WorldWideScience

Sample records for cultivated soil samples

  1. Modern Methods for Isolation, Purification, and Cultivation of Soil Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temraleeva, A D; Dronova, S A; Moskalenko, S V; Didovich, S V

    2016-07-01

    Up-to-date methods for isolation of cyanobacteria from soil samples, removal of accompanying microflora, obtaining axenic strains, and -conditions and media for subsequnt cultivation are reviewed. Char acterization of soil as a specific habitat for cyanobacteria is provided. Comparative analysis of pH and ele- mental composition of the liquid phase of most soil types with the media for cultivating cyanobacteria is car- ried out. The functional role of the major components required for the cultivation of cyanobacteria is de- scribed. The problems associated with isolation, purification, and cultivation of soil cyanobacteria, as well as the relevant solutions, are discussed.

  2. Depth distribution of available micronutrients in cultivated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Ivana Ž.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the profile distribution of available micronutrients Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn and radionuclide 137Cs in cultivated soil at the experimental field "Radmilovac" (property of Agricultural Faculty, Belgrade University in the vicinity of Vinĉa Institute of Nuclear Sciences. The soil belongs to the anthrosol class of anthropogenic soils according to FAO (2006. At first, the deep plowing was performed while preparing soil for planting peach trees followed by cultivation of soil for 12 years. All agricultural treatments at the experimental field ceased for three years. After that period, soil sampling was carried out. Contents of DTPA-extracted Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn were in the range of (mg kg-1: 5.8-41.6; 9.2-34.2; 1-7.6 and 0.2-1.3, respectively. Detected activity concentration (Bq kg-1 for 137Cs ranged from 1.8 to 35. It was noticed that distribution patterns of 137Cs radionuclide and available Cu and Zn along soil depth were very similar and they were analyzed by simple linear regression; mutual affinity for the soil organic matter might affect their distribution in soil. Contents of available Fe and Mn exhibited different, more constant distribution within a soil horizon.

  3. Soil covering in organic cultivation of onion cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Barreto Tavella; Regina Lúcia Felix Ferreira; Sebastião Elviro de Araújo Neto; Antônio Jussie da Silva Solino; Eliana Mara Napoli Corrêa de Paula da Silva; Maísa Pinto Bravin

    2015-01-01

    The soil preparation in horticulture, including organic, is characterized by intense soil tillage, which increases energy costs and unbalanced the environment. The organic system in onion cultivation has shown satisfactory results, however the soil covering use tends to improve the cultivation environment and may result in higher yields. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of onion cultivars in organic cultivation under different soil coverages. The experiment was co...

  4. Soil Acidification of Alfisols as Influenced by Tea Cultivation in Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; XU Ren-Kou; WANG Ning; LI Xing-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Soil acidification is an important process in land degradation around the world as well as in China. Acidification of Alfisols was investigated in the tea gardens with various years of tea cultivation in the eastern China. Cultivation of tea plants caused soil acidification and soil acidity increased with the increase of tea cultivation period. Soil pH of composite samples from cultivated layers decreased by 1.37, 1.62 and 1.85, respectively, after 13, 34 and 54 years of tea plantation,as compared to the surface soil obtained from the unused land. Soil acidification rates at early stages of tea cultivation were found to be higher than those at the later stages. The acidification rate for the period of 0-13 years was as high as 4.40 kmol H+ ha-1 year-1 for the cultivated layer samples. Soil acidification induced the decrease of soil exchangeable base cations and base cation saturation and thus increased the soil exchangeable acidity. Soil acidification also caused the decrease of soil cation exchange capacity, especially for the 54-year-old tea garden. Soil acidification induced by tea plantation also led to the increase of soil exchangeable Al and soluble Al, which was responsible for the Al toxiciy to plants.

  5. Genetic analysis reveals diversity and genetic relationship among Trichoderma isolates from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Al-Oweisi, Fatma A; Edwards, Simon G; Al-Nadabi, Hamed; Al-Fahdi, Ahmed M

    2015-07-28

    Trichoderma is one of the most common fungi in soil. However, little information is available concerning the diversity of Trichoderma in soil with no previous history of cultivation. This study was conducted to investigate the most common species and the level of genetic relatedness of Trichoderma species from uncultivated soil in relation to cultivated soil and potting media. A total of 24, 15 and 13 Trichoderma isolates were recovered from 84 potting media samples, 45 cultivated soil samples and 65 uncultivated soil samples, respectively. Analysis based on the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the translation elongation factor gene (EF1) indicated the presence of 9 Trichoderma species: T. harzianum (16 isolates), T. asperellum (13), T. citrinoviride (9), T. orientalis (3), T. ghanense (3), T. hamatum (3), T. longibrachiatum (2), T. atroviride (2), and T. viride (1). All species were found to occur in potting media samples, while five Trichoderma species were recovered from the cultivated soils and four from the uncultivated soils. AFLP analysis of the 52 Trichoderma isolates produced 52 genotypes and 993 polymorphic loci. Low to moderate levels of genetic diversity were found within populations of Trichoderma species (H = 0.0780 to 0.2208). Analysis of Molecular Variance indicated the presence of very low levels of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.0002 to 0.0139) among populations of the same Trichoderma species obtained from the potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil. The study provides evidence for occurrence of Trichoderma isolates in soil with no previous history of cultivation. The lack of genetic differentiation among Trichoderma populations from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil suggests that some factors could have been responsible for moving Trichoderma propagules among the three substrates. The study reports for the first time the presence of 4 Trichoderma species in Oman: T

  6. Contribution of soil esterase to biodegradation of aliphatic polyester agricultural mulch film in cultivated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Tamura, Kimiko; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Watanabe, Takashi; Koitabashi, Motoo; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Yarimizu, Tohru; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between degradation speed of soil-buried biodegradable polyester film in a farmland and the characteristics of the predominant polyester-degrading soil microorganisms and enzymes were investigated to determine the BP-degrading ability of cultivated soils through characterization of the basal microbial activities and their transition in soils during BP film degradation. Degradation of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) film was evaluated in soil samples from different cultivated fields in Japan for 4 weeks. Both the degradation speed of the PBSA film and the esterase activity were found to be correlated with the ratio of colonies that produced clear zone on fungal minimum medium-agarose plate with emulsified PBSA to the total number colonies counted. Time-dependent change in viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and esterase activities were monitored in soils where buried films showed the most and the least degree of degradation. During the degradation of PBSA film, the viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activities in soils, which adhered to the PBSA film, increased with time. The soil, where the film was degraded the fastest, recorded large PBSA-degrading fungal population and showed high esterase activity compared with the other soil samples throughout the incubation period. Meanwhile, esterase activity and viable counts of PBSA-degrading fungi were found to be stable in soils without PBSA film. These results suggest that the higher the distribution ratio of native PBSA-degrading fungi in the soil, the faster the film degradation is. This could be due to the rapid accumulation of secreted esterases in these soils.

  7. Bionic optimization research of soil cultivating component design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO ZhiJun; ZHOU ZhiLi; ZHANG Yi; LI ZhongLi

    2009-01-01

    The basic biomechanical laws that apply to the clawed toes of animals with powerful digging abilities and the optimal bionic design of curved soil cultivating components with an analogous contour were researched in a novel way. First, the curvature and profile of the inside contour line of a field mouse's clawed toe were analyzed. The finite element method (FEM) was then used to simulate the working process in order to study the changing characteristics of the working resistance of bionic soil-engaging surfaces and the stress field of the processed soil. A straight-line cultivating component was used for comparative analysis. In accordance with the simulation results, a series of soil cultivating components of varying design were manufactured. An indoor soil bin experiment was carried out to measure their working resistance and validate the results of the FEM analysis. The results of this research would have important values in the optimization design of cultivating components for energy and cost savings.

  8. Phosphorus critical levels and availability in lowland soils cultivated with flooded rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Isabela Orlando dos Santos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Lowland soils present a great potential for the flooded rice crop. This work aimed to estimate critical levels of P in waterlogged soils cultivated with rice using Mehlich 1 and anion exchange resin as soil-P extractors, compare the performance of these extractors as for the evaluation of the P availability, and study the soil-P fractions involved in the P nutrition of the rice crop. Studied soils consisted of four Histosols: Low Humic Gley (GP, Aluvial (A, Humic Gley (GH and Bog Soil (O which were previously cultivated with beans. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a factorial scheme, using four soils, five P rates (75, 150, 300, 500 and 800 mg dm-3 and two liming treatments (with and without liming, with three replicates. After 60 days of flooding, soil samples were submitted to P extraction by Mehlich 1 and resin, and phosphorous fractionation. Two rice plants were cultivated in pots containing 3 dm³ of waterlogged soils. The labile P and the moderately labile P of the soils contributed for rice nutrition. The two tested extractors presented efficiency in the evaluation of P availability for the rice cultivated in lowland waterlogged soils.

  9. Adsorption-desorption reactions of selenium (VI) in tropical cultivated and uncultivated soils under Cerrado biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, J H L; Araujo, A M; Silva, G N T; Guilherme, L R G; Lopes, G

    2016-12-01

    Soil management may affect selenium (Se) adsorption capacity. This study investigated adsorption and desorption of Se (VI) in selected Brazilian soils from the Cerrado biome, an area of ever increasing importance for agriculture expansion in Brazil. Soil samples were collected from cultivated and uncultivated soils, comprising clayed and sandy soils. Following chemical and mineralogical characterization, soil samples were subjected to Se adsorption and desorption tests. Adsorption was evaluated after a 72-h reaction with increasing concentrations of Se (0-2000 μg L(-1)) added as Na2SeO4 in a NaCl electrolyte solution (pH 5.5; ionic strength 15 mmol L(-1)). Desorption, as well as distribution coefficients (Kd) for selenate were also assessed. Soil management affected Se adsorption capacity, i.e., Se adsorbed amounts were higher for uncultivated soils, when compared to cultivated ones. Such results were also supported by data of Kd and maximum adsorption capacity of Se. This fact was attributed mainly to the presence of greater amounts of competing anions, especially phosphate, in cultivated soils, due to fertilizer application. Phosphate may compete with selenate for adsorption sites, decreasing Se retention. For the same group of soils (cultivated and uncultivated), Se adsorption was greater in the clayed soils compared to sandy ones. Our results support the idea that adding Se (VI) to the soil is a good strategy to increase Se levels in food crops (agronomic biofortification), especially when crops are grown in soils that have been cultivated over the time due to their low Se adsorption capacity (high Se availability).

  10. Changes in Soil Properties of Paddy Fields Across A Cultivation Chronosequence in Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong-Pei; ZHANG Tao-Lin; LI De-Cheng; B.VELDE; HAN Feng-Xiang

    2005-01-01

    Rice production plays a crucial role ia the food supply of China and a better understanding of the changes in paddy soil fertility and the management effects is of practical importance for increasing rice productivity. In this study, field sampling in a typical red soil region of subtropical China, Jiangxi Province, was used to observe changes in the soil physical, chemical,and biological properties in a cultivation chronosequence of paddy fields. After cultivation, clay (< 0.002 mm) content in the soil, which was 39% in the original uncultivated wasteland, decreased to 17% in the 80-year paddy field, while silt(0.02-0.002 mm) content increased. Additionally, macroporosity increased and pore shapes became more homogeneous.Soil pH generally increased. Soil organic C and total N contents of the 0-10 cm layer increased from 4.58 and 0.39 g kg-1to 19.6 and 1.62 g kg-1, respectively, in the paddy fields after 30-year cultivation and then remained stable. Soil total P content increased from 0.5 to 1.3 g kg-1 after 3 years of rice cultivation, indicating that application of phosphate fertilizer could accelerate phosphorous accumulation in the soil. Total K content in the 0-10 cm soil layer for the 80-year paddy field decreased by 28% compared to that of the uncultivated wasteland land. Total Fe and free Fe contents declined with years of cultivation. The bacterial population increased and urease activity noticeably intensified after years of cultivation.In this chronosequence it appeared that it took 30 years to increase soil fertility to a relatively constant value that was seen after 80 years of cultivation.

  11. Effect of Cultivation on Spatial Distribution of Nematode Trophic Groups in Black Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG WENJU; LI QI; JIANG YONG; CHEN WENBO; WEN DAZHONG

    2003-01-01

    Geostatistics combined with GIS was applied to assess the spatial distribution of nematode trophic groups following two contrasting soil uses in the black soil region of Northeast China. Two plots, one with fallow for 12 years and the other cultivated, were marked on regular square grids with 2-m spacing. Soil samples were collected from each sampling point, nematodes were extracted from these samples and classified into four trophic groups: bacterivores, fungivores, plant parasites, and omnivores/predators. The numbers of total nematodes and trophic groups analyzed had normal distributions on both fallow and cultivated plots. The absolute abundances of total nematodes and trophic groups were observed to be much more homogeneous on cultivated plot than on fallow one. Geostatistical analysis showed that the densities of total nematodes and trophic groups on both fallow and cultivated plots exhibited spatial dependence at the sampled scale and their experimental semivariograms were adjusted to a spherical or exponential model, except those of bacterivores and fungivores on cultivated plot. The spatial distribution of nematode trophic groups was found to be different for the two land uses, indicating that cultivation changed the native condition for soil nematode activities.

  12. Effect of Cultivation on Soil Organic Matter and Aggregate Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.WILLIAMS; XING Bao-Shan; P.VENEMAN

    2005-01-01

    Agricultural sustainability relates directly to maintaining or enhancing soil quality. Soil quality studies in Canada during the 1980's showed that loss of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil aggregate stability was standard features of non-sustainable land management in agroecosystems. In this study total soil organic carbon (SOC), particulate organic matter (POM), POM-C as a percentage of total SOC, and aggregate stability were determined for three cultivated fields and three adjacent grassland fields to assess the impact of conventional agricultural management on soil quality. POM was investigated using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine any qualitative differences that may be attributed to cultivation. Results show a highly significant loss in total SOC, POM and aggregate stability in the cultivated fields as compared to the grassland fields and a significant loss of POM-C as a percentage of total SOC.Integrated results of the NMR spectra of the POM show a loss in carbohydrate-C and an increase in aromatic-C in the cultivated fields, which translates to a loss of biological lability in the organic matter. Conventional cultivation decreased the quantity and quality of SOM and caused a loss in aggregate stability resulting in an overall decline in soil quality.

  13. "Lou soil", a fertile anthropogenic soil with thousands of years of cultivating history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J.; Liang, B.; Yan, J.; Zhao, W.

    2012-12-01

    Chinese farmers have a very long history of using manures in their fields. Owing to the long-term addition of manures, an anthropogenic layer was formed on the top of original soil profile (drab soil) in Guanzhong Plains on the south edge of the Loess Plateau, North China. This soil is named the Manural Loessial soil (or Lou soil, "Lou" means the different stories of a building in Chinese). The depth of anthropogenic layer is in range of about 30 to 100 cm depth, which has a close relationship with the soil productivity. This fertile agricultural soil has sustained the agriculture in the region for millenniums. We had determined the organic carbon (SOC) in 7 soil profiles, and found that the depths of anthropogenic layer of were in range of 40 to 71 cm (averaging 59 cm). And the anthropogenic layer became shallower as the profile was far from the village due to less manure application. The organic C stocks in this layer accounted for 69% of organic C stocks in 0-100 cm soil profiles. Organic C stocks in Lou soil was higher than that in the newly cultivated soil developed from loess parent materials. Our 30-day incubation experiment found that addition of synthetic N fertilizer significantly increased the decomposition of SOC in the soils. However, The decomposition rate of SOC in the soil added with manure and inorganic fertilizers for 18-yr (MNPK soil) was significantly lower than in the soils added without fertilizer or inorganic fertilizers (NF soil, and NPK soils). The half-life of the organic C in MNPK soils was also slower than the NF soil, and NPK soil. It indicates that long-term combined application of manure and inorganic fertilizers improves the stabilization of soil organic C. Long-term cultivation has not only increased organic C stocks, but also stabilization of organic C in soil profile. It provides us a unique sample to study the mechanism of accumulation and stabilization of organic C in soil to balance agricultural production and C sequestration

  14. Labile and stabilised fractions of soil organic carbon in some intensively cultivated alluvial soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, B C; Datta, S P; Rattan, R K; Singh, A K

    2013-11-01

    The present investigation was undertaken in view of the limited information on the relative proportion of labile and stabilized fractions of soil organic carbon (SOC) in intensively cultivated lands, particularly under tropics. The specific objectives were i) to study the comparative recovery of SOC by different methods of labile carbon estimation under intensively cultivated lands and ii) to evaluate the impact of agricultural practices on carbon management index. For this purpose, in all, 105 surface soil samples were collected from intensively cultivated tube well and sewage irrigated agricultural lands. These samples were analysed for total as well as labile pools of SOC. Results indicated that Walkley and Black, KMnO4-oxidizable and microbial biomass carbon constituted the total SOC to the extent of 10.2 to 47.4, 1.66 to 23.2 and 0.30 to 5.49%, respectively with the corresponding mean values of 26.2, 9.16 and 2.15%. Lability of SOC was considerably higher in sewage irrigated soils than tube well irrigated soils under intensive cropping. Under soybean-wheat, the higher values of carbon management index (CMI) (279 and 286) were associated with the treatments where entire amount of nitrogen was supplied through FYM. Similar results were obtained under rice-wheat, whereas in case of maize-wheat the highest value of CMI was recorded under treatment receiving NPK through chemical fertilizer along with green manure. There was also a significant improvement in CMI under integrated (chemical fertilizer + organics) and chemical fertilizer-treated plots. The values of CMI ranged from 220 to 272 under cultivated lands receiving irrigation through sewage and industrial effluents.

  15. Microbial activity of soil cultivated with corn in association with weeds under different fertility management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Melo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between weeds and soil microorganisms can give them a competitive advantage over crops. This study assessed the biomass and microbial activity of soil cultivated with weeds and corn (Zea mays L. in monoculture and in competition under different fertility management systems. The experiment considered four soil fertility management systems (calcium and magnesium silicate + fertilization; limestone + fertilization; no correction source + fertilization; no correction source + no fertilization and 12 crops (five competition arrangements between corn and weeds Urochloa brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich. R.D. Webster, lpomoea grandifolia (Dammer O'Donell, Conyza canadensis (L. Cronquist, Hyptis suaveolens (L. Poit., and Bidens pilosa L. plus the six species in monoculture and bare soil. After 60 d coexisting in a greenhouse, soil samples were collected to determine microbial biomass, respiration rate, and metabolic quotient. Soils cultivated with B. pilosa and Z. mays+U. brizantha showed higher microbial biomass. Cultivation of B. pilosa and Z. mays+H. suaveolens provided greater energy efficiency to maintain microbial cells. Biomass and microbial activity were altered by plant species, coexistence, and soil fertility management. Calcium and magnesium silicate, as well as limestone similarly influenced biomass and respiration rate of soil cultivated with most species. For some crops, the Si source was better than limestone to promote lower specific activity of the edaphic microbiota. The change in the microbial activity of soil can be a strategy used by the species to minimize the effects of competition.

  16. Effects of shifting cultivation on biological and biochemical characteris-tics of soil microorganisms in Khagrachari hill district, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sohag Miah; S.M. Sirajul Haque; Wahida Sumi; Mohammad Mosharraf Hossain

    2014-01-01

    We collected soil samples from two representative sites at Aatmile of Khagarachari hill district in Chittagong Hill Tracts. One of the sites was under shifting cultivation and the other an adjacent 13-year old teak plantation. Both sites were in the same physiographic condition and same aspect with parable soil type, which enabled us to measure the effects of shifting cultivation on soil micro-flora. We studied soil phys-ico-chemical properties and the biochemical and biological properties of soil microbes. Moisture and organic matter content as well as fungi and bacterial populations, both in surface and subsurface soils, were signifi-cantly (p≤0.001) lower in shifting cultivated soils compared to soils not under shifting cultivation, i.e. the teak plantation site. The most abundant bacteria in surface (0-10 cm) and sub-surface (10-20 cm) soils under shifting cultivation were Pseudomonas diminuta and Shigella, respec-tively, while in corresponding soil layers of teak plantation, predominant microbes were Bacillus firmus (0-10 cm) and Xanthomonas (10-20 cm). The microbial population differences cannot be explained by soil texture differences because of the textural similarity in soils from the two sites but could be related to the significantly lower moisture and organic mat-ter contents in soils under shifting cultivation.

  17. Aggregate structure and carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in native and cultivated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Metadata only record This study evaluates the impact of cultivation on soil organic matter loss in North American grassland soils by measuring numerous aggregate- and nutrient-related soil indicators. Macroaggregates were more stable in native soil than in cultivated soil. In both soils, more C, N, and P were present in macroaggregates than in microaggregates.

  18. Soil covering in organic cultivation of onion cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Barreto Tavella

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The soil preparation in horticulture, including organic, is characterized by intense soil tillage, which increases energy costs and unbalanced the environment. The organic system in onion cultivation has shown satisfactory results, however the soil covering use tends to improve the cultivation environment and may result in higher yields. The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of onion cultivars in organic cultivation under different soil coverages. The experiment was conducted in the period of April to October of 2009, under protected cropping, in the experimental area of the horticulture sector of the Universidade Federal do Acre (UFAC, in Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil. A randomized block design was adopted, in a split-plot arrangement, the plots being comprised of soil coverings: coffee bean husks, grass straw (Brachiaria decumbens; dessicated bamboo leaves (Bambusa spp. and uncovered soil (control treatment, and the subplots comprised of three onion cultivars (IPA 10, IPA 11 and IPA 12, with four repetitions. The variables analyzed were total bulb yield (t ha-1, marketable bulb yield (t ha-1, fresh mass of the bulb (g bulb-1, classification of the bulbs and loss of mass as a function of storage time. There was no interaction effect between the soil coverings and the cultivars. Cultivars IPA 10 and IPA 11 showed greater agronomic performance of the studied variables. The soil coverings did not affect the yield and average mass of the bulbs under organic cultivation. The three cultivars presented more than approximately 70% of the bulbs in class 2 and a maximum of 5% of unmarketable bulbs. The loss of mass after 49 days of storage was 10% independent of the cultivar or soil covering.

  19. Bionic optimization research of soil cultivating component design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The basic biomechanical laws that apply to the clawed toes of animals with powerful digging abilities and the optimal bionic design of curved soil cultivating components with an analogous contour were researched in a novel way. First, the curvature and profile of the inside contour line of a field mouse’s clawed toe were analyzed. The finite element method (FEM) was then used to simulate the working process in order to study the changing characteristics of the working resistance of bionic soil- engag- ing surfaces and the stress field of the processed soil. A straight-line cultivating component was used for comparative analysis. In accordance with the simulation results, a series of soil cultivating com- ponents of varying design were manufactured. An indoor soil bin experiment was carried out to meas- ure their working resistance and validate the results of the FEM analysis. The results of this research would have important values in the optimization design of cultivating components for energy and cost savings.

  20. Morphological studies of some cultivated soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slager, S.

    1966-01-01

    A study was made of those morphological and physical soil properties considered to govern root development.A deep and wide-branched root system was shown only to develop in a soil containing a permanent heterogeneous pore system, formed by biological activity in the profile. Therefore a distinction

  1. Phytolith analysis of archeological soils: evidence for maize cultivation in formative ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, D M

    1978-01-13

    Soil samples from the archeological sites of Real Alto and OGCh-20, Santa Elena Peninsula, Ecuador, show the presence of cross-shaped silica bodies identifiable as maize (Zea mays L.) phytoliths by size comparison with known wild grass and maize phytoliths. These results support arguments for the cultivation of maize at 2450 B.C. in coastal Ecuador.

  2. Study on soils under shifting cultivation and other land use categories in Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alake Biswas; M.Alamgir; S.M.S.Haque; K.T.Osman

    2012-01-01

    Soil samples were collected and analyzed from 25 sites of three hilly regions (Rangamati,Banderban and Khagrachari) for an understanding of the impact of denudation and land use on soils in Chittagong Hill Tracts,Bangladesh.There were natural forests,bushy land,slashed sites,slashed and burnt sites,and the sites prepared for shifting cultivation,one year after shifting cultivation and two years after shifting cultivation.The soils were generally yellowish brown to reddish brown,sandy to sandy clay loam,strongly acid,and well to excessively drained on steep slopes with considerable variation among the sites and land use categories.Bulk density was the highest in sites of one year after shifting cultivation (1.52 g·cm-3) and the lowest in foreted sites (1.38 g·cm-3).Water holding capacities were,however,statistically similar in all sites.Organic carbon varied from 0.54% (slashed and burnt sites) to 1.55% (forested sites) and total N ranged from 0.05% (shifting cultivation for one year) to 0.13% (forested sites).Available phosphorus (Bray & Kurtz-2 P) was the maximum in forested sites (12.32 mg·kg-1),and it did not differ significantly in other sites.Contents of available Ca,Mg and K were also higher in the bushy lands and forested sites than cleared and shifting cultivated sites.

  3. Tropical soils cultivated with tomato: fractionation and speciation of Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueirol, Roberta Corrêa; Monteiro, Francisco Antonio; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes

    2015-04-01

    Soil acidity and the associated problems of aluminum (Al) toxicity and scarce exchangeable bases are typically the most important limiting factors of agricultural yield in wet tropical regions. The goals of this study were to test how soil lime rates affect the forms and distribution of Al in the soil fractions and how different levels of bioavailable Al affect two tomato genotypes grown in wet tropical soils. The tomato genotypes CNPH 0082 and Calabash Rouge were grown in two wet tropical soils in a greenhouse. Soil lime rates of 0, 560, and 2240 mg kg(-1) soil (clay soil) and 0, 280, and 1120 mg kg(-1) soil (sandy soil) were applied to modify Al concentrations. Dry mass production and Al concentrations were determined in shoots and roots. Al was fractionated in the soil, and the soil solution was speciated after cultivation. The Calabash Rouge genotype possesses mechanisms to tolerate Al3+, absorbed less Al, exhibited smaller reduction in growth, and lower Al concentrations in plant parts than the CNPH 0082. Increased soil pH reduced the exchangeable Al fraction and increased the fraction mainly linked to organic matter. Al in the soil in the form of complexes with organic compounds and Al(SO4)+ (at the highest lime rate) did not affect plant development. Soil acidity can be easily neutralized by liming the soil, which transforms toxic Al3+ in the soil into forms that do not harm tomato plants, thereby avoiding oxidative stress in the plants. Al-induced stress in tomatoes varies with genotypes and soil type.

  4. Spatial Variability of Soil Properties in Archeological Dark Earth Sites under Cacao Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Marcelo Pinheiro da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soils with an A horizon formed by human activity, an anthropogenic A horizon, are found in the Amazon Region. Few studies have examined the spatial distribution of the properties of these soils. We mapped the spatial variability of some soil properties in an area of Archaeological Dark Earth (ADE in the Brazilian Amazon. A sampling grid was defined over an area of 42 × 88 m under cacao cultivation in which sampling points were established at a spacing of 6 × 8 m, for a total of 88 points. Samples were collected from the 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.20, and 0.20-0.30 m depth layers. Soil texture, aggregate stability, and organic carbon (OC analyses were performed on disturbed soil samples. Undisturbed samples were used to determine soil macroporosity (Macro, microporosity (Micro, total porosity (TP, and soil resistance to penetration (RP. The results were analyzed by descriptive statistic, Pearson correlation (p<0.01, and geostatistics. Soil bulk density, total pore volume, and geometric mean diameter are dependent on the total amount of OC in the ADE area. Increased soil bulk density and RP are proportional to a decrease in OC content and lower Micro and TP. Moreover, soil resistance to penetration is influenced by soil water and clay content with depth.

  5. Factors affecting the occurrence and distribution of entomopathogenic fungi in natural and cultivated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Moraga, Enrique; Navas-Cortés, Juan A; Maranhao, Elizabeth A A; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Santiago-Alvarez, Cándido

    2007-08-01

    Factors affecting the occurrence and distribution of entomopathogenic fungi in 244 soil samples collected from natural and cultivated areas in Spain were studied using an integrated approach based on univariate and multivariate analyses. Entomopathogenic fungi were isolated from 175 of the 244 (71.7%) soil samples, with only two species found, Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae. Of the 244 soil samples, 104 yielded B. bassiana (42.6%), 18 yielded M. anisopliae (7.3%), and 53 soil samples (21.7%) harboured both fungi. Log-linear models indicated no significant effect of habitat on the occurrence of B. bassiana, but a strong association between M. anisopliae and soils from cultivated habitats, particularly field crops. Also, irrespective of habitat type, B. bassiana predominated over M. anisopliae in soils with a higher clay content, higher pH, and lower organic matter content. Logistic regression analyses showed that pH and clay content were predictive variables for the occurrence of B. bassiana, whereas organic matter content was the predictive variable for M. anisopliae. Also, latitude and longitude predicted the occurrence of these same species, but in opposite directions. Altitude was found to be predictive for the occurrence of B. bassiana. Using principal component analysis, four factors (1 to 4) accounted for 86% of the total variance; 32.8, 22.9, 19.6 and 10.4% of the cumulative variance explained, respectively. Factor 1 was associated with high positive weights for soil clay and silt content and high negative weights for soil sand content. Factor 2 was associated with high positive weights for soil organic matter content and high negative weights for soil pH. Factor 3 was associated with high positive weights for latitude and longitude of the sampled localities and factor 4, had high positive weights only for the altitude. Bi-plot displays representing soil samples were developed for different factor combinations and indicated that, irrespective

  6. Microbiological attributes of the soil under cultivation of sugar cane with and without burning straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pereira Paredes Junior

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of sugar cane cultivation with and without burning of residues on microbial biomass, soil basal respiration and their derived indices. The study was carried out from 2009 to 2010, at the sugar mills, Itahum district, the city of Dourados, MS, on a Hapludox soil. An adjacent area of native vegetation was included in the study as a reference the original condition of the soil. Soil samples were collected at three depths: 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 cm, with five composite samples, from five subsamples collected at intervals of ten feet between each other, along a transect. Considering the different cropping systems, the results demonstrated the system without burning (mechanized harvesting of the sugar cane residues, favored microbial biomass and basal respiration and soil chemical properties, compared with the system with burning, especially in the upper layers of soil.

  7. Soil erosion from shifting cultivation and other smallholder land use in Sarawak, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Andreas de; Magid, Jakob; Mertz, Ole

    2008-01-01

    caused by leaching and losses via ashes after clearing and burning. The position on slope had no significant effect on soil texture, carbon or P content, indicating very limited physical movement of soil downslope. A soil carbon inventory to 90 cm depth on the three land uses only showed a higher carbon...... land use of native forest, secondary re-growth, upland rice fields and pepper gardens. Soil samples were collected to 90 cm depth from all three land use types, and analysed for various chemical parameters, including texture, total organic matter and 137Cs content. 137Cs is a radioactive isotope...... comparing to 30 cm depth, soil loss was 30% from both upland rice and pepper fields. Low 137Cs activity in deeper soil layers rendered a total profile inventory impossible. It is concluded that shifting cultivation of upland rice in the current system is not leading to degradation of soil chemical...

  8. Effects of Soil and Substrate Cultivation on Lettuce Rhizosphere Bacterial Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Yun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizosphere bacterial community can promote the nutrition absorption of plant root, which result in the upgrade of plant quality. Cultivation system has effect on rhizosphere bacterial community. Four treatments were set to investigate the effects of two different cultivation systems, soil and substrate systems, for two varieties of lettuce, Shengxuan NO.5 and cv. Lollo Rossca.(two cultivation systems × two varieties. Each treatment had three pots as samples with 10 lettuce plants for each pot. After 30 days of transplanting, five plants of each pot were randomly selected, and rhizosphere soil or substrate was sampled. Real-time PCR and PCR-DGGE were implied to analyze the characteristics of rhizosphere bacterial community in each treatment. Real-Time PCR detection showed that the number of the population of rhizosphere bacteria in substrate system was significantly higher than that of soil system(P<0.05. PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that the diversity of substrate system was significantly higher than that of soil system. As for Shenxuan NO.5, the Shannon-Wiener index(H, Simpson index(Dand Pielou evenness index(Eof substrate system were significantly higher than that of soil system(P<0.05, and for cv.Lollo Rossca, index H of substrate system were significantly higher than that of soil system(P<0.05. RDA revealed that soil and substrate systems had different bacterial communities, and pH and nitrate nitrogen were two main factors that determining the community structure. In addition, water content, C/N, and available phosphorus were positively correlated with the development of bacterial community. Overall, soil and substrate cultivation systems had different rhizosphere bacterial community, and the quantity and diversity were higher in substrate system due to the physiochemical difference.

  9. Microbial Biomass Carbon and Total Organic Carbon of Soils as Affected by Rubber Cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; ZHANG Gan-Lin

    2003-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from different rubber fields in twenty-five plots selected randomly in the Experimental Farm of the Chinese Academy of Tropical Agriculture Sciences located in Hainan, China, to analyse the ecological effect of rubber cultivation. The results showed that in the tropical rubber farm,soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and total organic C (TOC) were relatively low in the content but highly correlated with each other. After rubber tapping, soil MBC of mature rubber fields decreased significantly,by 55.5%, compared with immature rubber fields. Soil TOC also decreased but the difference was not significant. Ratios of MBC to TOC decreased significantly. The decreasing trend of MBC stopped at about ten years of rubber cultivation. After this period, soil MBC increased relatively while soil TOC still kept in decreasing. Soil MBC changes could be measured to predict the tendency of soil organic matter changes due to management practices in a tropical rubber farm several years before the changes in soil TOC become detectable.

  10. A study on the impact of phosphate fertilizers on the radioactivity profile of cultivated soils in Srirangam (Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shahul Hameed

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate fertilizers are enriched with 238U during its production from phosphate rocks. Since, application of phosphate fertilizers in modern agriculture is ever on the increase, the present study investigated the impact of phosphate fertilizers on the radioactivity profile of cultivated (fertilized soils as against virgin soils. Thirty soil samples each from cultivated fields and virgin fields were collected from Srirangam taluk and analyzed for the activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K employing gamma ray spectrometry. Similar analysis was also undertaken in commonly used phosphate fertilizers. Among the phosphate fertilizers analyzed single super phosphate (396.3 Bq/kg and triple super phosphate (284.2 Bq/kg registered higher level of 238U. The mean activity level of 238U in cultivated soil (8.4 Bq/kg was 25% higher than that of virgin soil (6.8 Bq/kg, while the mean 232Th and 40K activities in cultivated soil (98.4 Bq/kg & 436 Bq/kg were elevated by 12.4% and 4% respectively as compared to virgin soil (87.5 Bq/kg & 419 Bq/kg. The mean radium equivalent (Raeq value for virgin and cultivated soil samples was found to be 164.5 Bq/kg and 181.7 Bq/kg respectively. It is evident that the application of phosphate fertilizers elevated 238U level of the soil. However, the mean Raeq value for soil samples is well below the permissible limit of 370 Bq/kg and hence cultivated soils do not pose any radiological risk.

  11. Some heterotrophic flagellates from a cultivated garden soil in Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Flemming; Patterson, DJ

    1997-01-01

    The flagellates of an Australian garden soil were studied by placing coverslips on wet soil and subsequently examining the coverslips by light microscopy. A number of genera and species were found which have not previously been reported from soil samples. Besides the three new species, Apusomonas...

  12. WATER INFILTRATION IN TWO CULTIVATED SOILS IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildegardis Bertol

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Infiltration is the passage of water through the soil surface, influenced by the soil type and cultivation and by the soil roughness, surface cover and water content. Infiltration absorbs most of the rainwater and is therefore crucial for planning mechanical conservation practices to manage runoff. This study determined water infiltration in two soil types under different types of management and cultivation, with simulated rainfall of varying intensity and duration applied at different times, and to adjust the empirical model of Horton to the infiltration data. The study was conducted in southern Brazil, on Dystric Nitisol (Nitossolo Bruno aluminoférrico húmico and Humic Cambisol (Cambissolo Húmico alumínico léptico soils to assess the following situations: simulated rains on the Nitisol from 2001 to 2012 in 31 treatments, differing in crop type, sowing direction, type of soil opener on the seeder, amount and type of crop residue and amount of liquid swine manure applied; on the Cambisol, rains were simlated from 2006 to 2012 and 18 treatments were evaluated, differing in crop, seeding direction and crop residue type. The constant of the water infiltration rate into the soil varies significantly with the soil type (30.2 mm h-1 in the Nitisol and 6.6 mm h-1 in the Cambisol, regardless of the management system, application time and rain intensity and duration. At the end of rainfalls, soil-water infiltration varies significantly with the management system, with the timing of application and rain intensity and duration, with values ranging from 13 to 59 mm h-1, in the two studied soils. The characteristics of the sowing operation in terms of relief, crop type and amount and type of crop residue influenced soil water infiltration: in the Nitisol, the values of contour and downhill seeding vary between 27 and 43 mm h-1, respectively, with crop residues of corn, wheat and soybean while in the Cambisol, the variation is between 2 and 36 mm h-1

  13. II. SOILS FROM CULTIVATED STANDS OF SHOREA JAVANICA

    OpenAIRE

    M.J. SHEEHY SKHFFINGTON

    1987-01-01

    Soils from Shorea javanica plantations in different parts of Lampung province, South Sumatra were sampled to a depth of 50 cm and described. They varied from quite deep loamy alkaline soils near Krui, to sticky acid clays behind Ngaras. The cation content of most samples was quite high, but organic nutrients were low, suggesting volcanic origin of the soils. Preliminary observations of performance in situ of 5. javanica would suggest a requirement for deep loamy, fairly al...

  14. Biochar from commercially cultivated seaweed for soil amelioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David A.; Paul, Nicholas A.; Dworjanyn, Symon A.; Bird, Michael I.; de Nys, Rocky

    2015-01-01

    Seaweed cultivation is a high growth industry that is primarily targeted at human food and hydrocolloid markets. However, seaweed biomass also offers a feedstock for the production of nutrient-rich biochar for soil amelioration. We provide the first data of biochar yield and characteristics from intensively cultivated seaweeds (Saccharina, Undaria and Sargassum – brown seaweeds, and Gracilaria, Kappaphycus and Eucheuma – red seaweeds). While there is some variability in biochar properties as a function of the origin of seaweed, there are several defining and consistent characteristics of seaweed biochar, in particular a relatively low C content and surface area but high yield, essential trace elements (N, P and K) and exchangeable cations (particularly K). The pH of seaweed biochar ranges from neutral (7) to alkaline (11), allowing for broad-spectrum applications in diverse soil types. We find that seaweed biochar is a unique material for soil amelioration that is consistently different to biochar derived from ligno-cellulosic feedstock. Blending of seaweed and ligno-cellulosic biochar could provide a soil ameliorant that combines a high fixed C content with a mineral-rich substrate to enhance crop productivity. PMID:25856799

  15. Soil Copper and Zinc Accumulation and Bioavailability under a Long Term Vineyard Cultivation in South Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Corea

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil metal contamination, particularly by copper, is a phenomenon which often occurs in the surface layer of vineyard soils, due to the widespread application of Cu-based products in the plant disease management. Our study was focused on soil Cu and Zn accumulation and bioavailability as related to some soil properties under a long term vineyard cultivation, in a D.O.C. wine area of South Italy (Calabria region. Soils selected from different landscape units, ranging from acid to alkaline, under homogeneous climate conditions and vineyard management system, were investigated. Each soil was sampled in both a vineyard and a fallow area, at the depth levels of 0-10 cm, 10-25 cm and 25-50 cm. The experimental data were analysed by ANOVA, correlation and multiple stepwise regression procedures. As expected, the results indicated a contamination of the vineyard soils by Cu due to the repeated application of Cu-based products in the plant disease control, with increments of total Cu content up to 150% against the fallow soils. On the contrary, the results led to exclude any soil Zn pollution due to the vineyard management and to suppose a main pedogenic origin for this metal. According to the relationships between Cu content and soil properties, Cu accumulation was promoted by higher pH, clay and organic matter contents. These soil properties also showed a strong influence on metal bioavailability, which underwent a significant reduction in soils with higher pH and clay contents. A further result of great significance was the adverse impact of soil erosion, enhanced by the application of not suitable management systems in hilly areas, on soil capability to retain polluting metals. Soil pH, organic matter content and texture, as well as soil management system, are key factors in soil capability to limit polluting metal dispersion in the environment.

  16. Soil Copper and Zinc Accumulation and Bioavailability under a Long Term Vineyard Cultivation in South Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Corea

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil metal contamination, particularly by copper, is a phenomenon which often occurs in the surface layer of vineyard soils, due to the widespread application of Cu-based products in the plant disease management. Our study was focused on soil Cu and Zn accumulation and bioavailability as related to some soil properties under a long term vineyard cultivation, in a D.O.C. wine area of South Italy (Calabria region. Soils selected from different landscape units, ranging from acid to alkaline, under homogeneous climate conditions and vineyard management system, were investigated. Each soil was sampled in both a vineyard and a fallow area, at the depth levels of 0-10 cm, 10-25 cm and 25-50 cm. The experimental data were analysed by ANOVA, correlation and multiple stepwise regression procedures. As expected, the results indicated a contamination of the vineyard soils by Cu due to the repeated application of Cu-based products in the plant disease control, with increments of total Cu content up to 150% against the fallow soils. On the contrary, the results led to exclude any soil Zn pollution due to the vineyard management and to suppose a main pedogenic origin for this metal. According to the relationships between Cu content and soil properties, Cu accumulation was promoted by higher pH, clay and organic matter contents. These soil properties also showed a strong influence on metal bioavailability, which underwent a significant reduction in soils with higher pH and clay contents. A further result of great significance was the adverse impact of soil erosion, enhanced by the application of not suitable management systems in hilly areas, on soil capability to retain polluting metals. Soil pH, organic matter content and texture, as well as soil management system, are key factors in soil capability to limit polluting metal dispersion in the environment.

  17. Weed infestation of onion in soil reduced cultivation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Błażej-Woźniak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiment was conducted in the years 1998-2000 in GD Felin. The influence of no-tillage cultivation and conventional tillage with spring ploughing on weed infestation of onion was compared. In experiment four cover crop mulches (Sinapis alba L., Vicia sativa L., Phacelia tanacetifolia B., Avena sativa L. were applied. From annual weeds in weed infestation of onion in great number Matricaria chamomilla L., and Senecio vulgaris L. stepped out. and from perennial - Agropyron repens (L.P.B. Reduced soil cultivation system (no-tillage caused the significant growth of primary weed infestation of onion in comparison with conventional tillage. In all years of investigations the executed pre-sowing ploughing limited significantly the annual weeds' number in primary weed infestation. The applied mulches from cover plants limited in considerable degree the number of primary weed infestation. In all years of investigations the most weeds stepped out on control object. Among investigated cover crop mulches Vicia sativa L. and Avena sativa L. had a profitable effect on decrease of onion`s primary weed infestation. Soil cultivation system and cover crop mulches had no signi ficant residual influence on the secondary weed infestation of onion.

  18. Curiosity analyzes Martian soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy; Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has conducted its first analysis of Martian soil samples using multiple instruments, the agency announced at a 3 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. "These results are an unprecedented look at the chemical diversity in the area," said NASA's Michael Meyer, program scientist for Curiosity.

  19. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  20. Some heterotrophic flagellates from a cultivated garden soil in Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Flemming; Patterson, DJ

    1997-01-01

    The flagellates of an Australian garden soil were studied by placing coverslips on wet soil and subsequently examining the coverslips by light microscopy. A number of genera and species were found which have not previously been reported from soil samples. Besides the three new species, Apusomonas......: Petalomonas pusilla, Bicosoeca epiphytica, Bicosoeca mignotii, and Ancyromonas sigmoides. In addition, we extracted a number of forms which have been found in soil but which are usually not considered as members of the soil flagellate community. They are: Codosiga botrytis, Salpingoeca amphoridium......, and Goniomonas truncata. Only a minority of the taxa recorded are thought of as common and widespread in soils, they include: Apusomonas proboscidea, and species of Cercomonas and Spumella. At least part of the difference between communities of flagellates from freshwaters and those of soils are due to different...

  1. EFFECT OF REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CONTAMINATION ON BACTERIAL POPULATION AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CULTIVATED AGRICULTURAL SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Sogo Olalemi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the effect of refined petroleum products contamination on bacterial population and physicochemical characteristics of cultivated agricultural soil was carried out. The soil samples obtained from the Teaching and Research Farm, Obakekere, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State were contaminated with varying volumes of petrol, diesel and kerosene. The results revealed higher bacterial populations in uncontaminated soils than contaminated soils. The counts of bacteria ranged from 3.0 × 105 to 5.0 × 105 cfu/g in uncontaminated soils and 1.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 105 cfu/g in contaminated soils. The isolated bacteria were identified as Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, Corynebacterium variabilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens. The contamination had no significant effect on pH, potassium, sodium, organic carbon and nitrogen content of the soils, while the moisture, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the contaminated soils were significantly different (P < 0.05 compared with the uncontaminated soils. The ability of Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens to utilize the refined petroleum products suggest that these bacteria had potential to bioremediate petroleum contaminated soils.

  2. 29 CFR 780.110 - Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations included in âcultivation and tillage of the soil... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Cultivation and Tillage of the Soil § 780.110 Operations included in “cultivation and tillage of the soil.” “Cultivation and tillage of the soil”...

  3. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  4. The structure of fungal biomass and diversity of cultivated micromycetes in Antarctic soils (progress and Russkaya Stations)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfenina, O. E.; Nikitin, D. A.; Ivanova, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    The distribution of the fungal biomass and diversity of cultivated microscopic fungi in the profiles of some soils from East (Progress Station, valleys of the Larsemann Hills oasis) and West (Russkaya Station, the Marie Byrd Land) Antarctica regions were studied. The structure of the biomass (spore/mycelium and live cells/dead cells) was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy with staining using a set of coloring agents: calcofluor white, ethidium bromide, and fluorescein diacetate. The species composition of the cultivated microscopic fungi was determined on Czapek's medium. The fungal biomass in the soils studied is not high (on the average, 0.3 mg/g of soil); the greatest biomass (0.6 mg/g) was found in the soil samples with plant residues. The fungal biomass is mainly (to 70%) represented by small (to 2.5 μm) spores. About half of the fungal biomass is composed of living cells. There are differences in the distribution of the fungal biomass within the profiles of different primitive soils. In the soil samples taken under mosses and lichens, the maximal biomass was registered in the top soil horizons. In the soils with the peat horizon under stone pavements, the greatest fungal biomass was registered in the subsurface horizons. Thirty-eight species of cultivated microscopic fungi were isolated from the soils studied. Species of the genus Penicillium and Phoma herbarum predominated.

  5. [Effects of stereoscopic cultivation on soil microorganism, enzyme activity and the agronomic characters of Panax notoginseng].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-ran; Cui, Xiu-ming; Lan, Lei; Chen, Wei-dong; Wang, Cheng-xiao; Yang, Xiao-yan; Liu, Da-hui; Yang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Compartments of soil microorganism and enzymes between stereoscopic cultivation (three storeys) and field cultivation (CK) of Panax notoginseng were carried out, and the effects on P. notoginseng agronomic characters were also studied. Results show that concentration of soil microorganism of stereoscopic cultivation was lower than field cultivation; the activity of soil urea enzyme, saccharase and neutral phosphatase increased from lower storey to upper storey; the activity of soil urea enzyme and saccharase of lower and upper storeys were significantly lower than CK; agronomic characters of stereoscopic cultivated P. notoginsengin were inferior to field cultivation, the middle storey with the best agronomic characters among the three storeys. The correlation analysis showed that fungi, actinomycetes and neutral phosphatase were significantly correlated with P. notoginseng agronomic characters; concentration of soil fungi and bacteria were significantly correlated with the soil relative water content; actinomycete and neutral phosphatase were significantly correlated with soil pH and relative water content, respectively; the activities of soil urea enzyme and saccharase were significantly correlated with the soil daily maximum temperature difference. Inconclusion, The current research shows that the imbalance of soil microorganism and the acutely changing of soil enzyme activity were the main reasons that caused the agronomic characters of stereoscopic cultivated P. notoginseng were worse than field cultivation. Thus improves the concentration of soil microorganism and enzyme activity near to field soil by improving the structure of stereoscopic cultivation is very important. And it was the direction which we are endeavoring that built better soil ecological environment for P. notoginseng of stereoscopic cultivation.

  6. Change in peat coverage in Danish cultivated soils during the past 35 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2014-01-01

    samples were used. These databases contain partly categorical information on parent material (organic [peat, gytje] and mineral [sand, silt and clay]) and partly continuous data (soil organic carbon, in %) reclassified into organic and mineral soils (using 12% soil organic carbon as a cutoff value.......35. Results revealed there has been a total areal coverage loss of 35%(37,786 ha) of the Danish organic cultivated wetlands during a period of 35 years (map 1975 had 107,962-ha coverage of peat). The peat depletion is related to peat mining and agricultural drainage/tillage activities, rather than natural......Mapping the spatial and temporal changes of peatland in farming systems is crucial to the study of soil quality and productivity and the modeling of the global carbon cycle (in relation to climate change). This study compiles a contemporary map (2010) of peatland coverage (according to Kyoto...

  7. Parental material and cultivation determine soil bacterial community structure and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Gao, Jusheng; Huang, Ting; Kendall, Joshua R A; Shen, Qirong; Zhang, Ruifu

    2015-01-01

    Microbes are the key components of the soil environment, playing important roles during soil development. Soil parent material provides the foundation elements that comprise the basic nutritional environment for the development of microbial community. After 30 years artificial maturation of cultivation, the soil developments of three different parental materials were evaluated and bacterial community compositions were investigated using the high-throughput sequencing approach. Thirty years of cultivation increased the soil fertility and soil microbial biomass, richness and diversity, greatly changed the soil bacterial communities, the proportion of phylum Actinobacteria decreased significantly, while the relative abundances of the phyla Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Armatimonadetes and Nitrospira were significantly increased. Soil bacterial communities of parental materials were separated with the cultivated ones, and comparisons of different soil types, granite soil and quaternary red clay soil were similar and different with purple sandy shale soil in both parental materials and cultivated treatments. Bacterial community variations in the three soil types were affected by different factors, and their alteration patterns in the soil development also varied with soil type. Soil properties (except total potassium) had a significant effect on the soil bacterial communities in all three soil types and a close relationship with abundant bacterial phyla. The amounts of nitrogen-fixing bacteria as well as the abundances of the nifH gene in all cultivated soils were higher than those in the parental materials; Burkholderia and Rhizobacte were enriched significantly with long-term cultivation. The results suggested that crop system would not deplete the nutrients of soil parental materials in early stage of soil maturation, instead it increased soil fertility and changed bacterial community, specially enriched the nitrogen-fixing bacteria to accumulate

  8. Carbon dioxide emissions from peat soils under potato cultivation in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jenny; Langan, Charlie; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Organic wetland soils in south western Uganda are found in valley bottom wetlands, surrounded by steep, mineral soil hill slopes. Land use change in these papyrus dominated wetlands has taken place over the past forty years, seeing wetland areas cleared of papyrus, rudimentary drainage channel systems dug, and soil cultivated and planted with crops, predominantly potatoes. There has been little research into the cultivation of organic wetlands soils in Uganda, or the impacts on soil carbon dynamics and associated carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This study used two rounds of farmer interviews to capture the land management practices on these soils and how they vary over the period of a year. Three potato fields were also randomly selected and sampled for CO2 emissions at four points in time during the year; 1) just after the potato beds had been dug, 2) during the potato growing period, 3) after the potato harvest, and 4) at the end of the fallow season. Carbon dioxide emissions, soil and air temperatures, water table depth, vegetation cover and land use were all recorded in situ in each field on each sampling occasion, from both the raised potato beds and the trenches in between them. There appeared to be a delay in the disturbance effect of digging the peat, with heterotrophic CO2 emissions from the raised beds not immediately increasing after being exposed to the air. Excluding these results, there was a significant linear relationship between mean emissions and water table depth from the raised beds and trenches in each field over time (pfundamental data gaps which need to be addressed with future studies.

  9. Characteristics of Channeling Flow in Cultivated Horizon of Saline Rice Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jinming; DENG Wei; ZHANG Xiaoping; YANG Fan; LI Xiujun

    2006-01-01

    By applying bromide ion as tracer, the channeling flow has been quantitatively described in saline rice soil and alkaline soil of Da'an City, Jilin Province of China. Breakthrough curves of bromide ion in the saline rice soils after 1-year cultivation and 5-year cultivation and alkaline soil have been attained. Results show that the rice cultivation practice can improve the alkaline soil structure, however, it can accelerate the development of channeling flow pathway.Therefore, the channeling flow pathway has been developed widely in saline rice soil, but rarely in the alkaline soil.Three models of convection-dispersion equation (CDE), transfer functional model (TFM) and Back-Progation Network (BP Network) were used to simulate the transportation process of bromide ion. The peaks of probability density function of saline rice soil are higher with left skewed feature compared with that of the alkaline soil. It shows that the TFM and CDE can simulate the transportation process of the bromide ion in saline rice soil after 5-year cultivation, however, some deviation exists when it was used to simulate transportation process of bromide ion in saline rice soil after 1-year cultivation and alkaline soil; BP network can effectively simulate transportation process of bromide ion in both saline rice soil and alkaline soil.

  10. Microbial activity in soil cultivated with different summer legumes in coffee crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted for ten years in a sandy soil in the north part of the Paraná State, Brazil. The soil samples were collected at 0-10 cm depth, both under the coffee canopy and in the inter row space between the coffee plants, in the following treatments: Control, Leucaena leucocephala, Crotalaria spectabilis, Crotalaria breviflora, Mucuna pruriens, Mucuna deeringiana, Arachis hypogaea and Vigna unguiculata. The legume crops influenced the microbial activity, both under the coffee canopy and in the inter row space. The cultivation of Leucaena leucocephala increased the microbial biomass C, N and P. Although L. leucocephala and Arachis hypogaea provided higher microbial biomass, the qCO2 decreased by up to 50% under the coffee canopy and by about 25% in the inter row space. The soil microbial biomass was enriched in N and P due to green manure residue addition.

  11. Effect of shifting cultivation on soil physical and chemical properties in Bandarban hill district, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khandakar Showkat Osman; M. Jashimuddin; S. M. Sirajul Haque; Sohag Miah

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the effects of shifting cultivation at slashing stage on soil physicochemical properties at Bandarban Sadar Upazila in Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. At this initial stage of shifting cultivation no general trend was found for moisture content, maximum water holding capacity, field capacity, dry and moist bulk density, parti-cle density for some chemical properties between shifting cultivated land and forest having similar soil texture. Organic matter was significantly (p≤0.05) lower in 1-year and 3-year shifting cultivated lands and higher in 2-year shifting cultivation than in adjacent natural forest. Significant differences were also found for total N, exchangeable Ca, Mg and K and in CEC as well as for available P. Slashed area showed higher soil pH. Deterioration in land quality starts from burning of slashing materials and continues through subsequent stages of shifting cultivation.

  12. Microbial activity promoted with organic carbon accumulation in macroaggregates of paddy soils under long-term rice cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yalong; Wang, Ping; Ding, Yuanjun; Lu, Haifei; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Filley, Timothy; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Pan, Genxing

    2016-12-01

    While soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation and stabilization has been increasingly the focus of ecosystem properties, how it could be linked to soil biological activity enhancement has been poorly assessed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected from a series of rice soils shifted from salt marshes for 0, 50, 100, 300 and 700 years from a coastal area of eastern China. Soil aggregates were fractioned into different sizes of coarse sand (200-2000 µm), fine sand (20-200 µm), silt (2-20 µm) and clay (communities, soil respiration and enzyme activity. The results showed that the mass proportion both of coarse-sand (2000-200 µm) and clay (management. The finding here provides a mechanistic understanding of soil organic carbon turnover and microbial community succession at fine scale of soil aggregates that have evolved along with anthropogenic activity of rice cultivation in the field.

  13. Soil heavy metal dynamics and risk assessment under long-term land use and cultivation conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuelei; Xu, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    Long-term agricultural development and cultivation conversions affect soil heavy metal balance and the regional environmental safety. In this study, heavy metal parameters were used to identify changes in soil properties in response to land use and cultivation conversions. The integrated soil quality index, which involves seven heavy metal indices, was proposed to assess the environmental risk of long-term human activities in Northeast China. We used the remote sensing and geographical data for the four-term land use distribution from 1979 to 2009 to identify the spatial patterns of regional land use conversions. Then, 41 samples from the top 20 cm of the soil at sites corresponding to these seven types of conversions were collected (permanent dry land, dry land converted from wetland, dry land converted from forest, permanent wetland, permanent forest, paddy land converted from dry land, and paddy land converted from wetland). Based on the local soil properties and tillage practices, the following seven heavy metal parameters were employed: Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni), Lead (Pb), and Zinc (Zn). The conversion of farmland from wetland resulted in an increase in the concentration of Pb and Cr in the soil. In contrast, the concentrations of Zn, Cu, Ni, and Cd decreased when wetland was converted into farmland because the tillage practices washed these heavy metals away. During the conversion of dry land and paddy land to wetland, the levels of Pb increased by approximately 28.6% and 24.7%, respectively. Under the same conditions, the concentration of As increased by 32.5% and 14.1%, respectively. The integrated index also demonstrated that the farmlands were not contaminated by the heavy metals during long-term agricultural development.

  14. Biochemical changes in black oat (avena strigosa schreb) cultivated in vineyard soils contaminated with copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Eduardo; Ceretta, Carlos A; Rossato, Liana V; Farias, Julia G; Brunetto, Gustavo; Miotto, Alcione; Tiecher, Tadeu L; de Conti, Lessandro; Lourenzi, Cledimar R; Schmatz, Roberta; Giachini, Admir; Nicoloso, Fernando T

    2016-06-01

    Soils used for the cultivation of grapes generally have a long history of copper (Cu) based fungicide applications. As a result, these soils can accumulate Cu at levels that are capable of causing toxicity in plants that co-inhabit the vineyards. The aim of the present study was to evaluate growth parameters and oxidative stress in black oat plants grown in vineyard soils contaminated with high levels of Cu. Soil samples were collected from the Serra Gaúcha and Campanha Gaúcha regions, which are the main wine producing regions in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in southern Brazil. Experiments were conducted in a greenhouse in 2009, with soils containing Cu concentrations from 2.2 to 328.7 mg kg(-1). Evaluated parameters included plant root and shoot dry matter, Cu concentration in the plant's tissues, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress in the shoots of plants harvested 15 and 40 days after emergence. The Cu absorbed by plants predominantly accumulated in the roots, with little to no translocation to the shoots. Even so, oat plants showed symptoms of toxicity when grown in soils containing high Cu concentrations. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems of oat plants were unable to reverse the imposed oxidative stress conditions.

  15. Short term recovery of soil biological functions in a new vineyard cultivated in organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Edoardo; Agnelli, Alessandro; Fabiani, Arturo; Gagnarli, Elena; Mocali, Stefano; Priori, Simone; Simoni, Sauro; Valboa, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Deep earthwork activities carried out before vineyard plantation completely upset soil profile and characteristics. The resulting soil features are often much more similar to the underlying substratum than original soil profile. The time needed to recover soil functions is ecologically relevant and affects vine phenology and grape yield, particularly in organic viticulture. The general aim of this research work was to investigate the time needed to recover soil functions after the earthworks made before vine plantation. This study compared for a four years period physical and chemical properties, microbial and mesofauna communities, in new and old vineyards, cultivated on the same soil type. The experiment was conducted in a farm of the Chianti Classico district (Central Italy), on hills of high altitude (400-500 m a.s.l.) on clayey-calcareous flysches, with stony and calcareous soils (Haplic Cambisol (Calcaric, Skeletic)). The reference vine cultivar was Sangiovese. The older vineyard was planted in 2000, after slope reshaping by bulldozing and back hoe ploughing down to about 0.8-1.0 m. The new vineyard was planted in 2011 after an equivalent earthwork carried out in the summer of 2009. Both vineyards were organically managed and only compost at the rate of 1,000 kg ha-1 -a was added every year. The new vineyard was periodically cultivated by mechanical tillage, while the older only at alternate rows. Soil samples from the first 15 cm depth were collected in 4 replicates in the younger as well as in the older vineyard during the springtime of 2010-2013; in the older vineyard, two samples were from the periodically cultivated swaths and two under permanent grass cover. Samples were analysed for physical (particle size, field capacity, wilting point), chemical (pH, electrical conductivity, lime, active lime, organic carbon, total nitrogen), microbiological (soil respiration, microbial biomass, DGGE), and mesofauna features (abundance, taxa richness, BSQ index and

  16. Daily dynamics of the number and activity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in fallow and intensely cultivated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emer, N. R.; Semenov, A. M.; Zelenev, V. V.; Zinyakova, N. B.; Kostina, N. V.; Golichenkov, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    The daily dynamics (during 33 days) of the number (colony-forming units (CFU)) of nitrogen-fixing bacteria and of the nitrogen-fixing activity (the acetylene method) were determined in a gray forest soil under a fallow land and under an intensely cultivated field. The daily dynamics of the CFUs determined on the nitrogen-free medium in the samples from both plots had wavelike patterns. The daily values of the actual and potential activities of nitrogen fixation in the samples from the fallow land plot and of the actual activity of nitrogen fixation in the samples from the intensely cultivated soil were low and close to the detection limit. The potential activity of nitrogen fixation in the intensely cultivated soil was significant and also had a wavelike pattern. The harmonic analysis of the daily dynamics of the CFUs and nitrogen fixation showed the statistically significant harmonics of these biological characteristics pointing to the objective and regular character of the wavelike dynamics. The revealed dynamics of the biological characteristics of the soils and the methods of their analysis are important in terms of the comparative study of the biological properties of different soils.

  17. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  18. Fracionamento de metais pesados em solo contaminado antes e após cultivo de arroz Fractionation of heavy metals in polluted soil before and after rice cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ligia de Souza Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to evaluate the distribution of Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn among the different fractions of contaminated soil, before and after rice cultivation. Seven soil samples with different degrees of contamination were studied using a randomized experimental design, with four replicates. Using an ICP-OES we analyzed the contents of heavy metals in fractions of soil, the organic matter therein, the oxides and the residual content before and after rice cultivation. The largest concentrations of Cd, Cu, Mn and Zn in the soil are found in the fractions with stable chemical bonds.

  19. [Chlorine speciation and concentration in cultivated soil in the northeastern China studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lang, Chun-Yan; Ma, Ling-Ling; Xu, Dian-Dou; Zheng, Lei; Lu, Yu-Nanz; Cui Li-Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Meng

    2014-10-01

    A procedure has been proposed to determine chlorine speciation and concentration in soil with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and this method was applied to study the cultivated soil (bog, dark brown and black cultivated soil) in the Northeastern China. Qualitative analysis was carried out by least-squares fitting of sample spectra with standard spectra of three model compounds (NaCl, 3-chloropropionic acid, chlorophenol red). Linear correlation between the absolute fluorescence intensity of a series of NaCl standards and the Cl concentration was used as quantification standard for measuring the total Cl concentration in samples. The detection limits,relative standard deviation (RSD), recoveries were 2 mg · kg(-1), 0%-5% and 77%-133%, respectively. The average concentration of total Cl was 19 mg · kg(-1). The average relative content was as high as 61% of organochlorine with the concentration of 1-2 times as high as the concentration of inorganic chloride. The distribution trend of the total Cl, inorganic chloride and organic chlorine in different types of soil was: bog arable soil > dark brown soil > black soil. In conclusion, XANES is a reliable method to nondestructively characterize the speciation and concentration of chlorine in soil, which would provide some basic data for the future study of the chlorine's biogeochemical transformations.

  20. Soil carbon dioxide emission from intensively cultivated black soil in Northeast China. Nitrogen fertilization effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Kang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture; Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Ding, Weixin; Cai, Zucong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing (China). State Key Lab. of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture; Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Xilin; Zhou, Baoku [Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin (China). Inst. of Soil and Fertilizer

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to understand the effect of nitrogen fertilization on soil respiration and native soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition and to identify the key factor affecting soil respiration in a cultivated black soil. Materials and methods: A field experiment was conducted at the Harbin State Key Agroecological Experimental Station, China. The study consisted of four treatments: unplanted and N-unfertilized soil (U0), unplanted soil treated with 225 kg N ha{sup -1} (UN), maize planted and N-unfertilized soil (P0), and planted soil fertilized with 225 kg N ha{sup -1} (PN). Soil CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were measured using the static closed chamber method. Results and discussion: Cumulative CO{sub 2} emissions during the maize growing season with the U0, UN, P0, and PN treatments were 1.29, 1.04, 2.30 and 2.27 Mg C ha{sup -1}, respectively, indicating that N fertilization significantly reduced the decomposition of native SOC. However, no marked effect on soil respiration in planted soil was observed because the increase of rhizosphere respiration caused by N addition was counteracted by the reduction of native SOC decomposition. Soil CO{sub 2} fluxes were significantly affected by soil temperature but not by soil moisture. The temperature sensitivity (Q{sub 10}) of soil respiration was 2.16-2.47 for unplanted soil but increased to 3.16-3.44 in planted soil. N addition reduced the Q{sub 10} of native SOC decomposition possibly due to low labile organic C but increased the Q{sub 10} of soil respiration due to the stimulation of maize growth. The estimated annual CO{sub 2} emission in N-fertilized soil was 1.28 Mg C ha{sup -1} and was replenished by the residual stubble, roots, and exudates. In contrast, the lost C (1.53 Mg C ha{sup -1}) in N-unfertilized soil was not completely supplemented by maize residues, resulting in a reduction of SOC. Although N fertilization significantly increased N{sub 2}O emissions, the global warming potential

  1. [Natural ocurrence of entomopathogenic fungi in soils cultivated with Paraguay tea (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.) in Misiones, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapovaloff, María E; Angeli Alves, Luis F; Urrutia, María I; López Lastra, Claudia C

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to morphologically isolate, identify and characterize entomopathogenic fungi present in soils cultivated with Paraguay tea (Ilex paraguariensis). A survey of native entomopathogenic fungi was conducted from 40 soil samples grown with Paraguay tea in the province of Misiones, Argentina, from May 2008 to June 2010. The soil dilution plate methodology on selective culture media was used to isolate microorganisms. Taxonomic identification was performed using macroscopic and microscopic characters and specific keys. Twenty nine strains, belonging to the species Beauveria bassiana (n = 17), Metarhizium anisopliae (n = 2) and Purpureocillium lilacinum (n = 10) were isolated and identified.

  2. Effect of soil carbohydrates on nutrient availability in natural forests and cultivated lands in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, R. R.; Seneviratne, G.; Kulasooriya, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    Carbohydrates supply carbon sources for microbial activities that contribute to mineral nutrient production in soil. Their role on soil nutrient availability has not yet been properly elucidated. This was studied in forests and cultivated lands in Sri Lanka. Soil organic matter (SOM) fractions affecting carbohydrate availability were also determined. Soil litter contributed to sugars of plant origin (SPO) in croplands. The negative relationship found between clay bound organic matter (CBO) and glucose indicates higher SOM fixation in clay that lower its availability in cultivated lands. In forests, negative relationships between litter and sugars of microbial origin (SMO) showed that litter fuelled microbes to produce sugars. Fucose and glucose increased the availability of Cu, Zn and Mn in forests. Xylose increased Ca availability in cultivated lands. Arabinose, the main carbon source of soil respiration reduced the P availability. This study showed soil carbohydrates and their relationships with mineral nutrients could provide vital information on the availability of limiting nutrients in tropical ecosystems.

  3. INFLUENCE OF TRANSPORT POLLUTION ON SOIL AND CULTIVATED VEGETATION OF THE WAYSIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Sławiński

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was identification of the impact of transport pollution on soil and vegetation grown in roadside soil. These pollutants are not only exhaust fumes but also dust generated by the friction of tires on road surface, fluids leaking from leaky installations and trash thrown by drivers while driving. The plant living in this environment is exposed to various stresses and damage. The main reason negatively affecting plant growth and even causing their death, is constantly increasing air pollution, especially in downtown areas and along busy roads. As a result of the use of salt for deicing, we risk contamination of the soil, resulting in poor plant growth and reduction in soil acidity. In many of these areas contamination exceeds the standards of plant resistance, being the basic cause of diseases and mass dying. The object of the study was corn and its habitat of cultivation. For the purposes of analyses soil samples were collected in the field located in the village of Kośmidry, and the following determination were carried out: pH, salinity, organic carbon content and levels of heavy metals. In the cornfield of the maize the presence of bio-and abiotic factors was noted affecting the health status of plants and the level of weed growth.

  4. The impacts of shifting cultivation on tropical forest soil: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Antunes Ribeiro Filho

    Full Text Available The sustainability of shifting cultivation is presently a topic of debate in scientific and institutional communities; however, there is no current consensus. To address this debate, we performed a search of the pertinent literature that was published during the last 30 years on the impact of shifting agriculture on tropical soils. This search revealed that the nature of the impact depends on the shifting cultivation system (SCS phase (conversion, cultivation, or fallow and on the soil properties (physical, chemical, and biological. We also suggest soil quality indicators for evaluating this agricultural practice in tropical forests, which may be used as a basis for analyses on the tendencies of conservation and degradation of impacted soils. Future research should improve the choices of these indicators, relying mostly on practical criteria, so they can be used by shifting cultivators.

  5. Effects of traffic control on the soil physical quality and the cultivation of sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Soares de Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of sugarcane with intensive use of machinery, especially for harvest, induces soil compaction, affecting the crop development. The control of agricultural traffic is an alternative of management in the sector, with a view to preserve the soil physical quality, resulting in increased sugarcane root growth, productivity and technological quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical quality of an Oxisol with and without control traffic and the resulting effects on sugarcane root development, productivity and technological quality. The following managements were tested: no traffic control (NTC, traffic control consisting of an adjustment of the track width of the tractor and sugarcane trailer (TC1 and traffic control consisting of an adjustment of the track width of the tractor and trailer and use of an autopilot (TC2. Soil samples were collected (layers 0.00-0.10; 0.10-0.20 and 0.20-0.30 m in the plant rows, inter-row center and seedbed region, 0.30 m away from the plant row. The productivity was measured with a specific weighing scale. The technological variables of sugarcane were measured in each plot. Soil cores were collected to analyze the root system. In TC2, the soil bulk density and compaction degree were lowest and total porosity and macroporosity highest in the plant row. Soil penetration resistance in the plant row, was less than 2 MPa in TC1 and TC2. Soil aggregation and total organic carbon did not differ between the management systems. The root surface and volume were increased in TC1 and TC2, with higher productivity and sugar yield than under NTC. The sugarcane variables did not differ between the managements. The soil physical quality in the plant row was preserved under management TC1 and TC2, with an improved root development and increases of 18.72 and 20.29 % in productivity and sugar yield, respectively.

  6. Hydrophobicity of soil samples and soil size fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowen, H.A.; Dudas, M.J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources; Roy, J.L. [Imperial Oil Resources Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada); Johnson, R.L. [Alberta Research Council, Vegreville, AB (Canada); McGill, W.B. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources

    2001-07-01

    The inability of dry soil to absorb water droplets within 10 seconds or less is defined as soil hydrophobicity. The severity, persistence and circumstances causing it vary greatly. There is a possibility that hydrophobicity in Alberta is a symptom of crude oil spills. In this study, the authors investigated the severity of soil hydrophobicity, as determined by the molarity of ethanol droplet test (MED) and dichloromethane extractable organic (DEO) concentration. The soil samples were collected from pedons within 12 hydrophobic soil sites, located northeast from Calgary to Cold Lake, Alberta. All the sites were located at an elevation ranging from 450 metres to 990 metres above sea level. The samples contained compounds from the Chernozemic, Gleysolic, Luvisolic, and Solonetzic soil orders. The results obtained indicated that the MED and DEO were positively correlated in whole soil samples. No relationships were found between MED and DEO in soil samples divided in soil fractions. More severe hydrophobicity and lower DEO concentrations were exhibited in clay- and silt-sized particles in the less than 53 micrometres, when compared to the samples in the other fraction (between 53 and 2000 micrometres). It was concluded that hydrophobicity was not restricted to a particular soil particle size class. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Speciation and bioavailability of some heavy metals in agricultural soils used for cultivating various vegetables in Bedugul, Bali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaka, I. Made; Utama, I. Made Supartha; Manuaba, I. B. Putra; Adnyana, I. Made; Sahara, Emmy

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the speciation and bioavailability of some heavy metals in agricultural soils used to cultivate various vegetables in Bedugul, Bali. Vegetables grown on contaminated soils where agrochemicals were applied uncontrolled could contain a number of heavy metals. This could occur in the vegetables produced from agricultural soils of Bedugul as the farmers applied agrochemicals excessively. In considering the metals transport to the vegetables, a speciation and bioavailability methods were necessary to be studied. Wet digestion and sequential extraction techniques were employed to the sample prior to the metals measurement by AAS. The results showed that the average concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cd, Cr, and Zn in the soils were 38.531, 132.126, 7.689, 15.952, and 147.275 mg/kg, respectively. The highest concentrations of Pb and Zn were found in the soil for cultivating lettuce, Cd and Cr in the soil for tomato, and Cu in the soil for potatoes. It was found that the speciation of Pb, Cu, Cd, and Cr were predominantly bound to Fe-Mn oxides fraction, while Zn was mostly associated with the EFLE (easily, freely, leachable, and exchangeable) fractions. The highest bioavailability among the metals in the studied soils was Cr, while the lowest was Cu.

  8. CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT CULTIVATING PATTERNS ON PROPERTIES OF ALBIC SOIL IN SANJIANG PLAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Zhao-hua; LU Xian-guo; ZHOU Jia

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied the cumulative effects of different cultivating patterns on the properties of albic soils in the Sanjiang Plain using correlation analysis. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of the albic soil changed greatly when it was cultivated as farmland. As for physical properties of the soil, bulk density and specific gravity increased gradually, the porosity and field capacity decreased gradually year by year, but they increased after being abandoned. As for chemical properties, pH increased, organic matter and other nutrients decreased with increasing of the cultivating years. For the albic soil cultivated with forage, the cumulative effects were apparently strengthened with the increase of cultivating years, especially for the bulk density, total porosity, capillary porosity and capillary moisture capacity. Moreover, fertilization also had great effects on the albic soil. Applying magnetism fertilizer improved the physical properties such as bulk density, soil moisture and porosity, raised the utilization rate of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer. Compared with nutrient fertilizer, utilization of the magnetism fertilizer made production increase by 5.9%-13.9%. At the same time, using organic material and loosing the albic layer could improve not only the physical, chemical and biological properties of the cultivating layer, but also the ill properties of the albic layer, thus making organic carbon and heavy fraction carbon contents increase, and biological activity increase obviously.

  9. Sampling for validation of digital soil maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.; Kempen, B.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.

    2011-01-01

    The increase in digital soil mapping around the world means that appropriate and efficient sampling strategies are needed for validation. Data used for calibrating a digital soil mapping model typically are non-random samples. In such a case we recommend collection of additional independent data and

  10. Sampling depth confounds soil acidification outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the northern Great Plains (NGP) of North America, surface sampling depths of 0-15 or 0-20 cm are suggested for testing soil characteristics such as pH. However, acidification is often most pronounced near the soil surface. Thus, sampling deeper can potentially dilute (increase) pH measurements an...

  11. Specificity of Cs-137 redistribution in toposequence of arable soils cultivated after the Chernobyl accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey; Baranchukov, Vladimir; Berezkin, Victor; Moiseenko, Fedor; Kirov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Investigations performed after the Chernobyl accident showed high spatial variation of radionuclide contamination of the soil cover in elementary landscape geochemical systems (ELGS) that characterize catena's structure. Our studies of Cs-137 distribution along and cross the slopes of local ridges in natural forested key site revealed a cyclic character of variation of the radionuclide surface activity along the studied transections (Korobova et al, 2008; Korobova, Romanov, 2009; 2011). We hypothesized that the observed pattern reflects a specific secondary migration of Cs-137 with water, and that this process could have taken place in any ELGS. To test this hypothesis a detailed field measurement of Cs-137 surface activity was performed in ELGS in agricultural area cultivated after the Chernobyl accident but later withdrawn from land-use. In situ measurements carried out by field gamma-spectrometry were accompanied by soil core sampling at the selected points. Soil samples were taken in increments of 2 cm down to 20 cm and of 5 cm down to 40 cm. The samples were analyzed for Cs-137 in laboratory using Canberra gamma-spectrometer with HP-Ge detector. Obtained results confirmed the fact of area cultivation down to 20 cm that was clearly traced by Cs-137 profile in soil columns. At the same time, the measurements also showed a cyclic character of Cs-137 variation in a sequence of ELGS from watershed to the local depression similar to that found in woodland key site. This proved that the observed pattern is a natural process typical for matter migration in ELGS independently of the vegetation type and ploughing. Therefore, spatial aspect is believed to be an important issue for development of adequate technique for a forecast of contamination of agricultural production and remediation of the soil cover on the local scale within the contaminated areas. References Korobova, E.M., Romanov, S.L., 2009. A Chernobyl 137Cs contamination study as an example for the spatial

  12. Diversity surveys of soil bacterial community by cultivation-based methods and molecular fingerprinting techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Hai-feng; QI Hong-yan; ZHANG Hong-xun

    2004-01-01

    By combining the cultivation methods with molecular fingerprinting techniques, the diversity surveys of soil bacterial community in 13 areas of China were carried out. The cultivable heterotrophic diversity was investigated by colony morphology on solid LB medium. Genetic diversity was measured as bands on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE) by the extraction and purification of the total soil DNA, and amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA fragments by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR). The Shannon-Wiener indices of diversity (H), richness (S)and evenness( EH ) were employed to estimate the diversity of soil bacterial community. The results showed that there was an obvious diversification existed in soil from the different areas. However, the genetic diversity estimated by PCR-DGGE can provide more comprehensive information on bacterial community than the cultivation-based methods. Therefore, it is suggested to combine the traditional methods with genetic fingerprinting techniques to survey and estimate soil bacterial diversity.

  13. Short-term d13C changes in cultivated soils from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounejeva, E.; Etchevers, J.; Morales Puente, P.; Cienfuegos Alvarado, E.; Sedov, S.; Solleiro, E.; Hidalgo, C.

    2007-05-01

    The soils of the Mexican Volcanic Belt are part of ecosystems subjected to strong human impact during the last six centuries. One measurable characteristic of the soil is the stable carbon isotopic relation of the soil organic matter (SOM) or d13C. The d13C SOM parameter is a genetic characteristic of soil reflecting the relative proportion of C3 and C4 that comes from colonizing plants having different photosynthetic C pathway and is used as a high-spatial resolution tool to infer paleoenvironmental changes.The d13C mean signatures of C3 and C4 plants are -27 and -13 %o, respectively. This work focuses on short-term changes in d13C on soils subjected to controlled agricultural practices during 2002-2005 in two sites of Mexico with similar annual precipitation and temperature. The tepetate was broken up 20y ago and ameliorated with fertilizers and organic matter. In both sites three experimental treatments consisting of traditional soil management and two variations of this one were evaluated. Traditional treatment implies low fertilizer and any chemical input, sowing annual crops during the rainy season and, in general, using low energy input. The crops planted were: legumes C3, oat C3, and a mixture of maizeC4 and beanC3, and wheatC3. The Improved and Organic treatments, had higher input of N and P as chemical fertilizers, and of organic manure (manure or compost), respectively. Soil samples were collected from the plow layer in Tlaxcala and in Michoacán, before C4 maize was planted. An Andisol from a pine-oak (C3 species) forest close to the Atecuaro site was also sampled up to 40 cm. This soil was considered a reference site not recently influenced by human activity. To analyze the d13C ratios of the SOM carbonate free samples, a routine combustion method and mass spectrometry (Finnigan MAT250) were used. In both agricultural sites a general excess of C3 species over C4 was evidenced through a mass balance equation derived from experimental d13C values

  14. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlgran, James R.

    1997-12-01

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation are described using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  15. Variation in soil fertility influences cycle dynamics and crop diversity in shifting cultivation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braga Junqueira, A.; Stomph, T.J.; Clement, C.R.; Struik, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Smallholder farming in Amazonia is practised mostly through shifting cultivation, which under low population pressure is well adapted to the low-fertility soils that predominate in uplands and to the lack of external inputs. In this paper we investigate the effects of soil heterogeneity (in terms of

  16. Variation in soil fertility influences cycle dynamics and crop diversity in shifting cultivation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braga Junqueira, A.; Stomph, T.J.; Clement, C.R.; Struik, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Smallholder farming in Amazonia is practised mostly through shifting cultivation, which under low population pressure is well adapted to the low-fertility soils that predominate in uplands and to the lack of external inputs. In this paper we investigate the effects of soil heterogeneity (in terms of

  17. Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischhauer, H.L.

    1985-10-01

    Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

  18. Effects of cultivation on N20 emission and seasonal quantitative variations of related microbes in a temperate grassland soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory and in situ experiments were done to investigate the influences of cultivation on temperate semi-arid grassland (for 17years spring wheat planted once every two years without fertilization) on soil N2O emission and quantitative variations of related soil microbes.In the laboratory (25℃ and soil moisture 18% ), cultivation increased soil transformations of fertilizer nitrogen ( 100 μg N/g as NaNO3, urea,or as urea with dicyandiamide I μg N/g). The N2O emissions from the cultivated and uncultivated soils with or without nitrogen additions were relatively Iow, and mainly originated from the nitrification. The soil N2O emission due to cultivation decreased somewhat upon no fertilization or NaNO3 addition, but significantly upon urea addition. The role of dicyandiamide as nitrification inhibitor was only considerable in the cultivated soil, and had small influence on decreasing N2O emission in the two soils. The influence of cultivation on soil N2O emission was also reflected by the number variations of microbes related with soil nitrogen transformation in the two soils. Compared to the uncultivated grassland, in situ ammonifiem and denitrifiers in the cultivated grassland quantitatively averagely increased, and aerobic no-symbiotic azotobacters were quantitatively similar, leading to the continued decrease of organic matter content and the decrease of N2O emission from the cultivated grassland soil.

  19. Predicting the Soil Phosphorus Dynamics of the Ploughed Layer Under Continuous Cultivation and P Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, C.; Augusto, L.; Gallet-Budynek, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    One major component of the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus (P) in soils is the plant-available soil P. Its sound management, to minimize the loss of soil P to surface waters while ensuring enough P to sustain soil fertility, requires being able to predict the long term dynamics of plant-available soil P with the P budget. We examined the ability of a simple model to predict the change in plant-available soil P of the ploughed layer for almost 3 decades of continuous cultivation and P fertilization. We used a process-based assessment of plant-availability that considers both the concentration (Cp) of phosphate ions (Pi) in solution and the time-dependent amount (Pr) of Pi bound to the soil solid phase that can diffuse towards solution that equilibrates with time Pi in solution under the effect of a gradient of concentration. Soil analyses were performed in batch experiment on soil suspensions using a 32Pi-dilution method at steady-state. The modeling considered the difference between P inputs minus P outputs. This annual P budget was partitioned between Cp and Pr for one year. Every year the P budget was calculated as the added P to soil minus the P removed in grain yields and the P that leaves the plough layer by leaching estimated as the simulated Cp value multiplied by the annual volume of drainage water. Other fluxes that can play a role in P cycling such as atmospheric deposit, preferential, subsurface and surface flows were neglected. We analyzed archived soil samples, taken up every 3-4 years from a long-term field experiment (1972-2000) on a sandy soil under temperate climate. It comprised 4 replicates and 3 annual rates of P application as commercial superphosphate: 0, 44 and 96 kg Pha-1 yr-1. The crop was a monoculture of irrigated-maize. Grain yields and their P content were determined every year for all plots. The overall corn grain yield over almost 3 decades was: 11.6 t ha-1 yr-1 (mean P content of grain = 3.0 g P kg¬-1). The starting Cp value in

  20. Use of extracts from oyster shell and soil for cultivation of Spirulina maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Sunmin; Lee, Hansol; Kim, Kyochan; Kim, Woong; Park, Min S; Kwon, Jong-Hee; Yang, Ji-Won

    2014-12-01

    Calcium ion and trace metals play important roles in various metabolisms of photosynthetic organisms. In this study, simple methods were developed to extract calcium ion and micronutrients from oyster shell and common soil, and the prepared extracts were tested as a replacement of the corresponding chemicals that are essential for growth of microalgae. The oyster shell and soil were treated with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide or with 10 % hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The potential application of these natural sources to cultivation was investigated with Spirulina maxima. When compared to standard Zarrouk medium, the Spirulina maxima cultivated in a modified Zarrouk media with elements from oyster shell and soil extract exhibited increases in biomass, chlorophyll, and phycocyanin by 17, 16, and 64 %, respectively. These results indicate that the extracts of oyster shell and soil provide sufficient amounts of calcium and trace metals for successful cultivation of Spirulina maxima.

  1. Eukaryotic diversity in historical soil samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moon-van der Staay, S.Y.; Tzeneva, V.A.; Staay, van der G.W.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic biodiversity in historical air-dried samples of Dutch agricultural soil has been assessed by random sequencing of an 18S rRNA gene library and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Representatives of nearly all taxa of eukaryotic soil microbes could be identified, demonstrating

  2. Copper Accumulation, Availability and Adsorption Capacity in Sandy Soils of Vineyards with Different Cultivation Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallmann, F. J. K.; Miotto, A.; Bender, M. A.; Gubiani, E.; Rheinheimer, D. D. S.; Kaminski, J.; Ceretta, C. A.; Šimůnek, J.

    2015-12-01

    Bordeaux mixture is a copper-based (Cu) fungicide and bactericide applied in vineyards to control plant diseases. Since it is applied several times per year, it accumulates in large quantities on plants and in soil. This study evaluates the Cu accumulation in, and desorption kinetics and adsorption capability of a sandy Ultisol in a natural field and in 3 vineyards for 5 (V1), 11 (V2), and 31 (V3) years in South of Brazil. Soil samples were collected in 8 depths (0-60 cm) of all four soil profiles, which all displayed similar soil properties. The following soil properties were measured: pH, organic matter (OM), soil bulk density, Cu total concentration, and Cu desorption and adsorption curves. A two first-order reactions model and the Langmuir isotherm were fitted to the desorption and adsorption curves, respectively. An increase in the total mass of Cu in the vineyards followed a linear regression curve, with an average annual increase of 7.15 kg ha-1. Cu accumulated down to a depth of 5, 20, and 30 cm in V1, V2 and V3, respectively, with the highest Cu content reaching 138.4 mg kg-1 in the 0-5 cm soil layer of V3. Cu desorption parameters showed a high correlation with its total concentration. Approximately 57 and 19% of total Cu were immediately and slowly available, respectively, indicating a high potential for plant absorption and/or downward movement. Cu concentrations extracted by EDTA from soil layers not affected by anthropogenic Cu inputs were very low. The maximum Cu adsorption capacity of the 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers increased with the vineyard age, reaching concentrations higher than 900 mg kg-1. This increase was highly related to OM and pH, which both increased with cultivation duration. Despite of low clay content of these soils, there is low risk of groundwater Cu contamination for actual conditions. However, high Cu concentrations in the surface layer of the long-term vineyards could cause toxicity problems for this and for companion crops.

  3. Mitigation of greenhouse gas fluxes from cultivated organic soils by raised water table

    OpenAIRE

    Regina, Kristiina

    2010-01-01

    Cultivated organic soils are a remarkable source of greenhouse gases (GHG) in some countries and raised ground water table has been suggested as a mitigation measure on these soils. Drainage of the peat increases mineralization of the organic matter and causes high emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) while emissions of methane (CH4) are lowered compared to pristine peatlands. In countries with a large area of organic soils these GHG emissions can be remarkable. In ...

  4. Simulation of Soil Quality with Riparian Forests and Cultivated with Sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luiz Gabriel; Colato, Alexandre; Casagrande, José Carlos; Soares, Marcio Roberto; Perissatto Meneghin, Silvana

    2013-04-01

    Riparian forests are entrusted with important hydrological functions, such as riparian zone protection, filtering sediments and nutrients and mitigation of the amount of nutrients and xenobiotic molecules from the surrounding agro ecosystems. The soil was sampled in the depths of 0-0,2 and 0.2-0.4 m and its chemical (nutrient content and organic matter, cationic exchange capacity - CEC, sum of bases-SB, bases saturation, V%, and aluminum saturation, m%); physical (particle size distribution, density and porosity) and microbiological attributes (basal respiration and microbial biomass) were determined. This work aimed to study the liner method of combining data, figures of merit (FoM), weighing process and the scoring functions developed by Wymore and asses the quality of the soil (SQI) by means of chemical, physical and microbiological soil attributes, employing the additive pondered model for two areas of riparian forest at different stages of ecological succession and an adjacent area cultivated with sugar cane, located on the dam shores of Sugar Mill Saint Lucia-Araras/SP. Some hierarchical functions containing FoMs and their parameters were constructed, and from them weights were assigned to each FoM and parameter, in a way that cluster of structures with the same FoMs and parameters with different weights were formed. These clusters were used to calculate the SQI for all vegetal formations considering two types of soil (Oxisol and Podzol), in that way, the SQI was calculated for each combination of vegetation and soil. The SQIs values were usually higher in the oldest riparian forest, while the recent riparian forest showed the smallest SQI values, for both types of soil. The variation of values within a combination vegetation/soil was also different between all combinations, being that the set of values from the oldest riparian forest presented the lowest amplitude. It was also observed that the Oxisols, regardless of the vegetation, presented higher SQIs

  5. Health hazards and heavy metals accumulation by summer squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) cultivated in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Tarek M

    2016-07-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the heavy metal concentration accumulated by summer squash cultivated in contaminated soil and their health hazards for public consumers at south Cairo Province, Egypt. Soil and plants were sampled from contaminated and reference farms, using 1 m(2) quadrats, for biomass estimation and nutrient analysis. The daily intake of metals (DIM) and health risk index (HRI) were estimated. Significant differences in soil variables (except As) between contaminated and reference sites were recognized. Summer squash showed remarkable reduction in fresh and dry biomass, fruit production, and photosynthetic pigments under pollution stress. The inorganic and organic nutrients in the aboveground and belowground parts showed significant reduction in contaminated site. In addition, higher concentrations of heavy metals were accumulated in the edible parts and roots more than shoots. The bioaccumulation factor of summer squash for investigated metals was greater than 1, while the translocation factor did not exceed unity in both contaminated and reference sites. The DIM for all investigated metals in the reference site and in the contaminated site (except Fe and Mn) did not exceed 1 in both adults and children. However, HRI of Ni and Mn in the reference site and Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni, Fe, Mn, and Zn in the contaminated one exceeded unity indicating great potential to pose health risk to the consumers. The author recommends that people living in the contaminated area should not eat large quantities of summer squash, so as to avoid excess accumulation of heavy metals in their bodies.

  6. Soil water erosion under different cultivation systems and different fertilization rates and forms over 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildegardis Bertol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The action of rain and surface runoff together are the active agents of water erosion, and further influences are the soil type, terrain, soil cover, soil management, and conservation practices. Soil water erosion is low in the no-tillage management system, being influenced by the amount and form of lime and fertilizer application to the soil, among other factors. The aim was to evaluate the effect of the form of liming, the quantity and management of fertilizer application on the soil and water losses by erosion under natural rainfall. The study was carried out between 2003 and 2013 on a Humic Dystrupept soil, with the following treatments: T1 - cultivation with liming and corrective fertilizer incorporated into the soil in the first year, and with 100 % annual maintenance fertilization of P and K; T2 - surface liming and corrective fertilization distributed over five years, and with 75 % annual maintenance fertilization of P and K; T3 - surface liming and corrective fertilization distributed over three years, and with 50 % annual maintenance fertilization of P and K; T4 - surface liming and corrective fertilization distributed over two years, and with 25 % annual maintenance fertilization of P and K; T5 - fallow soil, without liming or fertilization. In the rotation the crops black oat (Avena strigosa , soybean (Glycine max , common vetch (Vicia sativa , maize (Zea mays , fodder radish (Raphanus sativus , and black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris . The split application of lime and mineral fertilizer to the soil surface in a no-tillage system over three and five years, results in better control of soil losses than when split in two years. The increase in the amount of fertilizer applied to the soil surface under no-tillage cultivation increases phytomass production and reduces soil loss by water erosion. Water losses in treatments under no-tillage cultivation were low in all crop cycles, with a similar behavior as soil losses.

  7. Nutrients, heavy metals and phthalate acid esters in solar greenhouse soils in Round-Bohai Bay-Region, China: impacts of cultivation year and biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqun; Tian, Tian; Gao, Lihong; Tian, Yongqiang

    2016-07-01

    Solar greenhouse is a common facility type used for horticultural crop production in China. However, most solar greenhouse fields have been degraded due to continuous cropping and excessive fertilizer use. Therefore, we investigated solar greenhouse soils covering a wide range of cultivation years and environmental conditions in Round-Bohai Bay-Region to test the effects of cultivation year and biogeography on nutrients, heavy metals, and phthalate acid esters (PAEs). In general, soil pH decreased while soil electrical conductivity (EC), organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), NO3 (-)-N, NH4 (+)-N, mineral nitrogen (MN), Olsen-P, and NH4OAc-K contents increased as time of cultivation increased. However, this trend was influenced by sampling sites. Among sampling sites, Jiangsu showed a relatively low soil pH and high Olsen-P content, while Hebei showed a relatively high soil EC value, NO3 (-)-N, NH4 (+)-N, MN, and NH4OAc-K contents. Liaoning was characterized by relatively high soil OM and TN contents. The nutrient level indexes in evaluation of soil quality on Olsen-P and NH4OAc-K exceeded the standard seriously. The maximum values of the heavy metals Cd, Cu, and Zn were 4.87, 2.78, and 1.15 times higher than the threshold values, respectively. There was a rising trend on the heavy metal contents with the increasing cultivation years, and this trend was significantly influenced by sampling sites. Both Cu and Zn had relative high heavy metal indexes in evaluation of soil pollution. The PAEs were not detected in almost all sampling soils. Overall, the excessive fertilizer application was an important cause of nutrient accumulation and heavy metal pollution, resulting in soil degradation in solar greenhouses.

  8. APPLICATION DIMENSIONAL AND SIMILARITY THEORY IN DETERMINING THE PARAMETERS AND OPERATING MODES OF SOIL CULTIVATING MACHINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shhirov V. N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a study of parameters and modes of operation of machines for soil cultivation. In determining the parameters and modes of operation of machinery for tillage we have applied the theory of similarity and dimensions of physical quantities. We have obtained the regularities of disclosing the relationship of the parameters from the medium to the energy characteristics of the process. As the initial data we used test protocols of machines for soil cultivation (Central - Black Earth, Kubanskaya, Sibirskaya, of North - Caucasion MIS, RosNIITiM : KPI - 3.8, AРC - 3.9, AKV - 4, AKM - 6 - V, AMP - 4 APC - 4 A, AРC - 10 APR - 4.4, APU - 6.5 APSH - 6 , CNC - 6.0, CSТ - 3.8, APC - 4. We defined the formula оf dimension parameters and modes of operation of machines for soil cultivation and properties of soil (traction resistance, depth, width, speed, hardness of the soil, acceleration. Based on dimension theory we have received similarity criteria. Based on the correlation analysis and the least squares method we determined the nature of addiction and the coefficients for it. We have also received a graph for determining the operating modes and parameters of machines for soil cultivation

  9. Impact of tillage on soil magnetic properties: results over thirty years different cultivation plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesson, Julien; Kessouri, Pauline; Buvat, Solène; Tabbagh, Alain

    2010-05-01

    Cultivation may favour or not different processes such as air and water circulation, organic matter and fertilizers supplies..., consequently it can a priori induce significant changes in local oxido-reduction conditions which determine the magnetic properties of soils: the soil magnetic signal. If laboratory measurements on soil samples can be slow and irreversible, it is also possible to perform in field measurements by using electromagnetic devices that allow quick and easy measuring over the relevant soil thicknesses both in time (TDEM) and frequency (FDEM) domains. The object of this study is to compare the variation of two magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility, measured by FDEM apparatus and magnetic viscosity measured by TDEM apparatus) and there ratio along depth for three different types of tillage (no tillage, ploughing, and simplified tillage). An experimental plot of 80 m by 50 m total area, on which these three types of tillage have been conducted for more than thirty years, was surveyed. The plot is divided in five strips of 16 m by 50 m area, each of which being cultivated by one type of tillage only. Each strip is divided in two parts, one half with nitrogen-fixing crop during intercultivation winter period and the other half with bare soil during this period. On each part, the variation along depth of both magnetic properties was assessed by surveying with different devices corresponding to three different volumes of investigation. For the magnetic susceptibility measurements the devices used were the MS2 of Bartington Ltd with the MS2D probe and the CS60 a slingram prototype use in VCP and HCP configurations. For the magnetic viscosity, the devices used were the DECCO from Littlemore ltd. And the VC100, a slingram prototype, used at two heights. Eleven values of the two magnetic properties have been recorded using each device and their medians calculated. The data were inverted to define the median magnetic profiles of each half

  10. Effects of Changing Cultivation System on Soil Carbon Dynamics in Cotton Field of Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Wang, X.; Tian, C.

    2010-12-01

    There has being a change in cotton cultivative practice in the northwestern China, i.e., from the traditional cultivation (TF) of no mulching with flood-irrigation to the modern cultivation (PM) of plastic film mulching with drip-irrigation. Little is known how this change affects soil carbon dynamics. This paper presents a field study that includes comparisons of soil organic carbon (SOC), soil CO2 concentration and soil surface CO2 efflux during cotton growing season. At the initial growing stage, SOC content was similar between TF and PM, showing a clear decreasing trend over depth (i.e., ~9 g/kg, ~7.5 g/kg and ~3 g/kg at 0-20 cm, 20-30 cm and 30-70 cm, respectively). After five months, SOC generally decreased at 0-20 cm but increased below 30 cm. Overal, SOC was higher in the surface soil in the PM than in the TF, particularly at 20-30 cm where SOC reached ~9 g/kg in the PM. In general, CO2 concentration in soil profile was higher in the PM (3107 - 9212 ppmv) than in the TF (1275 - 8994 ppmv). However, rate of CO2 efflux was lower in the PM than in the TF, primarily owing to plastic film covering. For the whole cotton growing season, accumulated rates of CO2 efflux were 300 g C m-2 and 394 g C m-2 in the PM and the TF, respectively. Fig. 1. Soil organic carbon (SOC) in (a) May (b) August and (c) October between plastic film mulching cultivation (PM) and traditional flooding cultivation (TF). Table 1. Soil surface CO2 efflux during different growing stages in different systems ADR: averaged daily rate during each stage; AE: accumulative efflux for each stage.

  11. Monitoring of soil water content and quality inside and outside the water curtain cultivation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, K.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of green house. Artificial groundwater recharge application to the water curtain cultivation facilities was adopted and tested to use groundwater sustainably in a rural region of Korea. The groundwater level in the test site shows natural trend corresponding rainfall pattern except during mid-November to early April when groundwater levels decline sharply due to groundwater abstraction for water curtain cultivation. Groundwater levels are also affected by surface water such as stream, small dams in the stream and agricultural ditches. Infiltration data were collected from lysimeter installation and monitoring inside and outside water cultivation facility and compared with each other. The infiltration data were well correlated with rainfall outside the facility, but the data in the facility showed very different from the other. The missing infiltration data were attributed to groundwater level rise and level sensor location below water table. Soil water contents in the unsaturated zone indicated rainfall infiltration propagation at depth and with time outside the facility. According to rainfall amount and water condition at the initial stage of a rainfall event, the variation of soil water content was shown differently. Soil water contents and electrical conductivities were closely correlated with each other, and they reflected rainfall infiltration through the soil and water quality changes. The monitoring results are useful to reveal the hydrological processes from the infiltration to groundwater recharge, and water management planning in the water cultivation areas.

  12. Chemical Attributes of Soil Fertilized with Cassava Mill Wastewater and Cultivated with Sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Suyane Marques Dantas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of waste arising from agroindustrial activities, such as cassava wastewater, has been steadily implemented in order to reduce environmental pollution and nutrient utilization. The aim of this study is that the changes in chemical properties of dystrophic red-yellow latosol (oxisol were evaluated at different sampling times after reuse of cassava wastewater as an alternative to mineral fertilizer in the cultivation of sunflower, hybrid Helio 250. The experiment was conducted at the Experimental Station of the Agricultural Research Company of Pernambuco (IPA, located in Vitória de Santo Antão. The experimental design was randomized blocks with 6×5 subplots; six doses of cassava wastewater (0; 8.5; 17.0; 34.0; 68.0; and 136 m3 ha−1; and five sampling times (21, 42, 63, 84, and 105 days after applying the cassava wastewater, with four replications. Concentrations of available phosphorus and exchangeable potassium, calcium, magnesium and sodium, pH, and electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extract were evaluated. Results indicate that cassava wastewater is an efficient provider of nutrients to the soil and thus to the plants, making it an alternative to mineral fertilizers.

  13. Number of Microorganisms in the Soil Cultivated with Legume-Grass Mixtures Supplied with Phytohormones and Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek SOSNOWSKI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study concerned the number of microorganisms colonizing the humus layer and under plough soil from the cultivation of perennial ryegrass mixtures with red clover, which were fed by biostimulant based on the phytohormones  and different doses of nitrogen. Nitrogen was applied at four levels-control (no nitrogen, 50, 100 and 150 kg N∙ha-1, biostimulant in two combinations - with and without preparation. Soil material to assess the size of individual groups of microorganisms was collected from each experimental plot in autumn 2010 from the humus (0-20 cm and under plough layers (20-40 cm. The analysis of soil samples for a total number of bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi was conducted at the Department of Agricultural Microbiology IUNG-PIB in Pulawy. Results of studies have shown that more colonies of bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi were colonized the humus horizon. Biostimulant application in this cultivation led to a decrease of the total number of colonies of the all soil microorganisms groups but improved the ratio of bacteria to fungi. Increasing doses of mineral nitrogen by the limiting of the bacteria number and intensive development of soil fungi, helped to narrow the B/F ratio.

  14. Cultivating Erect Milkvetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) (Leguminosae) Improved Soil Properties in Loess Hilly and Gullies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhan-bin; WANG Qing-yi

    2013-01-01

    Erect milkvetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.), a leguminous grass, is a major source of fuel and forage, and has an important role in the restoration of the degraded ecosystems in central and northeastern China. The objective of this work was to investigate how erect milkvetch planting would affect the physical and chemical properties of soil in degraded arable lands. Soil samples at the depths of 0-20 and 20-40 cm were collected from erect milkvetch planting fileds at ages of 0, 1, 2 and 3 yr. Changes in soil bulk density, soil porosity, total N and P, organic matter content, available P, hydrolysable N and available K were measured. The results showed that root biomass and above-ground plant biomass were both significantly increased with plantation age. The significant increase in root nodule biomass was not observed in the first two years. However, it was significantly increased after three years. Root growth of erect milkvetch improved soil structure, and hence, decreased soil bulk density and increased soil porosity. Furthermore, the nitrogen fixation by erect milkvetch and return of erect milkvetch plant to soil increased the soil total N, hydrolysable N and organic matter content of the soil. Low concentrations of P in the soil with erect milkvetch planting could be ascribed to high plant uptakes and possibly to high sequestrations of P in plant biomass. Concentrations of K significantly increased during the first two years of erect milkvetch planting. The high accumulation of K under erect milkvetch cultivation in the first two years could partly be attributed to low plant uptake, and partly to relatively quick recycling within plant-soil systems. Three years after erect milkvetch plantingr, K accumulation at 0-20 cm soil layer was significantly lower than that from non-vegetated field sites, which could be attributed to high plant uptake. These parameters, except for soil bulk density, were all decreased with increasing soil depth. Soil total N, organic

  15. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupinambá, Daiva Domenech; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Costa, Ohana Yonara Assis; Bergmann, Jessica Carvalho; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Kyaw, Cynthia Maria; Barreto, Cristine Chaves; Quirino, Betania Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7%) were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers) were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest) and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area). More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied.

  16. Archaeal Community Changes Associated with Cultivation of Amazon Forest Soil with Oil Palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Domenech Tupinambá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared soil archaeal communities of the Amazon forest with that of an adjacent area under oil palm cultivation by 16S ribosomal RNA gene pyrosequencing. Species richness and diversity were greater in native forest soil than in the oil palm-cultivated area, and 130 OTUs (13.7% were shared between these areas. Among the classified sequences, Thaumarchaeota were predominant in the native forest, whereas Euryarchaeota were predominant in the oil palm-cultivated area. Archaeal species diversity was 1.7 times higher in the native forest soil, according to the Simpson diversity index, and the Chao1 index showed that richness was five times higher in the native forest soil. A phylogenetic tree of unclassified Thaumarchaeota sequences showed that most of the OTUs belong to Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group. Several archaeal genera involved in nutrient cycling (e.g., methanogens and ammonia oxidizers were identified in both areas, but significant differences were found in the relative abundances of Candidatus Nitrososphaera and unclassified Soil Crenarchaeotic Group (prevalent in the native forest and Candidatus Nitrosotalea and unclassified Terrestrial Group (prevalent in the oil palm-cultivated area. More studies are needed to culture some of these Archaea in the laboratory so that their metabolism and physiology can be studied.

  17. Physical properties of soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas and associated green vegetation covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian José Ferreira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. is a sustainable option for biodiesel production due to its adaptation to different agro-ecological conditions and its high content of non-edible oil grains. The possibility of its cultivation in degraded low fertility soils makes the physic nut attractive to the Paraíba do Sul Valley region. This study evaluated physical attributes and water processes of an Oxisol which had been previously used for livestock and later converted to experimental farming. The soil was intercropped with perennial herbaceous legumes (Arachis pintoi and Calopogonio muconoides in place of the original cover of Brachiaria brizantha, largely cultivated in the region. We determined the soil texture, the levels of saturation and water retention, soil resistance to root penetration and the basic infiltration rate of water into the soil (VIB. The soil resistance to root penetration in B. brizantha ranged from high to moderate at 30 cm depth, while the addition of perennial herbaceous legumes as cover crops intercropped with Jatropha reduced this resistance and increased the average soil VIB from 4 mm h-1 (B. brizantha to 33 mm h-1. We conclude that the association of herbaceous legumes with Jatropha contributed to the improvement of the soil’s physical properties.

  18. Diversity in soil bacterial communities structure in four high-altitude vineyards cultivated using different soil management techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsi, Francesca; Landa, Blanca; Zecca, Odoardo; Biddoccu, Marcella; Barmaz, Andrea; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    Some of the major wine producing countries are located in the Mediterranean regions, where viticulture represents one of the most widespread cultivations with economic and social importance. The area devoted to vineyards can also expand to mountain and steep slope zones, often characterized by small-scale high quality wine production, where viticulture contributes to the sustainable development from the ecological and environmental point of view. Farming practices adopted in sloping vineyards have the purpose to improve the soil physicochemical but also biological properties to avoid the degradation of the soil characteristics and resulting problems such as soil erosion and organic matter losses. A preliminary study was conducted during 2013 in four commercial vineyards located in Aosta Valley (north-western Italy), within a small area located in the adjacent municipalities of Chambave and Saint-Denis in order to minimize soil variability. Two sites have been identified on the lower (about 600 m asl) and higher (about 750 m asl) zone of the slope, each of which consist of two vineyards managed since at least ten years with different soil management techniques: grass cover and chemical weed control. The four experimental soils had a sandy loam texture with abundant skeleton, and were characterized by a slightly alkaline reaction. The organic matter content was greater in the lower zone (2.4%) than in the upper (1.5%), without specific differences between treatments. The low values of the C:N ratio reported (on average 6.2) reveal the increased organic matter mineralization; furthermore the CEC values were rather low, typical of loose soils. Soil microbiota are critical for the maintenance of soil health and quality, playing an important role in agricultural soil ecosystems. A 16S rDNA pyrosequencing approach was used for investigating differences, abundance and diversity in bacterial community structure of the four studied vineyards. Data from pyrosequencing

  19. Eukaryotic diversity in historical soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo; Tzeneva, Vesela A; van der Staay, Georg W M; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke; Hackstein, Johannes H P

    2006-09-01

    The eukaryotic biodiversity in historical air-dried samples of Dutch agricultural soil has been assessed by random sequencing of an 18S rRNA gene library and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Representatives of nearly all taxa of eukaryotic soil microbes could be identified, demonstrating that it is possible to study eukaryotic microbiota in samples from soil archives that have been stored for more than 30 years at room temperature. In a pilot study, 41 sequences were retrieved that could be assigned to fungi and a variety of aerobic and anaerobic protists such as cercozoans, ciliates, xanthophytes (stramenopiles), heteroloboseans, and amoebozoans. A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of samples collected between 1950 and 1975 revealed significant changes in the composition of the eukaryotic microbiota.

  20. Changes in Soil C and N Contents and Mineralization Across a Cultivation Chronosequence of Paddy Fields in Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong-Pei; ZHANG Tao-Lin; HAN Feng-Xiang; P. FELIX-HENNINGSEN

    2005-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic matter in a cultivation chronosequence of paddy fields were studied in subtropical China.Mineralization of soil organic matter was determined by measuring CO2 evolution from soil during 20 days of laboratory incubation. In the first 30 years of cultivation, soil organic C and N contents increased rapidly. After 30 years, 0-10 cm soil contained 19.6 g kg-1 organic C and 1.62 g kg-1 total N, with the corresponding values of 18.1 g kg-1 and 1.50 g kg-1 for 10-20 cm, and then remained stable even after 80 years of rice cultivation. During 20 days incubation the mineralization rates of organic C and N in surface soil (0-10 cm) ranged from 2.2% to 3.3% and from 2.8% to 6.7%,respectively, of organic C and total N contents. Biologically active C size generally increased with increasing soil organic C and N contents. Soil dissolved organic C decreased after cultivation of wasteland to 10 years paddy field and then increased. Soil microbial biomass C increased with number of years under cultivation, while soil microbial biomass N increased during the first 30 years of cultivation and then stabilized. After 30 years of cultivation surface soil (0-10 cm)contained 332.8 mg kg-1 of microbial biomass C and 23.85 mg kg-1 of microbial biomass N, which were 111% and 47% higher than those in soil cultivated for 3 years. It was suggested that surface soil with 30 years of rice cultivation in subtropical China would have attained a steady state of organic C content, being about 19 g kg-1.

  1. Contamination and health risks from heavy metals in cultivated soil in Zhangjiakou City of Hebei Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qian; Xue, Zhan-Jun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Zhi-Mei; Yang, Zhi-Xin; Liu, Shu-Qing

    2015-12-01

    A total of 79 topsoil samples (ranging from 0 to 20 cm in depth) were collected from a grape cultivation area of Zhangjiakou City, China. The total concentrations of As, Cd, Hg, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in soil samples were determined to evaluate pollution levels and associated health risks in each sample. Pollution levels were calculated using enrichment factors (EF) and geoaccumulation index (I geo). Health risks for adults and children were quantified using hazard indexes (HI) and aggregate carcinogenic risks (ACR). The mean concentrations of measured heavy metals Cd, Hg, and Cu, only in the grape cultivation soil samples, were higher than the background values of heavy metals in Hebei Province. According to principal component analysis (PCA), the anthropogenic activities related to agronomic and fossil fuel combustion practices attributed to higher accumulations of Cd, Hg, and Cu, which have slightly polluted about 10-40% of the sampled soils. However, the HI for all of the heavy metals were lower than 1 (within safe limits), and the ACR of As was in the 10(-6)-10(-4) range (a tolerable level). This suggests the absence of both non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks for adults and children through oral ingestion and dermal absorption exposure pathways in the studied area. It should be also noted that the heightened vulnerability of children to health risks was accounted for higher HI and ACR values. Consequently, heavy metal concentrations (e.g., Cd, Hg, Cu) should be periodically monitored in these soils and improved soil management practices are required to minimize possible impacts on children's health.

  2. Soil concentration of glyphosate and AMPA under rice cultivation with contrasting levels of fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey Montoya, Tania; Micaela Biassoni, María; Graciela Herber, Luciana; De Geronimo, Eduardo; Aparicio, Virginia

    2017-04-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the world's most important crop species and occupies c. 150 mill ha. The province of Corrientes in Argentina leads the national production of rice cultivation. Glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide commonly used to control weeds. The molecule is inactivated once applied due to its adsorption in the soil, and once desorbed is degraded by soil microflora resulting in sarcosine and aminomethylphosphoric acid (AMPA) molecules. The objective of this investigation was to compare glyphosate and AMPA concentration in soil under different levels of fertilization along the growth season of the rice crop. A field experiment following a completely randomized design was carried out with four replicates. We evaluated four levels of fertilization (0-18-40): Control: 0 kg ha-1, Dose 1: 120 kg ha-1, Dose 2: 150 kg ha-1, Dose 3: 180 kg ha-1; and two levels of Glyphosate: with (Gly) or without (No) application. Four sampling moments were defined: pre-sowing (taken as reference), vegetative stage (V4, 30 days after application), in floral primordial differentiation-DPF (80 days post-application), and at physiological maturity-MF (125 days after application). Flooding was applied in V4 after sampling. The method used for determination and quantification was by ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to ESI UHPLC-MS / MS tandem mass spectrometer (+/-) (Acquit-Quattro Premier). We found that glyphosate and AMPA varied their concentration in soil according to the time of sampling. Detected levels of both molecules at pre-sowing indicate the persistence of this herbicide from earlier crop seasons. The highest concentration was measured in MF followed by V4. Interestingly, AMPA concentration showed higher values in V4 without application compared to the treatment with glyphosate application. On the other hand, in flooded soil both molecules presented a decrease in their concentration probably because of their dilution in water, increasing it again after

  3. Seasonal fluctuations of bacterial population and microbial activity in soils cultivated with eucalyptus and pinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigobelo Everlon Cid

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation and decomposition of litter in soils under forests depend on climatic and biotic conditions. This work evaluated the effect of monthly rainfall and temperature on total bacteria, and on the dehydrogenase and respiration microbial activities. The effects of organic matter, total organic C and soil moisture were also evaluated. Performed from April, 1999 to March, 2000 in an Eucalyptus-cultivated and Pinus-cultivated Oxisol (Typic Haplustox, the study showed that climate and the soil variables affect the total number of bacteria and the microbial activities. The highest air temperatures and rainfall intensities were found during the Summer and, consequently, all the studied variables were maximal during this period. Minimal values varied from Autumn to Winter or, for some parameters, up to Spring. A positive correlation proved the influence of the organic matter, organic C and soil moisture on the total bacteria and on the respiratory and dehydrogenase activities. Litter content was also higher in the Summer as compared to the Winter, but it correlated only with the total bacteria (r = 0.52***. However, the correlation between the litter content and organic matter (r = 0.64*** and soil moisture (r = 0.49** suggest that the soil organic matter may have influenced microbial activity. All variables found in the Eucalyptus soil were higher than that of Pinus soil, probably favored by the best soil fertility and higher pH value.

  4. Addition of residues and reintroduction of microorganisms in Jatropha curcas cultivated in degraded soil

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana A. Santos; Agustini,José A.; Katia L. Maltoni; Cassiolato, Ana M. R. [UNESP

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate, through mycorrhization (root colonization and number of spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi - AMF), leaf acid phosphatase and soil chemical characteristics, the effects of the addition of residues (macrophytes and ash), hydrogel and the reintroduction of microorganisms in a degraded area cultivated with jatropha. Degradation occurred when the surface soil was removed during the construction of a hydroelectric power plant. The experiment was s...

  5. Organic matter loss from cultivated peat soils in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    The degradation of drained peat soils in agricultural use is an underestimated source of loss of organic matter. Oxidation (biological degradation) of agricultural peat soils causes a loss of organic matter (OM) of 11 - 22 t ha-1 y-1 causing a CO2 emission of 20 - 40 t ha-1 y-1. Together with the associated N2O emissions from mineralized N this totals in the EU to about 98.5 Mton CO2 eq per year. Peat soils are very prone to climate change and it is expected that at the end of this century these values are doubled. The degradation products pollute surface waters. Wind erosion of peat soils in arable agriculture can cause losses of 3 - 30 t ha-1 y-1 peat also causing air pollution (fine organic particles). Subsidence rates are 1 - 2 cm per year which leads to deteriorating drainage effect and make peat soils below sea or inland water levels prone to flooding. Flooding agricultural peat soils is in many cases not possible without high costs, high GHG emissions and severe water pollution. Moreover sometimes cultural and historic landscapes are lost and meadow birds areas are lost. In areas where the possibility to regulate the water table is limited the mitigation options are either to increase biomass production that can be used as bioenergy to substitute some fossil fuel, try to slow down the break-down of the peat by different amendments that inhibit microbial activity, or permanent flooding. The negative effects of wind erosion can be mitigated by reducing wind speed or different ways to protect the soil by crops or fiber sheets. In a newly started project in Sweden a typical peat soil with and without amendment of foundry sand is cropped with reed canary grass, tall fescue and timothy to investigate the yield and greenhouse gas emissions from the different crops and how the sand effect the trafficability and GHG emissions.

  6. SOIL AND SEDIMENT SAMPLING METHODS | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response's (OSWER) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) needs innovative methods and techniques to solve new and difficult sampling and analytical problems found at the numerous Superfund sites throughout the United States. Inadequate site characterization and a lack of knowledge of surface and subsurface contaminant distributions hinders EPA's ability to make the best decisions on remediation options and to conduct the most effective cleanup efforts. To assist OSWER, NERL conducts research to improve their capability to more accurately, precisely, and efficiently characterize Superfund, RCRA, LUST, oil spills, and brownfield sites and to improve their risk-based decision making capabilities, research is being conducted on improving soil and sediment sampling techniques and improving the sampling and handling of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soils, among the many research programs and tasks being performed at ESD-LV.Under this task, improved sampling approaches and devices will be developed for characterizing the concentration of VOCs in soils. Current approaches and devices used today can lose up to 99% of the VOCs present in the sample due inherent weaknesses in the device and improper/inadequate collection techniques. This error generally causes decision makers to markedly underestimate the soil VOC concentrations and, therefore, to greatly underestimate the ecological

  7. Spatial distribution of nematodes in soil cultivated with sugarcane under different uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, M. O.; Pedrosa, E. M. R.; Vicente, T. F. S.; Siqueira, G. M.; Montenegro, A. A. A.

    2012-04-01

    Sugarcane is a crop of major importance within the Brazilian economy, being an activity that generates energy and with high capacity to develop various economic sectors. Currently the greatest challenge is to maximize productivity and minimize environmental impacts. The plant-parasites nematodes have great expression, because influence directly the productive potential of sugarcane crops. Accordingly, little research has been devoted to the study of spatial variability of nematodes. Thus, the purpose of this work is to analyze the spatial distribution of nematodes in a soil cultivated with sugarcane in areas with and without irrigation, with distinct spacing of sampling to determine the differences between the sampling scales. The study area is located in the municipality of Goiana (Pernambuco State, Brazil). The experiment was conducted in two areas with 40 hectares each, being collected 90 samples at different spacing: 18 samples with spacing of 200.00 x 200.00 m, 36 samples with spacing of 20.00 m x 20.00 m and 36 samples with spacing of 2.00 m x 2.00 m. Soil samples were collected at deep of 0.00-0.20 m and nematodes were extracted per 300 cm3 of soil through centrifugal flotation in sucrose being quantified, classified according trophic habit (plant-parasites, fungivores, bacterivores, omnivores and predators) and identified in level of genus or family. In irrigated area the amount of water applied was determined considering the evapotranspiration of culture. The data were analyzed using classical statistics and geostatistics. The results demonstrated that the data showed high values of coefficient of variation in both study areas. All attributes studied showed log normal frequency distribution. The area B (irrigated) has a population of nematodes more stable than the area A (non-irrigated), a fact confirmed by its mean value of the total population of nematodes (282.45 individuals). The use of geostatistics not allowed to assess the spatial distribution of

  8. Heterogeneous water flow and pesticide transport in cultivated sandy soils : description of model concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2011-01-01

    There is ample experimental evidence that complications in water flow and pesticide transport can occur in cultivated humic-sandy and loamy-sandy soils. As a result, pesticide leaching to groundwater and water courses can be higher than expected. We made an inventory of mechanistic/deterministic mod

  9. The role of Amazonian anthropogenic soils in shifting cultivation: learning from farmers’ rationales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braga Junqueira, A.; Almekinders, C.J.M.; Stomph, T.J.; Clement, C.R.; Struik, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated farmers’ rationales to understand their decision making in relation to the use of fertile anthropogenic soils, i.e., Amazonian dark earths (ADE), and for dealing with changes in shifting cultivation in Central Amazonia. We analyzed qualitative information from 196 interviews with farmer

  10. Influence of Cultivation and Cropping Systems on Production of Soil Sediment on Agricultural Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poposka, Hristina; Mukaetov, Dusko

    2017-04-01

    Soil conservation practices and in particular soil tillage and crop cultivation patterns are becoming an important issue in agricultural production. Combating soil erosion and diminishing its negative impact on agricultural soil imposes as a matter of vital interest which gained even greater significance, in a pronounced negative impact of climate change. Main objective of the three-year research and monitoring program was to evaluate the effects of the easy-to-use adaptive measures on intensity of soil erosion, and soil properties considering to be of crucial importance on run-off velocity and sediment loss, like: soil structure stability, soil infiltration rate, soil organic matter and soil moisture conservation. The influence of soil tillage practices and different cropping systems on soil intensity and sediment loss, has been monitored on specially designed soil erosion fields with standard dimensions (20m length x 4m. width), on a sloppy terrain (12% slope). The experimental field is located on heavily textured Chromic cambisol on saprolite. This is the predominant soil type on the sloppy terrains in the country, usually under intensive agricultural activities Soil texture and physical characteristics were thoroughly investigated in order to determine the base soil conditions. The influence of downslope and contour ploughing on quantity of eroded sediment has been monitored in three consecutive years. The eroded sediment has been collected periodically on a weekly base and after intensive rainfalls. The intensity of soil erosion under most widespread cropping systems in the country, like: a) cereals as a monoculture, b) crop rotation, and c) perennial grass, was monitored as well. The collected sediment was examined in order to determine the quantity of soil organic matter and nutrient loss (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium). Soil chemical properties are examined after each vegetative season in order to quantify the effect of tillage and cropping systems on

  11. Statistical sampling approaches for soil monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes three statistical sampling approaches for regional soil monitoring, a design-based, a model-based and a hybrid approach. In the model-based approach a space-time model is exploited to predict global statistical parameters of interest such as the space-time mean. In the hybrid

  12. Statistical sampling approaches for soil monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes three statistical sampling approaches for regional soil monitoring, a design-based, a model-based and a hybrid approach. In the model-based approach a space-time model is exploited to predict global statistical parameters of interest such as the space-time mean. In the hybrid ap

  13. Soil organic carbon stock and distribution in cultivated land converted to grassland in a subtropical region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J H; Li, F C; Wang, Y; Xiong, D H

    2014-02-01

    Land-use change from one type to another affects soil carbon (C) stocks which is associated with fluxes of CO2 to the atmosphere. The 10-years converted land selected from previously cultivated land in hilly areas of Sichuan, China was studied to understand the effects of land-use conversion on soil organic casrbon (SOC) sequestration under landscape position influences in a subtropical region of China. The SOC concentrations of the surface soil were greater (P\\0.001) for converted soils than those for cultivated soils but lower (P\\0.001) than those for original uncultivated soils. The SOC inventories (1.90–1.95 kg m-2) in the 0–15 cm surface soils were similar among upper, middle, and lower slope positions on the converted land, while the SOC inventories (1.41–1.65 kg m-2) in this soil layer tended to increase from upper to lower slope positions on the cultivated slope. On the whole, SOC inventories in this soil layer significantly increased following the conversion from cultivated land to grassland (P\\0.001). In the upper slope positions, converted soils (especially in 0–5 cm surface soil) exhibited a higher C/N ratio than cultivated soils (P = 0.012), implying that strong SOC sequestration characteristics exist in upper slope areas where severe soil erosion occurred before land conversion. It is suggested that landscape position impacts on the SOC spatial distribution become insignificant after the conversion of cultivated land to grassland, which is conducive to the immobilization of organic C. We speculate that the conversion of cultivated land to grassland would markedly increase SOC stocks in soil and would especially improve the potential for SOC sequestration in the surface soil over a moderate period of time (10 years).

  14. Effects of CaMSRB2-Expressing Transgenic Rice Cultivation on Soil Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Soo-In; Oh, Young-Ju; Kim, Byung-Yong; Cho, Hyun-Suk

    2016-07-28

    Although many studies on the effects of genetically modified (GM) crops on soil microorganisms have been carried out over the past decades, they have provided contradictory information, even for the same GM crop, owing to the diversity of the soil environments in which they were conducted. This inconsistency in results suggests that the effects of GM crops on soil microorganisms should be considered from many aspects. In this study, we investigated the effects of the GM drought-tolerant rice MSRB2-Bar-8, which expresses the CaMSRB2 gene, on soil microorganisms based on the culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. To this end, rhizosphere soils of GM and non-GM (IM) rice were analyzed for soil chemistry, population densities of soil microorganisms, and microbial community structure (using pyrosequencing technology) at three growth stages (seedling, tillering, and maturity). There was no significant difference in the soil chemistry between GM and non-GM rice. The microbial densities of the GM soils were found to be within the range of those of the non-GM rice. In the pyrosequencing analyses, Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi were dominant at the seedling stage, while Chloroflexi showed dominance over Proteobacteria at the maturity stage in both the GM and non-GM soils. An UPGMA dendrogram showed that the soil microbial communities were clustered by growth stage. Taken together, the results from this study suggest that the effects of MSRB2-Bar-8 cultivation on soil microorganisms are not significant.

  15. Glyphosate application and direct sowing of winter wheat considering soil cultivation history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordmeyer, Henning

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a two year field trial (2013/2014 and 2014/2015 the possible impact of glyphosate application on winter wheat after direct sowing was investigated. Glyphosate was applied with single and double application rates seven days before sowing and until five days after sowing. For comparison a mechanical treatment with flat cultivator and rotary harrow was created. The trials were carried out on an agricultural field with plots of three different soil cultivation history (conventional = plough, reduced = mulch sowing, direct sowing = direct sowing with glyphosate application. Plant emergence and yield of winter wheat was investigated. Conventional soil cultivation history showed highest plant emergence and highest yields in both years. Lowest plant emergence was estimated in trials with flat cultivator and reduced or direct sowing soil history. Treatments with glyphosate application before and after sowing showed no significant yield differences. At a double glyphosate application rate, plant emergence was lower in comparison to the single application rate in most cases in 2013/2014. This was also estimated for glyphosate application after sowing in 2014/2015.

  16. Sampling for Soil Carbon Stock Assessment in Rocky Agricultural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem-Miller, Jeffrey P.; Kong, Angela Y. Y.; Ogle, Stephen; Wolfe, David

    2016-01-01

    Coring methods commonly employed in soil organic C (SOC) stock assessment may not accurately capture soil rock fragment (RF) content or soil bulk density (rho (sub b)) in rocky agricultural soils, potentially biasing SOC stock estimates. Quantitative pits are considered less biased than coring methods but are invasive and often cost-prohibitive. We compared fixed-depth and mass-based estimates of SOC stocks (0.3-meters depth) for hammer, hydraulic push, and rotary coring methods relative to quantitative pits at four agricultural sites ranging in RF content from less than 0.01 to 0.24 cubic meters per cubic meter. Sampling costs were also compared. Coring methods significantly underestimated RF content at all rocky sites, but significant differences (p is less than 0.05) in SOC stocks between pits and corers were only found with the hammer method using the fixed-depth approach at the less than 0.01 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site (pit, 5.80 kilograms C per square meter; hammer, 4.74 kilograms C per square meter) and at the 0.14 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site (pit, 8.81 kilograms C per square meter; hammer, 6.71 kilograms C per square meter). The hammer corer also underestimated rho (sub b) at all sites as did the hydraulic push corer at the 0.21 cubic meters per cubic meter RF site. No significant differences in mass-based SOC stock estimates were observed between pits and corers. Our results indicate that (i) calculating SOC stocks on a mass basis can overcome biases in RF and rho (sub b) estimates introduced by sampling equipment and (ii) a quantitative pit is the optimal sampling method for establishing reference soil masses, followed by rotary and then hydraulic push corers.

  17. Estimation of the sugar cane cultivated area from LANDSAT images using the two phase sampling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Cappelletti, C. A.; Mendonca, F. J.; Lee, D. C. L.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.

    1982-01-01

    A two phase sampling method and the optimal sampling segment dimensions for the estimation of sugar cane cultivated area were developed. This technique employs visual interpretations of LANDSAT images and panchromatic aerial photographs considered as the ground truth. The estimates, as a mean value of 100 simulated samples, represent 99.3% of the true value with a CV of approximately 1%; the relative efficiency of the two phase design was 157% when compared with a one phase aerial photographs sample.

  18. The Effects of Enclosing Cultivated Land on the Physical Properties of Soil in the Loess Hill Region of Ordos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protection of the environment by returning farmland to forest and grassland through enclosing areas of land to permit regeneration of native flora is being implemented in the Loess hill region of China. Soil physical properties are important components of ecological systems, as comparisons between cultivated and enclosed areas demonstrate. The results showed: the soil moisture content in the enclosed area was 14.6% and that in the cultivated area was 14%; the soil bulk density and soil porosity were respectively 1.45 g/cm3 and 45.28% in the enclosed areas, and respectively 1.46 g/cm3 and 44.79% in cultivated land. The alteration of soil physical properties was not big between cultivated areas and enclosed areas in the short term.

  19. Degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene in spiked soils by single and combined plants cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Sardar Alam; Imran Khan, Muhammad; Shen, Chaofeng; Tang, Xianjin; Farooq, Muhammad; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Congkai; Chen, Yingxu

    2010-05-15

    The present study was conducted to investigate the capability of four plant species (tall fescue, ryegrass, alfalfa, and rape seed) grown alone and in combination to the degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) in spiked soil. After 65 days of plant growth, plant biomass, dehydrogenase activity, water-soluble phenolic (WSP) compounds, plant uptake and accumulation and residual concentrations of phenanthrene and pyrene were determined. Our results showed that presence of vegetation significantly enhanced the dissipation of phenanthrene and pyrene from contaminated soils. Higher degradation rates of PAHs were observed in the combined plant cultivation (98.3-99.2% phenanthrene and 88.1-95.7% pyrene) compared to the single plant cultivation (97.0-98.0% phenanthrene and 79.8-86.0% pyrene). Contribution of direct plant uptake and accumulation of phenanthrene and pyrene was very low compared to the plant enhanced dissipation. By contrast, plant-promoted biodegradation was the predominant contribution to the remediation enhancement. The correlation analysis indicates a negative relation between biological activities (dehydrogenase activity and WSP compounds) and residual concentrations of phenanthrene and pyrene in planted soils. Our results suggest that phytoremediation could be a feasible choice for PAHs contaminated soil. Moreover, the combined plant cultivation has potential to enhance the process. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbon dioxide exchange of a perennial bioenergy crop cultivation on a mineral soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Saara E.; Shurpali, Narasinha J.; Peltola, Olli; Mammarella, Ivan; Hyvönen, Niina; Maljanen, Marja; Räty, Mari; Virkajärvi, Perttu; Martikainen, Pertti J.

    2016-03-01

    One of the strategies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the energy sector is to increase the use of renewable energy sources such as bioenergy crops. Bioenergy is not necessarily carbon neutral because of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during biomass production, field management and transportation. The present study focuses on the cultivation of reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinacea L.), a perennial bioenergy crop, on a mineral soil. To quantify the CO2 exchange of this RCG cultivation system, and to understand the key factors controlling its CO2 exchange, the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) was measured from July 2009 until the end of 2011 using the eddy covariance (EC) method. The RCG cultivation thrived well producing yields of 6200 and 6700 kg DW ha-1 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Gross photosynthesis (GPP) was controlled mainly by radiation from June to September. Vapour pressure deficit (VPD), air temperature or soil moisture did not limit photosynthesis during the growing season. Total ecosystem respiration (TER) increased with soil temperature, green area index and GPP. Annual NEE was -262 and -256 g C m-2 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Throughout the study period from July 2009 until the end of 2011, cumulative NEE was -575 g C m-2. Carbon balance and its regulatory factors were compared to the published results of a comparison site on drained organic soil cultivated with RCG in the same climate. On this mineral soil site, the RCG had higher capacity to take up CO2 from the atmosphere than on the comparison site.

  1. [Effects of heavy machinery operation on the structural characters of cultivated soils in black soil region of Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, En-Heng; Chai, Ya-Fan; Chen, Xiang-Wei

    2008-02-01

    With the cultivated soils in black soil region of Northeast China as test objects, this paper measured their structural characters such as soil strength, bulk density, and non-capillary porosity/capillary porosity (NCP/CP) ratio before and after heavy and medium-sized machinery operation, aimed to study the effects of machinery operation on the physical properties of test soils. The results showed that after machinery operation, there existed three distinct layers from top to bottom in the soil profiles, i.e., plowed layer, cumulative compacted layer, and non-affected layer, according to the changes of soil strength. Under medium-sized machinery operation, these three layers were shallower, and there was a new plow pan at the depth between 17.5 and 30 cm. Heavy machinery operation had significant positive effects on the improvement of topsoil structure (P machinery, the bulk density of topsoil decreased by 7.2% and 3.5%, respectively, and NCP/CP increased by 556.6% after subsoiling, which would benefit water infiltration, reinforce water storage, and weaken the threat of soil erosion. The main action of heavy machinery operation was soil loosening, while that of medium-sized machinery operation was soil compacting.

  2. The environmental origins of shifting cultivation: climate, soils, and disease in the nineteenth-century US South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, John; Tchakerian, Viken

    2007-01-01

    Farmers and planters in the antebellum South held large tracts of unimproved land because they practiced shifting cultivation. Southern cultivators burned tracts of forest growth to quickly release nutrients into the soil. After five or six years, when the soil had been depleted, the old field was abandoned for as long as twenty years. Environmental factors such as poor soils, rugged topography, and livestock diseases accounted for the persistence of this practice, more so than slavery or the availability of western lands. Shifting cultivation slowly declined in the postbellum era, but southern farmers continued to improve a far smaller percentage of their land well into the twentieth century.

  3. Soil organic carbon stock change by short rotation coppice cultivation on croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Katja; Don, Axel; Flessa, Heinz

    2013-04-01

    Bioenergy is a means to climate mitigation if the overall greenhouse gas balance of the respective crop is better than that of the replaced fossil fuel. The change in soil organic carbon (SOC) by land use change to bioenergy has to be integrated into the greenhouse gas balance. One promising way to provide biomass for energy purposes is the cultivation of fast growing trees in short rotation coppices (SRC), because their energy input is low compared to their energy output. Moreover, due to high litter input and no-till management we hypothesize that SOC is accumulating in SRC on the long term. To study this long term effect 18 old poplar and willow SRC plantations and adjacent croplands with the same land use history were sampled throughout Germany using a standardized sampling protocol with a sampling depth down to 80 cm. The age of SRC ranged from 8 to 35 years and they were harvested every 3 to 15 years. Soil organic carbon content, bulk density, pH value and texture were determined. The SOC stocks were calculated and corrected for equivalent soil masses. In the top 10 cm, SOC increased under poplar and willow plantations at all sites by 4.8 +/- 3.2 Mg ha-1, which is an accumulation rate of 0.3 Mg ha-1 a-1. Regarding the whole profile to 80 cm depth, the SOC change was not significant with 0.8 +/- 13.5 Mg ha-1. At 8 sites SOC stocks increased compared to the respective cropland, at 10 sites SOC stocks decreased (-18 Mg C ha-1 to +30 Mg C ha-1). The litter accumulation was low compared to afforestations, ranging from 0.4 Mg C ha-1 to 3.2 Mg C ha-1 which is a litter C accumulation rate of 0.2 Mg ha-1 a-1. Including the respective litter carbon, the average SOC accumulation rate was 0.1 ± 0.8 Mg C ha-1 a-1. Taking into account the large scatter of SOC stock changes among different sites, the hypothesis of long-term SOC accumulation by SRC cannot generally be confirmed. Nevertheless, SRC may substantially increase SOC if installed on carbon depleted croplands and

  4. Geostatistics And Soil Attributes In Area Cultivated With Sugar Cane [geoestatística E Atributos Do Solo Em áreas Cultivadas Com Cana-de-açúcar

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Z.M.; Marques Jr. J.; Pereira G.T.

    2010-01-01

    The intense traffic of agricultural machines in soils cultivated with sugar cane can cause soil compaction. Therefore, the objective of this research was to characterize the spatial variability of soil physical attributes and content organic matter of a eutroferric Red Latosol gibbisitic (under Basalt) and dystroferric Red Latosol caulinitic (under Sandstone) in the depths of 0.0-0.2m and 0.2-0.4m in areas cultivated with sugar cane. Soils were sampled at the crossing points of a grid at regu...

  5. The Effects of Soybean Cultivation on Soil Nitrogen Dynamics in the Southeast of Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, A. S.; Davidson, E. A.; Hayhoe, S.; Porder, S.; Neill, C.; Martinelli, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities, including agricultural expansion, have greatly changed the nitrogen dynamics in tropical systems. The expanding soybean frontier in Brazil is a reality, and investigations of the processes driving N dynamics in these systems are needed to minimize environmental impacts and promote sustainability of agricultural systems. In order to understand the effects of soybean cultivation on the nitrogen cycle, we investigated physical and chemical properties of soils, soil N stocks, and soil δ15N in old growth forest, pasture, and along a chronosequence of soybean fields (2, 5, and 6 year-old) in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso, which is at the southern limit of the Amazon forest. An increase in N stocks in the first 10cm depth of soil was observed along the following sequence of land-uses: pasture, soybean, and forest. We also observed differences in physical and chemical soil properties between forest and soybean sites. There was no difference in the soil δ15N among the chronosequence of soybean fields, although values were lower than the values found in the pasture and higher than those found in the forest soil. These preliminary results showed a pattern of nitrogen accumulation in the soil along the chronosequence of soybean fields, indicating a possible return to the levels of N cycling occurring in the forest soil before the conversion to pasture and soybean

  6. Cerium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles alter the nutritional value of soil cultivated soybean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Hernandez-Viezcas, Jose A; Zhao, Lijuan; Diaz, Baltazar Corral; Ge, Yuan; Priester, John H; Holden, Patricia Ann; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine nutrient elements in soybean (Glycine max) plants cultivated in farm soil amended with nCeO2 at 0-1000 mg kg(-1) and nZnO at 0-500 mg kg(-1). Digested samples were analyzed by ICP-OES/MS. Compared to control, pods from nCeO2 at 1000 mg kg(-1) had significantly less Ca but more P and Cu, while pods from 100 mg kg(-1)nZnO had more Zn, Mn, and Cu. Plants treated with nZnO showed significant correlations among Zn, P, and S in pods with Zn in roots. Correlations among pod Zn/root Zn was r = 0.808 (p ≤ 0.01) and pod P/root P was r = 0.541 (p ≤ 0.05). The correlation among pod S/root S was r = -0.65 (p ≤ 0.01). While nCeO2 treatments exhibited significant correlations between pod Ca/root Ca (r = 0.645, p ≤ 0.05). The data suggest that nCeO2 and nZnO alter the nutritional value of soybean, which could affect the health of plants, humans, and animals.

  7. Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2006-10-12

    This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to

  8. DDT and HCH isomer levels in soils, carrot root and carrot leaf samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, S M; Carvajal, O; Gómez-Arroyo, S; Amador-Muñoz, O; Villalobos-Pietrini, R; Hayward-Jones, P M; Valencia-Quintana, R

    2008-10-01

    Agricultural cultivation assists organochlorine pesticide migration from contaminated soils to growing plants. This phenomenon is caused by retention processes that modify volatile pesticide exchange between soil, air and plants. The aim of the study was to monitor organochlorine pesticide (HCB, alpha- and gamma-HCH, pp'DDE, op'DDT, pp'DDT) levels and compare these concentrations in soil, carrot roots and carrot leaves. Fifty soil samples, 50 carrot root and 50 carrot leaf samples were taken from the same fields and analyzed by GLC-ECD. The results reveal organochlorine pesticide diffusion from agricultural soils to growing carrot plants and their vapors adsorption by leaves. Within the carrot plant, organochlorine pesticides accumulate especially in carrot root peel, 3-7 times more than in root flesh.

  9. Uptake and speciation of selenium in garlic cultivated in soil amended with symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) and selenate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Lobinski, R.; Burger-Meyer, K.

    2006-01-01

    The scope of the work was to investigate the influence of selenate fertilisation and the addition of symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) to soil on selenium and selenium species concentrations in garlic. The selenium species were extracted from garlic cultivated in experimental plots by proteolytic...... in garlic. The selenium content in garlic, which was analysed by ICP-MS, showed that addition of mycorrhiza to the natural soil increased the selenium uptake by garlic tenfold to 15 mu g g(-1) (dry mass). Fertilisation with selenate and addition of mycorrhiza strongly increased the selenium content...... in garlic to around one part per thousand. The parallel analysis of the sample extracts by cation exchange and reversed-phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection showed that gamma-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine amounted to 2/3, whereas methylselenocysteine, selenomethionine and selenate each amounted to a few...

  10. Connectivity and percolation of pore networks in a cultivated silt loam soil quantified by X-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats

    2016-04-01

    The connectivity of macropore networks is thought to exert an important control on transport processes in soil. However, little progress has been made towards quantifying these effects for natural soils in the field, partly because of the experimental difficulties but also because the concept of connectivity lacks a unique mathematical definition. To investigate this question, X-ray tomography was used to measure pore volume, size distribution and connectivity at an image resolution of 65 microns for 64 samples taken in two consecutive years in the harrowed and ploughed layers of a silt loam soil a few weeks after spring cultivation. Three different connectivity metrics were evaluated and compared: one local metric, the Euler number, and two global measures, the connection probability and the probability of percolation (the fraction of the porosity which is continuous across the sample). The connection probability was found to be a good measure of the long-range connectivity (i.e. continuity) of the pore networks. In contrast, the Euler number was not a sensitive measure of global connectivity, although all samples with negative Euler numbers did percolate. We also found that the way connection is defined in the image analysis (either by 6 or 26 nearest neighbours) did not influence the calculations of percolating porosity. The results also demonstrate that harrowing has a clear homogenizing effect on the distribution of the pore space. However, a comparison with random field simulations and the evidence of small percolation thresholds shows that the macropore system developed in the recently harrowed soil was far from completely random or disordered. In some samples, more than one pore cluster percolated, while in others the percolating cluster was not the largest one. Nevertheless, the macropore networks in this cultivated silt loam soil displayed some key features predicted by percolation theory: a strong relationship was found between the percolating fraction

  11. Treatment of turtle-breeding wastewater and domestic fecal sewage with soil cultivating system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Turtle-breeding wastewater and domestic fecal sewage were treated by means of soil cultivating system. Results indicated that more than 50% CODcr and BOD5 of wastewaters were removed, removal rates of NH4+ -N could reach about 70%-80%, but PO34- could not be removed. The thesis analyzed functional mechanisms for pollutants and put forward main elements affecting treatment efficiencies, thus provided conditions for further research.

  12. Relationships Between Agronomic and Environmental Soil Test Phosphorus in Three Typical Cultivated Soils in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Min; JIE Xiao-Lei; ZHU Yong-Guan; HOU Yan-Lin; ZHANG Tie-Quan

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relationships between agronomic soil test P and environmental soil test P in three soils predominately distributing in three typical agricultural production areas of China. Soil P was analyzed using Bray-1 (BP), Oisen (OP), and Mehlich-3 (MP) methods as agronomic tests, and using Fe-oxide impregnated filter paper (FeP), anion-exchange resin membrane (RP), and water (WP) as environmental tests. There were linear relationships between soil P extractable with all the tests evaluated. The regression coefficients, R2, ranged from 0.8164 to 0.9409 between each two of thc agronomic soil test P, and ranged from 0.4702 to 0.8990 between each two of the environmental soil test P, when the three soils were considered separately. When soil test P was analyzed across all the three soils, the highest regression R2 was found between OP and MP (0.7940) amongst agronomic soil test P, and between FeP and RP amongst environmental soil test P (0.8842). While all of the three agronomic soil test P was linearly related to each of the environmental soil test P across the three soils, strongest relationships were found between OP and environmental soil test P. Agronomic OP may be adopted as an analytical tool for environmental prediction of soil P.

  13. Effects of cultivation of Osr HSA transgenic rice on functional diversity of microbial communities in the soil rhizosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobing; Zhang; Xujing; Wang; Qiaoling; Tang; Ning; Li; Peilei; Liu; Yufeng; Dong; Weimin; Pang; Jiangtao; Yang; Zhixing; Wang

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread cultivation of transgenic crops, there is increasing concern about unintended effects of these crops on soil environmental quality. In this study, we used the Biolog method and ELISA to evaluate the possible effects of Osr HSA transgenic rice on soil microbial utilization of carbon substrates under field conditions. There were no significant differences in average well-color development(AWCD) values, Shannon–Wiener diversity index(H), Simpson dominance indices(D) and Shannon–Wiener evenness indices(E) of microbial communities in rhizosphere soils at eight samplings between Osr HSA transgenic rice and its non-transgenic counterpart. The main carbon sources utilized by soil microbes were carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, amino acids and polymers. The types,capacities and patterns of carbon source utilization by microbial communities in rhizosphere soils were similar throughout the detection period. We detected no Osr HSA protein in the roots of Osr HSA transgenic rice. We concluded that Osr HSA transgenic rice and the r HSA protein it produced did not alter the functional diversity of microbial communities in the rhizosphere.

  14. Convergent adaptations: bitter manioc cultivation systems in fertile anthropogenic dark earths and floodplain soils in central Amazonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraser, J.A.; Alves-Pereira, A.; Braga Junqueira, A.; Peroni, N.; Clement, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Shifting cultivation in the humid tropics is incredibly diverse, yet research tends to focus on one type: long-fallow shifting cultivation. While it is a typical adaptation to the highly-weathered nutrient-poor soils of the Amazonian terra firme, fertile environments in the region offer opportunitie

  15. Convergent adaptations: bitter manioc cultivation systems in fertile anthropogenic dark earths and floodplain soils in central Amazonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraser, J.A.; Alves-Pereira, A.; Braga Junqueira, A.; Peroni, N.; Clement, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Shifting cultivation in the humid tropics is incredibly diverse, yet research tends to focus on one type: long-fallow shifting cultivation. While it is a typical adaptation to the highly-weathered nutrient-poor soils of the Amazonian terra firme, fertile environments in the region offer opportunitie

  16. Differential Responses of Soil Microbial Community to Four-Decade Long Grazing and Cultivation in a Semi-Arid Grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Grazing and cultivation are two important management practices worldwide that can cause significant soil organic carbon (SOC losses. However, it remains elusive how soil microbes have responded to soil carbon changes under these two practices. Based on a four-decade long field experiment, this study investigated the effects of grazing and cultivation on SOC stocks and microbial properties in the semi-arid grasslands of China. We hypothesize that grazing and cultivation would deplete SOC and depress microbial activities under both practices. However, our hypotheses were only partially supported. As compared with the adjacent indigenous grasslands, SOC and microbial biomass carbon (MBC were decreased by 20% or more under grazing and cultivation, which is consistent with the reduction of fungi abundance by 40% and 71%, respectively. The abundance of bacteria and actinomycetes was decreased under grazing but increased under cultivation, which likely enhanced microbial diversity in cultivation. Invertase activity decreased under the two treatments, while urease activity increased under grazing. These results suggest that nitrogen fertilizer input during cultivation may preferentially favor bacterial growth, in spite of SOC loss, due to rapid decomposition, while overgrazing may deteriorate the nitrogen supply to belowground microbes, thus stimulating the microbial production of nitrogen acquisition enzymes. This decade-long study demonstrated differential soil microbial responses under grazing and cultivation and has important applications for better management practices in the grassland ecosystem.

  17. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-10-27

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist.

  18. Reduction of soil erosion and mercury losses in agroforestry systems compared to forests and cultivated fields in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béliveau, Annie; Lucotte, Marc; Davidson, Robert; Paquet, Serge; Mertens, Frédéric; Passos, Carlos J; Romana, Christine A

    2017-12-01

    In addition to causing physical degradation and nutrient depletion, erosion of cultivated soils in the Amazon affects aquatic ecosystems through the release of natural soil mercury (Hg) towards lakes and rivers. While traditional agriculture is generally cited as being among the main causes of soil erosion, agroforestry practices are increasingly appreciated for soil conservation. This study was carried out in family farms of the rural Tapajós region (Brazil) and aimed at evaluating soil erosion and associated Hg release for three land uses. Soils, runoff water and eroded sediments were collected at three sites representing a land cover gradient: a recently burnt short-cycle cropping system (SCC), a 2-year-old agroforestry system (AFS) and a mature forest (F). At each site, two PVC soil erosion plots (each composed of three 2 × 5 m isolated subplots) were implemented on steep and moderate slopes respectively. Sampling was done after each of the 20 rain events that occurred during a 1-month study period, in the peak of the 2011 rain season. Runoff volume and rate, as well as eroded soil particles with their Hg and cation concentrations were determined. Total Hg and cation losses were then calculated for each subplot. Erosion processes were dominated by land use type over rainfall or soil slope. Eroded soil particles, as well as the amount of Hg and cations (CaMgK) mobilized at the AFS site were similar to those at the F site, but significantly lower than those at the SCC site (p Erosion reduction at the AFS site was mainly attributed to the ground cover plants characterizing the recently established system. Moreover, edaphic change throughout AFS and F soil profiles differed from the SCC site. At the latter site, losses of fine particles and Hg were enhanced towards soil surface, while they were less pronounced at the other sites. This study shows that agroforestry systems, even in their early stages of implementation, are characterized by low erosion levels

  19. Aracnidae diversity in soil cultivated with corn (Zea mays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Vanessa da Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies carried out on the diversity and abundance of spiders may provide a rich information base on the degree of integrity of agricultural systems where they are found. In transgenic corn, Bacillus thuringiensis proteins are expressed in great amounts in plant tissues and may affect arthropod communities. Thus, the main goal of this work was to identify the spider diversity associated to transgenic and conventional corn hybrids. Pitfall collections were performed in conventional and transgenic corn plots during the 2010/2011 crop season, at the experimental field of the Agronomy Course of the University of Cruz Alta, RS. A total of 559 spiders were collected, from which 263 were adults and 296 young individuals. In the transgenic corn 266 spiders were collected and in the conventional one 293. Eleven families were determined and the adult individuals grouped in 27 morphospecies. Families with the largest number of representatives were Linyphiidae (29.70%, Theridiidae (5.72% and Lycosidae (5.01%. The most abundant morphospecies were Lyniphiidae sp. with 77 individuals, Erigone sp. with 40 individuals, Lynyphiidae sp. with 33 individuals, Theridiidae sp. with 21 individuals, Lycosa erythrognatha with 14 individuals and Lycosidae sp. with 13 individuals. The Shannon Diversity Index was higher for transgenic corn (H” =1.01 in February and smaller (H’=0.54 in the December collection in the conventional corn, and the Margaleff Richness Index showed higher diversity in December and February for the conventional corn (M=18.3, and smaller diversity for the transgenic corn in November (M=11.3. Families were classified in five guilds; two weavers: Irregular web builders and sheet web builders, and three hunter guilds: Night soil runners, ambush spiders and aerial night runners. The relative proportion of the spiders morphospecies found in this research, as well as the guilds, suggest that this group may not have been affected by the genetically

  20. Heavy metal toxicity in rice and soybean plants cultivated in contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Lígia de Souza Silva; Godofredo Cesar Vitti; Anderson Ricardo Trevizam

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals can accumulate in soil and cause phytotoxicity in plants with some specific symptoms. The present study evaluated the specific symptoms on rice and soybeans plants caused by excess of heavy metals in soil. Rice and soybean were grown in pots containing soil with different levels of heavy metals. A completely randomized design was used, with four replications, using two crop species and seven sample soils with different contamination levels. Rice and soybean exhibited different re...

  1. Chinantec shifting cultivation : InTERAcTIVE landuse : a case-study in the Chinantla, Mexico, on secondary vegetation, soils and crop performance under indigenous shifting cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der H.

    1999-01-01

    The development of secondary vegetation, soils and crop performance was studied in local variants of shifting cultivation in two villages in the Chinantla, Mexico. In Chapter 1, the institutional, social and political context of the research are presented and the reader is advertised that the scope

  2. Decay of enteric microorganisms in biosolids-amended soil under wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, K R; Sidhu, J P S; Pritchard, D L; Li, Y; Toze, S

    2014-08-01

    There is a growing need for better assessment of health risks associated with land-applied biosolids. This study investigated in-situ decay of seeded human adenovirus (HAdV), Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and bacteriophage (MS2) in biosolids-amended soil under wheat cultivation. The biosolids seeded with microorganisms were placed in decay chambers which were then placed in the topsoil (10 cm depth) at three different sites. Sites were selected in arid wheat-growing regions of Australia with loamy-sand soil type (Western Australia) and sandy soil (South Australia). Seeded E. coli and S. enterica had a relatively short decay time (T90 = 4-56 days) in biosolids-amended soil compared to un-amended soil (T90 = 8-83 days). The decreasing soil moisture over the wheat-growing season significantly (P soils. Increasing soil temperature also significantly (P soils at all three sites. The HAdV decay time (T90 ≥ 180 days) in biosolids-amended and un-amended soils was significantly higher than MS2 (T90 = 22-108 days). The results of this study suggest that adenovirus could survive for a longer period of time (>180 days) during the winter in biosolids-amended soil. The stability of adenovirus suggests that consideration towards biosolids amendment frequency, time, rates and appropriate withholding periods are necessary for risk mitigation. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of Amazonian anthropogenic soils in shifting cultivation: learning from farmers' rationales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André B. Junqueira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated farmers' rationales to understand their decision making in relation to the use of fertile anthropogenic soils, i.e., Amazonian dark earths (ADE, and for dealing with changes in shifting cultivation in Central Amazonia. We analyzed qualitative information from 196 interviews with farmers in 21 riverine villages along the Madeira River. In order to decide about crop management options to attain their livelihood objectives, farmers rely on an integrated and dynamic understanding of their biophysical and social environment. Farmers associate fallow development with higher crop yields and lower weed pressure, but ADE is always associated with high yields and high weeding requirements. Amazonian dark earths are also seen as an opportunity to grow different crops and/or grow crops in more intensified management systems. However, farmers often maintain simultaneously intensive swiddens on ADE and extensive swiddens on nonanthropogenic soils. Farmers acknowledge numerous changes in their socioeconomic environment that affect their shifting cultivation systems, particularly their growing interaction with market economies and the incorporation of modern agricultural practices. Farmers considered that shifting cultivation systems on ADE tend to be more prone to changes leading to intensification, and we identified cases, e.g., swiddens used for watermelon cultivation, in which market demand led to overintensification and resulted in ADE degradation. This shows that increasing intensification can be a potential threat to ADE and can undermine the importance of these soils for agricultural production, for the conservation of agrobiodiversity, and for local livelihoods. Given that farmers have an integrated knowledge of their context and respond to socioeconomic and agro-ecological changes in their environment, we argue that understanding farmers' knowledge and rationales is crucial to identify sustainable pathways for the future of ADE and of

  4. Effect of Inhibitory Substances on Microbiospora Isolated from Soil under Cultivation of Curcuma Longa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Kamble

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Soil Pollution is major problem because different types of pesticides are used to control plant pest. The residual component of pesticide diffuses into the soil. It is necessary to check whether actinomycetes degrade these components and control the soil pollution. Approach: In Ayurved system of medicine the rhizome portion of Curcuma longa L. was used as an anti-inflammatory and antiseptic. Antimicrobial substances released from these plants diffuse into the surrounding soil area of the plant. Actinomycete which grow in these area were resistant to these substances. Hence considerable attention had been given in studying the effect of inhibitory substances on actinomycetes especially Microbiospora isolated from soil under cultivation of Curcuma longa L. Results: The present study deals with effect of inhibitory substances like dettol, phenol, sodium azide, lysol and crystal violet. The results were recorded on the basis of presence or absence of growth. All five isolates of Microbiospora were found sensitive against dettol. One strain of Microbiospora was found resistant to phenol. Conclusion/Recommendations: From the study performed we conclude that Microbiospora which is resistant to phenol and other inhibitory substances can be used to degrade the residual components of pesticide which are released into the soil. It may have better option to prevent soil pollution.

  5. Protein hydrolysate as a component of salinized soil in the cultivation of Ageratum houstonianum Mill. (Asteraceae

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    Renata Matraszek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of using a protein hydrolysate, Hemozym N-K 4.5-6, as a component of salinized soil in the cultivation of flossflower (Ageratum houstonianum Mill., Asteraceae. The experiment was focused on the yield and decorative value of A. houstonianum, grown under different concentrations of NaCl and/or Hemozym. Ageratum houstonianum plants were grown in the soil under different NaCl salinity (EC: 0.28 – as control or 3.25 dS m−1 – salt stress or/and Hemozym dose (0, 0.07 or 0.14 ml kg−1. The results of the experiment imply that A. houstonianum is sensitive to salinity. The application of Hemozym to both unsalinized and salinized soils caused an increase in the yield of the plant organs (roots, stems, leaves, and inflorescence, the number of leaves, and the chlorophyll content without significant changes in the carotenoids. Moreover, an increase in the number and size of first-order inflorescences (heads as well as more intensive flower color were observed. Thus, it can be stated that the protein hydrolysate studied can be a beneficial component of both salinized and unsalinized soils in the cultivation of A. houstonianum.

  6. Carbon Sequestration and Nitrogen Mineralization in Soil Cooperated with Organic Composts and Bio-char During Corn (Zea mays) Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joung-Du; Lee, Sun-Ill; Park, Wu-Gyun; Choi, Yong-Su; Hong, Seong-Gil; Park, Sang-Won

    2014-05-01

    Objectives of this study were to estimate the carbon sequestration and to evaluate nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in soils cooperated with organic composts and bio-char during corn cultivation. For the experiment, the soil used in this study was clay loam types, and application rates of chemical fertilizer and bio-char were recommended amount after soil test and 2 % to soil weight, respectively. The soil samples were periodically taken at every 15 day intervals during the experimental periods. The treatments were consisted of non-application, cow manure compost, pig manure compost, swine digestate from aerobic digestion system, their bio-char cooperation. For the experimental results, residual amount of inorganic carbon was ranged from 51 to 208kg 10a-1 in soil only cooperated with different organic composts. However it was estimated to be highest at 208kg 10a-1 in the application plot of pig manure compost. In addition to bio-char application, it was ranged from 187.8 to 286kg 10a-1, but was greatest accumulated at 160.3kg 10a-1 in the application plot of cow manure compost. For nitrogen mineralization and nitrification rates, it was shown that there were generally low in the soil cooperated with bio-char compared to the only application plots of different organic composts except for 71 days after sowing. Also, they were observed to be highest in the application plot of swine digestate from aerobic digestion system. For the loss of total inorganic carbon (TIC) by run-off water, it was ranged from 0.18 to 0.36 kg 10a-1 in the different treatment plots. Also, with application of bio-char, total nitrogen was estimated to be reduced at 0.42(15.1%) and 0.38(11.8%) kg 10a-1 in application plots of the pig manure compost and aerobic digestate, respectively.

  7. Effect of reed canary grass cultivation on greenhouse gas emission from peat soil at controlled rewetting

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    S. Karki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of bioenergy crops in rewetted peatland (paludiculture is considered as a possible land use option to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. However, bioenergy crops like reed canary grass (RCG can have a complex influence on GHG fluxes. Here we determined the effect of RCG cultivation on GHG emission from peatland rewetted to various extents. Mesocosms were manipulated to three different ground water levels (GWL, i.e., 0, −10 and −20 cm below the soil surface in a controlled semi-field facility. Emissions of CO2 (ecosystem respiration, ER, CH4 and N2O from mesocosms with RCG and bare soil were measured at weekly to fortnightly intervals with static chamber techniques for a period of one year. Cultivation of RCG increased both ER and CH4 emissions, but decreased the N2O emissions. The presence of RCG gave rise to 69, 75 and 85% of total ER at −20, −10 and 0 cm GWL, respectively However, this difference was due to decreased soil respiration at the rising GWL as the plant-derived CO2 flux was similar at all three GWL. For methane, 70–95% of the total emission was due to presence of RCG, with the highest contribution at −20 cm GWL. In contrast, cultivation of RCG decreased N2O emission by 33–86% with the major reductions at −10 and −20 cm GWL. In terms of global warming potential, the increase in CH4 emissions due to RCG cultivation was more than off-set by the decrease in N2O emissions at −10 and −20 cm GWL; at 0 cm GWL the CH4 emissions was offset only by 23%. CO2 emissions from ER obviously were the dominant RCG-derived GHG flux, but above-ground biomass yields, and preliminary measurements of gross photosynthetic production, show that ER could be more than balanced due to the uptake of CO2 by RCG. Our results support that RCG cultivation could be a good land use option in terms of mitigating GHG emission from rewetted peatlands, potentially turning these ecosystems into a sink of atmospheric CO2.

  8. Global patterns of domestic cannabis cultivation: sample characteristics and patterns of growing across eleven countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Gary R; Barratt, Monica J; Malm, Aili; Bouchard, Martin; Blok, Thomas; Christensen, Anne-Sofie; Decorte, Tom; Frank, Vibeke Asmussen; Hakkarainen, Pekka; Klein, Axel; Lenton, Simon; Perälä, Jussi; Werse, Bernd; Wouters, Marije

    2015-03-01

    This article aims to provide an overview of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; personal use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets; contacts with the criminal justice system for respondents to an online survey about cannabis cultivation drawn from eleven countries (N=6530). Important similarities and differences between the national samples recruited will be discussed. This paper utilizes data from the online web survey of predominantly 'small-scale' cannabis cultivators in eleven countries conducted by the Global Cannabis Cultivation Research Consortium (GCCRC). Here we focus primarily on descriptive statistics to highlight key similarities and differences across the different national samples. Overall there was a great deal of similarity across countries in terms of: demographic characteristics; experiences with growing cannabis; methods and scale of growing operations; reasons for growing; use of cannabis and other drugs; participation in cannabis and other drug markets, and; contacts with the criminal justice system. In particular, we can recognise that a clear majority of those small-scale cannabis cultivators who responded to our survey are primarily motivated for reasons other than making money from cannabis supply and have minimal involvement in drug dealing or other criminal activities. These growers generally come from 'normal' rather than 'deviant' backgrounds. Some differences do exist between the samples drawn from different countries suggesting that local factors (political, geographical, cultural, etc.) may have some influence on how small-scale cultivators operate, although differences in recruitment strategies in different countries may also account for some differences observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Economic Efficiency of Selected Crops Cultivated under Different Technology of Soil Tillage

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    Vach M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the model comparison and economic evaluation of different methods of soil tillage and crop stand establishments used. Based on yield results (winter wheat, spring barley, and white mustard cultivated in three-crop rotation from field experiments with conventional, conservation with minimum tillage, and no-tillage methods conducted at the site Prague-Ruzyně, model economic balances were evaluated. Prices of the main products were determined based on the yield results from the period 2010-2013 and the current market prices. In the individual tillage systems, the total costs of production of evaluated crops were counted up and profitability was calculated as a ratio of profit to total costs. The highest total costs of crop cultivation were identified in cereals under conventional soil tillage, on the contrary, the lowest in cereals cultivated under conservation tillage technology. As for the growing technologies, the highest profitability was found in winter wheat, as for the tillage methods, it was in the conservation variant with minimum tillage. The economic evaluation for individual crops was based on standards of growing technologies and particular work operations.

  10. Carbon balance indicates a time limit for cultivation of organic soils in central Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sonja; Ammann, Christof; Alewell, Christine; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands serve as important carbon sinks. Globally, more than 30% of the soil organic carbon is stored in organic soils, although they cover only 3% of the land surface. The agricultural use of organic soils usually requires drainage thereby transforming these soils from a net carbon sink into a net source. Currently, about 2 to 3 Gt CO2 are emitted world-wide from degrading organic soils (Joosten 2011; Parish et al. 2008) which is ca. 5% of the total anthropogenic emissions. Besides these CO2 emissions, the resulting subsidence of drained peat soils during agricultural use requires that drainage system are periodically renewed and finally to use pumping systems after progressive subsidence. In Switzerland, the Seeland region is characterised by fens which are intensively used for agriculture since 1900. The organic layer is degrading and subsequently getting shallower and the underlying mineral soil, as lake marl or loam, is approaching the surface. The questions arises for how long and under which land use practises and costs these soils can be cultivated in the near future. The study site was under crop rotation until 2009 when it was converted to extensively used grassland with the water regime still being regulated. The soil is characterised by a degraded organic horizon of 40 to 70 cm. Since December 2014 we are measuring the carbon exchange of this grassland using the Eddy-Covariance method. For 2015, the carbon balance indicates that the degraded fen is a strong carbon source, with approximately 500 g C m-2 a-1. The carbon balance is dominated by CO2 emissions and harvest. Methane emissions are negligible. With the gained emission factors different future scenarios are evaluated for the current cultivation practise of organic soils in central Switzerland. Joosten, H., 2011: Neues Geld aus alten Mooren: Über die Erzeugung von Kohlenstoffzertifikaten aus Moorwiedervernässungen. Telma Beiheft 4, 183-202. Parish, F., A. Sirin, D. Charman, H. Joosten, T

  11. Addition of residues and reintroduction of microorganisms in Jatropha curcas cultivated in degraded soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana A. Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate, through mycorrhization (root colonization and number of spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi - AMF, leaf acid phosphatase and soil chemical characteristics, the effects of the addition of residues (macrophytes and ash, hydrogel and the reintroduction of microorganisms in a degraded area cultivated with jatropha. Degradation occurred when the surface soil was removed during the construction of a hydroelectric power plant. The experiment was set in a randomized block design, using a 2 x 2 x 4 factorial scheme, i.e., two inoculation treatments (with and without soil-inoculum, two hydrogel treatments (with and without and four with the addition of residues (macrophytes - MAC, ash, MAC + ash and control, without residues applied in the planting hole, with 4 replicates and 5 plants in each replicate. Soil from preserved Cerrado area was used as a source of microorganisms, including AMF. The conclusion is that, after 12 months of planting, the hydrogel increased root colonization, while the chemical characteristics of the degraded soil responded positively to the addition of MAC and MAC + ash, with increase in pH and SB and reduction of Al and H + Al. The addition of the soil-inoculum, along with MAC and MAC + ash, promoted higher mycorrhizal colonization and number of spores and reduced amounts of leaf acid phosphatase, indicating increased absorption of P by the host.

  12. Reduced soil cultivation and organic fertilization on organic farms: effects on crop yield and soil physical traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surböck, Andreas; Gollner, Gabriele; Klik, Andreas; Freyer, Bernhard; Friedel, Jürgen K.

    2017-04-01

    A continuous investment in soil fertility is necessary to achieve sustainable yields in organic arable farming. Crucial factors here besides the crop rotation are organic fertilization and the soil tillage system. On this topic, an operational group (Project BIOBO*) was established in the frame of an European Innovation Partnership in 2016 consisting of organic farmers, consultants and scientists in the farming region of eastern Austria. The aim of this group is the development and testing of innovative, reduced soil cultivation, green manure and organic fertilization systems under on-farm and on-station conditions to facilitate the sharing and transfer of experience and knowledge within and outside the group. Possibilities for optimization of the farm-specific reduced soil tillage system in combination with green manuring are being studied in field trials on six organic farms. The aim is to determine, how these measures contribute to an increase in soil organic matter contents, yields and income, to an improved nitrogen and nutrient supply to the crops, as well as support soil fertility in general. Within a long-term monitoring project (MUBIL), the effects of different organic fertilization systems on plant and soil traits have been investigated since 2003, when the farm was converted to organic management. The examined organic fertilization systems, i.e. four treatments representing stockless and livestock keeping systems, differ in lucerne management and the supply of organic manure (communal compost, farmyard manure, digestate from a biogas plant). Previous results of this on-station experiment have shown an improvement of some soil properties, especially soil physical properties, since 2003 in all fertilization systems and without differences between them. The infiltration rate of rainwater has increased because of higher hydraulic conductivity. The aggregate stability has shown also positive trends, which reduces the susceptibility to soil erosion by wind and

  13. Physical-hydraulic properties of a sandy loam typic paleudalf soil under organic cultivation of 'montenegrina' mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore¹

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    Caroline Valverde dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are the most important fruit species in the world, with emphasis to oranges, mandarins and lemons. In Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, most fruit production is found on small properties under organic cultivation. Soil compaction is one of the factors limiting production and due to the fixed row placement of this crop, compaction can arise in various manners in the interrows of the orchard. The aim of this study was to evaluate soil physical properties and water infiltration capacity in response to interrow management in an orchard of mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore 'Montenegrina' under organic cultivation. Interrow management was performed through harrowing, logs in em "V", mowing, and cutting/knocking down plants with a knife roller. Soil physical properties were evaluated in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, between the wheel tracks (BWT, and in the area under the line projection of the canopy (CLP, with undisturbed soil samples collected in the 0.00-0.15, 0.15-0.30, 0.30-0.45, and 0.45-0.60 m layers, with four replicates. The soil water infiltration test was performed using the concentric cylinder method, with a maximum time of 90 min for each test. In general, soil analysis showed a variation in the physical-hydraulic properties of the Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico arênico (sandy loam Typic Paleudalf in the three sampling sites in all layers, regardless of the management procedure in the interrows. Machinery traffic leads to heterogeneity in the soil physical-hydraulic properties in the interrows of the orchard. Soil porosity and bulk density are affected especially in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, which causes a reduction in the constant rate of infiltration and in the accumulated infiltration of water in this sampling site. The use of the disk harrow and mower leads to greater harmful effects on the soil, which can interfere with mandarin production.

  14. Effect of plastic mulching on mycotoxin occurrence and mycobiome abundance in soil samples from asparagus crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, K; Schmidt-Heydt, M; Stoll, D; Diehl, D; Ziegler, J; Geisen, R; Schaumann, G E

    2015-11-01

    Plastic mulching (PM) is widely used in modern agriculture because of its advantageous effects on soil temperature and water conservation, factors which strongly influence the microbiology of the soil. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of PM on mycotoxin occurrence in relation with mycobiome abundance/diversity and soil physicochemical properties. Soil samples were collected from green (GA) and white asparagus (WA) crops, the last under PM. Both crops were cultivated in a ridge-furrow-ridge system without irrigation. Samples were analyzed for mycotoxin occurrence via liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Total colony-forming unit was indicative of mycobiome abundance, and analysis of mycobiome diversity was performed by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. PM avoided the drop of soil temperature in winter and allowed higher soil temperature in early spring compared to non-covered soil. Moreover, the use of PM provided controlled conditions for water content in soil. This was enough to generate a dissimilar mycotoxin occurrence and mycobiome diversity/abundance in covered and non-covered soil. Mycotoxin soil contamination was confirmed for deoxynivalenol (DON), range LOD to 32.1 ng/g (LOD = 1.1 ng/g). The DON values were higher under PM (average 16.9 ± 10.1 ng/g) than in non-covered soil (9.1 ± 7.9 ng/g); however, this difference was not statically significant (p = 0.09). Mycobiome analysis showed a fungal compartment up to fivefold higher in soil under PM compared to GA. The diversity of the mycobiome varied between crops and also along the soil column, with an important dominance of Fusarium species at the root zone in covered soils.

  15. Application of wood chips for soil mulching in the cultivation of ornamental grasses

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    Henschke Monika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A mulch is a layer of material applied to the surface of the soil. Mulching plays an important role in the maintenance of green spaces. Organic materials are still sought for the preparation of mulches. Recently interest in wood chips has grown. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of mulching with pine and birch chips on the contents of phenolic compounds in the soil, as well as on the growth and flowering of ornamental grasses – Bouteloua gracilis (Kunth. Lag. ex Griffiths, Panicum virgatum L. and Pennisetum alopecuroides L. The content of phenolic compounds in the soil steadily increased from spring to autumn. Mulching led to a substantial increase in the level of phenolic compounds. In the first year of cultivation more phenolic compounds were released by chips of pine than birch, while in the second year this difference did not occur. Mulching had a negative impact on the growth and flowering of ornamental grasses, especially in the first year of cultivation. Ornamental grass sensitivity to the substances released from mulches decreased with the age of the plants and was dependent on the species – Bouteloua gracilis was found to be particularly sensitive.

  16. Vegetative growth and yield of strawberry under irrigation and soil mulches for different cultivation environments

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    Pires Regina Célia de Matos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The vegetative growth and yield of strawberry in relation to irrigation levels and soil mulches are still not well known, mainly for different environmental conditions. Two experiments were carried out in Atibaia, SP, Brazil, during 1995, one in a protected environment and the other in an open field, to evaluate the cultivar Campinas IAC-2712, under different irrigation levels and soil mulches (black and clear polyethylene. Three water potential levels in the soil were used in order to define irrigation time, corresponding to -0.010 (N1, -0.035 (N2, and -0.070 (N3 MPa, measured through tensiometers installed at the 10 cm depth. A 2 x 3 factorial arrangement was adopted, as randomized complete block, with 5 replicates. In the protected cultivation, the irrigation levels of -0.010 and -0.035 MPa and the clear plastic mulch favored the vegetative growth, evaluated through plant height, maximum horizontal dimension of the plant, leaf area index, as well as by total marketable fruit yield and its components (mean number and weight of fruits per plant. In the open field cultivation, no effect of treatments due to rainfall were observed.

  17. INFLUENCE OF THE ENVIRONMENT ON THE CONTENT OF ARSENIC IN CULTIVATED SOILS IN ZGORZELEC-BOGATYNIA REGION

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    Ewa Kucharczak-Moryl

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in the area of influence of Mine and Power Plant “Turów” which, through the emission of gaseous and particulate pollutants contribute to soil contamination, among other things by arsenic. The aim of this study was to determine the total content of this metal in samples of anable soils collected in the area of the impact of the above-mentioned emitters. At the same time their grain-size distribution and their physico-chemical properties, as pH and percentage of organic matter were determined. Soils collected from a depth of 0.0 to 0.3 m below ground surface, and from 0.3 to 0.6 m b.g.s. came from the area of direct impact of the mine and power plant (area of Bogatynia and the region of Zgorzelec ,located out of the direct impact of emitters. Total arsenic content was determined by ICP- AES using a plasma spectrometer Varian Liberty Series II. All soil samples, independently of the place of origin, showed acid pH, and organic matter content in both research areas was higher at a depth of 0.0 to 0.3 m. In accordance with the classification of PTG 2008, soils from the area of Zgorzelec were classified as very light, light and medium (loose sand, loamy sand, sandy loam and light loam, with a high content of sand fraction it was also found. The soils of Bogatynia region were classified as medium and heavy silty (loamy silt and clayey silt, with a high content of silt fraction . Increased levels of arsenic in cultivated soils in the area of influence of the Mine and Power Plant, on the one hand they are connected with its anthropogenic its release during the combustion of coal, and on the other hand it is the influence of physico-chemical properties of soils. It is the reason of increased accumulation of this metal, mostly at a depth of 0.3 to 0.6 m. Significant, 3 times, higher level of this metal was showed in the area of direct impact of Mine and Power Plant “Turów”, compared with the area of Zgorzelec, apart from

  18. Differential Responses of Nitrifier and Denitrifier to Dicyandiamide in Short-and Long-Term Intensive Vegetable Cultivation Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi; YANG Yang; QIN Hong-ling; ZHU Yi-jun; WEI Wen-xue

    2014-01-01

    Nitriifcation inhibitors, such as dicyandiamide (DCD), have been shown to decrease leaching from urea- and ammonium-based fertilizers in agricultural soils. The effect of nitriifcation inhibitors on nitriifer and denitriifer in short-and long-term intensive vegetable cultivation soils was poorly understood. In this study, the pot trial was conducted to investigate the differential responses of nitriifer (amoA-containing bacteria) and denitriifer (nirK-containing bacteria) to DCD in short-(soil S) and long-term (soil L) intensive vegetable cultivation soils. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) were employed to detect the abundance and composition of amoA-and nirK-containing communities. The results indicated that application of DCD led to a consistently higher NH4+-N concentration during the whole incubation in soil L, while it was quickly decreased in soil S after 21 days. Furthermore, DCD induced more severe decrease of the abundance of amoA-containing bacteria in soil L than in soil S. However, the abundance of the nirK-containing community was not signiifcantly affected by DCD in both soils. Long-term vegetable cultivation resulted in a super-dominant amoA-containing bacteria group and less divergence in soil L compared with soil S, and DCD did not cause obvious shifts of the composition of ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB). On the contrary, both amoA-and nirK-containing bacterial compositions were inlfuenced by DCD in soil S. The results suggested that long-term intensive vegetable cultivation with heavy nitrogen fertilization resulted in signiifcant shifts of AOB community, and this community was sensitive to DCD, but denitriifers were not clearly affected by DCD.

  19. Metal contamination of home gardens soils and cultivated vegetables in the province of Brescia, Italy: Implications for human exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Roberta; Hashim, Dana; Smith, Donald R.; Guazzetti, Stefano; Donna, Filippo; Ferretti, Enrica; Curatolo, Michele; Moneta, Caterina; Beone, Gian Maria; Lucchini, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    Background For the past century, ferroalloy industries in Brescia province, Italy produced particulate emissions enriched in manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), aluminum (Al). This study assessed metal concentrations in soil and vegetables of regions with varying ferroalloy industrial activity levels. Methods Home gardens (n=63) were selected in three regions of varying ferroalloy plant activity duration in Brescia province. Total soil metal concentration and extractability were measured by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), aqua regia extraction, and modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction. Unwashed and washed spinach and turnips cultivated in the same gardens were analyzed for metal concentrations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Results Median soil Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in home gardens near ferroalloy plants compared to reference home gardens. The BCR method yielded the most mobile soil fraction (the sum of extractable metals in Fractions 1 and 2) and all metal concentrations were higher in ferroalloy plant areas. Unwashed spinach showed higher metal concentrations compared to washed spinach. However, some metals in washed spinach were higher in the reference area likely due to history of agricultural product use. Over 60% of spinach samples exceeded the 2- to 4-fold Commission of European Communities and Codex Alimentarius Commission maximum Pb concentrations, and 10% of the same spinach samples exceeded 2- to 3-fold maximum Cd concentrations set by both organizations. Turnip metal concentrations were below maximum standard reference values. Conclusions Prolonged industrial emissions increase median metal concentrations and most soluble fractions (BCR F1+F2) in home garden soils near ferroalloy plants. Areas near ferroalloy plant sites had spinach Cd and Pb metal concentrations several-fold above maximum standard references. We

  20. Yields and nutrient pools in soils cultivated with Tectona grandis and Gmelina arborea in Nigerian rainforest ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A.J. Adekunle

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the yield of the two most prominent exotic species in southwest Nigeria and the nutrient status of soils cultivated with these species. The impacts of plantation development on soil nutrients were also examined. The plantations species are Gmelina arborea (Gmelina stands established in 1984, 1988, 1990 and 1994 and Tectona grandis (Teak established in 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996 and 1997. Growth data and composite soil samples from 3 depths (0–15, 15–30 and 30–60 cm were collected from five equal sized plots (20 × 20 m2 randomly located in the plantation of the two species. Also, soil samples were collected from the adjacent natural forest for comparison. The results for both species show that tree growth variables increased substantially with increase in tree age. There was significant difference in number of trees per hectare, dominant diameter, volume/ha and MAI for the Gmelina stands. In the Teak stand, there was significant difference in most of the tree growth variables also. Nutrients required by plants to survive were present in the soil samples from the plantations and the natural forest in different proportions. There was high correlation between percentage sand and most of the tree growth variables for both species. The pH value obtained for the Gmelina stands ranged between 6.47 and 7.47 while that of Teak stands ranged between 5.57 and 8.33. There was also a high and positive relationship between some soil chemical properties and tree growth variables. The highest significant correlation coefficient existed between phosphorus concentration and basal area for stands of both species. The r-values are 0.98 and 0.96 for Gmelina and Teak, respectively. While a high, negative and significant r-value (−0.88 was also obtained between potassium and volume/ha for the Gmelina stands, a high positive r-value was obtained between the potassium and basal area for the Teak stands. Comparison of soil nutrients in the

  1. Effect of long-term soil amendments on speciation of fallout {sup 90}Sr and stable Sr in a cultivated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, H.; Takeda, A.; Uemura, T.; Hisamatsu, S.; Inaba, J. [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Dept. of Radioecology, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The present study examined speciation of fallout {sup 90}Sr and stable Sr in a cultivated soil with different soil managements for three plots over 60 years: (1) F-plot, (2) FC-plot and (3) FCL-plot, where F, C and L represented chemical fertilizers, compost and lime, respectively. Four fractions of {sup 90}Sr and stable Sr in the soil samples were individually extracted by means of 1 M CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4} (E2, exchangeable ions), 0.04 M NH{sub 2}OH- HCl in 25% CH{sub 3}COOH (E3, E2 + bound to Fe-Mn oxides), H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidisation and then added 3.2 M CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4} in 20% HNO{sub 3} (E4, E3 + bound to organic matter), and 6 M HCl after igniting at 450 deg C (E5, E4 + residue). The pHs of the water extractant in the F-, FC- and FCL-plots were 4.1, 4.7 and 6.2, respectively, and acidification of the soils in F- and FC-plots was enhanced by long-term applications of chemical fertilizers without liming. The {sup 90}Sr concentrations of E5 fraction (total content) in the F-, FC and FCL-plots were 0.21, 0.89 and 1.8 Bq kg{sup -1}, respectively. The {sup 90}Sr contents in the four fractions decreased with acidification, and the application of compost inhibited the desorption of {sup 90}Sr in the soil. The {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the fractions increased in order of E2cultivated soil varies with the type of soil amendments, and the distribution of the {sup 90}Sr concentration in the fractions is also changed. The concentration of {sup 90}Sr in each fraction had a good correlation with that of stable Sr, and the ratio of {sup 90}Sr to stable Sr in the fractions will be discussed. This work was supported by a grant from the Aomori Prefectural Government, Japan. (author)

  2. Genetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal populations in fallow and cultivated soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren; Matzen, Hans

    2008-01-01

    protein-coding genes GmFOX2 and GmTOR2 were used as co-dominant genetic markers together with the large subunit (LSU) rDNA. The gene diversity and genetic structure of Glomus mosseae, Glomus geosporum and Glomus caledonium were compared within and between the fields. •  Spores of G. caledonium and G...... be attributed to variation between plots rather than subplots, suggesting that the lack of soil cultivation resulted in more heterogeneous population genetic structures. Analyses of haplotype networks of the fungi suggested a subdivision of G. mosseae haplotypes between the two fields, whereas no such division...

  3. Effect of Different Cultivation Periods on Soil Stable Organic Carbon Pool in Citrus Orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yi-xiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of different cultivation periods on soil stable organic carbon pools and fractions in citrus orchard was investigated to provide scientific basis on the study of orchard soil carbon sequestration by the temporal-spatial substitution method and physical and chemical fractionation method. The results showed that the citrus orchard planted in 1954 compared with the citrus orchard planted in 1980, the content of total organic carbon increased by 27.16%, organic carbon content in macro-aggregates increased by 13.59%, organic carbon content in micro-aggregates increased by 80.19%, organic carbon content of heavy fraction increased by 29.25%, resistant organic carbon content increased by 32.00%, black carbon content increased by 4.01%. Organic carbon which combined with micro-aggregates was protected, and resistant organic carbon and black carbon were recalcitrant organic carbon in soil, this indicated that the stable organic carbon fractions gradually enriched in soil with the increase of growing periods, which was conducive to improve carbon sink in citrus orchard soil.

  4. Chemical, Biochemical, and Microbiological Properties of Soils from Abandoned and Extensively Cultivated Olive Orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Palese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The abandonment of olive orchards is a phenomenon of great importance triggered mainly by economic and social causes. The aim of this study was to investigate some chemical, biochemical, and microbiological properties in a soil of a southern olive grove abandoned for 25 years. In order to define the effect of the long-term land abandonment on soil properties, an adjacent olive grove managed according to extensive practices was taken as reference (essentially minimum tillage and no fertilization. Soil organic matter, total nitrogen, and pH were significantly higher in the abandoned olive grove due to the absence of tillage and the natural inputs of organic matter at high C/N ratio which, inter alia, increased the number of cellulolytic bacteria and stimulated the activity of β-glucosidase, an indicator of a more advanced stage of soil evolution. The soil of the abandoned olive orchard showed a lower number of total bacteria and fungi and a lower microbial diversity, measured by means of the Biolog method, as a result of a sort of specialization trend towards low quality organic substrates. From this point of view, the extensive cultivation management seemed to not induce a disturbance to microbiological communities.

  5. Chemical, biochemical, and microbiological properties of soils from abandoned and extensively cultivated olive orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palese, A M; Magno, R; Casacchia, T; Curci, M; Baronti, S; Miglietta, F; Crecchio, C; Xiloyannis, C; Sofo, A

    2013-01-01

    The abandonment of olive orchards is a phenomenon of great importance triggered mainly by economic and social causes. The aim of this study was to investigate some chemical, biochemical, and microbiological properties in a soil of a southern olive grove abandoned for 25 years. In order to define the effect of the long-term land abandonment on soil properties, an adjacent olive grove managed according to extensive practices was taken as reference (essentially minimum tillage and no fertilization). Soil organic matter, total nitrogen, and pH were significantly higher in the abandoned olive grove due to the absence of tillage and the natural inputs of organic matter at high C/N ratio which, inter alia, increased the number of cellulolytic bacteria and stimulated the activity of β -glucosidase, an indicator of a more advanced stage of soil evolution. The soil of the abandoned olive orchard showed a lower number of total bacteria and fungi and a lower microbial diversity, measured by means of the Biolog method, as a result of a sort of specialization trend towards low quality organic substrates. From this point of view, the extensive cultivation management seemed to not induce a disturbance to microbiological communities.

  6. Physical-hydric properties of a soil cultivated with eucalyptus irrigated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Braga Belchior

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was evaluate the physical-hydric properties of an ultisol cultivated with two eucalyptus hybrids, Urograndis and Grancam, irrigated and without irrigated. The experimental design was a randomized block in a split split plots, with 4 repetitions. In the plots, the treatments employed corresponded two irrigation systems (microsprinkler and drip and without irrigation area. In subplot, treatments were the eucalyptus hybrids (Urograndis and Grancam and the sub-subplots were the depths of soil of 0.0-0.1 m, 0.1-0.2 m, 0.2-0.3 m, 0.3-0.4 m and 0.4-0.5 m. Were evaluated the bulk density and soil porosity, soil penetration resistance and available water capacity for depths 0.0-0.5 m. The results were statistically analyzed by Tukey test to 5% probability. The irrigation (drip and microsprinkler provides lowest soil penetration resistance in surface layer. Generally, the eucalyptus hybrids not influence in the soil attributes analyzed.

  7. Changes in the Diversity of Soil Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi after Cultivation for Biofuel Production in a Guantanamo (Cuba) Tropical System

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a native vegetation soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba), in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soi...

  8. Lead behavior in soil treated with contaminated sewage sludge and cultivated with maize

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    Marcilene Ferrari Barriquelo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb behavior was studied in soil treated twice with sewage sludge contaminated with lead at interval of 18 months. Soil samples received five different treatments: three with lead [0 (reference; 2,500; 5,000 mug g-1] and two with a mixture of lead and cadmium (interferer (2,500 + 2,500 and 5,000 + 5,000 mug g-1, respectively. Vases containing treated soil were cultivated with maize in a greenhouse for 75 days. Pb was extracted using nitric perchloric digestion and analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The soil, containing sewage sludge contaminated by lead presented a higher concentration of Pb. The metal concentration remained constant in all treatments at 20-60 cm depth. No absorption of Pb by the plants was detected.O comportamento do Pb foi estudado num Latossolo Vermelho Escuro tratado com lodo de esgoto (biossólido contaminado, 18 meses após o tratamento do mesmo. As amostras de solo coletadas num perfil de 0 a 80 cm de profundidade foram dispostas da mesma forma em tubos de PVC (80 cm de altura e 10 cm de diâmetro em triplicata, os quais tinham lateral e diametralmente opostos, a cada 10 cm de profundidade a partir dos 20 cm da superfície, tubos sonda contendo o mesmo solo do interior do tubo de PVC. As frações de solo de 0 a 20 cm de cada tubo, receberam 5 tratamentos: três concentrações de chumbo: 0,0 (referência; 2.500; 5.000 mig g-1 e duas com a mistura de chumbo e cádmio (como interferente nas seguintes proporções: 2.500 : 2.500 e 5.000 : 5.000 mig g-1, respectivamente. Nos tubos com o solo contaminado, em casa de vegetação, foi cultivado o milho como planta teste, durante 75 dias. Após, as plantas, os solos tratados (0 a 20 cm e os solos dos tubos sonda foram coletados, preparados e digeridos com ácido nítrico e perclórico. As concentrações de Pb foram obtidas pelo método da espectrometria de absorção atômica. As amostras de solo da camada de 0-20 cm foram as que apresentaram as maiores

  9. Phenolic profiles of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial samples of Melissa officinalis L. infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Dias, Maria Inês; Sousa, Maria João; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) is normally consumed as an infusion and presents therapeutic properties, such as sedative, carminative and antispasmodic, also being included in some pharmaceutical preparations. The phenolic profiles of different samples of lemon balm, prepared as infusions, were evaluated by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS. The profiles were compared in order to understand the differences between cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial (bags and granulated) samples. All the samples showed a similar phenolic profile, presenting differences only in the quantities found of each compound. Rosmarinic acid was the most abundant compound, being higher in commercial samples, especially in tea bag sample (55.68mg/g of infusion) and lower in in vitro cultured sample (15.46mg/g). Moreover, dimers, trimers and tetramers of caffeic acid were identified and quantified for the first time in lemon balm. Only one flavonoid, luteolin-3'-O-glucuronide was found in all the samples, ranging from 8.43mg/g in commercial granulate sample to 1.22mg/g in in vitro cultured sample. Overall, cultivated and in vitro cultured samples presented the lowest amounts of phenolic compounds (59.59 and 30.21mg/g, respectively); otherwise, commercial samples showed the highest contents (109.24mg/g for tea bag and 101.03mg/g for granulate sample). The present study shows that infusion of lemon balm can be a source of phenolic compounds, known for their bioactive effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution and identification of proteolytic Bacillus spp. in paddy field soil under rice cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Hayano, K

    1993-07-01

    Proteolytic bacteria in paddy field soils under rice cultivation were characterized and enumerated using azocoll agar plates. Bacillus spp. were the proteolytic bacteria that were most frequently present, comprising 59% of the isolates. They were always the numerically dominant proteolytic bacteria isolated from three kinds of fertilizer treatments (yearly application of rice-straw compost and chemical fertilizer, yearly application of chemical fertilizer, and no fertilizer application) and at three different stages of rice development (vegetative growth stage, maximal tillering stage, and harvest stage). Of the 411 proteolytic bacteria isolated, 124 isolates had stronger proteolytic activity than others on the basis of gelatin liquefaction tests and most of them were Bacillus spp. (100% in 1989 and 92.4% in 1991). Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus were the main bacteria of this group and Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus megaterium were also present. We conclude that these Bacillus spp. are the primary source of soil protease in these paddy fields.

  11. SELECTIVE ISOLATION OF A GRAM NEGATIVE CARBAMATE PESTICIDE DEGRADING BACTERIUM FROM BRINJAL CULTIVATED SOIL

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    Dilara Islam Sharif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A bacterial species having the ability to grow in the presence of carbosulfan pesticide “Marshall” was isolated from Solanum melongena (brinjal cultivated soil in Khulna region, Bangladeh, having a history of pesticide usage. The strain was morphologically and biochemically identified to belong to the genera Pseudomonas. A comparative study of growth of this strain with other isolated bacteria showed its ability to grow in the presence of different concentrations of Marshall. The susceptibility of the stain to Marshall was also assessed through disk diffusion assay which showed the strain to be resistant at concentrations of Marshal commonly used under field conditions. The selected strain also showed its capability to degrade Marshall through observed characteristics on sublimated agar plates. The biodegradation capability of the strain isolated in this study can be valuable for further study towards bioremediation of pesticide contaminated soils.

  12. Method for spiking soil samples with organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Ulla C; Ekelund, Flemming; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2002-01-01

    We examined the harmful side effects on indigenous soil microorganisms of two organic solvents, acetone and dichloromethane, that are normally used for spiking of soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for experimental purposes. The solvents were applied in two contamination protocols to either...... higher than in control soil, probably due mainly to release of predation from indigenous protozoa. In order to minimize solvent effects on indigenous soil microorganisms when spiking native soil samples with compounds having a low water solubility, we propose a common protocol in which the contaminant...... the whole soil sample or 25% of the soil volume, which was subsequently mixed with 75% untreated soil. For dichloromethane, we included a third protocol, which involved application to 80% of the soil volume with or without phenanthrene and introduction of Pseudomonas fluorescens VKI171 SJ132 genetically...

  13. The effect of sewage sludge application on soil properties and willow (Salix sp.) cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniak, Magdalena; Wyrwicka, Anna; Tołoczko, Wojciech; Serwecińska, Liliana; Zieliński, Marek

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the study was to determine the impact of sewage sludge from three wastewater treatment plants of different sizes (small, medium and large) applied in two doses (3 and 9 tons per hectare) on soil properties, determined as the content of organic carbon and humus fractions, bacterial abundance, phytotoxicity and PCDD/PCDF TEQ concentrations. The study also evaluated the impact of this sewage sludge on the biometric and physiological parameters and detoxification reaction of willow (Salix sp.) as a typical crop used for the remediation of soil following sludge application. The cultivation of willow on soil treated with sludge was found to result in a gradual increase of humus fractions, total organic carbon content and bacterial abundance as well as soil properties measured using Lepidium sativum. However, it also produced an initial increase of soil phytotoxicity, indicated by Sinapis alba and Sorghum sacharatum, and PCDD/PCDF Toxic Equivalent (TEQ) concentrations, which then fell during the course of the experiment, particularly in areas planted by willow. Although the soil phytotoxicity and PCDD/PCDF TEQ content of the sewage sludge-amended soil initially increased, sludge application was found to have a positive influence on willow, probably due to its high nutrient and carbon content. The obtained results reveal increases in willow biomass, average leaf surface area and leaf length as well as chlorophyll a+b content. Moreover, a strong decline was found in the activity of the detoxifying enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GSTs), a multifunctional enzyme involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics in plants, again demonstrating the used sludge had a positive influence on willow performance.

  14. Changes in the diversity of soil arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi after cultivation for biofuel production in a Guantanamo (Cuba tropical system.

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    Maria del Mar Alguacil

    Full Text Available The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a native vegetation soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba, in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soil fertility (total N, Organic C, microbial biomass C, aggregate stability percentage, pH and electrical conductivity were changed with the cultivation of both crop species. The AM fungal small sub-unit (SSU rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty AM fungal sequence types were identified: 19 belong to the Glomeraceae and one to the Paraglomeraceae. Two AMF sequence types related to cultured AMF species (Glo G3 for Glomus sinuosum and Glo G6 for Glomus intraradices-G. fasciculatum-G. irregulare did not occur in the soil cultivated with J. curcas and R. communis. The soil properties (total N, Organic C and microbial biomass C were higher in the soil cultivated with the two plant species. The diversity of the AMF community decreased in the soil of both crops, with respect to the native vegetation soil, and varied significantly depending on the crop species planted. Thus, R. communis soil showed higher AMF diversity than J. curcas soil. In conclusion, R. communis could be more suitable for the long-term conservation and sustainable management of these tropical ecosytems.

  15. Changes in the diversity of soil arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi after cultivation for biofuel production in a Guantanamo (Cuba) tropical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, Maria del Mar; Torrecillas, Emma; Hernández, Guillermina; Roldán, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a native vegetation soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba), in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soil fertility (total N, Organic C, microbial biomass C, aggregate stability percentage, pH and electrical conductivity) were changed with the cultivation of both crop species. The AM fungal small sub-unit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty AM fungal sequence types were identified: 19 belong to the Glomeraceae and one to the Paraglomeraceae. Two AMF sequence types related to cultured AMF species (Glo G3 for Glomus sinuosum and Glo G6 for Glomus intraradices-G. fasciculatum-G. irregulare) did not occur in the soil cultivated with J. curcas and R. communis. The soil properties (total N, Organic C and microbial biomass C) were higher in the soil cultivated with the two plant species. The diversity of the AMF community decreased in the soil of both crops, with respect to the native vegetation soil, and varied significantly depending on the crop species planted. Thus, R. communis soil showed higher AMF diversity than J. curcas soil. In conclusion, R. communis could be more suitable for the long-term conservation and sustainable management of these tropical ecosytems.

  16. Changes in the Diversity of Soil Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi after Cultivation for Biofuel Production in a Guantanamo (Cuba) Tropical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, Maria del Mar; Torrecillas, Emma; Hernández, Guillermina; Roldán, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a native vegetation soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba), in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soil fertility (total N, Organic C, microbial biomass C, aggregate stability percentage, pH and electrical conductivity) were changed with the cultivation of both crop species. The AM fungal small sub-unit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty AM fungal sequence types were identified: 19 belong to the Glomeraceae and one to the Paraglomeraceae. Two AMF sequence types related to cultured AMF species (Glo G3 for Glomus sinuosum and Glo G6 for Glomus intraradices-G. fasciculatum-G. irregulare) did not occur in the soil cultivated with J. curcas and R. communis. The soil properties (total N, Organic C and microbial biomass C) were higher in the soil cultivated with the two plant species. The diversity of the AMF community decreased in the soil of both crops, with respect to the native vegetation soil, and varied significantly depending on the crop species planted. Thus, R. communis soil showed higher AMF diversity than J. curcas soil. In conclusion, R. communis could be more suitable for the long-term conservation and sustainable management of these tropical ecosytems. PMID:22536339

  17. Soil pH management without lime, a strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cultivated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Shahid; Bakken, Lars; Reent Köster, Jan; Tore Mørkved, Pål; Simon, Nina; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-04-01

    For decades, agricultural scientists have searched for methods to reduce the climate forcing of food production by increasing carbon sequestration in the soil and reducing the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O). The outcome of this research is depressingly meagre and the two targets appear incompatible: efforts to increase carbon sequestration appear to enhance the emissions of N2O. Currently there is a need to find alternative management strategies which may effectively reduce both the CO2 and N2O footprints of food production. Soil pH is a master variable in soil productivity and plays an important role in controlling the chemical and biological activity in soil. Recent investigations of the physiology of denitrification have provided compelling evidence that the emission of N2O declines with increasing pH within the range 5-7. Thus, by managing the soil pH at a near neutral level appears to be a feasible way to reduce N2O emissions. Such pH management has been a target in conventional agriculture for a long time, since a near-neutral pH is optimal for a majority of cultivated plants. The traditional way to counteract acidification of agricultural soils is to apply lime, which inevitably leads to emission of CO2. An alternative way to increase the soil pH is the use of mafic rock powders, which have been shown to counteract soil acidification, albeit with a slower reaction than lime. Here we report a newly established field trail in Norway, in which we compare the effects of lime and different mafic mineral and rock powders (olivine, different types of plagioclase) on CO2 and N2O emissions under natural agricultural conditions. Soil pH is measured on a monthly basis from all treatment plots. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission measurements are carried out on a weekly basis using static chambers and an autonomous robot using fast box technique. Field results from the first winter (fallow) show immediate effect of lime on soil pH, and slower effects of the mafic rocks. The

  18. Changes in carbon stability and microbial activity in size fractions of micro-aggregates in a rice soil chronosequence under long term rice cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Genxing; Liu, Yalong; Wang, Ping; Li, Lianqinfg; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Bian, Rongjun; Ding, Yuanjun; Ma, Chong

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown soil carbon sequestration through physical protection of relative labile carbon intra micro-aggregates with formation of large sized macro-aggregates under good management of soil and agricultural systems. While carbon stabilization had been increasingly concerned as ecosystem properties, the mechanisms underspin bioactivity of soil carbon with increased carbon stability has been still poorly understood. In this study, topsoil samples were collected from rice soils derived from salt marsh under different length of rice cultivation up to 700 years from eastern China. Particle size fractions (PSF) of soil aggregates were separated using a low energy dispersion protocol. Carbon fractions in the PSFs were analyzed either with FTIR spectroscopy. Soil microbial community of bacterial, fungal and archaeal were analyzed with molecular fingerprinting using specific gene primers. Soil respiration and carbon gain from amended maize as well as enzyme activities were measured using lab incubation protocols. While the PSFs were dominated by the fine sand (200-20μm) and silt fraction (20-2μm), the mass proportion both of sand (2000-200μm) and clay (content in the size fractions followed a similar trend to that of SOC. Bacterial and archaeal gene abundance was concentrated in both sand and clay fractions but that of fungi in sand fraction, and sharply decreased with the decreasing size of aggregate fraction. Gene abundance of archaeal followed a similar trend to that of bacterial but showing an increasing trend with prolonged rice cultivation in both sand and clay fractions. Change in community diversity with sizes of aggregate fractions was found of fungi and weakly of bacterial but not of archaeal. Soil respiration ratio (Respired CO2-C to SOC) was highest in silt fraction, followed by the fine sand fraction but lowest in sand and clay fractions in the rice soils cultivated over 100 years. Again, scaled by total gen concentration, respiration was

  19. Agronomic efficiency of polymer-coated triple superphosphate in onion cultivated in contrasting texture soils

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    Wantuir Filipe Teixeira Chagas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Information related to phosphate fertilization and coated phosphate fertilizer in onion is scarce. Thus, this study was carried out to evaluate agronomic efficiency, production and nutritional characteristics of triple superphosphate coated with polymers in onion cultivated in contrasting texture soils. Two experiments were carried out under protected conditions in pots containing 5 kg soil. The experimental design was completely randomized with treatments arranged in a 2 x 5 factorial: triple superphosphate (TSP and polymer-coated triple superphosphate (TSP+P applied in five phosphorus rates: Dystroferric Red Latosol (LVdf (clayey = 0; 100; 200; 400; 800 mg P2O5 kg-1, and Quartzarenic Neosol (sandy = 0; 75; 150; 300; 600 mg P2O5 kg-1, with three replications. Results indicated that polymer-coated TSP showed no difference for bulb mass and agronomic efficiency for phosphorus fertilization. Agronomic efficiency of phosphorus fertilization decreased with the increase in the amount of phosphorus applied. Phosphorus accumulation for onion bulb cultivated in Dystroferric Red Latosol (LVdf was higher with the use of polymer-coated triple superphosphate. Growth, production and nutritional characteristics in onion were affected by phosphorus. The highest bulbs mass production and phosphorus accumulation occurred at the doses of 783; 629 mg kg-1 P2O5 (Dystroferric Red Latosol - LVdf, and of 406; 600 mg kg-1 P2O5 (Quartzarenic Neosol -RQ.

  20. Initial growth and yield structure of selected cultivars of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. cultivated on mineral soils

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    Szwonek Eugeniusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the possibility of cranberry cultivation on mineral soils and to assess the influence of vegetative biomass development, generative growth and yield components on the yielding of three cranberry cultivars originating in the USA (Stevens, Pilgrim and Ben Lear at two locations in Poland. The key biometrical traits involved in yield formation were taken into account, and the soil and plant chemical conditions were evaluated. All of the measured biometrical characteristics were strongly influenced by the location and the year of cultivation, and varietal differences were also noted. The most important determinants that explained yield variation were: the number of uprights per square meter, floral induction and berry set. However, the participation of each component in yield variation was strongly affected by the location, age of plantation and to a minor extent by the cultivar. The study confirmed the possibility of cranberry cultivation on mineral soils with a low pH. The biggest average yield of the three years was collected from cv. Stevens as cultivated on sandy soil in contrast to the same cultivar grown on sandy loam soil. In the case of sandy loam soil after acidification, cv. Pilgrim appeared to be a relatively better yielding cultivar.

  1. Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Barry H [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-16

    A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

  2. Changes in the soil microbial community after reductive soil disinfestation and cucumber seedling cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinqi; Liu, Liangliang; Wen, Teng; Zhang, Jinbo; Wang, Fenghe; Cai, Zucong

    2016-06-01

    Reductive soil disinfestation (RSD) has been proven to be an effective and environmentally friendly way to control many soilborne pathogens and diseases. In this study, the RSDs using ethanol (Et-RSD) and alfalfa (Al-RSD) as organic carbons were performed in a Rhizoctonia solani-infected soil, and the dissimilarities of microbial communities during the RSDs and after planting two seasons of cucumber seedlings in the RSDs-treated soil were respectively investigated by MiSeq pyrosequencing. The results showed that, as for bacteria, Coprococcus, Flavisolibacter, Rhodanobacter, Symbiobacterium, and UC-Ruminococcaceae became the dominant bacterial genera at the end of Al-RSD. In contrast, Et-RSD soil involved more bacteria belonging to Firmicutes, such as Sedimentibacter, UC-Gracilibacteraceae, and Desulfosporosinus. For fungi, Chaetomium significantly increased at the end of RSDs, while Rhizoctonia and Aspergillus significantly decreased. After planting two seasons of cucumber seedlings, those bacteria belonging to Firmicutes significantly decreased, but Lysobacter and Rhodanobacter belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria as well as UC-Sordariales and Humicola belonging to Ascomycota alternatively increased in Al- and Et-RSD-treated soils. Besides, some nitrification, denitrification, and nitrogen fixation genes were apparently increased in the RSD-treated soils, but the effect was more profound in Al-RSD than Et-RSD. Overall, Et-RSD could induced more antagonists belonging to Firmicutes under anaerobic condition, whereas Al-RSD could continuously stimulate some functional microorganisms (Lysobacter and Rhodanobacter) and further improve nitrogen transformation activities in the soil at the coming cropping season.

  3. Method for spiking soil samples with organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Ulla C; Ekelund, Flemming; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2002-01-01

    We examined the harmful side effects on indigenous soil microorganisms of two organic solvents, acetone and dichloromethane, that are normally used for spiking of soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for experimental purposes. The solvents were applied in two contamination protocols to either...... the whole soil sample or 25% of the soil volume, which was subsequently mixed with 75% untreated soil. For dichloromethane, we included a third protocol, which involved application to 80% of the soil volume with or without phenanthrene and introduction of Pseudomonas fluorescens VKI171 SJ132 genetically...

  4. Export of soil macronutrients in area cultivated with maize to feeding feedlot steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Kyoshi Ueno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The maize cultivated for forage requires special care with soil management. The nutrients exportation by silage might cause reducing of soil fertility, with consequent decrease of yield and nutritional quality of posterior crops. The aim of this work was assess levels of macronutrients in maize plant fragments (stem, leaves, bracts plus cob and grains, at stage of ensilage, in entire plant (silage forage and in the mature grains; measure the nutrients exportation from soil by forage or grains. After, two diets were used in feedlot cattle, first was based on silage and other based in grains, to appraise the potential of nutrients to return into soil by manure and the final account of nutrients balance. The levels of N, P, K, Ca and Mg from forage were, respectively: 1,37; 0,24; 0,81; 0,2 and 0,22%; and in grains: 1,8; 0,28; 0,34; 0,12; and 0,11%. The fertilization performed was enough to supply extracted nutrients when was harvested only grains, promoting deficits in soil of 93 kg ha-1 of N and 84 kg ha-1 of K when was harvested forage. The manure of animals feed with silage+concentrated, compared to diet without roughage (80% grains and 20% protein core, cycled different amounts of N (276,28 vs 59,37, P (128,12 vs 33,37, K (58,32 vs 5,38, Ca (177,7 vs 78,89 and Mg (43,64 vs 11,81 in the cultivated area. The evaluated production systems presented capacity to maintain the levels of nutrients at soil through replacement via manure, and might contribute to the enrichment of fertility and reduce costs with mineral fertilizers in successive crops. The system which forage was used presented deficit of 25 kg ha-1 de K, probably due to insufficient amount of K applied, which recommendation is frequently made to grain production.

  5. Comparison of Methods for Soil Sampling and Carbon Content Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željka Zgorelec

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper methods for sampling and analysis of total carbon in soil were compared. Soil sampling was done by sampling scheme according to agricultural soil monitoring recommendations. Soil samples were collected as single (four individual probe patterns and composite soil samples (16 individual probe patterns from agriculture soil. In soil samples mass ratio of total soil carbon was analyzed by dry combustion method (according to Dumas; HRN ISO 10694:2004 in Analytical Laboratory of Department of General Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture University of Zagreb (FAZ and by oxidation method with chromium sulfuric acid (modified HRN ISO 14235:2004 in Analytical laboratory of Croatian Center for Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, Department of Soil and Land Conservation (ZZT. The observed data showed very strong correlation (r = 0.8943; n = 42 between two studied methods of analysis. Very strong correlation was also noted between different sampling procedures for single and composite samples in both laboratories, and coefficients of correlation were 0.9697 and 0.9950 (n = 8, respectively.

  6. Conservation tillage, optimal water and organic nutrient supply enhance soil microbial activities during wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Singh, Geeta; Singh, Rana P.

    2011-01-01

    The field experiments were conducted on sandy loam soil at New Delhi, during 2007 and 2008 to investigate the effect of conservation tillage, irrigation regimes (sub-optimal, optimal and supra-optimal water regimes), and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices on soil biological parameters in wheat cultivation. The conservation tillage soils has shown significant (pbiofertilizer+25% Green Manure) has been used in combination with the conservation tillage and the optimum water supply. Study demonstrated that microbial activity could be regulated by tillage, water and nitrogen management in the soil in a sustainable manner. PMID:24031665

  7. Bioprospecting the lat gene in soil samples

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aarohi Dharwadkar; Vidya Gupta; Aditi Pant

    2003-09-01

    Twenty soil communities from the northeastern forests (Assam) and the Western Ghats (Maharashtra) were screened for the presence of the lysine aminotransferase (lat) gene from Nocardia. Hybridization probes and primers were synthesized in accordance with the reported sequence of the Nocardia lat gene from GenBank (number: G1 49355). Seven positives were obtained from the 20 soils. Six of the seven positive were from the Western Ghats and one from the northeast Assam forests. Eighteen actinomycete isolates from the 7 positive soils showed the presence of the lat gene. Only 9 isolates actually produced an antibiotic. These results are discussed.

  8. Different influences of cadmium on soil microbial activity and structure with Chinese cabbage cultivated and non-cultivated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao Min; Ma Aili; Peng Ying [Dept. of Resources Science, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab. of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou (China); Xie Xiaomei [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal, accumulated in soil by anthropogenic activities and has serious effects on soil microbial activities in contaminated soils. Moreover, there is a lack of reliable data on the effects of Cd in the soil-plant system, since most of the information on Cd-microorganism interactions in soils are based on sewage sludge without plants. The main objective of this study was to assess the effects of Cd on soil microbial activities and community structure during growth of plant. Materials and methods: A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of different concentrations of Cd on soil microbial activities during the growth of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis) in two different soils. The field soils were used in this short-term (60 days) greenhouse pot experiment. The soils were spiked with different Cd concentrations, namely, 0, 1, 3, 8, 15, 30 mg Cd kg{sup -1} oven dry soil, respectively. The experimental design was a 2 (soil) x 2 (vegetation/non-vegetation) x 5 (treatments (Cd)) x 3 (replicate factorial experiment). After 60 days, the study was terminated and soils were analyzed for selected microbial parameters, such as, microbial biomass carbon (C{sub mic}), basal respiration and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). Results and discussion: Application of Cd at lower concentrations (1 and 3 mg kg{sup -1}) resulted in a slight increase in C{sub mic}, whereas Cd concentrations >8 mg kg{sup -1} caused an immediate significant decline in C{sub mic}, the ratio of C{sub mic} to total organic C (C{sub mic}/C{sub org}) decreased and the metabolic quotient (qCO{sub 2}, namely, the basal respiration CO{sub 2}/C{sub mic}) increased with elevated Cd concentration. However, the impact on soil C{sub mic} and basal respiration caused by Cd was dependent from plant cover or soil properties. The results of PLFAs showed relative increase in fatty acid indicators for fungi and actinomycetes and gradual increase in the ratio of

  9. Water and sediment dynamics in a small Mediterranean cultivated catchment under cracking soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoubli, Nesrine; Raclot, Damien; Moussa, Roger; Habaieb, Hamadi; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Shrink-swell soils, such as those in a Mediterranean climate regime, can cause changes in terms of hydrological and erosive responses due to the changing soil water storage conditions. Only a limited number of long-term studies have focused on the impacts on both hydrological and erosive responses and their interactions in an agricultural environment. In this context, this study aims to document the dynamics of cracks, runoff and soil erosion within a small Mediterranean cultivated catchment and to quantify the influence of crack processes on the water and sediment supplied to a reservoir located at the catchment outlet. Detailed monitoring of the presence of topsoil cracks was conducted within the Kamech catchment (ORE OMERE, Tunisia), and runoff and suspended sediment loads were continuously measured over a long period of time (2005-2012) at the outlets of a field (1.32 ha) and a catchment (263 ha). Analysis of the data showed that topsoil cracks were open approximately half of the year and that the rainfall regime and water table level conditions locally control the seasonal cracking dynamics. Topsoil cracks appeared to seriously affect the generation of runoff and sediment concentrations and, consequently, sediment yields, with similar dynamics observed at the field and catchment outlets. A similar time lag in the seasonality between water and sediment delivery was observed at these two scales: although the runoff rates were globally low during the presence of topsoil cracks, most sediment transport occurred during this period associated with very high sediment concentrations. This study underlines the importance of a good prediction of runoff during the presence of cracks for reservoir siltation considerations. In this context, the prediction of cracking effects on runoff and soil erosion is a key factor for the development of effective soil and water management strategies and downstream reservoir preservation.

  10. Heavy metal toxicity in rice and soybean plants cultivated in contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lígia de Souza Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals can accumulate in soil and cause phytotoxicity in plants with some specific symptoms. The present study evaluated the specific symptoms on rice and soybeans plants caused by excess of heavy metals in soil. Rice and soybean were grown in pots containing soil with different levels of heavy metals. A completely randomized design was used, with four replications, using two crop species and seven sample soils with different contamination levels. Rice and soybean exhibited different responses to the high concentrations of heavy metals in the soil. Rice plants accumulated higher Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn concentrations and were more sensitive to high concentrations of these elements in the soil, absorbing them more easily compared to the soybean plants. However, high available Zn concentrations in the soil caused phytotoxicity symptoms in rice and soybean, mainly chlorosis and inhibited plant growth. Further, high Zn concentrations in the soil reduced the Fe concentration in the shoots of soybean and rice plants to levels considered deficient.

  11. Diel pattern of soil respiration in N-amended soil under maize cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weixin; Cai, Yan; Cai, Zucong; Zheng, Xunhua

    To understand maize- and N-induced diel variations in CO 2 emission, we examined hourly CO 2 emissions during the three typical growth stages of maize in sandy loam soil. There was a distinct diel pattern in soil CO 2 emissions, with the peak occurring between 14:00 and 18:00 and the trough occurring between 0:00 and 4:00. Maize presence delayed the time of the peak. The absolute amount and diel fluctuation of CO 2 emissions tended to diminish with time in the bare soil fertilized with 150 kg N ha -1 (BS). In contrast, N-fertilized maize (N150) significantly enhanced the total amount of CO 2 emissions and the peak-trough differences in CO 2 emissions, which reached a maximum at the pollination stage and then decreased. Control soil (CK) containing maize but no N fertilizer had highest overall CO 2 emissions but reduced diel fluctuation because rhizosphere respiration was elevated in the nighttime. Soil temperature accounted for 61-71% of diel variation in the BS treatment but for only 44-59% and 38-58% in the N150 and CK treatments, respectively. Photosynthesis rates affected diel variation at the seedling and pollination stages. Both temperature and photosynthesis rates together explained up to 67-84% of diel variation at the seedling and pollination stages in the N150 treatment, but only 61% at the seedling stage in the CK treatment due to more CO 2 released in the nighttime. The increased nighttime CO 2 release, in turn, decreased the effect of temperature and even reduced the influence of photosynthesis rate on diel variations in CO 2 release. Based on the present results, the best time for obtaining a representative daily CO 2 measurement was found to be approximately 8:00 at the seedling stage and 9:00-11:00 at the other growth stages. The current findings indicate that N addition reduces soil CO 2 emissions and its diel fluctuation.

  12. Validated sampling strategy for assessing contaminants in soil stockpiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamé, F.; Honders, T.; Derksen, G.B.; Gadella, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dutch legislation on the reuse of soil requires a sampling strategy to determine the degree of contamination. This sampling strategy was developed in three stages. Its main aim is to obtain a single analytical result, representative of the true mean concentration of the soil stockpile. The

  13. Validated sampling strategy for assessing contaminants in soil stockpiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamé, F.; Honders, T.; Derksen, G.B.; Gadella, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dutch legislation on the reuse of soil requires a sampling strategy to determine the degree of contamination. This sampling strategy was developed in three stages. Its main aim is to obtain a single analytical result, representative of the true mean concentration of the soil stockpile. The developme

  14. Environmental hazards related to Miscanthus x giganteus cultivation on heavy metal contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pogrzeba M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available According to recent estimates reaching the target of a 20% share of renewable energy sources (RES in the final energy balance in Poland by 2020 will result in the demand for more than 8 million tons of biomass, which, in turn, will entail the necessity of creating large-scale energy crop plantations. According to EU assumptions the most effective way to produce biomass for energy purposes is cultivation of energy crops in agricultural areas. It is particularly vital for Poland, because these areas constitute a relatively large part of the country (59%, 76% of them being used as farmlands. In Silesia, the most industrialized region of the country, 5-10% of agricultural soils are contaminated with cadmium, lead and zinc. The main objective of the presented study was to estimate the accumulation of heavy metals in the tissues of Miscanthus x giganteus grown on contaminated soils and calculate concentrations of Pb, Cd and Zn in crops. It was shown that the large intake of heavy metals by that species could cause high emissions of pollutants into the atmosphere during its improper combustion. As a side effect, winter harvesting led to the loss of even 30% of biomass. Plant residues (leaves can be the source of pollution after decomposing and releasing metals back into the soil. Moreover, miscanthus leaves can be transferred by wind to the surrounding areas. It is very likely that ash coming from the combustion of contaminated biomass cannot be used as a fertilizer.

  15. Water Footprint of Industrial Tomato Cultivations in the Pinios River Basin: Soil Properties Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios Evangelou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Industrial tomatoes are cultivated in about 4000 ha of the Pinios river basin (central Greece, providing significant income to the farmers. In this study, the water footprint (WF of industrial tomatoes between planting and harvest was estimated in 24 different farms for three consecutive years. The selected farms were representative of the main agro-climatic zones and soil textural classes within the river basin. Green, blue and grey WF calculations were based on datasets of the experimental plots for each farm, including irrigation water volume, meteorological, soil, and crop yield data. The results showed that the WF of tomatoes ranged from 37 to 131 m3 water/ton tomatoes with an average of 61 m3/ton. The WF variation depended mainly on crop yield, local agro-climatic and soil conditions. The green, blue, and grey WF components averaged 13, 27 and 21 m3/ton, respectively. The results reveal the importance of WF in understanding how tomato production relates to the sustainable use of freshwater and pollution at local level.

  16. Pequi leaves incorporated into the soil reduce the initial growth of cultivated, invasive and native species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAÍSA N. ALLEM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have identified the phytotoxicity of many native species of the Cerrado; however, most of them were conducted either in inert substrates, or using exaggerate proportions of plant material. We investigated the phytotoxicity of pequi leaves added to substrate soil in quantities compatible with the litter produced by this species. Pequi leaves were triturated and added to red latosol in concentrations of 0.75%, 1.5% and 3%; the control was constituted of leafless soil. These mixtures were added to pots and irrigated daily to keep them moist. Germinated seeds of the cultivated sorghum and sesame, of the invasive brachiaria and of the native purple ipê, were disposed in the pots to grow for five to seven days at 30°C within a photoperiod of 12 h. Seedlings of all the species presented a reduction in their initial growth in a dose-dependent way. In general, the root growth was more affected by the treatments than the shoot growth; moreover, signs of necrosis were observed in the roots of the sorghum, sesame and brachiaria. The phytotoxic effects generated by relatively small quantities of leaves, in a reasonable range of species within a soil substrate, suggest potential allelopathy of pequi leaves under natural conditions.

  17. Uptake and speciation of selenium in garlic cultivated in soil amended with symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) and selenate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Erik H.; Hansen, Marianne; Rasmussen, Peter Have; Sloth, Jens J. [Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research, Department of Food Chemistry, Soeborg (Denmark); Lobinski, Ryszard; Ruzik, Rafal; Mazurowska, Lena [CNRS UMR 5034, Pau (France); Warsaw University of Technology, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Warsaw (Poland); Burger-Meyer, Karin; Scholten, Olga [Wageningen University and Research Centre, Plant Research International (PRI), P.O. Box 16, Wageningen (Netherlands); Kik, Chris [Wageningen University and Research Centre, Plant Research International (PRI), P.O. Box 16, Wageningen (Netherlands); Wageningen University and Research Centre, Centre for Genetic Resources, The Netherlands (CGN), P.O. Box 16, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2006-07-15

    The scope of the work was to investigate the influence of selenate fertilisation and the addition of symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) to soil on selenium and selenium species concentrations in garlic. The selenium species were extracted from garlic cultivated in experimental plots by proteolytic enzymes, which ensured liberation of selenium species contained in peptides or proteins. Separate extractions using an aqueous solution of enzyme-deactivating hydroxylamine hydrochloride counteracted the possible degradation of labile selenium species by enzymes (such as alliinase) that occur naturally in garlic. The selenium content in garlic, which was analysed by ICP-MS, showed that addition of mycorrhiza to the natural soil increased the selenium uptake by garlic tenfold to 15 {mu}g g{sup -1} (dry mass). Fertilisation with selenate and addition of mycorrhiza strongly increased the selenium content in garlic to around one part per thousand. The parallel analysis of the sample extracts by cation exchange and reversed-phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection showed that {gamma}-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine amounted to 2/3, whereas methylselenocysteine, selenomethionine and selenate each amounted to a few percent of the total chromatographed selenium in all garlic samples. Se-allyl-selenocysteine and Se-propyl-selenocysteine, which are selenium analogues of biologically active sulfur-containing amino acids known to occur in garlic, were searched for but not detected in any of the extracts. The amendment of soil by mycorrhiza and/or by selenate increased the content of selenium but not the distribution of detected selenium species in garlic. Finally, the use of two-dimensional HPLC (size exclusion followed by reversed-phase) allowed the structural characterisation of {gamma}-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine and {gamma}-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenomethionine in isolated chromatographic fractions by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  18. Metal contamination of home garden soils and cultivated vegetables in the province of Brescia, Italy: Implications for human exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferri, Roberta [Occupational Health, University of Brescia (Italy); Hashim, Dana [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (United States); Smith, Donald R. [Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Guazzetti, Stefano [Public Health Service, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Donna, Filippo [Occupational Health, University of Brescia (Italy); Ferretti, Enrica; Curatolo, Michele; Moneta, Caterina [Department of Food Chemistry, Metal Laboratory, IZSLER, Brescia (Italy); Beone, Gian Maria [Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry, Università Cattolica, Piacenza (Italy); Lucchini, Roberto G. [Occupational Health, University of Brescia (Italy); Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (United States); Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Background: For the past century, ferroalloy industries in Brescia province, Italy produced particulate emissions enriched in manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), and aluminum (Al). This study assessed metal concentrations in soil and vegetables of regions with varying ferroalloy industrial activity levels. Methods: Home gardens (n = 63) were selected in three regions of varying ferroalloy plant activity durations in Brescia province. Total soil metal concentration and extractability were measured by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), aqua regia extraction, and modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction. Unwashed and washed spinach and turnips cultivated in the same gardens were analyzed for metal concentrations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: Median soil Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in home gardens near ferroalloy plants compared to reference home gardens. The BCR method yielded the most mobile soil fraction (the sum of extractable metals in Fractions 1 and 2) and all metal concentrations were higher in ferroalloy plant areas. Unwashed spinach showed higher metal concentrations compared to washed spinach. However, some metals in washed spinach were higher in the reference area likely due to history of agricultural product use. Over 60% of spinach samples exceeded the 2- to 4-fold Commission of European Communities and Codex Alimentarius Commission maximum Pb concentrations, and 10% of the same spinach samples exceeded 2- to 3-fold maximum Cd concentrations set by both organizations. Turnip metal concentrations were below maximum standard reference values. Conclusions: Prolonged industrial emissions increase median metal concentrations and most soluble fractions (BCR F1 + F2) in home garden soils near ferroalloy plants. Areas near ferroalloy plant sites had spinach Cd and Pb metal concentrations several-fold above maximum standard references

  19. Comparative studies of the occurrence of arbuscular fungi and mycorrhizae (Glomales in cultivated and uncultivated soils of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Błaszkowski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of 6-year studies on the occurrence of arbuscular fungi and mycorrhizae in cultivated and uncultivated soils of Poland. The comparisons include the include of spore and species densi-lies. and the levels of mycorrhizal colonization. The relationship between the occurrence of arbuscular fungi and mycorrhizae and soil chemical properties was assessed based on analysis of correlation. The distribution of the fungal species found both in Poland and in the world is presented.

  20. Experimental research on the influence of two cultivation practices on rainfall runoff- and (sandy and muddy) sediment-generating processes in purple soil environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Pei; WANG Yukuan; FU Bin

    2008-01-01

    Rainfall simulations have been conducted to study the soil erosion process of purple soil in two cultivation practices-contour cultivation and downslope cultivation. Results showed that under the two cultivation practices, the surface runoff can be described by the logarithmic function formula. In the initial period of rainfall, the amount of runoff increased with the rainfall duration and 20 minutes later it became relatively constant. The changing process of soil erosion rate may be described by the logarithmic function formula. The erosion rate increased with the rainfall duration and 20 minutes later it also became constant. Under downslope cultivation condition, the soil erosion rate increased more significantly than that under contour cultivation condition in the case of of gentle rainfall intensity, and there is no obvious difference in erosion rate for downslope cultivation and contour cultivation practices. However, with increasing rainfall intensity the soil erosion rate under the downslope cultivation condition could be more than 30 times that under the contour cultivation condition. But this kind of difference would be reduced to some extent in the case of heavy rain.

  1. Comparing anthracene and fluorene degradation in anthracene and fluorene-contaminated soil by single and mixed plant cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somtrakoon, Khanitta; Chouychai, Waraporn; Lee, Hung

    2014-01-01

    The ability of three plant species (sweet corn, cucumber, and winged bean) to remediate soil spiked with 138.9 and 95.9 mg of anthracene and fluorene per kg of dry soil, respectively, by single and double plant co-cultivation was investigated. After 15 and 30 days of transplantation, plant elongation, plant weight, chlorophyll content, and the content of each PAH in soil and plant tissues were determined. Based on PAH removal and plant health, winged bean was the most effective plant for phytoremediation when grown alone; percentage of fluorene and anthracene remaining in the rhizospheric soil after 30 days were 7.8% and 24.2%, respectively. The most effective combination of plants for phytoremediation was corn and winged bean; on day 30, amounts of fluorene and anthracene remaining in the winged bean rhizospheric soil were 3.4% and 14.3%, respectively; amounts of fluorene and anthracene remaining in the sweet corn rhizospheric soil were 4.1% and 8.8%, respectively. Co-cultivation of sweet corn and cucumber could remove fluorene to a higher extent than anthracene from soil within 15 days, but these plants did not survive and died before day 30. The amounts of fluorene remaining in the rhizospheric soil of corn and cucumber were only 14% and 17.3%, respectively, on day 15. No PAHs were detected in plant tissues. This suggests that phytostimulation of microbial degradation in the rhizosphere was most likely the mechanism by which the PAHs were removed from the spiked soil. The results show that co-cultivation of plants has merit in the phytoremediation of PAH-spiked soil.

  2. Incorporation of brassica seed meal soil amendment and wheat cultivation for control of macrophomina phaseolina in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophomina phaseolina is the cause of charcoal rot, a disease of emerging importance in strawberry production systems. Brassicaceae seed meals (SM) and prior cultivation of soils with wheat, were evaluated for the capacity to suppress charcoal rot of strawberry and to determine the relative contri...

  3. Uptake and specification of selenium in garlic cultivated in soil amended with symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) and selenate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, E.H.; Lobinski, R.; Burger-Meijer, K.; Hansen, M.; Ruzik, R.; Mazurowska, L.; Rasmussen, P.H.; Sloth, J.J.; Scholten, O.E.; Kik, C.

    2006-01-01

    The scope of the work was to investigate the influence of selenate fertilisation and the addition of symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) to soil on selenium and selenium species concentrations in garlic. The selenium species were extracted from garlic cultivated in experimental plots by proteolytic enzymes

  4. Gel microbead cultivation with a subenrichment procedure can yield better bacterial cultivability from a seawater sample than standard plating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shiqi; Zhao, Rui; Yin, Qi; Zhao, Yuan; Liu, Chenguang; Xiao, Tian; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2012-03-01

    A gel microbead (GMD) cultivation method was employed to cultivate microorganisms from an amphioxus breeding zone in Qingdao, P. R. China. The culture results were compared with those by standard plating method. In the GMD-based method, the microcolony-forming GMDs were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). To further get pure cultures, a subsequent enrichment culture and a streaking purification procedure were conducted on marine R2A medium. Eighty bacterial strains isolated by the GMD-based method were randomly selected for sequencing. These isolates belonged to Alphaproteobacteria (33%), Gammaproteobacteria (44%), Bacteroidetes (11%), Actinobacteria (5%), Firmicutes (5%), Epsilonproteobacteria (1%), and Verrucomicrobia (1%), the last two groups being usually difficult to culture. The 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a diverse community with 91.1%-100% of the bacterial rRNAs similarities. Thirteen strains were sharing 16S rRNA gene sequence which was less than 97% similar to any other rRNA genes currently deposited in TYP16S database. Seventy isolates derived from the standard plating method fell into 4 different taxonomic groups: Alphaproteobacteria (9%), Gammaproteobacteria (81%), Bacteroidetes (7%) and Firmicutes (3%) with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between 95.8%-100%, in which only 3 strains were sharing 16S rRNA gene sequence of less than 97%. The results indicated that the GMD-based method with subenrichment culture yielded more taxonomic groups and more novel microbial strains, including members of previously rarely cultured groups, when compared with the standard plating method, and that this method markedly improved the bacterial cultivability.

  5. Levels of glyphosate in surface waters, sediments and soils associated with direct sowing soybean cultivation in north pampasic region of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo, Pablo J; Porta, Atilio A; Ronco, Alicia E

    2008-11-01

    Levels of glyphosate were determined in water, soil and sediment samples from a transgenic soybean cultivation area located near to tributaries streams of the Pergamino-Arrecifes system in the north of the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Field work took into account both the pesticide application and the rains occurring after applications. The pesticide was analysed by HPLC-UV detection, previous derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate (FMOC-Cl). In addition, SoilFug multimedia model was used to analyse the environmental distribution of the pesticides. In the field, levels of glyphosate in waters ranged from 0.10 to 0.70 mg/L, while in sediments and soils values were between 0.5 and 5.0 mg/Kg. Temporal variation of glyphosate levels depended directly on the time of application and the rain events. The results obtained from the application of the model are in accordance with the values found in the field.

  6. EFFECT OF FLUCTUATION OF WETTING AND DRYING PHENOMENA ON SOIL FERTILITY STATUS UNDER RICE CULTIVATION IN WETLAND SOIL IN RWANDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamudu Rukangantambara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1980, wetland s in Rwanda have been considered as important areas for agriculture intensification through improving food security and incomes to the farmers. However, changes in the soil nutrient status due to repeatedly wetting and drying phenomena may considerably affect soil fertility status thus leading to low crop productivity of the wetlands. This has consequently created fear to the wetland users especially the local farmers, extension workers and agronomists. The comparative study was conducted to assess the effect of drained and irrigated phenomena at Mamba, Rwasave and Rugeramigozi marshlands on soil fertility change under rice growing. 24 samples were taken with 12 samples under drained and 12 under irrigated areas. The samples were collected randomly from top soil ( 0- 20 cm. The following parameters were quantified; soil pH( H 2O in soil water suspension with ratio 1:2.5; Al exchangeable( 1N Kcl, organic carbon( walkely and black method in Sumner method modified (1984, Total nitrogen kjeldahl (TNK in Bremner modified method, available phosphorus ( bray 1. Bases exchangeable with 1 N ammonium acetate following AAS and CEC and available Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn (DTDA diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Data analyses were processed with GEN STAT version 3. The results showed that the fluctuation of wet and dry water have significantly affected soil fertility status at p= 0,05. The phosphorus and potassium are in the low levels of deficiency 2.32 ppm and 47.72 ppm in irrigated area while crop requirement nutrients are 20 ppm and 200 ppm respectively. And Al is in toxic level conditions, 27.5% in drained area while rice tolerance is 20%. Fe was 641.51 ppm in irrigated area while requirement narrowed to 300 ppm. As conclusion, the soil fertility is low and toxic which constitutes a limitation. The wetland soil in Rwanda should offer opportunities for paddy growing ( rice, etc, if soil fertility factors would be amended by lime for its

  7. Dissipation and Adsorption Behavior of the Insecticide Ethiprole on Various Cultivated Soils in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin-gang; DONG Feng-shou; XU Jun; YUAN Shan-kui; ZHENG Yong-quan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the hydrolysis of the insecticide ethiprole in buffered solutions at pH 4.0, 7.0 and 9.0, respectively, and the degradation and adsorption-desorption behaviors of ethiprole in ifve agricultural soil samples from China were investigated. The half-lives under anaerobic conditions were faster than that in the aerobic experiment. Ethiprole was relatively stable under both acidic and neutral conditions while it was readily hydrolyzed under alkaling condition. The sorption of ethiprole on ifve soils was well described by the linear and Freundlich equation and mainly governed by soil organic matter. The exothermic process of ethiprole adsorption can also be well explained by physical adsorption. A weak adsorption capacity was observed in all soils, which could readily lead to leaching problems.

  8. Soil organic carbon stocks in southeast Germany as affected by land use, soil type and sampling depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmeier, M.; von Lützow, M.; Spörlein, P.; Geuß, U.; Hangen, E.; Reischl, A.; Schilling, B.; Kögel-Knabner, I.

    2012-04-01

    Precise estimations of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks are of decided importance for the detection of carbon sequestration or emission potential induced by land use changes. For Germany, a comprehensive, land use-specific SOC data set has not yet been compiled. We evaluated a unique data set of 1460 soil profiles in southeast Germany in order to calculate representative SOC stocks to a depth of 1 m for the main land use types. The results showed that grassland soils stored the highest amount of SOC, with a median value of 11.8 kg m-2, whereas considerably lower stocks of 9.8 and 9.0 kg m-2 were found for forest and cropland soils, respectively. However, the differences between extensively used land (grassland, forest) and cropland were much lower compared with results from other studies in central European countries. The depth distribution of SOC showed that despite low SOC concentrations in A horizons of cropland soils, their stocks were not considerably lower compared with other land uses. This was due to a deepening of the topsoil compared with grassland soils. Higher grassland SOC stocks were caused by an accumulation of SOC in the B horizon which was attributable to a high proportion of C-rich Gleysols within grassland soils. The incorporation of subsoil SOC stocks revealed that land use may not be the main controlling factor for SOC storage and highlighted the importance of pedogenetic properties, particularly in grassland soils. We recommend that pedogenetic soil information should be included in SOC stock estimations as well as in carbon sequestration studies. Our results further indicate that SOC depletion in cropland soils due to cultivation is probably often overestimated because tillage-induced deepening of the topsoil was ignored by studies with fixed depths. The application of modelled parameters in SOC inventories is generally questioned, because SOC stocks, calculated with pedotransfer functions, were systematically biased, particularly for forest

  9. Diversity of microorganisms isolated from the soil sample surround Chroogomphus rutilus in the Beijing region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, P; Liu, Y; Yin, Y;

    2011-01-01

    to isolate and classify beneficial microorganisms that could affect its growth, which could be used in future research on artificial cultivation. In total, 342 isolates were isolated from soil samples collected around a C. rutilus colony in the Beijing region. Of these, 22 bacterial and 14 fungal isolates....... Using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis, fungal isolates were divided into four monophyletic clusters: Penicillium, Trichoderma, Mortierella, and Bionectria. Moreover, the phylogenetic diversity of these isolates was analysed. The results indicated that numerous microorganisms were......Artificially cultivating Chroogomphus rutilus is too inefficient to be commercially feasible. Furthermore, isolating C. rutilus mycelia in the wild is difficult. Thus, it is important to de-termine the natural habitat of its fruiting body. This study focused on the ecology of the C. rutilus habitat...

  10. Distribution Characteristics of the Heavy Metal Cd in the Irrigation Water-Cultivated Soil-Fertilizer-Crop Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei; HUANG; Peihao; PENG; Wende; CHENG

    2013-01-01

    Shuangqiao Countryside of Neijiang City in hilly ground area in the midland of Sichuan Province was chosen as the study geographic area to survey and analyze the content distribution characteristics of the Cd in the irrigation water,ground water mud,surface layer cultivated soil,profile soil and the fertilizer which were often used in the locality,and in different crops set earth,fructification as well. The results showed that the content of Cd in the irrigation and ground water mud respectively comply with the national agriculture use irrigation standard and the contamination control standard value in agriculture use mud ( GB4284-84) respectively. The average contents in the surface cultivated soil and each layer of soil profile are all above the background level of Chengdu economic region ( 44% ) ,referring to a large scale pollution risk. The average value of Cd element in fertilizer was 1. 81 μg / g,which was higher than the third class standard of national soil environment quality; The average content of Cd element in the crops’ set earth was 0. 410-0. 439 μg / g,which was higher than the second class standard of national soil environment quality and there was a measure of cumulation; The average values of Cd in crops’ fructificationwas all below the primary standard of national soil environment quality,and the bioamplification coefficient sorting was CF( Cdpeanut) > CF( Cdcitrus) > CF ( Cdrice) > CF( Cdcorn) . Irrigation water had little influence on the soil Cd pollution,where fertilizer using was closely related to the Cd pollution in the surface cultivated soil in the survey area and had a certain influence on the Cd cumulation in the crops. The sorption and enrichment of crops’ set earth and fructification was obviously different.

  11. Micromorphological Features of Old Cultivated and Modern Soils in Guanzhong Areas, Shaanxi Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Jiang-li; HU Xuan-er; HUANG Chun-chang; Zhang Xu

    2006-01-01

    Using the data obtained from the LGT soil profile, this article attempts to illustrate the process of modern soil formation in the Guanzhong areas and its micromorphological features. The micromorphology is observed under a petrographic microscope, and its image is quantitatively measured by LEICAL Qwin 2.6 software. Micromorphological observations of the thin sections show that the assemblage of minerals in different horizons is very similar, which is mainly composed of Q and Pl. However, there are obvious differences in C/F15μm ratio, mineral content, and coarse features. The pedofeatures is mainly composed of clay, calcite, and amorphous Fe. Ap horizon is characterized by abundant needleshaped secondary calcite,secondary clay, and earthworm fecal pellet. BC horizon is characterized by a large quantity of secondary calcite with various shapes. Bt1and Bt2 horizons are characterized by abundant clay hypocoatings and a small quantity of secondary calcite. All the results of this research suggest that Earth-cumulic Orthic Anthrosols consist of both the upper Ap horizon, which cause loessal dung and eolian dust deposition, and cultivation occurs simultaneously during the process of Ap horizon-formation,and the lower BC horizon, which is aeolian sedimentary at the time of relative aridity during late Holocene.

  12. Soil Nutrient Condition of Coffee Cultivation with Industrial Woody-crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Erwiyo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Black pod rot disease (BPRD which is caused by Phytophthora palmivora is one of the main diseases of cocoa cultivations particularly in plantations with wet climate. Black pod rot can develop rapidly under high humidity environments, particularly during rainy seasons. This disease can cause loss of harvest of up to 46.63% in East Java. The various control efforts attempted so far have not resulted in significant improvements. Urea, in addition to functioning as fertilizer, can also produce the ammonia gas which is believed to be able to suppress black pod rot. This research aims to determine the effectiveness of black pod rot control using the combination of lime and urea. This research was conducted from June to September 2013. The materials used in test included sterile soil, black pod rot infected cocoa, urea, and agricultural lime. Observation results showed that ammonia could form from urea. Lime can increase the speed of the formation. The ammonia gas forming from 0.06% urea and 0.3% lime can control the P. palmivora fungus inside the soil. Key words: Pod rot, P. palmivora, urea, lime, ammonia

  13. Diversity of microorganisms isolated from the soil sample surround Chroogomphus rutilus in the Beijing region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, P; Liu, Y; Yin, Y

    2011-01-01

    to isolate and classify beneficial microorganisms that could affect its growth, which could be used in future research on artificial cultivation. In total, 342 isolates were isolated from soil samples collected around a C. rutilus colony in the Beijing region. Of these, 22 bacterial and 14 fungal isolates....... Using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis, fungal isolates were divided into four monophyletic clusters: Penicillium, Trichoderma, Mortierella, and Bionectria. Moreover, the phylogenetic diversity of these isolates was analysed. The results indicated that numerous microorganisms were...

  14. Tolerance of cultivated and wild plants of different taxonomy to soil contamination by kerosene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharonova, Natalia; Breus, Irina

    2012-05-01

    In laboratory experiments on leached chernozem contaminated by kerosene (1-15 wt.%), germination of 50 plants from 21 families (cultivated and wild, annual and perennial, mono- and dicotyledonous) as affected by kerosene type and concentration and plant features was determined. Tested plants formed three groups: more tolerant, less tolerant, and intolerant, in which relative germination was more than 70%, 30-70% and less than 30%, respectively. As parameters of soil phytotoxicity, effective kerosene concentrations (EC) causing germination depression of 10%, 25% and 50% were determined. EC values depended on the plant species and varied in a wide range of kerosene concentrations: 0.02-7.3% (EC(10)), 0.05-8.1% (EC(25)), and 0.2-12.7% (EC(50)). The reported data on germination in soils contaminated by oil and petrochemicals were generalized. The comparison showed that at very high contamination levels (10 and 15%) kerosene was 1.3-1.6 times more phytotoxic than diesel fuel and 1.3-1.4 times more toxic than crude oil, and at low (1 and 2%) and medium (3 and 5%) levels the toxicity of these contaminants was close differing by a factor of 1.1-1.2. Tolerance of plants to soil contamination had a species-specific nature and, on the average, decreased in the following range of families: Fabaceae (germination decrease of 10-60% as compared to an uncontaminated control)>Brassicaceae (5-70%)>Asteraceae (25-95%)>Poaceae (10-100%). The monocotyledonous species tested were characterized as medium- and low-stable to contamination, whereas representatives of dicotyledonous plants were met in all groups of tolerance. Tested wild plants, contrary to reference data on oil toxicity, were more sensitive to kerosene than cultivated. No correlation was observed between degree of plant tolerance to kerosene and mass of seeds. The evidence indicates factors as structure and properties of testa, structure of germ, type of storage compounds, and type of seed germination (underground or

  15. Controlled traffic and soil physical quality of an Oxisol under sugarcane cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Soares de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Machinery traffic in sugarcane (Saccharumsp. plantations reduces soil physical quality, and hinders both root development and crop yield. We evaluated the physical quality of an Oxisol and the development of sugarcane roots under controlled traffic. The treatments assessed were: without controlled machinery traffic (WCT, controlled traffic by adjusting the tractor and infield wagons to a 3.0 m track width with the operator guiding the machinery (CT1 and the previous treatment using real time kinematic / global positioning system (RTK / GPS precision auto steer (CT2. Soil samples were collected from the planting rows, seedbed and inter-row center to determine the least limiting water range (LLWR and soil porosity from scanned 2-D images. The root dry mass was sampled from monoliths, separated from the soil by washing through a 2-mm sieve and dried in an oven. A higher LLWR was observed in the planting row under CT1 and CT2 than under WCT. The planting row had a predominance of complex pores with a diameter > 500 µm in the 0.15-0.27 m depth layer under CT1 and CT2. In the planting rows under WCT, the root dry mass was only 44 % of that measured under CT2. Benefits regarding soil physical quality and growth roots were observed when the tractor-wagon track width was adjusted based on the sugarcane spacing using either precision auto steering or manual operation of the machinery.

  16. Soil, water and nutrient losses by interrill erosion from green cane cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilka Rocha Vasconcelos da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Interrill erosion occurs by the particle breakdown caused by raindrop impact, by particle transport in surface runoff, by dragging and suspension of particles disaggregated from the soil surface, thus removing organic matter and nutrients that are essential for agricultural production. Crop residues on the soil surface modify the characteristics of the runoff generated by rainfall and the consequent particle breakdown and sediment transport resulting from erosion. The objective of this study was to determine the minimum amount of mulch that must be maintained on the soil surface of a sugarcane plantation to reduce the soil, water and nutrient losses by decreasing interrill erosion. The study was conducted in Pradópolis, São Paulo State, in 0.5 x 1.0 m plots of an Oxisol, testing five treatments in four replications. The application rates were based on the crop residue production of the area of 1.4 kg m-2 (T1- no cane trash; T2-25 % of the cane trash; T3- 50 % trash; T4-75 % trash; T5-100 % sugarcane residues on the surface, and simulated rainfall was applied at an intensity of 65 mm h-1 for 60 min. Runoff samples were collected in plastic containers and soon after taken to the laboratory to quantify the losses of soil, water and nutrients. To minimize soil loss by interrill erosion, 75 % of the cane mulch must be maintained on the soil, to control water loss 50 % must be maintained and 25 % trash controls organic matter and nutrient losses. This information can contribute to optimize the use of this resource for soil conservation on the one hand and the production of clean energy in sugar and alcohol industries on the other.

  17. Statistical sampling strategies for survey of soil contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews methods for selecting sampling locations in contaminated soils for three situations. In the first situation a global estimate of the soil contamination in an area is required. The result of the surey is a number or a series of numbers per contaminant, e.g. the estimated mean con

  18. Soil properties and crop yield under different tillage methods for rapeseed cultivation in paddy fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-year research was conducted to investigate the effect of different tillage methods on some soil physical characteristics and crop yield in rapeseed cultivation after rice harvesting. Five tillage treatments including: (i using rotavator, once to depth of 10-15 cm (T1, (ii using rotavator, twice to depth of 10-15 cm (T2, (iii using moldboard plow to depth of 25 cm + rotavator, once to depth of 10-15 cm (T3, (iv no-till planting through removing rice stubbles from plots (T4, and (v no-till planting without removing rice stubbles from plots (T5, were evaluated under randomized complete block design (RCBD in three replications. The biannual results revealed that the effect of tillage methods was significant (p<0.01 on soil bulk density, surface residues after tillage, dry mass of weeds, seed germination, and grain yield. T2 and T3 made considerable reduction in soil bulk density compared to other treatments for the 15- to 30-cm tillage depths. In T1, T2, T3, and T4, surface residues after tillage decreased in comparison with T5 by up to 35.37, 50.71, 69.92, and 75.75%, respectively. Having 71.48 g m-2, T5 had the maximum dry mass of weeds while T3 had the minimum one with 37.50 g m-2. Means comparison represented that in T2 and T3, seed germination reached the shortest length of 6.4 days in average. The highest and lowest grain yields were acquired in T3 (1,571 kg ha-1 and T5 (1,339 kg ha-1, respectively. Statistically, there was no significant difference between T1 (1,432 kg ha-1 and T2 (1,537 kg ha-1 compared with T3 in terms of grain yield.

  19. Quantitative analysis of soil erosion in ecologically and conventionally cultivated vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Alexander; Brings, Christine; Rodrigo Comino, Jesús; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2016-04-01

    Long term observations of soil erosion in vineyards showed that they are generally stable. But the soil erosion rates reach very varying dimensions by the increased occurrence of extreme rainfall events or under the influence of different soil and vineyard management. To identify the differences between an ecologically (with natural vegetation cover under and around the vines) and conventionally cultivated vineyard, in 2014 six sediment traps were installed on a south-west exposed slope of the Rhenish Slate Mountains, West Germany. The research area is part of Saar terrace (around 180 meter high above sea level), a tributary of the Moselle, so the substrate is made of clay stone and gravel sand. Sediment traps allow in-situ measurements during a natural rainfall event. By dint of them the overland flow and sediment can be collected. The sediment traps were placed in a row in the middle of the slope, in the steepest part (averaged 23°). They were emptied weekly. Runoff and sediments were divided by the gravimetric filtering method. The results show more collected runoff and sediment in the conventional vineyard than in the ecological. The sum of the runoffs amounts to 75 liter in the conventional vineyard, 29 liter for the ecological old and 0.73 liter for the ecological young vineyard. The amount of sediment of conventional vineyard (403 g) was five times higher than in the ecological one (79 g). The causes lay in the low vegetation cover and existing traffic lines in the conventional vineyard. But the highest sediment concentration has been detected in the ecological young vineyard.

  20. Mercury Fractionation in Superficial Sediment and Paddy Soil Samples from Tianjin, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhaoji; Fei, Yuhong; Wu, Guoqing; Qian, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Sediment and soil samples from the Beitang River (BR) and the Haihe River (HR) in Tianjin were analyzed to investigate the extent of mercury contamination. The results show that total mercury (THg) contents in the BR and HR sediments were 2241 ± 1024 and 653 ± 450 ng g(-1), and THg in rice paddy soils were 907 ± 345 and 328 ± 286 ng g(-1), respectively. Industrial and domestic sewage were regarded as the main sources of mercury in the two river basins. Sediment-bound mercury in the BR and the HR were found to be predominantly associated with the organic-bound fraction (55 %) and residual fraction and (54 %), while soil-bound mercury was mainly in organic-bound fraction in paddy soils (61 % and 57 %, respectively). The availability of this element (soluble and exchangeable and specifically sorbed fraction) seemed restricted, but significantly higher in the paddy soils than in sediments. Higher soluble and exchangeable, specifically sorbed fraction and organic-bound fraction may promote the higher toxic methylmercury and bioavailable fraction formation in the soils during the rice cultivation.

  1. Combination of comprehensive geophysical measurements and conventional soil sampling for high resolution soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werban, U.; Nuesch, A.; Vienken, T.; Dietrich, P.; Behrens, T.

    2010-12-01

    The focus of the FP7-EU project iSOIL “Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping” is to develop new and to improve existing strategies and innovative methods for generating accurate, high-resolution soil property maps. Thus we will develop, validate, and evaluate concepts and strategies for transferring measured physical parameter distributions into soil property, soil function and soil threat maps of different scales. The resulting soil property maps can be used for agriculture applications and soil degradation threats studies, e.g. erosion, compaction and soil organic matter decline. A fast and cost efficient way to detect physical parameters of soils at large areas is the application of mobile geophysical platforms. An advantage of these platforms is the flexibility since different kind of instruments can be mounted and combined. Following instruments are used on platforms within iSOIL project: EMI, GPR, gamma-spectrometry and magnetics. Since geophysical methods provide only physical parameters it is essential to combine them with conventional soil sampling methods for ground truthing. Physical parameters have to be converted into soil parameters via (site specific) transfer functions. One focus of the project was the development of measuring designs for the evaluation and combination of different geophysical methods. The application of a hierarchical approach is one way to combine different scales and parameters. The implementation of this approach will be presented and can be summarized as follows: - The first step is a survey of the total area with EMI and gamma-spectrometry. The distance between two lines is 10 - 20 meters. - By means of the geophysical data and a digital elevation model, representative soil sampling points are chosen, via a weighted conditioned latin hypercube sampling scheme (wLHS) based on conditioned latin hypercube sampling (cLHS). - All soil sampling points are probed

  2. Soil sampling sensor system on a mobile robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Peter M.; Hall, Ernest L.; Zhang, Evan

    2003-10-01

    Determining if a segment of property is suitable for use as an aircraft is a vitally important task that is currently performed by humans. However, this task can also put our people in harms way from land mines, sniper and artillery attacks. The objective of this research is to build a soil survey manipulator that can be carried by a lightweight, portable, autonomous vehicle, sensors and controls to navigate in assault zone. The manipulators permit both surface and sub surface measurements. An original soil sampling tube was constructed with linear actuator as manipulator and standard penetrometer as sampling sensor. The controls provide local control of the robot as well as the soil sampling mechanism. GPS has been selected to perform robot global navigation. The robot was constructed and tested on the test field. The results verified the concepts of using soil sampling robot to survey runway is feasible.

  3. Modification of the potential production capabilities of agricultural terrace soils due to historical cultivation in the Budina cadastral area, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slámová Martina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The soil production attributes of historical agrarian terraced fields were examined in the Budina cadastral area of the Ostrozky Mountains. This landscape represents a unique sub-mountainous Carpathian landscape with farms that use a historically preserved triple-field agricultural system. We determined the geo-spatial parameters of different types of land cover and terraces using geographic information systems. The soil depth was measured in the field, and the skeleton content was determined in the laboratory. We compared data regarding the potential production capabilities of the soil with data from the national classification of agricultural soils. Our results indicated that the soil productivity attributes improved because the naturally less fertile cambisols were positively affected by terracing and long-term cultivation. We recommend the preservation of traditional agricultural activities in historical terraced fields because these terraces represent valuable features that improve the quality of the landscape.

  4. [Characteristics of soil microbial variation during crop rotation period at cultivation area of Salvia miltiorrhiza in Zhongjiang of Sichuan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guibing; Wan, Deguang; Yang, Xinjie; Zhao, Kui; Zhu, Yuxia; Yan, Zhuyun

    2009-12-01

    To study the characteristics of soil microbial variation during Salvia miltiorrhiza crop rotation. the conventional cultivating microbial method was used to study the microbial number and communities structure and soil microbial biomass phosphorus (SMBP) was determined by chloroform vapor extraction method. The data was then analyzed by SPSS software. With the increase of the crop rotation years, the numbers of bacteria and actinomycetes in soil also, but the fungi and SMBP decreased. Microbial mechanism of crop rotation of the planting S. miltiorrhiza is the regulation of microbial number and bacteria physiological communities, the process rebuilds the soil ecological system balance. Microbial communities in soil need at lest 2 years to get to restore, after planting S. miltiorrhiza, which consisting with traditional planting experience.

  5. Changes in soil parameters under continuous plastic mulching in strawberry cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Katherine; Diehl, Dörte; Scopchanova, Sirma; Schaumann, Gabriele E.

    2016-04-01

    Plastic mulching (PM) is a widely used practice in modern agriculture because they generate conditions for optimal yield rates and quality. However, information about long-term effects of PC on soil quality parameters is scarce. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of three different mulching managements on soil quality parameters. Sampling and methodology: Three different managements were studied: Organic mulching (OM), 2-years PM and 4-years PM. Soil samples were collected from irrigated fields in 0-5, 5-10 and 10-30 cm depths and analyzed for water content (WC), pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total soil carbon (Ctot) and cation exchange capacity (CECeff). Results and discussion: Mulching management has an influence on soil parameters. The magnitude of the effects is influenced by the type (organic agriculture practice vs. plastic mulching practice) and duration of the mulching. PM modified the water distribution through the soil column. WC values at the root zone were in average 10% higher compared to those measured at the topsoil. Under OM, the WC was lower than under PM. The pH was mainly influenced by the duration of the managements with slightly higher values after 4 than after 2-years PM. Under PM, aqueous extracts of the topsoil (0-5 cm depth) contained in average with 8.5±1.8 mg/L higher DOC than in 10-30 cm depth with 5.6±0.5 mg/L, which may indicate a mobilization of organic components in the upper layers. After 4-years PM, Ctot values were slightly higher than after 2-years PM and after OM. Surprisingly, after 4-years PM, CECeff values were with 138 - 157 mmolc/kg almost 2-fold higher than after 2-years PM and OM which had with 74 - 102 mmolc/kg comparable CECeff values. Long-term PM resulted in changes of soil pH and slightly increased Ctot which probably enhanced the CECeff of the soil. However, further investigations of the effect of PM on stability of soil organic matter and microbial community structure are needed.

  6. Statistical sampling methods for soils monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann M. Abbott

    2010-01-01

    Development of the best sampling design to answer a research question should be an interactive venture between the land manager or researcher and statisticians, and is the result of answering various questions. A series of questions that can be asked to guide the researcher in making decisions that will arrive at an effective sampling plan are described, and a case...

  7. Microbiological and faunal soil attributes of coffee cultivation under different management systems in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Lammel

    Full Text Available Abstract Brazil is the biggest coffee producer in the world and different plantation management systems have been applied to improve sustainability and soil quality. Little is known about the environmental effects of these different management systems, therefore, the goal of this study was to use soil biological parameters as indicators of changes. Soils from plantations in Southeastern Brazil with conventional (CC, organic (OC and integrated management systems containing intercropping of Brachiaria decumbens (IB or Arachis pintoi (IA were sampled. Total organic carbon (TOC, microbial biomass carbon (MBC and nitrogen (MBN, microbial activity (C-CO2, metabolic quotient (qCO2, the enzymes dehydrogenase, urease, acid phosphatase and arylsulphatase, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF colonization and number of spores and soil fauna were evaluated. The greatest difference between the management systems was seen in soil organic matter content. The largest quantity of TOC was found in the OC, and the smallest was found in IA. TOC content influenced soil biological parameters. The use of all combined attributes was necessary to distinguish the four systems. Each management presented distinct faunal structure, and the data obtained with the trap method was more reliable than the TSBF (Tropical Soils method. A canonic correlation analysis showed that Isopoda was correlated with TOC and the most abundant order with OC. Isoptera was the most abundant faunal order in IA and correlated with MBC. Overall, OC had higher values for most of the biological measurements and higher populations of Oligochaeta and Isopoda, corroborating with the concept that the OC is a more sustainable system.

  8. Microbiological and faunal soil attributes of coffee cultivation under different management systems in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammel, D R; Azevedo, L C B; Paula, A M; Armas, R D; Baretta, D; Cardoso, E J B N

    2015-11-01

    Brazil is the biggest coffee producer in the world and different plantation management systems have been applied to improve sustainability and soil quality. Little is known about the environmental effects of these different management systems, therefore, the goal of this study was to use soil biological parameters as indicators of changes. Soils from plantations in Southeastern Brazil with conventional (CC), organic (OC) and integrated management systems containing intercropping of Brachiaria decumbens (IB) or Arachis pintoi (IA) were sampled. Total organic carbon (TOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN), microbial activity (C-CO2), metabolic quotient (qCO2), the enzymes dehydrogenase, urease, acid phosphatase and arylsulphatase, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization and number of spores and soil fauna were evaluated. The greatest difference between the management systems was seen in soil organic matter content. The largest quantity of TOC was found in the OC, and the smallest was found in IA. TOC content influenced soil biological parameters. The use of all combined attributes was necessary to distinguish the four systems. Each management presented distinct faunal structure, and the data obtained with the trap method was more reliable than the TSBF (Tropical Soils) method. A canonic correlation analysis showed that Isopoda was correlated with TOC and the most abundant order with OC. Isoptera was the most abundant faunal order in IA and correlated with MBC. Overall, OC had higher values for most of the biological measurements and higher populations of Oligochaeta and Isopoda, corroborating with the concept that the OC is a more sustainable system.

  9. Measurements of natural radionuclides in soil samples from Upper Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaban Ramadan Mohamed HARB; Khaled SALAHEL DIN; Abd Elbaset ABBADY; Mohamed Abd Elleh ALI; Rolf MICHEL

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of natural radioactivity measured for the soil of Qena using gamma-ray spectrometry at ZSR, Hanover University, Germany. Soil samples of radioactive concentrations of 238U-series (234Th,214Pb, and 214Bi), 232Th-series (228Ac, 212pb, and 208Tl) and 40K were analyzed. Three objectives were set: (1) activity levels by surface soil sampling at 0~30 cm depth, (2) dose rates of gamma radiation, radium equivalent, index hazard, and effective dose, and (3) ambient dose rates.

  10. Sewage sludge use in bioenergy production. A case study of its effects on soil properties under Cynara cardunculus L. cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso J. Lag-Brotons

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy crops cultivation is expected to further increase, which represents an opportunity to establish synergies able to enhance key environmental components (i.e. soil. To reach this benefits crop management is crucial and should be properly assessed. The aim of this work is to provide an insight on the effects of sewage sludge compost (SSC on soil properties, when this material is applied as basal dressing for the cultivation of a Mediterranean energy crop (Cynara cardunculus L.. A 3-years trial (2008/2011 was conducted in Alicante (Southeastern Spain, testing four SSC application rates (0, 30, 50 and 70 t/ha on a heavy textured Anthrosol. The addition of SSC enhanced soil fertility, primarily increasing organic carbon (Cox, Kjeldahl nitrogen (Nk, available P (PBurriel, CuDTPA and ZnDTPA levels. Comparatively with the control (0 t/ha, 30, 50 and 70 t/ha treatments induced a rise of 11%, 19% and 25% in Nk (Control=1.11 g/kg and PBurriel (Control=79 mg/kg, while for Cox (Control=11.8 g/kg was 14%, 21% and 30%. However, these variables apparently did not significantly decrease throughout the experiment, which suggests that the organic matter added was under a stabilization process, favoured by the poor physical properties of the soil. Other elements (NaNH4Ac, KNH4Ac, MnDTPA were accumulated within the soil as time passed by, as a result of soil status, Mediterranean environmental conditions and crop management. The use of SSC as organic fertilizer represents an effective option to optimize cynara cultivation systems while improving soil quality through enhanced long-lasting organic matter pools.

  11. Sewage sludge use in bioenergy production. A case study of its effects on soil properties under Cynara cardunculus L. cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lag-Brotons, A.J.; Gómez, I.; Navarro-Pedreño, J.

    2015-07-01

    Energy crops cultivation is expected to further increase, which represents an opportunity to establish synergies able to enhance key environmental components (i.e. soil). To reach this benefits crop management is crucial and should be properly assessed. The aim of this work is to provide an insight on the effects of sewage sludge compost (SSC) on soil properties, when this material is applied as basal dressing for the cultivation of a Mediterranean energy crop (Cynara cardunculus L.). A 3-years trial (2008/2011) was conducted in Alicante (Southeastern Spain), testing four SSC application rates (0, 30, 50 and 70 t/ha) on a heavy textured Anthrosol. The addition of SSC enhanced soil fertility, primarily increasing organic carbon (Cox), Kjeldahl nitrogen (Nk), available P (PBurriel), CuDTPA and ZnDTPA levels. Comparatively with the control (0 t/ha), 30, 50 and 70 t/ha treatments induced a rise of 11%, 19% and 25% in Nk (Control=1.11 g/kg) and PBurriel (Control=79 mg/kg), while for Cox (Control=11.8 g/kg) was 14%, 21% and 30%. However, these variables apparently did not significantly decrease throughout the experiment, which suggests that the organic matter added was under a stabilization process, favoured by the poor physical properties of the soil. Other elements (NaNH4Ac, KNH4Ac, MnDTPA) were accumulated within the soil as time passed by, as a result of soil status, Mediterranean environmental conditions and crop management. The use of SSC as organic fertilizer represents an effective option to optimize cynara cultivation systems while improving soil quality through enhanced long-lasting organic matter pools. (Author)

  12. Levels of glyphosate in surface waters, sediments and soils associated with direct sowing soybean cultivation in north pampasic region of Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peruzzo, Pablo J. [Grupo Materiales Polimericos, INIFTA - Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (UNLP-CONICET), Diag. 113 y 64, CC 16 Suc 4, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Porta, Atilio A. [CIMA - Centro de Investigaciones del Medio Ambiente, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 y 115, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Division Quimica Analitica, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 y 115, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: aporta@quimica.unlp.edu.ar; Ronco, Alicia E. [CIMA - Centro de Investigaciones del Medio Ambiente, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 y 115, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-11-15

    Levels of glyphosate were determined in water, soil and sediment samples from a transgenic soybean cultivation area located near to tributaries streams of the Pergamino-Arrecifes system in the north of the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Field work took into account both the pesticide application and the rains occurring after applications. The pesticide was analysed by HPLC-UV detection, previous derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate (FMOC-Cl). In addition, SoilFug multimedia model was used to analyse the environmental distribution of the pesticides. In the field, levels of glyphosate in waters ranged from 0.10 to 0.70 mg/L, while in sediments and soils values were between 0.5 and 5.0 mg/Kg. Temporal variation of glyphosate levels depended directly on the time of application and the rain events. The results obtained from the application of the model are in accordance with the values found in the field. - Glyphosate concentrations in the environment from a region where little information exists about this and intensive cultivation activities predominate in large areas.

  13. The investigation of the possibility for using some wild and cultivated plants as hyperaccumulators of heavy metals from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Miroslava; Antonijevic, Milan; Alagic, Sladjana

    2013-02-01

    The copper production in Bor (East Serbia) during the last 100 years presents an important source of the pollution of environment. Dust, waste waters, tailing, and air pollutants influence the quality of soil, water, and air. Over 2,000 ha of fertile soil have been damaged by the flotation tailing from Bor's facilities. The goal of the present work has been to determine the content of Pb, Cu, and Fe in wild plants (17 species) naturally growing in the damaged soil and in fodder crops (nine species) planted at the same place. The content of Pb, Cu, and Fe has been analyzed in damaged soil as well. This study has also searched for native (wild) and cultivated plants which are able to grow in contaminated soil in the area of the intense industrial activity of copper production in Bor, which means that they can accumulate and tolerate heavy metals in their above-ground tissues. It has been found out that the content of all metals in contaminated soil decreases considerably at the end of the experiment. As it has been expected, all plant species could accumulate investigated metals. All tested plants, both wild-growing and cultivated plants, seem to be quite healthy on the substrate which contained extremely high concentrations of copper.

  14. Isolation, cultivation, purification and identification of bacterial species from microfauna of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Ali

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Abstract:
    Soil is an excellent source of unknown microorganisms since bacteria, algae, protozoans, yeasts, moulds, and microscopic worms are routinely found in this environment. Therefore, soil is a medium in which life is sustained in a fragile biological balance. Bacteria play an important role in nutritional chains that are an important part of biological balance. In the present study, four different soil samples were collected from the rhizosphere of i Sapota zapotilla, ii Eucalyptus species, iii Ficus religiosa from Lahore and iv soil from Changa manga, Pakistan. A Total of 28 bacterial species were isolated and classified in the period between November 2008 and December 2009. All species were cultured on recommended media for verification of biochemical characteristics. The results showed that at least fifteen Gram-positive bacterial species were present in samples and these were considered as the major group constituting the bacterial population strains

  15. Dynamics of Microbial Biomass in a Rainfed Soil Under Wheat Cultivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. AKMAL; K. S.KHAN; XU Jian-Ming

    2004-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to determine the dynamics of soil microbial biomass in a rainfed soil under wheat cultivation at the University of Arid Agriculture, Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The treatments applied were: 1) a control (CK), 2) NPK (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1), 3) farmyard manure (FYM, 110 g pot-1), 4)poultry manure (PM, 110 g pot-1), 5) FYM (110 g pot-1) + NPK (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1), 6) poultry manure (PM, 110 g pot-1) + NPK (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1), 7) FYM (110 g pot-1) + NPK(S) (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1, one half of the NPK at sowing and the other half one month after sowing), and 8) PM (110 g pot-1) + NPK(S) (0.44-0.26-0.18 g pot-1, one half of the NPK applied at sowing and the other half one month after sowing). The experiment was laid out using a completely randomized design with three replications. Microbial biomass C, N and P contents increased continuously from the beginning of the experiment up to the three-leaf stage. A slight decline was observed at the tillering stage in all treatments except with the organic manures + NPK(S) treatments. After tillering there was an increase in all treatments to the recorded maximum point at the full heading stage in all treatments except with the organic manures + NPK(S) treatments. In the FYM + NPK(S) and PM + NPK(S) treatments; however, there was a continuous increase in microbial biomass up to the heading stage. At the harvesting stage a sharp decline was noted in all treatments. The C:N ratio of microbial biomass in tested soil ranged from 7.8 to 11.3, while C:P ratio of microbial biomass in the tested soil ranged from 22.6 to 35.1 throughout all growth stages of the wheat crop.

  16. Optimizing Soil Moisture Sampling Locations for Validation Networks for SMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshani, E.; Berg, A. A.; Lindsay, J.

    2013-12-01

    Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite (SMAP) is scheduled for launch on Oct 2014. Global efforts are underway for establishment of soil moisture monitoring networks for both the pre- and post-launch validation and calibration of the SMAP products. In 2012 the SMAP Validation Experiment, SMAPVEX12, took place near Carman Manitoba, Canada where nearly 60 fields were sampled continuously over a 6 week period for soil moisture and several other parameters simultaneous to remotely sensed images of the sampling region. The locations of these sampling sites were mainly selected on the basis of accessibility, soil texture, and vegetation cover. Although these criteria are necessary to consider during sampling site selection, they do not guarantee optimal site placement to provide the most efficient representation of the studied area. In this analysis a method for optimization of sampling locations is presented which combines the state-of-art multi-objective optimization engine (non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, NSGA-II), with the kriging interpolation technique to minimize the number of sampling sites while simultaneously minimizing the differences between the soil moisture map resulted from the kriging interpolation and soil moisture map from radar imaging. The algorithm is implemented in Whitebox Geospatial Analysis Tools, which is a multi-platform open-source GIS. The optimization framework is subject to the following three constraints:. A) sampling sites should be accessible to the crew on the ground, B) the number of sites located in a specific soil texture should be greater than or equal to a minimum value, and finally C) the number of sampling sites with a specific vegetation cover should be greater than or equal to a minimum constraint. The first constraint is implemented into the proposed model to keep the practicality of the approach. The second and third constraints are considered to guarantee that the collected samples from each soil texture categories

  17. Selecting and applying cesium-137 conversion models to estimate soil erosion rates in cultivated fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Lobb, David A; Tiessen, Kevin H D; McConkey, Brian G

    2010-01-01

    The fallout radionuclide cesium-137 ((137)Cs) has been successfully used in soil erosion studies worldwide. However, discrepancies often exist between the erosion rates estimated using various conversion models. As a result, there is often confusion in the use of the various models and in the interpretation of the data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to test the structural and parametrical uncertainties associated with four conversion models typically used in cultivated agricultural landscapes. For the structural uncertainties, the Soil Constituent Redistribution by Erosion Model (SCREM) was developed and used to simulate the redistribution of fallout (137)Cs due to tillage and water erosion along a simple two-dimensional (horizontal and vertical) transect. The SCREM-predicted (137)Cs inventories were then imported into the conversion models to estimate the erosion rates. The structural uncertainties of the conversion models were assessed based on the comparisons between the conversion-model-estimated erosion rates and the erosion rates determined or used in the SCREM. For the parametrical uncertainties, test runs were conducted by varying the values of the parameters used in the model, and the parametrical uncertainties were assessed based on the responsive changes of the estimated erosion rates. Our results suggest that: (i) the performance/accuracy of the conversion models was largely dependent on the relative contributions of water vs. tillage erosion; and (ii) the estimated erosion rates were highly sensitive to the input values of the reference (137)Cs level, particle size correction factors and tillage depth. Guidelines were proposed to aid researchers in selecting and applying the conversion models under various situations common to agricultural landscapes.

  18. Determination of Radionuclide Concentrations in Tea Samples Cultivated in Guilan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Poursharif

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Foodstuffs are known to contain natural and artificial radionuclides. Determination of radionuclide concentration is of great significance for the protection of human health. The main objective of the present study was the quantification of radionuclides in tea samples, cultivated in Guilan Province in North of Iran. Materials and Methods The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K, and 137Cs in 18 tea samples were measured, using a gamma spectrometry system. In addition, radium equivalent index (Raeq and radiation hazard index (HI were calculated. ANOVA test was used for the statistical analysis of the data Results The concentration of 137Cs was below the minimum detectable activity (MDA. The concentrations of 226Ra and 232Th ranged from < MDA to 0.042 and < MDA to 0.037  Bq/kg respectively. The mean concentration of 40K was 410±15  Bq/kg. Based on the findings, the concentration of 40K was significantly higher than other radionuclides (P

  19. Conservation tillage, optimal water and organic nutrient supply enhance soil microbial activities during wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Singh, Geeta; Singh, Rana P

    2011-04-01

    The field experiments were conducted on sandy loam soil at New Delhi, during 2007 and 2008 to investigate the effect of conservation tillage, irrigation regimes (sub-optimal, optimal and supra-optimal water regimes), and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices on soil biological parameters in wheat cultivation. The conservation tillage soils has shown significant (ptillage soil. Optimum water supply (3-irrigations) enhanced soil respiration over sub-optimum and supra-optimum irrigations by 13.32% and 79% respectively. Soil dehydrogenase (DH) activity in optimum water regime has also increased by 23.33% and 8.18% respectively over the other two irrigation regimes. Similarly, SMBC has also increased by 12.14% and 27.17% respectively in soil with optimum water supply compared to that of sub-optimum and supra-optimum water regime fields. The maximum increase in soil microbial activities is found when sole organic source (50% Farm Yard Manure+25% biofertilizer+25% Green Manure) has been used in combination with the conservation tillage and the optimum water supply. Study demonstrated that microbial activity could be regulated by tillage, water and nitrogen management in the soil in a sustainable manner.

  20. Roseomonas soli sp. nov., isolated from an agricultural soil cultivated with Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Uk; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2014-03-01

    A bacterial strain, designated 5N26(T), was isolated from an agricultural soil cultivated with Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris). Cells of this strain were Gram-reaction-negative, strictly aerobic, motile, non-spore-forming rods, and catalase- and urease-negative. The major fatty acids of strain 5N26(T) were C16 : 0 (7.5 %), C18 : 1 2-OH (13.4 %) and summed feature 8 (C18:1ω6c and/or C18:1ω7c; 63.2%). The polar lipid profile contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and one unidentified aminolipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain 5N26(T) was 68.3 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain 5N26(T) was phylogenetically related to Roseomonas lacus TH-G33(T) and Roseomonas terrae DS-48(T) (97.0 % and 96.6 % sequence similarity, respectively). The results of genotypic and phenotypic data showed that strain 5N26(T) could be distinguished from phylogenetically related species, and that this strain represented a novel species within the genus Roseomonas, for which the name Roseomonas soli sp. nov. (type strain 5N26(T) = KACC 16376(T) = NBRC 109097(T)) is proposed.

  1. The effect of nitrogen fertilization on morphology traits of sweet sorghum cultivated on sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Szydełko-Rabska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the experiment conducted in 2010-2012 on the influence of nitrogen fertilizer type (ammonium sulfate, calcium nitrate, ammonium nitrate and urea on sweet sorghum cultivated on sandy soil. Selected morphological traits and fresh and dry matter biomass were analyzed. Although fertilization significantly increased fresh and dry aboveground biomass, it did not affect sweet sorghum yield. Fresh aboveground biomass was highest under fertilization with ammonium nitrate (59.3 t ha-1. Fertilization influenced also yield growth rate, which ranged from 23.3 t ha-1 (under fertilization with urea to 26.5 t ha-1 (under fertilization with ammonium nitrate. The highest dry matter content (26.1% and dry matter yield (15.3 t ha-1 were obtained under ammonium sulfate. Nitrogen efficiency was affected by nitrogen fertilization and ranged from 40.4 (under fertilization with urea to 52.4 kg D.M. kg-1 N (under fertilization with ammonium sulfate. On the contrary, nitrogen physiological efficiency was not affected.

  2. Agroforestry systems, nutrients in litter and microbial activity in soils cultivated with coffee at high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal de Alcantara Notaro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Agroforestry systems are an alternative option for sustainable production management. These systems contain trees that absorb nutrients from deeper layers of the soil and leaf litter that help improve the soil quality of the rough terrain in high altitude areas, which are areas extremely susceptible to environmental degradation. The aim of this study was to characterize the stock and nutrients in litter, soil activity and the population of microorganisms in coffee (Coffea arabica L. plantations under high altitude agroforestry systems in the semi-arid region of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Samples were collected from the surface litter together with soil samples taken at two depths (0-10 and 10-20 cm from areas each subject to one of the following four treatments: agroforestry system (AS, native forest (NF, biodynamic system (BS and coffee control (CT.The coffee plantation had been abandoned for nearly 15 years and, although there had been no management or harvesting, still contained productive coffee plants. The accumulation of litter and mean nutrient content of the litter, the soil nutrient content, microbial biomass carbon, total carbon, total nitrogen, C/N ratio, basal respiration, microbial quotient, metabolic quotient and microbial populations (total bacteria, fluorescent bacteria group, total fungi and Trichoderma spp. were all analyzed. The systems thatwere exposed to human intervention (A and BS differed in their chemical attributes and contained higher levels of nutrients when compared to NF and CT. BS for coffee production at high altitude can be used as a sustainable alternative in the high altitude zones of the semi-arid region in Brazil, which is an area that is highly susceptible to environmental degradation.

  3. The technology of layer-specific rotary soil cultivation for forest crops and equipment for its implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Orlovskiy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Influence of existing methods and technologies of soil processing for forest crops on establishment and growth of cultivated tree species was studied. It was found that furrow plough processing of soil can interfere with the cultivated trees’ ecological peculiarities, because the furrow floor, where trees are planted, often constitutes the lower part of the turf or the upper part of the ashen-gray layers having unfavorable water-physical conditions and decreased crop-producing power. Whenever conifer trees grow on the bottom of a furrow excavated in medium and heavy clay loam, their growth is significantly decreased and accompanied by remarkable changes in morphology. Processing of shallow humus thickness soil with multiple cutter results in mixing of A0, A1 and A2 (ashen-gray layers. Consequently, the processed horizon obtains a lower amount of fertile substances than the vegetable soil on non-processed places. An apparatus for graded soil tillage, its construction, working principle and usage technology are described. The major peculiarity of the device consists in the ability not to crumbl the soil, but to shake down vegetable earth cut by subsurface plow from beneath. The technology involves removing roots and grass outside cultivated land, so that it cannot be then overgrown with weeds. It was found that exploitation of the device improves soil pulverization quality, enhances percentage of separates less than 10 mm and 10–50 mm, decreases content of the separate larger than 50 mm, and reduced specific energy output almost three-fold. Vertical displacement of control particles while soil processing with common cutter machines and the suggested device was studied. Establishment and growth of Siberian pine was determined in experimental productive cultures at different planting technologies. It was shown that under the suggested technology, forest plants furrow sowing can be done while soil processing, so that making nurseries becomes

  4. Composite Sampling Approaches for Bacillus anthracis Surrogate Extracted from Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian France

    Full Text Available Any release of anthrax spores in the U.S. would require action to decontaminate the site and restore its use and operations as rapidly as possible. The remediation activity would require environmental sampling, both initially to determine the extent of contamination (hazard mapping and post-decon to determine that the site is free of contamination (clearance sampling. Whether the spore contamination is within a building or outdoors, collecting and analyzing what could be thousands of samples can become the factor that limits the pace of restoring operations. To address this sampling and analysis bottleneck and decrease the time needed to recover from an anthrax contamination event, this study investigates the use of composite sampling. Pooling or compositing of samples is an established technique to reduce the number of analyses required, and its use for anthrax spore sampling has recently been investigated. However, use of composite sampling in an anthrax spore remediation event will require well-documented and accepted methods. In particular, previous composite sampling studies have focused on sampling from hard surfaces; data on soil sampling are required to extend the procedure to outdoor use. Further, we must consider whether combining liquid samples, thus increasing the volume, lowers the sensitivity of detection and produces false negatives. In this study, methods to composite bacterial spore samples from soil are demonstrated. B. subtilis spore suspensions were used as a surrogate for anthrax spores. Two soils (Arizona Test Dust and sterilized potting soil were contaminated and spore recovery with composites was shown to match individual sample performance. Results show that dilution can be overcome by concentrating bacterial spores using standard filtration methods. This study shows that composite sampling can be a viable method of pooling samples to reduce the number of analysis that must be performed during anthrax spore remediation.

  5. Composite Sampling Approaches for Bacillus anthracis Surrogate Extracted from Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Brian; Bell, William; Chang, Emily; Scholten, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Any release of anthrax spores in the U.S. would require action to decontaminate the site and restore its use and operations as rapidly as possible. The remediation activity would require environmental sampling, both initially to determine the extent of contamination (hazard mapping) and post-decon to determine that the site is free of contamination (clearance sampling). Whether the spore contamination is within a building or outdoors, collecting and analyzing what could be thousands of samples can become the factor that limits the pace of restoring operations. To address this sampling and analysis bottleneck and decrease the time needed to recover from an anthrax contamination event, this study investigates the use of composite sampling. Pooling or compositing of samples is an established technique to reduce the number of analyses required, and its use for anthrax spore sampling has recently been investigated. However, use of composite sampling in an anthrax spore remediation event will require well-documented and accepted methods. In particular, previous composite sampling studies have focused on sampling from hard surfaces; data on soil sampling are required to extend the procedure to outdoor use. Further, we must consider whether combining liquid samples, thus increasing the volume, lowers the sensitivity of detection and produces false negatives. In this study, methods to composite bacterial spore samples from soil are demonstrated. B. subtilis spore suspensions were used as a surrogate for anthrax spores. Two soils (Arizona Test Dust and sterilized potting soil) were contaminated and spore recovery with composites was shown to match individual sample performance. Results show that dilution can be overcome by concentrating bacterial spores using standard filtration methods. This study shows that composite sampling can be a viable method of pooling samples to reduce the number of analysis that must be performed during anthrax spore remediation. PMID:26714315

  6. Composite Sampling Approaches for Bacillus anthracis Surrogate Extracted from Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Brian; Bell, William; Chang, Emily; Scholten, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Any release of anthrax spores in the U.S. would require action to decontaminate the site and restore its use and operations as rapidly as possible. The remediation activity would require environmental sampling, both initially to determine the extent of contamination (hazard mapping) and post-decon to determine that the site is free of contamination (clearance sampling). Whether the spore contamination is within a building or outdoors, collecting and analyzing what could be thousands of samples can become the factor that limits the pace of restoring operations. To address this sampling and analysis bottleneck and decrease the time needed to recover from an anthrax contamination event, this study investigates the use of composite sampling. Pooling or compositing of samples is an established technique to reduce the number of analyses required, and its use for anthrax spore sampling has recently been investigated. However, use of composite sampling in an anthrax spore remediation event will require well-documented and accepted methods. In particular, previous composite sampling studies have focused on sampling from hard surfaces; data on soil sampling are required to extend the procedure to outdoor use. Further, we must consider whether combining liquid samples, thus increasing the volume, lowers the sensitivity of detection and produces false negatives. In this study, methods to composite bacterial spore samples from soil are demonstrated. B. subtilis spore suspensions were used as a surrogate for anthrax spores. Two soils (Arizona Test Dust and sterilized potting soil) were contaminated and spore recovery with composites was shown to match individual sample performance. Results show that dilution can be overcome by concentrating bacterial spores using standard filtration methods. This study shows that composite sampling can be a viable method of pooling samples to reduce the number of analysis that must be performed during anthrax spore remediation.

  7. Soil Quality under Riparian Forest at Different Stages of Ecological Succession and Cultivated with Sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiz Gabriel; Casagrande, José Carlos; Colato, Alexandre; Soares, Marcio Roberto; Perissatto Meneghin, Silvana

    2014-05-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the quality of the soil through its chemical, physical and microbiological attributes, using additive pondered model, as well as studying the characteristics of the linear method of combination of data, figures of merit (FoMs), the process of assigning weights and standard score functions, using measurements collected in three areas (two riparian forests and a commercial crop of sugarcane) in two soil types (Oxisol and Podzol) located on the dam shores of Sugar Mill Saint Lucia-Araras/SP. The soil was sampled in the depths of 0-0.2 and 0.2-0.4m, and was determined some of its chemical attributes (nutrient content and organic matter, cationic exchange capacity - CEC, etc.), physical (particle size distribution, density and porosity) and microbiological (microbial biomass and basal respiration). Two models were built, one containing two hierarchical levels of FoMs (Mod1), and another containing three levels (Mod2), in order to try to isolate FoMs highly correlated from each other within a top-level FoM. At FoMs of Mod1 were assigned various combinations of weights, and those of Mod2 were assigned weights from three methods, distribution from fixed value, classification and pair-wise comparison. In the Mod1, in virtually all combinations of weights used, values of Soil Quality Index (SQI) were superior in older forests, while the most recent forest presented the lowest SQI, for both types of soil. The variation of SQI values obtained from the sets of weights used also differed between the combinations tested, with the set of values of the ancient forest showing smaller amplitude. It could also be observed that the sets of values of Oxisol showed higher SQI and lower amplitude in relation to that of Podzol. It was observed that these facts are due mainly to the soil organic matter content (MO), which differs between the vegetations and soil types, and influences many parameters used in the model. Thus, in the structures where MO had

  8. Concentration of radioactive elements (U, Th and K) derived from phosphatic fertilizers in cultivated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becegato, Valter Antonio [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Ambiental]. E-mail: becegato@cav.udesc.br; Ferreira, Francisco Jose Fonseca [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Lab. de Geofisica Aplicada]. E-mail: francisco.ferreira@ufpr.br; Machado, William Cesar Pollonio [Instituto Ambiental do Parana, Pato Branco, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: wcpm@mail.crea-pr.org.br

    2008-11-15

    Gamma spectrometric measurements were obtained for the agricultural soils aiming at characterizing the spatial distribution of radionuclide concentrations (K, eU and eTh), as well for the samples of phosphatic fertilizers and agricultural gypsum. In the study areas, three types of soils occurred: Eutrophic Red Nitosol (Alfisoil), Eutroferric Red Latosol of clayey texture (Oxisoil) and Dystrophic Red Latosol of medium texture (Oxisoil). The results showed that the radionuclide concentrations in more clayey soils were higher than in more sandy soils, mainly as a function of a higher adsorption capacity of the former. For the area where human activity predominated, the average contents of K, eU and eTh were respectively 54.75; 10.22 and 7.27 Bq/Kg, significantly higher than those for the area where no fertilizers were used (34.15 Bq/Kg K; 1.69 Bq/Kg eU, and 5.36 Bq/Kg eTh). Variations in the radionuclide concentrations were also observed in various fertilizer formula used in soybean and wheat crops. (author)

  9. Nitrate and potassium concentration in fertigated soil cultivated with wine vines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Oliveira da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the semiarid region of Brazil the use of irrigation systems for applying fertilizers in horticulture is the primary means for incorporating nutrients in the soil. However, this technique still requires its use in wine vines to be assessed. In view of this, this study aimed to assess nitrate and potassium concentrations in soil fertigated with nitrogen and potassium fertilizers in 3 wine grape growing cycles. A field experiment was conducted with 'Syrah' wine grapes, in Petrolina, Pernambuco, Brazil; it assessed five nitrogen doses (0, 15, 30, 60 and 120 kg ha-1 and five K2O doses (0, 15, 30, 60 and 120 kg ha-1 applied by drip irrigation system with two emitters per plant, with a flow rate of 4 L h-1. The experimental design used was the factorial split-plot, making up 13 combinations arranged in 4 randomized blocks. Soil solution samples were collected weekly with the aid of porous cup extractors for all treatments and at depths of 0.4 and 0.6 m by determining nitrate and potassium concentrations and electrical conductivity. Increased levels of both nutrients in the irrigation water increased the availability of nitrate and potassium in the soil solution. The highest nitrate and potassium concentrations were found in the second growing cycle at both depths studied.

  10. Stability of volatile organics in environmental soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.; Johnson, L.H.; Holladay, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on data generated for the purpose of establishing the stability of 19 volatile organic compounds in environmental soil samples. The study was carried out over a 56 day (for two soils) and a 111 day (for one reference soil) time frame and took into account as many variables as possible within the constraints of budget and time. The objectives of the study were: 1) to provide a data base which could be used to provide guidance on pre-analytical holding times for regulatory purposes; and 2) to provide a basis for the evaluation of data which is generated outside of the currently allowable holding times.

  11. Stability of volatile organics in environmental soil samples. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.; Johnson, L.H.; Holladay, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report focuses on data generated for the purpose of establishing the stability of 19 volatile organic compounds in environmental soil samples. The study was carried out over a 56 day (for two soils) and a 111 day (for one reference soil) time frame and took into account as many variables as possible within the constraints of budget and time. The objectives of the study were: 1) to provide a data base which could be used to provide guidance on pre-analytical holding times for regulatory purposes; and 2) to provide a basis for the evaluation of data which is generated outside of the currently allowable holding times.

  12. Use of passive sampling devices to determine soil contaminant concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.A. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States)]|[Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Hooper, M.J. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States); Weisskopf, C.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The effective remediation of contaminated sites requires accurate identification of chemical distributions. A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDs) can provide a thorough site assessment. We have been pursuing their application in terrestrial systems and have found that they increase the ease and speed of analysis, decrease solvent usage and overall cost, and minimize the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a higher sampling frequency than is generally the case using traditional methods. PSDs have been used in the field in soils of varying physical properties and have been successful in estimating soil concentrations ranging from 1 {mu}g/kg (parts per billion) to greater than 200 mg/kg (parts per million). They were also helpful in identifying hot spots within the sites. Passive sampling devices show extreme promise as an analytical tool to rapidly characterize contaminant distributions in soil. There are substantial time and cost savings in laboratory personnel and supplies. By selectively excluding common interferences that require sample cleanup, PSDs can be retrieved from the field and processed rapidly (one technician can process approximately 90 PSDs in an 8-h work day). The results of our studies indicate that PSDs can be used to accurately estimate soil contaminant concentrations and provide lower detection limits. Further, time and cost savings will allow a more thorough and detailed characterization of contaminant distributions. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Natural abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soils: results from aromatic model compounds and soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan G; Kotte, Karsten; Schöler, Heinz F

    2013-02-05

    Oxalic acid is the smallest dicarboxylic acid and plays an important role in soil processes (e.g., mineral weathering and metal detoxification in plants). We have first proven its abiotic formation in soils and investigated natural abiotic degradation processes based on the oxidation of soil organic matter, enhanced by Fe(3+) and H(2)O(2) as hydroxyl radical suppliers. Experiments with the model compound catechol and further hydroxylated benzenes were performed to examine a common degradation pathway and to presume a general formation mechanism of oxalic acid. Two soil samples were tested for the release of oxalic acid and the potential effects of various soil parameters on oxalic acid formation. Additionally, the soil samples were treated with different soil sterilization methods to prove the oxalic acid formation under abiotic soil conditions. Different series of model experiments were conducted to determine a range of factors including Fe(3+), H(2)O(2), reaction time, pH, and chloride concentration on oxalic acid formation. Under certain conditions, catechol is degraded up to 65.6% to oxalic acid referring to carbon. In serial experiments with two soil samples, oxalic acid was produced, and the obtained results are suggestive of an abiotic degradation process. In conclusion, Fenton-like conditions with low Fe(3+) concentrations and an excess of H(2)O(2) as well as acidic conditions were required for an optimal oxalic acid formation. The presence of chloride reduced oxalic acid formation.

  14. Sampling and analysis of alien materials in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liphard, K.G.

    1987-02-01

    For the determination of alien materials in soil, sampling is the decisive step. After minute planning, samples can be obtained by probing, boring or abrasion. Some types of substances can be verified by advance sampling, partly already in the field. Inorganic substances present as anions or cations are eluted and determined with water, heavy metals are determined after preparing a number of solutions by spectroscopic methods. Organic alien substances are extracted with solvents and, as a rule, analysed by chromatography.

  15. GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

    2003-08-01

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

  16. GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

    2004-01-01

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

  17. Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Vimal [Deptt of Physics, M. M. University, Mullana (Ambala)-133 207 (India); Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001 (India); Singh, Tejinder Pal, E-mail: tejinders03@gmail.com [Deptt of Physics, S.A. Jain (P.G.) College, Ambala City- 134 003 (India); Chauhan, R. P. [Deptt of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra- 136 119 (India); Mudahar, G. S. [Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Radon and its progeny are major contributors in the radiation dose received by general population of the world. Because radon is a noble gas, a large portion of it is free to migrate away from radium. The primary sources of radon in the houses are soils and rocks source emanations, emanation from building materials, and entry of radon into a structure from outdoor air. Keeping this in mind the study of radon exhalation rate from some soil samples of the Kharar, Punjab has been carried out using Can Technique. The equilibrium radon concentration in various soil samples of Kharar area of district Mohali varied from 12.7 Bqm{sup −3} to 82.9 Bqm{sup −3} with an average of 37.5 ± 27.0 Bqm{sup −3}. The radon mass exhalation rates from the soil samples varied from 0.45 to 2.9 mBq/kg/h with an average of 1.4 ± 0.9 mBq/kg/h and radon surface exhalation rates varied from 10.4 to 67.2 mBq/m{sup 2}/h with an average of 30.6 ± 21.8 mBq/m{sup 2}/h. The radon mass and surface exhalation rates of the soil samples of Kharar, Punjab were lower than that of the world wide average.

  18. Effects of Biochar Addition on CO2 and N2O Emissions following Fertilizer Application to a Cultivated Grassland Soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Chen

    Full Text Available Carbon (C sequestration potential of biochar should be considered together with emission of greenhouse gases when applied to soils. In this study, we investigated CO2 and N2O emissions following the application of rice husk biochars to cultivated grassland soils and related gas emissions tos oil C and nitrogen (N dynamics. Treatments included biochar addition (CHAR, NO CHAR and amendment (COMPOST, UREA, NO FERT. The biochar application rate was 0.3% by weight. The temporal pattern of CO2 emissions differed according to biochar addition and amendments. CO2 emissions from the COMPOST soils were significantly higher than those from the UREA and NO FERT soils and less CO2 emission was observed when biochar and compost were applied together during the summer. Overall N2O emission was significantly influenced by the interaction between biochar and amendments. In UREA soil, biochar addition increased N2O emission by 49% compared to the control, while in the COMPOST and NO FERT soils, biochar did not have an effect on N2O emission. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain the higher N2O emissions upon biochar addition to UREA soil than other soils. Labile C in the biochar may have stimulated microbial N mineralization in the C-limited soil used in our study, resulting in an increase in N2O emission. Biochar may also have provided the soil with the ability to retain mineral N, leading to increased N2O emission. The overall results imply that biochar addition can increase C sequestration when applied together with compost, and might stimulate N2O emission when applied to soil amended with urea.

  19. Effects of Biochar Addition on CO2 and N2O Emissions following Fertilizer Application to a Cultivated Grassland Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Kim, Hyunjin; Yoo, Gayoung

    2015-01-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration potential of biochar should be considered together with emission of greenhouse gases when applied to soils. In this study, we investigated CO2 and N2O emissions following the application of rice husk biochars to cultivated grassland soils and related gas emissions tos oil C and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Treatments included biochar addition (CHAR, NO CHAR) and amendment (COMPOST, UREA, NO FERT). The biochar application rate was 0.3% by weight. The temporal pattern of CO2 emissions differed according to biochar addition and amendments. CO2 emissions from the COMPOST soils were significantly higher than those from the UREA and NO FERT soils and less CO2 emission was observed when biochar and compost were applied together during the summer. Overall N2O emission was significantly influenced by the interaction between biochar and amendments. In UREA soil, biochar addition increased N2O emission by 49% compared to the control, while in the COMPOST and NO FERT soils, biochar did not have an effect on N2O emission. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain the higher N2O emissions upon biochar addition to UREA soil than other soils. Labile C in the biochar may have stimulated microbial N mineralization in the C-limited soil used in our study, resulting in an increase in N2O emission. Biochar may also have provided the soil with the ability to retain mineral N, leading to increased N2O emission. The overall results imply that biochar addition can increase C sequestration when applied together with compost, and might stimulate N2O emission when applied to soil amended with urea.

  20. Spatial heterogeneity of DTPA-extractable zinc in cultivated soils induced by city pollution and land use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG; Yong; LIANG; Wenju; WEN; Dazhong; ZHANG; Yuge; CHEN

    2005-01-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of DTPA-extractable zinc in the cultivated soils of Shenyang suburbs in Liaoning Province of China was investigated, and its map was drawn by the methods of geostatistics combined with geographic information system. The data of soil DTPA-extractable zinc fitted normal distribution after logarithm transformation, and its semivariogram fitted a spherical model. The semivariogram indicated that the spatial dependence of soil DTPA-extractable zinc content was moderate, with the spatial dependence range of 1.69 km and the fractal dimension of 1.96. Stochastic factors contributed to 49.9% of the spatial variability, while structural factors contributed to 50.1% of it. The spatial heterogeneity of soil DTPA-extractable zinc shown by a kriged interpolation map was deeply influenced by stochastic factors such as city pollution, land use pattern and crop distributions. For example, the average content of Zn in vegetable garden soils was 2.5-4 times as much as in their originated soils, and was lower in paddy soils than in their originated soils. The areas with a higher content of soil DTPA-extractable zinc appeared in the near suburbs and the riverside along Hunhe River and the wastewater drainage of Xihe River, and the extremely high values in the near suburb of the city's residential area were a striking feature, indicating the key role of city pollution in the spatial heterogeneity of soil DTPA-extractable zinc. When recorded in the form of a soil pollution map,the results of such a survey make it possible to identify the unusually polluted areas, and to provide more information for precise agriculture and environmental control.

  1. Temporal changes of hydraulic conductivity of cultivated soil studied with help of multipoint tension infiltrometer and X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipa, Vladimir; Zumr, David; Snehota, Michal; Dohnal, Michal

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregates, its shape, size and spatial distribution affect the pores arrangement and thus govern the hydraulic conductivity of soil and soil moisture regime. On arable lands the soil is exposed to rapid structural changes within each growing season due to agrotechnical practices, quick crop and root growth, soil biota and climatic conditions. This contribution is mainly focused on temporal changes of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of cultivated soil. The research is supplemented by detailed analysis of CT images of soil samples for better understanding of structural change of soil during the year and its impact on soil hydraulic conductivity. The infiltration experiments were done using automated multipoint tension infiltrometer recently developed at CTU in Prague on the plots located on the Nucice experimental catchment. The catchment is situated in a moderately hilly area in central Bohemia (Czech Republic). Fourteen regular infiltration campaigns (77 individual infiltration experiments) were conducted from October 2012 until July 2015 on a single arable plot. In general, agricultural practice captured involved complete life cycle from sowing, through harvest, to postharvest stubble breaking. Weather conditions during infiltration experiments ranged from clear-sky to light rain, with temperatures between 8 and 30°C. All measurements were consistently performed with small suction of 3 cm and hydraulic conductivities were determined using extended semiempirical estimation procedure of Zhang. Results show that unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was the lowest in early spring and did increase at beginning of summer in the years 2012 - 2014. During the summer and autumn (2012 - 2014) the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity remained relatively unchanged. On the contrary, results in the year 2015 show opposite trend - the highest hydraulic conductivity was observed in early spring and did gradually decrease until the end of July. In both cases, however, the

  2. Relationships between soil parameters and physiological status of Miscanthus x giganteus cultivated on soil contaminated with trace elements under NPK fertilisation vs. microbial inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrzeba, Marta; Rusinowski, Szymon; Sitko, Krzysztof; Krzyżak, Jacek; Skalska, Aleksandra; Małkowski, Eugeniusz; Ciszek, Dorota; Werle, Sebastian; McCalmont, Jon Paul; Mos, Michal; Kalaji, Hazem M

    2017-06-01

    Crop growth and development can be influenced by a range of parameters, soil health, cultivation and nutrient status all play a major role. Nutrient status of plants can be enhanced both through chemical fertiliser additions (e.g. N, P, K supplementation) or microbial fixation and mobilisation of naturally occurring nutrients. With current EU priorities discouraging the production of biomass on high quality soils there is a need to investigate the potential of more marginal soils to produce these feedstocks and the impacts of soil amendments on crop yields within them. This study investigated the potential for Miscanthus x giganteus to be grown in trace element (TE)-contaminated soils, ideally offering a mechanism to (phyto)manage these contaminated lands. Comprehensive surveys are needed to understand plant-soil interactions under these conditions. Here we studied the impacts of two fertiliser treatments on soil physico-chemical properties under Miscanthus x giganteus cultivated on Pb, Cd and Zn contaminated arable land. Results covered a range of parameters, including soil rhizosphere activity, arbuscular mycorrhization (AM), as well as plant physiological parameters associated with photosynthesis, TE leaf concentrations and growth performance. Fertilization increased growth and gas exchange capacity, enhanced rhizosphere microbial activity and increased Zn, Mg and N leaf concentration. Fertilization reduced root colonisation by AMF and caused higher chlorophyll concentration in plant leaves. Microbial inoculation seems to be a promising alternative for chemical fertilizers, especially due to an insignificant influence on the mobility of toxic trace elements (particularly Cd and Zn). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Extraction DNA from Activated Sludge-Comparing with Soil Sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢冰; 奚旦立; 陈季华

    2003-01-01

    DNA directly extraction from activated sludge and soil sample with enzyme lyses methods was investigated in this paper. DNA yield from activated sludge was 3.0 mg/g. VLSS, and 28.2-43.8 μg/g soil respectively. The resulting DNA is suitable for PCR.By studied methods, higher quality and quantity of sludge DNA could be obtained rapidly and inexpensively from large number of samples, and the PCR product obtained from this protocol was not affected by contaminated higher concentration of heavy metals.

  4. Toilet compost and human urine used in agriculture: fertilizer value assessment and effect on cultivated soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, D; Sou Dakoure, M; Hijikata, N; Lahmar, R; Yacouba, H; Coulibaly, L; Funamizu, N

    2015-01-01

    Toilet compost (TC) and human urine are among natural fertilizers, which raise interest due to their double advantages to combine sanitation and nutrient recovery. However, combination of urine and TC is not so spread probably because the best ratio (urine/TC) is still an issue and urine effect on soil chemical properties remains poorly documented. This study aims to determine the best ratio of urine and TC in okra cultivation, by targeting higher fertilization effect combined with lower impact on soil chemical properties. Based on Nitrogen requirement of okra, seven treatments were compared: (T0) no fertilizer, (T1) chemical fertilizer (NPK: 14-23-14), (T2) 100% urine, (T3) 100% TC, (T4) ratio of 75% urine+25% TC, (T5) 50% urine+50% TC and (T6) 25% urine+75% TC. Results indicated that T4 (75% urine+25% TC) gave the highest plant height and yield. In contrast, T2 (100% urine) gave the lowest results among all treatments, indicating toxicity effects on plant growth and associated final yield. Such toxicity is confirmed by soil chemical properties at T2 with soil acidification and significant increase in soil salinity. In contrast, application of urine together with TC mitigates soil acidification and salinity, highlighting the efficiency of urine and TC combination on soil chemical properties. However, further investigation is necessary to refine better urine/TC ratio for okra production.

  5. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil under soybean cultivation and at an adjacent rainforest in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Patrick Beldini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Land-use change in the Amazon basin has occurred at an accelerated pace during the last decade, and it is important that the effects induced by these changes on soil properties are better understood. This study investigated the chemical, physical, and biological properties of soil in a field under cultivation of soy and rice, and at an adjacent primary rain forest. Increases in soil bulk density, exchangeable cations and pH were observed in the soy field soil. In the primary forest, soil microbial biomass and basal respiration rates were higher, and the microbial community was metabolically more efficient. The sum of basal respiration across the A, AB and BA horizons on a mass per area basis ranged from 7.31 to 10.05 Mg CO2-C ha-1yr-1, thus yielding estimates for total soil respiration between 9.6 and 15.5 Mg CO2-C ha-1yr-1 across sites and seasons. These estimates are in good agreement with literature values for Amazonian ecosystems. The estimates of heterotrophic respiration made in this study help to further constrain the estimates of autotrophic soil respiration and will be useful for monitoring the effects of future land-use in Amazonian ecosystems.

  6. Effects of Some Beneficial Bacteria in Casing Soil on Growth and Yield of Cultivated Mushroom Agaricus bisporus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Çetin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out to determine the interaction between some bacteria naturally existing in casing soil and Agaricus bisporus (Sylvan Hauser A15 hypha in laboratory (in vitro and cultivation (in vivo conditions, and to confirm its effects on mushroom yield. Totally 32 bacteria (3 Gram (+ and 29 Fluorescent Pseudomonads was isolated from casing soil and healthy sporophores. As a result of in vitro experiment carried out to determine the effects of bacteria on mycelium growth of A. bisporus, 24 bacterial isolates were found more effective at the rate of 2 to 115% than control treatment. To determine the effects of bacterium, chosen at the end of in vitro experiments, on mushroom yield in cultivation conditions, three experiments were established in March, May and July in 2008. At the end of experiments, bacterial isolates provided 8 – 40 % increase in total yield. Population density and change in population number related to time was observed during growing period, after the inoculation of bacterial isolates into casing soil. According to the results, Pseudomonas fluorescens (T 4/2 and Ş 8, P.putida (Ş 2/1 and Ş 10 and Bacillus mycoides (T 7/2 bacterial isolates were colonized successfully both in casing soil and sporophores.

  7. Cloudberry cultivation in cutover peatlands: hydrological and soil physical impacts on the growth of different clones and cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Théroux Rancourt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus L. cultivation is receiving increasing attention as a means of revitalising regional economy and rehabilitating cutover peatlands. The study reported here investigated the necessary soil physical and hydrological conditions, the compatibility of cloudberry cultivation with restoration of mined peatlands, and the performance of newly commercialised Norwegian cultivars in North America. Terraces at two levels were landscaped in peatland after vacuum extraction of peat to create different growing conditions in terms of hydrology and soil properties, then planted with two Norwegian cultivars (Fjordgull and Fjellgull and two local (east Canadian clones of cloudberry in a randomised block experiment. After three years, both the clones and the cultivars grown on the lower terrace had more leaves per m2 due to lower soil bulk density combined with higher average water level. Mulching, inherent to restoration, reduced the number of leaves produced during the year following planting. The Fjordgull cultivar had a higher survival rate than Fjellgull and local clones. Overall, the number of living rhizomes decreased over the years following planting. These results suggest that soil properties (bulk density and porosity significantly influence cloudberry establishment and growth. Rhizomes should be planted two or three years after peatland restoration to avoid the initial negative effects of the mulch.

  8. Residual soil DNA extraction increases the discriminatory power between samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Clarke, Laurence J; Cooper, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Forensic soil analysis relies on capturing an accurate and reproducible representation of the diversity from limited quantities of soil; however, inefficient DNA extraction can markedly alter the taxonomic abundance. The performance of a standard commercial DNA extraction kit (MOBIO PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit) and three modified protocols of this kit: soil pellet re-extraction (RE); an additional 24-h lysis incubation step at room temperature (RT); and 24-h lysis incubation step at 55°C (55) were compared using high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer I ribosomal DNA. DNA yield was not correlated with fungal diversity and the four DNA extraction methods displayed distinct fungal community profiles for individual samples, with some phyla detected exclusively using the modified methods. Application of a 24 h lysis step will provide a more complete inventory of fungal biodiversity, and re-extraction of the residual soil pellet offers a novel tool for increasing discriminatory power between forensic soil samples.

  9. Evaluation of Nitrogen and Potassium Uptake and Efficiency of Two Rice Varieties Cultivated on an Acid Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shajarutulwardah M. Yusob

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A pot study was carried with the following objectives: (i To investigate N and K uptake of MR 220 and ARC 2 rice varieties grown on Bekenu series (Tipik Tualemkuts, and (ii To investigate N and K use efficiency of MR 220 and ARC 2 grown on Bekenu series. Treatments evaluated were: (i MR 220 and ARC 2 under fertilized condition (T1, and (ii MR 220 and ARC 2 under unfertilized condition (T0. The experiment was conducted in a glasshouse at Universiti Putra Malaysia Bintulu Campus, Sarawak, Malaysia. Altogether 24 pots were used having a completely randomized design (CRD with 6 replications (for each treatment and each variety. Nitrogen and K were applied in the forms of urea (46 % N and muriate of potash (60 % K2O for the two varieties. For T1 of MR 220, N, K, and P were applied at the rates of 4.0 g N, 1.10 g K2O and 2.13 g P2O5 per pot, respectively in split. In the case of T1 of ARC 2, N, K, and P rates used were 1.30 g N, 0.8 g K2O, and 1.70 g P2O5 per pot, respectively in split. At 65 days (ARC 2 and 70 days (MR 220 after planting, plants were sampled and partitioned into roots and stem, and their dry weight, N, and K concentrations determined using standard procedures. Soil sampling was done before and after fertilization. Soil total N was determined using the Kjeldahl method while exchangeable K, Ca, Mg, and Na were extracted by the double acid method and their concentrations determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The dry ashing method was used for the determination of K, Ca, Mg and Na concentrations in plant tissues while the Kjeldahl method was used to determine total N in plant tissues. The concentrations multiplied by the oven dried weight of roots and stem provided N, K, Ca, Mg and Na uptake in these plant parts. The N and K use efficiency was then calculated using the subtraction method. With the exception of Ca, urea and KCl application significantly increased soil N, K, Mg, and Na concentrations. Application of K

  10. Accumulation of germanium and rare earth elements in functional groups of selected energy crops cultivated on two different soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the uptake of Ge and selected REEs in functional groups of selected crop species. Five species belonging to the functional group of grasses (Hordeum vulgare, Zea mays, Avena sativa, Panicum miliaceum and Phalaris arundinacea) and four species from the group of herbs (Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius, Fagopyrum esculentum and Brassica napus) were cultivated in parallel on two soils with slightly alkaline (soil A: pH = 7.8) and slightly acidic (soil B: pH = 6.8) conditions. After harvest, concentrations of Ge, La, Nd, Gd, Er, P, Fe, Mn and Si in shoot tissues were determined with ICP-MS. Concentrations of Ge were significantly higher in grasses than in herbs. Conversely, concentrations of La and Nd were significantly higher in herbs, than in grasses. Highest concentrations were measured in Brassica napus (REEs) and Zea mays (Ge). Concentrations of Ge significantly correlated with that of Si in the shoots showing low concentrations in herbs and high concentrations in grasses, indicating a common mechanism during the uptake in grasses. Concentrations of REEs correlated significantly with that of Fe, indicating increasing concentrations of REEs with increasing concentrations of Fe. Cultivation of species on the slightly acidic soil significantly increased the uptake Ge in Lupinus albus and Phalaris arundinacea and the uptake of La and Nd in all species except of Phalaris arundinacea. This study demonstrated that commonly used field crops could be regarded as suitable candidates for a phytomining of Ge and REEs, since these species develop high yields of shoots, high concentrations of elements and are widely used in agricultural practice. Under soil conditions where bioavailability of Ge and REEs is expected to be low (soil A) accumulation can be estimated at 1.8 g/ha Ge in Z. mays and 3.7 g/ha REEs (1.5 g/ha La, 1.4 g/ha Nd, 0.6 g/ha Gd, 0.3 g/ha Er), respectively, in B. napus, assuming a constant high efficiency of

  11. Clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile cultivated from stool samples of hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Stojanovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to fortify the clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from stool samples of hospitalized patients. This survey included 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea and positive findings of Clostridium difficile in stool samples, and 100 hospitalized patients with formed stool as a control group. Bacteriological examination of a stool samples was conducted using standard microbiological methods. Stool sample were inoculated directly on nutrient media for bacterial cultivation (blood agar using 5% sheep blood, Endo agar, selective Salmonella Shigella agar, Selenite-F broth, CIN agar and Skirrow's medium, and to selective cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar (CCFA (Biomedics, Parg qe tehnicologico, Madrid, Spain for isolation of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile toxin was detected by ELISA-ridascreen Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B (R-Biopharm AG, Germany and ColorPAC ToxinA test (Becton Dickinson, USA. Examination of stool specimens for the presence of parasites (causing diarrhea was done using standard methods (conventional microscopy, commercial concentration test Paraprep S Gold kit (Dia Mondial, France and RIDA®QUICK Cryptosporidium/Giardia Combi test (R-Biopharm AG, Germany. Examination of stool specimens for the presence of fungi (causing diarrhea was performed by standard methods. All stool samples positive for Clostridium difficile were tested for Rota, Noro, Astro and Adeno viruses by ELISA - ridascreen (R-Biopharm AG, Germany. In this research we isolated 99 Clostridium difficile strains from 116 stool samples of 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea. The 53 (66.25% of patients with diarrhea were positive for toxins A and B, one (1.25% were positive for only toxin B. Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from samples of 26 (32.5% patients. However, other pathogenic microorganisms of intestinal tract cultivated from samples of 16 patients

  12. Copper, nickel and zinc accumulations in lettuce grown in soil amended with contaminated cattle manure vermicompost after sequential cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordão, Cláudio P; de Andrade, Renato P; Cotta, Aloísio J B; Cecon, Paulo R; Neves, Júlio C L; Fontes, Mauricio P F; Fernandes, Raphael B A

    2013-01-01

    The Cu, Ni and Zn accumulations in leaves and roots of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L) grown in soil amended with natural and contaminated cattle manure vermicompost were evaluated. The vermicompost residues containing relatively high metal concentrations used in this work were obtained from a previous experiment, in which vermicompost was applied to removing metals from electroplating wastes. Sequential lettuce cultivations were conducted in pots containing the residual substrates from the first cultivation by adding metal-enriched vermicompost residues. In general, the Cu, Ni and Zn concentrations in leaves and roots of lettuce plants grown in vermicompost enriched with these metals were higher than in the treatment using the natural vermicompost. The metal concentrations in leaves from treatments with natural vermicompost were below the critical concentrations of toxicity to plants. However, the metal concentrations in leaves of the third cultivation in which metal-enriched vermicompost was applied were greater than the upper limit that causes plant toxicity, but no visual damage was observed in the plants. Treatment with Zn-enriched vermicompost resulted in toxicity symptoms, but plant damage did not result in the death of the plant. The chemical fractionation of Cu, Ni and Zn in residues from lettuce cultivation was evaluated by using a sequential extraction procedure and metal concentrations were increased in the different chemical fractions according to the increase of vermicompost dose.

  13. Concentrations of Cu, growth, and chlorophyll content of field-cultivated wheat growing in naturally enriched Cu soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, C.M.; Vardaka, E.; Lanaras, T. [Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    1997-02-01

    The Serbo-Macedonian massif of northern Greece is notable for the occurrence of numerous small areas of sulphide mineralisation. Varying degrees of porphyry copper mineralisation, associated with post-Miocene volcanic rocks of rhyolitic composition, can be encountered in agricultural fields which are used mainly for wheat production. Although Cu is a trace element essential to plant nutrition, in excess, it is phytotoxic causing stunted growth, chlorosis and root malformation. Previous studies on wheat growing in these naturally enriched Cu soils have shown that plants have reduced growth, chlorosis and chloroplast ultrastructural changes and a reduced efficiency of the photochemistry of photosystem II (PSII). The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the Cu concentration of the soil and the plant tissue Cu concentration, growth and chlorophyll content of field-cultivated wheat growing in soils with varying degrees of porphyry copper mineralisation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Nitrogen use efficiency and life cycle of nodules in alfalfa after different mineral fertilization and soil cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vasileva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen use efficiency and life cycle of root nodules in alfalfa after different mineral fertilization and soil cultivation practices were studied. Field trial was conducted in the Institute of Forage Crops, Pleven, Bulgaria on leached chernozem subsoil type and no irrigation. The next treatments were tested: i for fertilization as follows: N0P0K0 (control; N60P100K80 (an accepted technology; N23P100K35 (nitrogen was applied 1/2 in first year of growing and 1/2 in third year; N23P100K35 (nitrogen was supplied pre-sowing; N35P80K50, and Аmophose - 250 kg/ha, calculated at fertilizing rates N27P120K0; ii for soil cultivation as follows: soil loosing 10-12 cm, plough at depth 12-15 cm, 22-24 cm (an accepted technology, 18-22 cm and 30-35 cm. It was found that soil cultivation and mineral fertilization had effect on nitrogen use efficiency and life cycle of root nodules in Alfalfa. Nitrogen use efficiency was found to be highest at N23P100K35 and plough at the depth of 22-24 cm. Life cycle of root nodules was the longest at N35P80K50 and plough at the depth of 18-22 cm. The better root mass to nodule number ratio was found at N23P100K35 and plough at the depth of 22-24 cm.

  15. Systematic comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial Melissa officinalis samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Sousa, Maria João; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-06-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) infusions are used worldwide for digestive, analgesic and other pharmaceutical applications. Herein, the nutraceuticals production and antioxidant potential in garden cultivated, in vitro cultured and two commercial samples (bags and granulated) of lemon balm was compared. The profile of in vitro cultured lemon balm is closer of garden cultivated sample than of both commercial samples (bag or granulate). It presented the highest levels of proteins and ash, and the lowest energetic value. The most favorable n6/n3 ration, as also the highest PUFA (mostly α-linolenic acid), tocopherols (including α-, γ- and δ-isoforms) and ascorbic acid contents were also observed in this sample. Nevertheless, it was the commercial bag lemon balm that gave the highest antioxidant activity and the highest levels of phenolics and flavonoids. As far as we kwon, this is the first comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial lemon balm samples. Moreover, it proved that in vitro culture might be used to stimulate vitamins production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coupling of Belowground Carbon Cycling and Stoichiometry from Organisms to Ecosystems along a Soil C Gradient Under Rice Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, W.; Ye, R.; Horwath, W. R.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Ecological stoichiometry is a framework linking biogeochemical cycles to organism functional traits that has been widely applied in aquatic ecosystems, animals and plants, but is poorly explored in soil microbes. We evaluated relationships among soil stoichiometry, carbon (C) cycling, and microbial community structure and function along a soil gradient spanning ~5-25% C in cultivated rice fields with experimental nitrogen (N) amendments. We found rates of soil C turnover were associated with nutrient stoichiometry and phosphorus (P) availability at ecosystem, community, and organism scales. At the ecosystem scale, soil C turnover was highest in mineral soils with lower C content and N:P ratios, and was positively correlated with soil inorganic P. Effects of N fertilization on soil C cycling also appeared to be mediated by soil P availability, while microbial community composition (by 16S rRNA sequencing) was not altered by N addition. Microbial communities varied along the soil C gradient, corresponding with highly covariant soil %C, N:P ratios, C quality, and carbon turnover. In contrast, we observed unambiguous shifts in microbial community function, imputed from taxonomy and directly assessed by shotgun sequenced metagenomes. The abundance of genes for carbohydrate utilization decreased with increasing soil C (and declining C turnover), while genes for aromatic C uptake, N fixation and P scavenging increased along with potential incorporation of C into biomass pools. Ecosystem and community-scale associations between C and nutrient substrate availability were also reflected in patterns of resource allocation among individual genomes (imputed and assembled). Microbes associated with higher rates of soil C turnover harbored more genes for carbohydrate utilization, fewer genes for obtaining energetically costly forms of C, N and P, more ribosomal RNA gene copies, and potentially lower C use efficiency. We suggest genome clustering by functional gene suites might

  17. Effects of Different Control Measures on Cucumber Yield, Quality and Soil Microbial Diversity Under Green house Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the effects of different control measures on soil microbial diversity by Biolog, the greenhouse soils of cucumber cultivated in Shouguang City, Shandong Prorince were collected and the relationship between the soils and yield and quality of cucumber was investigated. The results showed that, the average well color development(AWCDof returning straw to field(RSwas the highest and that of no fertilizer(CKwas the lowest. The activity of microbe was vigorous at the time of cultivation of 72 h and AWCD of treatments ranged from 0.494 to 0.881. AWCD of RS was 1.3 times than that of conventional fertilization(CFand the difference reached significant level at the moment. However, AWCD of drip irrigation(DIwas lower slightly than that of CF. Soil microbial diversity changed in different treatments. CF had the lowest Shannon index(Hand Substrate evenness(E, but these two indices increased significantly through the application of RS and DI. Principal component analysis showed that carbon utilization by soil microbial communities also changed in different treatments. RS concentrated in the positive direction of the first principal component and the score coefficients ranged from 4.91 to 5.50. Conversely, others concentrated in the negative direction and the score coefficients ranged from-3.26 to-0.18. Compared with CF, cucumber yield and quality of RS and DI treatments had no significant changes. Simpson’s dominance(Dsand Substrate richness(Swere positively correlated with cu-cumber yield, Vc and soluble sugar content. Comprehensive consideration, RS was more helpful to improve the soil micro-ecological envrion-ment than DI. Therefore, future research of RS is necessary for sustainable development of installation agriculture.

  18. Enzymatic activity and mineralization of carbon and nitrogen in soil cultivated with coffee and green manures Atividade enzimática e mineralização do carbono e nitrogênio sob solo cultivado com adubos verdes na cultura do cafeeiro

    OpenAIRE

    Elcio Liborio Balota; Julio César Dias Chaves

    2010-01-01

    There are great concerns about degradation of agricultural soils. It has been suggested that cultivating different plant species intercropped with coffee plants can increase microbial diversity and enhance soil sustainability. The objective of this study was to evaluate enzyme activity (urease, arylsulfatase and phosphatase) and alterations in C and N mineralization rates as related to different legume cover crops planted between rows of coffee plants. Soil samples were collected in a field e...

  19. Baseline Profile of Soil Samples from Upian River Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilanfranco Caballero TAYONE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB in the Philippines is currently mapping out the entire Davao City Watershed Area (DCWA. There are 8 major watershed areas within DCWA that has been identified by the MGB and the largest is the Davao River Watershed Area (DRWA. A smaller sub-watershed within DRWA, the Upian River Watershed Area (URWA, was proposed of which its boundary and soil profile is yet to be established. This study focused on the analyses of the soil samples from URWA. The results for pH, organic matter, cation exchange capacity, N, P, K, Ca and Mg were then compared to the Bureau of Soil standard for its fertility rating. Analysis of lead (Pb was also included as a pollutant indicator for possible soil contamination. There are 4 sampling sites with unfavorable ratings for pH, 3 for both organic matter and phosphorus, and 2 stations for both nitrogen and calcium. Fertility rating is generally good for cation exchange capacity, potassium and magnesium. The Bureau of Soil has no existing standards for micronutrients. However, all sampling sites were found to be too low with micronutrients according to Gershuny and Smillie. No indication of lead contamination or pollution on all sites as far as natural levels of lead in surface soil is concerned. This study will provide baseline information that is useful to all stakeholders, to the people living near the area, farmers, planners, and resource managers. This can also provide inputs to key government agencies in the Philippines like the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR and the City Planning Office of Davao in formulating policies for sustainable management of the resource upon implementation of their programs and projects. Without the aforementioned information, planners would have difficulty in predicting the impact or recommend best management strategies for a specific land use.

  20. Residues of organophosphate pesticides used in vegetable cultivation in ambient air, surface water and soil in Bueng Niam Subdistrict, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnpicharnchai, Kallaya; Chaiear, Naesinee; Charerntanyarak, Lertchai

    2013-11-01

    Agricultural pesticide utilization is one of the important problems in rural and urban crop-cultivated areas, with the majority of pollutants dispersing via ambient air, water and other natural pathways. This study was therefore conducted in a specially selected village which is known to be a leading vegetable growing area in Khon Kaen Province. The aim of the study was to assess pesticide residues, and measure the seasonal fluctuations in organophosphate concentrations during 2010 in the environment of a risk area. Samples from selected sites were collected in two phases: Phase I was in summer (during March to May) and Phase II was in winter (during October to December). A total of 150 samples were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. The results showed that dicrotophos, chlorpyrifos, profenofos and ethion were found at the highest concentrations in soil and at the lowest concentrations in ambient air (pwater samples, the highest mean concentration of a pesticide was 1.3757 +/- 0.5014 mg/l for dicrotophos in summer and 0.3629 +/- 0.4338 mg/l for ethion in winter. The highest mean concentration of a pesticide in soil samples was 42.2893 +/- 39.0711 mg/kg ethion in summer and 90.0000 +/- 24.1644 mg/kg of ethion in winter.

  1. Soil water regime and crop yields in relation to various technologies of cultivation in the Kulunda Steppe (Altai Krai

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    V. Beliaev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of crop yield in areas with different technologies of cultivation based on the network of automatic stations that provide data on climatic and soil-hydrological monitoring in the dry steppe during the vegetation period of May–September 2013–2016 . These data  on regional ecological and climatic parameters are of great interest to the ecologists, plant physiologists, and farmers working in the Kulunda Plain (Altai Territory. We compared the following options for cropping technologies: the modern system, which is the "no-till", technology without autumn tillage;the intensive technology of deep autumn tillage by plough PG-3-5 at a depth of 22–24 cm. Cultivation of crops was carried out using the following scheme of crop rotation: the modern system: 1–2–3–4 (wheat – peas – wheat – rape; the intensive system: 5/6 – 7/8 – 9/10 (fallow – wheat – wheat. We believe that the use of modern technology in these conditions is better due to exchange between the different layers of soil. When  the ordinary Soviet system , the so-called "plow sole" , was used , at a depth of 24 cm , we observed that this creates a water conductivity barrier that seems to preclude the possibility of lifting water from the lower horizons. Results of the study of infiltration of soil moisture at the depth of 30 and 60 cm  have shown in some years the advantages of the modern technology over the ordinary Soviet system: in the version with the use of modern technology we can trace better exchange between the various horizons and , probably,  moisture replenishment from the lower horizons. Differences in individual observation periods are comparatively large due to the redistribution of soil moisture, depending on the weather conditions, the crops used in the crop rotations, and cultivation techniques. Moreover, the average moisture reserves within the one meter layer did not show any significant differences during the

  2. 收获期木薯地耕作层土壤硬度的试验研究%Experimental Study on Soil Hardness of Cultivated Horizon at Cassava Cultivated Farm in Harvesting Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨望; 张硕; 杨坚; 周杰; 路宏

    2015-01-01

    采用田间物理测定和数理统计分析方法,测定了收获期木薯种植地耕作层不同深度的土壤硬度,建立了耕作层深度与土壤硬度的数学模型,分析了土层深度对土壤硬度的影响规律。结果表明:建立的木薯地耕作层土壤硬度与深度的数学模型精度高,硬度与深度基本上成3次方的非线性关系;采用盖膜方式种植的木薯地,其土壤硬度先随土层深度的增大而增大,后随土层深度的增大而缓慢增大或减小;不采用盖膜方式种植的木薯地,其土壤硬度先随土层深度的增大而减小,后随土层深度的增大而增大,最后又随土层深度的增大而减小。%Soil hardness of different depth in cultivated horizon at cassava cultivated farm in harvesting period was deter-mined by physical test method and mathematical statistics analysis method.The mathematical models of cultivated horizon depth and soil hardness were established.The influence of soil depth on soil hardness was analyzed.The results show that the mathematical models have high precision.The relationship between soil hardness and depth can be basically described by cubic function.The soil hardness at cassava cultivated farm covered by plastic mulch increases as soil depth increases at first,and then it increases slowly or decreases as soil depth increases.The soil hardness at cassava cultivated farm with-out plastic mulch decreases as soil depth increases at first, and then it increases as soil depth increases, finally it decrea-ses as soil depth increases.

  3. Cultivation of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant staphylococci from input and output samples of German biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Stefanie P; Sowinsky, Olivia; Brunner, Jana S; Dott, Wolfgang; Kämpfer, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) were detected in two mesophilic German biogas plants (BGPs) using selective pre-enrichment methods combined with cultivation on CHROMagar media and antibiotic resistance gene screening. Genetic fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed the presence of enterococci isolated by the VRE selective cultivation (67 isolates) in input and output samples of BGPs. In contrast, MRS (44 isolates) were detected in input, but in none of the output samples. Enterococcus isolates showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (>99.8%) to E. lemanii, E. casseliflavus/E. gallinarium or E. devriesei/E. pseudoavium/E. viikkiensis and carried vanA, vanB and/or vanC1 genes. Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis VRE were not detected, but isolates closely related to those species (>99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) were detected by the MRS selective cultivation methods. Staphylococcus isolates shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (>99.9%) with S. haemolyticus, S. lentus and S. sciuri and carried mecA genes. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were not detected. In summary, manure from livestock husbandry contained both, VRE and MRS. VRE were also detected in output samples, indicating that enterococci with vancomycin resistance genes could be release into the environment by the application of BGP output material as biofertilizers.

  4. Concentration of radioactive elements (U, Th and K derived from phosphatic fertilizers in cultivated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Antonio Becegato

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma spectrometric measurements were obtained for the agricultural soils aiming at characterizing the spatial distribution of radionuclide concentrations (K, eU and eTh, as well for the samples of phosphatic fertilizers and agricultural gypsum. In the study areas, three types of soils occured: Eutrophic Red Nitosol (Alfisoil, Eutroferric Red Latosol of clayey texture (Oxisoil and Dystrophic Red Latosol of medium texture (Oxisoil. The results showed that the radionuclide concentrations in more clayey soils were higher than in more sandy soils, mainly as a function of a higher adsorption capacity of the former. For the area where human activity predominated, the average contents of K, eU and eTh were respectively 54.75; 10.22 and 7.27 Bq/Kg, significantly higher than those for the area where no fertilizers were used (34.15 Bq/Kg K; 1.69 Bq/Kg eU, and 5.36 Bq/Kg eTh. Variations in the radionuclide concentrations were also observed in various fertilizer formula used in soybean and wheat crops.Medições gamaespectrométricas foram obtidas em solos agrícolas objetivando caracterizar a distribuição espacial das concentrações de radionuclídeos (K, eU e eTh, bem como em amostras de fertilizantes fosfatados e gesso agrícola. Na área ocorrem três tipos de solos: Nitossolo Vermelho Eutrófico, Latossolo Vermelho Eutroférrico textura argilosa e Latossolo Vermelho Distrófico textura média. Constatou-se que as concentrações de radionuclídeos nos solos mais argilosos foram maiores do que nos solos mais arenosos, em função, principalmente, da maior adsorção pelos primeiros. Os teores médios em Bq/Kg de K, eU e eTh na área com atividade antrópica foram respectivamente de 54,75; 10,22 e 7,27, significativamente maiores do que em áreas virgens sem aplicação de fertilizantes (34,15 de K; 1,69 de eU e 5,36 de eTh. Foram também observadas variações nas concentrações de radionuclídeos em diferentes formulações de adubos utilizados nas

  5. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  6. Spatial Variability of Soil Cation Exchange Capacity in Hilly Tea Plantation Soils Under Different Sampling Scales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Studies on the spatial variability of the soil cation exchange capacity (CEC) were made to provide a theoretical basis for an ecological tea plantation and management of soil fertilizer in the tea plantation. Geostatistics were used to analyze the spatial variability of soil CEC in the tea plantation site on Mengding Mountain in Sichuan Province of China on two sampling scales. It was found that, (1) on the small scale, the soil CEC was intensively spatially correlative, the rate of nugget to sill was 18.84% and the spatially dependent range was 1 818 m, and structural factors were the main factors that affected the spatial variability of the soil CEC; (2) on the microscale, the soil CEC was also consumingly spatially dependent,and the rate of nugget to sill was 16.52%, the spatially dependent range was 311 m, and the main factors affecting the spatial variability were just the same as mentioned earlier. On the small scale, soil CEC had a stronger anisotropic structure on the slope aspect, and a weaker one on the lateral side. According to the ordinary Kriging method, the equivalence of soil CEC distributed along the lateral aspect of the slope from northeast to outhwest, and the soil CEC reduced as the elevation went down. On the microscale, the anisotropic structure was different from that measured on the small scale. It had a stronger anisotropic structure on the aspect that was near the aspect of the slope, and a weaker one near the lateral aspect of the slope. The soil CEC distributed along the lateral aspect of the slope and some distributed in the form of plots.From the top to the bottom of the slope, the soil CEC increased initially, and then reduced, and finally increased.

  7. Water-stable 0-20 μm microaggregates of cultivated topsoils as relevant indicators of soil functioning ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watteau, Françoise; Villemin, Geneviève; Blanchart, Eric; Bartoli, François

    2010-05-01

    Growing concern about sustainable soil management in agroecosystems, has given new impetus to research on soil quality indicators used to monitor the ability of ecosystems to either resist or degrade or recover from disturbances, i.e. land use change, climate warning, pollution, tillage... Integrating soil aggregation characteristics, and their dynamics, into agrosystem studies is very useful to understand how cultivated soils function and how their soil organic matter pools could be preserved or improved. The aim of the researches reported here was to test the hypothesis that the characterization of water-stable organo-mineral 2-20μm microaggregates - in terms of size, composition, typology and stability - would be relevant dynamic soil quality indicators of the impact of cropping practices. For this, two agrosystems were studied: (1) a temperate maize-cropped silt loam soil amended with sewage sludge and (2) a vertisol of south-eastern Martinique presenting a high sensitivity for erosion and used for intensive vegetable cropping. A quantitative and qualitative study of organo-mineral associations, combining granulometric soil fractionations and morphological/analytical characterizations at ultrastructural (TEM/EDX) scale was conducted. 0-20μm water-stable organo-mineral aggregates were involved in the structural stability of the maize-cropped soil and their organic matter was still recognizable, mainly of plant origin, but also of bacterial origin. Some impacts of the application of sewage sludge were the emergence of microaggregates containing residues of sludge flocs, which can be considered as specific indicators of sludge, and the transfer of Cu from sludge to endogenous soil organic matter within microaggregates. In the agricultural vertisol different types of water-stable 2-20μm microaggregates, were defined, based on the nature and the biodegradation state of the organic matter included in them. Their relative distributions varied as a function of land

  8. Influence of Rhizophagus irregularis inoculation and phosphorus application on growth and arsenic accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.) cultivated on an arsenic-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, I; Beone, G M; Gonnelli, C

    2015-05-01

    Southern Tuscany (Italy) is characterized by extensive arsenic (As) anomalies, with concentrations of up to 2000 mg kg soil(-1). Samples from the location of Scarlino, containing about 200 mg kg(-1) of As, were used to study the influence of the inoculation of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis, previously known as Glomus intraradices) and of phosphorus (P) application, separately and in combination, on As speciation in the rhizosphere of Zea mays on plant growth and As accumulation. Also, P distribution in plant parts was investigated. Each treatment produced a moderate rise of As(III) in the rhizosphere, increased As(III) and lowered As(V) concentration in shoots. P treatment, alone or in combination with AM, augmented the plant biomass. The treatments did not affect total As concentration in the shoots (with all the values maize cultivation on a marginal land, like the one studied.

  9. Environmental Safety for Chernozem Soil Fertilized with Phosphogypsum and Ash for Spring Wheat Cultivation in North Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhanbet Ainur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, year by year the industrial waste stockpiles increase, but at the same time its recycling is not more than 10–15% of the production. There are several methods of recycling of such waste as phosphogypsum and ash, among which one of the perspective directions is considered using them in agriculture as fertilizer and ameliorator. The limiting factor of their widespread use in agriculture is the presence of heavy metals and radionuclides in them. This article presents data about environmental safety of using phosphogypsum and ash for cultivation spring wheat on the chernozem soils of Northern Kazakhstan. According to the results of research, using phosphogypsum and ash doesn’t give negative impact on the environment, the presence of heavy metals and radionuclides in the soil and grain do not exceed the maximum allowable concentrations.

  10. Runoff and losses of soil and nutrients from small watersheds under shifting cultivation (Jhum) in the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafur, Abdul; Jensen, Jens Raunsø; Borggaard, Ole K.; Petersen, Leif

    2003-08-01

    The effect of traditional shifting cultivation practices using slash and burn (locally known as Jhum) on runoff and losses of soil and nutrients was investigated over two years in three apparently similar small neighboring watersheds of approx. 1 ha each in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) of Bangladesh. The experiment used a paired catchment approach, comparing the effect of a one-year clearing/cultivation with long-term fallow and mixed perennial vegetation. In the year of cultivation, peak discharges increased considerably and the loss of soil and nutrients were significantly accelerated. The median peak discharge increased by a factor 7 and annual runoff increased by approx. 16%. The direct runoff from small watersheds under long-term fallow and/or perennial vegetation may typically vary between 15 and 24% of the annual rainfall. The loss of soil material from watersheds under mixed perennial vegetation or fallow is typically about 3 Mg ha -1 y -1, whereas the loss during the year of cultivation was about 6 times higher. But as indicated by the sediment delivery ratio of 0.57, a sizeable part of the soil lost from the uplands was deposited in the lower part of the main drainage line within the watershed. The soil loss from the upland part of the watershed was therefore approx. 30 Mg ha -1 yr -1, while the regional average sediment yield associated with shifting cultivation in the CHT is estimated to be 1.2 Mg ha -1 y -1, considerably lower than previous estimates. The depletion of soil organic matter and nutrients in the upland area was considerable, with sediment enrichment ratios in excess of unity. It is conservatively estimated that the net depletion of soil organic matter in the upland part of the watershed, resulting from the combined effects of slash and burn and erosion during the one year of cultivation, is at least 7%. Shifting cultivation practice in the CHT is associated with a high degree of hydraulic resilience, as indicated by the return of the

  11. Comparison of analytical error and sampling error for contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Björn; Luthbom, Karin; Lagerkvist, Anders

    2006-11-16

    Investigation of soil from contaminated sites requires several sample handling steps that, most likely, will induce uncertainties in the sample. The theory of sampling describes seven sampling errors that can be calculated, estimated or discussed in order to get an idea of the size of the sampling uncertainties. With the aim of comparing the size of the analytical error to the total sampling error, these seven errors were applied, estimated and discussed, to a case study of a contaminated site. The manageable errors were summarized, showing a range of three orders of magnitudes between the examples. The comparisons show that the quotient between the total sampling error and the analytical error is larger than 20 in most calculation examples. Exceptions were samples taken in hot spots, where some components of the total sampling error get small and the analytical error gets large in comparison. Low concentration of contaminant, small extracted sample size and large particles in the sample contribute to the extent of uncertainty.

  12. Molecular identification of Coccidioides spp. in soil samples from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filho Antônio D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1991 several outbreaks of acute coccidioidomycosis (CM were diagnosed in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil, mainly related to disturbance of armadillo burrows caused by hunters while digging them for the capture of these animals. This activity causes dust contaminated with arthroconidia of Coccidioides posadasii, which, once inhaled, cause the mycosis. We report on the identification of C. posadasii in soil samples related to outbreaks of CM. Results Twenty four soil samples had their DNA extracted and subsequently submitted to a semi-nested PCR technique using specific primers. While only 6 (25% soil samples were positive for C. posadasii by mice inoculation, all (100% were positive by the molecular tool. Conclusion This methodology represents a simple, sensitive and specific molecular technique to determine the environmental distribution of Coccidioides spp. in endemic areas, but cannot distinguish the species. Moreover, it may be useful to identify culture isolates. Key-words: 1. Coccidioidomycosis. 2. Coccidioides spp. 3. C. posadasii. 4. Semi-arid. 5. Semi-nested PCR

  13. Effect of Continuous Vegetable Cultivation on Phosphorus Levels of Fluvo-Aquic Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Min; HOU Yan-Lin

    2004-01-01

    Soil P status, inorganic P fractions, and P sorption properties were studied using sandy fluvo-aquic horticultural soils,which are high in organic matter content for vegetable production in comparison with a soil used for grain crop production in Zhengzhou, Henan Province, China. P fractions, Olsen-P, and OM were determined at different depths in the soil profile and sorption isotherm experiments were performed. Most P in excess of plant requirements accumulated in the topsoil and decreased with soil depth. Total P, inorganic P, and OM concentrations increased with continued horticultural use. Olsen-P concentrations in the 0-20 cm depth of horticultural soils were 9 to 25 times higher than those of the grain crop soil. A linear transformation of the Langmuir equation showed that the P adsorption maximum (491.3 mg P kg-i)and the maximum phosphate buffering capacity (162.1 L kg-1) for 80-100 cm were greater in the grain crop soil than the horticultural soils. Thus, the most immediate concern with excess P were in areas where heavy P fertilizer was used for vegetable crops and where soil P sorption capacities were low due to sandy soils and high organic matter content.

  14. Diversity of Microorganisms Isolated from the Soil Sample surround Chroogomphus rutilus in the Beijing Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang, Yu Liu, Yonggang Yin, Haojie Jin, Shouxian Wang, Feng Xu, Shuang Zhao, Xiaoli Geng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificially cultivating Chroogomphus rutilus is too inefficient to be commercially feasible. Furthermore, isolating C. rutilus mycelia in the wild is difficult. Thus, it is important to determine the natural habitat of its fruiting body. This study focused on the ecology of the C. rutilus habitat to isolate and classify beneficial microorganisms that could affect its growth, which could be used in future research on artificial cultivation. In total, 342 isolates were isolated from soil samples collected around a C. rutilus colony in the Beijing region. Of these, 22 bacterial and 14 fungal isolates were selected for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, based on their growth characteristics and colony morphology. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the bacterial isolates were divided into two monophyletic clusters which had significant hits to the genera Bacillus and Pseudomonas, respectively. Using internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequence analysis, fungal isolates were divided into four monophyletic clusters: Penicillium, Trichoderma, Mortierella, and Bionectria. Moreover, the phylogenetic diversity of these isolates was analysed. The results indicated that numerous microorganisms were present in C. rutilus habitat. This was the first reported examination of the microbiological ecology of C. rutilus.

  15. DIATOMS (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE IN RIVERS AND STREAMS AND ON CULTIVATED SOILS OF THE PODKARPACIE REGION IN THE YEARS 2007–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Noga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms Bacillariophyceae are a specialized, systematic group of algae, living in different types of ecosystems, and they are very good indicators of water quality. Recently, detailed studies have been carried out in the territory of the Podkarpacie Province on the diversity of diatoms in running waters. The area of study covers mostly the catchment of the biggest rivers of the province (mainly the River Wisłok and cultivated soils. Running waters in the Podkarpacie Province are characterized by a huge species richness of diatoms, 738 different taxa have been found so far. The highest number of taxa was noted in the Wisłok River (400, while the Żołynianka and Różanka streams and the Mleczka were also characterized by huge diversity (from 200 to over 350 taxa. In the majority of studied sites diatoms of alkaline (pH>7 and nutrient rich (eutrophic waters dominated: Navicula lanceolata, N. gregaria, N. capitatoradiata, Nitzschia palea, N. dissipata ssp. dissipata, Achnanthidium minutissimum var. minutissimum, A. pyrenaicum, Amphora pediculus, Diatoma vulgaris, Rhoicosphenia abbreviata, Planothidium lanceolatum, Cocconeis pediculus and C. placentula var. lineata. About 150 taxa were indentified on cultivated soils, among which the largest populations were formed by Hantzschia amphioxys, Mayamaea atomus, Nitzschia palea, N. pusilla, Pinnularia obscura and Stauroneis thermicola.

  16. Water Use Efficiency in Saline Soils under Cotton Cultivation in the Tarim River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Zhao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Tarim River Basin, the largest area of Chinese cotton production, is receiving increased attention because of serious environmental problems. At two experimental stations (Korla and Aksu, we studied the influence of salinity on cotton yield. Soil chemical and physical properties, soil water content, soil total suction and matric suction, cotton yield and water use efficiency under plastic mulched drip irrigation in different saline soils was measured during cotton growth season. The salinity (mS·cm−1 were 17–25 (low at Aksu and Korla, 29–50 (middle at Aksu and 52–62 (high at Aksu for ECe (Electrical conductivity measured in saturation-paste extract of soil over the 100 cm soil profile. The soil water characteristic curves in different saline soils showed that the soil water content (15%–23% at top 40 cm soil, lower total suction power (below 3500 kPa and lower matric suction (below 30 kPa in low saline soil at Korla had the highest water use efficiency (10 kg·ha−1·mm−1 and highest irrigation water use efficiency (12 kg·ha−1·mm−1 and highest yield (6.64 t·ha−1. Higher water content below 30 cm in high saline soil increased the salinity risk and led to lower yield (2.39 t·ha−1. Compared to low saline soils at Aksu, the low saline soil at Korla saved 110 mm irrigation and 103 mm total water to reach 1 t·ha−1 yield and increased water use efficiency by 5 kg·ha−1·mm−1 and 7 kg·ha−1·mm−1 for water use efficiency (WUE and irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE respectively.

  17. Enhancing the Urea-N Use Efficiency in Maize (Zea mays Cultivation on Acid Soils Amended with Zeolite and TSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osumanu H. Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia loss significantly reduces the urea-N use efficiency in crop production. Efforts to reduce this problem are mostly laboratory oriented. This paper reports the effects of urea amended with triple superphosphate (TSP and zeolite (Clinoptilolite on soil pH, nitrate, exchangeable ammonium, dry matter production, N uptake, fresh cob production, and urea-N uptake efficiency in maize (Zea mays cultivation on an acid soil in actual field conditions. Urea-amended TSP and zeolite treatments and urea only (urea without additives did not have long-term effect on soil pH and accumulation of soil exchangeable ammonium and nitrate. Treatments with higher amounts of TSP and zeolite significantly increased the dry matter (stem and leaf production of Swan (test crop. All the treatments had no significant effect on urea-N concentration in the leaf and stem of the test crop. In terms of urea-N uptake in the leaf and stem tissues of Swan, only the treatment with the highest amount of TSP and zeolite significantly increased urea-N uptake in the leaf of the test crop. Irrespective of treatment, fresh cob production was statistically not different. However, all the treatments with additives improved urea-N uptake efficiency compared to urea without additives or amendment. This suggests that urea amended with TSP and zeolite has a potential of reducing ammonia loss from surface-applied urea.

  18. Enhancing the urea-N use efficiency in maize (Zea mays) cultivation on acid soils amended with zeolite and TSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osumanu H; Hussin, Aminuddin; Ahmad, Husni M H; Rahim, Anuar A; Majid, Nik Muhamad Abd

    2008-04-20

    Ammonia loss significantly reduces the urea-N use efficiency in crop production. Efforts to reduce this problem are mostly laboratory oriented. This paper reports the effects of urea amended with triple superphosphate (TSP) and zeolite (Clinoptilolite) on soil pH, nitrate, exchangeable ammonium, dry matter production, N uptake, fresh cob production, and urea-N uptake efficiency in maize (Zea mays) cultivation on an acid soil in actual field conditions. Urea-amended TSP and zeolite treatments and urea only (urea without additives) did not have long-term effect on soil pH and accumulation of soil exchangeable ammonium and nitrate. Treatments with higher amounts of TSP and zeolite significantly increased the dry matter (stem and leaf) production of Swan (test crop). All the treatments had no significant effect on urea-N concentration in the leaf and stem of the test crop. In terms of urea-N uptake in the leaf and stem tissues of Swan, only the treatment with the highest amount of TSP and zeolite significantly increased urea-N uptake in the leaf of the test crop. Irrespective of treatment, fresh cob production was statistically not different. However, all the treatments with additives improved urea-N uptake efficiency compared to urea without additives or amendment. This suggests that urea amended with TSP and zeolite has a potential of reducing ammonia loss from surface-applied urea.

  19. Effect of Crop cultivation after Mediterranean maquis on soil carbon stock, δ13C spatial distribution and root turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Santoro, Antonino; La Mantia, Tommaso

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was investigate the effect of land use change on soil organic carbon (SOC) stock and distribution in a Mediterranean succession. A succession composed by natural vegetation, cactus pear crop and olive grove, was selected in Sicily. The land use change from mediterranena maquis (C3 plant) to cactus pear (C4 plant) lead to a SOC decrease of 65% after 28 years of cultivation, and a further decrease of 14% after 7 years since the land use from cactus pear to olive grove (C3 plant). Considering this exchange and decrease as well as the periods after the land use changes we calculated the mean residence time (MRT) of soil C of different age. The MRT of C under Mediterranean maquis was about 142 years, but was 10 years under cactus pear. Total SOC and δ13 C were measured along the soil profile (0-75cm) and in the intra-rows in order to evaluate the distribution of new and old carbon derived and the growth of roots. After measuring of weight of cactus pear root, an approach was developed to estimate the turnover of root biomass. Knowledge of root turnover and carbon input are important to evaluate the correlation between carbon input accumulation and SOC stock in order to study the ability of C sink of soils with different use and managements.

  20. Greenhouse gas emissions and plant characteristics from soil cultivated with sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and amended with organic or inorganic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Valdez, F; Fernández-Luqueño, F; Luna-Suárez, S; Dendooven, L

    2011-12-15

    Agricultural application of wastewater sludge has become the most widespread method of disposal, but the environmental effects on soil, air, and crops must be considered. The effect of wastewater sludge or urea on sunflower's (Helianthus annuus L.) growth and yield, the soil properties, and the resulting CO(2) and N(2)O emissions are still unknown. The objectives of this study were to investigate: i) the effect on soil properties of organic or inorganic fertilizer added to agricultural soil cultivated with sunflower, ii) how urea or wastewater sludge increases CO(2) and N(2)O emissions from agricultural soil over short time periods, and iii) the effect on plant characteristics and yield of urea or wastewater sludge added to agricultural soil cultivated with sunflower. The sunflower was fertilized with wastewater sludge or urea or grown in unamended soil under greenhouse conditions while plant and soil characteristics, yield, and greenhouse gas emissions were monitored. Sludge and urea modified some soil characteristics at the onset of the experiment and during the first two months but not thereafter. Some plant characteristics were improved by sludge. Urea and sludge treatments increased the yield at similar rates, while sludge-amended soil significantly increased N(2)O emissions but not CO(2) emissions compared to the other amended or unamended soils. This implies that wastewater sludge increased the biomass and/or the yield; however, from a holistic point of view, using wastewater sludge as fertilizer should be viewed with concern.

  1. Microscope Image of a Martian Soil Surface Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is the closest view of the material underneath NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This sample was taken from the top centimeter of the Martian soil, and this image from the lander's Optical Microscope demonstrates its overall composition. The soil is mostly composed of fine orange particles, and also contains larger grains, about a tenth of a millimeter in diameter, and of various colors. The soil is sticky, keeping together as a slab of material on the supporting substrate even though the substrate is tilted to the vertical. The fine orange grains are at or below the resolution of the Optical Microscope. Mixed into the soil is a small amount&mdashabout 0.5 percent&mdashof white grains, possibly of a salt. The larger grains range from black to almost transparent in appearance. At the bottom of the image, the shadows of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) beams are visible. This image is 1 millimeter x 2 millimeters. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Jatropha curcas and Ricinus communis differentially affect arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi diversity in soil when cultivated for biofuel production in a Guantanamo (Cuba) tropical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, M. M.; Torrecillas, E.; Hernández, G.; Torres, P.; Roldán, A.

    2012-04-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a control soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba), in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soil fertility (total N, Organic C, microbial biomass C, aggregate stability percentage, pH and electrical conductivity) were changed with the cultivation of both crop species. The AM fungal small sub-unit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty AM fungal sequence types were identified: 19 belong to the Glomeraceae and one to the Paraglomeraceae. Two AMF sequence types related to cultured AMF species (Glo G3 for Glomus sinuosum and Glo G6 for Glomus intraradices-G. fasciculatum-G. irregulare) disappeared in the soil cultivated with J. curcas and R. communis. The soil properties (total N, Organic C and microbial biomass C) were improved by the cultivation of the two plant species. The diversity of the AMF community decreased in the soil of both crops, with respect to the control soil, and varied significantly depending on the crop species planted. Thus, R. communis soil showed higher AMF diversity than J. curcas soil. In conclusion, R. communis could be more suitable in long-term conservation and sustainable management of these tropical ecosystems.

  3. Effect of reed canary grass cultivation on greenhouse gas emission from peat soil at controlled rewetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karki, Sandhya; Elsgaard, Lars; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    from ER were obviously the dominant RCG-derived GHG flux, but above-ground biomass yields, and preliminary measurements of gross photosynthetic production, showed that ER could be more than balanced due to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by RCG. Our results support that RCG cultivation could be a good...

  4. Cultivating Care and Connection: Preparing the Soil for a Just and Sustainable Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory A.

    2004-01-01

    Feminists and ecofeminists argue that relatedness and the care that emerges from this underlie an ethical response to other people, beings, and the planet, itself. The ability and willingness to care may well be the matrix within which a society characterized by ecological sustainability and social justice can be cultivated. Educators concerned…

  5. Genetic distance sampling: a novel sampling method for obtaining core collections using genetic distances with an application to cultivated lettuce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Hintum, van T.J.L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel sampling method for obtaining core collections, entitled genetic distance sampling. The method incorporates information about distances between individual accessions into a random sampling procedure. A basic feature of the method is that automatically larger samples are

  6. Effect of Soil Sampling Density on Detected Spatial Variability of Soil Organic Carbon in a Red Soil Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dong-Sheng; ZHANG Zhong-Qi; YANG Hao; SHI Xue-Zheng; TAN Man-Zhi; SUN Wei-Xia; WANG Hong-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Spatial variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) of different land use patterns and soil types was examined in a county-wide red soil region of South China, using six sampling densities, 14, 34, 68, 130, 255, and 525 samples designed by the method of grid sampling in 6 different grid sizes, labeled as D14, D34, D68, D130, D255, and D525, respectively. The results showed that the coefficients of variation (CVs) of SOC decreased gradually from 62.8% to 47.4% with the increase in soil sampling densities. The SOC CVs in the paddy field change slightly from 30.8% to 28.7%, while those of the dry farmland and forest land decreased remarkably from 58.1%to 48.7% and from 99.3% to 64.4%, respectively. The SOC CVs of the paddy soil change slightly, while those of red soil decreased remarkably from 82.8% to 63.9%. About 604, 500, and 353 (P < 0.05) samples would be needed a number of years later if the SOC change was supposedly 1.52 g kg-2, based on the CVs of SOC acquired from the present sampling densities of D14, D68, and D525,respectively. Moreover, based on the same SOC change and the present time CVs at D255, the ratio of samples needed for paddy field, dry farmland, and forest land should be 1:0.81:3.33, while the actual corresponding ratio in an equal interval grid sampling was 1:0.74:0.46. These indicated that the sampling density had important effect on the detection of SOC variability in the county-wide region, the equal interval grid sampling was not efficient enough, and the respective CV of each land use or soil type should be fully considered when determining the sampling number in the future.

  7. Vegetative growth and yield of strawberry under irrigation and soil mulches for different cultivation environments

    OpenAIRE

    Pires Regina Célia de Matos; Folegatti Marcos Vinícius; Passos Francisco Antonio; Arruda Flávio Bussmeyer; Sakai Emílio

    2006-01-01

    The vegetative growth and yield of strawberry in relation to irrigation levels and soil mulches are still not well known, mainly for different environmental conditions. Two experiments were carried out in Atibaia, SP, Brazil, during 1995, one in a protected environment and the other in an open field, to evaluate the cultivar Campinas IAC-2712, under different irrigation levels and soil mulches (black and clear polyethylene). Three water potential levels in the soil were used in order to defin...

  8. Comparison of Micromorphological Features of Two Agricultural Cultivated Soils in Guanzhong Areas, Shaanxi Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    By comparing micromorphological features of irrigated and non-irrigated soils in Guanzhong areas, China, this paper tries to illustrate the influences of farming management methods on the soil-forming process. The micromorphology was observed under a petrographic microscope and its image was quantificationally measured by Nikon NISBR 2.2 software.Both irrigated and non-irrigated soils have the same soil profile pattern, AP1-Ap2- BC, but the former has a more obvious profile dissimilation. The minerals assemblage of soil profiles A and B are very similar, which is mainly composed of Q and Pl. Compared with non-irrigated soil, grains of irrigated soil remarkably decrease in length, area, eqdiameter, perimeter,elongation, roundness, and C/F10 μm ratio; voids are characterized by more regular void shape and more smooth void wall;there is more abundant residual clay and small amount of illuvial clay. All results in this study suggest that the farming management method has influences on soil profile dissimilation and micromorphology. Agricultural irrigation could strengthen the degree of weathering, make smaller and rounder soil grains, cause a significant increase of residual clay and appearance of illuvial clay. But no significant change has been observed in the minerals assemblage of coarse grains.

  9. Development of internal forest soil reference samples and testing of digestion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.E. Hislop; J.W. Hornbeck; S.W. Bailey; R.A. Hallett

    1998-01-01

    Our research requires determinations of total elemental concentrations of forest soils. The lack of certified forest soil reference materials led us to develop internal reference samples. Samples were collected from three soil horizons (Oa, B, and C) at three locations having forested, acidic soils similar to those we commonly analyze. A shatterbox was used to...

  10. Soil development and sampling strategies for the returned Martian surface samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Everett K.

    1988-01-01

    Sampling of the Martian surface materials should be based on the experience gained from the study of soils and rocks collected in cold, dry environments, i.e., dry valleys of Antarctica. Previous studies have suggested that some of our best terrestrial analogs of the Martian soils are represented by those found in the polar deserts of Antarctica. Special sampling considerations must be taken into account when obtaining these samples because they represent at least five distinct types of materials. Weathering of planetary regolith materials occurs from both chemical and physical interactions of the planet's surface materials with the atmosphere and, if present, the hydrosphere and biosphere along with extraplanetary objects which may produce the original surface materials and produce secondary materials that are product of equilibrium between the atmosphere and study weathering processes and regolith development occurring on Martian-like surfaces, simulation studies must be carried out in materials in the field.

  11. Uncertainties in forest soil carbon and nitrogen estimates related to soil sampling methods in the Delaware River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B.; Plante, A. F.; Johnson, A. H.; Pan, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Estimating forest soil carbon and nitrogen (CN) is critical to understanding ecosystem responses to changing climate, disturbance and forest management practices. Most of the uncertainty in soil CN cycling is associated with the difficulty in characterizing soil properties in field sampling because forest soils can be rocky, inaccessible and spatially heterogeneous. A composite coring technique is broadly applied as the standard FIA soil sampling protocol. However, the accuracy of this method might be limited by soil compaction, rock obstruction and plot selection problems during sampling. In contrast, the quantitative soil pit sampling method may avoid these problems and provides direct measurements of soil mass, rock volume and CN concentration representative of a larger ground surface area. In this study, the two sampling methods were applied in 60 forest plots, randomly located in three research areas in the Delaware River Basin in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region. In each of the plots, one quantitative soil pit was excavated and three soil cores were collected. Our results show that average soil bulk density in the top 20 cm mineral soil measured from the soil cores was consistently lower than bulk density measured by soil pits. However, the volume percentage of coarse fragments measured by the core method was also significantly lower than the pit method. Conversely, CN concentrations were greater in core samples compared to pit samples. The resulting soil carbon content (0-20 cm) was estimated to be 4.1 ± 0.4 kg m-2 in the core method compared to 4.5 ± 0.4 kg m-2 in the pit method. Lower bulk density but higher CN concentration and lower coarse fragments content from the cores have offset each other, resulting in no significant differences in CN content from the soil pit method. Deeper soil (20-40 cm), which is not accessible in the core method, accounted for 29% of the total soil carbon stock (0-40 cm) in the pit method. Our results suggest that, although soil

  12. Fungicidal activities of soil humic/fulvic acids as related to their chemical structures in greenhouse vegetable fields with cultivation chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng; Song, Mengya; Liu, Ming; Jiang, Chunyu; Li, Zhongpei

    2016-01-01

    In the background of rapid expansion of plastic greenhouse vegetable production in China, many environmental risks have emerged in recent years. In this study, the soils with a chronosequence in greenhouse vegetable fields were collected and the soil humic acids (HAs) and fluvic acids (FAs) were extracted and purified. The soil HAs and FAs were found to show inhibition activities against phytopathogenic fungi for the first time. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was performed to investigate the chemical structures of HAs and FAs. The variation of relative peak areas indicated the chemical structure of HAs become more complex and stable under continuous cultivation. The PCA analysis showed HAs and FAs could be distinctly separated from each other and cultivation years mainly determined the variation. Mantel test and RDA analysis indicated the active components (aliphatic peaks for HAs and COOH, OH peaks for FAs) had positive correlation with the inhibition rates of HAs and FAs against phytopathogenic fungi. According to our research, the active fungicidal components in soil HAs and FAs decreased along with the extension of cultivation years, which made the soil suffer more risk to phytopathogenic fugi. So we believe continuous cultivation too many years in PGVP systems is inadvisable. PMID:27597259

  13. Fungicidal activities of soil humic/fulvic acids as related to their chemical structures in greenhouse vegetable fields with cultivation chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng; Song, Mengya; Liu, Ming; Jiang, Chunyu; Li, Zhongpei

    2016-09-01

    In the background of rapid expansion of plastic greenhouse vegetable production in China, many environmental risks have emerged in recent years. In this study, the soils with a chronosequence in greenhouse vegetable fields were collected and the soil humic acids (HAs) and fluvic acids (FAs) were extracted and purified. The soil HAs and FAs were found to show inhibition activities against phytopathogenic fungi for the first time. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was performed to investigate the chemical structures of HAs and FAs. The variation of relative peak areas indicated the chemical structure of HAs become more complex and stable under continuous cultivation. The PCA analysis showed HAs and FAs could be distinctly separated from each other and cultivation years mainly determined the variation. Mantel test and RDA analysis indicated the active components (aliphatic peaks for HAs and COOH, OH peaks for FAs) had positive correlation with the inhibition rates of HAs and FAs against phytopathogenic fungi. According to our research, the active fungicidal components in soil HAs and FAs decreased along with the extension of cultivation years, which made the soil suffer more risk to phytopathogenic fugi. So we believe continuous cultivation too many years in PGVP systems is inadvisable.

  14. Enhancing the Urea-N Use Efficiency in Maize (Zea mays Cultivation on Acid Soils using Urea Amended with Zeolite and TSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osumanu H. Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Ammonia loss significantly reduces urea-N use efficiency in crop production. Efforts to reduce ammonia loss are laboratory oriented, as such limited in reflecting actual field conditions. This paper reports the effects of urea amended with triple superphosphate (TSP and zeolite (Clinoptilolite on soil pH, soil nitrate, soil exchangeable ammonium, dry matter production, N uptake, fresh cob production and urea-N uptake efficiency in maize (Zea mays cultivation on an acid soil in actual field conditions. Approach: The treatments evaluated were: (i Normal N, P, K application (74.34 g urea, 27.36 g TSP, 24.12 g KCl (T1, (ii Urea-TSP mixture (74.34 g urea+27.36 g TSP+24.12 g KCl (T2, (iii 74.34 g urea+27.36 g TSP+9.0 g zeolite (T3, (iv 74.34 g urea+27.36 g TSP+13.5 g zeolite (T4 and (v No fertilization (T5. Note, the same amount of 24.12 g KCl was used in T3 and T4 plots. Standard procedures were used to determine the selected chemical properties of zeolite, soil, TSP and urea. The pH of the urea, zeolite, soil and TSP were determined in a 1:2.5 soil: distilled water suspension and/or 0.01 N CaCl2 using a glass electrode. The CEC of the zeolite was determined by the CsCl method. Soil CEC was determined by leaching with 1 N ammonium acetate buffer adjusted to pH 7.0 followed by steam distillation. Soil samples at harvest were analyzed for pH using the method previously outlined. Exchangeable ammonium and nitrate at harvest were extracted from the soil samples by the method of Keeney and Nelson and the amount determined using a LACHAT Autoanalyzer. Total N of the plant tissues (stem and leaf was determined by the Micro-Kjeldhal method. Results: Urea amended with TSP and zeolite treatments and Urea only (urea without additives did not have long term effect on soil pH and accumulation of soil exchangeable ammonium and nitrate. Treatments with higher amounts of TSP and zeolite significantly increased the dry matter (stem and leaf

  15. Livermore Big Trees Park 1998 soil sampling plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bainer, R. W.

    1998-10-01

    This sampling plan sets out the sampling goals, rationale, locations, and procedures for a plan to determine the extent of plutonium in soil above background levels in Big Trees Park and identify any possible pathways by which plutonium may have reached the park. The public is invited to witness the sampling at Big Trees Park. The plan has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists with guidance from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Radiologic Health and Environmental Health Investigations Branches of the California Health Services Department (CDHS-RHB and CDHS-EHIB), and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Input from citizens and community organizations was also received during an over-70-day public comment period.

  16. Light intensity and production parameters of phytocenoses cultivated on soil-like substrate under controled environment conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Gribovskaya, I. A.; Tirranen, L. S.; Manukovsky, N. S.; Zolotukhin, I. G.; Karnachuk, R. A.; Gros, J.-B.; Lasseur, Ch.

    To increase the degree of closure of biological life support systems of a new generation, we used vermicomposting to involve inedible phytomass in the intra-system mass exchange. The resulting product was a soil-like substrate, which was quite suitable for growing plants (Manukovsky et al. 1996, 1997). However, the soil like substrate can be regarded as a candidate for inclusion in a system only after a comprehensive examination of its physical, chemical, and other characteristics. An important criterion is the ability of the soil-like substrate to supply the necessary mineral elements to the photosynthesizing component under the chosen cultivation conditions. Thus, the purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of enhancing the production activity of wheat and radish crops by varying the intensity of photosynthetically active radiation, without decreasing the harvest index. The increase of light intensity from 920 to 1150 μmol·m -2·s -1 decreased the intensity of apparent photosynthesis of the wheat crops and slightly increased the apparent photosynthesis of the radish crops The maximum total and grain productivity (kg/m -2) of the wheat crops was attained at the irradiance of 920 μmol·m -2·s -1. Light intensity of 1150 μmol·m -2·s -1 decreased the productivity of wheat plants and had no significant effect on the productivity of the radish crops (kg/m 2) as compared to 920 μmol·m -2·s -1. The qualitative and quantitative composition of microflora of the watering solution and substrate was determined by the condition of plants, developmental phase and light intensity. By the end of wheat growth under 1150 μmol·m -2·s -1 the numbers of bacteria of the coliform family and phytopathogenic bacteria in the watering solution and substrate were an order of magnitude larger than under other illumination conditions. The obtained data suggest that the cultivation of plants in a life support system on soil-like substrate from composts has a number of

  17. Physical-hydric properties of a soil cultivated with eucalyptus irrigated

    OpenAIRE

    Isabela Braga Belchior; Adriano da Silva Lopes; Eder Duarte Fanaya Junior; Iago João Cassol; Jean Carlos Lopes de Oliveira; Kelvin Rosalvo Melgar Brito

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was evaluate the physical-hydric properties of an ultisol cultivated with two eucalyptus hybrids, Urograndis and Grancam, irrigated and without irrigated. The experimental design was a randomized block in a split split plots, with 4 repetitions. In the plots, the treatments employed corresponded two irrigation systems (microsprinkler and drip) and without irrigation area. In subplot, treatments were the eucalyptus hybrids (Urograndis and Grancam) and the sub-subplots were...

  18. 赤泥耕土制备技术%Preparation Process of Cultivated Soil Rehabilitated from Red Mud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭光菊; 张健伟; 张磊; 饶玉学

    2011-01-01

    Taking the plant waste as modifier of red mud, the preparation process of cultivated soil rehabilitated from red mud with wide applicability, which can treat with a large number of red mud was investigated. The basic principle of this technique was that the harmful elements in red mud are diluted by and made a complex ( sequestration) process with humic acids produced by the hydrolysis and fermentation of plant waste and with the alkaline in humus and red mud so as to improve the porosity for the red mud and supply with the needs for plant growth. Good results have been achieved to prepare the cultivated soil rehabilitated from red mud by using com stalks, bagasse and wastewater, weeds as modifier of red mud respectively in the tests, Among these, the test with com stalks as a modifier showed that the plants grew normally in the cultivated soil with the bulk density of 1. 3 g/cm3, and pH value at 7.9.%以植物性废料为赤泥的改性剂,研发了适用性广、可大量消纳赤泥的赤泥耕土制备技术.该技术的基本原理是利用植物废料水解、发酵产生的腐殖酸和腐殖质中和赤泥的碱性、稀释并络(鳌)合赤泥中的有害元素、提高赤泥的疏松度、为赤泥添加植物生长所需养分.分别以玉米秸秆、蔗渣和废醪液、杂草为赤泥改性剂进行的赤泥耕土制备试验均取得了良好效果,其中以玉米秸秆为改性剂的试验表明,所得赤泥耕土的容重为1.3 g/cm3,pH值为7.9,养分增加,植物可在其中正常生长.

  19. Seasonal variability of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity on cultivated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klípa, Vladimír; Zumr, David; Sněhota, Michal

    2014-05-01

    The soil structure and hydraulic properties of arable soils considerably vary during the year due to the periodical tillage and fertilization activities, soil compaction, plant and root grow, climate impact etc. The knowledge of the effect of temporal soil variability is essential when assessing water regime and associated dissolved substance transport in soils. The main aim of this contribution is to describe the temporal development of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity on arable land during a year. The experimental site is located in Nucice catchment (Central Bohemia, Czech republic), where also rainfall-runoff and soil erosion processes are studied. The soil is classified as Cambisol, typical texture ranges from loam to clay loam classes. Soil is conservatively tilled till depth of approximately 17 cm, below the topsoil a compacted subsoil was observed. Tension infiltration experiments were performed repeatedly at single location in order to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the topsoil. So far four tension infiltration campaigns were carried out under tension h0 = -3.0 cm with different field conditions: (i) young winter barley (October 2012), (ii) between postharvest stubble breaking and seeding (April 2013), (iii) full-grown oat (June 2013) and (iv) after fresh postharvest stubble breaking (October 2013). Measurements were carried out using newly introduced automated multi minidisk tension infiltrometer (Klipa et al., EGU2014-7230). All experiments were performed on the levelled soil surface after removing upper soil layer (1 to 3 cm). A thin layer of quartz sand (thickness 1 - 2 mm, grain size 0.1 - 0.6 mm) was applied to improve contact between the infiltrometer and the soil surface. Each infiltration campaign consisted of six tension infiltration experiments, the total number of 24 infiltration data sets was obtained for this study. Results show that unsaturated hydraulic conductivity was significantly smaller in April, but rather the

  20. Lotus corniculatus Crop Growth in Crude Oil Polluted Soil. Part1 Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons Reduction of Polluted and Cultivated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda Masu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of power plant fly ash, by its physical-chemical properties, can significantly change the characteristics of soils polluted with oil (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons, TPH, in their rehabilitation process, if combined with biodegradable organic materials, wastes such as sewage sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant. Maintaining vegetation on soils polluted with 80.5 ± 3.9 g·kg-1 D.M. of TPH under perennial regime specific to bird’s foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus, demonstrates the tolerance of the plant to the created conditions by the treatment of polluted soil with adequate amounts of fertilizer and fly ash from burning coal in power stations. The addition of 50-500 g fly ash per vegetation pot equipped with crude oil polluted soil mixed with 250 g sewage sludge per pot has reduced the oil content in the soil, in two ways: on the one hand influenced by the state of development of plants and on the other hand by weather conditions (alternation of seasons. The amount of TPH lost during the 16 months of vegetation in soils polluted with 80.5±3.9 g·kg-1 D.M. was 73.3-77.5 g·kg-1 D.M.

  1. Soil-Water Storage Predictions for Cultivated Crops on the Záhorská Lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarabicová, Miroslava; Minarič, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the impact of climate change on the soil-water regime of the Záhorská lowlands. The consequences of climate change on soil-water storage were analyzed for two crops: spring barley and maize. We analyzed the consequences of climate change on soil-water storage for two crops: spring barley and maize. The soil-water storage was simulated with the GLOBAL mathematical model. The data entered into the model as upper boundary conditions were established by the SRES A2 and SRES B1 climate scenarios and the KNMI regional climate model for the years from 2071 to 2100 (in the text called the time horizon 2085 which is in the middle this period). For the reference period the data from the years 1961-1990 was used. The results of this paper predict soil-water storage until the end of this century for the crops evaluated, as well as a comparison of the soil-water storage predictions with the course of the soil-water storage during the reference period.

  2. Evaluation of distribution and manganese availability in soils under soybean cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes Coutinho, Edson Luiz; de Cássia Gomes São João, Andréia; Mendes Coutinho Neto, André; Corá, José Eduardo; Fernandes, Carolina

    2013-04-01

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency in soybean became a problem in Brazil, mainly, due to soil low fertility use or soil high pH due to incorrect lime use. However, the manganese deficiency have not been thoroughly investigated. The effect of Mn soil application on Mn distribution among exchangeable, organic matter, amorphous Fe and Al oxides, crystalline Fe and Al oxides, and residual fractions were studied on a Typic Quartzipsament (RQ), a clayey Typic Haplustox (LVA) and a sandy clay loam Typic Haplustox (LV), in a greenhouse experiment carried out in Jaboticabal (SP) - Brazil (21°14'05'' S and 48°17'09'' W). A complete randomized design with three replications of treatments in a 3 x 6 factorial arrangement (three soils and six manganese rates) was used. Five soybean plants were grown during 34 days in pots with 2.5 kg of soil. The Mn contents in these fractions were correlated with those extracted by DTPA and by Mehlich-1 extractants and with soybean shoot Mn contents. Mn rates (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 mg kg-1) were applied using manganese sulphate (MnSO4). In the Oxisols, most of the Mn was associated with the Fe and Al oxides (amorphous and crystalline) and residual fractions. In the sandy soil (RQ), higher contents were found in exchangeable and residual fractions. Exchangeable fraction was the most important Mn supplier to soybean plants. Multiple regression analysis showed that Mn extracted by DTPA and Mehlich-1 were associated with soil exchangeable fraction.

  3. Characterization of Apollo Bulk Soil Samples Under Simulated Lunar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Thomas, I.; Bowles, N. E.; Greenhagen, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    Remote observations provide key insights into the composition and evolution of planetary surfaces. A fundamentally important component to any remote compositional analysis of planetary surfaces is laboratory measurements of well-characterized samples measured under the appropriate environmental conditions. The vacuum environment of airless bodies like the Moon creates a steep thermal gradient in the upper hundreds of microns of regolith. Lab studies of particulate rocks and minerals as well as selected lunar soils under vacuum and lunar-like conditions have identified significant effects of this thermal gradient on thermal infrared (TIR) spectral measurements [e.g. Logan et al. 1973, Salisbury and Walter 1989, Thomas et al. 2012, Donaldson Hanna et al. 2012]. Such lab studies demonstrate the high sensitivity of TIR emissivity spectra to environmental conditions under which they are measured. To best understand the effects of the near surface-environment of the Moon, a consortium of four institutions with the capabilities of characterizing lunar samples was created. The goal of the Thermal Infrared Emission Studies of Lunar Surface Compositions Consortium (TIRES-LSCC) is to characterize Apollo bulk soil samples with a range of compositions and maturities in simulated lunar conditions to provide better context for the spectral effects due to varying compositions and soil maturity as well as for the interpretation of data obtained by the LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer and future lunar and airless body thermal emission spectrometers. An initial set of thermal infrared emissivity measurements of the bulk lunar soil samples will be made in three of the laboratories included in the TIRES-LSCC: the Asteroid and Lunar Environment Chamber (ALEC) in RELAB at Brown University, the Simulated Lunar Environment chamber in the Planetary Spectroscopy Facility (PSF) at the University of Oxford, and the Simulated Airless Body Emission Laboratory (SABEL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  4. GY SAMPLING THEORY IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 1: ASSESSING SOIL SPLITTING PROTOCOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five soil sample splitting methods (riffle splitting, paper cone riffle splitting, fractional shoveling, coning and quartering, and grab sampling) were evaluated with synthetic samples to verify Pierre Gy sampling theory expectations. Individually prepared samples consisting of l...

  5. Comparison of soil solution sampling techniques to assess metal fluxes from contaminated soil to groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelot, F; Sappin-Didier, V; Keller, C; Atteia, O

    2014-12-01

    The unsaturated zone plays a major role in elemental fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems. A representative chemical analysis of soil pore water is required for the interpretation of soil chemical phenomena and particularly to assess Trace Elements (TEs) mobility. This requires an optimal sampling system to avoid modification of the extracted soil water chemistry and allow for an accurate estimation of solute fluxes. In this paper, the chemical composition of soil solutions sampled by Rhizon® samplers connected to a standard syringe was compared to two other types of suction probes (Rhizon® + vacuum tube and Rhizon® + diverted flow system). We investigated the effects of different vacuum application procedures on concentrations of spiked elements (Cr, As, Zn) mixed as powder into the first 20 cm of 100-cm columns and non-spiked elements (Ca, Na, Mg) concentrations in two types of columns (SiO2 sand and a mixture of kaolinite + SiO2 sand substrates). Rhizon® was installed at different depths. The metals concentrations showed that (i) in sand, peak concentrations cannot be correctly sampled, thus the flux cannot be estimated, and the errors can easily reach a factor 2; (ii) in sand + clay columns, peak concentrations were larger, indicating that they could be sampled but, due to sorption on clay, it was not possible to compare fluxes at different depths. The different samplers tested were not able to reflect the elemental flux to groundwater and, although the Rhizon® + syringe device was more accurate, the best solution remains to be the use of a lysimeter, whose bottom is kept continuously at a suction close to the one existing in the soil.

  6. Cs phytoremediation by Sorghum bicolor cultivated in soil and in hydroponic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Chen, Can; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-04-03

    Cs accumulation characteristics by Sorghum bicolor were investigated in hydroponic system (Cs level at 50-1000 μmol/L) and in soil (Cs-spiked concentration was 100 and 400 mg/kg soil). Two varieties of S. bicolor Cowly and Nengsi 2# grown on pot soil during the entire growth period (100 days) did not show significant differences on the height, dry weight (DW), and Cs accumulation. S. bicolor showed the potential phytoextraction ability for Cs-contaminated soil with the bioaccumulation factor (BCF) and the translocation factor (TF) values usually higher than 1 in soil system and in hydroponic system. The aerial parts of S. bicolor contributed to 86-92% of the total removed amounts of Cs from soil. Cs level in solution at 100 μmol/L gave the highest BCF and TF values of S. bicolor. Cs at low level tended to transfer to the aerial parts, whereas Cs at high level decreased the transfer ratio from root to shoot. In soil, the plant grew well when Cs spiked level was 100 mg/kg soil, but was inhibited by Cs at 400 mg/kg soil with Cs content in sorghum reaching 1147 mg/kg (roots), 2473 mg/kg (stems), and 2939 mg/kg (leaves). In hydroponic system, average Cs level in sorghum reached 5270 mg/kg (roots) and 4513 mg/kg (aerial parts), without significant damages to its biomass at 30 days after starting Cs treatment. Cs accumulation in sorghum tissues was positively correlated with the metal concentration in medium.

  7. Influence of hydroponic and soil cultivation on quality and shelf life of ready-to-eat lamb's lettuce (Valerianella locusta L. Laterr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzocco, Lara; Foschia, Martina; Tomasi, Nicola; Maifreni, Michela; Dalla Costa, Luisa; Marino, Marilena; Cortella, Giovanni; Cesco, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing interest in the hydroponic floating system to cultivate leafy vegetables for ready-to-eat salads. It is reasonable that different growing systems could affect the quality and shelf life of these salads. The quality and shelf life of ready-to-eat lamb's lettuce grown in protected environment in soil plot or in soil-less system over hydroponic solution with or without the addition of 30 µmol L⁻¹ silicon were evaluated. Minimum effects were observed on colour, firmness and microbial counts. Hydroponic cultivation largely affected plant tissue hydration, leading to weight loss and structural modifications during refrigerated storage. The shelf life of lamb's lettuce was limited by the development of visually detectable unpleasant sensory properties. Shelf life, calculated by survival analysis of consumer acceptability data, resulted about 7 days for soil-cultivated salad and 2 days for the hydroponically grown ones. The addition of silicon to the hydroponic solution resulted in an interesting strategy to increase plant tissue yield and reduce nitrate accumulation. Although hydroponic cultivation may have critical consequences on product quality and shelf life, these disadvantages could be largely counterbalance by increased yield and a reduction of nitrate accumulation when cultivation is performed on nutritive solutions with supplemental addition of silicon. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Reuse of Ablution Water to Improve Peat Soil Characteristics for Ornamental Landscape Plants Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radin Mohamed Radin Maya Saphira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to reuse of ablution water for washing peat soil in order to reduce the concentrations of heavy metals in these soils which might effect negatively on the plant growth. The washing process design was similar to horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW consist of layers of peat and sand soil and surrounded by gravel on both sides. Strelitzia sp. was used to detect the presence negative effect of the washing process on the morphological characteristics of the plants. The physical and chemical characteristics of ablution water was examined before and after the washing process by using Inductively Couple Plasma- Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS. The characteristics of peat soil before and after the washing process were examined by using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF. The results revealed that the percentage of FeO3in peat soil reduced from 45.80 to 1.01%. The percentage of SiO2 in sand soil dropped from 87.7 to 67.10%. Parameters of ablution water resulted from the washing process which including Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5 and heavy metals have increased but still within the standard limits for the disposal of ablution water into the environment. No atrophy was observed in Strelitzia sp. leaves, indicating the ability of plant to grow normally. It can be concluded that the utilization of ablution water in the washing of peat soil has improve the characteristics of the soil without effect on their organic constitutes.

  9. Soil Samplers: New Techniques for Subsurface Sampling for Volatile Organic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Sorini; John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2009-03-31

    Soil sampling techniques for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the soil that is being sampled. Preventing VOC loss from soil cores that are collected from the subsurface and brought to the surface for subsampling is often difficult. Subsurface bulk sample retrieval systems are designed to obtain intact cylindrical cores of soil ranging anywhere from one to four inches in diameter, and one to several feet in length. The current technique that is used to subsample these soil cores for VOC analysis is to expose a horizontal section of the soil core to the atmosphere; screen the exposed soil using a photoionization detector (PID) or other appropriate device to locate contamination in the soil core; and use a hand-operated coring tool to collect samples from the exposed soil for analysis. Because the soil core can be exposed to the atmosphere for a considerable length of time during screening and sample collection, the current sub-sampling technique provides opportunity for VOCs to be lost from the soil. This report describes three alternative techniques from the current technique for screening and collecting soil samples from subsurface soil cores for VOC analysis and field testing that has been done to evaluate the techniques. Based on the results of the field testing, ASTM D4547, Standard Guide for Sampling Waste and Soils for Volatile Organic Compounds, was revised to include information about the new techniques.

  10. Barium and sodium in sunflower plants cultivated in soil treated with wastes of drilling of oil well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jésus Sampaio Junior

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study aimed to evaluate the effects of the application of two types of oil drilling wastes on the development and absorption of barium (Ba and sodium (Na by sunflower plants. The waste materials were generated during the drilling of the 7-MGP-98D-BA oil well, located in the state of Bahia, Brazil. The treatments consisted of: Control – without Ba application, comprising only its natural levels in the soil; Corrected control – with fertilization and without wastes; and the Ba doses of 300, 3000 and 6000 mg kg-1, which were equivalent to the applications of 16.6, 165.9 and 331.8 Mg ha-1 of waste from the dryer, and 2.6, 25.7 and 51.3 Mg ha-1 of waste from the centrifugal. Plants cultivated using the first dose of dryer waste and the second dose of centrifugal waste showed growth and dry matter accumulation equal to those of plants under ideal conditions of cultivation (corrected control. The highest doses of dryer and centrifugal wastes affected the development of the plants. The absorption of Ba by sunflower plants was not affected by the increase in the doses. Na proved to be the most critical element present in the residues, interfering with sunflower development.

  11. Nutrients, Trace Elements and Water Deficit in Greek Soils Cultivated with Olive Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Karyotis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The studied soils consist of alluvial and/or colluvial deposits  located in the Prefecture of Messinia, Western Peloponnese (Greece. A total number of 263 surface soil layers were selected and analysed for the main properties. Minimum and maximum values and  the distribution of soil properties varied greatly and can be attributed mainly to various fertilization practices adopted by  farmers, inputs of nutrients by irrigation water and differences due to inherent soil conditions. Lower variability was recorded for the parameters pH, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC, total soil nitrogen (N and soil organic matter (SOM, while coefficients of variation for properties that can be affected easily by human activities such as available phosphorus and micronutrients, are much higher. Minor content for trace elements was observed in the following order:Zinc (Zn>Manganese (Mn>Boron (B>Iron (Fe. During the dry period, irrigation of olive trees is recommended and the appropriate irrigation demands were defined, taking into account rainfall and  water requirements.

  12. Conversion from long-term cultivated wheat field to Jerusalem artichoke plantation changed soil fungal communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingang; Zhang, Jianhui; Gao, Danmei; Gao, Huan; Guo, Meiyu; Li, Li; Zhao, Mengliang; Wu, Fengzhi

    2017-01-01

    Understanding soil microbial communities in agroecosystems has the potential to contribute to the improvement of agricultural productivity and sustainability. Effects of conversion from long-term wheat plantation to Jerusalem artichoke (JA) plantation on soil fungal communities were determined by amplicon sequencing of total fungal ITS regions. Quantitative PCR and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were also used to analyze total fungal and Trichoderma spp. ITS regions and Fusarium spp. Ef1α genes. Results showed that soil organic carbon was higher in the first cropping of JA and Olsen P was lower in the third cropping of JA. Plantation conversion changed soil total fungal and Fusarium but not Trichoderma spp. community structures and compositions. The third cropping of JA had the lowest total fungal community diversity and Fusarium spp. community abundance, but had the highest total fungal and Trichoderma spp. community abundances. The relative abundances of potential fungal pathogens of wheat were higher in the wheat field. Fungal taxa with plant growth promoting, plant pathogen or insect antagonistic potentials were enriched in the first and second cropping of JA. Overall, short-term conversion from wheat to JA plantation changed soil fungal communities, which is related to changes in soil organic carbon and Olsen P contents.

  13. Impacts from Land Use Pattern on Spatial Distribution of Cultivated Soil Heavy Metal Pollution in Typical Rural-Urban Fringe of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbo; Wang, Dongyan; Wang, Qing; Liu, Shuhan; Zhu, Yuanli; Wu, Wenjun

    2017-03-22

    Under rapid urban sprawl in Northeast China, land conversions are not only encroaching on the quantity of cultivated lands, but also posing a great threat to black soil conservation and food security. This study's aim is to explore the spatial relationship between comprehensive cultivated soil heavy metal pollution and peri-urban land use patterns in the black soil region. We applied spatial lag regression to analyze the relationship between PLI (pollution load index) and influencing factors of land use by taking suburban cultivated land of Changchun Kuancheng District as an empirical case. The results indicate the following: (1) Similar spatial distribution characteristics are detected between Pb, Cu, and Zn, between Cr and Ni, and between Hg and Cd. The Yitong River catchment in the central region, and the residential community of Lanjia County in the west, are the main hotspots for eight heavy metals and PLI. Beihu Wetland Park, with a larger-area distribution of ecological land in the southeast, has low level for both heavy metal concentrations and PLI values. Spatial distribution characteristics of cultivated heavy metals are related to types of surrounding land use and industry; (2) Spatial lag regression has a better fit for PLI than the ordinary least squares regression. The regression results indicate the inverse relationship between heavy metal pollution degree and distance from long-standing residential land and surface water. Following rapid urban land expansion and a longer accumulation period, residential land sprawl is going to threaten cultivated land with heavy metal pollution in the suburban black soil region, and cultivated land irrigated with urban river water in the suburbs will have a higher tendency for heavy metal pollution.

  14. Impacts from Land Use Pattern on Spatial Distribution of Cultivated Soil Heavy Metal Pollution in Typical Rural-Urban Fringe of Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbo; Wang, Dongyan; Wang, Qing; Liu, Shuhan; Zhu, Yuanli; Wu, Wenjun

    2017-01-01

    Under rapid urban sprawl in Northeast China, land conversions are not only encroaching on the quantity of cultivated lands, but also posing a great threat to black soil conservation and food security. This study’s aim is to explore the spatial relationship between comprehensive cultivated soil heavy metal pollution and peri-urban land use patterns in the black soil region. We applied spatial lag regression to analyze the relationship between PLI (pollution load index) and influencing factors of land use by taking suburban cultivated land of Changchun Kuancheng District as an empirical case. The results indicate the following: (1) Similar spatial distribution characteristics are detected between Pb, Cu, and Zn, between Cr and Ni, and between Hg and Cd. The Yitong River catchment in the central region, and the residential community of Lanjia County in the west, are the main hotspots for eight heavy metals and PLI. Beihu Wetland Park, with a larger-area distribution of ecological land in the southeast, has low level for both heavy metal concentrations and PLI values. Spatial distribution characteristics of cultivated heavy metals are related to types of surrounding land use and industry; (2) Spatial lag regression has a better fit for PLI than the ordinary least squares regression. The regression results indicate the inverse relationship between heavy metal pollution degree and distance from long-standing residential land and surface water. Following rapid urban land expansion and a longer accumulation period, residential land sprawl is going to threaten cultivated land with heavy metal pollution in the suburban black soil region, and cultivated land irrigated with urban river water in the suburbs will have a higher tendency for heavy metal pollution. PMID:28327541

  15. Soil physical and microbiological attributes cultivated with the common bean under two management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Adriana De Gennaro

    Full Text Available Agricultural management systems can alter the physical and biological soil quality, interfering with crop development. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and microbiological attributes of a Red Latosol, and its relationship to the biometric parameters of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, irrigated and grown under two management systems (conventional tillage and direct seeding, in Campinas in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The experimental design was of randomised blocks, with a split-plot arrangement for the management system and soil depth, analysed during the 2006/7 and 2007/8 harvest seasons, with 4 replications. The soil physical and microbiological attributes were evaluated at depths of 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.20 and 0.20-0.40 m. The following were determined for the crop: density, number of pods per plant, number of beans per pod, thousand seed weight, total weight of the shoots and harvest index. Direct seeding resulted in a lower soil physical quality at a depth of 0.00-0.05 m compared to conventional tillage, while the opposite occurred at a depth of 0.05-0.10 m. The direct seeding showed higher soil biological quality, mainly indicated by the microbial biomass nitrogen, basal respiration and metabolic quotient. The biometric parameters in the bean were higher under the direct seeding compared to conventional tillage.

  16. Tillage systems and cover crops on soil physical properties after soybean cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael B. Teixeira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil management alters soil physical attributes and may affect crop yield. In order to evaluate soil physical attributes in layers from 0 to 0.40 m and soybean grain yield, in the 2012/2013 agricultural year, an essay was installed in the experimental area of the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS/CPCS. Soil tillage systems were: conventional tillage (CT, minimum tillage (MT and no tillage (DS, the cover crops used were millet, sunn hemp and fallow. The experimental design was randomized blocks with split plots. For the layer of 0.20-0.30 m, millet provided the best results for soil bulk density, macro and microporosity. The resistance to penetration (RP was influenced in the layer of 0-0.10 m, and millet provided lower RP. The DS provided the lowest RP values for the layer of 0.10-0.20 m. The treatments did not influence yield or thousand-seed weight.

  17. Adsorption and desorption behavior of metalaxyl in intensively cultivated acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Couso, Alipio; Fernandez-Calvino, David; Pateiro-Moure, Miriam; Garrido-Rodriguez, Beatriz; Novoa-Munoz, Juan Carlos; Estevez, Manuel Arias

    2011-07-13

    Metalaxyl adsorption and desorption behavior in acid soils were evaluated via batch and stirred-flow chamber experiments. On the basis of batch experiments (adsorption curves of the Giles C-type), metalaxyl has a low affinity for acid soils. Also, as derived from batch and stirred-flow chamber tests, its adsorption in acid soils is dictated mainly by their organic matter and clay contents. The high correlation between these two variables makes it rather complicated to resolve their effects. Metalaxyl adsorption occurs largely (80-99%) via fast adsorption reactions. On the other hand, the pesticide is desorbed in variable proportions (30-100%). The desorption parameters obtained by fitting the results to a pseudo-first-order reaction were correlated with no edaphic variable; however, the q(0)/q(max) ratio, which is a measure of reversibility in the adsorption-desorption process, exhibited significant negative correlation with the organic matter and clay contents.

  18. Biodegradation of pyrene and catabolic genes in contaminated soils cultivated with Lolium multiflorum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sardar [Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Univ. of Preshawar (Pakistan); Hesham, Abd El-Latif [Genetics Dept., Faculty of Agriculture, Assiut Univ. (Egypt); Qing Gu; Shuang Liu; He Jizheng [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2009-10-15

    Background, aim, and scope In the soil environment, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals (HMs) are of great environmental and human health concerns due to their widespread occurrence, persistence, and carcinogenic properties. Bioremediation of contaminated soil is a cost-effective, environmentally friendly, and publicly acceptable approach to address the removal of environmental contaminants. However, biore-mediation of contaminants depends on plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere. The microorganisms that can mineralize various PAHs have PAH dioxygenase genes like nahAc, phnAc, and pdol. To understand the fate of pyrene in rhizospheric and non-rhizospheric soils in the presence or absence of Pb, pyrene biodegradation, bacterial community structure, and dioxygenase genes were investigated in a pot experiment. (orig.)

  19. The effects of minimal tillage, contour cultivation and in-field vegetative barriers on soil erosion and phosphorus loss

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Runoff, sediment, total phosphorus and total dissolved phosphorus losses in overland flow were measured for two years on unbounded plots cropped with wheat and oats.\\ud \\ud Half of the field was cultivated with minimum tillage (shallow tillage with a tine cultivator) and half was conventionally ploughed. Within each cultivation treatment there were different treatment areas (TAs). In the first year of the experiment, one TA was cultivated up and down the slope, one TA was cultivated on the co...

  20. Zinc solubility and fractionation in cultivated calcareous soils irrigated with wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazif, W; Marzouk, E R; Perveen, S; Crout, N M J; Young, S D

    2015-06-15

    The solubility, lability and fractionation of zinc in a range of calcareous soils from Peshawar, Pakistan were studied (18 topsoils and 18 subsoils). The lability (E-value) of Zn was assessed as the fraction isotopically exchangeable with (70)Zn(2+); comparative extractions included 0.005 M DTPA, 0.43 M HNO3 and a Tessier-style sequential extraction procedure (SEP). Because of the extremely low concentration of labile Zn the E-value was determined in soils suspended in 0.0001 M Na2-EDTA which provided reliable analytical conditions in which approximately 20% of the labile Zn was dissolved. On average, only 2.4% of soil Zn was isotopically exchangeable. This corresponded closely to Zn solubilised by extraction with 0.005 DTPA and by the carbonate extraction step (F1+F2) of the Tessier-style SEP. Crucially, although the majority of the soil CaCO3 was dissolved in F2 of the SEP, the DTPA dissolved only a very small proportion of the soil CaCO3. This suggests a superficial carbonate-bound form of labile Zn, accessible to extraction with DTPA and to isotopic exchange. Zinc solubility from soil suspended in 0.01 M Ca(NO3)2 (PCO2 controlled at 0.03) was measured over three days. Following solution speciation using WHAM(VII) two simple solubility models were parameterised: a pH dependent 'adsorption' model based on the labile (isotopically exchangeable) Zn distribution coefficient (Kd) and an apparent solubility product (Ks) for ZnCO3. The distribution coefficient showed no pH-dependence and the solubility model provided the best fit to the free ion activity (Zn(2+)) data, although the apparent value of log10 Ks (5.1) was 2.8 log units lower than that of the mineral smithsonite (ZnCO3).

  1. Impact of 40 years poplar cultivation on soil carbon stocks and greenhouse gas fluxes

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    C. Ferré

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the JRC Kyoto Experiment in the Regional Park and UN-Biosphere Reserve "Parco Ticino" (North-Italy, near Pavia, the soil carbon stocks and fluxes of CO2, N2O, and CH4 were measured in a poplar plantation in comparison with a natural mesohygrophilous deciduous forest nearby, which represents the pristine land cover of the area. Soil fluxes were measured using the static and dynamic closed chamber techniques for CH4 N2O, and CO2, respectively. We made further a pedological study to relate the spatial variability found with soil parameters.

    Annual emission fluxes of N2O and CO2 and deposition fluxes of CH4 were calculated for the year 2003 for the poplar plantation and compared to those measured at the natural forest site. N2O emissions at the poplar plantation were 0.15$plusmn;0.1 g N2O m-2 y-1 and the difference to the emissions at the natural forest of 0.07±0.06 g N2O m-2 y-1 are partly due to a period of high emissions after the flooding of the site at the end of 2002. CH4 consumption at the natural forest was twice as large as at the poplar plantation. In comparison to the relict forest, carbon stocks in the soil under the poplar plantation were depleted by 61% of surface (10 cm carbon and by 25% down the profile under tillage (45 cm. Soil respiration rates were not significant different at both sites with 1608±1053 and 2200±791 g CO2 m-2 y-1 at the poplar plantation and natural forest, respectively, indicating that soil organic carbon is much more stable in the natural forest. In terms of the greenhouse gas budget, the non-CO2 gases contributed minor to the overall soil balance with only 0.9% (N2O and -0.3% (CH4 of CO2-eq emissions in the

  2. N2O emissions from a cultivated mollisol: optimal time of day for sampling and the role of soil temperature Emissões de N2O de um chernossolo cultivado: o tempo ideal do dia para amostragem e papel da temperatura do solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Rosa Noemi Cosentino

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The correct use of closed field chambers to determine N2O emissions requires defining the time of day that best represents the daily mean N2O flux. A short-term field experiment was carried out on a Mollisol soil, on which annual crops were grown under no-till management in the Pampa Ondulada of Argentina. The N2O emission rates were measured every 3 h for three consecutive days. Fluxes ranged from 62.58 to 145.99 ∝g N-N2O m-2 h-1 (average of five field chambers and were negatively related (R² = 0.34, p O uso adequado de câmaras estáticas para determinar as emissões de N2O no campo requer a definição da hora do dia que melhor representa a taxa de emissão média diária. Um experimento de campo de curta duração foi realizado em um Chernossolo do Pampa Ondulado da Argentina, cultivado com soja em sistema plantio direto. As taxas de emissão de N2O foram medidas a cada 3 h durante três dias consecutivos. As taxas de emissão de N2O variaram entre 62,58 e 145,99 mg m-2 h-1 de N-N2O (média de cinco câmaras de campo e foram negativamente relacionadas (R² = 0,34; p <0,01 com a temperatura do solo (14 - 20 °C. As taxas de emissão de N2O medidas entre 9 e 12 h foram positivamente relacionadas com a média diária (R² = 0,87; p <0,01, mostrando que na região de estudo a melhor época para amostragem de GEE é pela manhã.

  3. Role of Bacillus licheniformis in phytoremediation of nickel contaminated soil cultivated with rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Muhammad; Zeb, Salma; Anees, Muhammad; Roohi, Aneela; Ahmed, Iftikhar; ur Rehman, Shafiq; Rha, Eui Shik

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination in soil is an important environmental problem and it has negative effect on agriculture. Bacteria play a major role in phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soil. In this study, the effect of Bacillus licheniformis NCCP-59, a halophilic bacterium isolated from salt mines near Karak, Pakistan, were determined on a three week old greenhouse grown seedling and germinating seeds of two rice varieties (Basmati-385 (B-385) and KSK-282) in soil contaminated with different concentrations (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 ppm) of Nickel. Nickel significantly reduced the germination rate and germination percentage mainly at 500 and 1000 ppm. Significant decrease in ion contents (Na, K, and Ca) was observed while Ni ion concentration in the plant tissues increases as the concentration of Ni applied increases. The photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a (chl a), chlorophyll b (chl b), and carotenoids) were also decreased by the application of different concentrations of Ni. Total protein and organic nitrogen were found to be reduced at higher concentrations of Nickel. Inoculation of Bacillus licheniformis NCCP-59 improved seed germination and biochemical attribute of the plant under Ni stress. It is clear from the results that the Bacillus Licheniformis NCCP-59 strain has the ability to protect the plants from the toxic effects of nickel and can be used for the phytoremediation of Ni contaminated soil.

  4. Nitrogen dynamics in soils cultivated with maize and fertilized with pig slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emília Borges Alves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The proper disposal of pig manure is of great importance because, when mishandled, it can contaminate water resources. This study aimed to evaluate the nitrogen dynamics in a Cerrado Oxisol and its absorption, over time, by a maize crop managed with pig slurry associated with mineral fertilization (N P K. The study was conducted at a private farm, in the region of Sete Lagoas, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The maize crop was able to recover 62% of the mineral nitrogen that entered the soil-plant system, while 9% leached as nitrate and, to a lesser amount, as ammonium. The maximum average content of nitrate and ammonium of 92 kg ha-1 and 43 kg ha-1, respectively, was observed in the 0 to 0.3 m soil layer during the early crop development stage. A minimum content of 5.8 kg ha-1 of nitrate and 9.0 kg ha-1 of ammonium, respectively, was measured at the end of the cycle. In addition, the nitrate content at that soil layer, at the end of the maize cycle, remained below the values measured at the native Cerrado, indicating that the agricultural use of the land poses no additional risk to the nitrate accumulation and leaching into the soil profile.

  5. Altered humin compositions under organic and inorganic fertilization on an intensively cultivated sandy loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humin is the largest and also the least understood fraction of soil organic matter. The humin structure and its correlation with microbiological properties are particularly uncertain. We applied advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the structural chan...

  6. Application of the soil-ecological multiplicative index to assess suitability of Cis-Ural chernozems for cultivation with due account for economic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levykin, S. V.; Chibilev, A. A.; Kazachkov, G. V.; Petrishchev, V. P.

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of Russian concepts concerning the assessment of soil suitability for cultivation in relation to several campaigns on large-scale plowing of virgin steppe soils is examined. The major problems of agricultural land use in steppe areas—preservation of rainfed farming in the regions with increasing climatic risks, underestimation of the potential of arable lands in land cadaster assessments, and much lower factual yields in comparison with potential yields—are considered. It is suggested that the assessments of arable lands should be performed on the basis of the soil-ecological index (SEI) developed by I. Karmanov with further conversion of SEI values into nominal monetary values. Under conditions of land reforms and economic reforms, it is important to determine suitability of steppe chernozems for plowing and economic feasibility of their use for crop growing in dependence on macroeconomic parameters. This should support decisions on optimization of land use in the steppe zone on the basis of the principles suggested by V. Dokuchaev. The developed approach for assessing soil suitability for cultivation was tested in the subzone of herbaceous-fescue-feather grass steppes in the Cis-Ural part of Orenburg oblast and used for the assessment of soil suitability for cultivation in the southern and southeastern regions of Orenburg oblast.

  7. The formation of microorganism communities in the soil under the effect of chitosan and runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus L. cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Pięta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the studies was the soil with introduced solutions containing 0,1% chitosan. These materials were obtained from the Institute of Chemical Fibres in L6d2 (in the form of a microcrystalline gel and also from the Department of Food Biochemistry and Chemistry of the University of Agriculture in Lublin (in a liquid form,i.e.dissolved in acetic acid. In order to set an experiment in a growth chamber, grey brown podzolic soil formed from loesses and taken from a mechanically treated belt of black fallow was used. The soil (1000 g was watered every 8 days with 100 ml of examined chitosan solutions per pot. Control soil was watered with sterile distilled water. Seven days after each watering, soil samples were taken for microbiological analysis. Then 25 runner bean seeds were sown into each pot. After six weeks of plants' growth the experiment was finished and the number of plants was counted, their healthiness determined and soil microbiological analysis was performed. Regardless of chitosan form introduced to the soil it stimulated the growth of bacteria and fungi, since in these experimental combinations was found a significantly higher number of microorganisms as compared with the control. A particular high increase in the number of microorganism colonies was observed with simultaneous growth of plants and the application of chitosan. A considerable increase of fungi colonies from the Trichoderma genus was found in the soil treated with chitosan in the form ofboth a microcrystalline gel and a liquid. The species of this genus are considered to be antagonists; it affects pathogenic fungi through competition, antibiosis and over-parasitism. An increase in colonies of saprophytic microorganisms, including antagonistic ones of Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. was observed in the soil treated with chitosan . On the other hand, in the soil after the growth of bean and treated watered with chitosan only few colonies of Fusarium oxysporum f

  8. Zinc solubility and fractionation in cultivated calcareous soils irrigated with wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazif, W. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Marzouk, E.R. [Division of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Agricultural Sciences, Suez Canal University, North Sinai 45516 (Egypt); Perveen, S. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Agricultural University, Peshawar (Pakistan); Crout, N.M.J. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Young, S.D., E-mail: scott.young@nottingham.ac.uk [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    The solubility, lability and fractionation of zinc in a range of calcareous soils from Peshawar, Pakistan were studied (18 topsoils and 18 subsoils). The lability (E-value) of Zn was assessed as the fraction isotopically exchangeable with {sup 70}Zn{sup 2+}; comparative extractions included 0.005 M DTPA, 0.43 M HNO{sub 3} and a Tessier-style sequential extraction procedure (SEP). Because of the extremely low concentration of labile Zn the E-value was determined in soils suspended in 0.0001 M Na{sub 2}-EDTA which provided reliable analytical conditions in which approximately 20% of the labile Zn was dissolved. On average, only 2.4% of soil Zn was isotopically exchangeable. This corresponded closely to Zn solubilised by extraction with 0.005 DTPA and by the carbonate extraction step (F1 + F2) of the Tessier-style SEP. Crucially, although the majority of the soil CaCO{sub 3} was dissolved in F2 of the SEP, the DTPA dissolved only a very small proportion of the soil CaCO{sub 3}. This suggests a superficial carbonate-bound form of labile Zn, accessible to extraction with DTPA and to isotopic exchange. Zinc solubility from soil suspended in 0.01 M Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (PCO{sub 2} controlled at 0.03) was measured over three days. Following solution speciation using WHAM(VII) two simple solubility models were parameterised: a pH dependent ‘adsorption’ model based on the labile (isotopically exchangeable) Zn distribution coefficient (Kd) and an apparent solubility product (Ks) for ZnCO{sub 3}. The distribution coefficient showed no pH-dependence and the solubility model provided the best fit to the free ion activity (Zn{sup 2+}) data, although the apparent value of log{sub 10} Ks (5.1) was 2.8 log units lower than that of the mineral smithsonite (ZnCO{sub 3}). - Highlights: • Isotopically exchangeable Zn in the calcareous soils of Peshawar is extremely low. • There is no evidence of topsoil enrichment from the use of wastewater for irrigation. • Solubility

  9. Influence of plant roots on electrical resistivity measurements of cultivated soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloteau, Sophie; Blanchy, Guillaume; Javaux, Mathieu; Garré, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Electrical resistivity methods have been widely used for the last 40 years in many fields: groundwater investigation, soil and water pollution, engineering application for subsurface surveys, etc. Many factors can influence the electrical resistivity of a media, and thus influence the ERT measurements. Among those factors, it is known that plant roots affect bulk electrical resistivity. However, this impact is not yet well understood. The goals of this experiment are to quantify the effect of plant roots on electrical resistivity of the soil subsurface and to map a plant roots system in space and time with ERT technique in a soil column. For this research, it is assumed that roots system affect the electrical properties of the rhizosphere. Indeed the root activity (by transporting ions, releasing exudates, changing the soil structure,…) will modify the rhizosphere electrical conductivity (Lobet G. et al, 2013). This experiment is included in a bigger research project about the influence of roots system on geophysics measurements. Measurements are made on cylinders of 45 cm high and a diameter of 20 cm, filled with saturated loam on which seeds of Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv. are sowed. Columns are equipped with electrodes, TDR probes and temperature sensors. Experiments are conducted at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, in a growing chamber with controlled conditions: temperature of the air is fixed to 20° C, photoperiod is equal to 14 hours, photosynthetically active radiation is equal to 200 μmol m-2s-1, and air relative humidity is fixed to 80 %. Columns are fully saturated the first day of the measurements duration then no more irrigation is done till the end of the experiment. The poster will report the first results analysis of the electrical resistivity distribution in the soil columns through space and time. These results will be discussed according to the plant development and other controlled factors. Water content of the soil will also be detailed

  10. Utilization of composted sugar industry waste (pressmud) to improve properties of sodic soil for rice cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Rashi; Chandra, R; Kumar, Narendra; Tyagi, A K

    2005-07-01

    Sulphitation pressmud (SPM) and its composts were prepared by heap, pit, NADEP and vermicomposting methods and their effects were compared with soil properties and growth, yield and nutrient uptake by rice in a sodic soil under pot conditions. Application of 15 t ha(-1) SPM and its different composts significantly increased the plant height and dry matter accumulation at different intervals, grain and straw yields and N, P and K uptake by the crop over the control. NADEP compost of SPM alone recorded the maximum and significant plant height by 8.5 to 19.3% and plant dry matter by 14.6 to 32.8% over the raw SPM at different intervals. NADEP composts of SPM alone and SPM + rice straw were also found to be superior than raw SPM by recording 34.8 and 27.8% more grain yield respectively. The SPM composts prepared by NADEP and SPM by vermicomposting methods significantly accumulated higher N and K in rice grains and straw, while NADEP compost of SPM and SPM + rice straw recorded more P in grains and straw than raw SPM. Application of SPM and its composts reduced the pH, EC and bulk density of the soil after rice harvesting, though the reductions were not significant in comparison to the control. However, these treatments increased the soil organic C by 33.33 to 69.0%, available N by 41.4 to 74.8%, available P by 47.1 to 97.8%, available K by 11.8 to 59.2% and available S by 10.3 to 90.7% over the control. NADEP composts, in general, were found to be superior than the raw SPM and other composts in residual soil nutrient content after rice crop.

  11. EFFECT OF FALLOW LAND, CULTIVATED PASTURE AND ABANDONED PASTURE ON SOIL FERTILITY IN TWO DEFORESTED AMAZONIAN REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A DIEZ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of two practices adopted by settlers (abandoned pasture and fallow land on soil fertility of two deforested Amazonian regions (Belém-Pará and Ariquemes-Rondônia was studied. Whenever possible, cultivated pasture, over similar time periods in both cases and in natural forest, were employed as soil fertility reference standards. Nutrient dynamics was studied using the electroultra-filtration technique. In general, deforestation, as practiced in these areas, has a degrading effect on soil fertility. The effect of burning normally leads to a pH rise caused by ash. This usually yields a favorable transitory effect, improving soil fertility conditions, however not sufficient for plant needs, as inferred from the low P and K levels. Cattle excrements, improved the K level for cultivated pastures. Qualitative differences related to N were observed between cultivated pasture and both, fallow land or abandoned pasture. In the first, a certain recovery of available N levels was detected, mainly affecting the EUF-Norg fraction. On the other hand, a regeneration of organic compounds, in the fallow land and the abandoned pasture, closely related to those existing in the natural forest, was verified. This is mainly due to the presence of a higher proportion of NO3-_N and, consequently, a EUF-Norg/EUF-NO3- ratio close to 1.Comparou-se o efeito de duas práticas de manejo, ou seja, o abandono da pastagem e o pousio, sobre a fertilidade do solo de duas regiões desmatadas da Amazônia (Belém-Pará e Ariquemes-Rondônia. Quando possível, pastagens cultivadas por períodos semelhantes e florestas nativas foram usadas como padrões da fertilidade do solo. A dinâmica dos nutrientes foi estuda pela técnica da eletroultrafiltração (EUF. De um modo geral, o desmatamento, como praticado nessas regiões, tem efeito degradador sobre a fertilidade do solo. A queima da biomassa vegetal normalmente leva a um aumento do pH causado pelas cinzas, resultando

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and soil aggregation as affected by cultivation of various crops during the sugarcane fallow period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Viviane Truber

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Management systems involving crop rotation, ground cover species and reduced soil tillage can improve the soil physical and biological properties and reduce degradation. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effect of various crops grown during the sugarcane fallow period on the production of glomalin and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in two Latosols, as well as their influence on soil aggregation. The experiment was conducted on an eutroferric Red Latosol with high-clay texture (680 g clay kg-1 and an acric Red Latosol with clayey texture (440 g kg-1 clay in Jaboticabal (São Paulo State, Brazil. A randomized block design involving five blocks and four crops [soybean (S, soybean/fallow/soybean (SFS, soybean/millet/soybean (SMS and soybean/sunn hemp/soybean (SHS] was used to this end. Soil samples for analysis were collected in June 2011. No significant differences in total glomalin production were detected between the soils after the different crops. However, total external mycelium length was greater in the soils under SMS and SHS. Also, there were differences in easily extractable glomalin, total glomalin and aggregate stability, which were all greater in the eutroferric Red Latosol than in the acric Red Latosol. None of the cover crops planted in the fallow period of sugarcane improved aggregate stability in either Latosol.

  13. Can Soil Penetration Resistance and Bulk Density Be Determined in a Single Undisturbed Sample?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Fernandes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil quality indicators such as penetration resistance (PR and bulk density (BD are traditionally determined in a single undisturbed soil sample. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of PR measurements of undisturbed samples on the determination of BD in the same sample of two soils differing in clay contents. To this end, samples were collected from the 0.00-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m layers of two soils of clayey and very clayey texture. Volumetric rings were used to collect a total of 120 undisturbed soil samples from each soil layer that were divided into two subsets containing 60 units each. One sample set, designated “perforated samples”, was used to determine PR and BD in the same undisturbed sample; the other, named “intact samples”, was used to determine BD only. Bulk density values for perforated and intact samples were compared by analysis of variance, using a completely randomized experimental design. Means were compared by the t-test at 5 %. The BD values for the clayey soil were similar in perforated and intact samples from the two layers. However, BD of the very clayey soil was lower in the perforated than in the intact samples at both depths. Therefore, PR and BD in clayey soils can be accurately determined in the same undisturbed sample whereas in very clayey soils, different samples are required for this purpose.

  14. Pseudomonas matsuisoli sp. nov., isolated from a soil sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Hung, Mei-Hua; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Young, Li-Sen; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2015-03-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and polar-flagellated bacterium, designated strain CC-MHH0089(T), was isolated from a soil sample taken on Matsu Island (Taiwan). Strain CC-MHH0089(T) grew at 15-30 °C and pH 5.0-10.0 and tolerated ≤8 % (w/v) NaCl. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed high pairwise sequence similarity to Pseudomonas azotifigens 6H33b(T) (97.3 %) and Pseudomonas balearica SP1402(T) (96.7 %) and lower sequence similarity to other strains (Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas matsuisoli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-MHH0089(T) ( = BCRC 80771(T) = JCM 30078(T)).

  15. [Optimization of shelterbelt distribution for the gully erosion control of cultivated slope land in rolling hill black soil region of Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zi-Long; Cui, Ming; Fan, Hao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Shelterbelt system is one of the main components of cultivated slope land in rolling hill black soil region of Northeast China, which plays an important role in the control of gully erosion. Based on the Quickbird high-resolution remote sensing image and the digital elevation model (DEM), and combining with field survey data, this paper analyzed the effects of shelterbelt system in a small watershed of rolling hill black soil region in Heshan Farm of Heilongjiang Province on the control of gully erosion in the cultivated slope land, and put forward an optimized scheme for gully erosion control based on the features of gully erosion in the cultivated slope land and their relations with the distribution of the shelterbelt system. In the study area, the current distribution of the shelterbelt system promoted the occurrence and development of shallow gully and gully directly and indirectly. The proposed scheme for optimizing the distribution of the present shelterbelts included the adjustment of the direction of the shelterbelt perpendicular to the aspect of slope, the enhancement of the maintenance and regeneration of the shelterbelts to reduce the gaps of the shelterbelts, the increase of the shelterbelt number, and the decrease of the distances between shelterbelts. A method for calculating the shelterbelt number and the distances between the shelterbelts was also given. This study could provide scientific basis for the gully erosion control and the shelterbelts programming in the cultivated slope land of rolling hill black soil region.

  16. Microbial ecology of the watery ecosystems of Evros river in North Eastern Greece and its influence upon the cultivated soil ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavias, S; Alexopoulos, A; Plessas, S; Stefanis, C; Voidarou, C; Stavropoulou, E; Bezirtzoglou, E

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the microbial ecosystem of cultivated soils along the Evros river in NE Greece. Evros river together with its derivative rivers constitute the capital source of life and sustainable development of the area. Along this riverside watery ecosystem systematic agro-cultures were developed such as wheat, corn and vegetable cultures. The evaluation of the ecosystem microbial charge was conducted in both axes which are the watery ecosystem and the riverside cultivated soil area. Considerable discrimination of water quality was observed when considering chemical and microbiological parameters of the Evros river ecosystem. Ardas river possesses a better water quality than Evros and Erythropotamos, which is mainly due to the higher quantities that these two rivers accumulate from industrial, farming and urban residues leading to higher degree of pollution. An increased microbial pollution was recorded in two of the three rivers monitored and a direct relation in microbial and chemical charging between water and cultivated-soil ecosystems was observed. The protection of these ecosystems with appropriate cultivated practices and control of human and animal activities will define the homeostasis of the environmental area. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions and plant characteristics from soil cultivated with sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and amended with organic or inorganic fertilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Valdez, F., E-mail: flopez2072@yahoo.com [Laboratory of Agricultural Biotechnology, CIBA, IPN, Tepetitla de Lardizabal, C.P. 90700, Tlaxcala (Mexico); Laboratory of Soil Ecology, GIB, Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Cinvestav-Zacatenco, C.P. 07360, D.F. (Mexico); Fernandez-Luqueno, F. [Natural and Energetic Resources, Cinvestav-Saltillo, C.P. 25900, Coahuila (Mexico); Laboratory of Soil Ecology, GIB, Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Cinvestav-Zacatenco, C.P. 07360, D.F. (Mexico); Luna-Suarez, S. [Laboratory of Agricultural Biotechnology, CIBA, IPN, Tepetitla de Lardizabal, C.P. 90700, Tlaxcala (Mexico); Dendooven, L. [Laboratory of Soil Ecology, GIB, Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Cinvestav-Zacatenco, C.P. 07360, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    Agricultural application of wastewater sludge has become the most widespread method of disposal, but the environmental effects on soil, air, and crops must be considered. The effect of wastewater sludge or urea on sunflower's (Helianthus annuus L.) growth and yield, the soil properties, and the resulting CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions are still unknown. The objectives of this study were to investigate: i) the effect on soil properties of organic or inorganic fertilizer added to agricultural soil cultivated with sunflower, ii) how urea or wastewater sludge increases CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from agricultural soil over short time periods, and iii) the effect on plant characteristics and yield of urea or wastewater sludge added to agricultural soil cultivated with sunflower. The sunflower was fertilized with wastewater sludge or urea or grown in unamended soil under greenhouse conditions while plant and soil characteristics, yield, and greenhouse gas emissions were monitored. Sludge and urea modified some soil characteristics at the onset of the experiment and during the first two months but not thereafter. Some plant characteristics were improved by sludge. Urea and sludge treatments increased the yield at similar rates, while sludge-amended soil significantly increased N{sub 2}O emissions but not CO{sub 2} emissions compared to the other amended or unamended soils. This implies that wastewater sludge increased the biomass and/or the yield; however, from a holistic point of view, using wastewater sludge as fertilizer should be viewed with concern.

  18. Predictive mapping of soil organic carbon in wet cultivated lands using classification-tree based models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Rania Bou; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bøcher, Peder Klith

    2010-01-01

    the geographic distribution of SOC across Denmark using remote sensing (RS), geographic information systems (GISs) and decision-tree modeling (un-pruned and pruned classification trees). Seventeen parameters, i.e. parent material, soil type, landscape type, elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, mean curvature...... field measurements in the area of interest (Denmark). A large number of tree-based classification models (588) were developed using (i) all of the parameters, (ii) all Digital Elevation Model (DEM) parameters only, (iii) the primary DEM parameters only, (iv), the remote sensing (RS) indices only, (v......) selected pairs of parameters, (vi) soil type, parent material and landscape type only, and (vii) the parameters having a high impact on SOC distribution in built pruned trees. The best constructed classification tree models (in the number of three) with the lowest misclassification error (ME...

  19. Use of quality compost on arboreus cultivation to improve soil fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Antonio Buda

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, thank to remarkable technical-scientific progresses, agricultural production has reached very high values with regard to quantitative and qualitative aspects. To reach these objectives, the collectivity must pay high prices, as reduction of fertility soils, greater risk of erosive process in the hill areas, pollution of surface and deep water and of air, because the use of agrotechnical means (fertilizers, pesticides, mechanical means isn’t often appropriate. In two farms located in Scerni and Monteodorisio, we have carried out an experimental trial on a vineyard and on a olive grove, with the objective of using the quality compost obtained from the mixture of organic fraction of urban solid waste and the lignocellulosic residues, in order to recover organic refuses and to verify the possibility of improving the soil fertility. After two years of trials, we have found higher contents of organic matter and nutritive elements in the soil. The use of compost has not modified the quantity and the quality of products.

  20. Use of quality compost on arboreus cultivation to improve soil fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Antonio Buda

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, thank to remarkable technical-scientific progresses, agricultural production has reached very high values with regard to quantitative and qualitative aspects. To reach these objectives, the collectivity must pay high prices, as reduction of fertility soils, greater risk of erosive process in the hill areas, pollution of surface and deep water and of air, because the use of agrotechnical means (fertilizers, pesticides, mechanical means isn’t often appropriate. In two farms located in Scerni and Monteodorisio, we have carried out an experimental trial on a vineyard and on a olive grove, with the objective of using the quality compost obtained from the mixture of organic fraction of urban solid waste and the lignocellulosic residues, in order to recover organic refuses and to verify the possibility of improving the soil fertility. After two years of trials, we have found higher contents of organic matter and nutritive elements in the soil. The use of compost has not modified the quantity and the quality of products.

  1. Transfer and internalisation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in cabbage cultivated on contaminated manure-amended soil under tropical field conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongeng, D; Vasquez, G A; Muyanja, C; Ryckeboer, J; Geeraerd, A H; Springael, D

    2011-01-31

    Surface contamination and internalisation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in cabbage leaf tissues at harvest (120 days post-transplantation) following amendment of contaminated bovine manure to soil at different times during crop cultivation were investigated under tropical field conditions in the Central Agro-Ecological Zone of Uganda. Fresh bovine manure inoculated with rifampicin-resistant derivatives of non-virulent strains of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium was incorporated into the soil to achieve inoculum concentrations of 4 and 7 log CFU/g at the point of transplantation, 56 or 105 days post-transplantation of cabbage seedlings. Frequent sampling of the soil enabled the accurate identification of the survival kinetics in soil, which could be described by the Double Weibull model in all but one of the cases. The persistence of 4 log CFU/g E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in the soil was limited, i.e. only inocula applied 105 days post-transplantation were still present at harvest. Moreover, no internalisation in cabbage leaf tissues was observed. In contrast, at the 7 log CFU/g inoculum level, E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium survived in the soil throughout the cultivation period. All plants (18/18) examined for leaf contamination were positive for E. coli O157:H7 at harvest irrespective of the time of manure application. A similar incidence of leaf contamination was found for S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, only plants (18/18) cultivated on soil amended with contaminated manure at the point of transplantation showed internalised E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium at harvest. These results demonstrate that under tropical field conditions, the risk of surface contamination and internalisation of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in cabbage leaf tissues at harvest depend on the inoculum concentration and the time of manure application. Moreover, the internalisation of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in cabbage leaf tissues

  2. Assessment of dust sampling methods for the study of cultivable-microorganism exposure in stables.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Normand, A.C.; Vacheyrou, M.; Sudre, B.; Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Piarroux, R.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown a link between living on a farm, exposure to microbial components (e.g., endotoxins or beta-d-glucans), and a lower risk for allergic diseases and asthma. Due to the lack of validated sampling methods, studies of asthma and atopy have not relied on exposure assessment based on

  3. Influence of long-term mineral fertilization on metal contents and properties of soil samples taken from different locations in Hesse, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, S.; Düring, R.-A.

    2015-01-01

    Essential and non-essential metals occur in soils as a result of weathering, industrial processes, fertilization, and atmospheric deposition. Badly adapted cultivation of agricultural soils (declining pH value, application of unsuitable fertilizers) can enhance the mobility of metals and thereby increase their concentrations in agricultural products. As the enrichment of metals in soils occurs over long time periods, monitoring of the long-term impact of fertilization is necessary to assess metal accumulation in agricultural soils. The main objective of this study was to test the effects of different mineral fertilizer variations on soil properties (pH, Corg, and cation exchange capacity (CEC)) and pseudo-total and mobile metal contents of soils after 14 years of fertilizer application and to determine residual effects of the fertilization 8 years after cessation of fertilizer treatment. Soil samples were taken from a field experiment which was carried out at four different locations (210, 260, 360, and 620 m above sea level) in Hesse, Germany. During the study, a significant decrease in soil pH and an evident increase in soil carbon content and cation exchange capacity with fertilization were determined. The CEC of the soils was closely related to their organic C contents. Moreover, pseudo- and mobile metal (Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn) contents in the soils increased due to application of 14 years of mineral fertilizer treatments (N, P, NP, and NPK) when compared to control plots. Eight years after termination of the fertilization in the soil samples taken from soil profiles of the fertilized plots (NPK) for monitoring the residual effects of the fertilizer application, a decrease of 82.6, 54.2, 48.5, 74.4, and 56.9% in pseudo-total Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn contents, respectively, was determined.

  4. Remediation of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) contaminated site by successive methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and sunflower oil enhanced soil washing - Portulaca oleracea L. cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mao; Sun, Mingming; Hu, Feng; Kengara, Fredrick Orori; Jiang, Xin; Luo, Yongming; Yang, Xinlun

    2014-06-01

    An innovative ex situ soil washing technology was developed in this study to remediate organochlorine pesticides (OCPs)-contaminated site. Elevated temperature (50 °C) combined with ultrasonication (35 kHz, 30 min) at 25 g L(-1) methyl-β-cyclodextrin and 100 mL L(-1) sunflower oil were effective in extracting OCPs from the soil. After four successive washing cycles, the removal efficiency for total OCPs, DDTs, endosulfans, 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexanes, heptachlors, and chlordanes were all about 99%. The 4th washed soil with 3 months cultivation of Portulaca oleracea L. and nutrient addition significantly increase (p<0.05) the number, biomass carbon, nitrogen, and functioning diversity of soil microorganisms. This implied that the microbiological functioning of the soil was at least partially restored. This combined cleanup strategy proved to be effective and environmental friendly.

  5. Phylogenetic microarrays for cultivation-independent identification and metabolic characterization of microorganisms in complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Alexander; Pester, Michael; Steger, Doris

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing and hybridization technologies promise new insights into the natural diversity and dynamics of microorganisms. Among these new technologies are phylogenetic oligonucleotide microarrays (phylochips) that depend on the standard molecules for taxonomic and environmental studies of microorganisms: the ribosomal RNAs and their encoding genes. The beauty of phylochip hybridization is that a sample can be analyzed with hundreds to thousands of rRNA (gene)-targeted probes simultaneously, lending itself to the efficient diagnosis of many target organisms in many samples. An emerging application of phylochips is the highly parallel analysis of structure-function relationships of microbial community members by employing in vivo substrate-mediated isotope labeling of rRNA (via the isotope array approach). This chapter provides an introduction to phylochip and isotope array analysis and detailed wet-lab protocols for preparation, labeling, and hybridization of target nucleic acids.

  6. Evaluation of Uranium Concentration in Soil Samples of Central Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ned Xoubi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring radionuclides such as uranium, thorium and their decay products (226Ra, 222Rn are present in a number of geological settings in Jordan. Motivated by the existence of uranium anomalies ‎coupled with its lack of conventional ‎‎energy ‎‎resources, Jordan decided that the development of ‎this indigenes ‎resource (uranium is the first step in introducing nuclear power as part of its energy mix. Uranium deposits in Central Jordan were perceived not only as a secured resource that will ‎fulfill Jordan’s energy needs, but also as an economic asset that will ‎finance Jordan’s nuclear program. The average uranium concentration of 236 soil samples using ICP-Mass (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was found to be 109 parts per million (ppm. Results analysis revealed a wide range of 1066 ppm for uranium concentration, and a median of 41 ppm uranium. The measurements frequency distribution indicates that 72% of samples measured had a uranium content of less than 100 ppm, a concentration that characterizes overburden and tailings quality, rather than minable reserves. This paper presents and evaluates the concentration of uranium in central Jordan, being the most promising area with the highest radioactive anomalies in Jordan.

  7. Spectroscopic analyses of soil samples outside Nile Delta of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhry, Ahmed; Osman, Osama; Ezzat, Hend; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2016-11-01

    Soil in Egypt, especially around Delta is exposed to various pollutants which are affecting adversely soil fertility and stability. Humic Acids (HA) as a main part of soil organic matter (SOM) represent the heart of the interaction process of inorganic pollutants with soil. Consequently, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR) were used to characterize soil, sediment and extracted HA. Resulting data confirmed that the HA was responsible for transporting inorganic pollutants from surface to subsurface reaching the ground water, which may represent a high risk on public health. The transport process is coming as carboxyl in surface soil changed into metal carboxylate then transferred into the carboxyl in bottom soil.

  8. Soil Sampling Plan for the transuranic storage area soil overburden and final report: Soil overburden sampling at the RWMC transuranic storage area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanisich, S.N.

    1994-12-01

    This Soil Sampling Plan (SSP) has been developed to provide detailed procedural guidance for field sampling and chemical and radionuclide analysis of selected areas of soil covering waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The format and content of this SSP represents a complimentary hybrid of INEL Waste Management--Environmental Restoration Program, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) sampling guidance documentation. This sampling plan also functions as a Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP). The QAPP as a controlling mechanism during sampling to ensure that all data collected are valid, reliabile, and defensible. This document outlines organization, objectives and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) activities to achieve the desired data quality goals. The QA/QC requirements for this project are outlined in the Data Collection Quality Assurance Plan (DCQAP) for the Buried Waste Program. The DCQAP is a program plan and does not outline the site specific requirements for the scope of work covered by this SSP.

  9. Application of PIXE analysis to investigation of plants cultivated with contaminated soil of Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K., E-mail: keizo.ishii@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Ishizaki, A.; Arai, H.; Osada, N.; Sugai, H.; Takahashi, H. [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sera, K. [Cyclotron Research Center, Iwate Medical University, 348-58 Tomegamori, Takizawa, Iwate 020-0173 (Japan); Sasaki, H.; Sasaki, K.; Sawamura, T. [Sasaki Taro memorial PIXE Center, Asano-cho 5, Hakodate 040-0076 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to research low radioactive cesium contaminated plants by the use of PIXE analysis. Highly contaminated regions still remain in the Fukushima prefecture. We collected wild plants growing in this area, that is, Butterbur, Welsh onion, Alpine leek and White clover and measured their specific activities of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K. We also measured {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K specific activities of soil under these plants. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of {sup 137}Cs were ∼0.02 for 4 wild plants and those of {sup 40}K were ∼0.5 except for White clover. Using PIXE analysis, we measured the concentration of mineral elements in these plants. Among mineral elements, we noted the concentrations of additional alkali metal elements such as Na, K and Rb. The experimental results showed that the concentration of Rb was proportional to the specific activities of {sup 137}Cs except for Welsh onion and other elements had no strong correlation with {sup 137}Cs. These results indicate that there may be correlations between the adsorption of Cs and Rb.

  10. Using site-specific soil samples as a substitution for improved hydrological and nonpoint source predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Guobo; Zhong, Yucen; Zhao, Xin; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-08-01

    Soil databases are one of the most important inputs for watershed models, and the quality of soil properties affects how well a model performs. The objectives of this study were to (1) quantify the sensitivity of model outputs to soil properties and to (2) use site-specific soil properties as a substitution for more accurate hydrological and nonpoint source (H/NPS) predictions. Soil samples were collected from a typical mountainous watershed in China, and the impacts of soil sample parameters on H/NPS predictions were quantified using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The most sensitive parameters related to predicting flow, sediment, and total phosphorus (TP) mainly were the soil hydrological, the channel erosion processes, and the initial soil chemical environment, respectively. When the site-specific soil properties were used, the uncertainties (coefficient of variation) related to predicting the hydrology, sediment and TP decreased by 75∼80 %, 75∼84 %, and 46∼61 %, respectively. Based on changes in the Nash-Sutcliff coefficient, the model performance improved by 4.9 and 19.45 % for the hydrological and sediment model, accordingly. However, site-specific soil properties did not contribute to better TP predictions because of the high spatial variability of the soil P concentrations across the large watershed. Thus, although site-specific soil samples can be used to obtain more accurate H/NPS predictions, more sampling sites are required to apply this method in large watersheds.

  11. [Influence of interpolation method and sampling number on spatial prediction accuracy of soil Olsen-P].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-xiang; Wu, Chuan-zhou; Zhu, Ke-bao; Cui, Zhen-ling; Chen, Xin-ping; Zhang, Fu-suo

    2009-03-01

    Different from the large scale farm management in Europe and America, the scattered farmland management in China made the spatial variability of soil nutrients at county scale in this country more challenging. Taking soil Olsen-P in Wuhu County as an example, the influence of interpolation method and sampling number on the spatial prediction accuracy of soil nutrients was evaluated systematically. The results showed that local polynomial method, ordinary kriging, simple kriging, and disjunctive kriging had higher spatial prediction accuracy than the other interpolation methods. Considering of its simplicity, ordinary kriging was recommended to evaluate the spatial variability of soil Olsen-P within a county. The spatial prediction accuracy would increase with increasing soil sampling number. Taking the spatial prediction accuracy and soil sampling cost into consideration, the optimal sampling number should be from 500 to 1000 to evaluate the spatial variability of soil Olsen-P at county scale.

  12. 基于空间模拟退火算法的耕地质量布样及优化方法%Sampling and optimizing methods of cultivated land quality based on spatial simulated annealing algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建宇; 岳彦利; 宋海荣; 汤赛; 叶思菁; 徐凡

    2015-01-01

    change trend of sampling number and sampling precision, and on this basis we propose the extended spatial simulated annealing method to optimize spatial sampling design for obtaining the minimal Kriging variance. The main steps for computing the optimal sampling design can now be summarized as follows: 1) calculate the semi-variogram of cultivated land quality and determine the parameters of ordinary Kriging interpolation; 2) identify the quantity of samples, choose a set of cultivated land map spots randomly as an initial design, and compute the associated fitness function; 3) given one design,construct a candidate new sampling design by random perturbation; 4) compute the fitness function for the new design, and if it is smaller than or equal to that for the original design, accept the original design, or else accept the new design with an acceptance probability. If the new design is accepted, the estimated point (j) is returned to zero, or else increased by 1; 5) ifj is smaller than or equal to a threshold value of continuous rejections, increasei (representing monitoring point) by 1, or else stop the iteration and current design is the best. Designs by simulated annealing that reduce the average Kriging standard error are always accepted, and designs that worsen the interpolation effect are accepted with a certain probability, which decreases to zero as iterations proceed. However, there are integrated factors such as soil organic matter content, topsoil texture, profile pattern, salinization which affect arable land quality change over time and space, and are taken as potential change factors to detect potential change areas. Under the guidance of expert knowledge, the sampling points are set up through spatial simulated annealing algorithm and adjusted based on potential change areas, rivers, roads and abnormal monitoring points. We illustrate this new method using Daxing District, Beijing City as a case study. Spatial overlay analysis of potential change factors

  13. The intensity of mechanical cultivation measures vs. the amount of weed seeds in the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Wesołowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the number of mechanical operations in sugar beets plantation on the amount and species composition of weed seeds in the 0-5 cm deep layer of the loessial soil was studied. It has been proved that reduction in the number of weed seeds depends upon both the frequency of weeding-out operations and the level of agrotechnic. The highest decrease in the number of fruit and weed seeds was caused by eightfold weed removal which took place during the period from emergence phase to the joining of sugar beet rows. Application of increased mineral fertilization, microelements, fungicides, and insecticides caused the number of weed seeds to be reduced by 5,9%, in comparison to extensive agrotechnical level.

  14. Two-Step Separation of Nostotrebin 6 from Cultivated Soil Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp. by High Performance Countercurrent Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cheel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC was successfully applied for the separation of nostotrebin 6 from cultivated soil cyanobacteria in a two-step operation. A two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane–ethyl acetate–methanol–water (4:5:4:5, v/v/v/v was employed for the HPCCC separation. In the first-step operation, its neutral upper phase was used as stationary phase and its basic lower phase (1% NH3 in lower phase was employed as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. In the second operation step, its neutral upper phase was used as stationary phase, whereas both its neutral lower phase and basic lower phase were employed as mobile phase with a linear gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The revolution speed and temperature of the separation column were 1,000 rpm and 30 °C, respectively. Using HPCCC followed by clean-up on Sephadex LH-20 gel, 4 mg of nostotrebin 6 with a purity of 99% as determined by HPLC/DAD-ESI-HRMS was obtained from 100 mg of crude extract. The chemical identity of the isolated compound was confirmed by comparing its spectroscopic data (UV, ESI-HRMS, ESI-HRMS2 with those of an authentic standard and data available in the literature.

  15. Isotope determination of sulfur by mass spectrometry in soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexssandra Luiza Rodrigues Molina Rossete

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur plays an essential role in plants and is one of the main nutrients in several metabolic processes. It has four stable isotopes (32S, 33S, 34S, and 36S with a natural abundance of 95.00, 0.76, 4.22, and 0.014 in atom %, respectively. A method for isotopic determination of S by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS in soil samples is proposed. The procedure involves the oxidation of organic S to sulphate (S-SO4(2-, which was determined by dry combustion with alkaline oxidizing agents. The total S-SO4(2- concentration was determined by turbidimetry and the results showed that the conversion process was adequate. To produce gaseous SO2 gas, BaSO4 was thermally decomposed in a vacuum system at 900 ºC in the presence of NaPO3. The isotope determination of S (atom % 34S atoms was carried out by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS. In this work, the labeled material (K2(34SO4 was used to validate the method of isotopic determination of S; the results were precise and accurate, showing the viability of the proposed method.

  16. Environmental Assessment of Natural Radioactivity in Soil Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Hazama

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impacts and hazards due to the unstoppable hot mud flow by the East Java ‘LUSI’ Mud Volcano are increasing since its unexpected eruption on May 29, 2006. Analysis should be undertaken, not only to examine its impact on human health and the environment, but also to explore the potential benefits of the mud flow. One may be able to tap the mud flow as a material source for brick and cement. Recently there has been great concern about the health risks associated with exposure to natural radioactivity present in soil and building materials all over the world. In this context, measurements for natural radioactive isotopes such as 238U and 232Th series, and 40K in mud samples were carried out using the HPGe (High-Purity Germanium detector to determine the re-usability of the mud. 226Ra, 232Th and 40K activity concentrations were found to be 13±1, 15±1 and 111±3 Bq/kg (1 Bq = 1 sec-1, respectively, and the corresponding activity index was found to be 0.16±0.02. These values were compared with previous data and our measured accuracy was improved by a factor of nine at the maximum. Radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and annual effective dose equivalent were also evaluated and all were found to be within acceptable limits.

  17. Sampling and Analysis for Lead in Water and Soil Samples on a University Campus: A Student Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven J.; Zarrabi, Kaveh

    1995-01-01

    Describes a student research project that determined concentrations of lead in water drawn from selected drinking fountains and in selected soil samples on the campus of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (18 references) (DDR)

  18. On the influence of different soil cultivation practices in autumn and spring on the population development of the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Col.: Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fora, Ciprian George

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It can be expected that intensity and depth of soil cultivation have an impact on the eggs of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, which are predominantly positioned 10 to 15 cm below soil surface. Main aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between different cultivation measures in autumn and spring and the hatching of adult D. virgifera virgifera as well as the maize root damage, caused by larvae. Gauze covered hatch-cages (2 per plot were used to count the emerged imagines. Variants: Plough and grub, both 25 cm working depth, in autumn and superficial tillage with disc-harrow in spring. The trials were performed on fields with a significant natural D. virgifera virgifera infestation, in West Romania. The number of hatched adult D. virgifera virgifera was unsteady in the different years and did not correlate with soil-cultivation practices. This finding can be explained with the different climatic conditions in the single years. The maize-root damage under the hatch-cages was not significantly different between variants. This may on the one hand result from the limited number of samples (2 cages per plot on the other hand also from the artificial growth circumstances for the maize under the small cages. The maize-root damage assessed in the surrounding plots was significantly lower in the plough-variant compared to those in the grubber- and disc-harrow-plots, in two of three years. A summary of all data achieved in three years, showed a significant correlation between the number of adult D. virgifera virgifera and the maize-root damages in the field (p=0.0001, r=0.605.

  19. Calibration of time domain reflectometry technique using undisturbed soil samples from humid tropical soils of volcanic origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, A. M.; Grauel, W. T.; Keller, M.; Veldkamp, E.

    1997-06-01

    Time domain reflectrometry (TDR) is used to measure the apparent dielectric number (Ka) in soils. We studied two soil types (Humitropept and Hapludand) of low bulk density (about 0.7 Mg m-3 at 0.05 m to 0.8 Mg m-3 at 0.3 m depth) and high organic matter content (about 7% at 0.05 m to 4% at 0.3 m depth). Soils are located in a humid tropical environment (average annual soil water content is 0.51 to 0.58 m3 m-3). For calibration, undisturbed soil blocks, with a TDR probe installed in the center, were saturated and then allowed to dry by evaporation. Volumetric water content was calculated from measured Ka values and from gravimetric measurements. Because we used undisturbed soil samples, our calibration accounts for the natural heterogeneity in soils. We tested the suitability of various calibration functions relating Ka to soil water content for our soils. TDR technique underestimated the actual soil water content by 0.05-0.15 m3m-3, when using the widely applied Topp calibration function. A three-phase mixing model with a geometry parameter, α=0.47, fit our data best. We consider mixing models to be a robust approach for calibration of TDR technique on various soils.

  20. Uncertainty-guided sampling to improve digital soil maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stumpf, Felix; Schmidt, Karsten; Goebes, Philipp; Behrens, Thorsten; Schönbrodt-stitt, Sarah; Wadoux, Alexandre; Xiang, Wei; Scholten, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Digital soil mapping (DSM) products represent estimates of spatially distributed soil properties. These estimations comprise an element of uncertainty that is not evenly distributed over the area covered by DSM. If we quantify the uncertainty spatially explicit, this information can be used to impro

  1. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

    2010-07-26

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for large soil samples. The new soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using this two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time.

  2. Eliminating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil for rice cultivation using plant growth promoting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Radziah, Othman; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Razi, Ismail Mohd

    2015-02-20

    Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ground magnesium limestone (GML) and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0) at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM). Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB), GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha-1 each). Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  3. Eliminating Aluminum Toxicity in an Acid Sulfate Soil for Rice Cultivation Using Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB, ground magnesium limestone (GML and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0 at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM. Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB, GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  4. Emission of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O from soil cultivated with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) fertilized with different N sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Luqueno, F.; Reyes-Varela, V.; Martinez-Suarez, C.; Reynoso-Keller, R.E.; Mendez-Bautista, J.; Ruiz-Romero, E. [Laboratory of Soil Ecology, Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F, C.P. 07360 (Mexico); Lopez-Valdez, F. [Laboratory of Soil Ecology, Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F, C.P. 07360 (Mexico); CIBA, IPN, Tepetitla de Lardizabal, Tlaxcala C.P. 90700 (Mexico); Luna-Guido, M.L. [Laboratory of Soil Ecology, Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F, C.P. 07360 (Mexico); Dendooven, L., E-mail: dendoove@cinvestav.mx [Laboratory of Soil Ecology, Department of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F, C.P. 07360 (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    Addition of different forms of nitrogen fertilizer to cultivated soil is known to affect carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions. In this study, the effect of urea, wastewater sludge and vermicompost on emissions of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O in soil cultivated with bean was investigated. Beans were cultivated in the greenhouse in three consecutive experiments, fertilized with or without wastewater sludge at two application rates (33 and 55 Mg fresh wastewater sludge ha{sup -1}, i.e. 48 and 80 kg N ha{sup -1} considering a N mineralization rate of 40%), vermicompost derived from the wastewater sludge (212 Mg ha{sup -1}, i.e. 80 kg N ha{sup -1}) or urea (170 kg ha{sup -1}, i.e. 80 kg N ha{sup -1}), while pH, electrolytic conductivity (EC), inorganic nitrogen and CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions were monitored. Vermicompost added to soil increased EC at onset of the experiment, but thereafter values were similar to the other treatments. Most of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} was taken up by the plants, although some was leached from the upper to the lower soil layer. CO{sub 2} emission was 375 C kg ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} in the unamended soil, 340 kg C ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} in the urea-amended soil and 839 kg ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} in the vermicompost-amended soil. N{sub 2}O emission was 2.92 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} in soil amended with 55 Mg wastewater sludge ha{sup -1}, but only 0.03 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} in the unamended soil. The emission of CO{sub 2} was affected by the phenological stage of the plant while organic fertilizer increased the CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emission, and the yield per plant. Environmental and economic implications must to be considered to decide how many, how often and what kind of organic fertilizer could be used to increase yields, while limiting soil deterioration and greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. A simple strategy for investigating the diversity and hydrocarbon degradation abilities of cultivable bacteria from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bučková, Maria; Puškarová, Andrea; Chovanová, Katarína; Kraková, Lucia; Ferianc, Peter; Pangallo, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    The use of indigenous bacterial strains is a valuable bioremediation strategy for cleaning the environment from hydrocarbon pollutants. The isolation and selection of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria is therefore crucial for obtaining the most promising strains for site decontamination. Two different media, a minimal medium supplemented with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and a MS medium supplemented with triphenyltetrazolium chloride, were used for the isolation of bacterial strains from two hydrocarbon contaminated soils and from their enrichment phases. The hydrocarbon degradation abilities of these bacterial isolates were easily and rapidly assessed using the 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol assay. The diversity of the bacterial communities isolated from these two soil samples and from their enrichment phases was evaluated by the combination of a bacterial clustering method, fluorescence ITS-PCR, and bacterial identification by 16S rRNA sequencing. Different PCR-based assays were performed in order to detect the genes responsible for hydrocarbon degradation. The best hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, including Arthrobacter sp., Enterobacter sp., Sphingomonas sp., Pseudomonas koreensis, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, were isolated directly from the soil samples on minimal medium. The nahAc gene was detected only in 13 Gram-negative isolates and the sequences of nahAc-like genes were obtained from Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas brenneri, Pseudomonas entomophila and P. koreensis strains. The combination of isolation on minimal medium with the 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol assay was effective in selecting different hydrocarbon-degrading strains from 353 isolates.

  6. Effects of urban wastewater and compost on some characteristics of soil and its leachate under greenhouse cultivation of basil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahakarami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main anxieties in application of wastewater and compost in agricultural lands is their salinity and uptake of heavy metals by plants. To envestigate the effects of wastewater and compost on yield and accumulation of lead and nickel in the basil shoots, as well as electrical conductivity (EC and pH in soil profile and its leachate, a factorial test was conducted, based on completely randomized design with three replications, in 48 lysimeters. The factors included four types of watering [raw wastewater (W1, treated wastewater (W2, combination of 50% raw wastewater and fresh water (W3 and fresh water (W4] and four compost levels [0 (C1, 40 (C2, 80 (C3 and 120 (C4 ton/ha]. Totally, 11 waterings were applied during the growing season. Basil plants were harvested at three stages. After the third harvest, soil samples were taken from 10, 20, 40, 65, 85 and 105 cm depth in the lysimeters. Results showed that application of wastewater and compost, compared to the control treatment, significantly increased (p≤ 0.05 fresh and dry weights, concentration of lead and nickel in the shoots of basil, as well as EC of the soil, relative to type of irrigation water and level of compost. But, wastewater and compost application significantly decreased (p< 0.05 pH in the leachate water. The lead and nickel concentration was increased during the last harvests. The soil EC was decreased in the lower depths. The lead and nickel concentration in shoots ranged between 0.09-0.36 and 0.12- 0.44 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. Variation of EC in soil was 0.72- 2.5 dS/m and pH range of the leachate was 7.5-7.8.

  7. Spatial variability of available phosphorus for cultivated soil based on GARBF neural network%基于GARBF神经网络的耕地土壤有效磷空间变异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐剑波; 宋立生; 夏振; 张桥; 胡月明

    2012-01-01

    为了调整耕地管理措施、合理施用磷肥、减少磷素流失、降低水体非点源污染,该研究以高州市为例,在全市各区镇共采集了664个耕作层(0~20 cm)土样,利用遗传算法优化的径向基函数(radial basis function network optimized by genetic algorithm,GARBF)神经网络和普通克里金法(Ordinary Kriging)等方法,分析了县域耕地土壤有效磷在不同采样尺度下的空间变异特征及其空间分布格局与成因.结果表明,高州市耕地表层土壤有效磷存在半方差结构,半方差函数曲线与指数和球状模型曲线拟合较好;5种采样尺度下(训练样点数分别为100、200、300、400和500)耕地表层土壤有效磷均表现出弱的结构空间相关,在较大范围内空间自相关性较差.GARBF神经网络空间插值能力在整体上要有优于基于邻近点RBF神经网络和普通克里金法.300样本下GARBF神经网络空间插值结果表明,高州市耕地表层土壤有效磷的盈余现象比较严重,并且盈余有效磷的流失对该地区水环境会产生严重的威胁.该研究结果可以为土壤属性空间估测、合理施肥以及降低水体非点源污染提供理论依据和技术支持.%In order to adjust land management measures, use phosphorus fertilizer properly, minimize phosphorus loss and mitigate non-point source pollution of water, 664 soil samples in cultivate horizon were collected in Gaozhou city, Guangdong Province in this study. The radial basis function network optimized by genetic algorithm (GARBF) and Ordinary Kriging methods were applied to reveal the characteristics of spatial variability of cultivated soil variability phosphorus (AP) and its spatial distribution pattern. The results suggested that spatial variability of surface soil AP of cultivated land in Gaozhou city exhibited semi-variance structure, and its semi-variance function fitted exponential and spherical models well. The analysis showed that the spatial

  8. Soil and vegetation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    Soil sampling and analysis evaluates long-term contamination trends and monitors environmental radionuclide inventories. This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the soil and vegetation surveillance programs which were conducted during 1994. Vegetation surveillance is conducted offsite to monitor atmospheric deposition of radioactive materials in areas not under cultivation and onsite at locations adjacent to potential sources of radioactivity.

  9. 盐碱荒地开垦年限对表层土壤盐分的影响%Effects of cultivation on soil salinity in upper soil profiles of the saline-alkali land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽; 王玉刚; 李彦; 黄刚

    2013-01-01

    以典型荒漠区原生盐碱荒地及开垦农田为研究对象,通过对比研究,以阐明原生盐碱荒地开垦后不同管理措施下土壤可溶盐总量的变化规律,开垦后土壤剖面中可溶盐总量的垂直分布和季节变化规律.结果表明:开垦显著降低了0~50 cm土壤的可溶性盐含量,开垦达100 a以上老耕地的可溶性盐含量(2.31 g/kg)仅为原生盐碱荒地(26.62 g/kg)的1 1%;长期的耕作改变了土壤可溶性盐分在土层中的分布,原生荒漠土壤盐分具有鲜明的表聚特征,0~30 cm土层的盐分含量占整个土壤剖面的79%,开垦50a后,土壤中的盐分分布趋于均匀,各离子浓度的垂直分布不再明显;开垦使土壤中的盐分离子组成也发生了变化,Cl-、K+、Na+离子浓度降低,而SO42-、Mg2+、Ca2+离子浓度增加,耕作层土壤由SO4-2-Cl-1盐土转变为Cl-1-SO4-2盐土;盐碱荒地土壤可溶盐浓度伴随着降水变化具有显著的季节变化特征,而季节对开垦耕地没有显著影响.总体而言,盐碱荒地经过多年开垦利用后,土壤可溶性盐分和pH值均显著降低.%The primary saline land in Xinjiang is mainly used for agriculture. Soil saline content pattern is an important factor affecting plant productivity after cultivation, it is also critical for the stability and sustainability of oasis ecosystem. In this study, the pattern was investigated of total soil soluble saline under different planting patterns in Sangong River basin. Then, the vertical distribution pattern was studied of total soil soluble saline in both primary saline land and cultivated saline land; At last, the seasonal pattern was studied of total soil soluble saline. Results showed that cultivation significantly decreased soil total dissolvable salt concentration at 0 ~ 50 cm layers, the longer the cultivation, the lower the contents of the soil soluble salt in soil. The total soil dissolvable salt concentration was 2.31 g/kg in cultivated

  10. Evaluation of soil gas sampling and analysis techniques at a former petrochemical plant site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hers, I; Li, L; Hannam, S

    2004-07-01

    Methods for soil gas sampling and analysis are evaluated as part of a research study on soil vapour intrusion into buildings, conducted at a former petro-chemical plant site ("Chatterton site"). The evaluation process was designed to provide information on reliability and selection of appropriate methods for soil gas sampling and analysis, and was based on a literature review of data and methods, and experiments completed as part of the research study. The broader context of this work is that soil gas characterization is increasingly being used for input into risk assessment of contaminated sites, particularly when evaluating the potential intrusion of soil vapour into buildings. There are only a limited number of research studies and protocols addressing soil gas sampling and analysis. There is significant variability in soil gas probe design and sample collection and analysis methods used by practitioners. The experimental studies conducted to evaluate soil gas methods address the permeation or leakage of gases from Tedlar bags, time-dependent sorption of volatile organic compound (VOC)-vapours onto probe surfaces and sampling devices, and analytical and quality control issues for light gas and VOC analyses. Through this work, common techniques for soil gas collection and analysis are described together with implications for data quality arising from the different methods used. Some of the potential pitfalls that can affect soil gas testing are identified, and recommendations and guidance for improved protocols are provided.

  11. The use of gamma ray computed tomography to investigate soil compaction due to core sampling devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Luiz F.; Arthur, Robson C.J.; Correchel, Vladia; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Reichardt, Klaus [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Brasil, Rene P. Camponez do [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Engenharia Rural

    2004-09-15

    Compaction processes can influence soil physical properties such as soil density, porosity, pore size distribution, and processes like soil water and nutrient movements, root system distribution, and others. Soil porosity modification has important consequences like alterations in results of soil water retention curves. These alterations may cause differences in soil water storage calculations and matrix potential values, which are utilized in irrigation management systems. Because of this, soil-sampling techniques should avoid alterations of sample structure. In this work soil sample compaction caused by core sampling devices was investigated using the gamma ray computed tomography technique. A first generation tomograph with fixed source-detector arrangement and translation/rotational movements of the sample was utilized to obtain the images. The radioactive source is {sup 241}Am, with an activity of 3.7 GBq, and the detector consists of a 3 in. x 3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Soil samples were taken from an experimental field utilizing cylinders 4.0 cm high and 2.6 cm in diameter. Based on image analyses it was possible to detect compacted regions in all samples next to the cylinder wall due to the sampling system. Tomographic unit profiles of the sample permitted to identify higher values of soil density for deeper regions of the sample, and it was possible to determine the average densities and thickness of these layers. Tomographic analyses showed to be a very useful tool for soil compaction characterization and presented many advantages in relation to traditional methods. (author)

  12. Planning Considerations Related to Collecting and Analyzing Samples of the Martian Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Mellon, Mike T.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Noble, Sarah K.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Beaty, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Sample Return (MSR) End-to-End International Science Analysis Group (E2E-iSAG [1]) established scientific objectives associ-ated with Mars returned-sample science that require the return and investigation of one or more soil samples. Soil is defined here as loose, unconsolidated materials with no implication for the presence or absence of or-ganic components. The proposed Mars 2020 (M-2020) rover is likely to collect and cache soil in addition to rock samples [2], which could be followed by future sample retrieval and return missions. Here we discuss key scientific consid-erations for sampling and caching soil samples on the proposed M-2020 rover, as well as the state in which samples would need to be preserved when received by analysts on Earth. We are seeking feedback on these draft plans as input to mission requirement formulation. A related planning exercise on rocks is reported in an accompanying abstract [3].

  13. 旱地红壤线虫群落对不同耕作年限的响应及指示意义%Response of Soil Nematode Community to Cultivation in Upland Red Soil Relative to Cultivation History and Its Significance as Indicator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明伟; 刘雨迪; 陈小云; 胡锋; 刘满强

    2016-01-01

    Low fertility of the red soils in tropical and subtropical regions of China is a major factor restricting development of the agricultural productivity of the regions. Different types of land use and/or different cultivation practices may have different impacts on soil physicochemical and biological properties. Soil nematodes play an important role in the detritus food webs,and have been used as a sensitive indicator of changes in soil ecosystems caused by different agricultural practices. In order to explore the effects of farming cultivations,different in history,on community composition of soil nematode in upland red soils, and relationships between nematode communities and soil physicochemical and microbial properties, red soil peanut fields and vegetable gardens,10,20 and 50 years in cultivation history,and a tract of red soil wasteland were selected for comparison in the following indices;soil organic C(SOC),total N (TN),pH,mineral N(MN),available P(AP),microbial biomass C(MBC),microbial biomass N(MBN),microbial biomass P(MBP),basal respiration(BR),qCO2 and soil nematode community. It was found that compared with the wasteland,the peanut fields,regardless of cultivation history,all displayed declining trends in all indices of soil fertility,while the vegetable gardens did reversely. The 20-year old peanut field was the lowest in SOC,TN,MBC and(AP,and the 50-year old vegetable garden was significantly higher than the 10-year old one in all the indices(p < 0.05). In addition,soil nematodes showed a significant increase(p < 0.05)in the soil after 50 years of farming as vegetable garden,but it stayed almost unchanged in the 10- or 20-year old gardens from that in the wasteland. In the peanut fields,. plant-feeding nematodes gradually decreased in proportion in the soil with the cultivation going on (p < 0.05),from 45.89% in the wasteland to 2.60% in the 50-year old peanut field,while bacterial-feeding nematodes increased steadily in proportion with the cultivation

  14. Sampling Position under No-Tillage System Affects the Results of Soil Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Jorge Bernabé Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Understanding the spatial behavior of soil physical properties under no-tillage system (NT is required for the adoption and maintenance of a sustainable soil management system. The aims of this study were to quantify soil bulk density (BD, porosity in the soil macropore domain (PORp and in the soil matrix domain (PORm, air capacity in the soil matrix (ACm, field capacity (FC, and soil water storage capacity (FC/TP in the row (R, interrow (IR, and intermediate position between R and IR (designated IP in the 0.0-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m soil layers under NT; and to verify if these soil properties have systematic variation in sampling positions related to rows and interrows of corn. Soil sampling was carried out in transect perpendicular to the corn rows in which 40 sampling points were selected at each position (R, IR, IP and in each soil layer, obtaining undisturbed samples to determine the aforementioned soil physical properties. The influence of sampling position on systematic variation of soil physical properties was evaluated by spectral analysis. In the 0.0-0.1 m layer, tilling the crop rows at the time of planting led to differences in BD, PORp, ACm, FC and FC/TP only in the R position. In the R position, the FC/TP ratio was considered close to ideal (0.66, indicating good water and air availability at this sampling position. The R position also showed BD values lower than the critical bulk density that restricts root growth, suggesting good soil physical conditions for seed germination and plant establishment. Spectral analysis indicated that there was systematic variation in soil physical properties evaluated in the 0.0-0.1 m layer, except for PORm. These results indicated that the soil physical properties evaluated in the 0.0-0.1 m layer were associated with soil position in the rows and interrows of corn. Thus, proper assessment of soil physical properties under NT must take into consideration the sampling positions and previous

  15. EFFECT OF LIMING AND USE OF WASTE ORGANIC MATERIALS ON THE CONTENTS OF CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM IN COCK’S-FOOT CULTIVATED ON NICKEL-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kuziemska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of liming and the addition to soil of waste organic materials on the contents of calcium and magnesium in cock’s-foot (Dactylis glomerata L. cultivated on soil contaminated to various degrees with nickel was studied in a pot culture experiment. Plants from four cuts of grass were analysed in the third year of the study. The following factors were taken into account: 1 – contamination of soils with nickel (0, 75, 150 and 225 mg N·kg-1 of soil; 2 – liming (0 Ca and Ca according to Hh of soil; 3 – waste organic materials (no waste organic materials added, brown coal and rye straw. With increasing nickel content in soil, the magnesium content in biomass of the test plant decreased. The applied liming resulted in an increase in the average calcium content and a decrease in the magnesium content in cock’s-foot. No significant effect of introducing straw to soil on the contents of calcium and magnesium in biomass of the grass was found, while the effect of brown coal was visible both for calcium and for magnesium (in the plants harvested from the objects to which brown coal was applied, the contents of both macroelements were, on average, lower than in the plants harvested from the control objects.

  16. Influence of soil C stocks and interannual climatic variability on the CO2 and CH4 exchange of maize cultivated on mineral and organic soils in NE Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Madlen; Hagemann, Ulrike; Hoffmann, Mathias; Giebels, Michael; Albiac-Borraz, Elisa; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Due to its glacially influenced genesis and land use history, the soils of the Great Plain Region of NE-Germany show large differences in groundwater levels and soil carbon (C) stocks over short distances. Although generally featuring a rather dry climate, trace gas exchange at individual sites may be influenced by i) interannual climatic variability, particularly with respect to precipitation; as well as by ii) variability of soil C stocks. However, it is still unclear how these factors affect fluxes of CO2 and CH4, and if there is any positive or negative feedback on the C source or sink function of different soil types. We present measured and modeled CO2 and CH4 fluxes of minerally fertilized grain maize for three sites located near Paulinenaue, within the so-called Rhin-Havelluch, a shallow and drained paludification mire complex in NE Germany. The sites are characterized by a distinct gradient of 0-1 m soil organic C stocks: i) Arenosol (AR: mineral soil/distant groundwater; 8 000 g C m-2), ii) Gleysol (GL: organic soil/groundwater-dependent; 35 000 g C m-2), and iii) Histosol (HS: organic soil/near groundwater; 45 000 g C m-2). CO2 flux measurements of ecosystem respiration (Reco), net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and gross primary production (GPP; calculated as difference between NEE and Reco) were conducted every four weeks using a flow-through non-steady-state closed chamber system. Measurement gaps of Reco and NEE were filled by using temperature or radiation-based models, respectively. CH4 fluxes were measured bi-weekly using a static closed chamber system with interval sampling, with gap filling via linear interpolation. Cumulated fluxes of CO2-C (Reco, GPP, NEE) and CH4-C were calculated for a period of four consecutive years (2007-2010). The intensity of CO2-C fluxes increased with growing soil organic C stocks (AR exchange rates were generally very low exchange. However, the exceptionally wet summer of 2007 (May to July) resulted in drastically

  17. Atrazine, triketone herbicides, and their degradation products in sediment, soil and surface water samples in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchanska, Hanna; Sajdak, Marcin; Szczypka, Kornelia; Swientek, Angelika; Tworek, Martyna; Kurek, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the sediment, soil and surface water contamination with selected popular triketone herbicides (mesotrione (MES) and sulcotrione(SUL)), atrazine (ATR) classified as a possible carcinogen and endocrine disrupting chemical, as well as their degradation products, in Silesia (Poland). Seventeen sediment samples, 24 soil samples, and 64 surface water samples collected in 2014 were studied. After solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), analytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). Ten years after the withdrawal from the use, ATR was not detected in any of the collected samples; however, its degradation products are still present in 41 % of sediment, 71 % of soil, and 8 % of surface water samples. SUL was determined in 85 % of soil samples; its degradation product (2-chloro-4-(methylosulfonyl) benzoic acid (CMBA)) was present in 43 % of soil samples. In 17 % of sediment samples, CMBA was detected. Triketones were detected occasionally in surface water samples. The chemometric analysis (clustering analysis (CA), single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), N-Way ANOVA) was applied to find relations between selected soil and sediment parameters and herbicides concentration. In neither of the studied cases a statistically significant relationship between the concentrations of examined herbicides, their degradation products and soil parameters (organic carbon (OC), pH) was observed.

  18. Ganoderma lucidum Field Cultivation of Soil Fungi Identification%灵芝大田栽培土壤真菌的初步鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈友; 徐宏家; 陈永敢

    2013-01-01

    This article through to the Ganoderma lucidum field cultivation soil with coated plate method, extraction and separation of soil fungi were cultured in detection and identification. The results showed that soil of Trichoderma, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Mucor, Neurospora, Rhizopus, Chaetomium and Gymnoascus subumbrinus in eight species of fungi. According to the fungal growth speed, Ganoderma lucidum in different growth period appeared the species and the colony number, put forward suggestions of prevention of soil fungi cultivation of Ganoderma lucidum. This experiment was to obtain beneficial fungi resources, high yield, high quality and efficient cultivation of Ganoderma lucidum, provide effective help.%通过对灵芝大田栽培土壤采用涂布平板法,提取分离土壤中的真菌进行培养检测及鉴定.结果表明,土壤中共有木霉、青霉、曲霉、毛霉、链孢霉、根霉、毛壳霉、狄氏裸囊菌8种真菌.根据真菌的生长速度,灵芝生长不同时期出现的真菌种类和菌落数量,提出针对灵芝栽培土壤真菌的防治建议.试验既获得有益的真菌资源,又为高产、高质、高效的灵芝栽培提供有效帮助.

  19. Geothermal activity supports islands of biodiversity in a hyper-arid, high-elevation landscape, Socompa Volcano, Puna de Atacama, Andes: A cultivation-independent molecular-phylogenetic view of soil microbial communities from an extreme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, E.; Reed, S.; Sowell, P.; Halloy, S.; Schmidt, S.

    2006-12-01

    Socompa Volcano is a relatively young, unglaciated, 6051 m (19,852`) elevation stratovolcano that lies at the Chilean-Argentine border (24° 25`S, 68° 15`W) at the eastern edge of the Atacama Basin in the Arid Core of the Andes. A 1984 exploration revealed isolated mats of moss, liverwort, algae and lichen- dominated autotrophic communities associated with geothermal vents or warmspots near Socompa`s summit (Halloy, 1991). If extant, this system would present a unique opportunity to study life`s limits in a hyper-arid, high-elevation Mars-like landscape. Returning to Socompa in 2005, we encountered previously described warmspot "2" (Halloy, 1991) at 5824 m (19,107`) and found it partially disturbed by recent foot traffic. We collected warmspot-associated gas and soil samples, as well as other non-vent associated soils on Socompa. These soils were subjected to a battery of analyses, including cultivation-independent surveys of bacterial and eukaryotic small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. Gas samples contained elevated CO2 and CH4 that, along with water vapor, vent directly from rocky "tubes" and percolate diffusely through the ground at the site. In general, Socompa soils were unvegetated, poorly sorted sands and gravels. Non-vent and vent-associated soils had pH 5.23 and 6.8, respectively. Non-vent and warm (25°C), disturbed (mat destroyed) vent-associated soils had no measurable moisture or nitrogen and 0.03% carbon (with SOM δ13C of -26‰). These soils also contained no measurable photosynthetic or photoprotective pigments and low enzyme activities. Conversely, cold (-5°C), undisturbed (but not overlain with dense mat) vent-associated soil had 10% water, 0.02% nitrogen and 0.25% carbon (C:N=13, SOM δ13C of -23.5‰). These soils had higher enzyme activities, contained chlorophyll a, and harbored a diverse array of algae, moss, liverwort, ascomycete, alveolate, and metazoan 18S rRNA sequences (~30 species). On the other hand, in the warm

  20. Concentrations of some macro and micro plant nutrient of cultivated soils in Central and Eastern Blacksea Region and their mapping by inverse distance weighted (IDW method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Arif Özyazıcı

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine plant nutrients content and to in terms of soil variables their soil database and generate maps of their distribution on agricultural land in Central and Eastern Black Sea Region using geographical information system (GIS. In this research, total 3400 soil samples (0-20 cm depth were taken at 2.5 x 2.5 km grid points representing agricultural soils. Total nitrogen, extractable calcium, magnesium, sodium, boron, iron, copper, zinc and manganese contents were analysed in collected soil samples. Analysis results of these samples were classified and evaluated for deficiency, sufficiency or excess with respect to plant nutrients. Afterwards, in terms of GIS, a soil database and maps for current status of the study area were created by using inverse distance weighted (IDW interpolation method. According to this research results, it was determined sufficient plant nutrient elements in terms of total nitrogen, extractable iron, copper and manganese in arable soils of Central and Eastern Blacksea Region while, extractable calcium, magnesium, sodium were found good and moderate level in 66.88%, 81.44% and 64.56% of total soil samples, respectively. In addition, insufficient boron and zinc concentration were found in 34.35% and 51.36% of soil samples, respectively.

  1. Spatial Variation of Soil Lead in an Urban Community Garden: Implications for Risk-Based Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugdalski, Lauren; Lemke, Lawrence D; McElmurry, Shawn P

    2014-01-01

    Soil lead pollution is a recalcitrant problem in urban areas resulting from a combination of historical residential, industrial, and transportation practices. The emergence of urban gardening movements in postindustrial cities necessitates accurate assessment of soil lead levels to ensure safe gardening. In this study, we examined small-scale spatial variability of soil lead within a 15 × 30 m urban garden plot established on two adjacent residential lots located in Detroit, Michigan, USA. Eighty samples collected using a variably spaced sampling grid were analyzed for total, fine fraction (less than 250 μm), and bioaccessible soil lead. Measured concentrations varied at sampling scales of 1-10 m and a hot spot exceeding 400 ppm total soil lead was identified in the northwest portion of the site. An interpolated map of total lead was treated as an exhaustive data set, and random sampling was simulated to generate Monte Carlo distributions and evaluate alternative sampling strategies intended to estimate the average soil lead concentration or detect hot spots. Increasing the number of individual samples decreases the probability of overlooking the hot spot (type II error). However, the practice of compositing and averaging samples decreased the probability of overestimating the mean concentration (type I error) at the expense of increasing the chance for type II error. The results reported here suggest a need to reconsider U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sampling objectives and consequent guidelines for reclaimed city lots where soil lead distributions are expected to be nonuniform.

  2. Effect of pest controlling neem and mata-raton leaf extracts on greenhouse gas emissions from urea-amended soil cultivated with beans: a greenhouse experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Bautista, Joaquín; Fernández-Luqueño, Fabián; López-Valdez, Fernando; Mendoza-Cristino, Reyna; Montes-Molina, Joaquín A; Gutierrez-Miceli, Federico A; Dendooven, L

    2010-10-01

    In a previous laboratory experiment, extracts of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) and Gliricidia sepium Jacquin, locally known as mata-raton, used to control pests on crops, inhibited emissions of CO(2) from a urea-amended soil, but not nitrification and N(2)O emissions. We investigated if these extracts when applied to beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) affected their development, soil characteristics and emissions of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) in a greenhouse environment. Untreated beans and beans planted with lambda-cyhalothrin, a commercial insecticide, served as controls. After 117days, shoots of plants cultivated in soil amended with urea or treated with lambda-cyhalothrin, or extracts of neem or G. sepium were significantly higher than when cultivated in the unamended soil, while the roots were significantly longer when plants were amended with urea or treated with leaf extracts of neem or G. sepium than when treated with lambda-cyhalothrin. The number of pods, fresh and dry pod weight and seed yield was significantly higher when bean plants were treated with leaf extracts of neem or G. sepium treatments than when left untreated and unfertilized. The number of seeds was similar for the different treatments. The number of nodules was lower in plants fertilized with urea, treated with leaf extracts of neem or G. sepium, or with lambda-cyhalothrin compared to the unfertilized plants. The concentrations of NH(4)(+), NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) decreased significantly over time with the lowest concentrations generally found at harvest. Treatment had no significant effect on the concentrations of NH(4)(+) and NO(2)(-), but the concentration of NO(3)(-) was significantly lower in the unfertilized soil compared to the other treatments. It was found that applying extracts of neem or G. sepium leaves to beans favored their development when compared to untreated plants, but had no significant effect on nitrification in soil.

  3. Greenhouse gas emissions, soil quality, and crop productivity from a mono-rice cultivation system as influenced by fallow season straw management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Hussain, Saddam; Wu, Lishu; Qin, Ziguo; Li, Xiaokun; Lu, Jianwei; Khan, Fahad; Cao, Weidong; Geng, Mingjian

    2016-01-01

    Straw management during fallow season may influence crop productivity, soil quality, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from rice field. A 3-year field experiment was carried out in central China to examine the influence of different fallow season straw management practices on rice yield, soil properties, and emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from a mono-rice cultivation system. The treatments comprised an unfertilized control (CK), inorganic fertilization (NPK), rice straw burning in situ (NPK + RSB), rice straw mulching (NPK + RSM), and rice straw strip mulching with green manuring (NPK + RSM + GM). The maximum rice yield, soil organic carbon, soil total nitrogen, and available potassium were observed in NPK + RSM + GM treatment. Compared with NPK, the NPK + RSM + GM recorded 9% higher grain yield averaged across 3 years. However, NPK + RSM and NPK + RSB were statistically similar with NPK regarding grain yield. The NPK + RSM and NPK + RSM + GM recorded significantly higher CH4 emission during rice growing season as well as winter fallow; however, the response of N2O emissions was variable. The NPK + RSM and NPK + RSM + GM were statistically similar for annual cumulative CH4 and N2O emissions. The NPK + RSM + GM recorded 103 and 72% higher straw-induced net economic benefits and soil organic carbon sequestration rate, and reduced net global warming potential by 27% as compared with NPK + RSM. Considering the benefits of soil fertility, higher crop productivity, and environmental safety, the NPK + RSM + GM could be the most feasible and sustainable option for mono-rice cultivation system in central China.

  4. Field sampling of soil pore water to evaluate trace element mobility and associated environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo, E-mail: eduardo.moreno@uam.es [Departamento de Quimica Agricola, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Beesley, Luke [James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Lepp, Nicholas W. [35, Victoria Road, Formby, Liverpool L37 7DH (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Nicholas M. [Department of Ecology, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, PO Box 84 (New Zealand); Hartley, William [School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Cockcroft Building, Salford, M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Clemente, Rafael [Dep. of Soil and Water Conservation and Organic Waste Management, CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, PO Box 164, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Monitoring soil pollution is a key aspect in sustainable management of contaminated land but there is often debate over what should be monitored to assess ecological risk. Soil pore water, containing the most labile pollutant fraction in soils, can be easily collected in situ offering a routine way to monitor this risk. We present a compilation of data on concentration of trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in soil pore water collected in field conditions from a range of polluted and non-polluted soils in Spain and the UK during single and repeated monitoring, and propose a simple eco-toxicity test using this media. Sufficient pore water could be extracted for analysis both under semi-arid and temperate conditions, and eco-toxicity comparisons could be effectively made between polluted and non-polluted soils. We propose that in-situ pore water extraction could enhance the realism of risk assessment at some contaminated sites. - Highlights: > In situ pore water sampling successfully evaluates trace elements mobility in soils. > Field sampling proved robust for different soils, sites and climatic regimes. > Measurements may be directly related to ecotoxicological assays. > Both short and long-term monitoring of polluted lands may be achieved. > This method complements other widely used assays for environmental risk assessment. - In situ pore water sampling from a wide variety of soils proves to be a beneficial application to monitor the stability of pollutants in soils and subsequent risk through mobility.

  5. X-ray spectrometry and X-ray microtomography techniques for soil and geological samples analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Dziadowicz, M.; Kopeć, E. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Majewska, U. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Mazurek, M.; Pajek, M.; Sobisz, M.; Stabrawa, I. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Wudarczyk-Moćko, J. [Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Góźdź, S. [Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Institute of Public Health, Jan Kochanowski University, IX Wieków Kielc 19, 25-317 Kielce (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    A particular subject of X-ray fluorescence analysis is its application in studies of the multielemental sample of composition in a wide range of concentrations, samples with different matrices, also inhomogeneous ones and those characterized with different grain size. Typical examples of these kinds of samples are soil or geological samples for which XRF elemental analysis may be difficult due to XRF disturbing effects. In this paper the WDXRF technique was applied in elemental analysis concerning different soil and geological samples (therapeutic mud, floral soil, brown soil, sandy soil, calcium aluminum cement). The sample morphology was analyzed using X-ray microtomography technique. The paper discusses the differences between the composition of samples, the influence of procedures with respect to the preparation of samples as regards their morphology and, finally, a quantitative analysis. The results of the studies were statistically tested (one-way ANOVA and correlation coefficients). For lead concentration determination in samples of sandy soil and cement-like matrix, the WDXRF spectrometer calibration was performed. The elemental analysis of the samples was complemented with knowledge of chemical composition obtained by X-ray powder diffraction.

  6. Analysis of fullerenes in soils samples collected in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carboni, Andrea; Helmus, Rick; Emke, Erik; Brink, van den Nico; Parsons, John R.; Kalbitz, Karsten; Voogt, de Pim

    2016-01-01

    Fullerenes are carbon based nanoparticles that may enter the environment as a consequence of both natural processes and human activities. Although little is known about the presence of these chemicals in the environment, recent studies suggested that soil may act as a sink. The aim of the present

  7. Laboratory Jet Erosion Tests on the Lower American River Soil Samples, Sacramento, CA- Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 17 -8 Laboratory Jet Erosion Tests on the Lower American River Soil Samples, Sacramento, CA – Phase 2 G eo te ch ni...Jet Erosion Tests on the Lower American River Soil Samples, Sacramento, CA – Phase 2 Johannes L. Wibowo and Bryant A. Robbins Geotechnical and...laboratory Jet Erosion Tests performed on Plexiglas tube samples obtained from the Lower American River (LAR) between River Mile (RM) 6.0 and RM

  8. A sampling strategy for estimating plot average annual fluxes of chemical elements from forest soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.; Gruijter, de J.J.; Vries, de W.

    2010-01-01

    A sampling strategy for estimating spatially averaged annual element leaching fluxes from forest soils is presented and tested in three Dutch forest monitoring plots. In this method sampling locations and times (days) are selected by probability sampling. Sampling locations were selected by

  9. Guidance for Soil Sampling for Energetics and Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    concern at shooting ranges include arsenic and antimony (from ammunition), nickel ( coating on some lead shot), copper, zinc, strontium, and magnesium...sampling, use clean polyethylene sampling bags rather than sample bottles for multi-increment samples (Fig. 7.5). Label the outside of the sample bag...oil. Composition B: Comp B is a high explosive containing 60% RDX, 39% TNT, 1% wax . Concentration: Concentration can be expressed in a variety of

  10. MMRP Guidance Document for Soil Sampling of Energetics and Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    concern at shooting ranges include arsenic and antimony (from ammunition), nickel ( coating on some lead shot), copper, zinc, strontium, and magnesium...sampling, use clean polyethylene sampling bags rather than sample bottles for multi-increment samples (Fig. 7.5). Label the outside of the sample bag...explosive containing 60% RDX, 39% TNT, 1% wax . Concentration: Concentration can be expressed in a variety of ways parts per thousand (ppt), which is

  11. Field and Lab Methods to Reduce Sampling Variation in Soil Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, K. G.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Natural variability in soil and detrital carbon sampling is typically large enough that it hinders accurate assessment of standing stock and changes that may occur following disturbances and experimental treatments. We are developing carbon budgets in forests of Northern California and wish to see how experimental canopy thinning may affect carbon cycling in these forests. In the pre-treatment phase, we have sought methods to quantify detrital carbon pools in an accurate and efficient manner. We have found that small soil excavations 15 cm diameter to a depth of 10 cm work very well to reduce variation an avoid introducing sampling biases. We excavate a pit carefully of uniform dimensions using cutting chisels and scoops. We fill the void created using small pebbles contained in a small net and then weigh the pebbles to obtain a volume estimate of the soil collected. The samples are sorted moist through a series of sieves of 6, 4, and 2 mm into rocks, live roots, dead roots, woody debris, and remaining soil and its organic matter. From a single sample, we estimate proportional rock volume, fine soil bulk density (soil bulk density of the 2 mm fraction), live roots, dead roots, woody debris, and proportion of organic matter in the 2 mm fraction. The standard deviations of soil measures (soil carbon, loss on ignition, bulk density, rock volume, live and dead root mass) were universally reduced over similar measures by soil corers, in some instances by up to 5-fold. Coefficient of variation using excavation pits are typically 5 to 10 %, whereas cores were 20 to 30 %. We have observed that variation in soil organic matter is more a function of variation in soil bulk density than with variation in percent soil organic matter content. As a result, we often see increased soil organic matter stores at depths below 10 cm. Soils beneath highly decayed logs show increases in soil carbon in the mineral soil suggesting woody debris is a source of soil carbon. Below

  12. Recovering greater fungal diversity from pristine and diesel fuel contaminated Sub-Antarctic soil through cultivation using a high and a novel low nutrient approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Carlene Ferrari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel cultivation strategies for bacteria are widespread and are well described for recovering greater diversity from the hitherto unculturable majority. While similar approaches have not been demonstrated for fungi it has been suggested that of the 1.5 million estimated species less than 5% have been recovered into pure culture. Fungi are known to be involved in many degradative processes, including the breakdown of hydrocarbons, and it has been speculated that in Polar Regions they contribute significantly to bioremediation of soils contaminated with hydrocarbons. Given the biotechnological potential of fungi there is a need to increase efforts for greater species recovery, particularly from extreme environments such as sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. In this study, like the hitherto unculturable bacteria, high concentrations of nutrients selected for predominantly different species to that recovered using low nutrient media. By combining both approaches to cultivation from contaminated and non-contaminated soils, 99 fungal species were recovered, including 42 yet unidentified species, several of which were isolated from soils containing high concentrations of diesel fuel. These novel species will now be characterized for their potential role in hydrocarbon degradation.

  13. RESEARCH REGARDING SOIL MAINTENANCE METHODS IN APPLE TREE CULTIVATION IN THE CÂRCINOV-ARGES FRUIT GROWING BASIN

    OpenAIRE

    Şt. Popescu; Al. Teodorescu

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the introduction of genetically resistant varieties and the reduction of phytosanitary treatments the led to lower production costs, less chemically polluted fruits, making from apple tree cultivation a profitable culture in the consecrated countries.

  14. Shrinkage anisotropy characteristics from soil structure and initial sample/layer size

    CERN Document Server

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is a physical prediction of such soil shrinkage anisotropy characteristics as variation with drying of (i) different sample/layer sizes and (ii) the shrinkage geometry factor. With that, a new presentation of the shrinkage anisotropy concept is suggested through the sample/layer size ratios. The work objective is reached in two steps. First, the relations are derived between the indicated soil shrinkage anisotropy characteristics and three different shrinkage curves of a soil relating to: small samples (without cracking at shrinkage), sufficiently large samples (with internal cracking), and layers of similar thickness. Then, the results of a recent work with respect to the physical prediction of the three shrinkage curves are used. These results connect the shrinkage curves with the initial sample size/layer thickness as well as characteristics of soil texture and structure (both inter- and intra-aggregate) as physical parameters. The parameters determining the reference shrinkage c...

  15. Spatial variation in carbon and nitrogen in cultivated soils in Henan Province, China: potential effect on crop yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelin Zhang

    Full Text Available Improved management of soil carbon (C and nitrogen (N storage in agro-ecosystems represents an important strategy for ensuring food security and sustainable agricultural development in China. Accurate estimates of the distribution of soil C and N stores and their relationship to crop yield are crucial to developing appropriate cropland management policies. The current study examined the spatial variation of soil organic C (SOC, total soil N (TSN, and associated variables in the surface layer (0-40 cm of soils from intensive agricultural systems in 19 counties within Henan Province, China, and compared these patterns with crop yield. Mean soil C and N concentrations were 14.9 g kg(-1 and 1.37 g kg(-1, respectively, whereas soil C and N stores were 4.1 kg m(-2 and 0.4 kg m(-2, respectively. Total crop production of each county was significantly, positively related to SOC, TSN, soil C and N store, and soil C and N stock. Soil C and N were positively correlated with soil bulk density but negatively correlated with soil porosity. These results indicate that variations in soil C could regulate crop yield in intensive agricultural systems, and that spatial patterns of C and N levels in soils may be regulated by both climatic factors and agro-ecosystem management. When developing suitable management programs, the importance of soil C and N stores and their effects on crop yield should be considered.

  16. Radon exhalation rate from soil samples of South Kumaun Lesser Himalayas, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Yogesh; Prasad, Ganesh; Gusain, G.S. [Department of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India); Choubey, V.M. [Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun 248 001 (India); Ramola, R.C. [Department of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India)], E-mail: rcramola@gmail.com

    2008-08-15

    Ionizing radiation exposure experienced by the general population is mainly due to the indoor radon. Major part of radon comes from the top layer of the earth. The radon emanation is associated with radon in soil and sleepy back radium in the soil. Both field and laboratory measurements were carried out for the instantaneous and integrated radon concentration in soil-gas. The radon exhalation rate from collected soil samples was measured using LR-115 Type II plastic track detector. The soil-gas radon concentration was measured with the help of radon Emanometry method. The effective radium content of the soil samples was also calculated. The correlation coefficient between radium contents in collected soil samples and soil-gas radon from the same locations was calculated as 0.1, while it is 0.2 between radon exhalation rate and soil-gas radon concentration. The results show weak positive correlation due to the geological disturbance in the equilibrium conditions and high mobility of radon in the same geological medium.

  17. Challenges in Bulk Soil Sampling and Analysis for Vapor Intrusion Screening of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft Engineering Issue Paper discusses technical issues with monitoring soil excavations for VOCs and describes options for such monitoring as part of a VI pathway assessment at sites where soil excavation is being considered or used as part of the remedy for VOC-contaminat...

  18. Water type and irrigation time effects on microbial metabolism of a soil cultivated with Bermuda-grass Tifton 85

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Furlan Nogueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the microbial metabolism in Bermuda-grass Tifton 85 areas after potable-water and effluent irrigation treatments. The experiment was carried out in Lins/SP with samples taken in the rainy and dry seasons (2006 after one year and three years of irrigation management, and set up on an entirely randomized block design with four treatments: C (control, without irrigation or fertilization, PW (potable water + 520 kg of N ha-1 year-1; TE3 and TE0 (treated effluent + 520 kg of N ha-1 year-1 for three years and one year, respectively. The parameters determined were: microbial biomass carbon, microbial activity, and metabolic quotient. Irrigation with wastewater after three years indicated no alteration in soil quality for C and ET3; for PW, a negative impact on soil quality (microbial biomass decrease suggested that water-potable irrigation in Lins is not an adequate option. Microbial activity alterations observed in TE0 characterize a priming effect.

  19. Decision support tool for soil sampling of heterogeneous pesticide (chlordecone) pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostre, Florence; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie; Achard, Raphaël; Letourmy, Philippe; Cabidoche, Yves-Marie; Cattan, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    When field pollution is heterogeneous due to localized pesticide application, as is the case of chlordecone (CLD), the mean level of pollution is difficult to assess. Our objective was to design a decision support tool to optimize soil sampling. We analyzed the CLD heterogeneity of soil content at 0-30- and 30-60-cm depth. This was done within and between nine plots (0.4 to 1.8 ha) on andosol and ferralsol. We determined that 20 pooled subsamples per plot were a satisfactory compromise with respect to both cost and accuracy. Globally, CLD content was greater for andosols and the upper soil horizon (0-30 cm). Soil organic carbon cannot account for CLD intra-field variability. Cropping systems and tillage practices influence the CLD content and distribution; that is CLD pollution was higher under intensive banana cropping systems and, while upper soil horizon was more polluted than the lower one with shallow tillage (pollution in the soil profile. The decision tool we proposed compiles and organizes these results to better assess CLD soil pollution in terms of sampling depth, distance, and unit at field scale. It accounts for sampling objectives, farming practices (cropping system, tillage), type of soil, and topographical characteristics (slope) to design a relevant sampling plan. This decision support tool is also adaptable to other types of heterogeneous agricultural pollution at field level.

  20. Soil sampling and extraction methods with possible application to pear thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Bater

    1991-01-01

    Techniques are described for the sampling and extraction of microarthropods from soil and the potential of these methods to extract the larval stages of the pear thrips, Taeniothrips inconsequens (Uzel), from soil cores taken in sugar maple stands. Also described is a design for an emergence trap that could be used to estimate adult thrips...

  1. Evaluation of microbial biomass C and N content of the soils cultivated with vetch (Vicia sativa L. and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlyas Bolat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Legume forage crops have the ability of retaining free nitrogen in the air through symbiotic Rhizobium bacteria found in their roots. Additionally, microbial biomass (MB–an essential living component of soil and a significant factor influencing plant nutrient dynamics–is considered to be accurate indicator of soil’s biological condition. Given the aforementioned aspects, soil MB C (Cmic and MB N (Nmic of different legume forage crops were investigated in this study. Soil samples were taken in order to identify certain physical and chemical characteristics of the soil using volume cylinders (0 – 6.5 cm depth from Vicia sativa L. (VSP and Medicago sativa L. planted (MSP areas. To determine the Cmic and Nmic contents, topsoil samples were also taken from 0 – 6.5 cm depth. Cmic and Nmic contents were identified using chloroform – fumigation – extraction method. There was no statistical significance for particle density, bulk density, electrical conductivity, CaCO3 %, and decomposition ratio (Corg/Ntotal of the VSP and MSP soil (P > 0.05. However, some other soil characteristics such as temperature, porosity, sand, silt and clay contents, pH, organic C and total N differed significantly (P < 0.05. Compared to VSP soil, the Cmic contents were determined to be 27 % higher (P < 0.05 in MSP soil. In VSP soil, the soil Nmic content ranged from 83.38 µg g-1 to 124.67 µg g-1, while it ranged from 91.62 µg g-1 to 187.07 µg g-1 in MSP soil. The Nmic content of the MSP soil was observed to be approximately 35 % higher than VSP soil, and a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05 was noticed between the two. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found not only between the Cmic and organic C contents (r = 0.667; P < 0.05 but also between the Nmic and total N contents of MSP and VSP soil (r = 0.881; P < 0.01. The results of the study revealed that soil Cmic and Nmic values differ as the types of planted legume forage crops

  2. Field Sampling and Selecting On-Site Analytical Methods for Explosives in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this issue paper is to provide guidance to Remedial Project Managers regarding field sampling and on-site analytical methods fordetecting and quantifying secondary explosive compounds in soils.

  3. NEW SOIL VOC SAMPLERS: EN CORE AND ACCU CORE SAMPLING/STORAGE DEVICES FOR VOC ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

    2006-06-01

    Soil sampling and storage practices for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from samples. The En Core{reg_sign} sampler is designed to collect and store soil samples in a manner that minimizes loss of contaminants due to volatilization and/or biodegradation. An ASTM International (ASTM) standard practice, D 6418, Standard Practice for Using the Disposable En Core Sampler for Sampling and Storing Soil for Volatile Organic Analysis, describes use of the En Core sampler to collect and store a soil sample of approximately 5 grams or 25 grams for volatile organic analysis and specifies sample storage in the En Core sampler at 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours; -7 to -21 C for up to 14 days; or 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours followed by storage at -7 to -21 C for up to five days. This report discusses activities performed during the past year to promote and continue acceptance of the En Core samplers based on their performance to store soil samples for VOC analysis. The En Core sampler is designed to collect soil samples for VOC analysis at the soil surface. To date, a sampling tool for collecting and storing subsurface soil samples for VOC analysis is not available. Development of a subsurface VOC sampling/storage device was initiated in 1999. This device, which is called the Accu Core{trademark} sampler, is designed so that a soil sample can be collected below the surface using a dual-tube penetrometer and transported to the laboratory for analysis in the same container. Laboratory testing of the current Accu Core design shows that the device holds low-level concentrations of VOCs in soil samples during 48-hour storage at 4 {+-} 2 C and that the device is ready for field evaluation to generate additional performance data. This report discusses a field validation exercise that was attempted in Pennsylvania in 2004 and activities being performed to plan and conduct a field validation study in 2006. A draft ASTM

  4. MACRO- MICRO-PURGE SOIL GAS SAMPLING METHODS FOR THE COLLECTION OF CONTAMINANT VAPORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purging influence on soil gas concentrations for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as affected by sampling tube inner diameter and sampling depth (i.e., dead-space purge volume), was evaluated at different field sites. A macro-purge sampling system consisted of a standard hollo...

  5. EVALUATION OF VAPOR EQUILIBRATION AND IMPACT OF PURGE VOLUME ON SOIL-GAS SAMPLING RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequential sampling was utilized at the Raymark Superfund site to evaluate attainment of vapor equilibration and the impact of purge volume on soil-gas sample results. A simple mass-balance equation indicates that removal of three to five internal volumes of a sample system shou...

  6. Determination of pyridine in soil and water samples of a polluted area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.J.B.; Renesse van Duivenbode, J.A.D. van

    1994-01-01

    A method for the analyses of pyridine in environmental samples is described. For soil samples a distillation procedure followed by an extraction, an acidic extraction or a Soxhlet extraction can be used. For water samples a distillation procedure followed by extraction can be employed. Deuterated py

  7. EG & G Mount Plant, December 1990 and January 1991, D & D soil box sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    Six hundred eighty-two (682) containers of soil were generated at Mound Plant between April 1 and October 31, 1990 as a result of the excavation of soils containing plutonium-238 at two ongoing Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program sites; these areas are known as Area 14, the waste transfer system (WTS) hillside, and Area 17, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building Area. The soils from these areas are part of the Mound Plant waste stream number AMDM-000000010, Contaminated Soil, and are proposed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. These containers of soil are currently in storage at Mound Plant. The purpose of this sampling and analysis was to demonstrate that the D&D soils comply with the waste acceptance requirements of the NTS, as presented In Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements (DOE 1988). The sealed waste packages, constructed of wood or metal, are currently being stored In Building 31 and at other locations throughout the Mound Plant. For additional historical information concerning the D&D soils, Including waste stream evaluations and past sampling data see the Sampling and Analysis Plan for Mound Plant D&D Soils Packages (EG&G 1991).

  8. Antimalarial activity of Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae) ethanol extracts from wild plants collected in various localities or plants cultivated in humus soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Neto, Valter F; Brandão, Maria G L; Oliveira, Francielda Q; Casali, Vicente W D; Njaine, Brian; Zalis, Mariano G; Oliveira, Luciana A; Krettli, Antoniana U

    2004-08-01

    Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae), a medicinal plant used worldwide, has antimalarial activity as shown in previous work. This study tested ethanol extracts from wild plants collected in three different regions of Brazil and from plants cultivated in various soil conditions. The extracts were active in mice infected with P. berghei: doses of humus enriched soil, were active; but the wild plants were the most active. Analysis using thin layer chromatography demonstrated the presence of flavonoids (compounds considered responsible for the antimalarial activity) in all plants tested, even though at different profiles. Because B. pilosa is proven to be active against P. falciparum drug-resistant parasites in vitro, and in rodent malaria in vivo, it is a good candidate for pre-clinical tests as a phytotherapeutic agent or for chemical isolation of the active compounds with the aim of finding new antimalarial drugs.

  9. Naturally occurring radionuclides and rare earth elements in weathered Japanese soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sarata; Hosoda, Masahiro; Prasad, Ganesh; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Uchida, Shigeo

    2013-08-01

    The activity concentrations of 226Ra and 228Ac in weathered Japanese soils from two selected prefectures have been measured using a γ-ray spectroscopy system with high purity germanium detector. The uranium, thorium, and rare earth elements (REEs) concentrations were determined from the same soil samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For example, granitic rocks contain higher amounts of U, Th, and light REEs compared to other igneous rocks such as basalt and andesites. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the interaction between REEs and nature of soils since soils are complex heterogeneous mixture of organic and inorganic solids, water, and gases. In this paper, we will discuss about distribution pattern of 238U and 232Th along with REEs in soil samples of weathered acid rock (granite) collected from two prefectures of Japan: Hiroshima and Miyagi.

  10. Neutron Activation Analysis of Soil Samples from Different Parts of Edirne in Turkey*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaim, N.; Dogan, C.; Camtakan, Z.

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of constituent elements were determined in soil samples collected from different parts of the Maritza Basin, Edirne, Turkey. Neutron activation analysis, an extremely accurate technique, and the comparator method (using a standard) were applied for the first time in this region. After preparing the soil samples for neutron activation analysis, they were activated with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor, TRIGA-MARK II, at Istanbul Technical University. The activated samples were analyzed using a high-efficiency high-purity germanium detector, and gamma spectrometry was employed to determine the elemental concentration in the samples. Eight elements (chromium, manganese, cobalt, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, cadmium, and barium) were qualitatively and quantitatively identified in 36 samples. The concentrations of some elements in the soil samples were high compared with values reported in the literature.

  11. Soil hydraulic properties affected by topsoil thickness in cultivated switchgrass and corn-soybean rotation production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss of productive topsoil by soil erosion over time can reduce the productive capacity of soil and can significantly affect soil hydraulic properties. This study evaluated the effects of reduced topsoil thickness and perennial switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) versus corn (Zea mays L.)/soybean [Gly...

  12. A Mesophilic, Autotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Thaumarchaeal Group I.1a Cultivated from a Deep Oligotrophic Soil Horizon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Park, S.J.; Kim, S.J.; Kim, J.G.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Jeon, C.O.; Rhee, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Soil nitrification plays an important role in the reduction of soil fertility and in nitrate enrichment of groundwater. Various ammonia- oxidizing archaea (AOA) are considered to be members of the pool of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in soil. This study reports the discovery of a chemolithoautot

  13. A Preliminary Study of the Application of Electromagnetic Conductivity Meter on Soil Properties of Paddy Cultivation Areas at Wue Village, Jantho, Aceh Besar District, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Marwan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional soil sampling is time consuming and requires meticulous laboratory analysis. Hence, mapping of soil apparent in respect to electrical conductivity (ECa has been developed to identify areas of contrasting soil properties. Such ECa values are represent measures of soil properties. The sensor system, GF Instrument model CMD-4 were used to analyze soil physical properties. This system consists of three important parts, ECa sensor, data logger and Global Positioning System (DGPS receiver. This research was aimed to evaluate the relationships between ECa and soil properties as well as the yield of rice (paddy in paddy’s farming fields. One study site was chosen. The sensor was pulled through a plotted area of 0.25 km2. The distribution map of ECa was developed to identify the contrast of ECa. More than 100 ECa of data points were collected in 3-hour for the large plot. The data was later transferred to a notebook computer for generation of ECa maps using Surfer 11 software. According to the data analyses, field and ECa showed positive correlation. The average values of ECa are significantly different between hilly area and drainage canal area signifying differences in soil structure. Soil ECa could provide a measure of the spatial differences associated with soil physical and chemical properties, which for paddy soil may be a measure of soil suitability for crop growth and its productivity. This sensor can measure the soil ECa through the field quickly for detailed features of the soil and can be operated by just one worker. The ECa map provides some ideas for future soil management

  14. Sample size choices for XRCT scanning of highly unsaturated soil mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly unsaturated soil mixtures (clay, sand and gravel are used as building materials in many parts of the world, and there is increasing interest in understanding their mechanical and hydraulic behaviour. In the laboratory, x-ray computed tomography (XRCT is becoming more widely used to investigate the microstructures of soils, however a crucial issue for such investigations is the choice of sample size, especially concerning the scanning of soil mixtures where there will be a range of particle and void sizes. In this paper we present a discussion (centred around a new set of XRCT scans on sample sizing for scanning of samples comprising soil mixtures, where a balance has to be made between realistic representation of the soil components and the desire for high resolution scanning, We also comment on the appropriateness of differing sample sizes in comparison to sample sizes used for other geotechnical testing. Void size distributions for the samples are presented and from these some hypotheses are made as to the roles of inter- and intra-aggregate voids in the mechanical behaviour of highly unsaturated soils.

  15. Soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization under different tillage systems and Permanent Groundcover cultivation between Orange trees Mineralização do carbono e nitrogênio sob diferentes preparos de solo e coberturas permanentes intercalares em pomar de laranjeira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the alterations in carbon and nitrogen mineralization due to different soil tillage systems and groundcover species for intercropped orange trees. The experiment was established in an Ultisol soil (Typic Paleudults originated from Caiuá sandstone in northwestern of the state of Paraná, Brazil, in an area previously cultivated with pasture (Brachiaria humidicola. Two soil tillage systems were evaluated: conventional tillage (CT in the entire area and strip tillage (ST with a 2-m width, each with different groundcover vegetation management systems. The citrus cultivar utilized was the 'Pera' orange (Citrus sinensis grafted onto a 'Rangpur' lime rootstock. The soil samples were collected at a 0-15-cm depth after five years of experiment development. Samples were collected from under the tree canopy and from the inter-row space after the following treatments: (1 CT and annual cover crop with the leguminous Calopogonium mucunoides; (2 CT and perennial cover crop with the leguminous peanut Arachis pintoi; (3 CT and evergreen cover crop with Bahiagrass Paspalum notatum; (4 CT and cover crop with spontaneous B. humidicola grass vegetation; and (5 ST and maintenance of the remaining grass (pasture of B. humidicola. The soil tillage systems and different groundcover vegetation influenced the C and N mineralization, both under the tree canopy and in the inter-row space. The cultivation of B. humidicola under strip tillage provided higher potential mineralization than the other treatments in the inter-row space. Strip tillage increased the C and N mineralization compared to conventional tillage. The grass cultivation increased the C and N mineralization when compared to the others treatments cultivated in the inter-row space.No presente trabalho, foi avaliada a mineralização do Carbono e Nitrogênio devido ao cultivo intercalar de diferentes coberturas permanentes em pomar de laranjeira. O experimento foi

  16. Biodegradation of glyphosate in rhizospheric soil cultivated with Glycine max, Canavalia ensiformis e Stizolobium aterrimum Biodegradação de glyphosate em solo rizosférico de Glycine max, Canavalia ensiformis e Stizolobium aterrimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of glyphosate was evaluated in rhizospheric soil cultivated with Glycine max (soybean, var. BRS245-RR, Canavalia ensiformis and Stizolobium aterrimum. After these species were cultivated for 60 days, soil samples were collected, placed in flasks and treated with 14C-glyphosate. After 30 days of incubation, the total release rate of C-CO2 was determined along with microbial biomass (MBC, metabolic quotient (qCO2, and degradation percentage of the radio-labeled glyphosate released as 14C-CO2. A higher mass of rhizosphere-associated microorganisms was verified in the soil samples from pots cultivated with soybean, regardless of glyphosate addition. However, in the presence of the herbicide, this characteristic was the most negatively affected. Microorganisms from the C. ensiformis rhizosphere released a lower amount of 14C-CO2, while for those originated from S. aterrimum, the amount released reached 1.3% more than the total carbon derived from the respiratory activity. The rhizospheric soil from S. aterrimum also presented higher glyphosate degradation efficiency per microbial biomass unit. However, considering qCO2, the microbiota of the rhizospheric soil cultivated with soybean was more efficient in herbicide degradation.Avaliou-se neste trabalho a degradação de glyphosate em solo rizosférico proveniente do cultivo de Glycine max (soja var. BRS245-RR, Canavalia ensiformis e Stizolobium aterrimum. Para isso, após o cultivo, em vasos, das citadas espécies por 60 dias, coletaram-se amostras de solo, as quais foram acondicionadas em frascos e tratadas com 14C-glyphosate. Após 32 dias de incubação, foram determinados a taxa de desprendimento total de C-CO2, a biomassa microbiana (MBC, o quociente metabólico (qCO2 e a porcentagem de degradação do glyphosate radiomarcado liberado na forma de 14C-CO2. Verificou-se a maior massa de microrganismos associados à rizosfera em amostras de solo proveniente de vasos cultivados com a

  17. Cadmium biosorption by free and immobilised microorganisms cultivated in a liquid soil extract medium: effects of Cd, pH and techniques of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeau, T; Bagot, D; Jézéquel, K; Fabre, B

    2002-05-27

    Instead of soil clean-up, a process not very technically and economically suited to agricultural soil contaminated by heavy metals (with a low concentration of heavy metals but highly or potentially highly contaminated surfaces), the control of the transfer of cadmium from the soil to the crops may well be a convenient method. We tested the bacterium ZAN-044, the actinomycete R27 and a basidiomycete Fomitopsis pinicola isolated for their ability to biosorb Cd, in order to inoculate agricultural soils afterwards. We then compared the cadmium biosorption by viable microbial cells which were free or immobilised in alginate beads and incubated in a soil extract liquid medium at various pH values (5, 6 and 7) and cadmium concentrations (1 and 10 mg/l). The Cd concentration in the medium had the most important effect on the percentage of Cd biosorbed by the microorganisms, but the culture mode (free or immobilised cells) was not a side effect. In the case of F. pinicola and the actinomycete R27, the percentage of Cd biosorbed by free cells did not decrease when the Cd concentration in the medium increased (6-42% at the lowest Cd concentration to 11-48% at 10 mg Cd/l). On the other hand, with a low Cd concentration (1 mg Cd/l), the percentage of Cd biosorbed by the bacterium ZAN-044 was maximum (69%) at pH 7, while this bacterium did not grow at 10 mg Cd/l and it did not accumulate Cd. For the three micro-organisms tested, relatively low specific biosorptions of Cd were observed, when the microorganisms were cultivated with a soil extract medium ('poor' medium), comparatively to those with a 'rich' medium. Finally, the choice of microorganism for the inoculation of contaminated soils depends on the cadmium level in the medium and on the distribution of the metal between the biomass and the medium.

  18. Biodegradation of s-triazine herbicide atrazine by Enterobacter cloacae and Burkholderia cepacia sp. from long-term treated sugarcane-cultivated soils in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngigi, Anastasiah N; Getenga, Zachary M; Boga, Hamadi I; Ndalut, Paul K

    2012-09-01

    In this study soils from sugarc