01

    A large proportion of mastitis milk samples yield negative or nonspecific results (i.e., no mastitis pathogen can be identified) in bacterial culturing. Therefore, the culture-independent PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism method was applied to the investigation of bovine mastitis milk samples. In addition to the known mastitis pathogens, the method was suitable for the detection of fastidious bacteria such as Mycoplasma spp., which are often missed by conventional culturing methods. The detection of Helcococcus ovis in 4 samples might indicate an involvement of this species in pathogenesis of bovine mastitis. In conclusion, PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism is a promising tool for gaining new insights into the bacteriological etiology of mastitis.

  7. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  8. Effect of temperature, pH and detergents on the antifungal activity of bacterial culture filtrates against Mycosphaerella fijiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilyn Mena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria associated to crops have been studied as potential biocontrol agents. However, few investigations on the interaction Musa spp. - Mycosphaerella fijiensis-Musa associated bacteria have been developed. Consequently, bacterial metabolites involved and the effect on them of physical and chemical factors remain unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of temperature, pH and detergents on bacterial culture filtrates with antifungal activity in vitro against Mycosphaerella fijiensis. The pathogen growth inhibition was assessed by absorbance reading at OD 565nm. It was found that the antifungal activity of the bacterial culture filtrates against M. fijiensis, varied in the presence of different values of temperature, pH, and types of detergents and this was related to the bacterial strain. The results suggested the possible protein nature of the metabolites with antifungal activity. Keywords: bacteria, biological control, antifungal metabolites

  9. Urothelial cultures support intracellular bacterial community formation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ruth E; Klumpp, David J; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2009-07-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) causes most community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTI). In a mouse model of UTI, UPEC invades superficial bladder cells and proliferates rapidly, forming biofilm-like structures called intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). Using a gentamicin protection assay and fluorescence microscopy, we developed an in vitro model for studying UPEC proliferation within immortalized human urothelial cells. By pharmacologic manipulation of urothelial cells with the cholesterol-sequestering drug filipin, numbers of intracellular UPEC CFU increased 8 h and 24 h postinfection relative to untreated cultures. Enhanced UPEC intracellular proliferation required that the urothelial cells, but not the bacteria, be filipin treated prior to infection. However, neither UPEC frequency of invasion nor early intracellular trafficking events to a Lamp1-positive compartment were modulated by filipin. Upon inspection by fluorescence microscopy, cultures with enhanced UPEC intracellular proliferation exhibited large, dense bacterial aggregates within cells that resembled IBCs but were contained with Lamp1-positive vacuoles. While an isogenic fimH mutant was capable of forming these IBC-like structures, the mutant formed significantly fewer than wild-type UPEC. Similar to IBCs, expression of E. coli iron acquisition systems was upregulated by intracellular UPEC. Expression of other putative virulence factors, including hlyA, cnf1, fliC, kpsD, and the biofilm adhesin yfaL also increased, while expression of fimA decreased and that of flu did not change. These results indicate that UPEC differentially regulates virulence factors in the intracellular environment. Thus, immortalized urothelial cultures that recapitulate IBC formation in vitro represent a novel system for the molecular and biochemical characterization of the UPEC intracellular life cycle.

  10. Culture-independent analysis of bacterial communities in hemolymph of American lobsters with epizootic shell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert A; Smolowitz, Roxanna; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2013-03-26

    Epizootic shell disease (ESD) of the American lobster Homarus americanus H. Milne Edwards, 1837 is a disease of the carapace that presents grossly as large, melanized, irregularly shaped lesions, making the lobsters virtually unmarketable because of their grotesque appearance. We analyzed the bacterial communities present in the hemolymph of lobsters with and without ESD using nested-PCR of the 16S rRNA genes followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. All lobsters tested (n = 42) had bacterial communities in their hemolymph, and the community profiles were highly similar regardless of the sampling location or disease state. A number of bacteria were detected in a high proportion of samples and from numerous locations, including a Sediminibacterium sp. closely related to a symbiont of Tetraponera ants (38/42) and a Ralstonia sp. (27/42). Other bacteria commonly encountered included various Bacteroidetes, Pelomonas aquatica, and a Novosphingobium sp. One bacterium, a different Sediminibacterium sp., was detected in 20% of diseased animals (n = 29), but not in the lobsters without signs of ESD (n = 13). The bacteria in hemolymph were not the same as those known to be present in lesion communities except for the detection of a Thalassobius sp. in 1 individual. This work demonstrates that hemolymph bacteremia and the particular bacterial species present do not correlate with the incidence of ESD, providing further evidence that microbiologically, ESD is a strictly cuticular disease. Furthermore, the high incidence of the same species of bacteria in hemolymph of lobsters may indicate that they have a positive role in lobster fitness, rather than in disease, and further investigation of the role of bacteria in lobster hemolymph is required.

  11. Value of bacterial culture of vaginal swabs in diagnosis of vaginal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenadić Dane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Vaginal and cervical swab culture is still very common procedure in our country’s everyday practice whereas simple and rapid diagnostic methods have been very rarely used. The aim of this study was to show that the employment of simple and rapid diagnostic tools [vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy (VFWMM, vaginal pH and potassium hydroxide (KOH test] offers better assessment of vaginal environment than standard microbiologic culture commonly used in Serbia. Methods. This prospective study included 505 asymptomatic pregnant women undergoing VFWMM, test with 10% KOH, determination of vaginal pH and standard culture of cervicovaginal swabs. Combining findings from the procedures was used to make diagnoses of bacterial vaginosis (BV and vaginitis. In addition, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN was determined in each sample and analyzed along with other findings. Infections with Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis were confirmed or excluded by microscopic examination. Results. In 36 (6% patients cervicovaginal swab cultures retrieved several aerobes and facultative anaerobes, whereas in 52 (11% women Candida albicans was isolated. Based on VFWMM findings and clinical criteria 96 (19% women had BV, 19 (4% vaginitis, and 72 (14% candidiasis. Of 115 women with BV and vaginitis, pH 4.5 was found in 5, and of 390 with normal findings 83 (21% had vaginal pH 4.5. Elevated numbers of PMN were found in 154 (30% women - in 83 (54% of them VFWMM was normal. Specificity and sensitivity of KOH test and vaginal pH determination in defining pathological vaginal flora were 95% and 81%, and 79% and 91%, respectively. Conclusion. Cervicovaginal swab culture is expensive but almost non-informative test in clinical practice. The use of simpler and rapid methods as vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy, KOH test and vaginal pH offers better results in diagnosis, and probably in the treatment and prevention of sequels of vaginal

  12. Lipid biomarkers for bacterial ecosystems: studies of cultured organisms, hydrothermal environments and ancient sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Jahnke, L. L.; Simoneit, B. R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper forms part of our long-term goal of using molecular structure and carbon isotopic signals preserved as hydrocarbons in ancient sediments to improve understanding of the early evolution of Earth's surface environment. We are particularly concerned with biomarkers which are informative about aerobiosis. Here, we combine bacterial biochemistry with the organic geochemistry of contemporary and ancient hydrothermal ecosystems to construct models for the nature, behaviour and preservation potential of primitive microbial communities. We use a combined molecular and isotopic approach to characterize lipids produced by cultured bacteria and test a variety of culture conditions which affect their biosynthesis. This information is then compared with lipid mixtures isolated from contemporary hot springs and evaluated for the kinds of chemical change that would accompany burial and incorporation into the sedimentary record. In this study we have shown that growth temperature does not appear to alter isotopic fractionation within the lipid classes produced by a methanotropic bacterium. We also found that cultured cyanobacteria biosynthesize diagnostic methylalkanes and dimethylalkanes with the latter only made when growing under low pCO2. In an examination of a microbial mat sample from Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (USA), we could readily identify chemical structures with 13C contents which were diagnostic for the phototrophic organisms such as cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus. We could not, however, find molecular evidence for operation of a methane cycle in the particular mat samples we studied.

  13. Influences of Plant Species, Season and Location on Leaf Endophytic Bacterial Communities of Non-Cultivated Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Ding

    Full Text Available Bacteria are known to be associated endophytically with plants. Research on endophytic bacteria has identified their importance in food safety, agricultural production and phytoremediation. However, the diversity of endophytic bacterial communities and the forces that shape their compositions in non-cultivated plants are largely uncharacterized. In this study, we explored the diversity, community structure, and dynamics of endophytic bacteria in different plant species in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve of northern Oklahoma, USA. High throughput sequencing of amplified segments of bacterial rDNA from 81 samples collected at four sampling times from five plant species at four locations identified 335 distinct OTUs at 97% sequence similarity, representing 16 phyla. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in the communities, followed by the phyla Bacteriodetes and Actinobacteria. Bacteria from four classes of Proteobacteria were detected with Alphaproteobacteria as the dominant class. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that host plant species and collecting date had significant influences on the compositions of the leaf endophytic bacterial communities. The proportion of Alphaproteobacteria was much higher in the communities from Asclepias viridis than from other plant species and differed from month to month. The most dominant bacterial groups identified in LDA Effect Size analysis showed host-specific patterns, indicating mutual selection between host plants and endophytic bacteria and that leaf endophytic bacterial compositions were dynamic, varying with the host plant's growing season in three distinct patterns. In summary, next generation sequencing has revealed variations in the taxonomic compositions of leaf endophytic bacterial communities dependent primarily on the nature of the plant host species.

  14. Influences of Plant Species, Season and Location on Leaf Endophytic Bacterial Communities of Non-Cultivated Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Melcher, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are known to be associated endophytically with plants. Research on endophytic bacteria has identified their importance in food safety, agricultural production and phytoremediation. However, the diversity of endophytic bacterial communities and the forces that shape their compositions in non-cultivated plants are largely uncharacterized. In this study, we explored the diversity, community structure, and dynamics of endophytic bacteria in different plant species in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve of northern Oklahoma, USA. High throughput sequencing of amplified segments of bacterial rDNA from 81 samples collected at four sampling times from five plant species at four locations identified 335 distinct OTUs at 97% sequence similarity, representing 16 phyla. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in the communities, followed by the phyla Bacteriodetes and Actinobacteria. Bacteria from four classes of Proteobacteria were detected with Alphaproteobacteria as the dominant class. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that host plant species and collecting date had significant influences on the compositions of the leaf endophytic bacterial communities. The proportion of Alphaproteobacteria was much higher in the communities from Asclepias viridis than from other plant species and differed from month to month. The most dominant bacterial groups identified in LDA Effect Size analysis showed host-specific patterns, indicating mutual selection between host plants and endophytic bacteria and that leaf endophytic bacterial compositions were dynamic, varying with the host plant's growing season in three distinct patterns. In summary, next generation sequencing has revealed variations in the taxonomic compositions of leaf endophytic bacterial communities dependent primarily on the nature of the plant host species.

  15. MOSAIC: an online database dedicated to the comparative genomics of bacterial strains at the intra-species level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapello, Hélène; Gendrault, Annie; Caron, Christophe; Blum, Jérome; Petit, Marie-Agnès; El Karoui, Meriem

    2008-11-27

    The recent availability of complete sequences for numerous closely related bacterial genomes opens up new challenges in comparative genomics. Several methods have been developed to align complete genomes at the nucleotide level but their use and the biological interpretation of results are not straightforward. It is therefore necessary to develop new resources to access, analyze, and visualize genome comparisons. Here we present recent developments on MOSAIC, a generalist comparative bacterial genome database. This database provides the bacteriologist community with easy access to comparisons of complete bacterial genomes at the intra-species level. The strategy we developed for comparison allows us to define two types of regions in bacterial genomes: backbone segments (i.e., regions conserved in all compared strains) and variable segments (i.e., regions that are either specific to or variable in one of the aligned genomes). Definition of these segments at the nucleotide level allows precise comparative and evolutionary analyses of both coding and non-coding regions of bacterial genomes. Such work is easily performed using the MOSAIC Web interface, which allows browsing and graphical visualization of genome comparisons. The MOSAIC database now includes 493 pairwise comparisons and 35 multiple maximal comparisons representing 78 bacterial species. Genome conserved regions (backbones) and variable segments are presented in various formats for further analysis. A graphical interface allows visualization of aligned genomes and functional annotations. The MOSAIC database is available online at http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/mosaic.

  16. Characterization of culturable bacterial populations associating with Pinus sylvestris--Suillus bovinus mycorrhizospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Sari; Hurek, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial isolations were carried out on Pinus sylvestris--Suillus bovinus mycorrhizospheres obtained directly from boreal pine forest. When samples were taken during dry weather, the numbers of bacterial colony-forming units were significantly higher in uncolonized short roots and external mycelia than in mycorrhizal roots and soil outside the mycorrhizosphere. In contrast, the colony-forming unit counts were similar in all hypogeous samples after rainy weather. Culturable bacteria were absent from most Suillus bovinus sporocarps. The bacteria isolated from all types of mycorr hizo sphere samples, i.e. short roots, mycorrhizal roots, and external mycelia, consisted primarily of Burkholderia spp., whereas most isolates from soil outside the mycorrhizosphere were identified as Paenibacillus spp. This study shows that mycorrhizal external mycelia can expand the habitat favourable for common rhizosphere bacteria into the soil far from the immediate rhizosphere. Some of these bacteria may help the trees with nitrogen acquisition, since potentially diazotrophic bacteria harbouring nitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes were isolated from mycorrhizal root tips.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixandru, Brînduşa-Elena; Drăcea, Nicoleta Olguţa; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Drăgulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Luminiţa; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species.

  18. The pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein is an intra-species bacterial adhesin that promotes bacterial aggregation in vivo and in biofilms.

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    Carlos J Sanchez

    Full Text Available The Pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein (PsrP is a pathogenicity island encoded adhesin that has been positively correlated with the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease. Previous studies have shown that PsrP mediates bacterial attachment to Keratin 10 (K10 on the surface of lung cells through amino acids 273-341 located in the Basic Region (BR domain. In this study we determined that the BR domain of PsrP also mediates an intra-species interaction that promotes the formation of large bacterial aggregates in the nasopharynx and lungs of infected mice as well as in continuous flow-through models of mature biofilms. Using numerous methods, including complementation of mutants with BR domain deficient constructs, fluorescent microscopy with Cy3-labeled recombinant (rBR, Far Western blotting of bacterial lysates, co-immunoprecipitation with rBR, and growth of biofilms in the presence of antibodies and competitive peptides, we determined that the BR domain, in particular amino acids 122-166 of PsrP, promoted bacterial aggregation and that antibodies against the BR domain were neutralizing. Using similar methodologies, we also determined that SraP and GspB, the Serine-rich repeat proteins (SRRPs of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus gordonii, respectively, also promoted bacterial aggregation and that their Non-repeat domains bound to their respective SRRPs. This is the first report to show the presence of biofilm-like structures in the lungs of animals infected with S. pneumoniae and show that SRRPs have dual roles as host and bacterial adhesins. These studies suggest that recombinant Non-repeat domains of SRRPs (i.e. BR for S. pneumoniae may be useful as vaccine antigens to protect against Gram-positive bacteria that cause infection.

  19. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Versus Bacterial Culture in Detection of Organisms in Otitis Media with Effusion (OME) in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Balegh H; Hamad, Mostafa S; Mohey, Mervat; Amen, Sameh

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare between polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bacterial culture in detection of Streptococcus Pneumonia and M. Catarrhalis in otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. Fifty patients having OME were included in this study between 2003 and 2008. Myringotomy and tympanostomy tube insertion were done in every patient and the middle ear effusion samples were aspirated. The samples were subjected to bacteriological study in the form of culture and molecular study in the form of PCR using JM201/202-204 primer probe set for both S. pneumonia and M. catarrhalis. The results of Bacterial cultures are as follows: five cases (10%) were culture positive for S. pneumonia. Six cases (12%) were culture positive for M. catarrhalis. Only one case (2%) showed positively for both S. pneumonia and M. catarrhalis. Polymerase chain reaction test shows that 18 cases (36%) were positive for S. pneumonia, 22 cases (44%) were positive for M. catarrhalis, 6 cases (12%) were positive for both organism and 4 cases (8%) were negative. The difference between the proportion of culture positive and PCR positive specimens for both organisms individually and collectively was significant (P PCR is more accurate than bacterial culture in detection of organisms in middle ear fluid in OME and that M. catarrhalis plays a significant rule in OME as it is the sole organism identified more than the other one by PCR.

  20. Diversity and localization of bacterial endosymbionts from whitefly species collected in Brazil.

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    Julio Massaharu Marubayashi

    Full Text Available Whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae are sap-sucking insect pests, and some cause serious damage in agricultural crops by direct feeding and by transmitting plant viruses. Whiteflies maintain close associations with bacterial endosymbionts that can significantly influence their biology. All whitefly species harbor a primary endosymbiont, and a diverse array of secondary endosymbionts. In this study, we surveyed 34 whitefly populations collected from the states of Sao Paulo, Bahia, Minas Gerais and Parana in Brazil, for species identification and for infection with secondary endosymbionts. Sequencing the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene revealed the existence of five whitefly species: The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci B biotype (recently termed Middle East-Asia Minor 1 or MEAM1, the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum, B. tabaci A biotype (recently termed New World 2 or NW2 collected only from Euphorbia, the Acacia whitefly Tetraleurodes acaciae and Bemisia tuberculata both were detected only on cassava. Sequencing rRNA genes showed that Hamiltonella and Rickettsia were highly prevalent in all MEAM1 populations, while Cardinium was close to fixation in only three populations. Surprisingly, some MEAM1 individuals and one NW2 population were infected with Fritschea. Arsenopnohus was the only endosymbiont detected in T. vaporariorum. In T. acaciae and B. tuberculata populations collected from cassava, Wolbachia was fixed in B. tuberculata and was highly prevalent in T. acaciae. Interestingly, while B. tuberculata was additionally infected with Arsenophonus, T. acaciae was infected with Cardinium and Fritschea. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on representative individuals showed that Hamiltonella, Arsenopnohus and Fritschea were localized inside the bacteriome, Cardinium and Wolbachia exhibited dual localization patterns inside and outside the bacteriome, and Rickettsia showed strict localization outside the

  1. Diversity and localization of bacterial endosymbionts from whitefly species collected in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubayashi, Julio Massaharu; Kliot, Adi; Yuki, Valdir Atsushi; Rezende, Jorge Alberto Marques; Krause-Sakate, Renate; Pavan, Marcelo Agenor; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) are sap-sucking insect pests, and some cause serious damage in agricultural crops by direct feeding and by transmitting plant viruses. Whiteflies maintain close associations with bacterial endosymbionts that can significantly influence their biology. All whitefly species harbor a primary endosymbiont, and a diverse array of secondary endosymbionts. In this study, we surveyed 34 whitefly populations collected from the states of Sao Paulo, Bahia, Minas Gerais and Parana in Brazil, for species identification and for infection with secondary endosymbionts. Sequencing the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene revealed the existence of five whitefly species: The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci B biotype (recently termed Middle East-Asia Minor 1 or MEAM1), the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum, B. tabaci A biotype (recently termed New World 2 or NW2) collected only from Euphorbia, the Acacia whitefly Tetraleurodes acaciae and Bemisia tuberculata both were detected only on cassava. Sequencing rRNA genes showed that Hamiltonella and Rickettsia were highly prevalent in all MEAM1 populations, while Cardinium was close to fixation in only three populations. Surprisingly, some MEAM1 individuals and one NW2 population were infected with Fritschea. Arsenopnohus was the only endosymbiont detected in T. vaporariorum. In T. acaciae and B. tuberculata populations collected from cassava, Wolbachia was fixed in B. tuberculata and was highly prevalent in T. acaciae. Interestingly, while B. tuberculata was additionally infected with Arsenophonus, T. acaciae was infected with Cardinium and Fritschea. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on representative individuals showed that Hamiltonella, Arsenopnohus and Fritschea were localized inside the bacteriome, Cardinium and Wolbachia exhibited dual localization patterns inside and outside the bacteriome, and Rickettsia showed strict localization outside the bacteriome. This study is

  2. Host species and environmental effects on bacterial communities associated with Drosophila in the laboratory and in the natural environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Staubach

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila is a classic model organism to study adaptation as well as the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypes. Although associated bacterial communities might be important for many aspects of Drosophila biology, knowledge about their diversity, composition, and factors shaping them is limited. We used 454-based sequencing of a variable region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene to characterize the bacterial communities associated with wild and laboratory Drosophila isolates. In order to specifically investigate effects of food source and host species on bacterial communities, we analyzed samples from wild Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans collected from a variety of natural substrates, as well as from adults and larvae of nine laboratory-reared Drosophila species. We find no evidence for host species effects in lab-reared flies; instead, lab of origin and stochastic effects, which could influence studies of Drosophila phenotypes, are pronounced. In contrast, the natural Drosophila-associated microbiota appears to be predominantly shaped by food substrate with an additional but smaller effect of host species identity. We identify a core member of this natural microbiota that belongs to the genus Gluconobacter and is common to all wild-caught flies in this study, but absent from the laboratory. This makes it a strong candidate for being part of what could be a natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans core microbiome. Furthermore, we were able to identify candidate pathogens in natural fly isolates.

  3. Evidence of novel plant-species specific ammonia oxidizing bacterial clades in acidic South African fynbos soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramond, JB

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available -1 Journal of Basic Microbiology Evidence of novel plant-species specific ammonia oxidizing bacterial clades in acidic South African fynbos soils Jean-Baptiste Ramond1, Joseph D. W. Lako2, William H. L. Stafford3, Marla I. Tuffin4 and Don A. Cowan1...

  4. Diversity and localization of bacterial symbionts in three whitefly species (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) from the east coast of the Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaljac, M; Zanić, K; Hrnčić, S; Radonjić, S; Perović, T; Ghanim, M

    2013-02-01

    Several whitefly species (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) are cosmopolitan phloem-feeders that cause serious damage in numerous agricultural crops. All whitefly species harbor a primary bacterial symbiont and a diverse array of secondary symbionts which may influence several aspects of the insect's biology. We surveyed infections by secondary symbionts in Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) and Siphoninus phillyreae (Haliday) from areas in the east cost of the Adriatic Sea. Both the Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED) B. tabaci genetic groups were detected in Montenegro, whereas only the MED was confirmed in Croatia. Trialeurodes vaporariorum and S. phillyreae were found in all areas surveyed. MEAM1 and MED exhibited similarity to previously reported infections, while populations of T. vaporariorum from Montenegro harbored Rickettsia, Wolbachia and Cardinium in addition to previously reported Hamiltonella and Arsenopnohus. Siphoninus phillyreae harbored Hamiltonella, Wolbachia, Cardinium and Arsenophonus, with the latter appearing in two alleles. Multiple infections of all symbionts were common in the three insect species tested, with some reaching near fixation. Florescent in situ hybridization showed new localization patterns for Hamiltonella in S. phillyreae, and the morphology of the bacteriosome differed from that observed in other whitefly species. Our results show new infections with bacterial symbionts in the whitefly species studied. Infections with the same symbionts in reproductively isolated whitefly species confirm complex relationships between whiteflies and bacterial symbionts, and suggest possible horizontal transfer of some of these bacteria.

  5. Multi-probe real-time PCR identification of four common Candida species in blood culture broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foongladda, Suporn; Mongkol, Nanthanida; Petlum, Pornphan; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2014-06-01

    We developed a single-tube real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with multiple hybridization probes for detecting Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Primers were designed to amplify 18S rRNA gene of the genus Candida, and DNA probes were designed to hybridize two areas of the amplicons. The amplification curves and specific melting peaks of the probes hybridized with PCR product were used for definite species identifications. The reaction specificity was 100 % when evaluating the assay using DNA samples from 21 isolates of fungal and bacterial species. The assay was further evaluated in 129 fungal blood culture broth samples which were culture positive for fungus. Of the 129 samples, 119 were positively identified as: C. albicans (39), C. tropicalis (30), C. parapsilosis (23), C. glabrata (20), Candida spp. (5), and two samples containing mixed C. glabrata/C. albicans and C. glabrata/C. tropicalis. The five Candida spp. were identified by sequencing analysis as C. krusei, C. dubliniensis, C. aquaetextoris, and two isolates of C. athensensis. Of the ten samples which showed negative PCR results, six were Cryptococcus neoformans, and the others were Trichosporon sp., Rhodotorula sp., Fusarium sp., and Penicillium marneffei. Our findings show that the assay was highly effective in identifying the four medically important Candida species. The results can be available within 3 h after positivity of a blood culture broth sample.

  6. Predicting genetic and ecological characteristics of bacterial species by comparing the trajectories of dN/dS and dI/dS in bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2014-02-01

    Indel (insertion/deletion) causes gene disruption and is considered to be deleterious like non-synonymous mutation during the evolution of bacterial genomes. The trajectory of dN/dS (the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous mutation) has been found to decrease exponentially over time, but the trajectory of dI/dS (the ratio of indel to synonymous mutation) has not been thoroughly explored yet. Here we compared the patterns of dN/dS and dI/dS for several bacterial species. The majority of them showed a much steeper dI/dS trajectory than the dN/dS trajectory, suggesting that indel was more deleterious than non-synonymous mutation and therefore was more difficult to fix in genomes. However, the naturally competent bacteria, or those with a much lower genetic barrier for DNA exchange, presented a reverse relationship between dI/dS and dN/dS, indicative of an exceptional ability to tolerate horizontal genetic transfer. The result suggests that plotting of dN/dS and dI/dS trajectories can help to predict the genetic and ecological characteristics of bacterial species.

  7. Bacterial diversity assessed by cultivation-based techniques shows predominance of Staphylococccus species on coins collected in Lisbon and Casablanca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Caramujo, Maria José

    2014-04-01

    Money is usually considered a source of infections, yet survival of bacteria on dry metal surfaces is limited. The aim of this work was to assess the bacterial numbers and diversity on coins collected in Casablanca and Lisbon as these two cities, on different continents and only 585 km apart, have diverse cultural habitats, but have similar climate. A cultivation-based characterisation of the bacterial community showed that a relatively low number of cells per area of coin were found on both Moroccan Dirhams and Euros (0.014 and 0.125 colony-forming units (CFU) mm(-2) , respectively). Most of the bacterial isolates were located near the rim of the coins, and coins collected in Europe contained more CFU/area of coin. Coins collected in Europe and transported in pockets presented a higher number of bacterial isolates (maximum 0.125 CFU mm(-2) ) than coins transported in wallets (maximum 0.042 CFU mm(-2) ), regardless of the gender of the person transporting them, suggesting that temperature and moisture might be key parameters for bacterial survival on metallic coins. Bacterial diversity was higher for coins collected in Casablanca relative to coins collected in Lisbon, and there was no evidence that it was dependent on the gender of the person transporting the coins or the place of transport (pockets or wallets). Curiously, the percentage of Staphylococcus strains was 44% of the total isolates on both currencies.

  8. Production of bacterial cellulose using different carbon sources and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadkazemi, Faranak; Azin, Mehrdad; Ashori, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the effects of carbon sources and culture media on the production and structural properties of bacterial cellulose (BC) have been studied. BC nanofibers were synthesized using Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain PTCC 1734. Media used were Hestrin-Schramm (H), Yamanaka (Y), and Zhou (Z). Five different carbon sources, namely date syrup, glucose, mannitol, sucrose, and food-grade sucrose were used in these media. All the produced BC pellicles were characterized in terms of dry weight production, biomass yield, thermal stability, crystallinity and morphology by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The obtained results showed that mannitol lead to the highest yield, followed by sucrose. The highest production efficiency of mannitol might be due to the nitrogen source, which plays an important role. The maximum improvement on the thermal stability of the composites was achieved when mannitol was used in H medium. In addition, the crystallinity was higher in BC formed in H medium compared to other media. FE-SEM micrographs illustrated that the BC pellicles, synthesized in the culture media H and Z, were stable, unlike those in medium Y that were unstable. The micrographs of BC produced in media containing mannitol and sucrose provided evidence of the strong interfacial adhesion between the BC fibers without noticeable aggregates.

  9. The effect of boric acid on bacterial culture of canine and feline urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, M; Blackwood, L; Mas, A; Cripps, P; Crompton, C; Burrow, R

    2011-10-01

    To identify the optimal method of submission of canine and feline urine for bacterial culture. Cystocentesis samples from 250 animals (200 dogs, 50 cats) suspected of having urinary tract infections were collected. The reference aliquot, without preservative, was processed on site within 2 hours. Two further aliquots (one without preservative, one with boric acid) were stored at room temperature for up to 7 hours and then posted by guaranteed next day delivery to a commercial laboratory for analysis. Forty-seven of the samples were positive on culture in the reference test. There was no significant difference between reference test results and those of samples posted without preservative (P=0·39), but samples posted in boric acid were significantly less likely to give a positive result (P=0·01). Samples posted without preservative had a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 98%; for boric acid, sensitivity was 73% and specificity 99%. Postal urine samples should be submitted to the laboratory in a plain sterile tube. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  10. Rapid detection of Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from bacterial culture

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    Jyoti Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed to detect Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from a bacterial culture. Introduction: M. haemolytica is one of the most important and well-established etiological agents of pneumonia in sheep and other ruminants throughout the world. Accurate diagnosis of M. haemolytica primarily relies on bacteriological examination, biochemical characteristics and, biotyping and serotyping of the isolates. In an effort to facilitate rapid M. haemolytica detection, polymerase chain reaction assay targeting Pasteurella haemolytica serotype-1 specific antigens (PHSSA, Rpt2 and 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes were used to detect M. haemolytica directly from lung tissues and from bacterial culture. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 archived lung tissues from sheep that died of pneumonia on an organized farm were used. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR based on two-amplicons targeted PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica were used for identification of M. haemolytica isolates in culture from the lung samples. All the 12 lung tissue samples were tested for the presence M. haemolytica by PHSSA and Rpt2 genes based PCR and its confirmation by sequencing of the amplicons. Results: All the 12 lung tissue samples tested for the presence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica by mPCR were found to be positive. Amplification of 12S rRNA gene fragment as internal amplification control was obtained with each mPCR reaction performed from DNA extracted directly from lung tissue samples. All the M. haemolytica were also positive for mPCR. No amplified DNA bands were observed for negative control reactions. All the three nucleotide sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank (Accession No. KJ534629, KJ534630 and KJ534631. Sequencing of the amplified products revealed the identity of 99-100%, with published sequence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica available in the NCBI database. Sheep specific mitochondrial 12S r

  11. Clinical features, cytology and bacterial culture results in dogs with and without cheilitis and comparison of three sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelle, Maren; Loeffler, Anette; Wolf, Katharina; Kostka, Veit; Linek, Monika

    2016-06-01

    Cheilitis is a common presentation in dogs associated with a variety of skin diseases and often complicated by microbial infections. To describe and compare clinical and cytological features and bacterial culture results from the lower lips of dogs with cheilitis (as compared to healthy controls), and to evaluate three cytology sampling techniques for their abilities to differentiate between the groups. Fifty six dogs with cheilitis and 54 controls. Anatomy and clinical signs of the lower lip were recorded. Cytology samples taken by tape strip, direct impression and swabs rolled over skin were scored semiquantitatively for microorganisms, inflammatory cells and keratinocytes. Cytology scores were correlated with semiquantitative bacterial culture scores. Pure breeds, frequency of lip folds and all cytology scores except keratinocytes were higher in dogs with cheilitis than in controls, but a substantial overlap was seen in all microorganisms between the groups. Hypersensitivity disorders were diagnosed in 40 of 56 dogs with cheilitis. The tape strip technique yielded the greatest differences between groups. Bacterial growth was reported in 100% of dogs with cheilitis and in 93% of the controls. Pathogens such as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas spp were found more frequently in dogs with cheilitis. Cytology and bacterial culture were poorly correlated. Cheilitis was associated with primary hypersensitivity disorders and the presence of a lip fold was a predisposing factor. Results of aerobic culture were similar to prior studies on pyoderma of other body sites, except for higher rates of Pseudomonas spp. isolation. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  12. Tree phyllosphere bacterial communities: exploring the magnitude of intra- and inter-individual variation among host species

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    Isabelle Laforest-Lapointe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The diversity and composition of the microbial community of tree leaves (the phyllosphere varies among trees and host species and along spatial, temporal, and environmental gradients. Phyllosphere community variation within the canopy of an individual tree exists but the importance of this variation relative to among-tree and among-species variation is poorly understood. Sampling techniques employed for phyllosphere studies include picking leaves from one canopy location to mixing randomly selected leaves from throughout the canopy. In this context, our goal was to characterize the relative importance of intra-individual variation in phyllosphere communities across multiple species, and compare this variation to inter-individual and interspecific variation of phyllosphere epiphytic bacterial communities in a natural temperate forest in Quebec, Canada. Methods We targeted five dominant temperate forest tree species including angiosperms and gymnosperms: Acer saccharum, Acer rubrum, Betula papyrifera, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca. For one randomly selected tree of each species, we sampled microbial communities at six distinct canopy locations: bottom-canopy (1–2 m height, the four cardinal points of mid-canopy (2–4 m height, and the top-canopy (4–6 m height. We also collected bottom-canopy leaves from five additional trees from each species. Results Based on an analysis of bacterial community structure measured via Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S gene, we demonstrate that 65% of the intra-individual variation in leaf bacterial community structure could be attributed to the effect of inter-individual and inter-specific differences while the effect of canopy location was not significant. In comparison, host species identity explains 47% of inter-individual and inter-specific variation in leaf bacterial community structure followed by individual identity (32% and canopy location (6%. Discussion Our results suggest that

  13. Clostridium algifaecis sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterial species from decomposing algal scum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Fan; Zheng, Hui; Wu, Qing-Long; Yang, Hong; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Two anaerobic bacterial strains, MB9-7(T) and MB9-9, were isolated from decomposing algal scum and were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 are closely related to each other (99.7% similarity) and they are also closely related to Clostridium tyrobutyricum (96.5%). The two strains were Gram-stain positive and rod-shaped. Growth occurred at 20-45 °C, at pH 4.0-8.0 and at NaCl concentrations of up to 2% (w/v). Acid was produced from glucose, xylose and mannose. Products of fermentation in PYG medium were mainly butyrate, acetate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C(14:0) and C(16:0). The cellular polar lipids comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two glycolipids, one phospholipid, one aminophospholipid and two aminolipids. The DNA G+C contents of strain MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 were 27.9 and 28.7 mol%, respectively. These results support the assignment of the new isolates to the genus Clostridium and also distinguish them from other species of the genus Clostridium. Hence, it is proposed that strains MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 represent a novel species of the genus Clostridium, with the suggested name Clostridium algifaecis sp. nov. The type strain is MB9-7(T) ( =CGMCC 1.5188(T) =DSM 28783(T)).

  14. Bacterial Profiling Reveals Novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma Species in Australian Human-Biting Ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofton, Alexander W; Doggett, Stephen; Ratchford, Andrew; Oskam, Charlotte L; Paparini, Andrea; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, a conclusive aetiology of Lyme disease-like illness in human patients remains elusive, despite growing numbers of people presenting with symptoms attributed to tick bites. In the present study, we surveyed the microbial communities harboured by human-biting ticks from across Australia to identify bacteria that may contribute to this syndrome. Universal PCR primers were used to amplify the V1-2 hyper-variable region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in DNA samples from individual Ixodes holocyclus (n = 279), Amblyomma triguttatum (n = 167), Haemaphysalis bancrofti (n = 7), and H. longicornis (n = 7) ticks. The 16S amplicons were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform and analysed in USEARCH, QIIME, and BLAST to assign genus and species-level taxonomies. Nested PCR and Sanger sequencing were used to confirm the NGS data and further analyse novel findings. All 460 ticks were negative for Borrelia spp. by both NGS and nested PCR analysis. Two novel "Candidatus Neoehrlichia" spp. were identified in 12.9% of I. holocyclus ticks. A novel Anaplasma sp. was identified in 1.8% of A. triguttatum ticks, and a novel Ehrlichia sp. was identified in both A. triguttatum (1.2%) ticks and a single I. holocyclus (0.6%) tick. Further phylogenetic analysis of novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Anaplasma and Ehrlichia based on 1,265 bp 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that these are new species. Determining whether these newly discovered organisms cause disease in humans and animals, like closely related bacteria do abroad, is of public health importance and requires further investigation.

  15. Bacterial Profiling Reveals Novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma Species in Australian Human-Biting Ticks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W Gofton

    Full Text Available In Australia, a conclusive aetiology of Lyme disease-like illness in human patients remains elusive, despite growing numbers of people presenting with symptoms attributed to tick bites. In the present study, we surveyed the microbial communities harboured by human-biting ticks from across Australia to identify bacteria that may contribute to this syndrome. Universal PCR primers were used to amplify the V1-2 hyper-variable region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in DNA samples from individual Ixodes holocyclus (n = 279, Amblyomma triguttatum (n = 167, Haemaphysalis bancrofti (n = 7, and H. longicornis (n = 7 ticks. The 16S amplicons were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform and analysed in USEARCH, QIIME, and BLAST to assign genus and species-level taxonomies. Nested PCR and Sanger sequencing were used to confirm the NGS data and further analyse novel findings. All 460 ticks were negative for Borrelia spp. by both NGS and nested PCR analysis. Two novel "Candidatus Neoehrlichia" spp. were identified in 12.9% of I. holocyclus ticks. A novel Anaplasma sp. was identified in 1.8% of A. triguttatum ticks, and a novel Ehrlichia sp. was identified in both A. triguttatum (1.2% ticks and a single I. holocyclus (0.6% tick. Further phylogenetic analysis of novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Anaplasma and Ehrlichia based on 1,265 bp 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that these are new species. Determining whether these newly discovered organisms cause disease in humans and animals, like closely related bacteria do abroad, is of public health importance and requires further investigation.

  16. Antibiofilm Activity, Compound Characterization, and Acute Toxicity of Extract from a Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Musbah Alasil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of many antimicrobial agents is currently decreasing; therefore, it is important to search for alternative therapeutics. Our study was carried out to assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity using microtiter plate assay, to characterize the bioactive compounds using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and to test the oral acute toxicity on Sprague Dawley rats of extract derived from a novel bacterial species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI. Our results indicate that the crude extract and its three identified compounds exhibit strong antibiofilm activity against a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Three potential compounds were identified including an amino acid antibiotic C8H20N3O4P (MW 253.237, phospholipase A2 inhibitor C21H36O5 (MW 368.512, and an antibacterial agent C14H11N3O2 (MW 253.260. The acute toxicity test indicates that the mortality rate among all rats was low and that the biochemical parameters, hematological profile, and histopathology examination of liver and kidneys showed no significant differences between experimental groups P>0.05. Overall, our findings suggest that the extract and its purified compounds derived from novel Paenibacillus sp. are nontoxic exhibiting strong antibiofilm activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens that can be useful towards new therapeutic management of biofilm-associated infections.

  17. Cooperative role for tetraspanins in adhesin-mediated attachment of bacterial species to human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Luke R; Monk, Peter N; Partridge, Lynda J; Morris, Paul; Gorringe, Andrew R; Read, Robert C

    2011-06-01

    The tetraspanins are a superfamily of transmembrane proteins with diverse functions and can form extended microdomains within the plasma membrane in conjunction with partner proteins, which probably includes receptors for bacterial adhesins. Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningococcal disease, attaches to host nasopharyngeal epithelial cells via type IV pili and opacity (Opa) proteins. We examined the role of tetraspanin function in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to epithelial cells. Tetraspanins CD9, CD63, and CD151 were expressed by HEC-1-B and DETROIT 562 cells. Coincubation of cells with antibodies against all three tetraspanin molecules used individually or in combination, with recombinant tetraspanin extracellular domains (EC2), or with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced adherence of Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast, recombinant CD81, a different tetraspanin, had no effect on meningococcal adherence. Antitetraspanin antibodies reduced the adherence to epithelial cells of Neisseria meningitidis strain derivatives expressing Opa and pili significantly more than isogenic strains lacking these determinants. Adherence to epithelial cells of strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria lactamica, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae was also reduced by pretreatment of cells with tetraspanin antibodies and recombinant proteins. These data suggest that tetraspanins are required for optimal function of epithelial adhesion platforms containing specific receptors for Neisseria meningitidis and potentially for multiple species of bacteria.

  18. Diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Comparison of the 14C-D-xylose breath test and jejunal cultures in 60 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E; Bachmann, E

    1985-01-01

    Sixty consecutive patients suspected of having bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine (BOG) had aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures made of fasting upper jejunal fluid and also a 14C-D-xylose breath test (XBT). Culture-proven BOG was present in 23 patients. In another 15 patients...

  19. Comparative usefulness of inflammatory markers to indicate bacterial infection-analyzed according to blood culture results and related clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hirokazu; Shirano, Michinori; Kasamatsu, Yu; Morimura, Ayumi; Iida, Ko; Kishi, Tomomi; Goto, Tetsushi; Okamoto, Saki; Ehara, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    To assess relationships of inflammatory markers and 2 related clinical factors with blood culture results, we retrospectively investigated inpatients' blood culture and blood chemistry findings that were recorded from January to December 2014 using electronic medical records and analyzed the data of 852 subjects (426 culture-positive and 426 culture-negative). Results suggested that the risk of positive blood culture statistically increased as inflammatory marker levels and the number of related factors increased. Concerning the effectiveness of inflammatory markers, when the outcome definition was also changed for C-reactive protein (CRP), the odds ratio had a similar value, whereas when the outcome definition of blood culture positivity was used for procalcitonin (PCT), the greatest effectiveness of that was detected. Therefore, the current results suggest that PCT is more useful than CRP as an auxiliary indication of bacterial infection.

  20. Influence of fluoride on the bacterial composition of a dual-species biofilm composed of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus oralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Cai, Jian-Na; Cho, Sung-Dae; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2016-10-01

    Despite the widespread use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries, few studies have demonstrated the effects of fluoride on the bacterial composition of dental biofilms. This study investigated whether fluoride affects the proportion of Streptococcus mutans and S. oralis in mono- and dual-species biofilm models, via microbiological, biochemical, and confocal fluorescence microscope studies. Fluoride did not affect the bacterial count and bio-volume of S. mutans and S. oralis in mono-species biofilms, except for the 24-h-old S. mutans biofilms. However, fluoride reduced the proportion and bio-volume of S. mutans but did not decrease those of S. oralis during both S. oralis and S. mutans dual-species biofilm formation, which may be related to the decrease in extracellular polysaccharide formation by fluoride. These results suggest that fluoride may prevent the shift in the microbial proportion to cariogenic bacteria in dental biofilms, subsequently inhibiting the cariogenic bacteria dominant biofilm formation.

  1. Survey of childhood empyema in Asia: Implications for detecting the unmeasured burden of culture-negative bacterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Xuzhuang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parapneumonic empyema continues to be a disease of significant morbidity and mortality among children despite recent advances in medical management. To date, only a limited number of studies have assessed the burden of empyema in Asia. Methods We surveyed medical records of four representative large pediatric hospitals in China, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam using ICD-10 diagnostic codes to identify children Results During the study period, we identified 1,379 children diagnosed with empyema or pleural effusion (China, n = 461; Korea, n = 134; Taiwan, n = 119; Vietnam, n = 665. Diagnoses of pleural effusion (n = 1,074 were 3.5 times more common than of empyema (n = 305, although the relative proportions of empyema and pleural effusion noted in hospital records varied widely between the four sites, most likely because of marked differences in coding practices. Although pleural effusions were reported more often than empyema, children with empyema were more likely to have a cultured pathogen. In addition, we found that median age and gender distribution of children with these conditions were similar across the four countries. Among 1,379 empyema and pleural effusion specimens, 401 (29% were culture positive. Staphylococcus aureus (n = 126 was the most common organism isolated, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 83, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 37 and Klebsiella (n = 35 and Acinetobacter species (n = 34. Conclusion The age and gender distribution of empyema and pleural effusion in children in these countries are similar to the US and Western Europe. S. pneumoniae was the second leading bacterial cause of empyema and pleural effusion among Asian children. The high proportion of culture-negative specimens among patients with pleural effusion or empyema suggests that culture may not be a sufficiently sensitive diagnostic method to determine etiology in the majority of cases. Future prospective studies in different countries would

  2. Composition of the Cutaneous Bacterial Community in Japanese Amphibians: Effects of Captivity, Host Species, and Body Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino-Pinto, Joana; Bletz, Molly Catherine; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Shimizu, Norio; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Vences, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The cutaneous microbiota plays a significant role in the biology of their vertebrate hosts, and its composition is known to be influenced both by host and environment, with captive conditions often altering alpha diversity. Here, we compare the cutaneous bacterial communities of 61 amphibians (both wild and captive) from Hiroshima, Japan, using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of a segment of the 16S rRNA gene. The majority of these samples came from a captive breeding facility at Hiroshima University where specimens from six species are maintained under highly standardized conditions for several generations. This allowed to identify host effects on the bacterial communities under near identical environmental conditions in captivity. We found the structure of the cutaneous bacterial community significantly differing between wild and captive individuals of newts, Cynops pyrrhogaster, with a higher alpha diversity found in the wild individuals. Community structure also showed distinct patterns when comparing different species of amphibians kept under highly similar conditions, revealing an intrinsic host effect. Bacterial communities of dorsal vs. ventral skin surfaces did not significantly differ in most species, but a trend of higher alpha diversity on the ventral surface was found in Oriental fire-bellied toads, Bombina orientalis. This study confirms the cutaneous microbiota of amphibians as a highly dynamic system influenced by a complex interplay of numerous factors.

  3. Effect of Initial pH on Sulphate and Phosphate Uptake from Wastewater by Selected Bacterial and Fungal Species

    OpenAIRE

    Oghenerobor Benjamin Akpor; S. O. Dahunsi; R. Aransiola

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of pH on sulphate and phosphate uptake from wastewater by selected bacterial and fungal species. A total of four each of bacterial and fungal isolates were used under shaking flasks conditions. The wastewater was supplemented with sodium acetate to serve as external carbon source at a concentration of 5 g/L. Immediately after inoculation with the respective isolates and at 24 h intervals, for the next 96 h, aliquot wastewater samples were taken...

  4. [A retrospective study of the relationship between bacterial numbers from central venous catheter tip cultures and blood cultures for evaluating central line-associated bloodstream infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Nakayama, Asami; Yonetamari, Jun; Ando, Kohei; Miyazaki, Takashi; Ohta, Hirotoshi; Furuta, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tamayo; Ito, Hiroyasu; Murakami, Nobuo; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is an infectious disease requiring special attention. It is a common cause of nosocomial infections; catheter insertion into the central veins particularly increases the risk of infection (CLA-BSI: central line-associated bloodstream infection). We examined the relationship between the number of bacterial colonies cultured from shredded central venous catheter (CVC) tips and from blood cultures in our hospital from 2011 to 2012. Coagulase-negative staphylococci topped the list of microbe isolated from the CVC tip culture, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida spp. S. aureus and Candida spp., with growth of over 15 colony-forming units in the CVC tip culture, were also detected at high rates in the blood culture. However, gramnegative bacilli (Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa) did not show a similar increase in colony number in the CVC tip culture. Because microbes adhering to shredded catheter tips are readily detected by culture, this method is useful as a routine diagnostic test. In addition, prompt clinical reporting of the bacterial number of serious CLA-BSI-causing S. aureus and Candida spp. isolated from CVC tips could contribute to earlier CLA-BSI diagnosis.

  5. Nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia in Cuban intensive care units: bacterial species and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medell, Manuel; Hart, Marcia; Duquesne, Amílcar; Espinosa, Fidel; Valdés, Rodolfo

    2013-04-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia associated with use of mechanical ventilators is one of the greatest challenges confronted by intensivists worldwide. The literature associates several bacteria with this type of infection; most common in intensive care units are Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and some of the Enterobacteriaceae family. To identify the causal agents of nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the intensive care units of Havana's Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical-Surgical Teaching Hospital in 2011, and to characterize their antibiotic resistance. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using hospital administrative data of quantitative cultures from positive tracheal aspirates for January through December, 2011. Records were analyzed from 77 intensive care unit patients who developed nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia. Variables examined were age and sex, and pathogens identified from culture of tracheal aspirate and related antibiotic susceptibility. RESULTS Species most frequently isolated were: Acinetobacter baumannii in 53 patients (68.8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 34 patients (44.2%), other species of Pseudomonas in 15 patients (19.5%), and Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli in 12 patients each (15.6%). Some patients presented more than one pathogen in concurrent or successive infections. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing found high percentages of resistance to antibiotics in all these pathogens. Least resistance was found to colistin. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia is of concern. Colistin is the drug of choice among the antibiotics reviewed, but sensitivity to other antibiotics should be assessed to search for more appropriate broad-spectrum antibiotics for treating nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia. Our results also

  6. Microbiological and molecular identification of bacterial species isolated from nasal and oropharyngeal mucosa of fuel workers in Riyadh,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suaad S. AlWakeel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the bacterial species colonizing the nasal and oropharyngeal mucosa of fuel workers in Central Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on a microbiological and molecular level. Throat and nasal swab samples were obtained from 29 fuel station attendants in the period of time extending from March to May 2014 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Microbiological identification techniques were utilized to identify the bacterial species isolated. Antibiotic sensitivity was assessed for each of the bacterial isolates. Molecular identification techniques based on PCR analysis of specific genomic sequences was conducted and was the basis on which phylogeny representation was done for 10 randomly selected samples of the isolates. Blood was drawn and a complete blood count was conducted to note the hematological indices for each of the study participants. Nineteen bacterial species were isolated from both the nasal cavity and the oropharynx including Streptococcus thoraltensis, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Staphylococcus hominis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae and several others. We found 100% sensitivity of the isolates to ciprofloxacin, cefuroxime and gentamicin. Whereas cefotaxime and azithromycin posted sensitivities of 85.7% and 91.4%, respectively. Low sensitivities (<60% sensitivity to the antibiotics ampicillin, erythromycin, clarithromycin and norfloxacin were observed. Ninety-seven percent similarity to the microbial bank species was noted when the isolates were compared to it. Most hematological indices recorded were within the normal range. In conclusion, exposure to toxic fumes and compounds within fuel products may be a contributing factor to bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract in fuel workers.

  7. Suitability of Selected Coral Species for Culture in the Ornamental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The SEM (April to. October) is characterized by high cloud cover, .... Mean monthly variation of temperature and salinity measured at the coral culture site and remotely sensed monthly .... Wave induced net circulation in ringed lagoon: Bamburi ...

  8. The Botryosphaeriaceae: genera and species known from culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, A.J.L.; Alves, A.; Abdollahzadeh, J.; Slippers, B.; Wingfield, M.J.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give an account of the genera and species in the Botryosphaeriaceae. We consider morphological characters alone as inadequate to define genera or identify species, given the confusion it has repeatedly introduced in the past, their variation during development, and inevitable overla

  9. The Botryosphaeriaceae: genera and species known from culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, A.J.L.; Alves, A.; Abdollahzadeh, J.; Slippers, B.; Wingfield, M.J.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give an account of the genera and species in the Botryosphaeriaceae. We consider morphological characters alone as inadequate to define genera or identify species, given the confusion it has repeatedly introduced in the past, their variation during development, and inevitable

  10. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Paula; Neves, Ana Rute; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H.; Lametsch, René; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M. A. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are the main cause of fermentation failures in dairy plants. The majority of Streptococcus thermophilus phages can be divided into either cos- or pac-type phages and are additionally characterized by examining the V2 region of their antireceptors. We screened a large number of S. thermophilus phages from the Chr. Hansen A/S collection, using PCR specific for the cos- or pac-type phages, as well as for the V2 antireceptor region. Three phages did not produce positive results with the assays. Analysis of phage morphologies indicated that two of these phages, CHPC577 and CHPC926, had shorter tails than the traditional S. thermophilus phages. The third phage, CHPC1151, had a tail size similar to those of the cos- or pac-type phages, but it displayed a different baseplate structure. Sequencing analysis revealed the genetic similarity of CHPC577 and CHPC926 with a subgroup of Lactococcus lactis P335 phages. Phage CHPC1151 was closely related to the atypical S. thermophilus phage 5093, homologous with a nondairy streptococcal prophage. By testing adsorption of the related streptococcal and lactococcal phages to the surface of S. thermophilus and L. lactis strains, we revealed the possibility of cross-interactions. Our data indicated that the use of S. thermophilus together with L. lactis, extensively applied for dairy fermentations, triggered the recombination between phages infecting different bacterial species. A notable diversity among S. thermophilus phage populations requires that a new classification of the group be proposed. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus thermophilus is a component of thermophilic starter cultures commonly used for cheese and yogurt production. Characterizing streptococcal phages, understanding their genetic relationships, and studying their interactions with various hosts are the necessary steps for preventing and controlling phage attacks that occur during dairy fermentations. PMID:28039135

  11. MLPA diagnostics of complex microbial communities: relative quantification of bacterial species in oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefework, Zewdu; Pham, Chi L; Prosperi, Anja C; Entius, Mark M; Errami, Abdellatif; van Spanning, Rob J M; Zaura, Egija; Ten Cate, Jacob M; Crielaard, Wim

    2008-12-01

    A multitude of molecular methods are currently used for identification and characterization of oral biofilms or for community profiling. However, multiplex PCR techniques that are able to routinely identify several species in a single assay are not available. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) identifies up to 45 unique fragments in a single tube PCR. Here we report a novel use of MLPA in the relative quantification of targeted microorganisms in a community of oral microbiota. We designed 9 species specific probes for: Actinomyces gerencseriae, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Veillonella parvula; and genus specific probes for selected oral Streptococci and Lactobacilli based on their 16S rDNA sequences. MLPA analysis of DNA pooled from the strains showed the expected specific MLPA products. Relative quantification of a serial dilution of equimolar DNA showed that as little as 10 pg templates can be detected with clearly discernible signals. Moreover, a 2 to 7% divergence in relative signal ratio of amplified probes observed from normalized peak area values suggests MLPA can be a cheaper alternative to using qPCR for quantification. We observed 2 to 6 fold fluctuations in signal intensities of MLPA products in DNAs isolated from multispecies biofilms grown in various media for various culture times. Furthermore, MLPA analyses of DNA isolated from saliva obtained from different donors gave a varying number and intensity of signals. This clearly shows the usefulness of MLPA in a quantitative description of microbial shifts.

  12. Dynamics of culturable mesophilic bacterial communities of three fresh herbs and their production environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekenidis, M-T; Gossin, D; Schmelcher, M; Schöner, U; Remus-Emsermann, M N P; Drissner, D

    2017-10-01

    Investigate dynamics of culturable mesophilic bacteria and selected food-contaminating bacteria from three herbs and their production environment. Marjoram, basil and thyme were investigated during one growing season by sampling plants, organic fertilizers, soil, irrigation water and marketed products. Mesophilic bacteria and selected food-contaminating bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Bacillus cereus group) were cultured and identified by MALDI biotyping. Culturable mesophilic bacteria on marjoram and basil plants decreased over time by two orders of magnitude starting at above 10(6) colony forming units per gram (CFU per g), while they remained constant on thyme (~10(4)  CFU per g). Compared to the last field sample, mesophilic bacteria were increased on all market-ready products by one order of magnitude. Marjoram and basil were dominated by B. cereus group, Enterobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp., thyme by Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. All selected food-contaminating bacteria were detected in soil and reservoir-sourced irrigation water, whereas in municipal water, only B. cereus group and rarely Enterococcus spp. were found. Escherichia coli was detected only on young marjoram and basil plants (5 × 10(2) and 5 × 10(1)  CFU per g, respectively), whereas Enterococcus spp. and B. cereus group were consistently detected on these two herbs. Thyme plants only contained B. cereus group consistently (above 10(3) CFU per g). Marketed marjoram and thyme contained Enterococcus spp. (5 × 10(2) and 10(4) CFU per g) and B. cereus group (~5 × 10(2) CFU per g), while no selected food-contaminating bacteria were found on marketed basil. Overall, culturable mesophilic bacteria were dominated by Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus spp., with increased numbers on market-ready products. Selected food-contaminating bacteria were readily detectable, however, only the B. cereus group was found throughout in all systems. Insight into composition and

  13. Characterization of certain bacterial strains for potential use as starter or probiotic cultures in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo-Mera, A; Caro, I; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B; Rúa, J; Ferrero, M A; García-Armesto, M R

    2011-08-01

    The present work was aimed at characterizing 12 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to obtain improved potential starter or probiotic cultures that could be used for making dairy products from ewe's milk and cow's milk. Eight strains with antimicrobial properties, isolated from ewe's milk and from cheese made from ewe's and/or cow's milk, were studied. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (five strains), Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (one strain of each species). Additionally, four strains were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection: Lactobacillus casei 393 (isolated from cheese), L. lactis subsp. lactis 11454 (origin nonspecified and a producer of nisin), and two strains isolated from human feces (L. paracasei subsp. paracasei 27092 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus 53103, antibacterial agent producer). All E. faecalis strains showed at least one virulence factor (either hemolysin or gelatinase), which emphasizes the importance of these studies in this species. Both L. lactis strains and most Lactobacillus spp. were good acidifiers in ewe's milk and cow's milk at 30°C. High β-galactosidase activity, as well as aminopeptidase activities that favor the development of desirable flavors in cheese, were detected in all Lactobacillus spp. strains. Furthermore, L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 showed α-fucosidase activity (thought to help colonization of the intestine) and lack of α-glucosidase activity (a trait considered positive for diabetic and obese humans). This last enzymatic activity was also lacking in L. lactis ATCC 11454. L. mesenteroides was the only strain D(2)-lactic acid producer. The selection of any particular strain for probiotic or dairy cultures should be performed according to the technological and/or functional abilities needed.

  14. Susceptibility of different bacterial species isolated from food animals to copper sulphate, zinc chloride and antimicrobial substances used for disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hasman, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    that Danish bacterial isolates from livestock so far have not or have only to a limited degree developed resistance to antimicrobial compounds commonly used for disinfection. Acquired copper resistance was only found in enterococci. There were large differences in the intrinsic susceptibility of the different......A total of 569 different bacterial isolates (156 Salmonella, 202 E. coli, 43 S. aureus, 38 S. hyicus, 52 E. faecalis, 78 E faecium) were tested for susceptibility to copper sulphate, benzalkonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine using MIC determinations. A total of 442 isolates were...... of susceptibilities to the different antimicrobial agents. Large variations were observed in the susceptibility of the different bacterial species to the different compounds. Staphylococci were in general very susceptible to all antimicrobial compounds tested. The Salmonella isolates were in general less susceptible...

  15. Genomic Characterization of Dairy Associated Leuconostoc Species and Diversity of Leuconostocs in Undefined Mixed Mesophilic Starter Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzen, Cyril A.; Kot, Witold; Pedersen, Thomas B.; Ardö, Ylva M.; Broadbent, Jeff R.; Neve, Horst; Hansen, Lars H.; Dal Bello, Fabio; Østlie, Hilde M.; Kleppen, Hans P.; Vogensen, Finn K.; Holo, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Undefined mesophilic mixed (DL-type) starter cultures are composed of predominantly Lactococcus lactis subspecies and 1–10% Leuconostoc spp. The composition of the Leuconostoc population in the starter culture ultimately affects the characteristics and the quality of the final product. The scientific basis for the taxonomy of dairy relevant leuconostocs can be traced back 50 years, and no documentation on the genomic diversity of leuconostocs in starter cultures exists. We present data on the Leuconostoc population in five DL-type starter cultures commonly used by the dairy industry. The analyses were performed using traditional cultivation methods, and further augmented by next-generation DNA sequencing methods. Bacterial counts for starter cultures cultivated on two different media, MRS and MPCA, revealed large differences in the relative abundance of leuconostocs. Most of the leuconostocs in two of the starter cultures were unable to grow on MRS, emphasizing the limitations of culture-based methods and the importance of careful media selection or use of culture independent methods. Pan-genomic analysis of 59 Leuconostoc genomes enabled differentiation into twelve robust lineages. The genomic analyses show that the dairy-associated leuconostocs are highly adapted to their environment, characterized by the acquisition of genotype traits, such as the ability to metabolize citrate. In particular, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris display telltale signs of a degenerative evolution, likely resulting from a long period of growth in milk in association with lactococci. Great differences in the metabolic potential between Leuconostoc species and subspecies were revealed. Using targeted amplicon sequencing, the composition of the Leuconostoc population in the five commercial starter cultures was shown to be significantly different. Three of the cultures were dominated by Ln. mesenteroides subspecies cremoris. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides dominated in two of

  16. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eSuzuki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3 and tet(M, in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP in South Africa. There was no correlation between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs, suggesting the targeted ARGs are spread in a wide area without connection to selection pressure. Among sul genes, sul1 and sul2 were major genes in the total (over 10-2 copies/16S and colony forming bacteria assemblages (approx 10-1 copies/16S. In urban waters, the sul3 gene was mostly not detectable in total and culturable assemblages, suggesting sul3 is not abundant. tet(M was found in natural assemblages with 10-3 copies/16S level in STP, but was not detected in colony forming bacteria, suggesting the non-culturable (yet-to-be cultured bacterial community in urban surface waters and STP effluent possess the tet(M gene. Sulfamethoxazole resistant (SMXr and oxytetracycline resistant (OTCr bacterial communities in urban waters possessed not only sul1 and sul2 but also sul3 and tet(M genes. These genes are widely distributed in SMXr and OTCr bacteria. In conclusion, urban river and estuarine water and STP effluent in the Durban area were highly contaminated with ARGs, and the yet-to-be cultured bacterial community may act as a non-visible ARG reservoir in certain situations.

  17. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R. J.; Wallace, R. John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells. PMID:27630632

  18. Simple and versatile turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid cultures using a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer: application to facultative and strictly anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida R. G. Maia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213 and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897 anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256. For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (RSD < 3.5% was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells.

  19. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Margarida R G; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R J; Wallace, R John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells.

  20. mRNA differential display in a microbial enrichment culture: simultaneous identification of three cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostowicz, Patricia C; Walters, Dana M; Thomas, Stuart M; Nagarajan, Vasantha; Rouvière, Pierre E

    2003-01-01

    mRNA differential display has been used to identify cyclohexanone oxidation genes in a mixed microbial community derived from a wastewater bioreactor. Thirteen DNA fragments randomly amplified from the total RNA of an enrichment subculture exposed to cyclohexanone corresponded to genes predicted to be involved in the degradation of cyclohexanone. Nine of these DNA fragments are part of genes encoding three distinct Baeyer-Villiger cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three different bacterial species present in the enrichment culture. In Arthrobacter sp. strain BP2 and Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi2, the monooxygenase is part of a gene cluster that includes all the genes required for the degradation of cyclohexanone, while in Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi1 the genes surrounding the monooxygenase are not predicted to be involved in this degradation pathway but rather seem to belong to a biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, in the case of Arthrobacter strain BP2, three other genes flanking the monooxygenase were identified by differential display, demonstrating that the repeated sampling of bacterial operons shown earlier for a pure culture (D. M. Walters, R. Russ, H. Knackmuss, and P. E. Rouvière, Gene 273:305-315, 2001) is also possible for microbial communities. The activity of the three cyclohexanone monooxygenases was confirmed and characterized following their expression in Escherichia coli.

  1. Variations in the binding pocket of an inhibitor of the bacterial division protein FtsZ across genotypes and species.

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    Amanda Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent increase in antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria calls for new approaches to drug-target selection and drug development. Targeting the mechanisms of action of proteins involved in bacterial cell division bypasses problems associated with increasingly ineffective variants of older antibiotics; to this end, the essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ is a promising target. Recent work on its allosteric inhibitor, PC190723, revealed in vitro activity on Staphylococcus aureus FtsZ and in vivo antimicrobial activities. However, the mechanism of drug action and its effect on FtsZ in other bacterial species are unclear. Here, we examine the structural environment of the PC190723 binding pocket using PocketFEATURE, a statistical method that scores the similarity between pairs of small-molecule binding sites based on 3D structure information about the local microenvironment, and molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We observed that species and nucleotide-binding state have significant impacts on the structural properties of the binding site, with substantially disparate microenvironments for bacterial species not from the Staphylococcus genus. Based on PocketFEATURE analysis of MD simulations of S. aureus FtsZ bound to GTP or with mutations that are known to confer PC190723 resistance, we predict that PC190723 strongly prefers to bind Staphylococcus FtsZ in the nucleotide-bound state. Furthermore, MD simulations of an FtsZ dimer indicated that polymerization may enhance PC190723 binding. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a drug-binding pocket can vary significantly across species, genetic perturbations, and in different polymerization states, yielding important information for the further development of FtsZ inhibitors.

  2. Combined chemical and physical transformation method with RbCl and sepiolite for the transformation of various bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Lee, Haram; Yoo, Seung Min; Yu, Myeong-Sang; Park, Hansoo; Na, Dokyun

    2017-04-01

    DNA transformation that delivers plasmid DNAs into bacterial cells is fundamental in genetic manipulation to engineer and study bacteria. Developed transformation methods to date are optimized to specific bacterial species for high efficiency. Thus, there is always a demand for simple and species-independent transformation methods. We herein describe the development of a chemico-physical transformation method that combines a rubidium chloride (RbCl)-based chemical method and sepiolite-based physical method, and report its use for the simple and efficient delivery of DNA into various bacterial species. Using this method, the best transformation efficiency for Escherichia coli DH5α was 4.3×10(6)CFU/μg of pUC19 plasmid, which is higher than or comparable to the reported transformation efficiencies to date. This method also allowed the introduction of plasmid DNAs into Bacillus subtilis (5.7×10(3)CFU/μg of pSEVA3b67Rb), Bacillus megaterium (2.5×10(3)CFU/μg of pSPAsp-hp), Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (1.0×10(2)CFU/μg of pTRKH3-ermGFP), and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (2.2×10(2)CFU/μg of pMSP3535VA). Remarkably, even when the conventional chemical and physical methods failed to generate transformed cells in Bacillus sp. and Enterococcus faecalis, E. malodoratus and E. mundtii, our combined method showed a significant transformation efficiency (2.4×10(4), 4.5×10(2), 2×10(1), and 0.5×10(1)CFU/μg of plasmid DNA). Based on our results, we anticipate that our simple and efficient transformation method should prove usefulness for introducing DNA into various bacterial species without complicated optimization of parameters affecting DNA entry into the cell.

  3. 树鼩粪便细菌分离培养与鉴定%Isolation, culture and identification of bacterial strains from tree shrews feces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽君; 余柄廷; 胡凝珠; 孙晓梅; 王玮; 孙静; 胡云章; 李建芳

    2015-01-01

    Objective Study the fecal flora diversity of the tree shrew , to provide a basis data of fecal bacteria of feeding the tree shrew .Methods Ten tree shrews were used in this study .The Stools of the animals were respectively cultured with oxygen and without oxygen to isolate the bacterial .Then the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA of the bacterial was sequenced and analyzed .Results 25 bacterial strains belonging to ten bacterial species were isolated by anaerobic incubation , and 25 bacterial strains belonging to twelve bacterial species were isolated by aerobic incubation .Proteus vulgaris, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia fergusonii, Enterococcus faecium, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus , Aeromonas salmonicida subsp .masoucida , Rahnella aquatilis , Exiguobacterium aquaticum , Raoultella terrigena , and Escherichia coli were identified in this study .Conclusions There is a fecal flora diversity of the tree shrew, and the Proteus vulgaris , Escherichia fergusonii and Enterococcus faecium may be the major parasitic flora .%目的:了解人工饲养树鼩粪便菌群多样性,为树鼩的正常饲养繁殖和微生物质量控制标准化提供依据。方法随机采集10份树鼩粪便样品,利用有氧及厌氧培养基进行细菌分离培养,提取细菌基因组DNA后PCR扩增16SrRNA基因并测序鉴定。结果本实验从树鼩粪便样品中,经有氧培养分离鉴定出25株、12种细菌,经厌氧培养分离鉴定出25株、10种细菌,包括变形杆菌属、肠球菌属、埃希菌属、志贺菌属、葡萄球菌属、气单胞菌属、拉恩氏菌属、拉乌尔菌属、微小杆菌属、链球菌属、明串珠菌属。结论树鼩肠道好氧菌及厌氧菌具有丰富的种属多样性,普通变形杆菌群、费格森埃希菌群和屎肠球菌群可能是树鼩肠道的主要寄生菌群。

  4. Interaction of legionella pneumophila and helicobacter pylori with bacterial species isolated from drinking water biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Nuno F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen; by contrast, the mode of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unknown but water seems to play an important role. This work aims to study the influence of five microorganisms isolated from drinking water biofilms on the survival and integration of both of these pathogens into biofilms. Results Firstly, both pathogens were studied for auto- and co-aggregation with the species isolated from drinking water; subsequently the formation of mono and dual-species biofilms by L. pneumophila or H. pylori with the same microorganisms was investigated. Neither auto- nor co-aggregation was observed between the microorganisms tested. For biofilm studies, sessile cells were quantified in terms of total cells by SYTO 9 staining, viable L. pneumophila or H. pylori cells were quantified using 16 S rRNA-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA probes and cultivable cells by standard culture techniques. Acidovorax sp. and Sphingomonas sp. appeared to have an antagonistic effect on L. pneumophila cultivability but not on the viability (as assessed by rRNA content using the PNA probe, possibly leading to the formation of viable but noncultivable (VBNC cells, whereas Mycobacterium chelonae increased the cultivability of this pathogen. The results obtained for H. pylori showed that M. chelonae and Sphingomonas sp. help this pathogen to maintain cultivability for at least 24 hours. Conclusions It appears that M. chelonae may have an important role in the survival of both pathogens in drinking water. This work also suggests that the presence of some microorganisms can decrease the cultivability of L. pneumophila but not the viability which indicates that the presence of autochthonous microorganisms can lead to misleading results when the safety of water is assessed by cultivable methods alone.

  5. Regulated bioluminescence as a tool for bioremediation process monitoring and control of bacterial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Heitzer, Armin; Digrazia, Philip M.

    1991-01-01

    An effective on-line monitoring technique for toxic waste bioremediation using bioluminescent microorganisms has shown great potential for the description and optimization of biological processes. The lux genes of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri are used by this species to produce visible light. The lux genes can be genetically fused to the control region of a catabolic gene, with the result that bioluminescence is produced whenever the catabolic gene is induced. Thus the detection of light from a sample indicates that genetic expression from a specific gene is occurring. This technique was used to monitor biodegradation of specific contaminants from waste sites. For these studies, fusions between the lux genes and the operons for naphthalene and toluene/xylene degradation were constructed. Strains carrying one of these fusions respond sensitively and specifically to target substrates. Bioluminescence from these cultures can be rapidly measured in a nondestructive and noninvasive manner. The potential for this technique in this and other biological systems is discussed.

  6. Nucleoside analogues are activated by bacterial deoxyribonucleoside kinases in a species-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, Anders; On, Stephen L. W.

    2007-01-01

    bactericidal activity against several clinical bacterial isolates and type strains. We identified and subcloned the genes coding for putative deoxyribonucleoside kinases in Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, Salmonella enterica, Yersinia enterocolitica, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens...

  7. Limitations to estimating bacterial cross-species transmission using genetic and genomic markers: inferences from simulation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Julio A; Cross, Paul C; Luikart, Gordon; Creel, Scott

    2014-08-01

    Cross-species transmission (CST) of bacterial pathogens has major implications for human health, livestock, and wildlife management because it determines whether control actions in one species may have subsequent effects on other potential host species. The study of bacterial transmission has benefitted from methods measuring two types of genetic variation: variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, it is unclear whether these data can distinguish between different epidemiological scenarios. We used a simulation model with two host species and known transmission rates (within and between species) to evaluate the utility of these markers for inferring CST. We found that CST estimates are biased for a wide range of parameters when based on VNTRs and a most parsimonious reconstructed phylogeny. However, estimations of CST rates lower than 5% can be achieved with relatively low bias using as low as 250 SNPs. CST estimates are sensitive to several parameters, including the number of mutations accumulated since introduction, stochasticity, the genetic difference of strains introduced, and the sampling effort. Our results suggest that, even with whole-genome sequences, unbiased estimates of CST will be difficult when sampling is limited, mutation rates are low, or for pathogens that were recently introduced.

  8. Callus and cell culture of Tagetes species in relation to production of thiophenes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketel, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    The production of thiophene-biocides by cell cultures invitro was simultaneously investigated with Tageteserecta , T.patula and T.minuta . The calli from which the liquid cultures had to be derived differed between species in the appearance of

  9. Animal culture impacts species' capacity to realise climate-driven range shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keith, Sally A.; Bull, Joseph William

    2017-01-01

    (within generations) can encourage innovation and so facilitate dynamic responses to a changing environment. We believe that the time is right to unite recent advances in ecological modelling and behavioural understanding to explicitly incorporate the influence of animal culture into future predictions...... about their external environment, potentially mediated by information transmitted through social learning (i.e. culture). Vertical transmission of culture (between generations) might encourage conservative behaviour, constraining the ability of a species to respond, whilst horizontal transmission...

  10. Monitoring bacterial processes by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy : Helicobacter pylori drug inactivation and plasmid bioproduction in recombinant Escherichia coli cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Teresa; Lopes, Vitor V.; Calado, Cecília R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is evaluated as a tool to monitor two bacterial processes: strain discrimination and drug inactivation studies with the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori and the plasmid production process based on high-density cultures of recombinant Escherichia coli. Results show, that after evaluation of different incubation conditions of H.pylori with the drug model, the application of principal component analysis to the FTIR spectra assembles the samples ...

  11. Effects of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    . The culturable heterotrophic diversity was investigated by colony morphology and colony appearance on solid LB medium. Functional diversity was analysed as sole carbon utilisation patterns in ECOplates. Genetic diversity was measured as bands on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGCE) gels obtained...... analysed by Shannon-Weaver indices, functional diversity was found to increase almost immediately after mercury addition and to remain at a level higher than the control soil for the rest of the experiment. The fraction of culturable heterotrophic bacteria increased from 1% to 10% of the total bacterial...

  12. Comparison of 16S rDNA-PCR Amplification and Culture of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Foroughi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Early and accurate diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is of critical concern. Optimum and rapid laboratory facilities are not routinely available for detecting the etiologic agents of meningitis. The objective of this study was to compare polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay with culture for detection of bacteria in central nervous system (CNS samples from patients suspected to have meningitis. Methods: One-hundred CSF samples were obtained and divided into two parts. One part of samples was used for standard bacterial culture and gram staining. The remaining was used for DNA extraction. PCR assay was performed with universal primers for 16S rDNA gene of bacteria. Performance characteristics of the test were determined. Findings:The PCR method was able to detect bacteria in all 36 culture-positive and in 38 of 64 culture-negative cases showing sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 40.6% respectively. Positive predictive value was 48.6% and negative predictive value 100%, however, Kappa coefficient showed the correlation of the 2 methods to be at 0.33. Conclusion:There are advantages and disadvantages in performance characteristics of the conventional CSF culture and universal CSF 16S rDNA PCR. Therefore, it is recommended to use both methods in clinical practice, particularly in suspicious contaminated samples, with presumable presence of fastidious or slow growing bacteria because of antibiotic consumption.

  13. Evolution in an oncogenic bacterial species with extreme genome plasticity: Helicobacter pylori East Asian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handa Naofumi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of Helicobacter pylori, an oncogenic bacterium in the human stomach, rapidly evolves and shows wide geographical divergence. The high incidence of stomach cancer in East Asia might be related to bacterial genotype. We used newly developed comparative methods to follow the evolution of East Asian H. pylori genomes using 20 complete genome sequences from Japanese, Korean, Amerind, European, and West African strains. Results A phylogenetic tree of concatenated well-defined core genes supported divergence of the East Asian lineage (hspEAsia; Japanese and Korean from the European lineage ancestor, and then from the Amerind lineage ancestor. Phylogenetic profiling revealed a large difference in the repertoire of outer membrane proteins (including oipA, hopMN, babABC, sabAB and vacA-2 through gene loss, gain, and mutation. All known functions associated with molybdenum, a rare element essential to nearly all organisms that catalyzes two-electron-transfer oxidation-reduction reactions, appeared to be inactivated. Two pathways linking acetyl~CoA and acetate appeared intact in some Japanese strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed greater divergence between the East Asian (hspEAsia and the European (hpEurope genomes in proteins in host interaction, specifically virulence factors (tipα, outer membrane proteins, and lipopolysaccharide synthesis (human Lewis antigen mimicry enzymes. Divergence was also seen in proteins in electron transfer and translation fidelity (miaA, tilS, a DNA recombinase/exonuclease that recognizes genome identity (addA, and DNA/RNA hybrid nucleases (rnhAB. Positively selected amino acid changes between hspEAsia and hpEurope were mapped to products of cagA, vacA, homC (outer membrane protein, sotB (sugar transport, and a translation fidelity factor (miaA. Large divergence was seen in genes related to antibiotics: frxA (metronidazole resistance, def (peptide deformylase, drug target, and ftsA (actin

  14. Use of lymphocyte cultures for BrdU replication banding patterns in anuran species (Amphibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasahara Sanae

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the standardization of lymphocyte culture procedures in order to improve cytological preparations of anuran species. This methodology permits the use of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU treatment to obtain replication banding patterns in the chromosomes of these species.

  15. Bacterial Concentration and Diversity within Repetitive Aliquots Collected from Replicate Continuous-Flow Bioreactor Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, Tawni L; Sheffield, Cynthia L; Andrews, Kathleen; Bongaerts, Roy; Nisbet, David J

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility of small volume repeat sampling from replicate bioreactors with stabilized continuous-flow chicken cecal bacterial communities. Bacterial concentration and diversity were analyzed by phenotypic, biochemical and ribotype analysis. Significant differences in concentrations and variations in diversity were found in replicate bioreactors.

  16. Species composition of larvae cultured after anthelmintic treatment indicates reduced moxidectin susceptibility of immature Cylicocyclus species in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooyman, F N J; van Doorn, D C K; Geurden, T; Mughini-Gras, L; Ploeger, H W; Wagenaar, J A

    2016-08-30

    For the control of cyathostomins in horses, the macrocyclic lactones (MLs), moxidectin (MOX) and ivermectin (IVM) are the most commonly used anthelmintics. However, reduced activity, observed as shortening of the egg reappearance period (ERP) has been described. Shortening of the ERP may be caused by a decreased susceptibility of immature worms for MLs. Alternatively, immature worms may develop faster into egg producing adults as a result of repeated ML treatments. The species composition of the larval cultures obtained shortly after ML and pyrantel (PYR) treatment can confirm the hypothesis of decreased ML susceptibility, as this is often class-specific, whereas faster development would also occur after treatment with anthelmintics with a different mode of action. From 3 farms with a known history of shortened ERP, 8 horses per farm were selected and divided into 2 groups. The MOX-PYR-MOX group was treated twice with MOX (day 0 and 126) and once with PYR (day 84) and the IVM-PYR-IVM group was treated twice with IVM (day 0 and 98) and once with PYR (day 56). Cultured infective larvae (L3s) were counted and differentiated with the reverse line blot on pooled samples. Per cyathostomin species, the number of larvae per gram was calculated. The efficacy of all ML treatments was 100% and a shortened ERP was found on all 3 farms. The species composition of the larval cultures after ML treatment did not differ significantly from that after PYR treatment in the IVM-PYR-IVM group, but it did differ in the MOX-PYR-MOX group. The larval cultures obtained after MOX treatment consisted mostly of Cylicocyclus nassatus, while after PYR treatment Cylicostephanus longibursatus was the most abundant species. In the cultures from 42days after MOX treatment 6 cyathostomin species from 3 genera were found on the farm with the lowest activity (farm 1), while on the farm with the highest activity (farm 3) only 3 species from one genus were found in the same number of examined L3s. The

  17. The bacterial species associated with bacterial vaginosis: research progress%细菌性阴道病的细菌因素研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马薇; 傅思武

    2012-01-01

    细菌性阴道病是妇科常见疾病,对女性、胎儿和新生儿的健康构成严重威胁.阴道微生物群落中产H2O2的乳酸杆菌与厌氧菌数量发生转换为其主要特征,具体机制不清.本文系统综述了近年来细菌性阴道病的细菌因素研究进展.%Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common clinical disease that is associated with a variely of FemAle health problems, fetal and infant outcomes. Although its precise mechanism remains unclear, BV is characterized by a dramatic shift in the vaginal microflora, involving a relative decrease in hydrogen peroxide-producing lactobacilli, and a proliferation of anaerobes. This review summarizes the vaginal bacterial species associated with BV and the progress in recent researches.

  18. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung Ho; Scully, Erin D.; Peiffer, Michelle; Geib, Scott M.; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Felton, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We previously showed that symbiotic gut bacteria from CPB larvae suppressed jasmonate (JA)-induced defenses in tomato. However, little is known about how changes in the bacterial community may be involved in the manipulation of induced defenses in wild and cultivated Solanum plants of CPB. Here, we examined suppression of JA-mediated defense in wild and cultivated hosts of CPB by chemical elicitors and their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we investigated associations between the gut bacterial community and suppression of plant defenses using 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Symbiotic bacteria decreased plant defenses in all Solanum hosts and there were different gut bacterial communities in CPB fed on different host plants. When larvae were reared on different hosts, defense suppression differed among host plants. These results demonstrate that host plants influence herbivore gut bacterial communities and consequently affect the herbivore’s ability to manipulate JA-mediated plant defenses. Thus, the presence of symbiotic bacteria that suppress plant defenses might help CPB adapt to host plants. PMID:28045052

  19. Responses of Ammonia-Oxidising Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen, Lime, and Plant Species in Upland Grassland Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre C. Rooney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural improvement of seminatural grasslands has been shown to result in changes to plant and microbial diversity, with consequences for ecosystem functioning. A microcosm approach was used to elucidate the effects of two key components of agricultural improvement (nitrogen addition and liming on ammonia-oxidising bacterial (AOB communities in an upland grassland soil. Plant species characteristic of unimproved and improved pastures (A. capillaris and L. perenne were planted in microcosms, and lime, nitrogen (NH4NO3, or lime plus nitrogen added. The AOB community was profiled using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP of the amoA gene. AOB community structure was largely altered by NH4NO3 addition, rather than liming, although interactions between nitrogen addition and plant species were also evident. Results indicate that nitrogen addition drives shifts in the structure of key microbial communities in upland grassland soils, and that plant species may play a significant role in determining AOB community structure.

  20. Effect of holothurian and zoanthid extracts on growth of some bacterial and diatom species

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gonsalves, C.

    The antifouling properties of the extracts from two zoanthids, viz. Zoanthus sp, Protopalythoa sp and one holothurian species, viz. Holothuria leucospilota occurring in the coastal waters off Goa were tested against 5 bacteria and 2 diatom species...

  1. Characterization of the Bacterial Community Naturally Present on Commercially Grown Basil Leaves: Evaluation of Sample Preparation Prior to Culture-Independent Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siele Ceuppens

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fresh herbs such as basil constitute an important food commodity worldwide. Basil provides considerable culinary and health benefits, but has also been implicated in foodborne illnesses. The naturally occurring bacterial community on basil leaves is currently unknown, so the epiphytic bacterial community was investigated using the culture-independent techniques denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and next-generation sequencing (NGS. Sample preparation had a major influence on the results from DGGE and NGS: Novosphingobium was the dominant genus for three different basil batches obtained by maceration of basil leaves, while washing of the leaves yielded lower numbers but more variable dominant bacterial genera including Klebsiella, Pantoea, Flavobacterium, Sphingobacterium and Pseudomonas. During storage of basil, bacterial growth and shifts in the bacterial community were observed with DGGE and NGS. Spoilage was not associated with specific bacterial groups and presumably caused by physiological tissue deterioration and visual defects, rather than by bacterial growth.

  2. Exploring the sources of bacterial spoilers in beefsteaks by culture-independent high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca De Filippis

    Full Text Available Microbial growth on meat to unacceptable levels contributes significantly to change meat structure, color and flavor and to cause meat spoilage. The types of microorganisms initially present in meat depend on several factors and multiple sources of contamination can be identified. The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbial diversity in beefsteaks before and after aerobic storage at 4°C and to investigate the sources of microbial contamination by examining the microbiota of carcasses wherefrom the steaks originated and of the processing environment where the beef was handled. Carcass, environmental (processing plant and meat samples were analyzed by culture-independent high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The microbiota of carcass swabs was very complex, including more than 600 operational taxonomic units (OTUs belonging to 15 different phyla. A significant association was found between beef microbiota and specific beef cuts (P<0.01 indicating that different cuts of the same carcass can influence the microbial contamination of beef. Despite the initially high complexity of the carcass microbiota, the steaks after aerobic storage at 4°C showed a dramatic decrease in microbial complexity. Pseudomonas sp. and Brochothrix thermosphacta were the main contaminants, and Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter and Enterobacteriaceae were also found. Comparing the relative abundance of OTUs in the different samples it was shown that abundant OTUs in beefsteaks after storage occurred in the corresponding carcass. However, the abundance of these same OTUs clearly increased in environmental samples taken in the processing plant suggesting that spoilage-associated microbial species originate from carcasses, they are carried to the processing environment where the meat is handled and there they become a resident microbiota. Such microbiota is then further spread on meat when it is handled and it represents the starting microbial association

  3. Exploring the sources of bacterial spoilers in beefsteaks by culture-independent high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Microbial growth on meat to unacceptable levels contributes significantly to change meat structure, color and flavor and to cause meat spoilage. The types of microorganisms initially present in meat depend on several factors and multiple sources of contamination can be identified. The aims of this study were to evaluate the microbial diversity in beefsteaks before and after aerobic storage at 4°C and to investigate the sources of microbial contamination by examining the microbiota of carcasses wherefrom the steaks originated and of the processing environment where the beef was handled. Carcass, environmental (processing plant) and meat samples were analyzed by culture-independent high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The microbiota of carcass swabs was very complex, including more than 600 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to 15 different phyla. A significant association was found between beef microbiota and specific beef cuts (PPseudomonas sp. and Brochothrix thermosphacta were the main contaminants, and Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter and Enterobacteriaceae were also found. Comparing the relative abundance of OTUs in the different samples it was shown that abundant OTUs in beefsteaks after storage occurred in the corresponding carcass. However, the abundance of these same OTUs clearly increased in environmental samples taken in the processing plant suggesting that spoilage-associated microbial species originate from carcasses, they are carried to the processing environment where the meat is handled and there they become a resident microbiota. Such microbiota is then further spread on meat when it is handled and it represents the starting microbial association wherefrom the most efficiently growing microbial species take over during storage and can cause spoilage.

  4. Bacterial Species and Antibiotic Sensitivity in Korean Patients Diagnosed with Acute Otitis Media and Otitis Media with Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Changes over time in pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity resulting from the recent overuse and misuse of antibiotics in otitis media (OM) have complicated treatment. This study evaluated changes over 5 years in principal pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity in patients in Korea diagnosed with acute OM (AOM) and OM with effusion (OME). The study population consisted of 683 patients who visited the outpatient department of otorhinolaryngology in 7 tertiary hospitals in Korea between January 2010 and May 2015 and were diagnosed with acute AOM or OME. Aural discharge or middle ear fluid were collected from patients in the operating room or outpatient department and subjected to tests of bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity. The overall bacteria detection rate of AOM was 62.3% and OME was 40.9%. The most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacterial species was coagulase negative Staphylococcus aureus (CNS) followed by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pneumonia (SP), whereas the most frequently isolated Gram-negative bacterium was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). Regardless of OM subtype, ≥ 80% of CNS and MRSA strains were resistant to penicillin (PC) and tetracycline (TC); isolated MRSA strains showed low sensitivity to other antibiotics, with 100% resistant to PC, TC, cefoxitin (CFT), and erythromycin (EM); and isolated PA showed low sensitivity to quinolone antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin (CIP) and levofloxacin (LFX), and to aminoglycosides. Bacterial species and antibiotic sensitivity did not change significantly over 5 years. The rate of detection of MRSA was higher in OME than in previous studies. As bacterial predominance and antibiotic sensitivity could change over time, continuous and periodic surveillance is necessary in guiding appropriate antibacterial therapy. PMID:28244296

  5. Bacterial Species and Antibiotic Sensitivity in Korean Patients Diagnosed with Acute Otitis Media and Otitis Media with Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Eun Ju; Hong, Seok Min; Bae, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ho Yun; Park, Moo Kyun; Byun, Jae Yong; Kim, Myung Gu; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2017-04-01

    Changes over time in pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity resulting from the recent overuse and misuse of antibiotics in otitis media (OM) have complicated treatment. This study evaluated changes over 5 years in principal pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity in patients in Korea diagnosed with acute OM (AOM) and OM with effusion (OME). The study population consisted of 683 patients who visited the outpatient department of otorhinolaryngology in 7 tertiary hospitals in Korea between January 2010 and May 2015 and were diagnosed with acute AOM or OME. Aural discharge or middle ear fluid were collected from patients in the operating room or outpatient department and subjected to tests of bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity. The overall bacteria detection rate of AOM was 62.3% and OME was 40.9%. The most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacterial species was coagulase negative Staphylococcus aureus (CNS) followed by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pneumonia (SP), whereas the most frequently isolated Gram-negative bacterium was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). Regardless of OM subtype, ≥ 80% of CNS and MRSA strains were resistant to penicillin (PC) and tetracycline (TC); isolated MRSA strains showed low sensitivity to other antibiotics, with 100% resistant to PC, TC, cefoxitin (CFT), and erythromycin (EM); and isolated PA showed low sensitivity to quinolone antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin (CIP) and levofloxacin (LFX), and to aminoglycosides. Bacterial species and antibiotic sensitivity did not change significantly over 5 years. The rate of detection of MRSA was higher in OME than in previous studies. As bacterial predominance and antibiotic sensitivity could change over time, continuous and periodic surveillance is necessary in guiding appropriate antibacterial therapy. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  6. The Mars imperative: Species survival and inspiring a globalized culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Donald C.

    2015-02-01

    Humanity has crossed a unique technological threshold enabling self-guided survival, a first in the history of life on Earth. From a human perspective the Earth may be considered as a single interconnected ecosystem, and given our tenuous understanding and control over the environment as well as our own behaviors, ever-looming specters of social collapse or even extinction dictate enacting immediate off-world diversification and self-preservation efforts. Herein, Mars is touted as the most tenable and sustainable location in which to initiate such permanent diversification. Scientific curiosity alone cannot initiate nor drive such off-world settlement and concerted impetus and public support for such an endeavor is shown to be constrained by human attention span. Lastly, the initial act of settlement uniquely serves as humanities greatest globally inspiring self-initiated endeavor, a tangible benefit capable of inspiring generations, connecting cultures and motivating college enrollments and career path choices in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in a manner similar to the dawn of human space exploration.

  7. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We prev...

  8. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, J.A.M.; Molenaar, D.; Helm, J.J. van der; Caspers, M.P.M.; Kat Angelino-Bart, A. de; Schuren, F.H.J.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Richardus, J.H.; Boon, M. E.; Reid, G.; Vries, H.J.C de; Kort, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition profiles and evaluate

  9. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Dols (Joke); D. Molenaar (Douwe); van der Helm, J.J. (Jannie J.); Caspers, M.P.M. (Martien P.M.); Angelino-Bart, A.K. (Alie de Kat); F.H.J. Schuren (Frank); Speksnijder, A.G.C.L. (Adrianus G.C.L.); Westerhoff, H.V. (Hans V.); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); Boon, M.E. (Mathilde E.); G. Reid (Gregor); de Vries, H.J.C. (Henry J.C.); R. Kort (Remco)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition

  10. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, J.A.M.; Molenaar, D.; van der Helm, J.J.; Caspers, M.P.M.; de Kat Angelino-Bart, A.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Richardus, J.H.; Boon, M.E.; Reid, G.; de Vries, H.J.C.; Kort, R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition profiles and evaluate

  11. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, J.A.M.; Molenaar, D.; van der Helm, J.J.; Caspers, M.P.M.; de Kat Angelino-Bart, A.; Schuren, F.H.J.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Richardus, J.H.; Boon, M.E.; Reid, G.; de Vries, H.J.C.; Kort, R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition profiles and evaluate ind

  12. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Dols (Joke); D. Molenaar (Douwe); van der Helm, J.J. (Jannie J.); Caspers, M.P.M. (Martien P.M.); Angelino-Bart, A.K. (Alie de Kat); F.H.J. Schuren (Frank); Speksnijder, A.G.C.L. (Adrianus G.C.L.); Westerhoff, H.V. (Hans V.); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); Boon, M.E. (Mathilde E.); G. Reid (Gregor); de Vries, H.J.C. (Henry J.C.); R. Kort (Remco)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition profi

  13. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dols, J.A.M.; Molenaar, D.; Helm, J.J. van der; Caspers, M.P.M.; Kat Angelino-Bart, A. de; Schuren, F.H.J.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Richardus, J.H.; Boon, M. E.; Reid, G.; Vries, H.J.C de; Kort, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition profiles and evaluate ind

  14. Bacterial and fungal endophthalmitis in Upper Egypt: related species and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Gharamah

    2012-08-01

    Conclusions: The ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and mycotoxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues. Microbial contamination of operating rooms with air-borne bacteria and fungi in the present work may be a source of postoperative endophthalmitis.

  15. Bacterial Profiles of Root Caries in Elderly Patients▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Preza, Dorita; Olsen, Ingar; Aas, Jørn A.; Willumsen, Tiril; Grinde, Bjørn; Paster, Bruce J.

    2008-01-01

    Culture-based studies have shown that Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli are associated with root caries (RC). The purpose of the present study was to assess the bacterial diversity of RC in elderly patients by use of culture-independent molecular techniques and to determine the associations of specific bacterial species or bacterial communities with healthy and carious roots. Plaque was collected from root surfaces of 10 control subjects with no RC and from 11 subjects with RC. The bacter...

  16. Beware batch culture: Seasonality and niche construction predicted to favor bacterial adaptive diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocabert, Charles; Knibbe, Carole; Consuegra, Jessika; Schneider, Dominique; Beslon, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic cross-feeding interactions between microbial strains are common in nature, and emerge during evolution experiments in the laboratory, even in homogeneous environments providing a single carbon source. In sympatry, when the environment is well-mixed, the reasons why emerging cross-feeding interactions may sometimes become stable and lead to monophyletic genotypic clusters occupying specific niches, named ecotypes, remain unclear. As an alternative to evolution experiments in the laboratory, we developed Evo2Sim, a multi-scale model of in silico experimental evolution, equipped with the whole tool case of experimental setups, competition assays, phylogenetic analysis, and, most importantly, allowing for evolvable ecological interactions. Digital organisms with an evolvable genome structure encoding an evolvable metabolic network evolved for tens of thousands of generations in environments mimicking the dynamics of real controlled environments, including chemostat or batch culture providing a single limiting resource. We show here that the evolution of stable cross-feeding interactions requires seasonal batch conditions. In this case, adaptive diversification events result in two stably co-existing ecotypes, with one feeding on the primary resource and the other on by-products. We show that the regularity of serial transfers is essential for the maintenance of the polymorphism, as it allows for at least two stable seasons and thus two temporal niches. A first season is externally generated by the transfer into fresh medium, while a second one is internally generated by niche construction as the provided nutrient is replaced by secreted by-products derived from bacterial growth. In chemostat conditions, even if cross-feeding interactions emerge, they are not stable on the long-term because fitter mutants eventually invade the whole population. We also show that the long-term evolution of the two stable ecotypes leads to character displacement, at the level of

  17. Effectiveness of oxytetracycline in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish (Labeo rohita, Hamilton) under laboratory culture condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Ariful Haque; Md Shaheed Reza; Md Rajib Sharker; Md Mokhlasur Rahman; Md Ariful Islam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effectiveness of most widely used antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC) in reducing the bacterial load in rohu fish under artificial culture condition in the laboratory.Methods:University, Mymensingh-2202. The fish were reared in 8 aquaria where fish in 5 aquaria were used for replication of the treatment (experimental group) and fish in remaining 3 aquaria were considered as a control (Control group). OTC was fed to the fish in the experimental aquarium at the rate of 2 g/kg through diet twice daily whereas fish reared under control condition was given feed without antibiotic for 20 d and bacterial content in the aquarium water, gills, skin and intestine of fish were estimated at every alternative day after onset of the experiment. The experiment was conducted in the Faculty Fisheries, Bangladesh Agricultural Results: Rearing the fish with OTC treated feed resulted in gradual decrease of bacterial load in the aquarium water, gills, intestine and skin of the fish whereas the content remain unchanged or little increased in the control group. Water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH and total hardness were within the suitable range in the experimental aquarium but not in control aquaria throughout the experimental period.Conclusions:bacterial load in fish and can be used commercially for maintaining the fish health in aquarium conditions. These results suggest that OTC could be a potential antibiotic to reduce the

  18. No Evidence for a Culturable Bacterial Tetrodotoxin Producer in Pleurobranchaea maculata (Gastropoda: Pleurobranchidae and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren R. Salvitti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a potent neurotoxin found in the tissues of many taxonomically diverse organisms. Its origin has been the topic of much debate, with suggestions including endogenous production, acquisition through diet, and symbiotic bacterial synthesis. Bacterial production of TTX has been reported in isolates from marine biota, but at lower than expected concentrations. In this study, 102 strains were isolated from Pleurobranchaea maculata (Opisthobranchia and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes. Tetrodotoxin production was tested utilizing a recently developed sensitive method to detect the C9 base of TTX via liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Bacterial strains were characterized by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. To account for the possibility that TTX is produced by a consortium of bacteria, a series of experiments using marine broth spiked with various P. maculata tissues were undertaken. Sixteen unique strains from P. maculata and one from Stylochoplana sp. were isolated, representing eight different genera; Pseudomonadales, Actinomycetales, Oceanospirillales, Thiotrichales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, and Vibrionales. Molecular fingerprinting of bacterial communities from broth experiments showed little change over the first four days. No C9 base or TTX was detected in isolates or broth experiments (past day 0, suggesting a culturable microbial source of TTX in P. maculata and Stylochoplana sp. is unlikely.

  19. No evidence for a culturable bacterial tetrodotoxin producer in Pleurobranchaea maculata (Gastropoda: Pleurobranchidae) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvitti, Lauren R; Wood, Susanna A; McNabb, Paul; Cary, Stephen Craig

    2015-01-28

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin found in the tissues of many taxonomically diverse organisms. Its origin has been the topic of much debate, with suggestions including endogenous production, acquisition through diet, and symbiotic bacterial synthesis. Bacterial production of TTX has been reported in isolates from marine biota, but at lower than expected concentrations. In this study, 102 strains were isolated from Pleurobranchaea maculata (Opisthobranchia) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes). Tetrodotoxin production was tested utilizing a recently developed sensitive method to detect the C9 base of TTX via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bacterial strains were characterized by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. To account for the possibility that TTX is produced by a consortium of bacteria, a series of experiments using marine broth spiked with various P. maculata tissues were undertaken. Sixteen unique strains from P. maculata and one from Stylochoplana sp. were isolated, representing eight different genera; Pseudomonadales, Actinomycetales, Oceanospirillales, Thiotrichales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, and Vibrionales. Molecular fingerprinting of bacterial communities from broth experiments showed little change over the first four days. No C9 base or TTX was detected in isolates or broth experiments (past day 0), suggesting a culturable microbial source of TTX in P. maculata and Stylochoplana sp. is unlikely.

  20. Binding domains of Bacillus anthracis phage endolysins recognize cell culture age-related features on the bacterial surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Mundra, Ruchir V; Mehta, Krunal K; Pangule, Ravindra C; Wu, Xia; Glatfelter, Willing S; Chen, Zijing; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriolytic enzymes often possess a C-terminal binding domain that recognizes specific motifs on the bacterial surface and a catalytic domain that cleaves covalent linkages within the cell wall peptidoglycan. PlyPH, one such lytic enzyme of bacteriophage origin, has been reported to be highly effective against Bacillus anthracis, and can kill up to 99.99% of the viable bacteria. The bactericidal activity of this enzyme, however, appears to be strongly dependent on the age of the bacterial culture. Although highly bactericidal against cells in the early exponential phase, the enzyme is substantially less effective against stationary phase cells, thus limiting its application in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the binding domain of PlyPH may differ in affinity to cells in different Bacillus growth stages and may be primarily responsible for the age-restricted activity. We therefore employed an in silico approach to identify phage lysins differing in their specificity for the bacterial cell wall. Specifically we focused our attention on Plyβ, an enzyme with improved cell wall-binding ability and age-independent bactericidal activity. Although PlyPH and Plyβ have dissimilar binding domains, their catalytic domains are highly homologous. We characterized the biocatalytic mechanism of Plyβ by identifying the specific bonds cleaved within the cell wall peptidoglycan. Our results provide an example of the diversity of phage endolysins and the opportunity for these biocatalysts to be used for broad-based protection from bacterial pathogens.

  1. Culturable bacterial diversity from a feed water of a reverse osmosis system, evaluation of biofilm formation and biocontrol using phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgini, D R B; Dias, R S; Siqueira, V M; Valadares, L A B; Albanese, J M; Souza, R S; Torres, A P R; Sousa, M P; Silva, C C; De Paula, S O; Oliveira, V M

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm formation on reverse osmosis (RO) systems represents a drawback in the application of this technology by different industries, including oil refineries. In RO systems the feed water maybe a source of microbial contamination and thus contributes for the formation of biofilm and consequent biofouling. In this study the planktonic culturable bacterial community was characterized from a feed water of a RO system and their capacities were evaluated to form biofilm in vitro. Bacterial motility and biofilm control were also analysed using phages. As results, diverse Protobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were identified. Alphaproteobacteria was the predominant group and Brevundimonas, Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium the most abundant genera. Among the 30 isolates, 11 showed at least one type of motility and 11 were classified as good biofilm formers. Additionally, the influence of non-specific bacteriophage in the bacterial biofilms formed in vitro was investigated by action of phages enzymes or phage infection. The vB_AspP-UFV1 (Podoviridae) interfered in biofilm formation of most tested bacteria and may represent a good alternative in biofilm control. These findings provide important information about the bacterial community from the feed water of a RO system that may be used for the development of strategies for biofilm prevention and control in such systems.

  2. Evaluation and optimisation of bacterial genomic DNA extraction for no-culture techniques applied to vinegars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, Dhouha; Hidalgo, Claudio; Torija, María-Jesús; Gullo, Maria

    2011-10-01

    Direct genomic DNA extraction from vinegars was set up and suitability for PCR assays performed by PCR/DGGE and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. The method was tested on 12 intermediary products of special vinegars, fruit vinegars and condiments produced from different raw materials and procedures. DNAs extraction was performed on pellets by chemical, enzymatic, resin mediated methods and their modifications. Suitable yield and DNA purity were obtained by modification of a method based on the use of PVP/CTAB to remove polyphenolic components and esopolysaccharides. By sequencing of bands from DGGE gel, Gluconacetobacter europaeus, Acetobacter malorum/cerevisiae and Acetobacter orleanensis were detected as main species in samples having more than 4% of acetic acid content. From samples having no acetic acid content, sequences retrieved from excised bands revealed high similarity with prokaryotes with no function on vinegar fermentation: Burkholderia spp., Cupriavidus spp., Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The method was suitable to be applied for no-culture study of vinegars containing polyphenols and esopolysaccharides allowing a more complete assessment of vinegar bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A study of febrile versus afebrile patients after percutaneous nephrolithotomy regarding bacterial etiologic factors through blood and urine cultures and 16S rRNA detection in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaee, Seyed Amirmohsen; Kazemi, Bahram; Moghaddam, Seyed Mohammadmehdi Hosseini; Arianpoor, Arian; Abdi, Hamidreza; Pakmanesh, Hamid; Iran Pour, Elham

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the types of bacteria raising body temperature after a percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We conducted a prospective study of 120 patients who underwent PCNL at Labbafinejad Medical Center between March and July 2006. Each patient had proven negative urine cultures preoperatively and received prophylactic antibiotics at the time of the procedure. Fever was defined as an oral temperature higher than 37.8 degrees C, and those patients with a body temperature lower than 37.8 degrees C were designated as the control group. The feverish patients were divided into two groups: The first group with a temperature below 38.5 degrees C, and the second group with a temperature of 38.5 degrees C or higher. Clinical and operative charts were reviewed to detect fever during the hospital stay. Three simultaneous laboratory tests, including postoperative urine cultures and blood cultures, plus postoperative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were carried out to determine the causative agents. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the PCR results. Also, this study demonstrated that positive PCR results (pathogen and nonpathogen species) were the same in febrile and afebrile groups. Considering our findings, we may conclude that the effects of the bacterial etiologies in post-PCNL fever are insignificant.

  4. Agreement between microscopic examination and bacterial culture of bile samples for detection of bactibilia in dogs and cats with hepatobiliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashmakova, Medora B; Piccione, Julie; Bishop, Micah A; Nelson, Whitney R; Lawhon, Sara D

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the agreement between results of microscopic examination and bacterial culture of bile samples from dogs and cats with hepatobiliary disease for detection of bactibilia. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. ANIMALS 31 dogs and 21 cats with hepatobiliary disease for which subsequent microscopic examination and bacterial culture of bile samples was performed from 2004 through 2014. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records of included dogs and cats were reviewed to extract data regarding diagnosis, antimicrobials administered, and results of microscopic examination and bacterial culture of bile samples. Agreement between these 2 diagnostic tests was assessed by calculation of the Cohen κ value. RESULTS 17 (33%) dogs and cats had bactibilia identified by microscopic examination of bile samples, and 11 (21%) had bactibilia identified via bacterial culture. Agreement between these 2 tests was substantial (percentage agreement [positive and negative results], 85%; κ = 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.38 to 0.89) and improved to almost perfect when calculated for only animals that received no antimicrobials within 24 hours prior to sample collection (percentage agreement, 94%; κ = 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.61 to 1.00). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that agreement between microscopic examination and bacterial culture of bile samples for detection of bactibilia is optimized when dogs and cats are not receiving antimicrobials at the time of sample collection. Concurrent bacterial culture and microscopic examination of bile samples are recommended for all cats and dogs evaluated for hepatobiliary disease.

  5. Rathayibacter toxicus, Other Rathayibacter Species Inducing Bacterial Head Blight of Grasses, and the Potential for Livestock Poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Timothy D; Schroeder, Brenda K; Schneider, William L; Luster, Douglas G; Sechler, Aaron; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Subbotin, Sergei A

    2017-07-01

    Rathayibacter toxicus, a Select Agent in the United States, is one of six recognized species in the genus Rathayibacter and the best known due to its association with annual ryegrass toxicity, which occurs only in parts of Australia. The Rathayibacter species are unusual among phytopathogenic bacteria in that they are transmitted by anguinid seed gall nematodes and produce extracellular polysaccharides in infected plants resulting in bacteriosis diseases with common names such as yellow slime and bacterial head blight. R. toxicus is distinguished from the other species by producing corynetoxins in infected plants; toxin production is associated with infection by a bacteriophage. These toxins cause grazing animals feeding on infected plants to develop convulsions and abnormal gate, which is referred to as "staggers," and often results in death of affected animals. R. toxicus is the only recognized Rathayibacter species to produce toxin, although reports of livestock deaths in the United States suggest a closely related toxigenic species may be present. A closely related but undescribed species, Rathayibacter sp. EV, originally isolated from Ehrharta villosa var. villosa in South Africa, is suspected of producing toxin. Many of the diseases caused by Rathayibacter species occur in arid areas and the extracellular polysaccharide they produce is believed to aid in their survival between crops. For example, R. "agropyri" was isolated from infected plant material after being stored for 50 years in a herbarium. Similarly, the anguinid vectors associated with these bacteria form seed galls in infected plants and are capable of surviving for very long periods of time under dry conditions. The addition of R. toxicus to the list of Select Agents has raised concern over its potential introduction and a realization that current diagnostic methods are inadequate to distinguish among Rathayibacter species. In addition, little is known about the Rathayibacter species and their

  6. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production.

  7. Comparative Genomics of the Bacterial Genus Streptococcus Illuminates Evolutionary Implications of Species Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Yang; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Li, Hong-Wei; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into “species groups”. However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups. PMID:24977706

  8. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Streptococcus illuminates evolutionary implications of species groups.

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    Xiao-Yang Gao

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into "species groups". However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups.

  9. Antifouling effect of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata and different species of bacterial film on larval attachment of Balanus amphitrite (cirripedia, crustacea

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    Viswambaran Ganapiriya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The antifouling activity of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata (Dendy and five species of bacterial biofilm were studied. Larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cyprids and nauplii were used to monitor the settlement inhibition and the extent to which inhibition was due to toxicity. The crude extract and partially purified fractions of A.elongata showed significant inhibition over the settlement individually, and with the interaction of bacterial species. No bacterial film stimulated the barnacle settlement. The high but variable levels of antifouling activity in combination with less amount of toxicity showed the potential of these metabolites in environmentally-friendly antifouling preparations.

  10. Bacteroides uniformis is a putative bacterial species associated with the degradation of the isoflavone genistein in human feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2011-06-01

    Inter-individual variation in isoflavone absorption depends on gut microbial degradation and affects the efficacy of these compounds. We hypothesized that inter-individual variation in fecal isoflavone disappearance coincided with variation in bacterial species. In vitro anaerobic fecal disappearance of isoflavones was measured from 33 participants by HPLC. Fecal microbial 16S rRNA variable region PCR products were obtained from 4 participants with the greatest and least genistein or glycitein degradation and were subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. DNA bands with a homology of 90-95% to Bacteroides uniformis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were present in greater intensities in fecal samples showing a genistein disappearance rate constant of 1.47 ± 0.14 h(-1) compared with those with a genistein disappearance rate constant of 0.15 ± 0.03 h(-1) (P < 0.05). Human fecal bacterial species with DNA sequences 90-100% homologous to Tannerella forsythensis and 4 other species were present in greater intensities in fecal samples showing a glycitein disappearance rate constant of 0.57 ± 0.30 h(-1) compared with fecal samples with a glycitein disappearance rate constant of 0.08 ± 0.03 h(-1) (P < 0.05). In high degraders, B. uniformis may be a candidate for genistein degradation and T. forsythensis for glycitein degradation, based on fecal isoflavone degradation in the presence of these species. Bacteroides acidifaciens increased isoflavone disappearance in anaerobic human fecal incubations under nutrient-rich and -depleted conditions, suggesting this species as one responsible for the generally high degradation of isoflavones by humans. These fecal microbes are candidate biomarkers for interindividual variation in isoflavone uptake and efficacy.

  11. Detection of Bacterial and Yeast Species with the Bactec 9120 Automated System with Routine Use of Aerobic, Anaerobic, and Fungal Media▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Alfredo; Palmeri, Angelo; Amato, Teresa; Immordino, Rita; Distefano, Salvatore; Giammanco, Anna

    2008-01-01

    During the period 2006 and 2007, all blood cultures required by four units at high infective risk and most of those required by other units of the University Hospital of Palermo, Palermo, Italy were performed using a Bactec 9120 automated blood culture system with a complete set of Plus Aerobic/F, Plus Anaerobic/F, and Mycosis IC/F bottles. The aim of the study was to enable the authors to gain firsthand experience of the culture potentialities of the three different media, to obtain information regarding the overall and specific recovery of bacteria and yeasts from blood cultures in the hospital, and to reach a decision as to whether and when to utilize anaerobic and fungal bottles. Although very few bloodstream infections (1.8%) were associated with obligate anaerobes, the traditional routine use of anaerobic bottles was confirmed because of their usefulness, not only in the detection of anaerobes, but also in that of gram-positive cocci and fermentative gram-negative bacilli. In this study, Mycosis IC/F bottles detected 77.4% of all the yeast isolates, 87.0% of yeasts belonging to the species Candida albicans, and 45.7% of nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli resistant to chloramphenicol and tobramycin. In order to improve the diagnosis of fungemia in high-risk patients, the additional routine use of fungal bottles was suggested when, as occurred in the intensive-care unit and in the hematology unit of the University Hospital of Palermo, high percentages of bloodstream infections are associated with yeasts, and/or antibiotic-resistant bacteria and/or multiple bacterial isolates capable of inhibiting yeast growth in aerobic bottles. PMID:18923011

  12. Discovery of Rickettsia species in Dermacentor niveus Neumann ticks by investigating the diversity of bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Lu; Wang, Cheng-Yan; Tong, Yi-Gang; Tang, Fang; Yang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2014-09-01

    Ticks (Dermacentor niveus Neumann) were collected from Tacheng, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and their bacterial diversity was investigated using the 16S RNA gene library method from one pooled sample. A total of 452 clones was successfully sequenced and assigned to 4 phyla. The dominant phylum was the Proteobacteria, accounting for 62.8% of all the clones of the 16S rRNA gene at the confidence level 80%. The other sequences were assigned to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and accounted for 13.5%, 12.4%, and 11.3%, respectively. These results provide an insight into the bacterial diversity associated with D. niveus ticks in the natural environment of Tacheng. They indicate the occurrence of Rickettsia raoultii and Rickettsia slovaca in D. niveus ticks in this area, and as a consequence, cases of TIBOLA/DEBONEL may occur (tick-borne lymphadenopathy/Dermacentor-borne necrosis erythema and lymphadenopathy).

  13. Evaluation of the Yeast Traffic Light PNA FISH probes for identification of Candida species from positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leslie; Le Febre, Kara M; Deml, Sharon M; Wohlfiel, Sherri L; Wengenack, Nancy L

    2012-04-01

    The Yeast Traffic Light PNA FISH kit (YTL) correctly identified Candida spp. in 207/216 (96%) positive blood cultures. Discordant results were seen with known cross-reacting species and cultures containing Candida lambica and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The YTL provides rapid, reliable identification of the five common Candida species found in blood cultures.

  14. Popularity of Different Lampyrid Species in Japanese Culture as Measured by Google Search Volume

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    Kenta Takada

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available I investigated the popularity of different lampyrid species (34 species in Japanese culture as part of a study on cultural entomology. Popularity was assessed by the Google search volume for Japanese lampyrid species names in katakana and hiragana scripts, using the Keyword Tool of Google AdWords. The search volume of lampyrid species as “Genji-botaru” (Luciola cruciata Motschulsky, “Heike-botaru” (Luciola lateralis Motschulsky and “Hime-botaru” (Hotaria parvula Kiesenwetter, in either or both katakana and hiragana syllabic scripts, was enormously high relative to other lampyrid species, indicating the biased attention of Japanese to these lampyrid species. In addition, search volumes for familial or common lampyrid name (“Hotaru” was assessed and compared with that of 34 lampyrid species. This analyzing result showed that: (1 the search volumes for katakana and hiragana were 37.7 and 773.1 times higher for “Hotaru” than “Genji-botaru”, respectively; and (2 the search volume for all lampyrid species was clearly higher in katakana than hiragana, whereas the search volumes for “Hotaru” were clearly higher in hiragana than katakana. These results suggest that: (1 the Japanese public tends to perceive lampyrids with not a clear but an ambiguous taxonomic view; and (2 the attitude of the Japanese public toward lampyrids differs between those who perceive lampyrids with a clear taxonomic view (at species level and with an ambiguous taxonomic view.

  15. Popularity of Different Lampyrid Species in Japanese Culture as Measured by Google Search Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kenta

    2011-07-05

    I investigated the popularity of different lampyrid species (34 species) in Japanese culture as part of a study on cultural entomology. Popularity was assessed by the Google search volume for Japanese lampyrid species names in katakana and hiragana scripts, using the Keyword Tool of Google AdWords. The search volume of lampyrid species as "Genji-botaru" (Luciola cruciata Motschulsky), "Heike-botaru" (Luciola lateralis Motschulsky) and "Hime-botaru" (Hotaria parvula Kiesenwetter), in either or both katakana and hiragana syllabic scripts, was enormously high relative to other lampyrid species, indicating the biased attention of Japanese to these lampyrid species. In addition, search volumes for familial or common lampyrid name ("Hotaru") was assessed and compared with that of 34 lampyrid species. This analyzing result showed that: (1) the search volumes for katakana and hiragana were 37.7 and 773.1 times higher for "Hotaru" than "Genji-botaru", respectively; and (2) the search volume for all lampyrid species was clearly higher in katakana than hiragana, whereas the search volumes for "Hotaru" were clearly higher in hiragana than katakana. These results suggest that: (1) the Japanese public tends to perceive lampyrids with not a clear but an ambiguous taxonomic view; and (2) the attitude of the Japanese public toward lampyrids differs between those who perceive lampyrids with a clear taxonomic view (at species level) and with an ambiguous taxonomic view.

  16. PCR-based genotyping of Helicobacter pylori of Gambian children and adults directly from biopsy specimens and bacterial cultures

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    Secka Ousman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is an important agent of gastroduodenal disease in Africa and throughout the world. We sought to determine an optimum method for genotyping H. pylori strains from children and adults in The Gambia, West Africa. Results Virulence genes were amplified in 127 of 190 cases tested (121 adults and 6 children; each of 60 bacterial cultures, and 116 from DNA extracted directly from biopsies. The proportion of biopsies that were cagA+, the ratio of vacAs1/s2, and vacAm1/m2, and the proportion of mixed strain populations in individual subjects changed with age. Strains lacking virulence cagA and vacA genes and with apparently homogeneous (one predominant strain infections were more common among infants than adults. Conclusions In order to detect the range of bacterial genotypes harbored by individual patients, direct PCR proved slightly superior to isolation of H. pylori by biopsy culture, but the techniques were complementary, and the combination of both culture and direct PCR produced the most complete picture. The seemingly higher virulence of strains from adult than infant infections in The Gambia merits further analysis.

  17. PCR-based genotyping of Helicobacter pylori of Gambian children and adults directly from biopsy specimens and bacterial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is an important agent of gastroduodenal disease in Africa and throughout the world. We sought to determine an optimum method for genotyping H. pylori strains from children and adults in The Gambia, West Africa. Results Virulence genes were amplified in 127 of 190 cases tested (121 adults and 6 children); each of 60 bacterial cultures, and 116 from DNA extracted directly from biopsies. The proportion of biopsies that were cagA+, the ratio of vacAs1/s2, and vacAm1/m2, and the proportion of mixed strain populations in individual subjects changed with age. Strains lacking virulence cagA and vacA genes and with apparently homogeneous (one predominant strain) infections were more common among infants than adults. Conclusions In order to detect the range of bacterial genotypes harbored by individual patients, direct PCR proved slightly superior to isolation of H. pylori by biopsy culture, but the techniques were complementary, and the combination of both culture and direct PCR produced the most complete picture. The seemingly higher virulence of strains from adult than infant infections in The Gambia merits further analysis. PMID:21507253

  18. Is a single positive blood culture for Enterococcus species representative of infection or contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindai, K; Strerath, M S; Hess, T; Safdar, N

    2014-11-01

    Data on the clinical outcomes of patients with a single compared with multiple positive blood cultures for Enterococcus species is limited. We undertook a retrospective cohort study in adults with at least one positive blood culture for Enterococcus species in a single institution. Clinical outcomes included death and elimination of infection. We included 471 positive blood cultures from 206 enterococcal positive blood culture episodes in 189 patients. Multiple positive blood cultures for Enterococcus species occurred in 110/206 (53.4 %) episodes; 31.6 % of patients had diabetes mellitus; 42.9 % of patients had solid or hematologic malignancy; 26.5 % of patients were solid organ transplant recipients; hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated acquisition represented 55.3 % and 33.0 % of episodes, respectively. Thirty-five patients died and 110 episodes of enterococcal bloodstream infection were successfully treated. In the multivariable analysis, multiple positive blood cultures were not statistically significantly associated with an increased likelihood of in-hospital death [odds ratio (OR) 1.00, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.42-2.40] or elimination (OR 1.41, 95 % CI 0.76-2.64) compared with single positive blood cultures. Hematologic malignancy and diabetes mellitus were independently associated with in-hospital death (OR 2.83, 95 % Cl 1.02-7.82; OR 2.79, 95 % Cl 1.16-6.70, respectively). Infectious disease consultation was associated with a greater likelihood of elimination (OR 2.50, 95 % Cl 1.32-4.72). The clinical outcomes of patients with single versus multiple positive blood cultures with Enterococcus species were similar in our institution. Further studies should examine efficient methods to detect contamination versus true infection.

  19. Detection of Vibrio Species Isolated from Ornamental Guppy Fish in Kashan, Isfahan, Iran Fish culturing Pounds

    OpenAIRE

    Samira Kiani; Nafiseh Sadat Naghavi; Alireza Nazari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Gram-negative bacteria are the most pathogenic bacteria for marine organisms including ornamental fish. Materials and methods: In the present study Vibrio species isolated from ornamental guppy fish in Kashan, Isfahan, Iran fish ponds and were detected according to molecular detection and genetic alignment. Liver, kidney, skin, brain and gill samples were taken from ornamental guppy fish in Kashan, Isfahan, Iran. Samples were cultured on enriched culture media and purificati...

  20. Protoplast culture and plant regeneration of several species in the genus Dianthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, M; Mii, M

    1992-06-01

    Seventeen cultivars belonging to the genus Dianthus were examined for protoplast isolation, culture and shoot regeneration under the same conditions. These included D. caryophyllus, D. chinensis, D. barbatus, D. plumarius, D. superbus and D. japonicus as well as interspecific hybrid cultivars (D. caryophyllus x D. chinensis and D. chinensis x D. barbatus). In all cultivars, viable protoplasts were isolated at high yields from leaves of axenic shoot cultures and some of these protoplasts divided and formed colonies. However, shoot regeneration frequencies were markedly different among the species. High frequency shoot regeneration was obtained from D. chinensis and interspecific hybrid cultivars, while only low frequency or no shoot regeneration was obtained from other species.

  1. Honey bees avoid nectar colonized by three bacterial species, but not by a yeast species, isolated from the bee gut.

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    Ashley P Good

    Full Text Available The gut microflora of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, is receiving increasing attention as a potential determinant of the bees' health and their efficacy as pollinators. Studies have focused primarily on the microbial taxa that appear numerically dominant in the bee gut, with the assumption that the dominant status suggests their potential importance to the bees' health. However, numerically minor taxa might also influence the bees' efficacy as pollinators, particularly if they are not only present in the gut, but also capable of growing in floral nectar and altering its chemical properties. Nonetheless, it is not well understood whether honey bees have any feeding preference for or against nectar colonized by specific microbial species. To test whether bees exhibit a preference, we conducted a series of field experiments at an apiary using synthetic nectar inoculated with specific species of bacteria or yeast that had been isolated from the bee gut, but are considered minor components of the gut microflora. These species had also been found in floral nectar. Our results indicated that honey bees avoided nectar colonized by the bacteria Asaia astilbes, Erwinia tasmaniensis, and Lactobacillus kunkeei, whereas the yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii did not affect the feeding preference of the insects. Our results also indicated that avoidance of bacteria-colonized nectar was caused not by the presence of the bacteria per se, but by the chemical changes to nectar made by the bacteria. These findings suggest that gut microbes may not only affect the bees' health as symbionts, but that some of the microbes may possibly affect the efficacy of A. mellifera as pollinators by altering nectar chemistry and influencing their foraging behavior.

  2. Christensenella timonensis, a new bacterial species isolated from the human gut

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    S. Ndongo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new species, Christensenella timonensis, strain Marseille-P2437T (CSUR P2437T, which was isolated from gut microbiota of a 66-year-old patient as a part of culturomics study. C. timonensis represents the second species isolated within the Christensenella genus.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Acinetobacter species isolated from blood cultures in two Japanese university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Uetera, Yushi; Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji

    2014-02-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has rapidly spread worldwide. This study investigated antibiotic susceptibility and genotypic resistance of 123 consecutive blood culture isolates of Acinetobacter species collected between 2003 and 2011 in two Japanese hospitals. The isolates were assigned to 13 species. Carbapenem resistance was detected in four isolates. Only one A. baumannii isolate had blaOXA-23 together with ISAba1; the remaining three isolates had IMP-1 metallo-β-lactamase. Quinolone resistance was detected in five isolates that had point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region. The predominance of various non-A. baumannii species and low prevalence of carbapenem resistance among blood culture isolates of Acinetobacter species in two Japanese hospitals were confirmed.

  4. Bacterial isolates from the bryozoan Membranipora membranacea: influence of culture media on isolation and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindl, Herwig; Thiel, Vera; Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2012-03-01

    From specimens of the bryozoan Membranipora membranacea collected in the Baltic Sea, bacteria were isolated on four different media, which significantly increased the diversity of the isolated groups. All isolates were classified according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and tested for antimicrobial properties using a panel of five indicator strains and six different media. Each medium featured a unique set of isolated phylotypes, and a phylogenetically diverse collection of isolates was obtained. A total of 96 isolates were assigned to 49 phylotypes and 29 genera. Only one-third of the members of these genera had been isolated previously from comparable sources. The isolates were affiliated with Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria. A comparable large portion of up to 22 isolates, i.e., 15 phylotypes, probably represent new species. Likewise, 47 isolates (approximately 50%) displayed antibiotic activities, mostly against grampositive indicator strains. Of the active strains, 63.8 % had antibiotic traits only on one or two of the growth media, whereas only 12.7 % inhibited growth on five or all six media. The application of six different media for antimicrobial testing resulted in twice the number of positive hits as obtained with only a single medium. The use of different media for the isolation of bacteria as well as the variation of media considered suitable for the production of antibiotic substances significantly enhanced both the number of isolates obtained and the proportion of antibiotic active cultures. Thus the approach described herein offers an improved strategy in the search for new antibiotic compounds.

  5. In vitro inhibitory potentials of crude plant extracts on multidrug resistant bacterial species from infected human wounds

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    Yetunde A Ekanola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scientific data on usage of plants to promote wound healing is exclusively scare in Nigeria. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine in vitro inhibitory potentials of crude extracts of garlic (Allium sativum and ginger (Zingiber officinale on multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria isolated from deep and superficial human wounds. Materials and Methods: Using agar disc- and modified agar well-diffusion methods, 87 wound-borne bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were screened for in vitro susceptibility to 15 commonly-available antibiotic discs, 18 antibiotic drugs and three plant extracts. Results: Staph. aureus strains exhibited 52.5-97.4% resistance to antibiotic (discs, with multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR of 25.0 -100%. Between 39.1 and 95.7% of Proteus mirabilis strains resisted the antibiotics (discs, while MAR was 37.5-100%. Resistance rates displayed by Ps. aeruginosa strains were 61.5-100% with MAR of 50.0-100%. Overall antibiotic resistance patterns of respective bacterial species recorded for the antibiotic drugs were Staph. aureus (11.1-83.3%, Pr. mirabilis (16.7-77.8% and Ps. aeruginosa (16.7-50.0% and the most-resisted antibiotic drugs were axacef (55.3-82.6%, septrin (84.2-92.3%, primpex (78.3-84.6%, mediphenicol (63.2-73.1% and augmentin 1 (43.2-76.9%. All the multidrug resistant wound-borne bacterial strains exhibited minimal to moderate susceptibility towards crude extracts of garlic (17.4-34.6% and ginger (57.7-60.8%. Conclusion: Human wound-borne bacterial strains, which were multi-resistant to commonly available antibiotics (discs/drugs were minimally or moderately susceptible to crude extracts of garlic (Allium sativum and ginger (Zingiber officinale, which can be of clinical importance as herbal therapy in wound dressings or other forms of wound treatments.

  6. Decolourisation of Acid Orange 7 recalcitrant auto-oxidation coloured by-products using an acclimatised mixed bacterial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Hui Han; Lim, Chi Kim; Kee, Thuan Chien; Ware, Ismail; Chan, Giek Far; Shahir, Shafinaz; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2014-03-01

    This study focuses on the biodegradation of recalcitrant, coloured compounds resulting from auto-oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in a sequential facultative anaerobic-aerobic treatment system. A novel mixed bacterial culture, BAC-ZS, consisting of Brevibacillus panacihumi strain ZB1, Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain ZB2, and Enterococcus faecalis strain ZL bacteria were isolated from environmental samples. The acclimatisation of the mixed culture was carried out in an AO7 decolourised solution. The acclimatised mixed culture showed 98 % decolourisation within 2 h of facultative anaerobic treatment using yeast extract and glucose as co-substrate. Subsequent aerobic post treatment caused auto-oxidation reaction forming dark coloured compounds that reduced the percentage decolourisation to 73 %. Interestingly, further agitations of the mixed culture in the solution over a period of 48 h significantly decolourise the coloured compounds and increased the decolourisation percentage to 90 %. Analyses of the degradation compounds using UV-visible spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed complete degradation of recalcitrant AO7 by the novel BAC-ZS. Phytotoxicity tests using Cucumis sativus confirmed the dye solution after post aerobic treatment were less toxic compared to the parent dye. The quantitative real-time PCR revealed that E. faecalis strain ZL was the dominant strain in the acclimatised mix culture.

  7. Biodegradation potential of pure and mixed bacterial cultures for removal of 4-nitroaniline from textile dye wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Crowley, David E

    2009-03-01

    Environmentally toxic aromatic amines including nitroanilines are commonly generated in dye contaminated wastewater in which azo dyes undergo degradation under anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a process for biological treatment of 4-nitroaniline. Three bacteria identified as Acinetobacter sp., Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella oxytoca were isolated from enrichment cultures of activated sludge on 4-nitroaniline, after which the isolates and the mixed culture were studied to determine optimal conditions for biodegradation. HPLC analyses showed the mixed culture was capable of complete removal of 100micromol/L of 4-nitroaniline within 72h under aerobic conditions. There was an inverse linear relationship (R(2)=0.96) between the rate of degradation (V) and 4-nitraoaniline concentrations [S] over 100-1000micromol/L. The bacterial culture was also capable of decolorizing structurally different azo dyes (Acid Red-88, Reactive Black-5, Direct Red-81, and Disperse Orange-3) and also degraded nitrobenzene. Our findings show that enrichment cultures from activated sludge can be effective for the removal of dyes and their toxic intermediates, and that treatment may best be accomplished using an anaerobic-aerobic process.

  8. RESEARCH ON THE RELATFD FACTORS INFLUENCING THE POSITIVE RATE OF SURGICAL INCISION BACTERIAL CULTURE%影响手术切口细菌培养阳性率相关因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭燕萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the relative factors which influence the positive rate of bacterial culture from surgical incision, and to improve the accuracy of detection. Methods Retrospectively investigation was used to analysis 1 000 cases of surgical incisions bacterial culture results in our hospital, and find out the related factors which influence the positive rate. Results Several factors were found affecting the bacterial species and positive rate of surgical incision bacterial culture, including the disinfection of patient's skin and doctor's arm, the type of surgical incision, the time of operation, and so on. Conclusion When collecting and culturing the bacteria from surgical incision, we should pay attention to the disinfection of patient's skin and doctor's arm and other influencing factors, and take actions to obtain the accurate culture results.%目的 研究影响手术切口细菌培养阳性率的相关因素,提高检测的准确性.方法 通过回顾性调查方法,对某医院1000例手术患者切口细菌培养结果进行分析,找出相关因素.结果 切口细菌培养的细菌种类及阳性率与病人的皮肤和医生手臂的消毒、手术切口类型、手术时间、手术接台情况等相关因素呈正相关.结论 患者手术切口细菌学标本采集和培养应考虑到手术皮肤和术者手消毒及其他因素,采取控制措施,获得准确的培养结果.

  9. An enhanced vector-free allele exchange (VFAE) mutagenesis protocol for genome editing in a wide range of bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Ahmed E; Zhang, Chen; Yang, Zhimin; Shang, Liguo; Jiang, Shijie; Deng, Zhiping; Zhan, Yuhua; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Yan, Yongliang

    2017-12-01

    Vector-free allele exchange (VFAE) is a newly developed protocol for genome editing in Pseudomonas species. Although several parameters have been determined to optimize the procedures for obtaining a stable and high-frequency mutation, numerous false-positive clones still appear on the plate, which increases the difficulty of finding the desired mutants. It has also not been established whether this protocol can be used for genome editing in other bacterial species. In the current study, the protocol was modified to dramatically decrease the occurrence of false-positive colonies using Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 as a model strain. This improvement was reached by increasing the occurrence of circular-DNA cassettes of the correct size. Furthermore, the enhanced protocol was used to construct mutants in both the gram-negative Escherichia coli BL21 and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168 strains. The protocol works well in both strains, yielding ideal results with a low percentage of false-positive colonies. In summary, the enhanced VFAE mutagenesis protocol is a potential tool for use in bacterial genome editing.

  10. Working across cultures to protect Native American natural and cultural resources from invasive species in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice M. Alexander; Susan J. Frankel; Nina Hapner; John L. Phillips; Virgil Dupuis

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species know no boundaries; they spread regardless of ownership, and actions by neighboring landowners can influence local and regional populations and impacts. Native Americans and mainstream Western society (representing the prevalent attitudes, values, and practices of US society) both depend on forests for food, fiber, and emotional well-being, but in...

  11. A survey on species and prevalence rate of bacterial agents isolated from cockroaches in three hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarchi, Ali Akbar Karimi; Vatani, Hadi

    2009-04-01

    The presence of cockroaches has health implications, such as nosocomial infection, as the insects move freely from areas within and around hospitals that may harbor pathogenic organisms. The goals of the present study were to determine species of bacteria isolated from cockroaches found in three Tehran hospitals, and to determine distribution of potential vectors by species and sex. The study is descriptive laboratory research. A total of 305 cockroaches from three species were trapped and identified: Periplaneta americana (65.6%), Blatella germanica (12.1%), and Blatta orientalis (22.3%). From these potential vectors, 19 species of bacteria were isolated and identified. After transportation of cockroaches to the laboratory, separation of the whole-homogenized suspension of each species was carried out. Identification of the isolated bacteria was performed according to Burgey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th Edition. The most common species of bacteria isolated from cockroaches were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus Group D, Bacillus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus vulgaris. No statistical significance was found between sex and species of cockroach carrying bacteria (p > 0.05), but significance was found for sex in Citrobacter freundii, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus non-group A&B (p < 0.05).

  12. Bacterial colonization of the phyllosphere of mediterranean perennial species as influenced by leaf structural and chemical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R K P; Karamanoli, K; Vokou, D

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we assessed various leaf structural and chemical features as possible predictors of the size of the phyllosphere bacterial population in the Mediterranean environment. We examined eight perennial species, naturally occurring and coexisting in the same area, in Halkidiki (northern Greece). They are Arbutus unedo, Quercus coccifera, Pistacia lentiscus, and Myrtus communis (evergreen sclerophyllous species), Lavandula stoechas and Cistus incanus (drought semi-deciduous species), and Calamintha nepeta and Melissa officinalis (non-woody perennial species). M. communis, L. stoechas, C. nepeta, and M. officinalis produce essential oil in substantial quantities. We sampled summer leaves from these species and (1) estimated the size of the bacterial population of their phyllosphere, (2) estimated the concentration of different leaf constituents, and (3) studied leaf morphological and anatomical features and expressed them in a quantitative way. The aromatic plants are on average more highly colonized than the other species, whereas the non-woody perennials are more highly colonized than the woody species. The population size of epiphytic bacteria is positively correlated with glandular and non-glandular trichome densities, and with water and phosphorus contents; it is negatively correlated with total phenolics content and the thickness of the leaf, of the mesophyll, and of the abaxial epidermis. No correlation was found with the density of stomata, the nitrogen, and the soluble sugar contents. By regression tree analysis, we found that the leaf-microbe system can be effectively described by three leaf attributes with leaf water content being the primary explanatory attribute. Leaves with water content >73% are the most highly colonized. For leaves with water content 1.34 mg g(-1) d.w.) are more colonized, and leaves with the adaxial epidermis thicker than 20.77 microm are the least colonized. Although these critical attributes and values hold true only within

  13. Setup of an in vitro test system for basic studies on biofilm behavior of mixed-species cultures with dental and periodontal pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Standar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caries and periodontitis are important human diseases associated with formation of multi-species biofilms. The involved bacteria are intensively studied to understand the molecular basis of the interactions in such biofilms. This study established a basic in vitro single and mixed-species culture model for oral bacteria combining three complimentary methods. The setup allows a rapid screening for effects in the mutual species interaction. Furthermore, it is easy to handle, inexpensive, and reproducible. METHODS: Streptococcus mitis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis, typical inhabitants of the healthy oral cavity, S. mutans as main carriogenic species, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, S. intermedius and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as periodontitis-associated bacteria, were investigated for their biofilm forming ability. Different liquid growth media were evaluated. Safranin-staining allowed monitoring of biofilm formation under the chosen conditions. Viable counts and microscopy permitted investigation of biofilm behavior in mixed-species and transwell setups. FINDINGS: S. mitis, F. nucleatum, P. gingivalis and P. micra failed to form biofilm structures. S. mutans, S. sanguinis, S. intermedius and S. salivarius established abundant biofilm masses in CDM/sucrose. A. actinomycetemcomitans formed patchy monolayers. For in depth analysis S. mitis, S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans were chosen, because i they are representatives of the physiological-, cariogenic and periodontitis-associated bacterial flora, respectively and ii their difference in their biofilm forming ability. Microscopic analysis confirmed the results of safranin staining. Investigation of two species combinations of S. mitis with either S. mutans or A. actinomycetemcomitans revealed bacterial interactions influencing biofilm mass, biofilm structure and cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: This setup shows safranin staining

  14. Staphylococcus species and their Methicillin-Resistance in 7424 Blood Cultures for Suspected Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana ALMAŞ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of Staphylococcus species in bloodstream infections and to assess their susceptibility to methicillin. Material and Methods: Between January 1st 2008 - December 31st 2010, 7424 blood culture sets were submitted to the Laboratory Department of the Hospital for Clinical Infectious Diseases in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The blood cultures were performed using BacT/Alert until January 2010 and BacT/Alert 3D automated system (bioMérieux after that date. The blood culture bottles were incubated at 37°C in a continuously monitoring system for up to 7 days. The strain identifications were performed by conventional methods, ApiStaph galleries and Vitek 2 Compact system. Susceptibility to methicillin was determined by disk diffusion method with cefoxitin disk and by using Vitek 2 Compact system. Results: From the total number of performed blood cultures, 568 were positive with Staphylococcus species. From 168 bacteriemic episodes 103 were with Staphylococcus aureus. Among 65 coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates, Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most frequently isolated species (34, followed by Staphylococcus hominis (15, Staphylococcus haemolyticus (8, Staphylococcus saprophyticus (3, Staphylococcus cohnii (1, Staphylococcus auricularis (1, and 3 strains that were not identified at species level. Methicillin resistance was encountered in 53.40% of Staphylococcus aureus strains and in 80% of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Conclusions: An important percentage of blood cultures were contaminated with Staphylococcus species. The main species identified in true bacteriemia cases were Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The percentage of methicillin-resistance, proved to be high not only for coagulase-negative staphylococci but also for Staphylococcus aureus.

  15. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis in a rural setup: Comparison of clinical algorithm, smear scoring and culture by semiquantitative technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs in a rural set up and compare the smear scoring system to that of culture by semiquantitative technique. A total of 505 married women, who were in sexually active age group of 15-44 years, were selected from three different villages. High vaginal swabs, endocervical swabs, vaginal discharge and blood were collected and processed in the laboratory. Overall prevalence of 29% reproductive tract infection was detected. Endogenous infection was commonly observed (27.92%, and very low prevalence of STIs (Trichomonas 1.18%, Syphilis 0%, Gonorrhea 0% was detected. Diagnosis of BV was possible in 104 (20.5% women by smear alone and 88 (17.42% women by semiquantitative culture.

  16. Impact of arachidonic acid enrichment of live rotifer prey on bacterial communities in rotifer and larval fish cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seychelles, Laurent H; Doiron, Kim; Audet, Céline; Tremblay, Réjean; Pernet, Fabrice; Lemarchand, Karine

    2013-03-01

    Rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis), commonly used at first feeding in commercial fish hatcheries, carry a large bacteria load. Because they are relatively poor in essential fatty acids, it is common practice to enrich them with fatty acids, including arachidonic acid (AA). This study aims to determine whether prey enrichment with AA may act as a prebiotic and modify the microbial community composition either in AA-enriched rotifer cultures or in larval-rearing water using winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) as a larval fish model. AA enrichment modified the bacterial community composition in both the rotifer culture tanks and the larval-rearing tanks. We observed an increase in the number of cultivable bacteria on TCBS (thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose) agar, used as a proxy for the abundance of Vibrio sp. The results suggest that AA may also play an indirect role in larval health.

  17. Characterization of the Bacterial Community Associated with Larvae and Adults of Anoplophora chinensis Collected in Italy by Culture and Culture-Independent Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Rizzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The wood-boring beetle Anoplophora chinensis Forster, native to China, has recently spread to North America and Europe causing serious damage to ornamental and forest trees. The gut microbial community associated with these xylophagous beetles is of interest for potential biotechnological applications in lignocellulose degradation and development of pest-control measures. In this study the gut bacterial community of larvae and adults of A. chinensis, collected from different host trees in North Italy, was investigated by both culture and culture-independent methods. Larvae and adults harboured a moderately diverse bacterial community, dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The gammaproteobacterial family Enterobacteriaceae (genera Gibbsiella, Enterobacter, Raoultella, and Klebsiella was the best represented. The abundance of such bacteria in the insect gut is likely due to the various metabolic abilities of Enterobacteriaceae, including fermentation of carbohydrates derived from lignocellulose degradation and contribution to nitrogen intake by nitrogen-fixing activity. In addition, bacteria previously shown to have some lignocellulose-degrading activity were detected at a relatively low level in the gut. These bacteria possibly act synergistically with endogenous and fungal enzymes in lignocellulose breakdown. The detection of actinobacterial symbionts could be explained by a possible role in the detoxification of secondary plant metabolites and/or protection against pathogens.

  18. The role of silicon in enhancing resistance to bacterial blight of hydroponic- and soil-cultured rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Alin; Xue, Gaofeng; Cui, Peiyuan; Fan, Fenliang; Liu, Hongfang; Yin, Chang; Sun, Wanchun; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-04-19

    Here we report for the first time that bacterial blight of rice can be alleviated by silicon (Si) added. In both inoculated and uninoculated plants, shoot dry weight was significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. A soil-cultured trial showed that disease severity was 24.3% lower in the Si-amended plants than in the non-Si-amended plants. Plants that were switched from -Si to +Si nutrient solution and simultaneously inoculated with Xoo also exhibited the same high resistance to bacterial blight as the plants that were treated continuously with Si, with control efficiencies of 52.8 and 62.9%, respectively. Moreover, total concentrations of soluble phenolics and lignin in rice leaves were significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. Polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities in rice leaves were observed to be higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. The expression levels of Os03g0109600, Prla, Rcht2 and Lox2osPil, were also higher in +Si plants than in -Si plants post-inoculation during the experimental time. Addition of Si resulted in increased Pal transcription, and inhibited CatA and Os03g0126000 expression in the earlier and later stages of bacterial inoculation, respectively.

  19. The role of silicon in enhancing resistance to bacterial blight of hydroponic- and soil-cultured rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Alin; Xue, Gaofeng; Cui, Peiyuan; Fan, Fenliang; Liu, Hongfang; Yin, Chang; Sun, Wanchun; Liang, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    Here we report for the first time that bacterial blight of rice can be alleviated by silicon (Si) added. In both inoculated and uninoculated plants, shoot dry weight was significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the −Si plants. A soil-cultured trial showed that disease severity was 24.3% lower in the Si-amended plants than in the non-Si-amended plants. Plants that were switched from −Si to +Si nutrient solution and simultaneously inoculated with Xoo also exhibited the same high resistance to bacterial blight as the plants that were treated continuously with Si, with control efficiencies of 52.8 and 62.9%, respectively. Moreover, total concentrations of soluble phenolics and lignin in rice leaves were significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the −Si plants. Polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities in rice leaves were observed to be higher in the +Si plants than in the −Si plants. The expression levels of Os03g0109600, Prla, Rcht2 and Lox2osPil, were also higher in +Si plants than in −Si plants post-inoculation during the experimental time. Addition of Si resulted in increased Pal transcription, and inhibited CatA and Os03g0126000 expression in the earlier and later stages of bacterial inoculation, respectively. PMID:27091552

  20. Identification of bacterial cultures from archaeological wood using molecular biological techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, A.C.; Martiny, Adam Camillo; Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider

    2004-01-01

    with 21 clones was constructed by extracting and amplifying 16S rDNA sequences from the individual cultures. One clone was phylogenetically affiliated to the Spirochaeta. Eleven clones affiliated to an unidentified member of the alpha-Proteobacteria were present in all culture samples. Three clones were...

  1. Evaluation of Sysmex UF-100 urine flow cytometer vs chamber counting of supravitally stained specimens and conventional bacterial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, T T; Kähkönen, U; Malminiemi, K; Vuento, R; Rowan, R M

    1999-07-01

    We evaluated the Sysmex UF-100 urine flow cytometer (TOA Medical Electronics, Kobe, Japan) with 269 uncentrifuged urine specimens by comparing it with Sternheimer staining and particle counting in 1-microL disposable chambers with both brightfield and phase-contrast microscopy (the reference method). Results of routine test strip analysis, sediment microscopy (182 specimens), and bacterial culture (204 specimens) were also available. Detection of urinary WBCs and RBCs was highly reliable with the UF-100 compared with manual chamber counting (r = .98 and .88, respectively). Identification of bacteria was equal to that with visual microscopy of uncentrifuged specimens; sensitivity was 55%, and specificity 90%, compared with bacterial cultures at a cutoff of > 10(3) colony-forming units per milliliter. Renal damage was difficult to evaluate even with manual methods because of the low counts of renal tubular cells and casts; with standard manual Sternheimer-stained sediment analysis, sensitivity was 65% to 69% and specificity 66% to 91%, compared with the uncentrifuged chamber method at a cutoff of 3 and 10 particles per microliter, respectively. Renal damage was demonstrated with the UF-100 with a sensitivity of 26% to 69% and specificity 92% to 94%, compared with chamber counts. Automated urinalysis with the UF-100 urine flow cytometer offers considerable savings in time and labor. When high sensitivity is needed, visual microscopic review should be performed to detect renal disease.

  2. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a non-culture method of defining the specific bacterial etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li-Ping; Bian, Long-Yan; Xu, Min; Liu, Ying; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an acquired respiratory tract infection following tracheal intubation. The most common hospital-acquired infection among patients with acute respiratory failure, VAP is associated with a mortality rate of 20-30%. The standard bacterial culture method for identifying the etiology of VAP is not specific, timely, or accurate in identifying the bacterial pathogens. This study used 16S rRNA gene metagenomic sequencing to identify and quantify the pathogenic bacteria in lower respiratory tract and oropharyngeal samples of 55 VAP patients. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene has served as a valuable tool in bacterial identification, particularly when other biochemical, molecular, or phenotypic identification techniques fail. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed in parallel with the standard bacterial culture method to identify and quantify bacteria present in the collected patient samples. Sequence analysis showed the colonization of multidrug-resistant strains in VAP secretions. Further, this method identified Prevotella, Proteus, Aquabacter, and Sphingomonas bacterial genera that were not detected by the standard bacterial culture method. Seven categories of bacteria, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella, were detectable by both 16S rRNA gene sequencing and standard bacterial culture methods. Further, 16S rRNA gene sequencing had a significantly higher sensitivity in detecting Streptococcus and Pseudomonas when compared to standard bacterial culture. Together, these data present 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a novel VAP diagnosis tool that will further enable pathogen-specific treatment of VAP.

  3. Prescreening bacterial colonies for bioactive molecules with Janus plates, a SBS standard double-faced microbial culturing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Pascual, Javier; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Martín, Jesús; Kath, Gary S; Sigmund, Janet M; Masurekar, Prakash; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Bills, Gerald F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the availability of many culture-based antibiotic screening methods, the lack of sensitive automated methods to identify functional molecules directly from microbial cells still limits the search for new biologically active compounds. The effectiveness of antibiotic detection is influenced by the solubility of the assayed compounds, indicator strain sensitivity, culture media and assay configuration. We describe a qualitative high throughput screening system for detecting cell-perturbing molecules from bacterial colonies employing two opposed agar layers sequentially formed in prototype Society for Biomolecular Screening (SBS) plates, named Janus plates. Direct assay of microbial colonies against target organisms in opposed agar layers overcomes some of the limitations of agar overlay methods. The system enables the rapid detection of extracellular cell-perturbing molecules, e.g., antibiotics, excreted directly from environmental isolates. The source bacterial colonies remain separate from the target organism. The growth layer is prepared and grown independently, so environmental strains can be grown for longer intervals, at temperatures and in media that favor their growth and metabolite expression, while the assay layer with pathogens, usually requiring nutrient-rich medium and elevated temperatures, are added later. Colonies to be tested can be precisely arrayed on the first agar surface, thus avoiding dispersion and disturbance of potential antibiotic-producing colonies by overlaying agar with the target strain. The rectangular SBS configuration facilitates factorial replication of dense microbial colony arrays for testing with multiple assays and assay conditions employing robotic colony pickers and pin tools. Opposed agar layers only slightly reduced the effectiveness for detecting growth inhibition from pure antibiotics compared to single-layer agar diffusion assays. The Janus plate enabled an automation-assisted workflow where a lone operator can

  4. Bacterial infections from aquatic species: potential for and prevention of contact zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenen, O L M; Evans, J J; Berthe, F

    2013-08-01

    As aquaculture production and the consumption of aquaculture products increase, the possibility of contracting zoonotic infections from either handling or ingesting these products also increases. The principal pathogens acquired topically from fish or shellfish through spine/pincer puncture or open wounds are Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Mycobacterium marinum, Streptococcus iniae, Vibrio vulnificus and V. damsela. These pathogens, which are all indigenous to the aquatic environment, have also been associated with disease outbreaks in food fish. Outbreaks are often related to management factors, such as the quality and quantity of nutrients in the water and high stocking density, which can increase bacterial loads on the external surface of the fish. As a result, diseased fish are more likely to transmit infection to humans. This review provides an account of human cases of zoonoses throughout the world from the principal zoonotic pathogens of fish and shellfish.

  5. Nutritional stress induces exchange of cell material and energetic coupling between bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benomar, Saida; Ranava, David; Cárdenas, María Luz; Trably, Eric; Rafrafi, Yan; Ducret, Adrien; Hamelin, Jérôme; Lojou, Elisabeth; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse

    2015-02-23

    Knowledge of the behaviour of bacterial communities is crucial for understanding biogeochemical cycles and developing environmental biotechnology. Here we demonstrate the formation of an artificial consortium between two anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium acetobutylicum (Gram-positive) and Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (Gram-negative, sulfate-reducing) in which physical interactions between the two partners induce emergent properties. Molecular and cellular approaches show that tight cell-cell interactions are associated with an exchange of molecules, including proteins, which allows the growth of one partner (D. vulgaris) in spite of the shortage of nutrients. This physical interaction induces changes in expression of two genes encoding enzymes at the pyruvate crossroads, with concomitant changes in the distribution of metabolic fluxes, and allows a substantial increase in hydrogen production without requiring genetic engineering. The stress induced by the shortage of nutrients of D. vulgaris appears to trigger the interaction.

  6. The metabolism of neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam by soil enrichment cultures, and the bacterial diversity and plant growth-promoting properties of the cultured isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guang-Can; Wang, Ying; Ma, Yuan; Zhai, Shan; Zhou, Ling-Yan; Dai, Yi-Jun; Yuan, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A soil enrichment culture (SEC) rapidly degraded 96% of 200 mg L(-1) neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam (TMX) in MSM broth within 30 d; therefore, its metabolic pathway of TMX, bacterial diversity and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) activities of the cultured isolates were studied. The SEC transformed TMX via the nitro reduction pathway to form nitrso, urea metabolites and via cleavage of the oxadiazine cycle to form a new metabolite, hydroxyl CLO-tri. In addition, 16S rRNA gene-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that uncultured rhizobacteria are predominant in the SEC broth and that 77.8% of the identified bacteria belonged to uncultured bacteria. A total of 31 cultured bacterial strains including six genera (Achromobacter, Agromyces, Ensifer, Mesorhizobium, Microbacterium and Pseudoxanthomonas) were isolated from the SEC broth. The 12 strains of Ensifer adhaerens have the ability to degrade TMX. All six selected bacteria showed PGPR activities. E. adhaerens TMX-23 and Agromyces mediolanus TMX-25 produced indole-3-acetic acid, whereas E. adhaerens TMX-23 and Mesorhizobium alhagi TMX-36 are N2-fixing bacteria. The six-isolated microbes were tolerant to 200 mg L(-1) TMX, and the growth of E. adhaerens was significantly enhanced by TMX, whereas that of Achromobacter sp. TMX-5 and Microbacterium sp.TMX-6 were enhanced slightly. The present study will help to explain the fate of TMX in the environment and its microbial degradation mechanism, as well as to facilitate future investigations of the mechanism through which TMX enhances plant vigor.

  7. Effects of mercury (II) species on cell suspension cultures of catharanthus roseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L. (Hangzhou Univ. (China)); Cullen, W.R. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

    1994-11-01

    Mercury has received considerable attention because of its high toxicity. Widespread contamination with mercury poses severe environmental problems despite our extensive knowledge of its toxicity in living systems. It is generally accepted that the toxicity of mercury is related to its oxidation states and species, the organic forms being more toxic than the inorganic forms. In the aquatic environment, the toxicity of mercury depends on the aqueous speciation of the mercuric ion (Hg[sup 2+]). Because of the complex coordination chemistry of mercury in aqueous systems, the nature of the Hg[sup 2+] species present in aquatic environments is influenced greatly by water chemistry (e. g, pH, inorganic ion composition, and dissolved organics). Consequently, the influence of environmental factors on the aqueous speciation of mercury has been the focus of much attention. However, there is very little information available regarding the effects of the species and speciation on Hg (II) toxicity in plant-tissue cultures. Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus), commonly called the Madagascar Periwinkle, is a member of the alkaloid rich family Apocynaceae. The present investigation was concerned with the toxicity of mercury on the growth of C. roseus cell suspension cultures as influenced by mercury (II) species and speciation. The specific objectives of the study were to (a) study the effects of mercury species on the growth of C. roseus cultures from the point of view of environmental biology and toxicology; (b) evaluate the effects of selenate, selenite and selected ligands such as chloride, 1-cysteine in the media on the acute toxicity of mercuric oxide; (c) determine the impact of the initial pH of the culture media on the toxicities of mercuric compounds; (d) discuss the dependence of the toxicity on the chemical species and speciation of Hg (II). 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Pacaella massiliensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a new bacterial species isolated from the human gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ndongo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report the main characteristics of a new species named Pacaella massiliensis gen. nov., sp. nov., strain Marseille-P2670T (CSUR P2670 that was isolated from the gut microbiota of a 45-year-old French patient.

  9. Quantification of bacterial species of the vaginal microbiome in different groups of women, using nucleic acid amplification tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jespers Vicky

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vaginal microbiome plays an important role in urogenital health. Quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR assays for the most prevalent vaginal Lactobacillus species and bacterial vaginosis species G. vaginalis and A. vaginae exist, but qPCR information regarding variation over time is still very limited. We set up qPCR assays for a selection of seven species and defined the temporal variation over three menstrual cycles in a healthy Caucasian population with a normal Nugent score. We also explored differences in qPCR data between these healthy women and an ‘at risk’ clinic population of Caucasian, African and Asian women with and without bacterial vaginosis (BV, as defined by the Nugent score. Results Temporal stability of the Lactobacillus species counts was high with L. crispatus counts of 108 copies/mL and L. vaginalis counts of 106 copies/mL. We identified 2 types of ‘normal flora’ and one ‘BV type flora’ with latent class analysis on the combined data of all women. The first group was particularly common in women with a normal Nugent score and was characterized by a high frequency of L. crispatus, L. iners, L. jensenii, and L. vaginalis and a correspondingly low frequency of L. gasseri and A. vaginae. The second group was characterized by the predominance of L. gasseri and L. vaginalis and was found most commonly in healthy Caucasian women. The third group was commonest in women with a high Nugent score but was also seen in a subset of African and Asian women with a low Nugent score and was characterized by the absence of Lactobacillus species (except for L. iners but the presence of G. vaginalis and A. vaginae. Conclusions We have shown that the quantification of specific bacteria by qPCR contributes to a better description of the non-BV vaginal microbiome, but we also demonstrated that differences in populations such as risk and ethnicity also have to be taken into account. We believe

  10. Time-kill behaviour against eight bacterial species and cytotoxicity of antibacterial monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D; Fouad, Ashraf F; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate: (1) the antibacterial activity of two antibacterial monomers, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) and dimethylammoniumethyl dimethacrylate (DMAEDM), against eight different species of oral pathogens for the first time; (2) the cytotoxicity of DMAEDM and DMADDM. DMAEDM and DMADDM were synthesized by reacting a tertiary amine group with an organo-halide. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against eight species of bacteria were tested. Time-kill determinations were performed to examine the bactericidal kinetics. Cytotoxicity of monomers on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was assessed using a methyl thiazolyltetrazolium assay and live/dead viability assay. DMADDM showed strong bactericidal activity against all bacteria, with MIC of 1.2-9.8μg/mL. DMAEDM had MIC of 20-80mg/mL. Time-kill determinations indicated that DMADDM and DMAEDM had rapid killing effects against eight species of bacteria, and eliminated all bacteria in 30min at the concentration of 4-fold MBC. Median lethal concentration for DMADDM and DMAEDM was between 20 and 40μg/mL, which was 20-fold higher than 1-2μg/mL for BisGMA control. DMAEDM and DMADDM were tested in time-kill assay against eight species of oral bacteria for the first time. Both were effective in bacteria-inhibition, but DMADDM had a higher potency than DMAEDM. Different killing efficacy was found against different bacteria species. DMAEDM and DMADDM had much lower cytotoxicity than BisGMA. Therefore, DMADDM and DMAEDM are promising for use in bonding agents and other restorative/preventive materials to combat a variety of oral pathogens. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Detection of campylobacter species: a comparison of culture and polymerase chain reaction based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S P; Lever, S; Logan, J M J; Lawson, A J; Stanley, J; Shafi, M S

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the optimal method for the detection of campylobacters from stool samples by comparing selective culture with membrane filtration and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods: Three hundred and forty three stool samples were investigated by each of the three methods mentioned above. Selective culture was performed with charcoal cefoperazone desoxycholate agar plates. Membrane filtration was performed using cellulose triacetate membranes with 0.45 μm pores placed on blood agar plates. Enteropathogenic campylobacters were detected using a PCR identification algorithm, consisting of screening PCRs and species identification using a PCR enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA), both based on the 16S rRNA gene. Results: Of the 343 samples tested, 23 were positive by one or more method. Of these, 17 were positive by selective culture, 12 by membrane filtration, and 20 by the PCR identification algorithm. A total of 18 of 23 positives were identified as C jejuni and/or C coli by the PCR identification algorithm, compared with 14 identified to the genus level by selective culture, and 10 by membrane filtration. Among the remaining five positive samples, one C hyointestinalis was detected only by the PCR identification algorithm; one C upsaliensis was detected only by the PCR identification algorithm; one Campylobacter sp was detected by membrane filtration and selective culture and later identified as C concisus; one Campylobacter sp was detected by membrane filtration alone and later identified as Arcobacter sp; and one Campylobacter sp detected only by selective culture was lost to study and therefore not speciated. There was no significant difference between detection by selective culture and the other two methods. However, detection by PCR was significantly better than by membrane filtration (0.05 > p > 0.02). Conclusion: The PCR identification algorithm can detect and identify Campylobacter spp to the species level and the result is

  12. Composition of the bacterial community degrading Phaeocystis mucopolysaccharides in enrichment cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Ingmar; Zwart, Gabriel; Maarel, Marc J.E.C. van der; Gottschal, Jan C.

    2000-01-01

    As described recently, mucopolysaccharides of the marine microalga Phaeocystis can be degraded in enrichment cultures. In this paper we report on the characterization of the microbial community in such enrichments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles that were obtained during

  13. Behaviour of marine oil-degrading bacterial populations in a continuous culture system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohandass, C.; David, J.J.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    In pursuit of developing an oil-degrading microbial consortium, we used the principle of "plasmid assisted molecular breeding" (PAMB) in a continuous culture system. Three marine bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, Brevibacterium epidermidis...

  14. Cytotoxic responses to 405nm light exposure in mammalian and bacterial cells: Involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Praveen; Maclean, Michelle; MacGregor, Scott J; Anderson, John G; Grant, M Helen

    2016-06-01

    Light at wavelength 405 nm is an effective bactericide. Previous studies showed that exposing mammalian cells to 405 nm light at 36 J/cm(2) (a bactericidal dose) had no significant effect on normal cell function, although at higher doses (54 J/cm(2)), mammalian cell death became evident. This research demonstrates that mammalian and bacterial cell toxicity induced by 405 nm light exposure is accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, as detected by generation of fluorescence from 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. As indicators of the resulting oxidative stress in mammalian cells, a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione content and a corresponding increase in the efflux of oxidised glutathione were observed from 405 nm light treated cells. The mammalian cells were significantly protected from dying at 54 J/cm(2) in the presence of catalase, which detoxifies H2O2. Bacterial cells were significantly protected by sodium pyruvate (H2O2 scavenger) and by a combination of free radical scavengers (sodium pyruvate, dimethyl thiourea (OH scavenger) and catalase) at 162 and 324 J/cm(2). Results therefore suggested that the cytotoxic mechanism of 405 nm light in mammalian cells and bacteria could be oxidative stress involving predominantly H2O2 generation, with other ROS contributing to the damage.

  15. A. actinomycetemcomitans profile and red complex bacterial species of an Afro-Brazilian community: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo Neris, Murilo; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Aquino, Davi Romeiro; de Miranda, Taís Browne; Costa, Fernando de Oliveira; Cortelli, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    The primary aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare the levels of red complex bacteria between Afro-Brazilian and non Afro-Brazilian cohort. The secondary aim was to compare the distribution of both Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotype b and its JP2 strains among participants who harboured this bacterial species. A total of 84 individuals were included in this study: 42 Afro-descendants (mean age 35.9 ± 13.1 years) and 42 non-Afro-descendants (mean age 36.2 ± 13.1 years) matched (1:1) by periodontal diagnosis, age and gender. All participants received clinical examinations of periodontal pocket depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque and gingival indices. Subgingival samples were taken for microbial analysis. First, genomic DNA (gDNA) was extracted and purified and the quantification of total number of bacterial cells, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola was carried out by qPCR. Then, A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were classified according to serotype b and JP2 profiles by conventional PCR. Clinically, mean PD, mean CAL and percentage of CAL ≥ 3 mm differed between groups (Student's t-test pAfro-descendant populations are preferably colonised by A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b as well as JP2 strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenic species in solution culture and soil system: implications to remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, Nanthi; Mahimairaja, Santiago; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Seshadri, Balaji; Thangarajan, Ramya

    2015-06-01

    In this work, bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) species were compared between solution culture and soil system. Firstly, the adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was compared using a number of non-allophanic and allophanic soils. Secondly, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were examined using germination, phytoavailability, earthworm, and soil microbial activity tests. Both As-spiked soils and As-contaminated sheep dip soils were used to test bioavailability and ecotoxicity. The sheep dip soil which contained predominantly As(V) species was subject to flooding to reduce As(V) to As(III) and then used along with the control treatment soil to compare the bioavailability between As species. Adsorption of As(V) was much higher than that of As(III), and the difference in adsorption between these two species was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. In the solution culture, there was no significant difference in bioavailability and ecotoxicity, as measured by germination and phytoavailability tests, between these two As species. Whereas in the As-spiked soils, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were higher for As(III) than As(V), and the difference was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. Bioavailability of As increased with the flooding of the sheep dip soils which may be attributed to the reduction of As(V) to As(III) species. The results in this study have demonstrated that while in solution, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity do not vary between As(III) and As(V), in soils, the latter species is less bioavailable than the former species because As(V) is more strongly retained than As(III). Since the bioavailability and ecotoxicity of As depend on the nature of As species present in the environment, risk-based remediation approach should aim at controlling the dynamics of As transformation.

  17. [110th year Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Tandheelkunde. 2. Root canal treatment, intra-canal disinfectants and bacterial culture: past and present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorer, W R; Wesselink, P R

    2003-05-01

    Fifty years ago the Dutch Journal of Dentistry published methods and opinions concerning root canal treatment. Qualitative bacterial culture, inclusion of aggressive disinfectants, as well as antibiotics and widening of the apical constriction were carried out. Nowadays, because of several reasons, these are not clinical practice anymore. Controversy over the clinical consequences of bacterial presence in tubules and in the peri-apical area prevailed in the past and seem to be prevalent once again.

  18. Researches concerning in vitro cultures optimization of the vulnerable species Dianthus nardiformis Janka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina HOLOBIUC

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to establish an optimized protocol for in vitro short-term conservation of the vulnerable species Dianthus nardiformis Janka belonging to Romanian Flora.For our purpose, different culture media compositions were tested: complex variants added with plant growth regulators and simplified media with low levels of macro- and microelements.This species had a good in vitro reaction, the regeneration occurs through direct morphogenesis as in all Dianthus species. Generally, the use of variants of MS medium supplemented with cytokinin/ auxin at 10/1 ratio proved to induce high regeneration response starting from the first month of culture.In our study, MS media complex variants with diminished levels of plant growth hormones at the same ratio of cytokinins/auxins conducted to acceptable levels of regeneration.By the other hand on complex regeneration variants, the rooting process was absent or underwent at low levels.Using simplified media with reduced levels of macro- and microelements, both rhizogenesis and shoots formation were induced. The in vitro response was characterized through the mean number of regenerated shoots/explants and the mean number of neoformed roots/initial inoculum. Despite of low micro- and macroelements levels (1/2 and 1/4 of MS salts, the modified MS basal medium composition proved to be beneficial for D. nardiformis, plants could be efficiently regenerated and rooted and regenerative aggregates can also be propagated as short-term cultures. The need of the supplementary transfer on particular rooting medium is also eliminated.Using simplified culture media, this species can be efficiently micropropagated and maintained as active tissue cultures, able tosupply viable plants whenever it is necessary.

  19. An empirical strategy for characterizing bacterial proteomes across species in the absence of genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua E Turse

    Full Text Available Global protein identification through current proteomics methods typically depends on the availability of sequenced genomes. In spite of increasingly high throughput sequencing technologies, this information is not available for every microorganism and rarely available for entire microbial communities. Nevertheless, the protein-level homology that exists between related bacteria makes it possible to extract biological information from the proteome of an organism or microbial community by using the genomic sequences of a near neighbor organism. Here, we demonstrate a trans-organism search strategy for determining the extent to which near-neighbor genome sequences can be applied to identify proteins in unsequenced environmental isolates. In proof of concept testing, we found that within a CLUSTAL W distance of 0.089, near-neighbor genomes successfully identified a high percentage of proteins within an organism. Application of this strategy to characterize environmental bacterial isolates lacking sequenced genomes, but having 16S rDNA sequence similarity to Shewanella resulted in the identification of 300-500 proteins in each strain. The majority of identified pathways mapped to core processes, as well as to processes unique to the Shewanellae, in particular to the presence of c-type cytochromes. Examples of core functional categories include energy metabolism, protein and nucleotide synthesis and cofactor biosynthesis, allowing classification of bacteria by observation of conserved processes. Additionally, within these core functionalities, we observed proteins involved in the alternative lactate utilization pathway, recently described in Shewanella.

  20. An Empirical Strategy for Characterizing Bacterial Proteomes across Species in the Absence of Genomic Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turse, Joshua E.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Callister, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Global protein identification through current proteomics methods typically depends on the availability of sequenced genomes. In spite of increasingly high throughput sequencing technologies, this information is not available for every microorganism and rarely available for entire microbial communities. Nevertheless, the protein-level homology that exists between related bacteria makes it possible to extract biological information from the proteome of an organism or microbial community by using the genomic sequences of a near neighbor organism. Here, we demonstrate a trans-organism search strategy for determining the extent to which near-neighbor genome sequences can be applied to identify proteins in unsequenced environmental isolates. In proof of concept testing, we found that within a CLUSTAL W distance of 0.089, near-neighbor genomes successfully identified a high percentage of proteins within an organism. Application of this strategy to characterize environmental bacterial isolates lacking sequenced genomes, but having 16S rDNA sequence similarity to Shewanella resulted in the identification of 300–500 proteins in each strain. The majority of identified pathways mapped to core processes, as well as to processes unique to the Shewanellae, in particular to the presence of c-type cytochromes. Examples of core functional categories include energy metabolism, protein and nucleotide synthesis and cofactor biosynthesis, allowing classification of bacteria by observation of conserved processes. Additionally, within these core functionalities, we observed proteins involved in the alternative lactate utilization pathway, recently described in Shewanella. PMID:21103051

  1. Characterization of a Single Magnetotactic Bacterial Species from Devil's Bathtub, Mendon Ponds Park, Honeoye Falls, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C.; Tarduno, J. A.; Stein, A.; Sia, E.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) belong to a lineage of prokaryotic bacteria that synthesize magnetosomes, single domain magnetic particles (typically magnetite or greigite) with an average size of 50 nanometers. MTB utilize magnetosomes through magnetotaxis, the alignment and movement along magnetic field lines to navigate towards preferred environmental conditions. MTB are sensitive to different environments and are thought to exhibit varying magnetosome morphologies, compositions, sizes, and quantities in regards to the environments which they inhabit. These characteristics allow MTB and magnetofossils (preserved magnetosomes) to be used as modern/paleoenvironmental recorders and biomarkers for environmental change(s). Devil's Bathtub (Mendon Ponds Park, Honeoye Falls, NY) is a meromictic glacial kettle pond surrounded by deciduous tree cover. Here we examine one species of MTB based on prominence of this particular morphology at this locale. Magnetotaxis and morphology of this species have been observed using light microscopy. Micrographs have also been taken using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to verify cell morphology and to determine magnetosome morphology. TEM and magnetic hysteresis measurements were done to find and test the composition of magnetosomes. In this study we also focus on DNA sequencing and characterization of this MTB, as there are few MTB species which have been DNA sequenced successfully. Data from these experiments are directly applicable to this up-and-coming area of research as it will aid in the understanding and correlation of magnetosome and magnetofossils with environmental characteristics.

  2. Biodegradation of free cyanide by bacterial species isolated from cyanide-contaminated artisanal gold mining catchment area in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razanamahandry, Lovasoa Christine; Andrianisa, Harinaivo Anderson; Karoui, Hela; Kouakou, Koffi Marcelin; Yacouba, Hamma

    2016-08-01

    Soil and water samples were collected from a watershed in Burkina Faso where illegal artisanal gold extraction using cyanidation occurs. The samples were used to evaluate cyanide contamination and the presence of cyanide degrading bacteria (CDB). Free cyanide (F-CN) was detected in all samples, with concentrations varying from 0.023 to 0.9 mg kg(-1), and 0.7-23 μg L(-1) in the soil and water samples, respectively. Potential CDB also were present in the samples. To test the effective F-CN degradation capacity of the isolated CDB species, the species were cultivated in growth media containing 40, 60 or 80 mg F-CN L(-1), with or without nutrients, at pH 9.5 and at room temperature. More than 95% of F-CN was degraded within 25 h, and F-CN degradation was associated with bacterial growth and ammonium production. However, initial concentrations of F-CN higher than 100 mg L(-1) inhibited bacterial growth and cyanide degradation. Abiotic tests showed that less than 3% of F-CN was removed by volatilization. Thus, the degradation of F-CN occurred predominately by biological mechanisms, and such mechanisms are recommended for remediation of contaminated soil and water. The bacteria consortium used in the experiment described above exist in a Sahelian climate, which is characterized by a long hot and dry season. Because the bacteria are already adapted to the local climate conditions and show the potential for cyanide biodegradation, further applicability to other contaminated areas in West Africa, where illegal gold cyanidation is widespread, should be explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Woody-biomass production in Michigan: species, genotype, and cultural investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    A stepwise approach was adopted in 1978 for developing a comprehensive woody-biomass production system for Michigan. The program consisted of four phases: 1) identification of the most promising biomass species through trial plantings on abandoned agricultural fields and cleared forest stands, 2) preliminary yield comparisons of several species growing in existing experimental plantations, 3) species improvement using standard tree improvement techniques, and 4) development of cultural techniques designed to optimize woody-biomass yield from energy plantations. This dissertation summarizes results of research in each of these areas. Species recommendations for each of three climatic zones in Michigan are based on survival and growth of 23 species at nine oil-field sites after four growing seasons. Pinus sylvestris, P. banksiana, P. resinosa, P. nigra x P. densiflora, Larix leptolepis, Alnus glutinosa, and Picea abies are recommended for use in the Upper Peninsula; Pinus sylvestris, P. resinosa, P. nigra x P. densiflora, Larix leptolepis, Alnus glutinosa, Picea abies, and Quercus robur are recommended for use in the northern Lower Peninsula; and Pinus sylvestris, Alnus glutinosa, Larix leptolepis, Populus, Quercus robur, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, and Salix are recommended for use in the southern Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Yield predictor equations were developed and yields analyzed for 13 species. The best yielding species in the older plantations (14- 16-years old) were Pinus nigra x P. densiflora and Betula alleghaniensis. The best species in the group of younger plantations (five- to nine-years old) were a Populus hybrid mixture and Ailanthus altissima.

  4. Biodegradation of Maya crude oil fractions by bacterial strains and a defined mixed culture isolated from Cyperus laxus rhizosphere soil in a contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Ramirez, I. J.; Gutierrez-Rojas, M.; Favela-Torres, E. [Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM)- Iztapalapa, Dept. of Biotechnology, Federal District (Mexico); Ramirez-Sada, H. [Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM)-Xochimilco, Dept. of Biological Systems, Federal District (Mexico)

    2003-12-01

    Biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polar constituents of Maya crude oil by a set of isolated bacterial strains and a defined mixed culture made up with all isolated strains, was evaluated. The bacterial strains were obtained from the rhizosphere of Cyperus laxus, a native plant on a highly hydrocarbon-polluted site. Oxygen uptake rate was used to determine the culture transfer timing during the enrichment culture. Results showed that five of the isolated strains were able to degrade 50 per cent of the aliphatic fractions of Maya crude oil. With the defined mixed culture the level of biodegradation was 47 per cent for aliphatics and 6 per cent of the aromatic-polar mixture. When grown in the presence of total hydrocarbons, the defined mixed culture was able to degrade 40 per cent of the aliphatic fraction and 26 per cent of the aromatic fraction. By combining enrichment cultures with oxygen uptake rate to determine the culture transfer timing during the enrichment cultures allowed the isolation of bacterial strains that are able to degrade specific hydrocarbon fractions at high consumption rates. 28 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. Co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes within a dual-species biofilm community strongly increases resistance of Pseudomonas putida to benzalkonium chloride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios Giaouris

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation is a phenomenon occurring almost wherever microorganisms and surfaces exist in close proximity. This study aimed to evaluate the possible influence of bacterial interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas putida to develop a dual-species biofilm community on stainless steel (SS, as well as on the subsequent resistance of their sessile cells to benzalkonium chloride (BC used in inadequate (sub-lethal concentration (50 ppm. The possible progressive adaptability of mixed-culture biofilms to BC was also investigated. To accomplish these, 3 strains per species were left to develop mixed-culture biofilms on SS coupons, incubated in daily renewable growth medium for a total period of 10 days, under either mono- or dual-species conditions. Each day, biofilm cells were exposed to disinfection treatment. Results revealed that the simultaneous presence of L. monocytogenes strongly increased the resistance of P. putida biofilm cells to BC, while culture conditions (mono-/dual-species did not seem to significantly influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells. BC mainly killed L. monocytogenes cells when this was applied against the dual-species sessile community during the whole incubation period, despite the fact that from the 2nd day this community was mainly composed (>90% of P. putida cells. No obvious adaptation to BC was observed in either L. monocytogenes or P. putida biofilm cells. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis showed that the different strains behaved differently with regard to biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Such knowledge on the physiological behavior of mixed-culture biofilms could provide the information necessary to control their formation.

  6. Co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes within a dual-species biofilm community strongly increases resistance of Pseudomonas putida to benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a phenomenon occurring almost wherever microorganisms and surfaces exist in close proximity. This study aimed to evaluate the possible influence of bacterial interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas putida to develop a dual-species biofilm community on stainless steel (SS), as well as on the subsequent resistance of their sessile cells to benzalkonium chloride (BC) used in inadequate (sub-lethal) concentration (50 ppm). The possible progressive adaptability of mixed-culture biofilms to BC was also investigated. To accomplish these, 3 strains per species were left to develop mixed-culture biofilms on SS coupons, incubated in daily renewable growth medium for a total period of 10 days, under either mono- or dual-species conditions. Each day, biofilm cells were exposed to disinfection treatment. Results revealed that the simultaneous presence of L. monocytogenes strongly increased the resistance of P. putida biofilm cells to BC, while culture conditions (mono-/dual-species) did not seem to significantly influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells. BC mainly killed L. monocytogenes cells when this was applied against the dual-species sessile community during the whole incubation period, despite the fact that from the 2nd day this community was mainly composed (>90%) of P. putida cells. No obvious adaptation to BC was observed in either L. monocytogenes or P. putida biofilm cells. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that the different strains behaved differently with regard to biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Such knowledge on the physiological behavior of mixed-culture biofilms could provide the information necessary to control their formation.

  7. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis due to Listeria monocytogenes: importance of enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Saroj; Connor, Martin; Donaldson, Shona; Austin, Hannah; Foster, Adele

    2010-09-01

    A case of Listeria monocytogenes induced spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is reported in a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis. It is an indolent illness and may not show a neutrophil reaction in peritoneal fluid. Enrichment broth was required to isolate L monocytogenes in the patient. This is not routinely used in the UK and therefore isolates may be missed. L monocytogenes remains sensitive to ampicillin, penicillin and gentamicin, but is resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics. The rising incidence of listeriosis in the population suggests that the incidence of SBP from L monocytogenes is likely to increase.

  8. Phyllosphere and carposphere bacterial communities in olive plants subjected to different cultural practices

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Pascazio; Carmine Crecchio; Patrizia Ricciuti; Assunta Maria Palese; Cristos Xiloyannis; Adriano Sofo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize phyllosphere and carposphere bacterial communities of olive trees subjected for 13 years to two different soil management systems (sustainable and conventional) in a mature olive grove located in Southern Italy. Amplified DNA fragments of the 16S ribosomal RNA eubacterial gene (16S rRNA) of bacteria living on leaf and fruit surface, and in fruit pulp were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A clone library of 16S rRNA amplicons...

  9. Diesel biodegradation capacities of indigenous bacterial species isolated from diesel contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Nandhini; Ramya, Jayaprakash; Kumar, Srilakshman; Vasanthi, Ns; Chandran, Preethy; Khan, Sudheer

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum based products are the major source of energy for industries and daily life. Leaks and accidental spills occur regularly during the exploration, production, refining, transport, and storage of petroleum and petroleum products. In the present study we isolated the bacteria from diesel contaminated soil and screened them for diesel biodegradation capacity. One monoculture isolate identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis to be Acinetobacter baumannii was further studied for diesel oil biodegradation. The effects of various culture parameters (pH, temperature, NaCl concentrations, initial hydrocarbon concentration, initial inoculum size, role of chemical surfactant, and role of carbon and nitrogen sources) on biodegradation of diesel oil were evaluated. Optimal diesel oil biodegradation by A. baumanii occurred at initial pH 7, 35°C and initial hydrocarbon concentration at 4%. The biodegradation products under optimal cultural conditions were analyzed by GC-MS. The present study suggests that A. baumannii can be used for effective degradation of diesel oil from industrial effluents contaminated with diesel oil.

  10. A novel approach to recycle bacterial culture waste for fermentation reuse via a microbial fuel cell-membrane bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zhu, Yuan; Zhuang, Liangpeng; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Goodell, Barry; Sonoki, Tomonori; He, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Biochemical production processes require water and nutrient resources for culture media preparation, but aqueous waste is generated after the target products are extracted. In this study, culture waste (including cells) produced from a lab-scale fermenter was fed into a microbial fuel cell-membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) system. Electrical energy was generated via the interaction between the microbial consortia and the solid electrode in the MFC. The treated wastewater was reclaimed in this process which was reused as a solvent and a nutrient source in subsequent fermentation. Polarization testing showed that the MFC produced a maximum current density of 37.53 A m(-3) with a maximum power density of 5.49 W m(-3). The MFC was able to generate 0.04 kWh of energy per cubic meter of culture waste treated. The lab-scale fermenters containing pure cultures of an engineered Pseudomonas spp. were used to generate 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDC), a high value platform chemical. When the MFC-MBR-treated wastewater was used for the fermenter culture medium, a specific bacterial growth rate of 1.00 ± 0.05 h(-1) was obtained with a PDC production rate of 708.11 ± 64.70 mg PDC L(-1) h(-1). Comparable values for controls using pure water were 0.95 ± 0.06 h(-1) and 621.01 ± 22.09 mg PDC L(-1) h(-1) (P > 0.05), respectively. The results provide insight on a new approach for more sustainable bio-material production while at the same time generating energy, and suggest that the treated wastewater can be used as a solvent and a nutrient source for the fermentation production of high value platform chemicals.

  11. Impact of the freeze-drying process on product appearance, residual moisture content, viability, and batch uniformity of freeze-dried bacterial cultures safeguarded at culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiren, Jindrich; Hellemans, Ann; De Vos, Paul

    2016-07-01

    In this study, causes of collapsed bacterial cultures in glass ampoules observed after freeze-drying were investigated as well as the influence of collapse on residual moisture content (RMC) and viability. Also, the effect of heat radiation and post freeze-drying treatments on the RMC was studied. Cake morphologies of 21 bacterial strains obtained after freeze-drying with one standard protocol could be classified visually into four major types: no collapse, porous, partial collapse, and collapse. The more pronounced the collapse, the higher residual moisture content of the freeze-dried product, ranging from 1.53 % for non-collapsed products to 3.62 % for collapsed products. The most important cause of collapse was the mass of the inserted cotton plug in the ampoule. Default cotton plugs with a mass between 21 and 30 mg inside the ampoule did not affect the viability of freeze-dried Aliivibrio fischeri LMG 4414(T) compared to ampoules without cotton plugs. Cotton plugs with a mass higher than 65 mg inside the ampoule induced a full collapsed product with rubbery look (melt-back) and decreasing viability during storage. Heat radiation effects in the freeze-drying chamber and post freeze-drying treatments such as exposure time to air after freeze-drying and manifold drying time prior to heat sealing of ampoules influenced the RMC of freeze-dried products. To produce uniform batches of freeze-dried bacterial strains with intact cake structures and highest viabilities, inserted cotton plugs should not exceed 21 mg per ampoule. Furthermore, heat radiation effects should be calculated in the design of the primary drying phase and manifold drying time before heat sealing should be determined as a function of exposure time to air.

  12. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  13. A comparison of standard cultural methods for the detection of foodborne Salmonella species including three new chromogenic plating media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönenbrücher, Vanessa; Mallinson, Edward T; Bülte, Michael

    2008-03-31

    In this study the draft of the horizontal method for the detection of Salmonella species from human food and animal feed (ISO 6579:2002) was compared to the European gold standard (DIN EN 12824:1998), including the three new chromogenic plating media AES Salmonella Agar Plate (ASAP), Oxoid Salmonella Chromogen Media (OSCM) and Miller-Mallinson agar (MM). First the growth and appearance of 36 bacterial type strains (Salmonella and other 21 species) on ASAP, OSCM and MM were compared to those on the three traditional agars Brilliant Green Agar according to Edel and Kampelmacher (BGA), Xylose Lysine Deoxycholate Agar (XLD) and Xylose Lysine Tergitol 4 Agar (XLT4). Only on MM agar, did all of 36 tested type strains produce typical colonies, especially strains of S. Senftenberg, Salmonella arizonae, S. Dublin and S. Derby. Artificial inoculation experiments using raw pork ground meat (n=92) were subsequently conducted. A shortened incubation time of 24 h in RVS broth yielded a Salmonella species recovery of 100% from spiked meat samples. Finally, 286 naturally contaminated raw porcine and bovine minced meat samples and raw poultry meat samples were investigated. Forty-three strains from a total of 39 Salmonella-positive samples were found. S. Typhimurium (n=21), with DT 104 L, DT 012 and RDNC being the most prevalent subtypes isolated. D-tartrate-positive S. Paratyphi B (n=2) and S. Saint-Paul (n=3) were also recovered. They were cultured from poultry meat and were multi-resistant against antibiotics including nalidixic acid. Rappaport Vassiliadis broth with soypeptone (RVS) yielded the highest recovery of Salmonella spp. (97,4%) compared to Tetrathionate broth with Novobiocin according to Muller and Kauffman (MKTTn, 94,9%) and Selenite Cystine broth (SC, 38,5%). However, no significant difference was obtained by comparing the ISO 6579:2002 draft to the gold standard.

  14. Utilising bacterial communities associated with digested piggery effluent as a primary food source for the batch culture of Moina australiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sayali S; Ward, Andrew J; Kumar, Martin S; Ball, Andrew S

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a cladoceran planktonic invertebrate, Moina australiensis was uniquely cultured in two stage digested piggery wastewater and fed associated piggery wastewater bacteria. The viability of M. australiensis cultured in digested piggery wastewater under closed dark conditions to limit phytoplankton activity was tested by determining suitable effluent total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentrations. The highest total M. australiensis biomass production 0.94+/-0.47g and the rate of population increase (r) 0.15+/-0.08 was recorded in the 30mgl(-1) TAN concentration treatment. The lowest 'r' values and decreased biomass production was observed with increasing TAN concentration levels. This study, also focused on profiling and quantification of the associated bacterial populations in the wastewater culture media and within the digestive tract of M. australiensis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) which revealed the feeding specificity of M. australiensis towards "gamma-Proteobacteria." Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Komárek, J.; Elster, J.

    2009-01-01

    Four different communities and one culture of autotrophic microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area) and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia), from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville) and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas), in a minimal mineral (oligotrophic) media. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. Phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed sequences belonging to Proteobacteria Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria), Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla to be identified. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified) and the marine Antarctic soil the poorest (only one). Snow samples from Col du Midi (Alps) and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones). These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteriaclone). The only microorganism identified in the Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp.) was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. Most of the identified microorganisms had been detected previously in cold environments, marine sediments soils and rocks. Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those identified in this work, in environments very distant and very different from each other.

  16. Native bacterial endophytes promote host growth in a species-specific manner; phytohormone manipulations do not result in common growth responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Hoa Long

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All plants in nature harbor a diverse community of endophytic bacteria which can positively affect host plant growth. Changes in plant growth frequently reflect alterations in phytohormone homoeostasis by plant-growth-promoting (PGP rhizobacteria which can decrease ethylene (ET levels enzymatically by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC deaminase or produce indole acetic acid (IAA. Whether these common PGP mechanisms work similarly for different plant species has not been rigorously tested. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated bacterial endophytes from field-grown Solanum nigrum; characterized PGP traits (ACC deaminase activity, IAA production, phosphate solubilization and seedling colonization; and determined their effects on their host, S. nigrum, as well as on another Solanaceous native plant, Nicotiana attenuata. In S. nigrum, a majority of isolates that promoted root growth were associated with ACC deaminase activity and IAA production. However, in N. attenuata, IAA but not ACC deaminase activity was associated with root growth. Inoculating N. attenuata and S. nigrum with known PGP bacteria from a culture collection (DSMZ reinforced the conclusion that the PGP effects are not highly conserved. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that natural endophytic bacteria with PGP traits do not have general and predictable effects on the growth and fitness of all host plants, although the underlying mechanisms are conserved.

  17. Helicobacter species and common gut bacterial DNA in gallbladder with cholecystitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peren; H; Karagin; Unne; Stenram; Torkel; Wadstrm; sa; Ljungh

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To analyze the association between Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria in patients with cholecystitis. METHODS:A nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), specif ic to 16S rRNA of Helicobacter spp. was performed on paraff in-embedded gallbladder samples of 100 cholecystitis and 102 control cases. The samples were also analyzed for some common gut bacteria by PCR. Positive samples were sequenced for species identif ication. RESULTS: Helicobacter DNA was found in seven out of 100 cases of acute a...

  18. Antibiotic resistance among cultured bacterial isolates from bioethanol fermentation facilities across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Colin A; Heist, E Patrick; Moe, Luke A

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentations by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can have crippling effects on bioethanol production. Producers have had success controlling bacterial growth through prophylactic addition of antibiotics to fermentors, yet concerns have arisen about antibiotic resistance among the LAB. Here, we report on mechanisms used by 32 LAB isolates from eight different US bioethanol facilities to persist under conditions of antibiotic stress. Minimum inhibitory concentration assays with penicillin, erythromycin, and virginiamycin revealed broad resistance to each of the antibiotics as well as high levels of resistance to individual antibiotics. Phenotypic assays revealed that antibiotic inactivation mechanisms contributed to the high levels of individual resistances among the isolates, especially to erythromycin and virginiamycin, yet none of the isolates appeared to use a β-lactamase. Biofilm formation was noted among the majority of the isolates and may contribute to persistence under low levels of antibiotics. Nearly all of the isolates carried at least one canonical antibiotic resistance gene and many carried more than one. The erythromycin ribosomal methyltransferase (erm) gene class was found in 19 of 32 isolates, yet a number of these isolates exhibit little to no resistance to erythromycin. The erm genes were present in 15 isolates that encoded more than one antibiotic resistance mechanism, suggestive of potential genetic linkages.

  19. Transcript and metabolite profiling in cell cultures of 18 plant species that produce benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Scott C; Hagel, Jillian M; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-05-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a large and diverse group of ~2500 specialized metabolites found predominantly in plants of the order Ranunculales. Research focused on BIA metabolism in a restricted number of plant species has identified many enzymes and cognate genes involved in the biosynthesis of compounds such as morphine, sanguinarine and berberine. However, the formation of most BIAs remains uncharacterized at the molecular biochemical level. Herein a compendium of sequence- and metabolite-profiling resources from 18 species of BIA-accumulating cell cultures was established, representing four related plant families. Our integrated approach consisted of the construction of EST libraries each containing approximately 3500 unigenes per species for a total of 58,787 unigenes. The EST libraries were manually triaged using known BIA-biosynthetic genes as queries to identify putative homologs with similar or potentially different functions. Sequence resources were analyzed in the context of the targeted metabolite profiles obtained for each cell culture using electrospray-ionization and collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry. Fragmentation analysis was used for the identification or structural characterization coupled with the relative quantification of 72 BIAs, which establishes a key resource for future work on alkaloid biosynthesis. The metabolite profile obtained for each species provides a rational basis for the prediction of enzyme function in BIA metabolism. The metabolic frameworks assembled through the integration of transcript and metabolite profiles allow a comparison of BIA metabolism across several plant species and families. Taken together, these data represent an important tool for the discovery of BIA biosynthetic genes.

  20. FACTORS LIMITING BACTERIAL GROWTH : III. CELL SIZE AND "PHYSIOLOGIC YOUTH" IN BACTERIUM COLI CULTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, A D; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1938-07-20

    1. Measurements of the rate of oxygen uptake per cell in transplants of Bacterium coli from cultures of this organism in different phases of growth have given results in essential agreement with the observations of others. 2. Correlations of viable count, centrifugable nitrogen, and turbidity, with oxygen consumption, indicate that the increased metabolism during the early portion of the growth period is quantitatively referable to increased average size of cells. 3. Indirect evidence has suggested that the initial rate of growth of transplants is not related to the phase of growth of the parent culture.

  1. Helicobacter species and gut bacterial DNA in Meckel's diverticulum and the appendix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peren H Karagin; Unne Stenram; Torkel Wadstr(o)m; (A)sa Ljungh

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the possible association of various Helicobacter species and certain common gut bacteria in patients with Meckel's diverticulum and appendicitis. METHODS: A nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), specific to 16S rRNA of the Helicobacter genus, was performed on paraffin embedded samples, 50 with acute appendicitis, 50 normal appendixes, and 33 Meckel's diverticulum with gastric heterotopia and/or ulcer. Helicobacter genus positive samples were sequenced for species identification. All samples were also analysed for certain gut bacteria by PCR. RESULTS: Helicobacter pullorum DNA was found in one out of 33 cases and Enterobacteria in two cases of Meckel's diverticulum. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) was found in three, Enterobacter in 18, and Bacteroides in 19 out of 100 appendix samples by PCR. Enterococcus was not found in any MD or appendix samples. All H. pylori positive cases were from normal appendixes. CONCLUSION: Helicobacter is not an etiological agent in the pathogenesis of symptomatic Meckel's diverticulum or in acute appendicitis.

  2. Increased bacterial growth efficiency with environmental variability: results from DOC degradation by bacteria in pure culture experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eichinger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses how considering variation in DOC availability and cell maintenance in bacterial models affects Bacterial Growth Efficiency (BGE estimations. For this purpose, we conducted two biodegradation experiments simultaneously. In experiment one, a given amount of substrate was added to the culture at the start of the experiment whilst in experiment two, the same amount of substrate was added, but using periodic pulses over the time course of the experiment. Three bacterial models, with different levels of complexity, (the Monod, Marr-Pirt and the dynamic energy budget – DEB – models, were used and calibrated using the above experiments. BGE has been estimated using the experimental values obtained from discrete samples and from model generated data. Cell maintenance was derived experimentally, from respiration rate measurements. The results showed that the Monod model did not reproduce the experimental data accurately, whereas the Marr-Pirt and DEB models demonstrated a good level of reproducibility, probably because cell maintenance was built into their formula. Whatever estimation method was used, the BGE value was always higher in experiment two (the periodically pulsed substrate as compared to the initially one-pulsed-substrate experiment. Moreover, BGE values estimated without considering cell maintenance (Monod model and empirical formula were always smaller than BGE values obtained from models taking cell maintenance into account. Since BGE is commonly estimated using constant experimental systems and ignore maintenance, we conclude that these typical methods underestimate BGE values. On a larger scale, and for biogeochemical cycles, this would lead to the conclusion that, for a given DOC supply rate and a given DOC consumption rate, these BGE estimation methods overestimate the role of bacterioplankton as CO2 producers.

  3. Increased bacterial growth efficiency with environmental variability: results from DOC degradation by bacteria in pure culture experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eichinger

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses how considering variation in DOC availability and cell maintenance in bacterial models affects Bacterial Growth Efficiency (BGE estimations. For this purpose, we conducted two biodegradation experiments simultaneously. In experiment one, a given amount of substrate was added to the culture at the start of the experiment whilst in experiment two, the same amount of substrate was added, but using periodic pulses over the time course of the experiment. Three bacterial models, with different levels of complexity, (the Monod, Marr-Pirt and the dynamic energy budget (DEB model, were used, and calibrated using the above experiments. BGE has been estimated using the experimental values obtained from discrete samples and from model generated data. Cell maintenance was derived experimentally, from respiration rate measurements. The results showed that the Monod model did not reproduce the experimental data accurately, whereas the Marr-Pirt and DEB models demonstrated a good level of reproducibility, probably because cell maintenance was built into their formula. Whatever estimation method was used, the BGE value was always higher in experiment two (the periodically pulsed substrate as compared to the initially one-pulsed-substrate experiment. Moreover, BGE values estimated without considering cell maintenance (Monod model and empirical formula were always smaller than BGE values obtained from models taking cell maintenance into account. Since BGE is commonly estimated using constant experimental systems and ignore maintenance, we conclude that these typical methods underestimate BGE values. On a larger scale, and for biogeochemical cycles, this would lead to the conclusion that, for a given DOC supply rate and a given DOC consumption rate, these BGE estimation methods overestimate the role of bacterioplankton as CO2 producers.

  4. Description, culture and phylogenetic position of a new xerotolerant species of Physarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novozhilov, Yuri K; Okun, Mikhail V; Erastova, Daria A; Shchepin, Oleg N; Zemlyanskaya, Inna V; García-Carvajal, Eva; Schnittler, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A new widespread myxomycete species, Physarum pseudonotabile, inhabiting the arid regions of the Eurasia, South and North America is described and illustrated. Tentatively assigned to Ph. notabile T. Macbr., a phylogeny based on the small ribosomal subunit (SSU) and elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) genes placed the new species in a clade far from Ph. notabile. Ph. pseudonotabile was found to be frequent in surveys based on the moist chamber culture technique with samples of litter, bark and herbivore dung collected in dry steppe and deserts of the Caspian lowland (Russia), Kazakhstan, Mongolia, China, Spain, Argentina and USA. The main morphological difference between Ph. pseudonotabile and Ph. notabile lies in spore ornamentation. Spores of the former species display irregularly distributed verrucae, whereas the latter species possesses spores with dense and regularly arranged spinulae. In addition, the ecological preferences of the two species differ. Ph. pseudonotabile inhabits the bark of living plants and ground litter in arid regions, whereas Ph. notabile is found on coarse woody debris in boreal and temperate forests. Although the new species appears to be closest to Ph. notabile morphologically, the phylogenetic analysis reveals Ph. pusillum and Ph. nivale as the closest relatives. In addition, the molecular investigations revealed a considerable amount of hidden diversity within species of Physarum with gray lime flakes. Currently we have only sufficient material to assess the morphological variation of Ph. pseudonotabile but expect that more taxa within this clade may emerge within studies combining morphological and molecular analyses.

  5. Composition of the bacterial community degrading Phaeocystis mucopolysaccharides in enrichment cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Ingmar; Zwart, Gabriel; Maarel, Marc J.E.C. van der; Gottschal, Jan C.

    2000-01-01

    As described recently, mucopolysaccharides of the marine microalga Phaeocystis can be degraded in enrichment cultures. In this paper we report on the characterization of the microbial community in such enrichments. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles that were obtained during muc

  6. Development and application of bacterial cultures for the removal of chlorinated aliphatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; de Koning, Wim

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining microbial cultures for the degradation of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons is mainly determined by the diversity and activity of catabolic enzymes that exist in nature. If a suitable organism is available, applications for the treatment of different waste streams can

  7. Composition of the bacterial community degrading Phaeocystis mucopolysaccharides in enrichment cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, I.; Zwart, G.; Van der Maarel, M.J.E.C.; Gottschal, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    As described recently (Janse et al. 1999; Limnol Oceanogr 44(6):1447-1457), mucopolysaccharides of the marine microalga Phaeocystis can be degraded in enrichment cultures. In this paper we report on the characterization of the microbial community in such enrichments. Denaturing gradient gel

  8. Proteins dominate in the surface layers formed on materials exposed to extracellular polymeric substances from bacterial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wikieł, Agata J; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo T; Eloy, Pierre; Genet, Michel J; Moura, José J G; Sand, Wolfgang; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C; Rouxhet, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    The chemical compositions of the surface conditioning layers formed by different types of solutions (from isolated EPS to whole culture media), involving different bacterial strains relevant for biocorrosion were compared, as they may influence the initial step in biofilm formation. Different substrata (polystyrene, glass, steel) were conditioned and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Peak decomposition and assignment were validated by correlations between independent spectral data and the ubiquitous presence of organic contaminants on inorganic substrata was taken into account. Proteins or peptides were found to be a major constituent of all conditioning layers and polysaccharides were not present in appreciable concentrations; the proportion of nitrogen which may be due to DNA was lower than 15%. There was no significant difference between the compositions of the adlayers formed from different conditioning solutions, except for the adlayers produced with tightly bound EPS extracted from D. alaskensis.

  9. PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography for profiling of a subgroup of caries-associated bacterial species in plaque from healthy coronal surfaces and periodontal pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lingyang; Sato, Takuichi; Niwa, Kousuke; Kawase, Mitsuo; Mayanagi, Gen; Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The onset of plaque-mediated disease, including dental caries and periodontal diseases, is highly associated with compositional change of the resident microflora from the ecological perspective. As specific bacterial profiles have been linked to different disease stages, microbial compositional measurements might therefore have great value for clinical diagnosis. Previously we have reported a dry-reagent strip biosensor-PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography, which utilized molecular recognition of oligonucleotides and biotin-streptavidin, and the optical property of colored microspheres, for semiquantifying a five-membered subgroup of caries-associated bacterial species in supragingival plaque from healthy coronal surfaces of teeth. The present study aimed to evaluate this technique's ability to differentiate microflora by comparing the subset profiles. Sixteen subgingival plaque specimens were pooled from periodontal pockets and analyzed for the composition of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Scardovia wiggsiae, Actinomyces sp. and Veillonella parvula. Detection frequencies, relative abundance of each bacterial species, and the five-membered bacterial profiles were compared between supra- and subgingival groups. The supragingival plaque harbored significantly more of the tested species and higher amount of Actinomyces sp. and V. parvula. In subgingival plaque, the predominance was obscured, since several highly overlapped profiles were found at comparable frequencies. Thus, PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography using the same plaque sample enabled simultaneous profiling of multiple species at species level and facilitated discrimination between anticipated different microflora, making this technique a promising chair-side microbiota profiling method.

  10. Establishment of cell suspension cultures of two Costa Rican Jatropha species (Euphorbiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Solís Ramos, Laura Yesenia; Miranda Carballo, Laura; Valdez Melara, Marta

    2013-01-01

    J. curcas has been studied in different countries and some interesting agronomic, pharmacological and industrial properties have been reported. More recently, it has been considered an important alternative source for biofuel production. The objective of this study was to establish a long-term method for the maintenance of calli and cell suspension cultures of the local species J. curcas and J. gossypifolia, in order to allow future studies for novel compounds with pharmaceutical or industria...

  11. Helicobacter species and common gut bacterial DNA in gallbladder with cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagin, Peren H; Stenram, Unne; Wadström, Torkel; Ljungh, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria in patients with cholecystitis. METHODS: A nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), specific to 16S rRNA of Helicobacter spp. was performed on paraffin-embedded gallbladder samples of 100 cholecystitis and 102 control cases. The samples were also analyzed for some common gut bacteria by PCR. Positive samples were sequenced for species identification. RESULTS: Helicobacter DNA was found in seven out of 100 cases of acute and chronic cholecystitis. Sequence analysis displayed Helicobacter pullorum (H. pullorum) in six cases and Helicobacter pylori in one; H. pullorum was only found in cases with metaplasia. Control samples were negative for Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria. There was a significant difference (P = 0.007) between cholecystitis and control samples for Helicobacter DNA. CONCLUSION: A possible relationship was detected between Helicobacter DNA and cholecystitis. Further serological and immunohistochemical studies are needed to support these data. PMID:20939110

  12. Isolation and characterization of a novel violacein-like pigment producing psychrotrophic bacterial species Janthinobacterium svalbardensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrožič Avguštin, Jerneja; Žgur Bertok, Darja; Kostanjšek, Rok; Avguštin, Gorazd

    2013-04-01

    A bacterial strain designated JA-1, related to Janthinobacterium lividum, was isolated from glacier ice samples from the island Spitsbergen in the Arctic. The strain was tested for phenotypic traits and the most prominent appeared to be the dark red brown to black pigmentation different from the violet pigment of Janthinobacterium, Chromobacterium and Iodobacter. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridization tests showed that strain JA-1 belongs to the genus Janthinobacterium but represents a novel lineage distinct from the two known species of this genus, J. lividum and Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum. The DNA G + C content of strain JA-1 was determined to be 62.3 mol %. The isolate is a psychrotrophic Gram negative bacterium, rod-shaped with rounded ends, containing intracellular inclusions and one polar flagellum. On the basis of the presented results strain JA-1 is proposed as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Janthinobacterium, for which the name Janthinobacterium svalbardensis sp. nov. is proposed (JA-1(T) = DSM 25734, ZIM B637).

  13. Parallel Mutations Result in a Wide Range of Cooperation and Community Consequences in a Two-Species Bacterial Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Sarah M; Chubiz, Lon M; Harcombe, William R; Ytreberg, F Marty; Marx, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Multi-species microbial communities play a critical role in human health, industry, and waste remediation. Recently, the evolution of synthetic consortia in the laboratory has enabled adaptation to be addressed in the context of interacting species. Using an engineered bacterial consortium, we repeatedly evolved cooperative genotypes and examined both the predictability of evolution and the phenotypes that determine community dynamics. Eight Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains evolved methionine excretion sufficient to support growth of an Escherichia coli methionine auxotroph, from whom they required excreted growth substrates. Non-synonymous mutations in metA, encoding homoserine trans-succinylase (HTS), were detected in each evolved S. enterica methionine cooperator and were shown to be necessary for cooperative consortia growth. Molecular modeling was used to predict that most of the non-synonymous mutations slightly increase the binding affinity for HTS homodimer formation. Despite this genetic parallelism and trend of increasing protein binding stability, these metA alleles gave rise to a wide range of phenotypic diversity in terms of individual versus group benefit. The cooperators with the highest methionine excretion permitted nearly two-fold faster consortia growth and supported the highest fraction of E. coli, yet also had the slowest individual growth rates compared to less cooperative strains. Thus, although the genetic basis of adaptation was quite similar across independent origins of cooperative phenotypes, quantitative measurements of metabolite production were required to predict either the individual-level growth consequences or how these propagate to community-level behavior.

  14. Impacts of silver nanoparticles on bacterial species B. subtilis and E. coli and the major crop plant Z. mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Michael A.

    This thesis examines the impacts of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (c-AgNPs) on two species of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli), the major crop plant Zea mays, and the beneficial plant-microbe relationship between Z. mays and B. subtilis. AgNPs are an increasing component of antimicrobial consumer, industrial, and military products. This has led to widespread scientific concern for the ecological safety outside their intended use. An overview of their history, use, and toxicity was used to inform the design of experiments and resulting data. Growth inhibition and sub-lethal toxic effects were used to assess the effects of c-AgNP exposure to bacteria. Similar analytical methods were used to quantify the response of Z. mays to c-AgNP exposure. Results showed that exposure to c-AgNP significantly reduced the growth of bacterial populations and alters their growth kinetics. Z. mays experienced significant sub-lethal effects due to exposure, including reduced root length and biomass, and hyper-accumulated Ag in root tissues. Beneficial interactions between B. subtilis and Z. mays were reduced as both species suffered sub-lethal effects of exposure to c-AgNPs.

  15. Antarctic bacterial haemoglobin and its role in the protection against nitrogen reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Daniela; Giordano, Daniela; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; di Prisco, Guido; Ascenzi, Paolo; Poole, Robert K; Verde, Cinzia

    2013-09-01

    In a cold and oxygen-rich environment such as Antarctica, mechanisms for the defence against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are needed and represent important components in the evolutionary adaptations. In the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125, the presence of multiple genes encoding 2/2 haemoglobins and a flavohaemoglobin strongly suggests that these proteins fulfil important physiological roles, perhaps associated to the peculiar features of the Antarctic habitat. In this work, the putative role of Ph-2/2HbO, encoded by the PSHAa0030 gene, was investigated by in vivo and in vitro experiments in order to highlight its involvement in NO detoxification mechanisms. The PSHAa0030 gene was cloned and then over-expressed in a flavohaemoglobin-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, unable to metabolise NO, and the resulting strain was studied analysing its growth properties and oxygen uptake in the presence of NO. We here demonstrate that Ph-2/2HbO protects growth and cellular respiration of the heterologous host from the toxic effect of NO-donors. Unlike in Mycobacterium tuberculosis 2/2 HbN, the deletion of the N-terminal extension of Ph-2/2HbO does not seem to reduce the NO scavenging activity, showing that the N-terminal extension is not a requirement for efficient NO detoxification. Moreover, the ferric form of Ph-2/2HbO was shown to catalyse peroxynitrite isomerisation in vitro, confirming its potential role in the scavenging of reactive nitrogen species. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

  16. Multifunctionality and diversity of culturable bacterial communities strictly associated with spores of the plant beneficial symbiont Rhizophagus intraradices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battini, Fabio; Cristani, Caterina; Giovannetti, Manuela; Agnolucci, Monica

    2016-02-01

    Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) live in symbiosis with most crop plants and represent essential elements of soil fertility and plant nutrition and productivity, facilitating soil mineral nutrient uptake and protecting plants from biotic and abiotic stresses. These beneficial services may be mediated by the dense and active spore-associated bacterial communities, which sustain diverse functions, such as the promotion of mycorrhizal activity, biological control of soilborne diseases, nitrogen fixation, and the supply of nutrients and growth factors. In this work, we utilised culture-dependent methods to isolate and functionally characterize the microbiota strictly associated to Rhizophagus intraradices spores, and molecularly identified the strains with best potential plant growth promoting (PGP) activities by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. We isolated in pure culture 374 bacterial strains belonging to different functional groups-actinobacteria, spore-forming, chitinolytic and N2-fixing bacteria-and screened 122 strains for their potential PGP activities. The most common PGP trait was represented by P solubilization from phytate (69.7%), followed by siderophore production (65.6%), mineral P solubilization (49.2%) and IAA production (42.6%). About 76% of actinobacteria and 65% of chitinolytic bacteria displayed multiple PGP activities. Nineteen strains with best potential PGP activities, assigned to Sinorhizobium meliloti, Streptomyces spp., Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans, Nocardiodes albus, Bacillus sp. pumilus group, Fictibacillus barbaricus and Lysinibacillus fusiformis, showed the ability to produce IAA and siderophores and to solubilize P from mineral phosphate and phytate, representing suitable candidates as biocontrol agents, biofertilisers and bioenhancers, in the perspective of targeted management of beneficial symbionts and their associated bacteria in sustainable food production systems.

  17. Individual-based modelling of bacterial cultures in the study of the lag phase

    OpenAIRE

    Prats Soler, Clara

    2008-01-01

    La microbiologia predictiva és una de les parts més importants de la microbiologia dels aliments. En el creixement d'un cultiu bacterià es poden observar quatre fases: latència, exponencial, estacionària i mort. La fase de latència té un interès específic en microbiologia predictiva; al llarg de dècades ha estat abordada des de dues perspectives diferents: a nivell cel·lular i intracel·lular (escala microscòpica), i a nivell de població (escala macroscòpica). La primera estudia els processos ...

  18. Culture-independent study of bacterial communities in tropical river sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoetkiattikul, Honglada; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Pinyakong, Onruthai; Wisawapipat, Worachart; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Champreda, Verawat

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitous microbial communities in river sediments actively govern organic matter decomposition, nutrient recycling, and remediation of toxic compounds. In this study, prokaryotic diversity in two major rivers in central Thailand, the Chao Phraya (CP) and the Tha Chin (TC) distributary was investigated. Significant differences in sediment physicochemical properties, particularly silt content, were noted between the two rivers. Tagged 16S rRNA sequencing on a 454 platform showed that the sediment microbiomes were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria and sulfur/sulfate reducing Deltaproteobacteria, represented by orders Desulfobacteriales and Desulfluromonadales together with organic degraders Betaproteobacteria (orders Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales) together with the co-existence of Bacteroidetes predominated by Sphingobacteriales. Enrichment of specific bacterial orders was found in the clayey CP and silt-rich TC sediments, including various genera with known metabolic capability on decomposition of organic matter and xenobiotic compounds. The data represent one of the pioneered works revealing heterogeneity of bacteria in river sediments in the tropics.

  19. Molecular versus conventional culture for detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, A M; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Abd El Wanis, S; Bakry, N R

    2016-02-29

    Acute respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity in poultry farms allover the world. Six pathogens; Escherichia coli, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were involved in respiratory infections in poultry. Herein, conventional identification procedures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied for detection of the most common respiratory bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens of poultry obtained from 53 Egyptian farms with various respiratory problems and the results were compared statistically. The analyzed data demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of the most recovered microorganisms (Ppoultry farms were E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa (54.71% each), followed by M. haemolylica (35.85%) and M. gallisepticum (20.75%). In conclusion, PCR assay offered an effective alternative to traditional typing methods for the identification and simultaneous detection of the most clinically relevant respiratory pathogens in poultry.

  20. Assess suitability of hydroaeroponic culture to establish tripartite symbiosis between different AMF species, beans, and rhizobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansa Jan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like other species of the Phaseoleae tribe, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. has the potential to establish symbiosis with rhizobia and to fix the atmospheric dinitrogen (N2 for its N nutrition. Common bean has also the potential to establish symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF that improves the uptake of low mobile nutrients such as phosphorus, from the soil. Both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses can act synergistically in benefits on plant. Results The tripartite symbiosis of common bean with rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF was assessed in hydroaeroponic culture with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., by comparing the effects of three fungi spp. on growth, nodulation and mycorrhization of the roots under sufficient versus deficient P supplies, after transfer from initial sand culture. Although Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith colonized intensely the roots of common bean in both sand and hydroaeroponic cultures, Gigaspora rosea Nicolson & Schenck only established well under sand culture conditions, and no root-colonization was found with Acaulospora mellea Spain & Schenck under either culture conditions. Interestingly, mycorrhization by Glomus was also obtained by contact with mycorrhized Stylosanthes guianensis (Aubl. sw in sand culture under deficient P before transfer into hydroaeroponic culture. The effect of bean genotype on both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses with Glomus was subsequently assessed with the common bean recombinant inbreed line 7, 28, 83, 115 and 147, and the cultivar Flamingo. Significant differences among colonization and nodulation of the roots and growth among genotypes were found. Conclusion The hydroaeroponic culture is a valuable tool for further scrutinizing the physiological interactions and nutrient partitioning within the tripartite symbiosis.

  1. Comparative assessment of the efficacy of bacterial and cyanobacterial phytohormones in plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Anwar; Hasnain, Shahida

    2012-04-01

    Efficient callus and explant regeneration medium, using microbial extract (SPE purified) or supernatant has been formulated for Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata. Two cyanobacterial strains (Anabaena sp. Ck1 and Chroococcidiopsis sp. Ck4) and two bacterial strains, (Pseudomonas spp. Am3 and Am4) known to produce a number of cytokinins, tZ, cZ, ZR, DHZR and IAA were selected for the media formulation. Supernatant from strains with high cytokinin to IAA ratio, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa Am3 (2.08) and Chroococcidiopsis sp. Ck4 (0.8) efficiently induced compact calli which were turned green upon exposure to light. The strains producing lower cytokinins to IAA ratio (0.11-0.13) on the other hand induced friable callus which were unable to regenerate on the selected media combinations. Leaf, stem and root explants of Brassica oleracea L. regenerated on MS medium supplemented with phytohormones from microbial origin with efficiency comparable to standard cytokinins and IAA. Supplements from cyanobacterial origin proved to be the best for induction of adventitious roots and shoots on internodal and petiolar segments. Hypocotyl explants however, responded well on MS supplemented with bacterial metabolites. Induction of adventitious shoots on root explants was supported by phytohormones from both origin equally well. Callus induction on the seeds and regeneration of shoots on calli was also observed. Cyanobacteria based media were more efficient to induce calli capable of regeneration upon exposure to light. Internodal explants were highly amenable to regenerate shoot and roots simultaneously. Root explants were the less successful to regenerate shoots.

  2. Frequency of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in sheep slaughtered in an abattoir in Tabriz: comparison of bacterial culture and pathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoshti, Fereydon Rezazadeh; Khoojine, Amir Babak Sioofy; Helan, Javad Ashrafi; Hassanzadeh, Belal; Heydari, Ali Akbar

    2012-10-01

    From January to February 2008, 468 sheep carcasses (335 male and 133 female) in a Khosroshahr (suburb of Tabriz, East Azerbaijan province, Iran) abattoir were randomly selected for inspection. The aim of the study was to estimate the frequency of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in sheep and to compare the results of bacterial cultures and histopathology of suspected cases. The mean age of the population was 2.5 years. One hundred ninety-seven cases containing 153 (77.7%) males and 44 (22.3%) females had prominent enlargement of one of the lymph nodes (i.e., prescapular, prefemoral, inguinal, supramammary, or midiastinal); these were removed with the surrounding tissue for further evaluation. For confirmed diagnosis of CLA, samples were sent for microbiology and pathology analysis. Standard bacteriological culture methods for isolation of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and tissue preparations for histopathological sections were performed. To evaluate the effect of age on the frequency of CLA, animals were categorized in four groups: under 1, 1-2, 2-3, and over 3 years of age. Based on the results, in 59 (12.60%) carcasses C. pseudotuberculosis was isolated, and in 94 (20.08%) of the cases histopathological studies revealed pathognomonic signs (lamellated exudates or onion ring) of CLA. The frequency of CLA based on bacteriological culture was 12.60% and on histopathological study 20.08%. In 37 (18.8%) of the carcasses, both bacteriological and histopathological studies confirmed CLA. The frequency of CLA following microscopic examination (20.08%) presented a more precise diagnosis compared to bacteriological culture (12.60%) and macroscopic evaluation of the lymph nodes (P CLA detection with increasing age (P CLA test were 2.92 years and in the oldest age group 31 (47%) cases had the highest infection.

  3. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lhermie

    Full Text Available We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting.

  4. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhermie, Guillaume; El Garch, Farid; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Ferran, Aude A.; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting. PMID:26506096

  5. Survey on Heterotrophic Bacterial Contamination in Bottled Mineral Water by Culture Method

    OpenAIRE

    Essmaeel Ghorbanalinezhad; Ghazaleh Saeedi; Delaram Khanjani

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: This project focuses on the level of heterotrophic baceria in bottled mineral water which could be a health concern for the elderly, infants, pregnant women and immuno-compromised patients. Materials and Methods: Different brands of bottled water samples were selected randomly and evaluated for their bacteriological quality, using different specific culture media and biochemical tests. Water samples were analyzed within 24 hours of their purchase/collection. Samples we...

  6. Anaerobic biotransformation of high concentrations of chloroform by an enrichment culture and two bacterial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Huifeng; Kurtz, Harry D; Mykytczuk, Nadia; Trevors, Jack T; Freedman, David L

    2010-10-01

    A fermentative enrichment culture (designated DHM-1) was developed that is capable of cometabolically biotransforming high concentrations of chloroform (CF) to nontoxic end products. Two Pantoea spp. were isolated from DHM-1 that also possess this dechlorination capability. Following acclimation to increasing levels of CF, corn syrup-grown DHM-1 was able to transform over 500 mg/liter CF in the presence of vitamin B(12) (approximately 3% of CF on a molar basis) at a rate as high as 22 mg/liter/day in a mineral salts medium. CO, CO(2), and organic acids were the predominant biodegradation products, suggesting that hydrolytic reactions predominate during CF transformation. DHM-1 was capable of growing on corn syrup in the presence of high concentrations of CF (as may be present near contaminant source zones in groundwater), which makes it a promising culture for bioaugmentation. Strains DHM-1B and DHM-1T transform CF at rates similar to that of the DHM-1 enrichment culture. The ability of these strains to grow in the presence of high concentrations of CF appears to be related to alteration of membrane fluidity or homeoviscous and homeophasic adaptation.

  7. Enrichment culture and molecular identification of diverse Bartonella species in stray dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ying; Kosoy, Michael Y; Boonmar, Sumalee; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Sangmaneedet, Somboon; Peruski, Leonard F

    2010-12-15

    Using pre-enrichment culture in Bartonella alpha-Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM) followed by PCR amplification and DNA sequence identification that targeted a fragment of the citrate synthase gene (gltA), we provide evidence of common bartonella infections and diverse Bartonella species in the blood of stray dogs from Bangkok and Khon Kaen, Thailand. The overall prevalence of all Bartonella species was 31.3% (60/192), with 27.9% (31/111) and 35.8% (29/81) in the stray dogs from Bangkok and Khon Kaen, respectively. Phylogenetic analyzes of gltA identified eight species/genotypes of Bartonella in the blood of stray dogs, including B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis, B. elizabethae, B. grahamii, B. quintana, B. taylorii, and three novel genotypes (BK1, KK1 and KK2) possibly representing unique species with ≤ 90.2% similarities to any of the known Bartonella species B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis was the only species detected in dogs from both sites, B. quintana and BK1 were found in the dogs from Bangkok, B. elizabethae, B. taylorii, KK1 and KK2 were found in the dogs from Khon Kaen. We conclude that stray dogs in Thailand are frequently infected with Bartonella species that vary with geographic region. As some Bartonella species detected in the present study are considered pathogenic for humans, stray dogs in Thailand may serve as possible reservoirs for Bartonella causing human illnesses. Further work is needed to determine the role of those newly discovered Bartonella genotypes/species in human and veterinary medicine.

  8. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Culturing oil sands microbes as mixed species communities enhances ex situ model naphthenic acid degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, Marc A; Lemire, Joseph A; Yue, Gordon; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Oil sands surface mining for bitumen results in the formation of oil sands process water (OSPW), containing acutely toxic naphthenic acids (NAs). Potential exists for OSPW toxicity to be mitigated by aerobic degradation of the NAs by microorganisms indigenous to the oil sands tailings ponds, the success of which is dependent on the methods used to exploit the metabolisms of the environmental microbial community. Having hypothesized that the xenobiotic tolerant biofilm mode-of-life may represent a feasible way to harness environmental microbes for ex situ treatment of OSPW NAs, we aerobically grew OSPW microbes as single and mixed species biofilm and planktonic cultures under various conditions for the purpose of assaying their ability to tolerate and degrade NAs. The NAs evaluated were a diverse mixture of eight commercially available model compounds. Confocal microscopy confirmed the ability of mixed and single species OSPW cultures to grow as biofilms in the presence of the NAs evaluated. qPCR enumeration demonstrated that the addition of supplemental nutrients at concentrations of 1 g L(-1) resulted in a more numerous population than 0.001 g L(-1) supplementation by approximately 1 order of magnitude. GC-FID analysis revealed that mixed species cultures (regardless of the mode of growth) are the most effective at degrading the NAs tested. All constituent NAs evaluated were degraded below detectable limits with the exception of 1-adamantane carboxylic acid (ACA); subsequent experimentation with ACA as the sole NA also failed to exhibit degradation of this compound. Single species cultures degraded select few NA compounds. The degradation trends highlighted many structure-persistence relationships among the eight NAs tested, demonstrating the effect of side chain configuration and alkyl branching on compound recalcitrance. Of all the isolates, the Rhodococcus spp. degraded the greatest number of NA compounds, although still less than the mixed species cultures

  10. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species