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Sample records for culpepper nashville abingdon

  1. 78 FR 9988 - Noise Exposure Map Notice Nashville Interntional Airport, Nashville, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice Nashville Interntional Airport, Nashville, TN... Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted by Metropolitan Nashville.... DATES: Effective Date: The effective date of the FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is...

  2. Test of slope and intercept bias in college admissions: a response to Aguinis, Culpepper, and Pierce (2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista D; Patterson, Brian F

    2013-01-01

    Research on the predictive bias of cognitive tests has generally shown (a) no slope effects and (b) small intercept effects, typically favoring the minority group. Aguinis, Culpepper, and Pierce (2010) simulated data and demonstrated that statistical artifacts may have led to a lack of power to detect slope differences and an overestimate of the size of the intercept effect. In response to Aguinis et al.'s (2010) call for a revival of predictive bias research, we used data on over 475,000 students entering college between 2006 and 2008 to estimate slope and intercept differences in the college admissions context. Corrections for statistical artifacts were applied. Furthermore, plotting of regression lines supplemented traditional analyses of predictive bias to offer additional evidence of the form and extent to which predictive bias exists. Congruent with previous research on bias of cognitive tests, using SAT scores in conjunction with high school grade-point average to predict first-year grade-point average revealed minimal differential prediction (ΔR²intercept ranged from .004 to .032 and ΔR²slope ranged from .001 to .013 depending on the corrections applied and comparison groups examined). We found, on the basis of regression plots, that college grades were consistently overpredicted for Black and Hispanic students and underpredicted for female students. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. 76 FR 14855 - Television Broadcasting Services; Nashville, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... NewsChannel 5 Network, LLC, the licensee of station WTVF(TV), channel 5, Nashville, Tennessee... (computer diskettes, large print, audio recording, and Braille), send an e-mail to [email protected] or call... subject to Commission consideration or court review, all ex parte contacts (other than ex parte...

  4. Assessing Effectiveness of Students Taking a Right Stand (STARS) Nashville Student Assistance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanu, Mohamed; Hepler, Nancy; Labi, Halima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since 1984, Students Taking a Right Stand (STARS) Nashville has implemented Student Assistance Programs (SAPs) in the middle Tennessee area, to include 14 counties and 16 school districts. STARS Nashville serves K-12 with a focus in middle and high schools. Methods: The current study reviewed studies that utilized quasi-experimental…

  5. the function of “weeping and gnashing of teeth” in matthew's gospel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -642. riesner, r. 2004. Jesus as Preacher and Teacher. In: H. Wansborough (ed.), Jesus and the. Oral Gospel Tradition (London: T & T Clark), pp. 185-210. senior, D. 1998. Matthew. Abingdon New Testament Commentary. Nashville: Abingdon.

  6. 76 FR 39379 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 78; Nashville, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 78; Nashville, TN Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign-Trade... and Davidson County, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 78, submitted an application to the Board for...

  7. 75 FR 69398 - Foreign-Trade Zone 78-Nashville, TN; Application for Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 78--Nashville, TN; Application for Expansion An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by the Metropolitan Government of... provisions of the Foreign- Trade Zones Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), and the regulations of the Board...

  8. 78 FR 27029 - Modification of Class C Airspace; Nashville International Airport; TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Airport; TN AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies the Nashville International Airport, TN, Class C airspace area by removing a cutout from the surface area that was put in place to accommodate operations at an airport that is now permanently closed...

  9. How Busing Burdened Blacks: Critical Race Theory and Busing for Desegregation in Nashville-Davidson County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses critical race theory, court opinions, newspapers, and interviews to explain how the burden of busing for desegregation was placed upon Blacks in Nashville, Tennessee and why the agenda of the litigants in the Kelley v. Metropolitan Board of Education cases shifted over time. The deliberate pace of the initial desegregation…

  10. Use of the Delphi method for determining community growth goals inventory: the Nashville experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwa K. Varma

    1977-01-01

    The author discusses the growth-inducing pressures on Nashville, Tennessee, describes the application of the Delphi technique to develop an inventory of the community's growth goals, and suggests that the development of a list of community goals is a necessary first step toward growth management.

  11. Breaking the Cycle of Inequitable School Discipline through Community and Civic Collaboration in Nashville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majors, Tony; Ward, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Tom Ward and Tony Majors, community and district lead partners in Nashville, Tennessee, talk about what the Positive and Safe Schools Advancing Greater Equity (PASSAGE) initiative has meant in their city. They share how and why their journey began by embedding the work to end discipline disparities across a broad, cross-sector table that includes…

  12. Integrating Health and Transportation in Nashville, Tennessee, USA: From Policy to Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Leslie A; Whitfield, Geoffrey P

    2017-03-01

    The Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) is among the first MPOs in the United States to recognize the interplay of transportation and public health, particularly regarding physical activity, air pollution, and traffic crashes. The Nashville MPO has taken a multifaceted approach to simultaneously improve the transportation system, quality of life, and health status of the region's population. The purpose of this paper is to describe the multiple programs and projects that the MPO has undertaken to this end, so that other cities might learn from Nashville's example. The MPO's strategy comprised six processes. First, the MPO conducted the Regional Bicycle and Pedestrian Study in 2009 and 2014 that established priority issues to be addressed by bicycle and pedestrian projects in Regional Transportation Plans. Second, the MPO responded to public opinion by adopting new transportation policies in the 2035 and 2040 Regional Transportation Plans, including increasing bicycle and pedestrian options and expanding public transit. Third, the MPO created scoring criteria for proposed roadway projects that prioritized health impacts. Fourth, the MPO reserved funding for projects selected under the new criteria and established a new funding program, the Active Transportation Program. Fifth, the MPO conducted the Middle Tennessee Transportation and Health Study, one of the first regional studies in the nation linking transportation and health. Finally, the MPO implemented the Integrated Transport and Health Impact Model which predicts and monetizes population-level health impacts of shifting the population towards active transportation modes. Recent inventories of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure suggest these interrelated processes are increasing opportunities for walking, bicycling, and public transit use in the region. Further, each of these projects has contributed to a growing appreciation in the region of the links between transportation and health

  13. Flood-inundation maps for North Fork Salt Creek at Nashville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2017-11-13

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 3.2-mile reach of North Fork Salt Creek at Nashville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science website at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding that correspond to selected water levels (stages) at the North Fork Salt Creek at Nashville, Ind., streamgage (USGS station number 03371650). Real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also shows observed USGS stages at the same site as the USGS streamgage (NWS site NFSI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current (2015) stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 03371650, North Fork Salt Creek at Nashville, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 12 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals, except for the highest profile of 22.9 ft, referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 12.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 22.9 ft, which is the highest stage of the current (2015) USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 1.9 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging data having a 0.98-ft vertical accuracy and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage.The availability of these maps, along with information regarding current stage from the USGS

  14. Effects of Rumination on Child and Adolescent Depressive Reactions to a Natural Disaster: the 2010 Nashville Flood

    OpenAIRE

    Felton, Julia W; Cole, David A.; Martin, Nina C.

    2012-01-01

    The current longitudinal study tested hypotheses about Nolen-Hoeksema’s (1987, 1991) response styles theory (RST) of depression in a sample of child and adolescent public school students. Wave 1 measures of rumination, distraction, and depression were obtained 6 months prior to the 2010 Nashville flood. Similar measures plus a measure of flood-related stressors were administered at Wave 2, approximately ten days after students returned to school after the flood. Results revealed an indirect e...

  15. Narrating the Racialization of Space in Austin, Texas and Nashville, Tennessee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Norkunas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Narrating the Racialization of Space in Austin, Texas and Nashville, Tennessee People of color in the United States have been obligated to move through public space in particular ways, dictated by law and social custom. Narrators create cognitive maps of movement in the city shaped by racial codes of behavior. The maps change over time as law and social custom changes. The fluidity of the maps is also influenced by status, gender, class, and skin tone. This paper examines a rich body of oral narratives co-created with African Americans from 2004 to 2014 focusing on how men and women narrate their concepts of racialized space. It moves from narratives about the larger landscape — the city — to smaller, more personal public places — the sidewalk and the store — to intimate sites of contact in the public sphere. Many of the narratives describe complex flows of controlled movement dictated by racial boundaries in the context of capitalism. The narratives form an urban ethnography of the power relations inscribed on the landscape by racializing movement in space.   Narracje o urasowieniu przestrzeni w Austin (Teksas i Nashville (Tennessee Nie-Biali w Stanach Zjednoczonych byli zmuszeni do poruszania się w przestrzeni publicznej w szczególny sposób, określony przez prawo i zwyczaj społeczny. W swoich narracjach badani tworzą mapy kognitywne ruchu w mieście, kształtowane przez rasowe kody zachowania. Mapy te zmieniały się w czasie pod wpływem zmian prawnych i zwyczajowych. Na płynność tych map wpływały także status, płeć, klasa i odcień koloru skóry. W artykule przeanalizowano bogaty zbiór relacji ustnych tak zwanych Afroamerykanów, zbieranych w latach 2004-2014; uwaga skupia się na tym, jak mężczyźni i kobiety opowiadają o swoim widzeniu przestrzeni urasowionej. Omówiono narracje o szerszej przestrzeni miasta, jak i węższej, skoncentrowanej na bardziej osobistych miejscach publicznych, takich jak sklep. Wiele

  16. Rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data for five small watersheds, Nashville, Tennessee, 1990-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outlaw, George S.; Hoos, Anne B.; Pankey, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data were collected furing storm conditions at five urban watersheds in Nashville, Tennessee. These data can be used to build a database for developing predictive models of the relations between storm- water quality and land use, storm characteristics, and seasonal variations. The primary land and mix of land uses was different for each watershed. Stormwater samples were collected during three storms at each watershed and analyzed for selected volatile, acidic and base/neutral organic compounds; organic pesticides; trace metals; conventional pollutants; and several physical properties. Storm loads were computed for all constituents and properties with event mean concentration above the minimum reporting level. None of the samples con- tained acidic organic compounds at concentrations above the minimum reporting levels. Several constituents in each of the other categories, however, were present at concentrations above the minimum reporting level. For 21 of these constituents, water-quality criteria have been pro- mulgated by the State of Tennessee. For only 8 of the 21 did the value exceed the most restrictive of the criteria: pyrene, dieldrin, and mercury concen- trations and counts of fecal coliform exceeded the criteria for recreational use, copper and zinc concentrations and pH value exceeded the criteria for fish and aquatic life, and lead concentrations exceeded the criteria for domestic supply.

  17. Predictors of Youths' Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Following a Natural Disaster: The 2010 Nashville, Tennessee, Flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nina C; Felton, Julia W; Cole, David A

    2016-01-01

    Framed by a previously established conceptual model of youths' posttraumatic stress (PTS) responses following a disaster, the current longitudinal study examined the relation of predisaster child characteristics (age, gender, depressive symptoms, ruminative coping), predisaster environmental characteristics (negative life events and supportive and negative friendship interactions), and level of disaster exposure to youths' PTS symptoms in the wake of a natural disaster. Prior to the 2010 Nashville, Tennessee, flood, 239 predominantly Caucasian youth from four elementary and middle schools (ages = 10-15, 56% girls) completed measures of depressive symptoms, rumination, negative life events, and social support in the form of both supportive and negative friendship interactions. Approximately 10 days after returning to school, 125 completed measures of disaster exposure and postflood PTS symptoms. Bivariate correlations revealed that disaster-related PTS symptoms were unrelated to age, gender, or predisaster supportive friendship interactions and significantly positively related to level of disaster exposure and predisaster levels of negative life events, depressive symptoms, rumination, and negative friendship interactions. After controlling for level of disaster exposure and other predisaster child and environmental characteristics, depressive symptoms and negative friendship interactions predicted postdisaster PTS symptoms. The effect of child's flood-related experiences on PTS symptoms was not moderated by any of the preexisting child characteristics or environmental indicators. Faced with limited resources after a natural disaster, school counselors and other health professionals should focus special attention on youths who experienced high levels of disaster-related losses and whose predisaster emotional and interpersonal lives were problematic.

  18. Impacts of cool cities on air quality: A preliminary modeling assessment for Nashville TN, Dallas TX and Atlanta GA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, Haider

    1998-06-15

    Previous atmospheric modeling efforts that concentrated on the Los Angeles Basin suggested beneficial and significant air quality impacts from cool cities strategies. This paper discusses an extension of similar modeling efforts to three regions, Atlanta GA, Dallas - Ft. Worth TX, and Nashville TN, that experience smog and air quality problems. According to the older ozone air quality standard (120 ppb), these regions were classified as serious, moderate, and marginal, respectively, but may be out of compliance with respect to the newer, 80-ppb/8-hours standard. Results from this exploratory modeling work suggest a range of possible impacts on meteorological and air quality conditions. For example, peak ozone concentrations during each region's respective episode could be decreased by 1-6 ppb (conservative and optimistic scenarios, respectively) in Nashville, 5-15 ppb in Dallas - Fort Worth, and 5-12 ppb in Atlanta following implementation of cool cities. The reductions are generally smaller than those obtained from simulating the Los Angeles Basin but are still significant. In all regions, the simulations suggest, the net, domain-wide effects of cool cities are reductions in ozone mass and improvements in air quality. In Atlanta, Nashville, and Dallas, urban areas benefiting from reduced smog reach up to 8460, 7350, and 12870 km{sup 2} in area, respectively. Results presented in this paper should be taken as exploratory and preliminary. These will most likely change during a more comprehensive modeling study to be started soon with the support of the US Environmental Protection Agency. The main purpose of the present project was to obtain the initial data (emission inventories) for these regions, simulate meteorological conditions, and perform preliminary sensitivity analysis. In the future, additional regions will be simulated to assess the potential of cool cities in improving urban air quality.

  19. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Nashville quadrangle, Tennessee, and Kentucky. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The Nashville quadrangle covers a portion of the interior lowland plateau region of the Midwestern Physiographic Province. The quadrangle contains a shallow to moderately thick Paleozoic section that overlies a Precambrian basement complex. Paleozoic carbonates dominate surficial exposures. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. Fifty-five uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. Most anomalies appear to relate to cultural features. Some have relatively high uranium concentration levels that may be significant despite their correlation with culture. Magnetic data appear to illustrate complexities in the Precambrian basement.

  20. Effects of rumination on child and adolescent depressive reactions to a natural disaster: the 2010 Nashville flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Julia W; Cole, David A; Martin, Nina C

    2013-02-01

    The current longitudinal study tested hypotheses about Nolen-Hoeksema's (1987, 1991) response styles theory (RST) of depression in a sample of child and adolescent public school students. Wave 1 measures of rumination, distraction, and depression were obtained 6 months prior to the 2010 Nashville flood. Similar measures plus a measure of flood-related stressors were administered at Wave 2, approximately ten days after students returned to school after the flood. Results revealed an indirect effect of preflood rumination on postflood depressive symptoms via the intervening variable of postflood rumination, and partial mediation of the effect of preflood depression on postflood depression. Further, the interaction of rumination with flood-related stressors was moderated by age, suggesting that rumination may not become a strong cognitive diathesis for depression until adolescence. Developmental implications emerged for the treatment of child and adolescent victims of natural disasters and for the application of RST to children and adolescents. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  1. Development of a community-sensitive strategy to increase availability of fresh fruits and vegetables in Nashville's urban food deserts, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Celia; Haushalter, Alisa; Buck, Tracy; Campbell, David; Henderson, Trevor; Schlundt, David

    2013-07-25

    Food deserts, areas that lack full-service grocery stores, may contribute to rising rates of obesity and chronic diseases among low-income and racial/ethnic minority residents. Our corner store project, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Communities Putting Prevention to Work initiative, aimed to increase availability of healthful foods in food deserts in Nashville, Tennessee. We identified 4 food deserts in which most residents are low-income and racially and ethnically diverse. Our objectives were to develop an approach to increase availability of fresh fruits and vegetables, low-fat or nonfat milk, and 100% whole-wheat bread in Nashville's food deserts and to engage community members to inform our strategy. Five corner stores located in food deserts met inclusion criteria for our intervention. We then conducted community listening sessions, proprietor surveys, store audits, and customer-intercept surveys to identify needs, challenges to retailing the products, and potential intervention strategies. Few stores offered fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, low-fat or nonfat milk, or 100% whole-wheat bread, and none stocked items from all 4 categories. Major barriers to retailing healthful options identified by community members are mistrust of store owners, history of poor-quality produce, and limited familiarity with healthful options. Store owners identified neighborhood crime as the major barrier. We used community input to develop strategies. Engaging community residents and understanding neighborhood context is critical to developing strategies that increase access to healthful foods in corner stores.

  2. Well-done meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposures in relation to breast cancer risk: the Nashville Breast Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhenming; Deming, Sandra L.; Fair, Alecia M.; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Wujcik, Debra M.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kelley, Mark; Zheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the association of meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposure with breast cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We evaluated this association in a population-based case-control study of incident breast cancer conducted in Nashville, United States, including 2,386 breast cancer cases and 1,703 healthy women controls. Telephone interviews were conducted to obtain information related to meat intake including amount, cooking methods, and doneness levels, as well as other known or hypothesized risk factors for breast cancer. Unconditional logistic regression was used to derive odds ratios (ORs) after adjusting for potential confounders. High intake of red meat was associated with a significantly elevated risk of breast cancer (P-trend meat (P-trend meat and breast cancer risk were slightly stronger for postmenopausal women than for premenopausal women. Meat-derived mutagens such as 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, were significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women only (P-trend = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively). The results from this study provide strong support for the hypotheses that high red meat intake and meat-derived mutagen exposure may be associated with an increase in breast cancer risk. PMID:21537933

  3. BOOK REVIEW - Sieglinde Gstöhl and Simon Schunz (eds., Theorizing the European Neighbourhood Policy, Abingdon: Routledge, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian NITOIU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception at the beginning of the 2000s, the approach of the European Union (EU towards its neighbourhood has been afforded significant attention by the academic literature. Many research projects and studies have presented significant empirical insights regarding the way the EU has developed its approach towards its southern and eastern neighbourhoods (Theuns 2017; Ademmer, Delcour, and Wolczuk 2016; Nilsson and Silander 2016; Edwards 2008; Bechev and Nicolaïdis 2010; Beauguitte, Richard, and Guérin-Pace 2015. At the same time, the success and effectiveness of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP has been debated and reviewed by official institutions, think tanks or scholars, with the EU almost always lagging behind its ambitious goals and commitments (Schumacher 2015.

  4. 76 FR 33656 - Television Broadcasting Services; Nashville, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ...-transition digital channel 56 to its post-transition digital channel 5, thousands of calls were received from viewers that could no longer view the station's digital signal. DATES: This rule is effective July 11... Docket No. 11-29, adopted May 23, 2011, and released May 25, 2011. The full text of this document is...

  5. Case Study: Nashville. Needle-Moving Community Collaboratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Willa; Jolin, Michele; Schmitz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Communities face powerful challenges that require powerful solutions: a high-school dropout epidemic, youth unemployment, teen pregnancy. In an era of limited resources, those solutions must help communities to achieve more with less. A new kind of community collaborative--an approach that aspires to significant community-wide progress by…

  6. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Current Challenges in Liquid and Glass Science, (The Cosener's House, Abingdon 10-12 January 2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Alex C; Salmon, Philip S; Soper, Alan K

    2007-10-17

    The workshop was held to discuss current experimental and theoretical challenges in liquid and glass science and to honour the contribution made by Spencer Howells (ISIS, UK) to the field of neutron scattering from liquids and glasses. The meeting was attended by 70 experimentalists, theorists and computer simulators from Europe, Japan and North America and comprised 34 oral presentations together with two lively poster sessions. Three major themes were discussed, namely (i) the glass transition and properties of liquids and glasses under extreme conditions; (ii) the complementarity of neutron and x-ray scattering techniques with other experimental methods; and (iii) the modelling of liquid and glass structure. These themes served to highlight (a) recent advances in neutron and x-ray instrumentation used to investigate liquid and glassy materials under extreme conditions; (b) the relationship between the results obtained from different experimental and theoretical/computational methods; and (c) the modern methods used to interpret experimental results. The presentations ranged from polyamorphism in liquids and glasses to protein folding in aqueous solution and included the dynamics of fresh and freeze-dried strawberries and red onions. The properties of liquid phosphorus were also memorably demonstrated! The formal highlight was the 'Spencerfest' dinner where Neil Cowlam (Sheffield, UK) gave an excellent after dinner speech. The organisation of the workshop benefited tremendously from the secretarial skills of Carole Denning (ISIS, UK). The financial support of the Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils (CCLRC), the Liquids and Complex Fluids Group of the Institute of Physics, The ISIS Disordered Materials Group, the CCLRC Centre for Materials Physics and Chemistry and the CCLRC Centre for Molecular Structure and Dynamics is gratefully acknowledged. Finally, it is a pleasure to thank all the workshop participants whose lively contributions led to the success of the meeting. The present special issue stems from the interest of many of those present to collect their work into a single volume. [Formula: see text] The workshop participants. Spencer Howells is in the centre of the front row. DEDICATION William Spencer Howells It is a great pleasure to dedicate this Special Issue on Current Challenges in Liquid and Glass Science to the many contributions Spencer Howells has made to the structure and dynamics of liquids and glasses over some 40 years of work with the neutron scattering technique. After completing a first degree in Physics at Cambridge in 1966, Spencer started a postgraduate program with Gordon Squires at Cambridge, exploiting the early neutron scattering instrumentation that was available in those days at the Harwell reactors. This resulted in a Ph D thesis in 1970 on the twin topics of 'Neutron scattering of phonons in single-crystal molybdenum, using a time-of-flight chopper spectrometer (Part I)' and 'Neutron studies of the metal-insulator transition (Part II)'. The thesis was split into two parts because the hydrogen moderator blew-up on the chopper instrument used for the first part! From Cambridge, he moved to Leicester University as a post-doctoral Fellow with John Enderby, who was setting up a programme of study on the liquid state of matter. Here Spencer continued to use the Harwell Dido reactor, now to measure the structure of liquid metal alloys and molten salts - a topic that has kept his interest right through into retirement. He also initiated the first structural studies of aqueous solutions using neutron scattering, eventually pursuing this work as one of the first UK users of the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France (ILL). In 1973 Spencer moved to the ILL, which was then and has remained the world's leading steady-state neutron source, as instrument scientist on IN10, the quasi-elastic neutron scattering beam line. Here he led the field in developing the quasi-elastic technique and new quasi-elastic scattering experiments were begun on the dynamics of aqueous solutions. At the same time he was local contact for most of the UK users of the liquids diffractometer D4, often providing excellent hospitality to hungry and thirsty Ph D students, in addition to his scientific support! After the ILL he moved, in 1978, to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), later called ISIS, where he was responsible for building the Liquids and Amorphous Diffractometer, LAD. This was a tricky undertaking as there were no neutrons at the SNS until 1984, so initial testing of LAD was done on the Harwell Linac. He also worked on the design and specification of the SNS moderators and collimation, and his design for the neutron collimator is still in use at ISIS today. The initial design and build of the Small Angle Neutron Diffractometer for Amorphous and Liquid Samples (SANDALS) was undertaken in this period, and Spencer had a major impact on the development of the ATLAS software used to analyse diffraction data from disordered materials. He was also involved in the design of IRIS, the first quasi-elastic spectrometer at ISIS. As more people joined in liquids and amorphous materials research at ISIS, Spencer was able to diversify, and he took an increasing interest in the application of IRIS to liquid materials. Here he brought his expertise in data analysis from the ILL and LAD and applied it to the time-of-flight quasi-elastic technique. The suite of data analysis programs that evolved, called IDA, was enlarged to encompass quasi-elastic neutron scattering data taken on a number of ISIS and non-ISIS instruments, including OSIRIS, HET, and MARI (at ISIS), IN5, IN6, IN10, IN13 and IN16 (at ILL) and NEAT (at HMI, Berlin). At the same time, Spencer's penchant for working on computers meant he took an increasingly important role in setting up and running the ISIS user database and proposal system, which continued for many years until his retirement in 2004. He also became full-time instrument scientist on IRIS and even after retirement he continues to work on developing data analysis software for this instrument. In the course of his career Spencer Howells has so far produced more than 200 scientific publications, covering a broad spectrum of topics. Recent examples include 'Dynamics of fresh and freeze-dried strawberry and red onion: quasielastic neutron scattering.' and 'The structure and dynamics of 2-dimensional fluids in swelling clays', to illustrate some of the range of his science. This work has gone hand in hand with comprehensive support for users at the ILL, ISIS and elsewhere, and he has been a consultant at foreign institutions such as the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois. Arriving as he did at a time when large-scale central user facilities were first becoming established, Spencer has played a significant role in shaping the way these facilities operate and produce science. The Current Challenges Workshop was a fitting tribute to his work in disordered materials science and demonstrates how vibrant the field has become as a result.

  7. All Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place, and Contractor, FY 84. Part 13 (Abingdon, Virginia - F. E. Warren AFB, Wyoming).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    ViNO 00 0 1 - -0 00 - OOON cu -Oi M. 0 V.0-N O - - ) 0 0- 0) 0- N 0 0- - CO 0 ) N WN 0(NNN NY N NY C M C-C tC rN N NN( r l tCYC l IC) N. 0 C- V 0 -i...cl0 V. - - C00 00 0 (1 0 -D - O OO - D 00 to0 C VINO ON NNNN 0000 0- ONi Nto~ oO~~ C CM O)NYC C YWcl YWN l .0o V0N 0 0-- 000- 0 0 0 -00000 0 0- 0 MC). N

  8. Omicron Tau Theta Annual Professional Studies Seminar Proceedings (1st, Nashville, Tennessee, December 3, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, David G., Ed.; Kirby, Barbara M., Ed.

    This proceedings includes the following papers: "The 'Thoughtful' Health Practitioner: A Study of a Theoretical Basis for Critical Inquiry Regarding Liberal Arts in Health Professions Curricula" (Mary Jo Belenski); "Secondary School Vocational Program Performance Standards and Measures: Virginia's System of Locally Directed…

  9. Future directions in studies of nuclei far from stability. [Nashville, Tennessee, Sept. 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.H.; Spejewski, E.H.; Bingham, C.R.; Zganjar, E.F. (eds.)

    1980-01-01

    Individual abstracts were prepared for 27 of the papers in this volume. The remaining ten have already been cited in ERA; these papers can be located by reference to the entry CONF-790976-- in the report number index. (RWR)

  10. Operational Risk Preparedness: General George H. Thomas and the Franklin-Nashville Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    Brigadier General Ector Brigadier General Sears Brigadier General Cockrell Major General Edward C. Walthall Brigadier General Quarles Brigadier General...Millett, Alan R., Peter Maslowski, and Willaim B. Feis. For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States from 1607 to 2012. New York: Free

  11. ‘The current state of research on Dutch Golden Age painting’: The Ashgate Research Companion to Dutch Art of the Seventeenth Century edited by Wayne Franits, Abingdon, Oxon and New York: Routledge, 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Sakai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This review examines Wayne Franits’ edited volume, The Ashgate Research Companion to Dutch Seventeenth-Century Art. The collection of nineteen essays is organized into sections addressing genres, major artists (Frans Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, art movements, media other than painting, and areas of further research. The essays summarize the major developments in research produced in the last thirty to thirty-five years on their respective topics. This volume is an invaluable resource for scholars of Dutch seventeenth-century art; however, the structure of the book reinscribes some of the stereotypes and methodological problems directly addressed by many of the authors as needing to be done away with, or in some cases, already firmly consigned to the past. This review provides summaries of the main findings of each essay, while also addressing some of the broader themes that characterize these essays.

  12. 78 FR 54569 - Special Local Regulation, Cumberland River, Mile 190.0 to 192.0; Nashville, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... beginning at mile marker 190.0 and ending at mile marker 192.0, extending bank to bank. This zone is... ground floor of the Department of Transportation West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington... Cumberland River from mile marker 190.0 to 192.0. The Coast Guard determined that a temporary special local...

  13. Engineers on the Twin Rivers: A History of the Nashville District Corps of Engineers United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    the soldiers met four canoes carry- ing forty Ind ians and had what seemed a peaceful powwow, but as Major Dough - ty ’s party pushed off from the...one of its most grateful and acceptable members, and a widowed mother of the stay and solace of her declining years." Lieutenant Heintzelman , who

  14. Proceedings of Annual Meeting, Natural Resources Research Program (16th) Held in Nashville, Tennessee on April 16-17, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    field studies. And it provided some thoughts on how this work unit will operate after Kerlinger , Fred N. 1973. "Foundations of Be- it is complete, so...conditions where the field studies and the instruction report should be treatment varies ( Kerlinger 1973, P 381). With provided to project offices for

  15. The Visible Signature Modelling and Evaluation ToolBox

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Science in Particle Physics in 2001. Fol- lowing her Masters she undertook a Summer Scholarship at the Swinburne University in the area of AstroParticle ...Culpepper Maritime Platforms Division Joanne Culpepper graduated from Monash University with a B.AppSci. in Physics in 2000. She joined the...Experimental Particle Physics Group at the University of Melbourne in 2000. After completing a Post Graduate Diploma in Physics she com- menced a Master of

  16. Semantics of Statebuilding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasten, Maj Lervad

    2016-01-01

    Book review of: Semantics of Statebuilding: Language, Meanings & Sovereignty / (eds) Nicolas Lemay-Hébert, Nicholas Onuf, Vojin Rakić, Petar Bojanić. Abingdon: Routledge, 2014. 200 pp.......Book review of: Semantics of Statebuilding: Language, Meanings & Sovereignty / (eds) Nicolas Lemay-Hébert, Nicholas Onuf, Vojin Rakić, Petar Bojanić. Abingdon: Routledge, 2014. 200 pp....

  17. ADDRESSES ADAPTED FROM THE 24TH ANNUAL INSTITUTE OF RACE RELATIONS (FISK UNIVERSITY, AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER AND RACE RELATIONS DEPARTMENT, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHERRY, P.H., ED.

    THIS JOURNAL CONTAINS SPEECHES ON RACE RELATIONS AND THE NEGRO'S STRUGGLE FOR POLITICAL POWER. WHITNEY YOUNG DISCUSSES "THE SEARCH FOR LIBERALS" WHO WILL NOT BACK DOWN WHEN CONFRONTED BY ANGRY NEGRO DEMANDS FOR INDEPENDENCE AND EQUALITY. BAYARD RUSTIN ANALYZES TRENDS IN THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT AND CONCLUDES THAT THE MOVEMENT'S CURRENT…

  18. De Berlim a Brusque, de São Paulo a Nashville: a sociologia de Emílio Willems entre fronteiras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Villas Bôas

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available O artigo examina a repercussão da vivência de Emílio Willems, como imigrante, na perspectiva conceitual e temática que imprimiu ao seu trabalho intelectual. A marginalidade peculiar aos que transitam entre credos, culturas e valores distintos foi a experiência humana que norteou o pesquisador de origem alemã, para quem mudança cultural, conflito de valores e racionalização de ambigüidades tornaram-se assuntos privilegiados. Distante da nostalgia do outro e do longínquo, comum aos visitantes estrangeiros, a obra de Willems deixa ecoar a aventura improvisada de sua saída de Berlim e chegada ao Brasil em 1931.This paper examines the repercussion of Emilio Willems' life as an immigrant on the conceptual and thematic perspective given to his intellectual work. Being an outsider, a feature inherent to those who move between different creeds, cultures and values, was the human experience that directed this researcher of German origin. He focused on cultural change, conflict of values and the rationalization of ambiguities. Differently from the work of other foreign visitors, Willems' does not present a nostalgia for the `other' or for the `one far away', and it echoes the improvised character of the adventure of his journey from Berlin to Brazil in 1931.

  19. Network Theory and Religious Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collar, Anna

    Collar, A. C. F. ‘Network Theory and Religious Innovation’. In Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean, edited by I. Malkin, C. Constantakopoulou, K. Panagopoulou, 144-157. Abingdon: Routledge......Collar, A. C. F. ‘Network Theory and Religious Innovation’. In Greek and Roman Networks in the Mediterranean, edited by I. Malkin, C. Constantakopoulou, K. Panagopoulou, 144-157. Abingdon: Routledge...

  20. Influence of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus) density and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-26

    Dec 26, 2011 ... soybean and snap beans (Knezevic et al., 1999; Aguyoh and Masiunas, 2003; Bensch et al., 2003; Culpepper et al., 2006). However, information related to the density dependent effects of redroot pigweed on peanut yield losses are lack. Those losses would be even more important for short plants such as ...

  1. Numerical Grid Generation. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Numerical Generation of Curvilinear Coordinate Systems and their Use in the Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations, held April 1982, Nashville, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    hyperbolic. This latter case would occur, for instance, when an inner boundary of a region is 1S @ LANK -flu- ..-K -. " " .......• .. . 7.- , . . .. . . .. 80...Joe F. Thompson, editor 859 EQUIDISTANT MESH FOR GAS DYNAMIC CALCULATIONS C. M. ABLOW SRI International Menlo Park, CA 94025 The accuracy of finite

  2. Men on the Move-Nashville: Feasibility and Acceptability of a Technology-Enhanced Physical Activity Pilot Intervention for Overweight and Obese Middle and Older Age African American Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Donnatesa A L; Griffith, Derek M; McKissic, Sydika A; Cornish, Emily K; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki

    2016-04-19

    Men on the Move-Nashvillewas a quasi-experimental, 10-week pilot physical activity intervention. A total of 40 overweight or obese African American men ages 30 to 70 (mean age = 47) enrolled in the intervention. Participants attended 8 weekly, 90-minute small group sessions with a certified personal trainer. Each session consisted of discussions aimed to educate and motivate men to be more physically active, and an exercise component aimed to increase endurance, strength, and flexibility. Throughout each week, men used wearable activity trackers to promote self-monitoring and received informational and motivational SMS text messages. Of the 40 enrolled men, 85% completed the intervention, and 80% attended four or more small group sessions. Additionally, 70% of participants successfully used the activity tracker, but only 30% of men utilized their gym memberships. Participants benefited from both the small group discussions and activities through increasing social connection and guidance from their trainer and group members. These African American men reported being motivated to engage in physical activity through each of these technologies. Men reported that the activity trackers provided an important extension to their social network of physically active people. The intervention resulted in significant increases in men's self-reported levels of light, moderate, vigorous, and sports-related physical activities, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and significant decreases in weight and body fat percentage with small, moderate and large effects shown. Including technology and didactic components in small group-based interventions holds promise in motivating African American men to increase their physical activity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Impact of Nutrition on Health and Disease in Blacks and Other Minorities. Proceedings of the Meharry Medical College Annual Nutrition Workshop (1st, Nashville, Tennessee, October 28-30, 1987). Annual Nutrition Workshop Series, Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwonwu, Cyril O., Ed.

    Participants in this workshop were scientists from various disciplines, including public health, oncology, nutrition, epidemiology, biochemistry, immunology, pharmacology, pediatrics, geriatric medicine, and the behavioral sciences. The workshop featured deliberations by medical experts on the dimensions and demographics of hunger in America. The…

  4. A Movement for Realignment in Contemporary Sculpture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, Tim

    1982-01-01

    Argues that trends toward overspecialization in arts and design education have made it difficult for sculptors and architects to collaborate in the design of public spaces. Available from Carfax Publishing Company, P.O. Box 25, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 1RW England. (AM)

  5. Corresponding author: s.trahar@bristol.ac.uk Vol.5, No.1 (2017): pp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leibowitz, B., Bozalek, V. and Kahn, P. (eds.) 2017. Theorising learning to teach in higher education. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. ISBN978-1-138-67727-2. Pbk. xxii .... Australia. One or two contributions from those from a Confucian heritage context, for example, would perhaps have led to problematising of the 3 theoretical ...

  6. Novye ateisticheskie podkhody v kognitivnoi nauke o religii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2013-01-01

    En russisk oversættelse af et kapitel i bogen Contemporary Theories of Religion: A Critical Companion, red. af Michael Stausberg (Abingdon: Routledge, 2009) på engelsk. Det russiske tidsskrift har titlen State, Religion and Church in Russia and Worldwide....

  7. Book review: Robert Leckey (ed. After Legal Equality: Family, Sex, Kinship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Drągowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Book review: Robert Leckey (ed. After Legal Equality: Family, Sex, Kinship. Abingdon: Oxon; New York, NY: Routledge, 2015, pp. 224, ISBN 978-0-415-72161-5 £85DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2707055

  8. Palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmer MJ; Harris JS; McDonald CF; Bell CJ; Foster TL

    2012-01-01

    Terrah L Foster,1,2 Cynthia J Bell,1 Carey F McDonald,2 Joy S Harris,3 Mary Jo Gilmer,1,21Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, 2Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pediatric palliative care aims to enhance life and decrease suffering of children and adolescents living with life-threatening conditions and their loved ones. Oncology nurses are instrumental in providing palliative care to pediat...

  9. Tom Ford Construction, LLC Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Ford Construction, LLC (the Company) is located in Brentwood, Tennessee. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Nashville, Tennessee.

  10. Dietary Fat and Vitamin E in Prostate Cancer Risk Among African Americans and West Africans: A Case-Control Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukoli, Flora A; Smith, Ernest; Malin, Alecia; Zhao, Barbara; Osime, Usifo; Stain, Steven

    2005-01-01

    .... Nashville site: Administrative process including grant transfer, IRB approval, research assistant hire, design of souvenirs, posters and brochures has been completed, and purchase of supplies is in progress...

  11. Dietary Fat and Vitamin E in Prostate Cancer Risk Among African Americans and Africans: A Case-Control Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukoli, Flora A; Smith, Ernest; Malin, Alecia; Zhao, Barbara; Osime, Usifo; Stain, Steven

    2006-01-01

    .... Nashville site: Administrative process including grant transfer, IRB approval, research assistant hire, design of souvenirs, posters and brochures has been completed, and purchase of supplies is in progress...

  12. Desegregation in Higher Education: Twenty-Five Years of Controversy from Geier to Ayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ellen B.

    1993-01-01

    In 1977, a federal court ordered the merger of the University of Tennessee in Nashville (UT-N) and Tennessee State University (TSU), a historically black public institution in Nashville. A study of 15 years of effort reveals that the merger did not alter the role of TSU as an institution essentially black in character and mission. (MLF)

  13. Opportunities in Air Force Research and Development: Three Regional Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    of Biological Sci. Tennessee State Univ. Tennessee State Univ. Nashville, TN 37203 Nashville, TN 37203 Mr. Rudolph Woodbury Dr. Gregory Komives ... Komives Tennessee State University Dr. P. R. Thangudu Tennessee State University Dr. Calvin Gibson Tennessee State University Dr. Eva B. Landers Tennessee

  14. Comparison of the performance and security of free and open source smart card offcard APIs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chifura, A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available for correspondence: TEL/FAX 0406022464 Conference Topic: Network Services Sub Topics: E-Commerce, Web services Abstract The increase in internet connectivity has created new avenues for smart cards to be used as identity tokens in distributed on... web based smart card applications. References [1] Eric Rocco, “The Internet and Service Delivery: Great Expectations”, available from. http:// www.culpepper.com/eBulletin/1996/153rocco.asp [2] Nicole Shillington & Travers Waker, “The design...

  15. NIST-Traceable NMR Method to Determine Quantitative Weight Percentage Purity of Mustard (HD) Feedstock Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ECBC-TR-1506 NIST-TRACEABLE NMR METHOD TO DETERMINE QUANTITATIVE WEIGHT PERCENTAGE PURITY OF MUSTARD (HD) FEEDSTOCK SAMPLES David J...McGarvey RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE William R. Creasy LEIDOS, INC. Abingdon, MD 21009-1261 Theresa R. Connell EXCET, INC...Jan 2012–May 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NIST-Traceable NMR Method to Determine Quantitative Weight Percentage Purity of Mustard (HD) Feedstock

  16. Conformation driven complexation of two analogous benzimidazole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Castellano R K 2005 Org. Lett. 7 443. 50. CrysAlisPro, Version 1.171.33.66 2010 (Oxford Diffrac- tion Ltd.: Abingdon, UK). 51. Sheldrick G M 2008 Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A 64 112. 52. Dolomanov O V, Bourhis L J, Gildea R J, Howard J A. K and Puschmann H 2009 J. Appl. Cryst. 42 339. 53. Spek A L 2003 J. Appl. Cryst. 36 7.

  17. Characterization and Neutralization of Recovered Lewisite Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    polyesters, acrylics, styrenes, furans, nitrile, natural rubber , SBR , and isoprene are not compatible with aqueous permanganate solutions.59-62...Hulet Jill L. Ruth Amanda M. Schenning U.S. ARMY MATERIALS AGENCY From Science to Solutions SCIENCE APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION Abingdon, MD...William R. Brankowitz and Edward F. Doyle (CMA-APG); and Dr. Arthur Denny [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)] for their helpful

  18. The United South and Eastern Tribe (USET) Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) and Tribal Focused Environmental Risk and Sustainability Tool (Tribal-FERST) Train the Trainers Workshop.October 6-9, 2014, in Nashville, Tennessee: PFC Assessment for Management and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    The maintenance of wildlife and aquatic habitat is dependent on the development of a riparian area management strategy, which considers and adapts to certain basic ecological and economic relationships. These relationships are functions of riparian and terrestrial ecosystems, gro...

  19. Ideas and Inspirations: Good News about Diabetes Prevention and Management in Indian Country

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Albuquerque Area Bemidji Area Billings Area California Area Great Plains Area Nashville Area Navajo Area Oklahoma City ... PDF - 776 KB] Performance Plain Writing Act The White House USA.gov Website Privacy Policy Stay Connected ...

  20. Mobile user experience for voice services: A theoretical framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available . Oinas-Kukkonen, H. Mobile Electronic Commerce through the Web. in Second International Conference on Telecommunication and Electronic Commerce (ICTEC '99). 1999. Nashville, TN, USA. 15. Oinas-Kukkonen, H. and V. Kurkela, Developing Successful Mobile...

  1. 78 FR 40512 - Investigations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ...-5428, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. Signed at Washington, DC, this 26th day of... (Apple Inc) (Workers). Austin, TX 06/18/13 06/11/13 82818 Propex Operating Company, Nashville, GA...

  2. 77 FR 37710 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Company Home Office, 430 Oak Grove St., Minneapolis, 12000414 St. Louis County First National Bank of... Davidson County RCA Studio B, 1611 Roy Acuff Pl., Nashville, 12000420 WASHINGTON Clark County Kiggins...

  3. Ideas and Inspirations: Good News about Diabetes Prevention and Management in Indian Country

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Albuquerque Area Bemidji Area Billings Area California Area Great Plains Area Nashville Area Navajo Area Oklahoma City ... highlights, presentation slides, and watch selected presentation recordings. Good news: Reduction in Kidney Failure in AI/AN ...

  4. Opioids Over-Prescribed After C-Sections: Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Nashville. Addiction to prescription opioids such as oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percocet) and hydrocodone (Vicoprofen) is a growing epidemic ... leftovers. Then, patients chose how many 5-milligram oxycodone tablets to receive at discharge, up to the ...

  5. 75 FR 45660 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... burial objects from middle Tennessee. Finally, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation... possession of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Archaeology, Nashville...

  6. 78 FR 40506 - Certain Toner Cartridges and Components Thereof; Issuance of General Exclusion Order and Cease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... Marietta, Georgia; E-Max Group, Inc. (d/b/a Databazaar.com ) of Miramar, Florida; IJSS Inc. (d/b/a Toner..., California; Ink Technologies Printer Supplies, LLC of Dayton, Ohio; SupplyBuy.com , Inc. of Nashville...

  7. Clinard Company d/b/a Clinard Home Improvement Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinard Company d/b/a Clinard Home Improvement (the Company) is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at properties constructed prior to 1978, located in Tennessee.

  8. Commentary on "factors associated with satisfaction with prostate cancer care: results from Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE)." Resnick MJ, Guzzo TJ, Cowan JE, Knight SJ, Carroll PR, Penson DF, VA Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Care, Nashville, TN.: BJU Int 2013;111(2):213-20. [Epub 2012 Aug 29]. doi: 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2012.11423.x.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brent K

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of demographic, clinical, treatment and patient-reported parameters on satisfaction with prostate cancer care. Despite the significant worldwide impact of prostate cancer, few data are available specifically addressing satisfaction with treatment-related care. CaPSURE comprises participants from 40 US sites who were monitored during and after their treatment course. Participants who were diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer after 1999 underwent radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy or primary androgen deprivation, and those who also completed the satisfaction questionnaire within 2 years of treatment were included in the present study. Satisfaction was measured using a validated instrument that assesses contact with providers, confidence in providers, communication skills, humanness and overall satisfaction. Multivariable linear regression analysis were performed to evaluate the independent relationships between demographic, clinical, treatment and patient-reported parameters and satisfaction. Of the 3056 participants, 1927 (63%) were treated with radical prostatectomy, 843 (28%) were treated with radiation therapy and 286 (9%) were treated with primary androgen deprivation. Multivariable analysis showed that multiple patient-reported factors were independently associated with satisfaction, whereas clinical, demographic and treatment parameters were not. Baseline health-related quality of life, measured by the 36-item short-form health survey, baseline fear of cancer recurrence (all P<0.01) and declines in the sexual (P = 0.03), urinary (P<0.01) and bowel (P = 0.02) function domains of the University of California Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index were all independently associated with satisfaction. Patient-reported outcomes were more strongly associated with satisfaction in the low-risk subgroup. Patient-reported factors such as health-related quality of life and fear of cancer recurrence are independently associated with satisfaction with care. Pretreatment parameters should be used to identify populations at-risk for dissatisfaction to allow for intervention and/or incorporation into treatment decision-making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ancestor worship in Korea and Africa: Social function or religious phenomenon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Sup Bae

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Ancestor worship is a dilemma for Christian communities� in Korea and Africa, who have difficulty adapting Western theology to their Third World cultures. Allan Culpepper calls� ancestor worship a cultural phenomenon, not a hindrance to the Gospel message, which this article refutes. Ancestor worship is religious rather� than social in function. Common features of ancestor worship in Africa and Korea are 1 conventional� superstition (shamanism in Korea, animism in Africa, 2 belief in immortality, and� 3 ancestor veneration/filial piety. Theological assessment reveals the incompatibility of ancestor worship with Christianity. 1� Fear of ancestors is replaced by liberation� in Christ. 2 The dead exist in a mode completely different to earthly existence and have no power in the world. 3 Ancestors cannot fulfil the intermediary role reserved for the Holy Spirit. Ancestor worship should� be viewed as idol worship. Contextualisation of kerygma becomes distorted when religious pluralism is tolerated.

  10. Networks of power in digital copyright law and policy political salience, expertise and the legislative process

    CERN Document Server

    Farrand, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In this book, Benjamin Farrand employs an interdisciplinary approach that combines legal analysis with political theory to explore the development of copyright law in the EU. Farrand utilises Foucault's concept of Networks of Power and Culpepper's Quiet Politics to assess the adoption and enforcement of copyright law in the EU, including the role of industry representative, cross-border licensing, and judicial approaches to territorial restrictions. Focusing in particular on legislative initiatives concerning copyright, digital music and the internet, Networks of Power in Digital Copyright Law and Policy: Political Salience, Expertise and the Legislative Process demonstrates the connection between copyright law and complex network relationships. This book presents an original socio-political theoretical framework for assessing developments in copyright law that will interest researchers and post-graduate students of law and politics, as well as those more particularly concerned with political theory, EU and c...

  11. Cold War in Southern Africa Kalter Krieg im Südlichen Afrika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Graham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Review Article: Cold War in Southern Africa Gary Baines, Peter Vale (eds. (2008, Beyond the Border War: New Perspectives on Southern Africa’s Late-Cold War Conflicts, Pretoria: Unisa Press, ISBN 978 1 86888 456 8, xix + 342 pp. Sue Onslow (ed. (2009, Cold War in Southern Africa: White Power, Black Liberation, Abingdon: Routledge, ISBN 978 0 415 47420 7, 253 pp. Vladimir Shubin (2008, The Hot “Cold War”: The USSR in Southern Africa, London: Pluto Press, ISBN 978 0745324722, 320 pp. Review Article: Kalter Krieg im Südlichen Afrika Gary Baines, Peter Vale (eds. (2008, Beyond the Border War: New Perspectives on Southern Africa’s Late-Cold War Conflicts, Pretoria: Unisa Press, ISBN 978 1 86888 456 8, xix + 342 S. Sue Onslow (ed. (2009, Cold War in Southern Africa: White Power, Black Liberation, Abingdon: Routledge, ISBN 978 0 415 47420 7, 253 S. Vladimir Shubin (2008, The Hot “Cold War”: The USSR in Southern Africa, London: Pluto Press, ISBN 978 0745324722, 320 S.

  12. Using a Participatory Research Process to Address Disproportionate Hispanic Cancer Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Pamela C.; Canedo, Juan R.; Reece, Michelle C.; Lira, Irma; Reyes, Francisco; Garcia, Erandi; Juarez, Paul; Williams, Elizabeth; Husaini, Baqar A.

    2013-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers great potential for increasing the impact of research on reducing cancer health disparities. This article reports how the Community Outreach Core (COC) of the Meharry-Vanderbilt-Tennessee State University (TSU) Cancer Partnership has collaborated with community partners to develop and implement CBPR. The COC, Progreso Community Center, and Nashville Latino Health Coalition jointly developed and conducted the 2007 Hispanic Health in Nashville Survey as a participatory needs assessment to guide planning for subsequent CBPR projects and community health initiatives. Trained community and student interviewers surveyed 500 Hispanic adults in the Nashville area, using a convenience sampling method. In light of the survey results, NLHC decided to focus in the area of cancer on the primary prevention of cervical cancer. The survey led to a subsequent formative CBPR research project to develop an intervention, then to funding of a CBPR pilot intervention study to test the intervention. PMID:20173287

  13. 40 CFR 52.2235 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Ozone. 52.2235... strategy: Ozone. (a) Determination—EPA is determining that, as of August 8, 1995, the Nashville ozone nonattainment area has attained the ozone standard and that the reasonable further progress and attainment...

  14. Valor Collegiate Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The four guiding principles behind the blended, competency-based, personalized learning model of Valor Collegiate Academies, a charter organization serving grades 5-12 in Nashville, TN: (1) Reflect the diversity of both our country and local community; (2) Personalize a student's experience to meet his/her unique academic and non-academic needs;…

  15. Software Engineering Education Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    Macintosh PC Sun Additional Information: Design and Documentation and Software Leadership are proposed as part of a ro-,ised currculum. Master’s Project is a...Computer Science Nashville, TN 37208-3051 Degreies: BS CS, BS M Contact: Ms. Vivan J. Fielder Assistant professor Update: February 1990o Courses

  16. Dealing with Uncertainty about Item Parameters: Expected Response Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Psychometric Society, Nashville TN, June, 1985. Lindley, D.V. (1980). Approximate Bayesian methods. Trabajos Estadistica , 31,223-237. Lord, F.M. (1980...isn’t actually a maximum likelihood estimate of the mean, the likelihood may not increase uniformly. To prevent premature stopping of the estimation

  17. Training future chefs at Opryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Dina Starks is the culinary apprentice coordinator at Opryland Hotel Convention Center in Nashville, Tenn. Her apprentices have the unique opportunity to practice the culinary arts at the largest hotel convention center in the world, in a setting that has 15 restaurants and nearly 3,000 rooms.

  18. DNA methylation as a source of epigenetic regulation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    OpenAIRE

    Gavery, Mackenzie

    2013-01-01

    Aquaculture 2013, Nashville TN   This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1158119. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  19. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  20. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND ISOPRENE OXIDATION PRODUCTS AT A TEMPERATE DECIDUOUS FOREST SITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs) and their role in atmospheric oxidant formation were investigated at a forest site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as part of the Nashville Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) in July 1995. Of 98 VOCs detected, a major fraction were anthropogenic VOCs suc...

  1. 76 FR 36092 - Antidumping Methodologies in Proceedings Involving Non-Market Economies: Valuing the Factor of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... (``VASEP''). \\5\\ Armstrong is a domestic manufacturer of floors, ceilings, and cabinets. \\6\\ American Honey... Foundry Company, Nashville Wire Products, Inc., Norit Americas Inc., SGL Carbon LLC, Sioux Honey..., the calculated factory overhead ratio to reflect all indirect labor costs (e.g., employee pension...

  2. Comprehensive Organization/Operational Planning: A Research Project for Management Planning in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint Univ. Libraries, Nashville, TN. Office of Research and Development.

    The Joint University Libraries (JUL) of Nashville, Tennessee have found that as they become increasingly complex they must make optimum use of their resources. In 1972, JUL initiated a planning effort, called Comprehensive Organizational/Operational Planning (CO/OP), designed to provide information for intelligent management decisions. Policy…

  3. Clinical Investigation Program Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-30

    Society of Ricket - tsiology and Rickettsial Disease, September 1992. Coviello G, Banks R, Bowers T: Hepatic parasitism in prairie dogs. AALAS, Nashville...Mountain Flow Cytometry Users Group, Albuquerque, New Mexico , 10-11 September 1986. (6) Rickman, W.J., Harrison, S.M., Lima, J.E., Muehlbauer, S.M., and

  4. 78 FR 68859 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Fee-to-Trust Transfer of Property and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... requirements of the NEPA (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), and in accordance with the exercise of authority delegated....S. Environmental Protection Agency regarding the Tribe's application for the conveyance into trust..., Nashville, Tennessee 37214. Public hearings will be held at the Taunton High School, 50 William Street...

  5. Biological Treatment of Composition B Wastewaters. 2. Analysis of Performance of Holston Army Ammunition Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility, January 1985 through August 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-18

    If not removed, this accumulation can break the plate in the next cycle. Removal of this accumulation is easily accomplished with a spatula ; this...Industrial Waste Treatment. Enviro Press, Inc., Nashville, TN, p53ff. 16. U.S. Army Armament Research and Davelopment Command. 1979. As quoted in Kitchens

  6. Psychometric Evaluation of the Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS) Short Forms with Out-of-Home Care Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Thomas J.; Duppong Hurley, Kristin; Lambert, Matthew C.; Epstein, Michael H.; Stevens, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a need for brief progress monitoring measures of behavioral and emotional symptoms for youth in out-of-home care. The Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS; Bickman et al. in Manual of the peabody treatment progress battery. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 2010) is one measure that has clinician and youth short forms…

  7. Mammoth Cave: It's Explorers, Miners, Archeologists, and Visitors. Teaching with Historic Places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robert H.

    The mysterious darkness of Mammoth Cave in southwestern Kentucky, about 90 miles south of Louisville and 90 miles north of Nashville, has lured travelers to enter and warned them to stay away. From the dawn of time visitors have been awestruck by the cave's size and rugged beauty. This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places…

  8. The Relationship among Stress, Burnout, and Locus of Control of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Shana J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how stress, burnout, and locus of control are related for school psychologists providing direct services in the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. This knowledge is essential in providing the needed experience and outlook of working as a school psychologist. The current study provided school…

  9. Prostate Cancer Research Training in Health Disparities for Minority Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    described. Culture and Health: An Ethnographic and Qualitative Approach: Briefly examine the roles of race and racism as powerful cultural...chartered member of the Nashville chapter of the National Negro Council for Women, Student Ambassador, held the position of Miss Big Apple Club , and

  10. 75 FR 73034 - Application(s) for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... International Trade Administration Application(s) for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments Pursuant to... whether instruments of equivalent scientific value, for the purposes for which the instruments shown below..., Nashville, TN 37235. Instrument: Electron Microscope. Manufacturer: FEI Company, Czech Republic. Intended...

  11. Using the spatial and spectral precision of satellite imagery to predict wildlife occurrence patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward J. Laurent; Haijin Shi; Demetrios Gatziolis; Joseph P. LeBouton; Michael B. Walters; Jianguo. Liu

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the potential of using unclassified spectral data for predicting the distribution of three bird species over a -400,000 ha region of Michigan's Upper Peninsula using Landsat ETM+ imagery and 433 locations sampled for birds through point count surveys. These species, Black-throated Green Warbler, Nashville Warbler, and Ovenbird. were known to be...

  12. 47 CFR 22.503 - Paging geographic area authorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... license Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands, and... (Birmingham) 36, 74, 78-79. 25 (Nashville) 71. 26 (Memphis-Jackson) 73, 75-77. 27 (New Orleans-Baton Rouge) 80.... 49 (Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands) 173. 50 (Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands) 174. 51...

  13. Blending Ameliorative and Transformative Approaches in Human Service Organizations: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Scot D.; Hanlin, Carrie E.; Prilleltensky, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges and benefits of an action-research project with a Nashville-based nonprofit human service organization. In our view, outmoded human service organizations are in serious need of innovation to promote psychological and physical wellness, prevention of social problems, empowerment, and social justice. This project…

  14. 78 FR 52779 - Merchant Mariner Medical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    ... has completed its business. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Sarratt Student Center, Room 216-220, Vanderbilt University, 2302 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37235. For information on... American Epilepsy Society. (7) Presentation from American Chiropractic Association MEDMAC Discussion...

  15. 75 FR 78800 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Delays in Processing of Special Permits Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ...Surgery, Inc., 4 02-15-2011 Nashville, TN. 14573-M Polar Tank Trailer, 4 02-15-2011 LLC-FC, Holdingford...-N Vinci-technologies... 4 02-28-2011 14994-N Auto Chior System, 4 02-28-2010 Memphis, TN. 15003-N...

  16. SLA: A Time for New Initiatives-- CI Division Formed, Fundraising Goal Set, Certification Coming

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMattia, Susan; Blumenstein, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    Several initiatives were announced at the Special Libraries Association (d.b.a. SLA) conference, June 4-9, at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel in Nashville. A petition drive resulted in formation of a Competitive Intelligence (CI) Division from the former CI Section of the Leadership and Management Division. The board encouraged the member-driven…

  17. die prediker as preek basisteoretiese perspektiewe uit handelinge

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exploring Acts. Neptune: Loizeaux Brothers. PIETERSE H J C. 2001. Prediking in 'n konteks van armoede. Pretoria: Unisa. POLHILL J B. 1992. Acts. Nashville: Broadman. RIENECKER R. 1976. A linguistic key to the Greek New Testament 1. Grand Rapids: Zondervan. 1980. A linguistic key to the Greek New Testament 2.

  18. Disparate Vitamin D Activity in the Prostate of Men with African Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    University (Nashville, Tennessee, USA). Criteria for inclusion were self-declared race data, >500 mg of benign frozen prostatectomy specimen, serum...apical recycling pathway of epithelial cells. Nat Commun. 2016;7:11550. 52. Ternes SB, Rowling MJ. Vitamin D transport proteins megalin and disabled -2

  19. Diesel Mechanics: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a diesel mechanics vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  20. Robots Spur Software That Lends a Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    While building a robot to assist astronauts in space, Johnson Space Center worked with partners to develop robot reasoning and interaction technology. The partners created Robonaut 1, which led to Robonaut 2, and the work also led to patents now held by Universal Robotics in Nashville, Tennessee. The NASA-derived technology is available for use in warehousing, mining, and more.

  1. 76 FR 9812 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Marinenet, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Section 6(b) of the Act, the identities of the parties to the venture are: ACL Transportation Services LLC, Jeffersonville, IN; Ingram Barge Company, Nashville, TN; and AEP River Operations LLC, Chesterfield, MO. The... contracting river industry trading partners (the ``value added network'' or ``VAN''). The VAN will provide for...

  2. Magnetic Mapping of Current Distributions in Two-Dimensional Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Nashville, TN September, 1988 Aacession For 9NTIS GRA&I DTIC TAB go" Una nounced Justification By Distribut ion / Availability CodesA Y-- Ivai and/or Dist... Biomagnetism and Non-Destructive Testing," Hypres, Inc., Elmsford, NY, June, 1988. "High Resolution SQUID Magnetometry for Current Imaging: Applications to

  3. Cases in Partnership between Independent Schools and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnan, Vincent W.

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth look at six unique models of partnership between independent schools and a nearby college/university. The six cases include the University School of Nashville and Vanderbilt University; the Lab School and University of Chicago; the School at Columbia and Columbia University; the Boston University Academy and Boston…

  4. Empowerment and Civic Surrogacy: Community Workers' Perceptions of Their Own and Their Latino/a Students' Civic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how three Nashville educational support professionals' conceptions of empowerment map onto their civic expectations for their Latino/a students and themselves. It argues that these expectations are inversely related, with students standing as surrogates for professionals' civic selves or professionals acting as civic…

  5. Downy mildew on coleus (Plectranthus scutellarioides) caused by Peronospora belbahrii sensu lato in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleus (Plectranthus scutellarioides [syn. = Solenostemon scutellarioides]) is a popular ornamental plant in the mint family (Lamiaceae), prized for its colorful and showy foliage. In August 2015, disease symptoms typical of downy mildew were observed at two sites in Nashville, Tennessee: (i) at the...

  6. "Hotel-style services" evolve in hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirg, G

    1995-10-01

    Glenn Schirg has been the director of nutrition services at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee for the past 11 years. Besides taking full responsibility for his department, he now acts as a team leader responsible for facilitating one of the medical center's 10 major initiatives.

  7. 77 FR 12456 - Eighth Coast Guard District Annual Marine Events and Safety Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    .../Piranha Pittsburgh, PA. marker 0.0 to 1.0, July or first Sports LLC. Pittsburgh, PA. week of August. 5 5... marker 463.0 to 465.0. Triathlon/. Team Magic........ 35 35 4th weekend in Music City Nashville, TN... Tour/ Knoxville, TN..... Tennessee River mile August. World Sports and marker 647.0 to 648.0. Marketing...

  8. Immunological Prevention of Spontaneous Mammary Carcinoma in Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    collaboration with Dr. Luc Van Kaer , Nashville, TN (15)] TASK 2-3. PROPHYLACTIC VACCINATION WITH CYTOKINE GENE-TRANSDUCED TUMOR CELLS. The aim is to: a) induce...S, Boesteanu A, Joyce S, Van Kaer L, CDldl mutant mice are deficient in natural T cells that promptly produce IL-4. Immunity 6:469-677,1998 16

  9. What does recess have to do with democracy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meidell Sigsgaard, Anna-Vera

    2015-01-01

    and Knowers - Towards a realist sociology of education. Abingdon: Routledge. Meidell Sigsgaard, A.-V. (2012). Who Has the Knowledge if not the Primary Knower ? - Using exchange structure analysis to cast light on particular pedagogic practices in teaching Danish as a Second Language and History 1 Introduction......-Horarick, M. (1996). LiteracyAndLearningAcrossCurriculum. In R. Hasan & G. Williams (Eds.), Literacy in Society (pp. 232–278). New York: Addison Wesley Longman. Martin, J. R., & Rose, D. (2007). Working With Discourse: Meaning Beyond the Clause (2nd ed., p. 363). London: Continuum. Maton, K. (2014). Knowledge...... – What Are We Going To Learn Today ? In J. S. Knox (Ed.), To Boldly Proceed: Papers from the 39th International Systemic Functional Congress. 39th ISFC Organising Committee - Sydney. Meidell Sigsgaard, A.-V. (2013). Who Knows What? The teaching of knowledge and knowers in a fifth grade Danish as a second...

  10. A discourse activist approach to studying IT-security practices in Danish public organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann Starbæk; Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    : An introduction. Oxford. Oxford university Press. Scollon, R. & Scollon, S. W. (2004). Nexus Analysis: Discourse and the Emerging Internet. Abingdon: Routhledge.Soomro, Z. A., Shah, M. H & Ahmed, J. (2015). Information security management needs more holistic approach: A literature review. International Journal......; Alvesson & Kärreman, 2011; Iedema, 2011). IT-security is traditionally studied in a technological context (Soomro et al., 2015) and from normative, linear, top-down oriented and rationalistic models and approaches (Allen, 2005; Hedstrøm et. al., 2011; Somroo et al., 2015) which, for instance, insist....... Journal of Strategic Information Systems 20(2011) 373-384.Hamid, HA, Yosof, MM & Dali, NR (2011): Security Compliance Behaviour of SaaS Cloud Users: A Pilot Study. Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences, september, 2017.Iedema, R. (2007). On the multi-modality, materially and contingency...

  11. The Role of the JET Project in Global Fusion Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1983-01-01

    The aim of nuclear fusion research is to make fusion energy available as a new energy source. Fusion processes occur naturally in the sun, where hydrogen nuclei release energy by combining to form helium. A fusion reactor on earth will require even higher temperatures than in the interior...... of the sun, and it will be based on deuterium and tritium reactions. JET (Joint European Torus) is a major fusion experiment now under construction near Abingdon in the UK It is aimed at producing conditions approximating those necessary in a fusion reactor. The results expected from JET should permit...... a realistic evaluation of the prospects for fusion power and serve as a basis for the design of the next major fusion experiment....

  12. Proceedings of the 6th IAEA Technical Committee meeting on energetic particles in magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The sixth IAEA Technical Committee Meeting was organized by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. It was held at Naka, JAERI during October 12-14, 1999. The previous meetings of this series, formerly entitled 'Alpha Particles in Fusion Research', were held biennially in Kiev (1989), Aspenas (1991), Trieste (1993), Princeton (1995), and Abingdon (1997). The scope of the meeting covered theoretical and experimental work on alpha particle physics, transport of energetic particles, effects of energetic particles on fusion plasma, related collective phenomena, runaway electrons in disruption and diagnostics on energetic particles. The TCM was attended by over 60 participants. Twenty seven papers were presented orally and 19 papers as posters. This proceedings include 37 contributed papers in the meeting. (J.P.N.)

  13. School for Young High Energy Physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, M E

    2003-01-01

    Forty-seven experimental particle physicists attended the 2002 Summer School, held, as usual, at The Cosener's House in Abingdon during September. The weather was glorious allowing a number of tutorials and impromptu seminars to take place in the lovely gardens. The lectures were of a high standard and were delivered and received enthusiastically, providing material for lively discussions in tutorials and elsewhere. The students each gave a ten-minute seminar and the general quality of the talks was impressive and the time keeping excellent. The activities described ranged from front-line physics analysis to preparations for the next generation of machines and detectors, and gave a clear indication of the breadth of particle physics activities in the UK

  14. An archaeological reconnaissance of a 14 mile section of the East Fork Poplar Creek for the Environmental Restoration Project, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuVall, G.D. [DuVall and Associates, Inc., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, Nashville, Tennessee, an archaeological reconnaissance of the potential impact areas of the Environmental Restoration Project (ERP) along the East Fork Poplar Creek was conducted during the period December 16, 1991, and March 3, 1992. The reconnaissance was conducted in response to environmental evaluations as a result of the accidental spillage of approximately 293,000 pounds of mercury, radionuclides, heavy metals and other compounds. The reconnaissance to assess adverse impacts to cultural resources located within the boundaries of Federally-licensed, permitted, funded or assisted projects was conducted in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and Executive Order 11593.

  15. Dental management in patients with hypertension: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Southerland, Janet H; Gill, Danielle G; Gangula, Pandu R; Halpern, Leslie R; Cardona, Cesar Y; Mouton, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Janet H Southerland,1 Danielle G Gill,1 Pandu R Gangula,2–4 Leslie R Halpern,1 Cesar Y Cardona,5 Charles P Mouton6 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2Department of Oral Biology and Research, 3Department of Physiology, 4Center for Women's Health Research, 5Department of Internal Medicine, 6Department of Family and Community Medicine, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Hypertension is a chronic illness affecting more than a billion people worldw...

  16. DNA Methylation Patterns in Crassostrea gigas

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Claire; Roberts, Steven; Gavery, Mackenzie

    2013-01-01

    Poster presented at the NSA conference in Nashville in 2013.  This research uses the Pacific Oyster as a model organism to characterize the distribution and identify potential functions of DNA methylation.  We examined genome-wide methylation patterns to elucidate the mechanisms by which DNA methylation impacts transcriptional processes. ___________________________________________ This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1158119. ...

  17. Empowering Factors Among Breast Cancer Screening Compliant Underserved Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    are empow- controversies. J.Am Board Porn Pract. 2003; 1992z8:182-185. ered by the benefits of screening and 16:233-241. 19. Lee JR, Vogel VG. Who...University, Nashville, TN 37208. As adjunct faculty in Department of Psychology, responsibility was to teach child and adolescent development course to...and Biostatistics; research design, statistical and epidemiologic analysis, program evaluation. @Developing Web -based Biostatistics course

  18. Milnacipran for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Boomershine, Chad

    2010-01-01

    Michelle J Ormseth, Anne E Eyler, Cara L Hammonds, Chad S BoomershineDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a widespread pain condition associated with fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and stiffness. Milnacipran is one of three medications currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for the management of adult FMS patients. This review is t...

  19. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Boomershine CS; Scholz BA; Ormseth MJ

    2011-01-01

    Michelle J Ormseth, Beth A Sholz, Chad S BoomershineDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no tr...

  20. Duloxetine for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Boomershine, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Beth A Scholz, Cara L Hammonds, Chad S BoomershineDepartment of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a widespread pain condition associated with a wide range of additional symptoms including fatigue, insomnia, depression, anxiety and stiffness. Duloxetine is one of three medications currently FDA approved for use in FMS management. Duloxetine is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that functions by increasing ce...

  1. Cultural Affiliation Study in Support of Native American Consultation Efforts for Fort Gordon, GA: Richmond, Jefferson, McDuffie, and Columbia Counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    southeastern Indians. Nashville: The University of Tennessee Press. Hudson, Charles, ed. 1985. Ethnology of the southeastern Indians. New York...Mooney, James. 1900. Myths of the Cherokees. Bureau of American ethnology 19th annual report, pt. 1, 1897-1898. Washington, DC: Government Printing...the Creek Indians and their neighbors. Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin No. 73. Washington, DC. ———. 1946. The Indians of the Southeastern United

  2. Ocular comfort assessment of lifitegrast ophthalmic solution 5.0% in OPUS-3, a Phase III randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols,Kelly K; Holland,Edward; Toyos,Melissa M; Peace,James H; Majmudar,Parag; Raychaudhuri,Aparna; Hamdani,Mohamed; Roy,Monica; Shojaei,Amir

    2018-01-01

    Kelly K Nichols,1 Edward Holland,2 Melissa M Toyos,3 James H Peace,4 Parag Majmudar,5 Aparna Raychaudhuri,6 Mohamed Hamdani,6 Monica Roy,6 Amir Shojaei6 1School of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 2Cincinnati Eye Institute, Edgewood, KY, 3Toyos Clinic, Nashville, TN, 4United Medical Research Institute, Inglewood, CA, 5Chicago Cornea Consultants, Ltd., Hoffman Estates, IL, 6Shire, Lexington, MA, USA Purpose: To evaluate ocular comfort of lifitegrast ophthalmic ...

  3. Update on the clinical management of Wilson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hedera P

    2017-01-01

    Peter Hedera Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Wilson’s disease (WD), albeit relatively rare, is an important genetic metabolic disease because of highly effective therapies that can be lifesaving. It is a great imitator and requires a high index of suspicion for correct and timely diagnosis. Neurologic, psychiatric and hepatologic problems in WD are very nonspecific, and we discuss the most common clinical phenotypes. The di...

  4. Multifunctional ZnO Nanomaterials for Efficient Energy Conversion and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    Final Report: Multifunctional ZnO Nanomaterials for Efficient Energy Conversion and Sensing The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this...ADDRESS. Fisk University 1000 17th Avenue North Nashville, TN 37208 -3045 31-May-2015 ABSTRACT Final Report: Multifunctional ZnO Nanomaterials for...and reproducible nanomaterials growth/synthesis with control of nanostructure size, shape, and functionality, in uniform functionalization with both

  5. 75 FR 15736 - Investigations Regarding Certifications of Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Company, Inc. (Wkrs) Meadows of Dan, VA.... 02/22/10 02/16/10 73533 Bontex, Inc. (Comp)......... Buena Vista, VA....... 02/22/10 02/17/10 73534 US Natural Resources, Inc. Woodland, WA 02/22/10 02/01/10... Virginia (Comp). Meadows of Dan, VA.... 02/26/10 02/23/10 73581 Dell, Inc. (Wkrs) Nashville, TN......... 02...

  6. Reality TV positions heart center as cardiac care leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Saint Thomas Heart Institute, Nashville, Tenn., has a long history of successful cardiac care. More than 200,000 patients have been treated at Saint Thomas. Earlier this year the hospital launched a new branding campaign that features former patients who have bonded with the institution. These former patients were provided MiniDV video cameras to record their stories. The campaign has attracted considerable attention, including newspaper and TV news coverage.

  7. Prostate Cancer Research Training in Health Disparities for Undergraduates (PCaRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    demographic and anthropometric variables . Materials and Methods Target Population • 50 cases and 100 controls each of Nigerians and African-Americans from...DRE and PSA results, age, level of education, and other demographic and anthropometric variables of the clinic and community populations.  Describe...MATERIALS AND METHODS Target Population: Black men ≥40 years in Nashville, TN & Edo and Delta States, Nigeria. African-American Sample: Controls

  8. United States Air Force Summer Research Program -- 1993. Volume 1. Program Management Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Vanderbilt University Vol-Page No: 6- 1 Nashville, TN 37235-0000 Abrate, Serge Field: Aeronautical Engineering Assistant Professor, PhD Laboratory: WL/FZ... Lang Field: Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor, PhD Laboratory: WL/AA Dept of Electrical Engin Wright State University Vol-Page No: 5- 7 Dayton...MATERIALS Serge ABRATE Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics University of Missouri-Rolla Abstract Understanding

  9. Vertebral compression fractures: a review of current management and multimodal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wong CC; McGirt MJ

    2013-01-01

    Cyrus C Wong, Matthew J McGirt Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Vertebral compression fractures are a prevalent disease affecting osteoporotic patients. When symptomatic, they cause significant pain and loss of function and have a high public health impact. In this paper we outline the diagnosis and management of these patients, with evidence-based review of treatment outcomes for the various therapeutic options. Diagnosis involves a clinical history focusin...

  10. Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Group: The University of Michigan Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    cerebrovascular accident , myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or coronary artery stenting within 6 months of enrollment, or a history of venous thrombosis...Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer: NCI 8476 Dr. David Smith JHU (Princess Margaret Hospital ) Activated at UM site on 10/20/2011. On-hold to...University Hospital , Philadelphia, PA; New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY; Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN; ImClone

  11. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. 1985 Technical Report. Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    1973 Meharry Medical College Specialty: Lipid Biochemistry, Dept. of Pediatrics Nutrition, Hyperbaric Nashville, Tennessee 37208 Medicine (615) 327...Amberlite XAD-2 resin (16), silica gel (17,18), and glass beads (19). The high-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis of the hydrazone reaction product...metal isocyanates. The use of crown ethers would be useful here since these are known to accelerate the rate of substitution reactions by separating ion

  12. Economic impact analysis of energy facilities with particular reference to the Hartsville, Tennessee, area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isard, W.; Reiner, T. A.; Van Zele, R.

    1979-05-01

    The study focuses on the economic impacts of construction of the Hartsville, Tennessee, nuclear power plant. Four reactor units are now under construction. Investigated are the consequences likely to be felt in a six-county region, including the site and the city of Nashville. Estimates were made by applying to the construction and operating requirements of the plant an economic multiplier which yields an estimate of the induced and indirect effects of the power plant.

  13. DDDAMS-based Urban Surveillance and Crowd Control via UAVs and UGVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    paper:  S. Minaeian, J. Liu, Y. Son, Vision-based Target Detection and Localization via a Team of Cooperative UAV and UGVs, IEEE Transactions on...Localization via a Team of Cooperative UAV and UGVs, IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics: Systems (Special Issue on Biomedical Robotics...System,” Proceedings of 2015 IIE Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN.  Minaeian, S., Liu, J., and Son, Y., 2015, “Crowd Detection and Localization Using a

  14. Pregabalin for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chad S Boomershine

    2010-01-01

    Chad S BoomershineDepartment of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: This last article in a three-part series on approved medications for managing fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) reviews pregabalin (Lyrica®). Pregabalin was the first drug approved for FMS management and, as an anticonvulsant, differs from the other approved agents that are antidepressants. Pregabalin inhibits presynaptic excitatory neurotransmitter release by blocking a2d calcium channels....

  15. Archaeological Reconnaissance Survey and Salvage Excavation in the Salt Lick Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    region, all of the geological strata are nearly horizontal and-.dip gently away from the Nashville Dome! Central Basin area ( Floyd 1965:7-8, Figure 1...is also known that minor deposits of halite (rock salt) have been located in Anderson, White, Van Buren, Warren, Overton, and Jackson counties ( Floyd ...Banded Fossiliferous Pink Pink Cherty Limestone Quartzite Chalcedony 524’ Non-cryptocrystalline Clay (burnt) Sandstone Ferrous Sandstone Greenstone Shale

  16. School-based violence prevention strategy: a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Rachel V; Apfeld, Jordan C; Johnson, Ronald K; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Jahangir, A Alex; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-07-01

    Violence has recently been reported among a primarily young, minority population in Nashville, Tennessee. School-based programs have been proven as effective methods of reducing violent behavior, beliefs, and actions that lead to violence among adolescents. Investigators implemented a rigorous search for an appropriate school-based violence prevention program for Metropolitan Nashville middle school students utilizing a systematic review and discussion group with victims of violence. 27 programs nation-wide were reviewed and 2 discussion groups with African American males under the age of 25 admitted to a level 1 trauma center for assault-related injuries were conducted. Our findings led to a single, evidence-based conflict resolution program. In conjunction with educators, we evaluated the program's effectiveness in a pilot study in a Nashville middle school with high rates of violence. 122 students completed the conflict resolution program and described their behavior and experiences with violence in a pre-test/post-test self-rate questionnaire. Results showed a significant decrease in violent behavior and an increase in students' competencies to deal with violence (p less than 0.05). This study shows that a reduction in violent behavior and beliefs among middle school students can be achieved through the implementation of a targeted violence intervention program. A larger-scale intervention is needed to develop more conclusive evidence of effectiveness. © 2015 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  17. William J. Morrison (1860-1926): co-inventor of the cotton candy machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2005-07-01

    William James Morrison (1860-1926), from Nashville, Tennessee was a noted dentist, lawyer, author and leader in civic and political affairs. An 1890 graduate of the University of Tennessee Dental College, Dr. Morrison became President of the Tennessee State Dental Association in 1894. He had a wide interest in both science and politics, and was personally associated with both William Jennings Bryan and President Woodrow Wilson. Additionally, he was a popular author of children's books and particularly effective in fostering reading among youngsters. Also, Dr. Morrison patented several important inventions. He developed a process for extracting oils from cotton seed, and converting them into a lard substitute. Likewise, he devised a chemical process to purify the public drinking water for Nashville. In 1897, he and John C. Wharton (a fellow Nashville candy maker) conceived and co-patented an "electric candy machine" which produced cotton candy (then called "Fairy Floss".) This article provides background information about the production of spun sugar during medieval times and later, it describes the development of their cotton candy machine, the process of its operation and details about its eventual worldwide commercialization. In addition, it discusses the introduction of this new confection to the public, during the 184 day, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, held in St. Louis, MO. in 1904. In late 1926, Dr. Morrison, died of a stroke at age 66.

  18. Palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmer MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrah L Foster,1,2 Cynthia J Bell,1 Carey F McDonald,2 Joy S Harris,3 Mary Jo Gilmer,1,21Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, 2Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pediatric palliative care aims to enhance life and decrease suffering of children and adolescents living with life-threatening conditions and their loved ones. Oncology nurses are instrumental in providing palliative care to pediatric oncology populations. This paper describes pediatric palliative care and provides an overview of literature related to the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domains of palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer. Nurses can provide optimal palliative care by accounting for children's understanding of death, encouraging early initiation of palliative care services, and improving utilization of pediatric palliative care in cancer settings. Specific roles of registered nurses and advanced practice nurses in pediatric palliative care will be addressed. Recommendations for future research are made to further advance the science of pediatric palliative care and decrease suffering for children and teens with cancer.Keywords: pediatric palliative care, pediatric cancer, oncology, child, suffering

  19. Extent of atypical hyperplasia stratifies breast cancer risk in 2 independent cohorts of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnim, Amy C; Dupont, William D; Radisky, Derek C; Vierkant, Robert A; Frank, Ryan D; Frost, Marlene H; Winham, Stacey J; Sanders, Melinda E; Smith, Jeffrey R; Page, David L; Hoskin, Tanya L; Vachon, Celine M; Ghosh, Karthik; Hieken, Tina J; Denison, Lori A; Carter, Jodi M; Hartmann, Lynn C; Visscher, Daniel W

    2016-10-01

    Women with atypical hyperplasia (AH) on breast biopsy have a substantially increased risk of breast cancer (BC). Here the BC risk for the extent and subtype of AH is reported for 2 separate cohorts. All samples containing AH were included from 2 cohorts of women with benign breast disease (Mayo Clinic and Nashville). Histology review quantified the number of foci of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) and atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH). The BC risk was stratified for the number of AH foci within AH subtypes. The study included 708 Mayo AH subjects and 466 Nashville AH subjects. In the Mayo cohort, an increasing number of foci of AH was associated with a significant increase in the risk of BC both for ADH (relative risks of 2.61, 5.21, and 6.36 for 1, 2, and ≥3 foci, respectively; P for linear trend = .006) and for ALH (relative risks of 2.56, 3.50, and 6.79 for 1, 2, and ≥3 foci, respectively; P for linear trend = .001). In the Nashville cohort, the relative risks of BC for ADH were 2.70, 5.17, and 15.06 for 1, 2, and ≥3 foci, respectively (P for linear trend independent cohort studies of benign breast disease, the extent of atypia stratified the long-term BC risk for ADH and ALH. Cancer 2016;122:2971-2978. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. Bringing Class and Indigeneity In, but Leaving Japaneseness Out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moorehead

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Paul Bayliss. On the Margins of Empire: Buraku and Korean Identity in Prewar and Wartime Japan. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2013. 454 pp. $45 (cloth. Mark K. Watson. Japan's Ainu Minority in Tokyo: Diasporic Indigeneity and Cultural Politics. Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2014. 190 pp. $145 (cloth. Buoyed by waves of labor migration into Japan from Asia and Latin America, the field of Japan studies has seen a renewed interest in Japan’s minority groups. Much of the new scholarship has focused on debunking notions of Japanese uniqueness found in political discourse about the nation, known as Nihonjinron. In particular, this work has focused on Japan’s supposed ethnic, racial, and class homogeneity, examining the experiences of newcomers, oldcomers, and native others in Japan. From this academic work, two key analytical foci—social class and indigeneity—have tended to be missing. On the Margins of Empire: Buraku and Korean Identity in Prewar and Wartime Japan, by Jeffrey Paul Bayliss, and Japan’s Ainu Minority in Tokyo: Diasporic Indigeneity and Urban Politics, by Mark K. Watson, address this shortcoming in their respective analyses of Burakumin and Koreans from the Meiji Restoration to the end of World War II, and of present-day Ainu residing in Tokyo...

  1. Spatial and Temporal Migration Patterns of Neotropical Migrants in the Southwest Revealed by Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Kristina L.; van Riper, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary We used stable hydrogen isotopes (?D) to investigate both temporal and spatial patterns during spring migration for three warbler species, Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla), MacGillivray's Warbler (Oporornis tolmiei), and Nashville Warbler (Vermivora ruficapilla), across multiple migration routes in southwest North America. A strong correlation between stable hydrogen isotope values of feathers and the local precipitation at sites where feathers where collected across the breeding range for all three species reaffirmed that stable hydrogen isotopes were a good predictor of breeding locations. For the Wilson's Warbler, we found a significant negative relationship between the date when warblers passed through the sampling station and ?D values of their feathers, indicating that warblers who bred the previous season at southern latitudes migrated through the migration stations earlier than did warblers that had previously bred at more northern latitudes. This pattern was consistent across their southwestern migration route (5 sites sampled) and was consistent between years. Comparing ?D values between migration stations also showed a shift towards more negative ?D values from the western to the eastern migration stations sampled in this study, which corresponded to different geographical regions of the Wilson's Warblers' western breeding range. For MacGillivray's Warbler we found the same temporal pattern as Wilson's Warbler, with warblers that bred the previous season at southern latitudes migrating through the migration stations earlier than warblers that had previously bred at more northern latitudes. This pattern was consistent at the Lower Colorado River and Arivaca Creek, the two sites where sample sizes were adequate to test these hypotheses. Comparison of the ?D between the two sites indicated that the majority of warblers migrating through these stations were breeding within a geographically limited area of MacGillivray's Warblers' overall

  2. Religious fatalism and its association with health behaviors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Monica D; Schlundt, David G; McClellan, Linda H; Kinebrew, Tunu; Sheats, Jylana; Belue, Rhonda; Brown, Anne; Smikes, Dorlisa; Patel, Kushal; Hargreaves, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    To examine the association between religious fatalism and health care utilization, health behaviors, and chronic illness. As part of Nashville's REACH 2010 project, residents (n=1273) participated in a random telephone survey that included health variables and the helpless inevitability subscale of the Religious Health Fatalism Questionnaire. Religious health fatalism was higher among African Americans and older participants. Some hypotheses about the association between fatalism and health outcomes were confirmed. Religious fatalism is only partially predictive of health behaviors and outcomes and may be a response to chronic illness rather than a contributor to unhealthy behaviors.

  3. United States Air Force Summer Research Program - 1993. Volume 5B. Wright Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Elect.ricl Engineering Research, MS Laboratory: AEDC/ Box 1649 Station B Vanderbilt University Vol-Page No: 6- 1 Nashville, TN 37235-0000 Abrate, Serge Field...Laboratory: RL/C3 Electrical Engineering University of Southwestern Lou Vol-Page No: 4- 3 Lafayette, LA 70504-3890 x SFRP Participant Data Hong, Lang ...T. Frey, Ch. Gerber, H.-J. Guntherodt, H.P. Lang , and J. Mannhart, Z. Phys. B 86, 163 (1992) 46. S.J. Pennycook, M.F. Chisholm, D.E. Jesson, R

  4. Clio goes roller-skating: Images of Memory in some poems by Mary Kennan Herbert Clio goes roller-skating: Images de la mémoire dans quelques poèmes de Mary Kennan Herbert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Kilgore

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A few words about Mary Kennan HerbertMary Kennan Herbert is a writer with midwestern roots. She was born in 1938 in St. Louis, Missouri, and spent most of her childhood there. During her adolescent years she lived in Tennessee. She obtained a University degree in art from Peabody College in Nashville. In New York, she pursued a career as editor in a publishing house until the 1980s, when a merger ended her job security. After several attempts at working for different publishers, she started s...

  5. Analysis of the Treatment of a Biological Weapon Spread through a Transportation Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    associate weapons of mass destruction only with atomic bombs , biological agents still have the ability to inflict mass casualties and panic. By...MSO 7 MOBILE, AL MOB 16 MODESTO, CA MOD 1 MOLINE, IL MLI 21 MONTEREY, CA MRY 13 MONTGOMERY, AL MGM 29 NASHVILLE, TN BNA 100 NEW BERN , NC EWN 17...LAWTON, OK LAW 18 LEXINGTON, KY LEX 18 LOS ANGELES, CA ONT 18 NEW BERN , NC EWN 17 GREENSBORO, NC GSO 16 MOBILE, AL MOB 16 PROVIDENCE, RI PVD 16

  6. Empresarios y vías de comunicación en el siglo XIX: Una ruta y un pionero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ernesto Ramírez

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available La época del Pacífico llega a Colombia: Construcción de la ruta Cali-Buenaventura, 1854-1882. James Harold Neal (Tesis de doctorado en historia. Vanderbilt University. Nashville. Tennesee, 1971 University Microfilm International, Ann Arbor. 1983, xvii-278 pags: cinco mapas. Francisco Javier Cisneros: un pionero en transportes y desarrollo económico en Colombia. Hernán Horna (Tesis de doctorado en historia. Vanderbilt Universty. Nashvilie, Tennesee. 1970 University Microfilm International, Ann Arbor, 1983, vii-337 págs: cinco mapas.

  7. The PRECiSE 2 trial of certolizumab pegol, a new PEGylated anti-TNF agent, in the treatment of Crohn's disease - An interview with David A Schwartz, 13 June 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Schwartz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available David A SchwartzVanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USAContext: Certolizumab pegol (CDP 870 is a new anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF therapy currently in development for the treatment of Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Certolizumab pegol is the first PEGylated biologic anti-TNF agent and has a high binding affinity for TNF. Dr. Schwartz was an investigator of the PRECiSE (PEGylated Antibody Fragment Evaluation in Crohn’s Disease Safety and Efficacy 2 trial of certolizumab pegol in patients with Crohn’s disease.Keywords: certolizumab pegol, PRECiSE 2 trial, Crohn’s disease

  8. Solar-Assisted Electric Vehicle Charging Station Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Durfee, Norman [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Overbey, Randall M [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been awarded $6.8 million in the Department of Energy (DOE) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds as part of an overall $114.8 million ECOtality grant with matching funds from regional partners to install 125 solar-assisted Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations across Knoxville, Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis. Significant progress has been made toward completing the scope with the installation of 25 solar-assisted charging stations at ORNL; six stations at Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); and 27 stations at Nissan's Smyrna and Franklin sites, with three more stations under construction at Nissan's new lithium-ion battery plant. Additionally, the procurement process for contracting the installation of 34 stations at Knoxville, the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), and Nashville sites is underway with completion of installation scheduled for early 2012. Progress is also being made on finalizing sites and beginning installations of 30 stations in Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis by EPRI and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The solar-assisted EV charging station project has made great strides in fiscal year 2011. A total of 58 solar-assisted EV parking spaces have been commissioned in East and Middle Tennessee, and progress on installing the remaining 67 spaces is well underway. The contract for the 34 stations planned for Knoxville, UTK, and Nashville should be underway in October with completion scheduled for the end of March 2012; the remaining three Nissan stations are under construction and scheduled to be complete in November; and the EPRI/TVA stations for Chattanooga, Vanderbilt, and Memphis are underway and should be complete by the end of March 2012. As additional Nissan LEAFs are being delivered, usage of the charging stations has increased substantially. The project is on course to complete all 125 solar-assisted EV charging stations in time to collect meaningful data

  9. «Something the lord made» (2004. From research to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva FEITO CUESTA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Something the lord made is a biopic focused on the life of a young Afro?American carpenter getting involved in medical research, together with a renowned surgeon in Nashville (Tennessee during the 1930s.It does not only show related aspects with Cardiology, Surgery and Medical Practice but also exposes the difficulties who the aforesaid carpenter had to face in the beginning of the 20th century firstly pursuing an utopia (cardiac surgery and achieving at last a successful development in what constituted a relevant breakthrough in Medicine.

  10. Key Factors Affecting the Price of Airbnb Listings: A Geographically Weighted Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Airbnb has been increasingly gaining popularity since 2008 due to its low prices and direct interactions with the local community. This paper employed a general linear model (GLM and a geographically weighted regression (GWR model to identify the key factors affecting Airbnb listing prices using data sets of 794 samples of Airbnb listings of business units in Metro Nashville, Tennessee. The results showed that the GWR model performs better than the GLM in terms of accuracy and affected variable selections. Statistically significant differences varied across regions in Metro Nashville. The coefficients illustrate a decreasing trend while there is an increase in the distance from the listed units to the convention center, which indicates that Airbnb listing prices are more sensitive to the distance from the convention center in the central area than in other areas. These findings can also provide implications for stakeholders such as Airbnb hosts to gain a better understanding of the market situation and formulate a suitable pricing strategy.

  11. Atmospheric NO2: in situ laser-induced fluorescence detection atparts per trillion mixing ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Joel A.; Wooldridge, Paul J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    1999-08-04

    NO2 affects the abundance of O3 and OH throughout theatmosphere, exerting influence over stratospheric ozone, on the oxidativecapacity of the atmosphere, on the greenhouse effect, on production oforganic and inorganic aerosol, and on production of photochemical smog.In the troposphere, NO2 mixing ratios vary from 100s of parts per billion(ppb) in cities to below 10 parts per trillion (ppt) in remote locations.We describe a laser-induced fluorescence instrument designed for accurate(+-5 percent, 1s), continuous, autonomous, in situ observations of NO2with the sensitivity (15 ppt/10 secat S/N=2) and portability necessary tostudy NO2 anywhere in the troposphere. The technique is advantageousbecause it is spectroscopically specific and direct in that it does notrequire conversion of NO2 into another species (e.g., NO) prior todetection eliminating a class of potential interferences. Performance ofthe instrument is illustrated with 15 weeks (July-Oct 1998) ofobservations at the University of California, Blodgett Forest fieldstation located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada and 4 weeks (June15-July 15, 1999) in Nashville, TN during the Southern Oxidants Study.Ambient concentrations of NO2 at Blodgett Forest varied from below 50 pptto 4000 ppt and NO2 ranged from 5 to 50 percent of total reactivenitrogen, while in Nashville, TN concentrations ranged from 1 ppb to 75ppb.

  12. Pharmacologic management of bone-related complications and bone metastases in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardley DA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Denise A Yardley1,2 1Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Tennessee Oncology, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: There is a high risk for bone loss and skeletal-related events, including bone metastases, in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Both the disease itself and its therapeutic treatments can negatively impact bone, resulting in decreases in bone mineral density and increases in bone loss. These negative effects on the bone can significantly impact morbidity and mortality. Effective management and minimization of bone-related complications in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remain essential. This review discusses the current understanding of molecular and biological mechanisms involved in bone turnover and metastases, increased risk for bone-related complications from breast cancer and breast cancer therapy, and current and emerging treatment strategies for managing bone metastases and bone turnover in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, bone metastases, hormone receptor-positive, bone-related complications, interventions, management and management strategies, estrogen receptor-positive

  13. Characterization of Pollution Transport into Texas Using OMI and TES Satellite and In Situ data, and HYSPLIT Back Trajectory Analyses: implications for TCEQ State Implementation Plans and High School/Undergraduate STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxe, C.; Bella, D.; Khaimova, J.; Culpepper, J.; Ahmed, N.; Belkalai, A.; Ealy, J.; Arroyo, I.; Lahoumh, M.; Jenkins, O.; Emmanuel, S.; Andrews, J.; Fu, D.; Wu, L.; Choi, Y.; Morris, G.; Osterman, G. B.; Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Using an online trajectory analysis tool NASA, ArcGIS, Satellite and EPA in situ data, we assess whether high pollution events in Texas are primarily sourced locally or remotely. We focus satellite data that exemplify high O3 and NO2 over Texas's lower troposphere. Four day back trajectory analyses of all dates show that upper-, mid-, and lower-tropospheric air over Texas, containing high O3, is transported from the Gulf of Mexico, Southeast USA, Midwest USA, Northeast USA, the Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Mexico, etc. Only day showed air at 1 km is sourced within Texas. Satellite data show O3 enhancements in the boundary layer and O3 and NO2 enhancements via tropospheric column profiles. These enhancements complement four-day trajectory analysis. This study provides a viable basis for more quantifiable and accurate information for developing effective air quality State Implementation Plans. STEM Impact: (i) D. Bella was an NSF-LSAMP undergraduate research mentee with me at Medgar Evers College-CUNY; she received a B.S. in Environmental Science (and a Chemistry Minor) and is now a Ph.D. graduate student at University at Albany's School of Public Health. (ii) J. Khaimova is an undergraduate Geology and Planetary Science B.S. major at Brooklyn College-CUNY. I have supported Jessica's summer internship in summer 2013 as a CUNY Summer Research Fellow, where she is currently an NSF-REU research mentee at Pennsylvania State University's Meteorology Department. (iii) J. Culpepper received his B.S. in Environmental Science from MEC-CUNY and will be a Ph.D. student, Fall 2014 at University of Iowa's Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. (iv) S. Gentle was a high school researcher with me within ACS's Project SEED Program for high school students. S. Gentle will start her undergraduate career Fall 2014 at Pennsylvania State University and seeks to attain a B.S. in Chemistry. (v). All parties, including high school and undergraduate researchers seek to attend

  14. A charged fusion product diagnostic for a spherical tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Ramona Leticia Valenzuela

    Designs for future nuclear fusion power reactors rely on the ability to create a stable plasma (hot ionized gas of hydrogen isotopes) as a medium with which to sustain nuclear fusion reactions. My dissertation work involves designing, constructing, testing, installing, operating, and validating a new diagnostic for spherical tokamaks, a type of reactor test facility. Through detecting charged particles emitted from the plasma, this instrument can be used to study fusion reaction rates within the plasma and how they are affected by plasma perturbations. Quantitatively assessing nuclear fusion reaction rates at specific locations inside the plasma and as a function of time can provide valuable data that can be used to evaluate theory-based simulations related to energy transport and plasma stability. The Proton Detector (PD), installed in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE) in Abingdon, England, was the first instrument to experimentally detect 3 MeV Protons and 1 MeV Tritons created from deuterium- deuterium (hydrogen isotopes) nuclear fusion reactions inside a spherical tokamak's plasma. The PD consists of an array of particle detectors with a protective housing and the necessary signal conditioning electronics and readout. After several years of designing (which included simulations for detector orientations), fabricating, and testing the PD, it was installed in MAST and data were collected over a period of two months in the summer of 2013. Proton and triton rates as high as 200 kHz were measured and an initial radial profile of these fusion reaction rates inside the plasma was extracted. These results will be compared to a complementary instrument at MAST as well as theory-based simulations and form the knowledge basis for developing a larger future instrument. The design and performance of all instrument components (electrical, computational, mechanical), and subsequent data analysis methods and results are

  15. EDITORIAL: Publisher's Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlashan, Yasmin

    2006-12-01

    In addition to offering an excellent service to authors, referees and readers of the journal, one of the goals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (PPCF) is to support the plasma community. We sponsor a number of prizes each year, usually focused on students' contributions to conferences. The poster prize winners from the 33rd EPS Conference on Plasma Physics can be found in Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 48 B1-B506 along with the invited talks from the conference. Other prizes include: A poster prize at the CCLRC-organised High Power Laser Science Christmas meeting, held in Abingdon, UK, in December 2005. The winning poster was: `Implicit Vlasov Fokker Planck simulations including hydrodynamic ion motion' Christopher Ridgers (Imperial College London). The second prize went to C Cecchitti (Queens University of Belfast), and the third prize to John Howe (University of York). For the first time in 2006 PPCF also sponsored a prize for the best poster presented at the International Workshop on Frontiers of Plasma Physics, held from 21 August-1 September 2006 at the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy. The winner of this prize was Dr Bhaskar Chaudhury (Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, India), for his work on `Plasma stealth technology: reduction of radar cross section of plasma shrouded objects'. Thank you to everyone who participated in these prizes, and congratulations to the winners and runners-up. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the authors and referees of PPCF for all their hard work and support in making the journal a success in 2006 and to wish you all a successful 2007.

  16. Frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia, a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirshner HS

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Howard S KirshnerDepartment of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Frontotemporal dementias are neurodegenerative diseases in which symptoms of frontal and/or temporal lobe disease are the first signs of the illness, and as the diseases progress, they resemble a focal left hemisphere process such as stroke or traumatic brain injury, even more than a neurodegenerative disease. Over time, some patients develop a more generalized dementia. Four clinical subtypes characterize the predominant presentations of this illness: behavioral or frontal variant FTD, progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic primary progressive aphasia. These clinical variants correlate with regional patterns of atrophy on brain imaging studies such as MRI and PET scanning, as well as with biochemical and molecular genetic variants of the disorder. The treatment is as yet only symptomatic, but advances in molecular genetics promise new therapies.Keywords: FTD, behavior variant or frontal variant FTD, pick's disease, PPA, progressive nonfluent aphasia

  17. Spatiotemporal patterns of infant bronchiolitis in a Tennessee Medicaid population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Chantel D; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Wu, Pingsheng; Carroll, Kecia N; Mitchel, Edward F; Hartert, Tina V

    2013-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality in infants, primarily through the induction of bronchiolitis. RSV epidemics are highly seasonal, occurring in the winter months in the northern hemisphere. Within the United States, RSV epidemic dynamics vary both spatially and temporally. This analysis employs a retrospective space–time scan statistic to locate spatiotemporal clustering of infant bronchiolitis in a very large Tennessee (TN) Medicaid cohort. We studied infants less than 6 months of age (N = 52,468 infants) who had an outpatient visit, emergency department visit, or hospitalization for bronchiolitis between 1995 and 2008. The scan statistic revealed distinctive and consistent patterns of deviation in epidemic timing. Eastern TN (Knoxville area) showed clustering in January and February, and Central TN (Nashville area) in November and December. This is likely due to local variation in geography-associated factors which should be taken into consideration in future modeling of RSV epidemics.

  18. Appalachia meets the mid-south in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Richard S.; Jackson, Michel T.-T.

    2003-04-01

    The father of bluegrass and long-time member of the Opry in Nashville, Bill Monroe, had a number of musical influences, including blues, gospel, and the American versions of Anglo-Scots-Irish folk music endemic to Appalachia. (Although Bill Monroe was from western Kentucky, the Appalachian influence is apparent.) In 1946 he recorded a song for Columbia Records that he had written. This song was recorded again in 1954 at Sun Studios as a ``B side'' by the future king of rock and roll, Elvis Presley. Raised in East Tupelo, MS and Memphis, Elvis' music derived from the mid-south's blues and gospel music, but with a peculiar honkytonk-informed, Memphis style. We will compare these artists through this common song and their spoken interviews in terms of voice quality and English dialect. Some copy-synthesis of these artists will be attempted in our search for the high, lonesome and rock and roll sounds.

  19. Environmental setting and water-quality issues in the lower Tennessee River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, James A.; Hoos, Anne B.; Woodside, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program are to describe current water-quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's water resources, identify water-quality changes over time, and identify the primary natural and human factors that affect water quality. The lower Tennessee River Basin is one of 59 river basins selected for study. The water-quality assessment of the lower Tennessee River Basin study unit began in 1997. The lower Tennessee River Basin study unit encompasses an area of about 19,500 square miles and extends from Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Paducah, Kentucky. The study unit had a population of about 1.5 million people in 1995.The study unit was subdivided into subunits with relatively homogeneous geology and physiography. Subdivision of the study unit creates a framework to assess the effects of natural and cultural settings on water quality. Nine subunits were delineated in the study unit; their boundaries generally coincide with level III and level IV ecoregion boundaries. The nine subunits are the Coastal Plain, Transition, Western Highland Rim, Outer Nashville Basin, Inner Nashville Basin, Eastern Highland Rim, Plateau Escarpment and Valleys, Cumberland Plateau, and Valley and Ridge.The lower Tennessee River Basin consists of predominantly forest (51 percent) and agricultural land (40 percent). Activities related to agricultural land use, therefore, are the primary cultural factors likely to have a widespread effect on surface- and ground-water quality in the study unit. Inputs of total nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural activities in 1992 were about 161,000 and 37,900 tons, respectively. About 3.7 million pounds (active ingredient) of pesticides was applied to crops in the lower Tennessee River Basin in 1992.State water-quality agencies identified nutrient enrichment and pathogens as water-quality issues affecting both surface and ground water in the lower Tennessee River Basin. Water-quality data collected by State

  20. Ice rinks skate to energy savings, light quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-11-01

    Retrofitting community ice arenas with modern fluorescent lighting systems in place of the traditional high intensity discharge (HID) metal halide, high pressure sodium or mercury vapour systems to achieve significant energy savings, was discussed. Using the one-two-three-lamp version of a `Triad` instant start, RH series electronic ballasts (manufactured by MagneTek of Nashville, Tennessee) and the right combination of housing, energy consumption at full lighting levels has dropped to 45 to 50 per cent of the previous HID system. The new system also provides a wide range of light levels, and since full illumination is needed only occasionally the actual energy savings are in the 75 to 80 per cent range.

  1. The teratology society 2012-2017 strategic plan: pushing the boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Christine Perdan; Lau, Christopher; Schellpfeffer, Michael A; Stodgell, Christopher J; Carney, Edward W

    2013-01-01

    The Teratology Society held its fourth strategic planning session in Albuquerque, NM, April 10-12, 2012, and launched the 2012-2017 Strategic Plan in conjunction with the 2012 annual meeting in Baltimore, MD. Building on the energy of the successful implementation of prior strategic plans (San Diego, 2007; Nashville,TN 2002; Cincinnati, OH 1998), session participants worked to identify barriers to success as a scientific society, as well as impending challenges and opportunities to which the Society needs to respond. The following report provides an overview of the Strategic Planning process, objectives, activities, and conclusions. A total of 23 members were present at the session, and the group included representation from Council, various committees, and different member constituencies. This plan, Pushing the Boundaries, and its three strategic intents: Broaden Our Identity, Expand Our Membership, and Increase Our Influence, will drive the direction of the Teratology Society for the next five years. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Can we not work together to help family practitioners become more effective pain managers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudin J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Fudin,1,2,3 Timothy J Atkinson,4 Mena Raouf,4 Michael E Schatman51Stratton VA Medical Center, Albany, NY, USA; 2Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USA; 3Scientific and Clinical Affairs, Remitigate LLC, Delmar, NY, USA; 4VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Murfreesboro, Nashville, TN, USA; 5US Pain Foundation, Bellevue, WA, USASnyder et al recently published a review in American Family Physician titled, “Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update”, which provided an overview of pharmacologic treatment options for providers; however, some of the recommendations made by the authors were concerning.1 Recommendations that caught our attention included statements around pregabalin adjustment for renal impairment, using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN, classification of tramadol, tapentadol, and oxycodone in DPN.

  3. Vertebral compression fractures: a review of current management and multimodal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong CC

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyrus C Wong, Matthew J McGirt Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Vertebral compression fractures are a prevalent disease affecting osteoporotic patients. When symptomatic, they cause significant pain and loss of function and have a high public health impact. In this paper we outline the diagnosis and management of these patients, with evidence-based review of treatment outcomes for the various therapeutic options. Diagnosis involves a clinical history focusing on the nature of the patient's pain as well as various imaging studies. Management is multimodal in nature and starts with conservative therapy consisting of analgesic medication, medication for osteoporosis, physical therapy, and bracing. Patients who are refractory to conservative management may be candidates for vertebral augmentation through either vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. Keywords: vertebral compression fractures, osteoporosis, bracing, vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty

  4. Aquaculture applications of a thermal effluent and considerations on geothermal water use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, W.A.; Meriwether, J.

    1977-11-16

    Aquaculture may benefit from the use of thermal discharges from power plants or geothermal waters. Fish culture technology applicable to use of heated effluents should also apply generally to geothermal water sources. In the early 1970's the Tennessee Valley Authority and a private cooperator pumped thermal effluent from the discharge canal of the Gallatin Steam Plant near Nashville, TN, through a raceway facility, to evaluate an intensive culture system for catfish. Water tempertures averaged 5/sup 0/C above ambient plant intake water. Results demonstrated the potential of heated water to extend the growing season, enhance growth rates, and increase production. Numerous constraints hindering commercial use of thermal effluents for aquaculture were also identified.

  5. Current advances in the treatment of adolescent drug use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winters KC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ken C Winters,1,3 Emily E Tanner-Smith,2 Elena Bresani,3 Kathleen Meyers31Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, 2Peabody Research Institute, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 3Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Research on the development and efficacy of drug abuse treatment for adolescents has made great strides recently. Several distinct models have been studied, and these approaches range from brief interventions to intensive treatments. This paper has three primary aims: to provide an overview of conceptual issues relevant to treating adolescents suspected of drug-related problems, including an overview of factors believed to contribute to a substance use disorder, to review the empirical treatment outcome literature, and to identify areas of need and promising directions for future research.Keywords: adolescent drug abuse, treatment

  6. Searching for Work, Striving for Justice: New Perspectives on Latin American Migrations to the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert V. Kemper

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available – Corridors of Migration: The Odyssey of Mexican Laborers, 1600-1933, by Rodolfo F. Acuña. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press, 2007. – Impacts of Border Enforcement on Mexican Migration: The View from Sending Communities, edited by Wayne A. Cornelius and Jessa M. Lewis. La Jolla, SD: Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California, 2007.1– Four Generations of Norteños: New Research from the Cradle of Mexican Migration, edited by Wayne A. Cornelius, David Fitzgerald, and Scott Borger. La Jolla, SD: Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California, 2008. – Mayan Journeys: The New Migration from Yucatán to the United States, edited by Wayne A. Cornelius, David Fitzgerald, and Pedro Lewin Fischer. La Jolla, SD: Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, University of California, 2007. – In Search of Providence: Transnational Mayan Identities, by Patricia Foxen. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2007.

  7. Abstract and research accomplishments of University Coal Research Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their respective projects in time for distribution at a conference on June 13--14, 1995 at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to that request. For convenience, the 70 grants reported in this book are stored into eight technical areas, Coal Science, Coal Surface Science, Reaction Chemistry, Advanced Process Concepts, Engineering Fundamentals and Thermodynamics, Environmental Science, high Temperature Phenomena, and Special topics. Indexes are provided for locating projects by subject, principal investigators, and contracting organizations. Each extended abstract describes project objectives, work accomplished, significance to the Fossil Energy Program, and plans for the next year.

  8. Rational dosing of gabapentin and pregabalin in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mena Raouf,1 Timothy J Atkinson,1 Meredith W Crumb,1 Jeffrey Fudin2–5 1VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Murfreesboro, Nashville, TN, 2Stratton VA Medical Center, 3Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, 4Western New England University College of Pharmacy, Springfield, MA, 5Scientific and Clinical Affairs, Remitigate LLC, Delmar, NY, USA IntroductionRenal dose adjustments for gabapentin and pregabalin are ubiquitously evident in the medical literature. All manufacturers for these branded and generic dosage forms list dosing recommendations relative to creatinine clearance (CrCl for both medications (Table 1.1,2 However, the basis of these recommendations has not been well articulated. 

  9. Establishing a volunteer doula program within a nurse-midwifery education program: a winning situation for both clients and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Elizabeth G; Collins, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The use of labor doulas is beneficial for mothers and newborns, but availability and cost can be barriers. The Nashville Volunteer Doula Program was formed to provide labor support to clients of a faculty nurse-midwifery practice. The volunteer doula pool is comprised of both nurse-midwifery students who have trained as doulas and community doulas. Training and coordination of volunteers are managed by nurse-midwifery students with faculty support. Students gain valuable exposure to providing supportive care during labor and birth, which augments their nurse-midwifery education. This novel program operates at a low cost and offers benefits to students as well as women who use the doula service. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  10. Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease patients and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claassen DO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel O Claassen, Scott J KutscherDepartment of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor complaints of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD, and can have a great impact on quality of life. These disturbances manifest in a variety of ways; for instance, insomnia, sleep fragmentation, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep-related movement disorders such as restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements may share a common pathophysiology, and occurrence of rapid eye movement behavior disorder may predate the onset of PD or other synucleinopathies by several years. Medications for PD can have a significant impact on sleep, representing a great challenge to the treating physician. Awareness of the complex relationship between PD and sleep disorders, as well as the varied way in which sleep disturbances appear, is imperative for successful long-term management.Keywords: sleep disorders, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, Parkinson disease, fatigue, REM behavior disorder

  11. The clinical efficacy of dabigatran etexilate for preventing stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis CR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Ellis, Daniel W KaiserVanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: The use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs for stroke and systemic embolism prevention in the setting of specifically non valvular atrial fibrillation has provided clinicians with a realistic treatment alternative to the traditional dose-adjusted, warfarin-based anticoagulation that is targeted to a therapeutic international normalized ratio range of 2.0–3.0. We discuss the use of dabigatran in the setting of mechanical heart valves, atrial fibrillation or left atrial catheter ablation procedures, reversal of the drug in the setting of adverse bleeding events, and background on the molecular biology and development of this novel treatment for stroke reduction.Keywords: NOACs, systemic embolism, atrial fibrillation, stroke, dabigatran etexilate

  12. Imaging body composition in obesity and weight loss: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silver HJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Heidi J Silver1, E Brian Welch2, Malcolm J Avison2, Kevin D Niswender1,31Department of Medicine, 2Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Imaging Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; 3Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Obesity is a threat to public health worldwide primarily due to the comorbidities related to visceral adiposity, inflammation, and insulin resistance that increase risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The translational research portfolio that originally described these risk factors was significantly enhanced by imaging techniques, such as dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, computed tomography (CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In this article, we briefly review the important contributions of these techniques to understand the role of body composition in the pathogenesis of obesity-related complications. Notably, these imaging techniques have contributed greatly to recent findings identifying gender and racial differences in body composition and patterns of body composition change during weight loss. Although these techniques have the ability to generate good-quality body composition data, each possesses limitations. For example, DEXA is unable to differentiate type of fat, CT has better resolution but provides greater ionizing radiation exposure, and MRI tends to require longer imaging times and specialized equipment for acquisition and analysis. With the serious need for efficacious and cost-effective therapies to appropriately identify and treat at-risk obese individuals, there is greater need for translational tools that can further elucidate the interplay between body composition and the metabolic aberrations associated with obesity. In conclusion, we will offer our perspective on the evolution toward an ideal imaging method for body composition assessment in obesity and weight loss, and the challenges remaining to achieve this

  13. Contribution of biogenic emissions to the formation of ozone and particulate matter in the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Betty K; Wu, Shiang-Yuh; Seigneur, Christian

    2002-08-15

    As anthropogenic emissions of ozone (O3) precursors, fine particulate matter (PM2.5), and PM2.5 precursors continue to decrease in the United States, the fraction of O3 and PM2.5 attributable to natural sources may become significant in some locations, reducing the efficacy that can be expected from future controls of anthropogenic sources. Modeling studies were conducted to estimate the contribution of biogenic emissions to the formation of O3 and PM2.5 in Nashville/TN and the northeastern United States. Two approaches were used to bound the estimates. In an anthropogenic simulation, biogenic emissions and their influence at the domain boundaries were eliminated. Contributions of biogenic compounds to the simulated concentrations of O3 and PM2.5 were determined by the deviation of the concentrations in the anthropogenic case from those in the base case. A biogenic simulation was used to assess the amounts of O3 and PM2.5 produced in an environment free from anthropogenic influences in emissions and boundary conditions. In both locations, the contribution of biogenic emissions to O3 was small (production of O3 was much more sensitive to biogenic emissions in urban areas (22-34%). Therefore, the effects of biogenic emissions on O3 manifested mostly via their interaction with anthropogenic emissions of NOx. In the anthropogenic simulations, the average contribution of biogenic and natural sources to PM2.5 was estimated at 9% in Nashville/TN and 12% in the northeast domain. Because of the long atmospheric lifetimes of PM2.5, the contribution of biogenic/natural PM2.5 from the boundary conditions was higher than the contribution of biogenic aerosols produced within the domain. The elimination of biogenic emissions also affected the chemistry of other secondary PM2.5 components. Very little PM2.5 was formed in the biogenic simulations.

  14. Accuracy of immunodiagnostic tests for active tuberculosis using single and combined results: a multicenter TBNET-Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Goletti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical application of IFN-gamma release assays (IGRAs has recently improved the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection. In a multicenter study of the Tuberculosis Network European Trialsgroup (TBNET we aimed to ascertain in routine clinical practice the accuracy of a novel assay using selected peptides encoded in the mycobacterial genomic region of difference (RD 1 for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis in comparison with tuberculin skin test (TST, QuantiFERON-TB GOLD In-Tube (Cellestis Ltd., Carnegie, Australia and T-SPOT.TB (Oxfordimmunotec, Abingdon, UK. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 425 individuals from 6 different European centres were prospectively enrolled. We found that sensitivity of the novel test, TST, QuantiFERON-TB GOLD In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB was respectively 73.1%, 85.3%, 78.1%, and 85.2%; specificity was respectively 70.6%, 48.0%, 61.9% and 44.3%; positive likelihood ratios were respectively 2.48, 1.64, 2.05, and 1.53; negative likelihood ratios were respectively 0.38, 0.31, 0.35, 0.33. Sensitivity of TST combined with the novel test, QuantiFERON-TB GOLD In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB increased up to 92.4%, 97.7% and 97.1%, respectively. The likelihood ratios of combined negative results of TST with, respectively, the novel test, QuantiFERON-TB GOLD In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB were 0.19, 0.07 and 0.10. CONCLUSIONS: The assay based on RD1 selected peptides has similar accuracy for active tuberculosis compared with TST and commercial IGRAs. Then, independently of the spectrum of antigens used in the assays to elicit mycobacterial specific immune responses, the novel test, IGRAs, and the TST do not allow an accurate identification of active tuberculosis in clinical practice. However, the combined use of the novel assay or commercial IGRAs with TST may allow exclusion of tuberculosis.

  15. FOREWORD: VI Workshop in Electron Volt Neutron Spectroscopy: Frontiers and Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, A. G.; Senesi, R.; Fernandez-Alonso, F.

    2014-12-01

    January 2014 saw the congregation in Abingdon (UK) of scientists from across the world, to discuss the current state and future of spectroscopy using epithermal neutrons. This meeting was the sixth in a series of workshops held in collaboration between the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK) and the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy), aimed at bringing together researchers with an interest in the use of electron-volt neutrons in spectroscopic studies [1]. This technique is termed Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS), and also Neutron Compton Scattering (NCS) in reference to the analogy with Compton scattering of X-rays from electrons. In particular, this meeting centred jointly around experimentalists and theoreticians, formulating animated discussions as to the current overview of DINS and future horizons facing the field. The use of electron Volt neutrons for spectroscopic measurements dates back to the advent of proton-driven spallation neutron sources in the 1970s and 1980s. Following an initial scientific meeting in Los Alamos (USA) [2], the first two meetings in this series were held in Abingdon (UK) in 1995 and 1998, with subsequent meetings held in Santa Fe (USA) in 2005 [3], Oak Ridge National Laboratory (USA) in 2006 [4], and Rome, Italy; in 2010 [5]. The flagship instrument serving a continual user-programme for DINS measurements, and the main focus of this meeting, has been the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS [6, 7]. Subsequent instruments like SEQUOIA in the USA [8, 9] and a newer spectrometer in the Bariloche LINAC in Argentina [10, 11] have also been commissioned and began serving a growing user community. The availability of DINS measurements has extended the range of possible spectroscopic techniques that utilise neutrons into the kinematic region of high energy and momentum transfers, shown schematically in Figure 1. Spectroscopic instrument suites such as that of ISIS are thus able to probe processes on timescales across nine

  16. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.

    2010-08-01

    subsequent meetings (Aspenäs (1991), Trieste (1993), Princeton (1995), and JET/Abingdon (1997)) were entitled `Alpha Particles in Fusion Research'. During the JET/Abingdon meeting in 1997 it was decided to extend the topic by including other suprathermal particles, in particular accelerated electrons, and rename the meetings accordingly. The subsequent meetings with the current name `Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems' were held in Naka (1999), Gothenburg (2001), San Diego (2003), Takayama (2005) and Kloster Seeon (2007). The most recent meeting in this series was held in Kyiv, Ukraine, in September 2009. This was an anniversary meeting, 20 years after the first meeting. Like the first meeting, it was hosted by the Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. It was attended by about 80 researchers from 18 countries, ITER, and EC. The program of the meeting consisted of 78 presentations, including 12 invited talks, 16 oral contributed talks, and 50 posters, which were selected by the International Advisory Committee (IAC). The IAC consisted of 11 people representing EC (L.-G. Eriksson), Germany (S. Günter), Italy (F. Zonca), Japan (K. Shinohara and K. Toi), Switzerland (A. Fasoli), UK (S. Sharapov), Ukraine (Ya. Kolesnichenko—IAC Chair), USA (H. Berk, W. Heidbrink, and R. Nazikian). The meeting program covered a wide range of physics issues concerning energetic ions in toroidal fusion facilities—tokamaks, stellarators, and spherical tori. Many new interesting and practically important results of both experimental and theoretical studies were reported. The research presented covered topics such as instabilities driven by energetic ions, transport of energetic ions caused by plasma microturbulence and destabilized eigenmodes, non-linear phenomena induced by the instabilities, classical transport processes, effects of runaway electrons, diagnostics of energetic ions and plasmas, and aspects of ITER physics. In addition to these

  17. The pet factor--companion animals as a conduit for getting to know people, friendship formation and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lisa; Martin, Karen; Christian, Hayley; Nathan, Andrea; Lauritsen, Claire; Houghton, Steve; Kawachi, Ichiro; McCune, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    While companion animals have been previously identified as a direct source of companionship and support to their owners, their role as a catalyst for friendship formation or social support networks among humans has received little attention. This study investigated the indirect role of pets as facilitators for three dimensions of social relatedness; getting to know people, friendship formation and social support networks. A telephone survey of randomly selected residents in four cities, one in Australia (Perth; n = 704) and three in the U.S. (San Diego, n = 690; Portland, n = 634; Nashville, n = 664) was conducted. All participants were asked about getting to know people within their neighborhood. Pet owners were asked additional questions about the type/s of pet/s they owned, whether they had formed friendships as a result of their pet, and if they had received any of four different types of social support from the people they met through their pet. Pet owners were significantly more likely to get to know people in their neighborhood than non-pet owners (OR 1.61; 95%CI: 1.30, 1.99). When analyzed by site, this relationship was significant for Perth, San Diego and Nashville. Among pet owners, dog owners in the three U.S. cities (but not Perth) were significantly more likely than owners of other types of pets to regard people whom they met through their pet as a friend (OR 2.59; 95%CI: 1.94, 3.46). Around 40% of pet owners reported receiving one or more types of social support (i.e. emotional, informational, appraisal, instrumental) via people they met through their pet. This research suggests companion animals can be a catalyst for several dimensions of human social relationships in neighborhood settings, ranging from incidental social interaction and getting to know people, through to formation of new friendships. For many pet owners, their pets also facilitated relationships from which they derived tangible forms of social support, both of a practical and

  18. The association between dog walking, physical activity and owner’s perceptions of safety: cross-sectional evidence from the US and Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Christian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the relationship between dog walking and physical activity within and between four US cities and Australia and investigated if dog walking is associated with higher perceived safety in US and Australian cities. Methods Dog owners (n = 1113 in the Pet Connections Study completed a cross-sectional survey. Data were collected across four study sites; three in the US (San Diego, Nashville, Portland and a fourth in Australia (Perth. Physical activity, local walking, dog walking, and individual and community perceptions of safety were analysed for dog walkers and non-dog walkers for each study site. Between-city comparisons were examined for dog walkers. Results Across all study sites, dog walkers walked with their dog 5–6 times/week for a total of 93–109 min/week and achieved ≥30mins of physical activity on more days/week and walked in their neighbourhood more often/week, compared with non-dog walkers (all p ≤ 0.01. Compared with Perth, significantly fewer dog walkers walked in their local park in the three US study sites. San Diego dog walkers walked more often in their neighborhood/week compared with Perth dog walkers (all p ≤ 0.05. In Portland, dog walkers perceived significantly more neighborhood problems and in Nashville dog walkers perceived a significantly higher level of neighborhood natural surveillance (i.e., ‘eyes on the street’, compared with non-dog walkers (both p ≤ 0.05. Among dog walkers, females were more likely than males to feel safer walking with their dog in their neighborhood (OR = 2.49; 95 % CI = 1.76, 3.53. Compared with dog walkers in Perth, dog walkers from each of the US study sites felt safer in their neighborhood and perceived there was more neighborhood surveillance (all p ≤ 0.001. Conclusion This multi-site international study provides further support for the potential for dog walking to increase levels of daily physical activity. Walking

  19. The pet factor--companion animals as a conduit for getting to know people, friendship formation and social support.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Wood

    Full Text Available While companion animals have been previously identified as a direct source of companionship and support to their owners, their role as a catalyst for friendship formation or social support networks among humans has received little attention. This study investigated the indirect role of pets as facilitators for three dimensions of social relatedness; getting to know people, friendship formation and social support networks.A telephone survey of randomly selected residents in four cities, one in Australia (Perth; n = 704 and three in the U.S. (San Diego, n = 690; Portland, n = 634; Nashville, n = 664 was conducted. All participants were asked about getting to know people within their neighborhood. Pet owners were asked additional questions about the type/s of pet/s they owned, whether they had formed friendships as a result of their pet, and if they had received any of four different types of social support from the people they met through their pet.Pet owners were significantly more likely to get to know people in their neighborhood than non-pet owners (OR 1.61; 95%CI: 1.30, 1.99. When analyzed by site, this relationship was significant for Perth, San Diego and Nashville. Among pet owners, dog owners in the three U.S. cities (but not Perth were significantly more likely than owners of other types of pets to regard people whom they met through their pet as a friend (OR 2.59; 95%CI: 1.94, 3.46. Around 40% of pet owners reported receiving one or more types of social support (i.e. emotional, informational, appraisal, instrumental via people they met through their pet.This research suggests companion animals can be a catalyst for several dimensions of human social relationships in neighborhood settings, ranging from incidental social interaction and getting to know people, through to formation of new friendships. For many pet owners, their pets also facilitated relationships from which they derived tangible forms of social support, both of a practical

  20. Prospective Retinal and Optic Nerve Vitrectomy Evaluation (PROVE study: findings at 3 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy RK

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rahul K Reddy,1 Maziar Lalezary,1 Stephen J Kim,1 Jeffrey A Kammer,1 Rachel W Kuchtey,1 Edward F Cherney,1 Franco M Recchia,2 Karen M Joos,1 Anita Agarwal,1 Janice C Law11Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Tennessee Retina, PC, Nashville, TN, USABackground: The purpose of this paper is to report the 3-month findings of the Prospective Retinal and Optic Nerve Vitrectomy Evaluation (PROVE study.Methods: Eighty eyes of 40 participants undergoing vitrectomy were enrolled. Participants underwent baseline evaluation of the study (surgical and fellow (control eye that included: intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, gonioscopy, cup-to-disc ratio measurement, color fundus and optic disc photography, automated perimetry, and optical coherence tomography of the macula and optic nerve. Evaluation was repeated at 3 months. Main outcome measures were changes in macula and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness and intraocular pressure.Results: All participants completed follow-up. Mean cup-to-disc ratio of study and fellow eyes at baseline was 0.43 ± 0.2 and 0.46 ± 0.2, respectively, and 13% of participants had undiagnosed narrow angles. There was no significant change in intraocular pressure, cup-to-disc ratio, or pattern standard deviation in study eyes compared with baseline or fellow eyes at 3 months. Vision improved in all study eyes at 3 months compared with baseline (P = 0.013, but remained significantly worse than fellow eyes (P < 0.001. Central subfield and temporal peripapillary RNFL thickness were significantly greater in eyes with epiretinal membrane (P < 0.05, and resolution after surgery correlated with visual improvement (P < 0.05.Conclusion: The 3-month results do not indicate any increased risk for open-angle glaucoma but suggest that a relatively high percentage of eyes may be at risk of angle closure glaucoma. Temporal RNFL thickness and central subfield were increased

  1. Walter Rowe Courtenay, Jr. (1933–2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    WALTER R. COURTENAY, JR., ichthyologist and retired professor, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, died in Gainesville, Florida, on 30 January 2014 at age 80. Walt was born in Neenah, Wisconsin, on 6 November 1933, son of Walter and Emily Courtenay. Walt's interest in fish began at a young age as evidenced by a childhood diary in which at 13 years of age he wrote about his first catch—a two-and-a-half pound “pike” from Lake Winnebago. When Walt turned ten, the family moved from Wisconsin to Nashville, Tennessee, the move precipitated by his father accepting a position as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. During those early days in Nashville, Walt's father would take summers off and travel to Michigan to teach at Camp Miniwanca along the shore of Lake Michigan where father and son honed their angling skills. It was also at that time Walt's father had definite views on what his son should be doing in adult life—in Walt's case it was to become a medical doctor. However, his Woods Hole internship in marine biology and oceanography toward the end of his undergraduate years was a transformative experience for him so much so that he abandoned all ideas of becoming a medical doctor and instead specialized in ichthyology and oceanography. Apart from the inherent interest and opportunities Woods Hole opened to him, being back at the shore of a large body of water, in this case the Atlantic Ocean, was far more interesting than sitting in lectures on organic chemistry. With that, Walt completed his B.A. degree at Vanderbilt University in 1956. In 1960 while in graduate school in Miami, Walt met and married Francine Saporito, and over the next several years had two children, Walter III and Catherine. He went on to receive his M.S. in 1961 from The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami on the systematics of the genus Haemulon (grunts) and his Ph.D. degree in 1965 working under his advisor C. Richard

  2. The Pet Factor - Companion Animals as a Conduit for Getting to Know People, Friendship Formation and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lisa; Martin, Karen; Christian, Hayley; Nathan, Andrea; Lauritsen, Claire; Houghton, Steve; Kawachi, Ichiro; McCune, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background While companion animals have been previously identified as a direct source of companionship and support to their owners, their role as a catalyst for friendship formation or social support networks among humans has received little attention. This study investigated the indirect role of pets as facilitators for three dimensions of social relatedness; getting to know people, friendship formation and social support networks. Methods A telephone survey of randomly selected residents in four cities, one in Australia (Perth; n = 704) and three in the U.S. (San Diego, n = 690; Portland, n = 634; Nashville, n = 664) was conducted. All participants were asked about getting to know people within their neighborhood. Pet owners were asked additional questions about the type/s of pet/s they owned, whether they had formed friendships as a result of their pet, and if they had received any of four different types of social support from the people they met through their pet. Results Pet owners were significantly more likely to get to know people in their neighborhood than non-pet owners (OR 1.61; 95%CI: 1.30, 1.99). When analyzed by site, this relationship was significant for Perth, San Diego and Nashville. Among pet owners, dog owners in the three U.S. cities (but not Perth) were significantly more likely than owners of other types of pets to regard people whom they met through their pet as a friend (OR 2.59; 95%CI: 1.94, 3.46). Around 40% of pet owners reported receiving one or more types of social support (i.e. emotional, informational, appraisal, instrumental) via people they met through their pet. Conclusion This research suggests companion animals can be a catalyst for several dimensions of human social relationships in neighborhood settings, ranging from incidental social interaction and getting to know people, through to formation of new friendships. For many pet owners, their pets also facilitated relationships from which they derived tangible forms of social

  3. The Cumberland River Flood of 2010 and Corps Reservoir Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charley, W.; Hanbali, F.; Rohrbach, B.

    2010-12-01

    On Saturday, May 1, 2010, heavy rain began falling in the Cumberland River Valley and continued through the following day. 13.5 inches was measured at Nashville, an unprecedented amount that doubled the previous 2-day record, and exceeded the May monthly total record of 11 inches. Elsewhere in the valley, amounts of over 19 inches were measured. The frequency of this storm was estimated to exceed the one-thousand year event. This historic rainfall brought large scale flooding to the Cumberland-Ohio-Tennessee River Valleys, and caused over 2 billion dollars in damages, despite the numerous flood control projects in the area, including eight U.S. Army Corps of Engineers projects. The vast majority of rainfall occurred in drainage areas that are uncontrolled by Corps flood control projects, which lead to the wide area flooding. However, preliminary analysis indicates that operations of the Corps projects reduced the Cumberland River flood crest in Nashville by approximately five feet. With funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, hydrologic, hydraulic and reservoir simulation models have just been completed for the Cumberland-Ohio-Tennessee River Valleys. These models are being implemented in the Corps Water Management System (CWMS), a comprehensive data acquisition and hydrologic modeling system for short-term decision support of water control operations in real time. The CWMS modeling component uses observed rainfall and forecasted rainfall to compute forecasts of river flows into and downstream of reservoirs, using HEC-HMS. Simulation of reservoir operations, utilizing either the HEC-ResSim or CADSWES RiverWare program, uses these flow scenarios to provide operational decision information for the engineer. The river hydraulics program, HEC-RAS, computes river stages and water surface profiles for these scenarios. An inundation boundary and depth map of water in the flood plain can be calculated from the HEC-RAS results using Arc

  4. Occupy Vanderbilt: uma experiência entre o ativismo social e a sociedade de controle (Occupy Vanderbilt: an experience between the social activism and the control society Doi: 10.5212/Emancipacao.v.15i2.0007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Torreão Sá de Almeida

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O artigo em questão tem como objetivo analisar a ocupação criada na Universidade de Vanderbilt, em Nashville, no Tennessee, na esteira dos movimentos de ocupação ocorridos no ano de 2012, tal qual o Occupy Wall Street. O estudo é feito a partir das análises sobre a questão da sociedade de controle, de Gilles Deleuze; da estruturação dos espaços através do pensamento de Marc Augé; e do pensamento sobre os movimentos sociais, de Alain Touraine. Uma análise sobre os movimentos de ocupação de praças públicas no século XXI estabelece o ponto inicial do artigo, desenvolvendo a partir daí os desdobramentos da ocupação na Universidade de Vanderbilt. Partindo desse pressuposto foi feita uma etnografia sobre o Occupy Vanderbilt, relacionando o surgimento dessa nova proposta de ativismo social e sua relação com a sociedade de controle cotidianamente presente no mundo contemporâneo. Palavras-chave: Movimentos de ocupação. Sociedade de controle. Resistência.  Abstract: The article in question aims to analyze the occupation created at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, in the wake of the occupation movements in 2012, just as the Occupy Wall Street. The study is made from the analysis on the issue of control society, by Gilles Deleuze; the structuring of space through thought of Marc Augé; and the thinking of social movements, by Alain Touraine. An analysis of the occupation movements in public squares in the twenty-first century establishes the starting point of the article, developing from there the consequences of the occupation at Vanderbilt University. Based on this assumption was made an ethnography about the Occupy Vanderbilt, relating the emergence of this new proposal for social activism and its relation to the daily control of our society in the contemporary world. Keywords: occupation movements. Control society. Resistance.

  5. Overcoming the risk of inaction from emissions uncertainty in smallholder agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, N. J.; Ryan, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    proof of this concept and a platform on which greater functionality and flexibility can be built. We hope that this, and other similar initiatives, will deliver approaches to greenhouse gas accounting that reduce risks and maximize benefits to smallholder farmers. References Beddington J R et al 2012 What next for agriculture after Durban? Science 335 289-90 Coleman K and Jenkinson D S 1996 RothC 26.3 a model for the turnover of carbon in soil Evaluation of Soil Organic Matter Models Using Existing, Long-Term Datasets ed D S Powlson, P Smith and J U Smith (Heidelberg: Springer) Del Grosso S J, Ojima D S, Parton W J, Mosier A R, Petereson G A and Schimel D S 2002 Simulated effects of dryland cropping intensification on soil organic matter and greenhouse gas exchanges using the DAYCENT ecosystem model Environ. Pollut. 116 S75-83 IPCC (Intergovenmental Panel on Climate Change) 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. Prepared by the National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme (Hayama: IGES) (www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/2006gl/index.html) Li C, Frolking S and Harris R 1994 Modeling carbon biogeochemistry in agricultural soils Glob. Biogeochem. Cycles 8 237-54 Milori D M B P, Segini A, Da Silva W T L, Posadas A, Mares V, Quiroz R and Ladislau M N 2012 Emerging techniques for soil carbon measurements Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture ed E Wollenberg, A Nihart, M-L Tapio-Bistrom and M Greig-Gran (Abingdon: Earthscan) Olander L P 2012 Using biogeochemical process models to quantify greenhouse gas mitigation from agricultural management Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture ed E Wollenberg, A Nihart, M-L Tapio-Bistrom and M Greig-Gran (Abingdon: Earthscan) Parton W J, Schimel D S, Cole C V and Ojima D S 1987 Analysis of factors controlling soil organic matter levels in Great Plains grasslands Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 51 1173-9 Plan Vivo 2012 The Plan Vivo Standard For Community Payments for Ecosystem Services Programmes Version 2012 (available

  6. Stress across generations: A qualitative study of stress, coping, and caregiving among Mexican immigrant mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non, Amy L; León-Pérez, Gabriela; Glass, Holly; Kelly, Emma; Garrison, Nanibaa' A

    2017-07-03

    Hispanic immigrants represent the largest and fastest growing ethnic minority within the US, justifying increased attention to identify factors that influence declining immigrant health across generations. This study investigates the range of psychosocial stress exposures and coping mechanisms of Mexican immigrant mothers, and implications for the health of their US-born children. We conducted 10 focus groups with 1st generation Mexican-born immigrant mothers (n = 32 women) in Nashville, TN, in the summer of 2014. Focus groups elicited challenges and benefits of life as an immigrant mother. Data were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. We identified four themes that indicate how maternal stressors could impact children's health: (1) work-family tradeoff, (2) limited freedom/mobility, (3) reduction of social networks, and (4) transmission of anxiety and fears to children. Women in our study also engage in a range of coping mechanisms, including the creation of new social networks, seeking support in religion, and seeking help from community resources. These results highlight the importance of developing new questionnaires to elicit stress exposures for Mexican immigrant mothers. Findings also suggest the value of intervention strategies and social policies that would ultimately improve maternal and child health in this marginalized population.

  7. Delirium and Catatonia in Critically Ill Patients: The Delirium and Catatonia Prospective Cohort Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jo E; Carlson, Richard; Duggan, Maria C; Pandharipande, Pratik; Girard, Timothy D; Wang, Li; Thompson, Jennifer L; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Francis, Andrew; Nicolson, Stephen E; Dittus, Robert S; Heckers, Stephan; Ely, E Wesley

    2017-11-01

    Catatonia, a condition characterized by motor, behavioral, and emotional changes, can occur during critical illness and appear as clinically similar to delirium, yet its management differs from delirium. Traditional criteria for medical catatonia preclude its diagnosis in delirium. Our objective in this investigation was to understand the overlap and relationship between delirium and catatonia in ICU patients and determine diagnostic thresholds for catatonia. Convenience cohort, nested within two ongoing randomized trials. Single academic medical center in Nashville, TN. We enrolled 136 critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation and/or vasopressors, randomized to two usual care sedation regimens. Patients were assessed for delirium and catatonia by independent and masked personnel using Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU and the Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale mapped to Diagnostic Statistical Manual 5 criterion A for catatonia. Of 136 patients, 58 patients (43%) had only delirium, four (3%) had only catatonia, 42 (31%) had both, and 32 (24%) had neither. In a logistic regression model, more catatonia signs were associated with greater odds of having delirium. For example, patient assessments with greater than or equal to three Diagnostic Statistical Manual 5 symptoms (75th percentile) had, on average, 27.8 times the odds (interquartile range, 12.7-60.6) of having delirium compared with patient assessments with zero Diagnostic Statistical Manual 5 criteria (25th percentile) present (p delirium, these data prompt reconsideration of Diagnostic Statistical Manual 5 criteria for "Catatonic Disorder Due to Another Medical Condition" that preclude diagnosing catatonia in the presence of delirium.

  8. Treatment of bipolar disorders during pregnancy: maternal and fetal safety and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epstein RA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard A Epstein,1 Katherine M Moore,2 William V Bobo2 1Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Treating pregnant women with bipolar disorder is among the most challenging clinical endeavors. Patients and clinicians are faced with difficult choices at every turn, and no approach is without risk. Stopping effective pharmacotherapy during pregnancy exposes the patient and her baby to potential harms related to bipolar relapses and residual mood symptom-related dysfunction. Continuing effective pharmacotherapy during pregnancy may prevent these occurrences for many; however, some of the most effective pharmacotherapies (such as valproate have been associated with the occurrence of congenital malformations or other adverse neonatal effects in offspring. Very little is known about the reproductive safety profile and clinical effectiveness of atypical antipsychotic drugs when used to treat bipolar disorder during pregnancy. In this paper, we provide a clinically focused review of the available information on potential maternal and fetal risks of untreated or undertreated maternal bipolar disorder during pregnancy, the effectiveness of interventions for bipolar disorder management during pregnancy, and potential obstetric, fetal, and neonatal risks associated with core foundational pharmacotherapies for bipolar disorder. Keywords: bipolar disorder, pregnancy, anticonvulsants, antiepileptics, antipsychotics, safety

  9. A narrative review of the occurrence of posttraumatic stress responses in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuotto SC

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stefanie C Vuotto,1 Katia M Perez,2 Kevin R Krull,1 Tara M Brinkman1 1Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, 2Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors may experience posttraumatic stress responses following cancer diagnosis or treatment. The current paper reviews 23 studies reporting the occurrence of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, and associated predictors of these outcomes in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors. Results indicate considerable variability among prevalence estimates of PTSD (0%–34.8% and PTSS (4.4%–78%. Measurement inconsistencies limiting the ascertainment of reliable prevalence and risk estimates are discussed in the context of the reviewed literature. Specifically, differences in assessment measures utilized, the timing of assessment relative to diagnosis, the criteria used to define the outcome, and identification of the precipitating traumatic event may account for discrepancies in prevalence and risk estimates across studies. The application of specific PTSD diagnostic criteria to a survivorship population is discussed. Empirically supported interventions utilizing cognitive behavioral therapy approaches for the treatment of PTSS in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors are identified. Keywords: posttraumatic stress, adolescent and young adult, cancer survivors

  10. Temporal Trends in Age at HIV Diagnosis in Cohorts in the United States, the Caribbean, and Central and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Vega, Yanink Neried Caro; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Turner, Megan; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Fink, Valeria; Luz, Paula M.; Cortes, Claudia P.; Rouzier, Vanessa; Padgett, Denis; Jayathilake, Karu; McGowan, Catherine C.; Person, Anna K.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States (USA), the age of those newly diagnosed with HIV is changing, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM). A retrospective analysis included HIV-infected adults from 7 sites in the Caribbean, Central and South America network (CCASAnet) and the Vanderbilt Comprehensive Care Clinic (VCCC-Nashville, Tennessee, USA). We estimate the proportion of patients <25 years at HIV diagnosis by calendar year among the general population and MSM. 19,466 (CCASAnet) and 3,746 (VCCC) patients were included. The proportion <25 years at diagnosis in VCCC increased over time for both the general population and MSM (p<0.001). Only in the Chilean site for the general population and the Brazilian site for MSM were similar trends seen. Subjects <25 years of age at diagnosis were less likely to be immunocompromised at enrollment at both the VCCC and CCASAnet. Recent trends in the USA of greater numbers of newly diagnosed young patients are not consistently observed in Latin America and the Caribbean. Prevention efforts tailored to young adults should be increased. PMID:25613592

  11. Kept in His Care: The Role of Perceived Divine Control in Positive Reappraisal Coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed T. DeAngelis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A formidable body of literature suggests that numerous dimensions of religious involvement can facilitate productive coping. One common assumption in this field is that religious worldviews provide overarching frameworks of meaning by which to positively reinterpret stressors. The current study explicitly tests this assumption by examining whether perceived divine control—i.e., the notion that God controls the course and direction of one’s life—buffers the adverse effects of recent traumatic life events on one’s capacity for positive reappraisal coping. We analyze cross-sectional survey data from Vanderbilt University’s Nashville Stress and Health Study (2011–2014, a probability sample of non-Hispanic black and white adults aged 22 to 69 living in Davidson County, Tennessee (n = 1252. Findings from multivariate regression models confirm: (1 there was an inverse association between past-year traumatic life events and positive reappraisals; but (2 perceived divine control significantly attenuated this inverse association. Substantively, our findings suggest that people who believe God controls their life outcomes are better suited for positively reinterpreting traumatic experiences. Implications, limitations, and avenues for future research are discussed.

  12. Parental Refusal of Vitamin K and Neonatal Preventive Services: A Need for Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcewicz, Lauren H; Clayton, Joshua; Maenner, Matthew; Odom, Erika; Okoroh, Ekwutosi; Christensen, Deborah; Goodman, Alyson; Warren, Michael D; Traylor, Julie; Miller, Angela; Jones, Timothy; Dunn, John; Schaffner, William; Grant, Althea

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) in infants is a coagulopathy preventable with a single dose of injectable vitamin K at birth. The Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) investigated vitamin K refusal among parents in 2013 after learning of four cases of VKDB associated with prophylaxis refusal. Methods Chart reviews were conducted at Nashville-area hospitals for 2011-2013 and Tennessee birthing centers for 2013 to identify parents who had refused injectable vitamin K for their infants. Contact information was obtained for parents, and they were surveyed regarding their reasons for refusing. Results At hospitals, 3.0% of infants did not receive injectable vitamin K due to parental refusal in 2013, a frequency higher than in 2011 and 2012. This percentage was much higher at birthing centers, where 31% of infants did not receive injectable vitamin K. The most common responses for refusal were a belief that the injection was unnecessary (53%) and a desire for a natural birthing process (36%). Refusal of other preventive services was common, with 66% of families refusing vitamin K, newborn eye care with erythromycin, and the neonatal dose of hepatitis B vaccine. Conclusions for Practice Refusal of injectable vitamin K was more common among families choosing to give birth at birthing centers than at hospitals, and was related to refusal of other preventive services in our study. Surveillance of vitamin K refusal rates could assist in further understanding this occurrence and tailoring effective strategies for mitigation.

  13. Magnitude and distribution of option value for the Washakie Wilderness, northwest Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Kenneth A.; Beazley, Ronald I.

    1990-05-01

    Option value is estimated for the Washakie Wilderness, northwest Wyoming, USA, using the contingent valuation technique. Consumer surplus, the traditional measure of economic value, is estimated separately and compared with option value. Several populations are tested, including Washakie visitors, Yellowstone National Park visitors, and residents from four metropolitan test markets: Salt Lake City, Utah; Portland, Oregon; Nashville, Tennessee; and Orlando, Florida, USA. The average annual preservation option value (consumer surplus) expressed by on-site wilderness visitors is 46.17 (80.13), by urban residents is 9.70 (8.97), and by rural residents is 8.43 (7.80). Four selected attributes are determined to be important in motivating option demand for the Washakie, including existence value, bequest value, the desire for an on-site visit, and interest in securing the visiting privileges of others. The results suggest that option value is important in wilderness valuation and that off-site users account for a large part of the economic value of wilderness.

  14. Association of brief health literacy screening and blood pressure in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willens, David E; Kripalani, Sunil; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Cawthon, Courtney; Wallston, Ken; Mion, Lorraine C; Davis, Corinne; Danciu, Iona; Rothman, Russell L; Roumie, Christianne L

    2013-01-01

    Health literacy impacts health outcomes. However, the relationship to blood pressure is inconsistent. This study aimed to determine whether health literacy, assessed by clinic staff, is associated with blood pressure among patients with hypertension. The design was a cross-sectional study of a large sample of primary care patient encounters in 3 academic medical center clinics in Nashville, Tennessee. Health literacy was assessed using the Brief Health Literacy Screen, with higher scores indicating higher health literacy. Blood pressure was extracted from the electronic health record. Using 23,483 encounters in 10,644 patients, the authors examined the association of health literacy with blood pressure in multivariable analyses, adjusting for age, gender, race, education, and clinic location. Independent of educational attainment, 3-point increases in health literacy scores were associated with 0.74 mmHg higher systolic blood pressure (95% CI [0.38, 1.09]) and 0.30 mmHg higher diastolic blood pressure (95% CI [0.08, 0.51]). No interaction between education and health literacy was observed (p = .91). In this large primary care population of patients with hypertension, higher health literacy, as screened in clinical practice, was associated with a small increase in blood pressures. Future research is needed to explore this unexpected finding.

  15. Pregabalin for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad S Boomershine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Chad S BoomershineDepartment of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: This last article in a three-part series on approved medications for managing fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS reviews pregabalin (Lyrica®. Pregabalin was the first drug approved for FMS management and, as an anticonvulsant, differs from the other approved agents that are antidepressants. Pregabalin inhibits presynaptic excitatory neurotransmitter release by blocking a2d calcium channels. Five randomized, placebo-controlled trials have demonstrated pregabalin reduces pain and improves sleep and health-related quality of life in FMS patients. While indicated dosing is 300–450 mg divided twice daily, initial dosing of 25–50 mg at night is recommended owing to side effects including somnolence, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction. Since side effects such as weight gain and peripheral edema are dose-related, uptitration in weekly increments based on tolerability and therapeutic response is recommended. Due to its lack of protein binding and negligible hepatic metabolism, pregabalin can be safely combined with other medications and used in patients with renal failure when the dose is appropriate. Pregabalin may worsen sedation when combined with central nervous system depressants. Pregabalin should be discontinued gradually. Pregabalin-treated patients should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior. Pregabalin in combination with the other approved medications may be synergistic in treating FMS.Keywords: review, Lyrica®, treatment, depression

  16. Medical students as health educators at a student-run free clinic: improving the clinical outcomes of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrindo, Phillip; Peltz, Alon; Ladner, Travis R; Reddy, India; Miller, Bonnie M; Miller, Robert F; Fowler, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) provide service-learning opportunities for medical students and care to underserved patients. Few published studies, however, support that they provide high-quality care. In this study, the authors examined the clinical impact of a medical student health educator program for diabetic patients at an SRFC. In 2012, the authors retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of diabetic patients who established care at Shade Tree Clinic in Nashville, Tennessee, between 2008 and 2011. They compared clinical outcomes at initial presentation to the clinic and 12 months later. They analyzed the relationship between the number of patient-student interactions (touchpoints) and change in hemoglobin A1c values between these two time points and compared the quality of care provided to best-practice benchmarks (process and outcomes measures). The authors studied data from 45 patients. Mean hemoglobin A1c values improved significantly from 9.6 to 7.9, after a mean of 12.5 ± 1.5 months (P patients were screened during clinic visits, whereas a low to moderate percentage met benchmarks for A1c, LDL, and blood pressure levels. These findings demonstrate that a medical student health educator program at an SRFC can provide high-quality diabetes care and facilitate clinical improvement one year after enrollment, despite inherent difficulties in caring for underserved patients. Future studies should examine the educational and clinical value of care provided at SRFCs.

  17. Sedation in the intensive care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes CG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher G Hughes, Stuart McGrane, Pratik P PandharipandeVanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Critically ill patients are routinely provided analgesia and sedation to prevent pain and anxiety, permit invasive procedures, reduce stress and oxygen consumption, and improve synchrony with mechanical ventilation. Regional preferences, patient history, institutional bias, and individual patient and practitioner variability, however, create a wide discrepancy in the approach to sedation of critically ill patients. Untreated pain and agitation increase the sympathetic stress response, potentially leading to negative acute and long-term consequences. Oversedation, however, occurs commonly and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including longer time on mechanical ventilation, prolonged stay in the intensive care unit, and increased brain dysfunction (delirium and coma. Modifying sedation delivery by incorporating analgesia and sedation protocols, targeted arousal goals, daily interruption of sedation, linked spontaneous awakening and breathing trials, and early mobilization of patients have all been associated with improvements in patient outcomes and should be incorporated into the clinical management of critically ill patients. To improve outcomes, including time on mechanical ventilation and development of acute brain dysfunction, conventional sedation paradigms should be altered by providing necessary analgesia, incorporating propofol or dexmedetomidine to reach arousal targets, and reducing benzodiazepine exposure.Keywords: fentanyl, propofol, dexmedetomidine, Behavioral Pain Scale, Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale, Sedation-Agitation Scale, Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU

  18. A comparison of mixing depths observed by ground-based wind profilers and an airborne lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B.; Senff, C. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing depth is one of the most important parameters in air pollution studies because it determines the vertical extent of the `box` in which pollutants are mixed and dispersed. During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS95), scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) deployed four 915-MHz boundary-layer radar/wind profilers (hereafter radars) in and around the Nashville, Tennessee metropolitan area. Scientists from NOAA/ETL also operated an ultraviolet differential absorption lidar (DIAL) onboard a CASA-212 aircraft. Profiles from radar and DIAL can be used to derive estimates of the mixing depth. The methods used for both instruments are similar in that they depend on information derived from the backscattered power. However, different scattering mechanisms for the radar and DIAL mean that different tracers of mixing depth are measured. In this paper we compare the mixing depth estimates obtained from the radar and DIAL and discuss the similarities and differences that occur. (au)

  19. Vaccines and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, William

    2012-06-01

    My commitment to vaccines had its beginnings in an unlikely fashion. I just had completed two years of an internal medicine residency as well as two years of clinical and research training in infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. Now it was time to fulfill my national service obligation (Selective Service--"the draft") that all young men had back in the 1960s. Because of my interest in infectious diseases, it had been suggested that, rather than serving in the Army, I apply for a Commission in the US Public Health Service. To my delight and considerable surprise I had been accepted and I reported for training and further assignment to the Communicable Disease Center in Atlanta (now the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-CDC) as a newly minted Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer. Under the stern guidance of Alexander Langmuir, CDC's chief epidemiologist, each cadre of novice EIS Officers were immersed in the principles and practice of investigative field epidemiology which transformed clinicians such as myself who had heretofore focused on the illnesses of single patients into public health physicians who worked to ensure the health of entire communities. The 6-week instruction period was both demanding and inspiring. It instilled an esprit de corps; and at the completion of our training we were eager to undertake our new roles as "disease detectives" in our duty assignments. Mine was to be at the state health department in Rhode Island. Which is where I encountered measles and measles vaccine.

  20. Development of a GIS-based spill management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul H; LeBoeuf, Eugene J; Daniel, Edsel B; Dobbins, James P; Abkowitz, Mark D

    2004-08-30

    Spill Management Information System (SMIS) is a geographic information system (GIS)-based decision support system designed to effectively manage the risks associated with accidental or intentional releases of a hazardous material into an inland waterway. SMIS provides critical planning and impact information to emergency responders in anticipation of, or following such an incident. SMIS couples GIS and database management systems (DBMS) with the 2-D surface water model CE-QUAL-W2 Version 3.1 and the air contaminant model Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations (CAMEO) while retaining full GIS risk analysis and interpretive capabilities. Live 'real-time' data links are established within the spill management software to utilize current meteorological information and flowrates within the waterway. Capabilities include rapid modification of modeling conditions to allow for immediate scenario analysis and evaluation of 'what-if' scenarios. The functionality of the model is illustrated through a case study of the Cheatham Reach of the Cumberland River near Nashville, TN.

  1. Pregabalin in the management of partial epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M Arain

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Amir M ArainVanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pregabalin is a new antiepileptic medication that works by binding to alpha 2 delta subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channels present in presynaptic neurons. Its pharmacokinetic advantages include rapid and almost complete absorption, lack of protein binding, linear kinetics, absence of enzyme induction, and absence of interactions with other drugs. Pregabalin was found effective as adjunctive therapy for refractory partial-onset seizures, with up to 51% responder at a dose of 600 mg/day. The lowest effective dose was 150 mg/day. Pregabalin is also approved for treatment of painful diabetic polyneuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia and pain with fibromyalgia. Studies also suggest a beneficial effect on sleep and generalized anxiety disorders. Its main adverse effects in randomized adjunctive trials in adults have been mild to moderate. Most common side effects were dizziness, ataxia, somnolence and diplopia. Weight gain was not prominent in pivotal pregabalin trials, but was more problematic in long-term postmarketing analyses in epilepsy patients. Pregabalin, with its potent antiseizure effect, favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and effectiveness in common co-morbidities is an important addition to the treatment of epilepsy.Keywords: epilepsy, seizures, pregabalin, pharmacology, antiepileptic drugs, tolerability

  2. Duloxetine for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A Scholz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Beth A Scholz, Cara L Hammonds, Chad S BoomershineDepartment of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a widespread pain condition associated with a wide range of additional symptoms including fatigue, insomnia, depression, anxiety and stiffness. Duloxetine is one of three medications currently FDA approved for use in FMS management. Duloxetine is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI that functions by increasing central nervous system levels of serotonin and norepinephrine. This review is a primer on use of duloxetine in FMS management and includes information on pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, a review of the three duloxetine FMS treatment trials currently in publication, a discussion of the safety and tolerability of duloxetine, and patient-focused perspectives on duloxetine use in FMS management. Duloxetine has proven efficacy in managing pain and mood symptoms in adult FMS patients with and without major depressive disorder. However, due to side effects, duloxetine must be used with caution in patients with fatigue, insomnia, gastrointestinal complaints, headache, cardiovascular disease, bleeding-risk, and in those 24 years of age and younger due to risk of suicidality. Duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with liver disease or alcoholics. As with all medications, duloxetine is best used as part of an individualized regimen that includes nonpharmacologic modalities of exercise, education and behavioral therapies.Keywords: fibromyalgia, duloxetine, SNRI, safety

  3. Emerging role of nivolumab in the management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: current data and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feld E

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Emily Feld, Leora Horn Department of Internal Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Immune-checkpoint inhibitors have become valuable therapies in the treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Recent clinical trials have shown promising results with regard to efficacy and toxicity profiles of these agents compared to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Nivolumab was one of the first immune-checkpoint inhibitors to demonstrate clinical activity in patients with NSCLC, and is currently approved in the US for treatment of patients with advanced squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC who have progressed on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. This review provides an update on nivolumab’s pharmacology, safety, and efficacy, as established by the CheckMate trials. We also discuss specific applications and strategies for the use of nivolumab in NSCLC patients, as well as predictive biomarkers and their role in treatment selection. Keywords: nivolumab, non-small-cell lung cancer, immune-checkpoint inhibitor, PD1 

  4. On Rainfall Modification by Major Urban Areas. Part 1; Observations from Space-borne Rain Radar on TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Pierce, Harold; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study represents one of the first published attempts to identify rainfall modification by urban areas using satellite-based rainfall measurements. Data from the first space-based rain-radar, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, are employed. Analysis of the data enables identification of rainfall patterns around Atlanta, Montgomery, Nashville, San Antonio, Waco, and Dallas during the warm season. Results reveal an average increase of -28% in monthly rainfall rates within 30-60 kilometers downwind of the metropolis with a modest increase of 5.6% over the metropolis. Portions of the downwind area exhibit increases as high as 51%. The percentage chances are relative to an upwind CONTROL area. It was also found that maximum rainfall rates in the downwind impact area can exceed the mean value in the upwind CONTROL area by 48%-116%. The maximum value was generally found at an average distance of 39 km from the edge of the urban center or 64 km from the center of the city. These results are consistent with METROMEX studies of St. Louis almost two decades ago and more recent studies near Atlanta. Future work will investi(yate hypothesized factors causing rainfall modification by urban areas. Additional work is also needed to provide more robust validation of space-based rain estimates near major urban areas. Such research has implications for urban planning, water resource management, and understanding human impact on the environment.

  5. Recipe Modification Improves Food Safety Practices during Cooking of Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Curtis; Godwin, Sandria; Chambers, Delores; Chambers, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Many consumers do not practice proper food safety behaviors when preparing food in the home. Several approaches have been taken to improve food safety behaviors among consumers, but there still is a deficit in actual practice of these behaviors. The objective of this study was to assess whether the introduction of food safety instructions in recipes for chicken breasts and ground turkey patties would improve consumers' food safety behaviors during preparation. In total, 155 consumers in two locations (Manhattan, KS, and Nashville, TN) were asked to prepare a baked chicken breast and a ground turkey patty following recipes that either did or did not contain food safety instructions. They were observed to track hand washing and thermometer use. Participants who received recipes with food safety instructions (n = 73) demonstrated significantly improved food safety preparation behaviors compared with those who did not have food safety instructions in the recipe (n = 82). In addition, the majority of consumers stated that they thought the recipes with instructions were easy to use and that they would be likely to use similar recipes at home. This study demonstrates that recipes could be a good source of food safety information for consumers and that they have the potential to improve behaviors to reduce foodborne illness.

  6. Assessing the impacts of tillage and fertilization management on nitrous oxide emissions in a cornfield using the DNDC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Hui, Dafeng; Wang, Junming; Yu, Chih-Li; Li, Changsheng; Reddy, K. Chandra; Dennis, Sam

    2016-02-01

    Quantification and prediction of N2O emissions from croplands under different agricultural management practices are vital for sustainable agriculture and climate change mitigation. We simulated N2O emissions under tillage and no-tillage,and different nitrogen (N) fertilizer types and application methods (i.e., nitrification inhibitor, chicken manure, and split applications) in a cornfield using the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model. The model was parameterized with field experimental data collected in Nashville, Tennessee, under various agricultural management treatments and run for a short term (3 years) and a long term (100 years). Results showed that the DNDC model could adequately simulate N2O emissions as well as soil properties under different agricultural management practices. The modeled emissions of N2O significantly increased by 35% with tillage, and decreased by 24% with the use of nitrification inhibitor, compared with no-tillage and normal N fertilization. Chicken manure amendment and split applications of N fertilizer had minor impact on N2O emission in a short term, but over a long term (100 years) the treatments significantly altered N2O emission (+35%, -10%, respectively). Sensitivity analysis showed that N2O emission was sensitive to mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, soil organic carbon, and the amount of total N fertilizer application. Our model results provide valuable information for determining agricultural best management practice to maintain highly productive corn yield while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. The role of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease: an overview and update on new developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang JY

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available John Y Fang, Christopher Tolleson Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of neuronal dopamine production in the brain. Oral therapies primarily augment the dopaminergic pathway. As the disease progresses, more continuous delivery of therapy is commonly needed. Deep brain stimulation (DBS has become an effective therapy option for several different neurologic and psychiatric conditions, including PD. It currently has US Food and Drug Administration approval for PD and essential tremor, as well as a humanitarian device exception for dystonia and obsessive-compulsive disorder. For PD treatment, it is currently approved specifically for those patients suffering from complications of pharmacotherapy, including motor fluctuations or dyskinesias, and a disease process of at least 4 years of duration. Studies have demonstrated superiority of DBS and medical management compared to medical management alone in selected PD patients. Optimal patient selection criteria, choice of target, and programming methods for PD and the other indications for DBS are important topics that continue to be explored and remain works in progress. In addition, new hardware options, such as different types of leads, and different software options have recently become available, increasing the potential for greater efficacy and/or reduced side effects. This review gives an overview of therapeutic management in PD, specifically highlighting DBS and some of the recent changes with surgical therapy. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, deep brain stimulation, functional neurosurgery 

  8. The Stability of G6PD Is Affected by Mutations with Different Clinical Phenotypes

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    Saúl Gómez-Manzo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency worldwide, causing a wide spectrum of conditions with severity classified from the mildest (Class IV to the most severe (Class I. To correlate mutation sites in the G6PD with the resulting phenotypes, we studied four naturally occurring G6PD variants: Yucatan, Nashville, Valladolid and Mexico City. For this purpose, we developed a successful over-expression method that constitutes an easier and more precise method for obtaining and characterizing these enzymes. The kcat (catalytic constant of all the studied variants was lower than in the wild-type. The structural rigidity might be the cause and the most evident consequence of the mutations is their impact on protein stability and folding, as can be observed from the protein yield, the T50 (temperature where 50% of its original activity is retained values, and differences on hydrophobic regions. The mutations corresponding to more severe phenotypes are related to the structural NADP+ region. This was clearly observed for the Classes III and II variants, which became more thermostable with increasing NADP+, whereas the Class I variants remained thermolabile. The mutations produce repulsive electric charges that, in the case of the Yucatan variant, promote increased disorder of the C-terminus and consequently affect the binding of NADP+, leading to enzyme instability.

  9. PREFACE: Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, David; de Jager, Kees; Roberts, Craig; Sheldon, Paul; Swanson, Eric

    2007-06-01

    The Second Meeting of the APS Topical Group on Hadronic Physics was held on 22-24 October 2006 at the Opryland Resort in Nashville, Tennessee. Keeping with tradition, the meeting was held in conjunction with the Fall meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics. Approximately 90 physicists participated in the meeting, presenting 25 talks in seven plenary sessions and 48 talks in 11 parallel sessions. These sessions covered a wide range of topics related to strongly interacting matter. Among these were charm spectroscopy, gluonic exotics, nucleon resonance physics, RHIC physics, electroweak and spin physics, lattice QCD initiatives, and new facilities. Brad Tippens and Brad Keister provided perspective from the funding agencies. The organisers are extremely grateful to the following institutions for financial and logistical support: the American Physical Society, Jefferson Lab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Vanderbilt University. We thank the following persons for assisting in organising the parallel sessions: Ted Barnes, Jian-Ping Chen, Ed Kinney, Krishna Kumar, Harry Lee, Mike Leitch, Kam Seth, and Dennis Weygand. We also thank Gerald Ragghianti for designing the conference poster, Will Johns for managing the audio-visual equipment and for placing the talks on the web, Sandy Childress for administrative expertise, and Vanderbilt graduate students Eduardo Luiggi and Jesus Escamillad for their assistance. David Ernst, Kees de Jager, Craig Roberts (Chair), Paul Sheldon and Eric Swanson Editors

  10. Clinical management of achalasia: current state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krill JT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Joseph T Krill, Rishi D Naik, Michael F Vaezi Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Center for Swallowing and Esophageal Disorders, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Achalasia is a primary disorder of esophageal motility. It classically presents with dysphagia to both solids and liquids but may be accompanied by regurgitation and chest pain. The gold standard for the diagnosis of achalasia is esophageal motility testing with manometry, which often reveals aperistalsis of the esophageal body and incomplete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. The diagnosis is aided by complimentary tests, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy and contrast radiography. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is indicated to rule out mimickers of the disease known as “pseudoachalasia” (eg, malignancy. Endoscopic appearance of a dilated esophagus with retained food or saliva and a puckered lower esophageal sphincter should raise suspicion for achalasia. Additionally, barium esophagography may reveal a dilated esophagus with a distal tapering giving it a “bird’s beak” appearance. Multiple therapeutic modalities aid in the management of achalasia, the decision of which depends on operative risk factors. Conventional treatments include medical therapy, botulinum toxin injection, pneumatic dilation, and Heller myotomy. The last two are defined as the most definitive treatment options. New emerging therapies include peroral endoscopic myotomy, placement of self-expanding metallic stents, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. Keywords: achalasia, pseudoachalasia, pneumatic dilation, Heller myotomy, botulinum toxin injection, peroral endoscopic myotomy

  11. Establishing a Numerical Modeling Framework for Hydrologic Engineering Analyses of Extreme Storm Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Hossain, Faisal; Leung, L. Ruby

    2017-08-01

    In this study a numerical modeling framework for simulating extreme storm events was established using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Such a framework is necessary for the derivation of engineering parameters such as probable maximum precipitation that are the cornerstone of large water management infrastructure design. Here this framework was built based on a heavy storm that occurred in Nashville (USA) in 2010, and verified using two other extreme storms. To achieve the optimal setup, several combinations of model resolutions, initial/boundary conditions (IC/BC), cloud microphysics and cumulus parameterization schemes were evaluated using multiple metrics of precipitation characteristics. The evaluation suggests that WRF is most sensitive to IC/BC option. Simulation generally benefits from finer resolutions up to 5 km. At the 15km level, NCEP2 IC/BC produces better results, while NAM IC/BC performs best at the 5km level. Recommended model configuration from this study is: NAM or NCEP2 IC/BC (depending on data availability), 15km or 15km-5km nested grids, Morrison microphysics and Kain-Fritsch cumulus schemes. Validation of the optimal framework suggests that these options are good starting choices for modeling extreme events similar to the test cases. This optimal framework is proposed in response to emerging engineering demands of extreme storm events forecasting and analyses for design, operations and risk assessment of large water infrastructures.

  12. The Female Executive’s Perspective on Career Planning and Advancement in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasie J. Schulz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gender bias continues to play a role in the gender discrepancy at executive levels in organizations across the United States, although women hold 51% of all middle management positions. Female middle managers may be overlooked for advancement to executive positions because of a lack of synergy between individual career planning and organizational development and advancement practices. This may have significant implications for organizations as they struggle to recruit and hire qualified senior leadership to close the widening leadership gap created as baby boomers leave the workforce in record numbers over the next decade. One way to retain talented, knowledgeable, female middle managers is to incorporate career planning and advancement programs, which increase visibility for both the individual and organizational leaders into potential advancement opportunities. This descriptive phenomenological study was designed to investigate and describe the lived experiences of female executives with career planning and advancement in organizations. Data collected from 16 female executives employed in organizations in Nashville, Tennessee, revealed that although individuals must make a commitment to career planning and take responsibility for executing the plan, successful career planning and advancement are dependent on others beyond the individual seeking advancement. The findings of this study are important for women who desire advancement to executive levels and to organizational leaders who want to hire and promote the right person for the job regardless of gender.

  13. Healthy Families Study: Design of a Childhood Obesity Prevention Trial for Hispanic Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoorob, Roger; Buchowski, Maciej; Beech, Bettina M.; Canedo, Juan R.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Akohoue, Sylvie; Hull, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The childhood obesity epidemic disproportionately affects Hispanics. This paper reports on the design of the ongoing Healthy Families Study, a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a community-based, behavioral family intervention to prevent excessive weight gain in Hispanic children using a community-based participatory research approach. Methods The study will enroll 272 Hispanic families with children ages 5–7 residing in greater Nashville, Tennessee, United States. Families are randomized to the active weight gain prevention intervention or an alternative intervention focused on oral health. Lay community health promoters implement the interventions primarily in Spanish in a community center. The active intervention was adapted from the We Can! parent program to be culturally-targeted for Hispanic families and for younger children. This 12-month intervention promotes healthy eating behaviors, increased physical activity, and decreased sedentary behavior, with an emphasis on parental modeling and experiential learning for children. Families attend eight bi-monthly group sessions during four months then receive information and/or support by phone or mail each month for eight months. The primary outcome is change in children’s body mass index. Secondary outcomes are changes in children’s waist circumference, dietary behaviors, preferences for fruits and vegetables, physical activity, and screen time. Results Enrollment and data collection are in progress. Conclusion This study will contribute valuable evidence on efficacy of a childhood obesity prevention intervention targeting Hispanic families with implications for reducing disparities. PMID:23624172

  14. An Experimental Feasibility Study on Robotic Endonasal Telesurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Raul; Torres, Luis; Swaney, Philip; Gilbert, Hunter; Alterovitz, Ron; Webster, Robert J.; Weaver, Kyle D.; Russell, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel robots have recently been developed specifically for endonasal surgery. They can deliver several thin, tentacle-like surgical instruments through a single nostril. Among the many potential advantages of such a robotic system is the prospect of telesurgery over long distances. Objective To describe a phantom pituitary tumor removal done by a surgeon in Nashville, Tennessee, controlling a robot located approximately 800 km away in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. This is the first remote telesurgery experiment involving tentacle-like concentric tube manipulators. Methods A phantom pituitary tumor removal experiment was conducted twice – once locally and once remotely – using the robotic system. Robot commands and video were transmitted across the Internet. The latency of the system was evaluated quantitatively in both local and remote cases to determine the effect of the 800 km between the surgeon and robot. Results We measured a control and video latency of less than 100 ms in the remote case. Qualitatively, the surgeon was able to carry out the experiment easily, and observed no discernable difference between the remote and local cases. Conclusion Telesurgery over long distances is feasible with this robotic system. In the longer term, this may enable expert skull base surgeons to help many more patients by performing surgeries remotely over long distances. PMID:25599203

  15. The National Clinical Assessment Tool for Medical Students in the Emergency Department (NCAT-EM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna; Franzen, Douglas; Lawson, Luan; Manthey, David; Tews, Matthew; Dubosh, Nicole; Fisher, Jonathan; Haughey, Marianne; House, Joseph B; Trainor, Arleigh; Wald, David A; Hiller, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Clinical assessment of medical students in emergency medicine (EM) clerkships is a highly variable process that presents unique challenges and opportunities. Currently, clerkship directors use institution-specific tools with unproven validity and reliability that may or may not address competencies valued most highly in the EM setting. Standardization of assessment practices and development of a common, valid, specialty-specific tool would benefit EM educators and students. A two-day national consensus conference was held in March 2016 in the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) track at the Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine (CORD) Academic Assembly in Nashville, TN. The goal of this conference was to standardize assessment practices and to create a national clinical assessment tool for use in EM clerkships across the country. Conference leaders synthesized the literature, articulated major themes and questions pertinent to clinical assessment of students in EM, clarified the issues, and outlined the consensus-building process prior to consensus-building activities. The first day of the conference was dedicated to developing consensus on these key themes in clinical assessment. The second day of the conference was dedicated to discussing and voting on proposed domains to be included in the national clinical assessment tool. A modified Delphi process was initiated after the conference to reconcile questions and items that did not reach an a priori level of consensus. The final tool, the National Clinical Assessment Tool for Medical Students in Emergency Medicine (NCAT-EM) is presented here.

  16. Promoting Palliative Care Internationally: Building Leaders to Promote Education, Practice, and Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Pam; Ferrell, Betty; Virani, Rose; Mazanec, Polly

    2018-02-01

    In February 2000, nine nursing educators, practitioners, and researchers met in Nashville, Tennessee, to develop a palliative care curriculum specifically for nurses. The following month, 22 advisors from nursing organizations across the United States convened in Washington, DC to review the recommended curriculum development and dissemination plans for end-of-life care throughout nursing schools, hospitals, hospices, home care, and geriatric settings. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation provided funding for curriculum and competency development and for six national train-the-trainer courses to be held from 2001 to 2003. The curriculum entitled the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium was designed to meet the needs of nurses caring for patients with serious and complex illnesses at the end of their lives. This work, beginning in 2000 with the development of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium curriculum, has been taught in every state across America and in 91 countries around the world and has been translated into eight languages. Over 21,400 trainers have returned to their institutions and educated over 642,000 colleagues. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of the T-spot.TB test for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection

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    Andrea Amodeo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Tuberculosis (TB represents a major health problem both in developing and both in industrialized countries.The identification of individuals latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb play a key role for the efficacy of TB control. These individuals with a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, especially those with high risk of reactivation (e.g. HIV + / AIDS-infected individuals, patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy and children younger than 5 years could benefit from a preventive treatment with isoniazid reducing the risk of progression from LTBI to active TB. Until recently, detection of LTBI has relied on the tuberculin skin test (TST, but despite the widespread use in clinical practice,TST does not reliably diagnose LTBI because several drawbacks, e.g. lacking in specificity, particularly in who were exposed to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM or were vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG In addition, in young subjects,TST sensitivity is hampered by impaired T cell function leading frequently to false negative results.These several drawbacks limit the use of TST for the diagnose an LTBI in patients who may benefit from preventive chemotherapy. On the other hand, an accurate diagnosis of LTBI avoid the over-treatment of those patients with a positive TST results but not latently infected with Mtb. Recently, new tests based on the detection of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ after stimulation with Mtb-specific antigens: Early secretory Antigenic Target-6 (ESAT-6 and Culture Filtrate Protein-10 (CFP-10 have been proposed for the diagnosis of active TB and LTBI. Methods: During the period from January 2009 to June 2009, in our laboratory 70 patients were tested with T-SPOT.TB (Oxford Immunotech, Abingdon, United Kingdom.We enrolled transplant patients and subjects ongoing transplant, patients immigrants from high prevalence TB countries, patients screened for immunosuppressive treatment, HIV / AIDS – infected

  18. Pneumonia Criptogénica Organizante e Infecção por Vírus da Imunodeficiência Humana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Custódio Alves

    2015-09-01

    -alveolar cujo exame bacteriológico, micológico, pesquisa de BAAR e pneumocystis jiroveci foi negativo. Hemoculturas negativas. Dada manutenção do quadro clínico repetiu TC que demonstrou: “No parênquima pulmonar observam-se múltiplos focos de condensação alveolar, com distribuição multi-focal e bilateral, de predomínio peri-brônquico, com agravamento (…. Algumas destas lesões configuram sinal do alvo invertido (sinal do atol sendo sugestivas de COP. Face à hipótese colocada foi iniciada corticoterapia sistémica com prednisolona 40mg/dia, com franca melhoria, tendo alta para a consulta externa. Bibliografia: 1- Sheikh IA, Saadia N, Sheikh N, Culpepper-Morgan JA. “Simultaneous diagnosis of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and HIV in a 45 year old man”. Am J Case Rep. 2012;13:166-8 2- Zhan X, Zhang L, Wang Z, Jin M, Liu M, Tong Z. “Reversed Halo Sign: Presents in Different Pulmonary Diseases.” PLoS One. 2015 Jun 17;10(6:e0128153 3- Clause E, Wittman C, Gingo M, Fernainy K, Fuhrman C, Kessinger C, Weinman R, McMahon D, Leader J, Morris A. “ Chest computed tomography findings in HIV-infected individuals in the era of antiretroviral therapy”. PLoS ONE 9(11: e112237. Nov 2014 4- Felipe Olivares A., Alberto Fica C., Paulo Charpentier V.a, Antonio Hernández M., María Eugenia Manríquez A., Marcelo Castro S.” Cryptogenic organizing non-resolving pneumonia. Report of one case”. Rev. méd. Chile vol.142 no.2 Santiago Feb. 2014

  19. Observations of nonmethane hydrocarbons and oxygenated volatile organic compounds at a rural site in the southeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemer, Daniel; Pos, Willer; Milne, Peter; Farmer, Charlesk; Zika, Rod [Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)] [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Atmospheric Sciences, Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, Alabama (United States)] Apel, Eric [Atmospheric Chemistry Group, Mantech Environmental Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Olszyna, Ken [National Environmental Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA. Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States)] Kliendienst, Tad [Department of Chemistry, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States)] Lonneman, William [Departments of Chemistry, and Earth and Atmospheric Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana (United States); Shepson, Paul; Starn, Tim

    1998-11-01

    Measurements of an extensive range of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) including alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics, and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) including alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes were conducted for several weeks during the summer of 1995 as part of the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) at a rural experimental site (Youth, Inc.) 32 km southeast of Nashville, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. These measurements were conducted to (1) determine the absolute magnitude and variability of oxygenated compounds found in a contemporary rural region; (2) assess the importance of the measured ambient levels of OVOCs on a photochemical reactivity basis relative to the more commonly determined NMHCs; and (3) to evaluate our ability to accurately measure oxygenates by the current techniques employed under a field study scenario. Several other physical (temperature, insolation, etc.), meteorological (wind velocity, wind direction, atmospheric structure, and boundary layer height), and chemical (criterion pollutants, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO, O{sub 3}, etc.) parameters were measured concurrently with the NMHC and OVOC measurements. During the study period, OVOCs were consistently the dominant compounds present, and methanol and acetone had the highest mixing ratios. Although OVOCs made up the majority of the volatile organic compound component on a mass basis, a substantial sink for OH was isoprene and its immediate oxidation products, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone. In combination with CO and formaldehyde, these compounds comprised about 85{percent} of the observed OH reactivity at the site. Acetaldehyde and methanol were responsible for an additional 10{percent}, with the NMHCs and remaining OVOCs making up the final 5{percent} of the measured OH reactivity at the site. These observed patterns reinforce recent studies which find OVOCs to be an important component of the rural troposphere. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  20. Patchy distributions of myelin and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 align with cytochrome oxidase blobs and interblobs in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockoff EC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emily C Rockoff,1 Pooja Balaram,1 Jon H Kaas1,2 1Department of Psychology, 2Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Blobs are a modular component of the primary visual cortex (area 17 of all primates, but not of other mammals closely related to primates. They are characterized as an even distribution of patches, puffs, or blobs of dense cytochrome oxidase (CO expression in layer III of area 17, and are now known to differ from surrounding, nonblob cortex in thalamic, intrinsic, and extrastriate connections. Previous studies have also recognized a blob-like pattern of myelin-dense patches in layer III of area 17 of primates, and more recently the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT-2 isoform of the VGLUT family has been found to selectively distribute to layer III patches in a similar blob-like pattern. Here, we sought to determine if the blob-like patterns all identify the same modular structures in area 17 of primates by staining alternate brain sections cut parallel to the surface of area 17 of a prosimian primate (Otolemur garnettii for CO, myelin, and VGLUT2. By aligning the sections from the three preparations, we provide clear evidence that the three preparations all identify the same modular blob structures. The results provide a further understanding of the functional nature of the blobs by demonstrating that their higher level of CO activity is related to thalamic inputs from the lateral geniculate nucleus that use VGLUT2 as their main glutamate transporter, and via myelinated axons. Keywords: columns, modules, visual cortex, primates, prosimians

  1. Dental management in patients with hypertension: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southerland JH

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Janet H Southerland,1 Danielle G Gill,1 Pandu R Gangula,2–4 Leslie R Halpern,1 Cesar Y Cardona,5 Charles P Mouton6 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2Department of Oral Biology and Research, 3Department of Physiology, 4Center for Women's Health Research, 5Department of Internal Medicine, 6Department of Family and Community Medicine, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Hypertension is a chronic illness affecting more than a billion people worldwide. The high prevalence of the disease among the American population is concerning and must be considered when treating dental patients. Its lack of symptoms until more serious problems occur makes the disease deadly. Dental practitioners can often be on the frontlines of prevention of hypertension by evaluating preoperative blood pressure readings, performing risk assessments, and knowing when to consider medical consultation of a hypertensive patient in a dental setting. In addition, routine follow-up appointments and patients seen on an emergent basis, who may otherwise not be seen routinely, allow the oral health provider an opportunity to diagnose and refer for any unknown disease. It is imperative to understand the risk factors that may predispose patients to hypertension and to be able to educate them about their condition. Most importantly, the oral health care provider is in a pivotal position to play an active role in the management of patients presenting with a history of hypertension because many antihypertensive agents interact with pharmacologic agents used in the dental practice. The purpose of this review is to provide strategies for managing and preventing complications when treating the patient with hypertension who presents to the dental office. Keywords: high blood pressure, dental, guidelines, inflammation, metabolic disease, blood pressure medicines

  2. Biogenic contribution to PM-2.5 ambient aerosol from radiocarbon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C.; Klouda, G.; Ellenson, W.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide a means to quantify the biogenic fraction of any carbon-containing sample of ambient aerosol. In the absence of an impact from biomass burning (e.g., during summertime) such measurements can provide an estimate of the contribution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol, from biogenic volatile organic compound precursors. Radiocarbon results for 11.5-h PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, during summer 1999 will be presented. On average the measured biogenic fraction was surprisingly large (more than half), with the average biogenic fraction for night samples being only slightly smaller than for day samples. Discussion will include (a) description of the radiocarbon methodology, (b) use of radiocarbon measurements on local vegetation and fuel samples as calibration data, (c) concurrent measurements of organic carbon and elemental carbon ambient concentrations, (d) assessment of organic aerosol sampling artifact through use of organic vapor denuders, variable face velocities, and filter extraction, and (e) comparison with published radiocarbon results obtained in Houston, Texas in a similar study. Disclaimer: This work has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Interagency Agreement No. 13937923 to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Contract No. 68-D5-0049 to ManTech Environmental Tecnology, Inc. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

  3. Family History in Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis (PFAPA) Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthiram, Kalpana; Nesbitt, Emily; Morgan, Thomas; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to describe family history and inheritance patterns in patients with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome. We performed a case-control study to compare the family histories of patients with PFAPA recruited from Vanderbilt University Medical Center and matched healthy control subjects from a pediatric primary care practice in Nashville, Tennessee, by using a structured questionnaire. Characteristics of paired case subjects, control subjects, and their family members were compared by using McNemar's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Eighty PFAPA index case subjects and 80 control subjects were recruited. Eighteen PFAPA case subjects (23%) had ≥1 family member with PFAPA. Parents of PFAPA index case subjects were more likely to have recurrent pharyngitis (36% vs 16%; P aphthous stomatitis (46% vs 28%; P = .002) compared with parents of control subjects. Siblings of case subjects had a higher prevalence of PFAPA (10% vs 2%; P = .04), recurrent pharyngitis (24% vs 10%; P = .03), and recurrent aphthous stomatitis (27% vs 7%; P = .003) compared with siblings of control subjects. A portion of PFAPA case subjects seems to be familial, implying an inherited genetic predisposition to the disorder and/or shared environmental exposures. First-degree relatives (parents and siblings) of patients with PFAPA have a higher prevalence of recurrent pharyngitis and aphthous stomatitis than relatives of control subjects, which suggests that these disorders represent reduced penetrance phenotypes of PFAPA. Further characterization of the genetics and inflammatory profiles of these patients and their relatives is warranted. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Ethnic-based differences in the association of self-perceived health status and doctor's office utilization: longitudinal study on aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar N

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nisser Umar1, Muktar H Aliyu2, Jane Otado1, Richard F Gillum1, Thomas O Obisesan11Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Howard University Hospital, Washington, DC; 2Department of Preventive Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-perceived health status is predictive of a doctor's office visit in the Longitudinal Study on Aging (LSOA.Methods: This was a population-based longitudinal study of persons aged ≥70 years who participated in the Study on Aging in 1984 and a follow-up survey of the LSOA in 1986. The cohort for the study consisted of 560 blacks and 6880 whites who were 70 years or older in 1984. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed separately for blacks and for whites.Results: The study sample was predominantly Caucasian (91.2% with a mean age 76.8 ± 5.5 years and mean education grade 10 ± 3.7. The majority (82% lived above the poverty level. Self-reported poor health status predicted the use of doctor's office services among whites (odds ratio [OR] 5.15; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.34–7.95, but not in blacks (OR 1.6; 95% CI 0.54–4.76.Conclusion: Self-perceived health status predicted the use of doctor's office services among older whites but not in older blacks in the LSOA.Keywords: self-perceived health status, physician office visits, health services utilization, LSOA, elderly

  5. Associations of hormone-related factors with breast cancer risk according to hormone receptor status among white and African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha J; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Fair, Alecia M; Sanderson, Maureen; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kelley, Mark C; Zheng, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Causes of racial disparities in breast cancer incidence and mortality between white and African American women remain unclear. This study evaluated associations of menstrual and reproductive factors with breast cancer risk by race and cancer subtypes. Included in the study were 1866 breast cancer cases and 2306 controls recruited in the Nashville Breast Health Study, a population-based case-control study. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). African American women were more likely to have estrogen receptor-negative (ER(-)), progesterone receptor-negative (PR(-)), and triple-negative (ER(-)PR(-)HER2(-)) breast cancer than white women. Age at menarche (≥ 14 years) and multiparity (≥ 3 live births) were inversely associated with ER(+) tumors only, whereas late age at first live birth (> 30 years) and nulliparity were associated with elevated risk; such associations were predominantly seen in white women (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.55-0.88; OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.56-0.92; OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.13-1.79; OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.06-1.63, respectively). Age at menopause between 47 and 51 years was associated with elevated risk of ER(-) tumors in both white and African American women. Among women who had natural menopause, positive association between ever-use of hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk was seen in white women only (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.03-1.87). This study suggests that certain hormone-related factors are differentially associated with risk of breast cancer subtypes, and these associations also differ by race. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Process control charts in infection prevention: Make it simple to make it happen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemken, Timothy L; Furmanek, Stephen P; Carrico, Ruth M; Mattingly, William A; Persaud, Annuradha K; Guinn, Brian E; Kelley, Robert R; Ramirez, Julio A

    2017-03-01

    Quality improvement is central to Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) programs. Challenges may occur when applying quality improvement methodologies like process control charts, often due to the limited exposure of typical IPs. Because of this, our team created an open-source database with a process control chart generator for IPC programs. The objectives of this report are to outline the development of the application and demonstrate application using simulated data. We used Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap Consortium, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN), R (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria), and R Studio Shiny (R Foundation for Statistical Computing) to create an open source data collection system with automated process control chart generation. We used simulated data to test and visualize both in-control and out-of-control processes for commonly used metrics in IPC programs. The R code for implementing the control charts and Shiny application can be found on our Web site (https://github.com/ul-research-support/spcapp). Screen captures of the workflow and simulated data indicating both common cause and special cause variation are provided. Process control charts can be easily developed based on individual facility needs using freely available software. Through providing our work free to all interested parties, we hope that others will be able to harness the power and ease of use of the application for improving the quality of care and patient safety in their facilities. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anisotropy of ongoing neural activity in the primate visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Maier,1 Michele A Cox,1 Kacie Dougherty,1 Brandon Moore,1 David A Leopold2 1Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Section on Cognitive Neurophysiology and Imaging, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: The mammalian neocortex features distinct anatomical variation in its tangential and radial extents. This review consolidates previously published findings from our group in order to compare and contrast the spatial profile of neural activity coherence across these distinct cortical dimensions. We focus on studies of ongoing local field potential (LFP data obtained simultaneously from multiple sites in the primary visual cortex in two types of experiments in which electrode contacts were spaced either along the cortical surface or at different laminar positions. These studies demonstrate that across both dimensions the coherence of ongoing LFP fluctuations diminishes as a function of interelectrode distance, although the nature and spatial scale of this falloff is very different. Along the cortical surface, the overall LFP coherence declines gradually and continuously away from a given position. In contrast, across the cortical layers, LFP coherence is discontinuous and compartmentalized as a function of depth. Specifically, regions of high LFP coherence fall into discrete superficial and deep laminar zones, with an abrupt discontinuity between the granular and infragranular layers. This spatial pattern of ongoing LFP coherence is similar when animals are at rest and when they are engaged in a behavioral task. These results point to the existence of partially segregated laminar zones of cortical processing that extend tangentially within the laminar compartments and are thus oriented orthogonal to the cortical columns. We interpret these electrophysiological observations in light of the known anatomical organization of

  8. Low hepatitis C antibody screening rates among an insured population of Tennessean Baby Boomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Carlucci

    Full Text Available Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection is common and can cause liver disease and death. Persons born from 1945 through 1965 ("Baby Boomers" have relatively high prevalence of chronic HCV infection, prompting recommendations that all Baby Boomers be screened for HCV. If chronic HCV is confirmed, evaluation for antiviral treatment should be performed. Direct-acting antivirals can cure more than 90% of people with chronic HCV. This sequence of services can be referred to as the HCV "cascade of cure" (CoC. The Tennessee (TN Department of Health (TDH and a health insurer with presence in TN aimed to determine the proportion of Baby Boomers who access HCV screening services and appropriately navigate the HCV CoC in TN.TDH surveillance data and insurance claim records were queried to identify the cohort of Baby Boomers eligible for HCV testing. Billing codes and pharmacy records from 2013 through 2015 were used to determine whether HCV screening and other HCV-related services were provided. The proportion of individuals accessing HCV screening and other steps along the HCV CoC was determined. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify factors associated with HCV screening and treatment.Among 501,388 insured Tennessean Baby Boomers, 7% were screened for HCV. Of the 40,019 who received any HCV-related service, 86% were screened with an HCV antibody test, 20% had a confirmatory HCV PCR, 9% were evaluated for treatment, and 4% were prescribed antivirals. Hispanics were more likely to be screened and treated for HCV than non-Hispanic whites. HCV screening was more likely to occur in the Nashville-Davidson region than in other regions of TN, but there were regional variations in HCV treatment.Many insured Tennessean Baby Boomers do not access HCV screening services, despite national recommendations. Demographic and regional differences in uptake along the HCV CoC should inform public health interventions aimed at mitigating the effects of chronic

  9. Low hepatitis C antibody screening rates among an insured population of Tennessean Baby Boomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, James G; Farooq, Syeda A; Sizemore, Lindsey; Rickles, Michael; Cosley, Brandon; McCormack, Leigh; Wester, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is common and can cause liver disease and death. Persons born from 1945 through 1965 ("Baby Boomers") have relatively high prevalence of chronic HCV infection, prompting recommendations that all Baby Boomers be screened for HCV. If chronic HCV is confirmed, evaluation for antiviral treatment should be performed. Direct-acting antivirals can cure more than 90% of people with chronic HCV. This sequence of services can be referred to as the HCV "cascade of cure" (CoC). The Tennessee (TN) Department of Health (TDH) and a health insurer with presence in TN aimed to determine the proportion of Baby Boomers who access HCV screening services and appropriately navigate the HCV CoC in TN. TDH surveillance data and insurance claim records were queried to identify the cohort of Baby Boomers eligible for HCV testing. Billing codes and pharmacy records from 2013 through 2015 were used to determine whether HCV screening and other HCV-related services were provided. The proportion of individuals accessing HCV screening and other steps along the HCV CoC was determined. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify factors associated with HCV screening and treatment. Among 501,388 insured Tennessean Baby Boomers, 7% were screened for HCV. Of the 40,019 who received any HCV-related service, 86% were screened with an HCV antibody test, 20% had a confirmatory HCV PCR, 9% were evaluated for treatment, and 4% were prescribed antivirals. Hispanics were more likely to be screened and treated for HCV than non-Hispanic whites. HCV screening was more likely to occur in the Nashville-Davidson region than in other regions of TN, but there were regional variations in HCV treatment. Many insured Tennessean Baby Boomers do not access HCV screening services, despite national recommendations. Demographic and regional differences in uptake along the HCV CoC should inform public health interventions aimed at mitigating the effects of chronic HCV.

  10. Statin Use and Hospital Length of Stay Among Adults Hospitalized With Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havers, Fiona; Bramley, Anna M; Finelli, Lyn; Reed, Carrie; Self, Wesley H; Trabue, Christopher; Fakhran, Sherene; Balk, Robert; Courtney, D Mark; Girard, Timothy D; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Wunderink, Richard G; Jain, Seema

    2016-06-15

    Prior retrospective studies suggest that statins may benefit patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. However, prospective studies of the impact of statins on CAP outcomes are needed. We determined whether statin use was associated with improved outcomes in adults hospitalized with CAP. Adults aged ≥18 years hospitalized with CAP were prospectively enrolled at 3 hospitals in Chicago, Illinois, and 2 hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee, from January 2010-June 2012. Adults receiving statins before and throughout hospitalization (statin users) were compared with those who did not receive statins (nonusers). Proportional subdistribution hazards models were used to examine the association between statin use and hospital length of stay (LOS). In-hospital mortality was a secondary outcome. We also compared groups matched on propensity score. Of 2016 adults enrolled, 483 (24%) were statin users; 1533 (76%) were nonusers. Statin users were significantly older, had more comorbidities, had more years of education, and were more likely to have health insurance than nonusers. Multivariable regression demonstrated that statin users and nonusers had similar LOS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], .88-1.12), as did those in the propensity-matched groups (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, .88-1.21). No significant associations were found between statin use and LOS or in-hospital mortality, even when stratified by pneumonia severity. In a large prospective study of adults hospitalized with CAP, we found no evidence to suggest that statin use before and during hospitalization improved LOS or in-hospital mortality. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. An integrated safety analysis of intravenous ibuprofen (Caldolor® in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southworth SR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stephen R Southworth,1 Emily J Woodward,2 Alex Peng,2 Amy D Rock21North Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Clinic, PLLC, Tupelo, MS, 2Department of Research and Development, Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc., Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Intravenous (IV nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as IV ibuprofen are increasingly used as a component of multimodal pain management in the inpatient and outpatient settings. The safety of IV ibuprofen as assessed in ten sponsored clinical studies is presented in this analysis. Overall, 1,752 adult patients have been included in safety and efficacy trials over 11 years; 1,220 of these patients have received IV ibuprofen and 532 received either placebo or comparator medication. The incidence of adverse events (AEs, serious AEs, and changes in vital signs and clinically significant laboratory parameters have been summarized and compared to patients receiving placebo or active comparator drug. Overall, IV ibuprofen has been well tolerated by hospitalized and outpatient patients when administered both prior to surgery and postoperatively as well as for nonsurgical pain or fever. The overall incidence of AEs is lower in patients receiving IV ibuprofen as compared to those receiving placebo in this integrated analysis. Specific analysis of hematological and renal effects showed no increased risk for patients receiving IV ibuprofen. A subset analysis of elderly patients suggests that no dose adjustment is needed in this higher risk population. This integrated safety analysis demonstrates that IV ibuprofen can be safely administered prior to surgery and continued in the postoperative period as a component of multimodal pain management.Keywords: NSAID, surgical pain, fever, perioperative analgesia, critical care, multimodal pain management

  12. Availability of Low-Fat Milk and Produce in Small and Mid-Sized Grocery Stores After 2014 WIC Final Rule Changes, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlundt, David; Briley, Chiquita; Canada, Barbara; Jones, Jessica L.; Husaini, Baqar A.; Emerson, Janice S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The 2007 Interim Rule mandated changes to food packages in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) for implementation by 2009. The 2014 Final Rule required additional changes, including increasing the cash value voucher for fruits and vegetables from $6 to $8 for children by June 2014, and allowing only low-fat (1%) or nonfat milk for mothers and children aged 2 to 4 years by October 2014. This study evaluated the effect of the 2014 Final Rule changes on the food environment of small and mid-sized WIC-authorized grocery stores. Methods We analyzed secondary data using a natural experimental design to compare the percentage of shelf space for low-fat and nonfat milk and the number of fresh fruit and vegetable varieties in stock before and after the changes. We collected observational data on 18 small and mid-sized WIC-authorized grocery stores in Nashville, Tennessee, using the Nutrition Environment Measures in Store tool in March 2014 and February 2016. Results The mean percentage of shelf space occupied by low-fat and nonfat milk increased from 2.5% to 14.4% (P = .003), primarily because of an increase in the proportion of low-fat milk (P = .001). The mean number of fresh fruit and vegetable varieties increased from 24.3 to 27.7 (P = .01), with a significant increase for vegetables (P = .008) but not fruit. Conclusion Availability of low-fat milk and variety of fresh vegetables increased after the Final Rule changes in the observed stores. Future research should examine outcomes in other cities. PMID:28840823

  13. Objective reports versus subjective perceptions of crime and their relationships to accelerometer-measured physical activity in Hispanic caretaker-child dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakergem, Margaret; Sommer, Evan C; Heerman, William J; Hipp, James Aaron; Barkin, Shari L

    2017-02-01

    Crime and safety are commonly cited barriers to physical activity (PA). We had three objectives, 1) describe the association between objective crime measures and perceptions of crime, 2) analyze the relationships between each type of crime and accelerometer-measured physical activity in caretakers and young children (ages 3-5years), and 3) explore for early gender differences in the relationship between crime and physical activity in young children. Data are from the cross-sectional baseline data of an ongoing randomized controlled trial in Nashville, Tennessee spanning September 2012 through May 2014. Data was analyzed from 480 Hispanic dyads (adult caretaker and 3-5year old child). Objective crime rate was assessed in ArcGIS and perception of crime was measured by caretaker agreement with the statement "The crime rate in my neighborhood makes it unsafe to go on walks." The primary outcome was accelerometer-measured physical activity over seven consecutive days. Objective and perceived crime were significantly positively correlated. Caretaker vigorous PA was significantly related to perceptions of crime; however, its relationship to objective crime was not significant. Child PA was not significantly related to caretaker perceptions of crime. However, interactions suggested that the relationship between crime rate and PA was significantly more negative for girls than for boys. Objective and subjective measures of crime rate are expected to be important correlates of PA, but they appear to have complex relationships that are different for adults than they are for young children, as well as for young girls compared to boys, and research has produced conflicting findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Air pollution model for an urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, N. A.; Venegas, L. E.

    On présente un modèle de diffusion atmosphérique pour des polluants émis en zone urbaine par des sources multiples. On considère l'équation de continuité de la masse et les profils de vent habituels dans la couche limite. On suppose que la distribution verticale des polluants est représentée par une forme polynomiale. Les coefficients du polynôme dépendent des conditions de stabilité atmosphérique. On prend comme hauteur limite supérieure du panache une fonction potentielle de la distance. On compare les estimations de la concentration normalisée aux valeurs obtenues avec le modèle urbain de Gifford-Hanna. Il y a une bonne concordance entre les deux modèles en conditions de stabilité atmosphérique. Les différences augmentent en conditions d'instabilité. L'analyse de la sensibilité du modèle montre que des variations relatives de la rugosité du sol ont peu d'effet sur les valeurs de la concentration calculée. Les variations de l'exposant de la fonction potentielle prise pour le sommet du panache deviennent plus critiques avec la distance. Les distributions de la concentration au sol calculées par le modèle pour Nashville (E.U.), Bremen (R.F.A.) et Frankfort (R.F.A.) sont en bon accord avec les valeurs observées. On obtient un indice de concordance de 0,983 et une erreur relative moyenne de 0,0408 entre les valeurs calculées et observées.

  15. Evaluating Conveyance-Based DEM Correction Technique on NED and SRTM DEMs for Flood Impact Assessment of the 2010 Cumberland River Flood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. N. M. Bhuyian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the uncertainty in flood impact assessment (FIA that may be introduced by errors in moderate resolution regional and moderate resolution global Digital Elevation Models (DEM. One arc-second National Elevation Dataset (NED and one arc-second Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM DEMs were selected to represent moderate resolution regional and global DEMs. The relative performance for scenarios based on each of the DEMs was compared to a “control” terrain (combination of surveyed river bathymetry and a 1/3 arc-second LiDAR for floodplains-based scenario. Furthermore, a conveyance-based DEM correction technique was applied to the DEMs for investigating the suitability of the technique on selected DEMs, and determining subsequent improvement in the FIA. The May 2010 flood on the Cumberland River near Nashville, TN, was selected as the case study. It was found that the hydraulic properties necessary to implement the selected DEM correction technique could be more readily estimated from NED compared to SRTM. However, this study also prescribed alternate methods to extract necessary hydraulic properties if the DEM quality was compromised. NED-based hydrodynamic modeling resulted in a high overestimation of the simulated flood stage, but the SRTM-based model was unable to produce any reasonable result prior to DEM correction. Nevertheless, after DEM correction, both models became stable and produced less error. Error in simulated flood consequence (i.e., total structures affected and total loss in dollars also dropped accordingly, following the DEM correction. Therefore, application of this conveyance-based correction technique is reasonably effective on both moderate-resolution regional and global DEMs. The effectiveness of the technique on moderate resolution global DEM underscores the potential for users of remote and data-poor areas.

  16. Current research on the organization and function of the visual system in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaas JH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jon H Kaas, Pooja Balaram Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAll primates, including humans, are highly visual creatures.1–3 We rely heavily on visual cues for basic adaptive behaviors such as finding food, mates, and shelter; as well as more complex behaviors such as parental care and the formation of social hierarchies. Throughout the course of primate evolution, our dependence on visual cues has increased with each adaptive advantage acquired from visually guided behavior; and so has the demand for greater and more efficient processing of visual information in primate brains. Consequently, the number, size, and complexity of brain structures involved in visual processing has expanded dramatically in the primate order, far more than those of any other species in the mammalian lineage.2,4 As we have learned to interact with the world using visual cues, our brains have evolved to absorb, manipulate, and react to visual information in increasingly effective ways. Individual brain structures dedicated to vision in primates also frequently exhibit anatomical and functional specializations that are not present in other mammals. These adaptations are not present in most nonprimate mammals, partly because many species rely on other sensory modalities for their individual behaviors. Thus, understanding how we, as humans, perceive the visual world around us begins with learning how vision is processed in the primate brain. Furthermore, learning how vision in primates differs both structurally and functionally from vision in nonprimate mammals, and determining how those changes enable adaptive traits in the primate lineage, will allow us to understand the truly unique phenomenon of human visual behavior.

  17. Objective reports versus subjective perceptions of crime and their relationships to accelerometer-measured physical activity in Hispanic caretaker-child dyads

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakergem, Margaret; Sommer, Evan C.; Heerman, William J.; Hipp, James Aaron; Barkin, Shari L.

    2016-01-01

    Crime and safety are commonly cited barriers to physical activity (PA). We had three objectives, 1) describe the association between objective crime measures and perceptions of crime, 2) analyze the relationships between each type of crime and accelerometer-measured physical activity in caretakers and young children (ages 3–5 years), and 3) explore for early gender differences in the relationship between crime and physical activity in young children. Data are from the cross-sectional baseline data of an ongoing randomized controlled trial in Nashville, Tennessee spanning September 2012 through May 2014. Data was analyzed from 480 Hispanic dyads (adult caretaker and 3–5 year old child). Objective crime rate was assessed in ArcGIS and perception of crime was measured by caretaker agreement with the statement “The crime rate in my neighborhood makes it unsafe to go on walks.” The primary outcome was accelerometer-measured physical activity over seven consecutive days. Objective and perceived crime were significantly positively correlated. Caretaker vigorous PA was significantly related to perceptions of crime; however, its relationship to objective crime was not significant. Child PA was not significantly related to caretaker perceptions of crime. However, interactions suggested that the relationship between crime rate and PA was significantly more negative for girls than for boys. Objective and subjective measures of crime rate are expected to be important correlates of PA, but they appear to have complex relationships that are different for adults than they are for young children, as well as for young girls compared to boys, and research has produced conflicting findings. PMID:27939263

  18. Ablation in teeth with the free-electron laser around the absorption peak of hydroxyapatite (9.5 μm) and between 6.0 and 7.5 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, Manfred; Walker, Rudolf; Weber, Heiner; van der Meer, Lex; McKinley, Jim T.; Tolk, Norman H.; Jean, Benedikt J.

    1996-04-01

    Pulsed IR laser ablation on dental hard substances was studied in the wavelength range between 9.5 and 11.5 micrometers with the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) in Nieuwegein/NL and between 6.0 and 7.5 micrometers with the FEL at Vanderbilt University in Nashville/TN. Depth, diameter and volume of the ablation crater were determined with a special silicon replica method and subsequent confocal laser topometry. The irradiated surfaces and the ejected debris were examined with an SEM 9.5 - 11.5 micrometers : depth, diameter and volume of the ablation crater are greater and the ablation threshold is lower for ablation with a wavelength corresponding to the absorption max. of hydroxyapatite (9.5 micrometers ), compared to ablation at wavelengths with lower absorption (10.5 - 11.5 micrometers ). For all wavelengths, no thermal cracking can be observed after ablation in dentine, however a small amount of thermal cracking can be observed after ablation in enamel. After ablation at 9.5 micrometers , a few droplets of solidified melt were seen on the irradiated areas, whereas the debris consisted only of solidified melt. In contrast, the surface and the debris obtained from ablation using the other wavelengths showed the natural structure of dentine 6.0 - 7.5 micrometers : the depth of the ablation crater increases and the ablation threshold decreases for an increasing absorption coefficient of the target material. Different tissue components absorbed the laser radiation of different wavelengths (around 6.0 micrometers water and collagen, 6.5 micrometers collagen and water, 7.0 micrometers carbonated hydroxyapatite). Nevertheless the results have shown no major influence on the primary tissue absorber.

  19. "They have said that I was slightly depressed but there are circumstances that bring that on": How Middle-Aged and Older African American Men Describe Perceived Stress and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Emily K; Bergner, Erin M; Griffith, Derek M

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have focused on how men perceive stress and depression, and even fewer have examined how men of a specific racial or ethnic group describe their experiences of these conditions. African American men tend to define health in ways that are inclusive of their physical health, health behaviors, and mental health, but research has largely failed to explore how men put their health and mental health in social contexts. The objective of this article is to explore how middle-aged and older African American men who self-identify as having depression: 1) differentiate stress from depression; and 2) describe depression. Using data from semi-structured, individual interviews conducted between March and April 2014, we used a phenomenological approach to examine how men describe, experience, and perceive stress and depression. Nashville, Tennessee. 18 African American men aged 35-76 years who self-reported a previous or current diagnosis of depression. Men talked about the experiences of stress and how many of them viewed chronic stress as expected and depression as a normal part of life. They used phrases like being "slightly depressed" or "I take a light antidepressant" to describe how they feel and what they are doing to feel better. Within these narratives, men had difficulty distinguishing between stress and depression and they primarily explained that depression was the result of external stressors and strains. Men may have difficulty distinguishing between stress and depression and they may frame the causes of depression in ways that decrease their perceived culpability for its causes and limit their perceived control over the causes of depression.

  20. Patients visiting the emergency room for seizures: insurance status and clinic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhidvash, Fariba; Singh, Pradumna; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Arain, Amir

    2009-11-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic condition that is best treated in the outpatient clinic setting. However, many epilepsy patients use the hospital emergency room (ER) as a primary resource for seizure management. We studied characteristics of these patients in comparison with patients attending an epilepsy clinic. We reviewed ER data of patients seen in 2002 and 2003 for seizures, in Vanderbilt University Hospital (VUH) and Metro Nashville General Hospital (MNGH), seeking to identify patients who had visited the emergency room more than once. We collected demographic and insurance information on these patients and identified those who followed up in the epilepsy clinic. There were 1005 patients who visited the VUH ER and 205 the MNGH ER for seizures. Patients visiting the ER for seizures were less likely to be insured than epilepsy patients followed in the clinic, in both institutions. The proportion of patients visiting the ER more than once was 15.2% at VUH and 29.2% at MNGH. Among these patients, 3.2% at VUH and 26.7% at MNGH were uninsured. Clinic follow-up occurred in 68.6% of VUH and 13.3% of MNGH repeat ER visitors. Combining institutions, insured patients were much more likely to follow-up in the clinic. Repeated use of the ER for seizures was more common in the county hospital, where the proportion of uninsured patients was also higher. Patients visiting the county hospital ER repeatedly tend not to follow-up in the neurology clinic. This element of disparity of care requires further attention.

  1. APOBEC3 deletion polymorphism is associated with breast cancer risk among women of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Dennis; Li, Guoliang; Cai, Qiuyin; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kelley, Mark C; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong

    2013-10-01

    Copy number variations occur frequently in the genome and are a significant source of human genetic variation accounting for disease. Recently, we discovered a common deletion located in the APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes significantly associated with breast cancer in Chinese women. Investigating this locus in other populations would be an expedient way to evaluate the generalizability of the novel finding. We analyzed the APOBEC3 deletion in a large study of 3273 European-ancestry women (including 1671 breast cancer cases and 1602 controls) from the population-based Nashville Breast Health Study. All participants were genotyped using real-time qualitative PCR. Logistic regression was used to derive odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between the deletion polymorphism and breast cancer risk. The APOBEC3 deletion was observed in 12.4% of cases and 10.4% of controls. The deletion was significantly associated with breast cancer risk, with ORs and 95% CIs of 1.21 (1.02-1.43) associated with one-copy deletion and 2.29 (1.04-5.06) associated with two-copy deletion compared with women with no deletion (P for trend = 0.005). The positive association of the APOBEC3 deletion with breast cancer risk was similar for estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer and was not modified by known breast cancer risk factors. Results from this study confirmed the association of the APOBEC3 deletion with breast cancer risk among women of European ancestry.

  2. BRAFV600 mutations in solid tumors, other than metastatic melanoma and papillary thyroid cancer, or multiple myeloma: a screening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn AL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Allen L Cohn,1 Bann-Mo Day,2 Sarang Abhyankar,3 Edward McKenna,2 Todd Riehl,4 Igor Puzanov5 1Medical Research, Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Denver, CO, 2US Medical Affairs, 3Global Safety and Risk Management, 4Product Development Oncology, Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA, 5Melanoma Section, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Background: Mutations in the BRAF gene have been implicated in several human cancers. The objective of this screening study was to identify patients with solid tumors (other than metastatic melanoma or papillary thyroid cancer or multiple myeloma harboring activating BRAFV600 mutations for enrollment in a vemurafenib clinical study.Methods: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and sent to a central laboratory to identify activating BRAFV600 mutations by bidirectional direct Sanger sequencing.Results: Overall incidence of BRAFV600E mutation in evaluable patients (n=548 was 3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–4.7: 11% in colorectal tumors (n=75, 6% in biliary tract tumors (n=16, 3% in non-small cell lung cancers (n=71, 2% in other types of solid tumors (n=180, and 3% in multiple myeloma (n=31. There were no BRAFV600 mutations in this cohort of patients with ovarian tumors (n=68, breast cancer (n=86, or prostate cancer (n=21.Conclusion: This multicenter, national screening study confirms previously reported incidences of BRAFV600 mutations from single-center studies. Patients identified with BRAFV600 mutations were potentially eligible for enrollment in the VE-BASKET study. Keywords: genetic testing, proto-oncogene proteins B-raf, PLX4032

  3. The process of installing REDCap, a web based database supporting biomedical research: the first year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipin, M; Mare, I; Hazelhurst, S; Kramer, B

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and research data are essential for patient care, research and healthcare system planning. REDCapTM is a web-based tool for research data curatorship developed at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, USA. The Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg South Africa identified the need for a cost effective data management instrument. REDCap was installed as per the user agreement with Vanderbilt University in August 2012. In order to assist other institutions that may lack the in-house Information Technology capacity, this paper describes the installation and support of REDCap and incorporates an analysis of user uptake over the first year of use. We reviewed the staffing requirements, costs of installation, process of installation and necessary infrastructure and end-user requests following the introduction of REDCap at Wits. The University Legal Office and Human Research Ethics Committee were consulted regarding the REDCap end-user agreement. Bi-monthly user meetings resulted in a training workshop in August 2013. We compared our REDCap software user numbers and records before and after the first training workshop. Human resources were recruited from existing staff. Installation costs were limited to servers and security certificates. The total costs to provide a functional REDCap platform was less than $9000. Eighty-one (81) users were registered in the first year. After the first training workshop the user numbers increased by 59 in one month and the total number of active users to 140 by the end of August 2013. Custom software applications for REDCap were created by collaboration between clinicians and software developers. REDCap was installed and maintained at limited cost. A small number of people with defined skills can support multiple REDCap users in two to four hours a week. End user training increased in the number of users, number of projects created and the number of projects moved to production.

  4. HeRO monitoring to reduce mortality in NICU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairchild KD

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Karen D Fairchild,1 Judy L Aschner21Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, 2Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: In 2011, the results of a large, multicenter, randomized clinical trial of heart rate characteristics (HeRO monitoring in preterm infants were published. Remarkably, in approximately 3000 very low birthweight (VLBW patients in nine neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in the US, randomization to having the HeRO score displayed to clinicians resulted in a greater than 20% reduction in mortality compared with infants whose HeRO score was not displayed. In this trial, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the number needed to “treat” or monitor was 48 for each additional VLBW survivor. For extremely low birthweight infants, the number needed to monitor was 23 for each additional survivor. The HeRO score incorporates two heart rate components, decreased variability and decelerations, that occur in a variety of pathologic conditions, most notably sepsis. The HeRO score was designed as an early warning system for sepsis in NICU patients. In the clinical trial, mortality among patients with blood culture-positive sepsis dropped from 16% in controls to 10% in those whose HeRO scores were displayed. Ongoing analyses are investigating whether the HeRO score is also a useful clinical or research tool for identifying other neonatal pathologies, such as necrotizing enterocolitis and acute brain injury. The purpose of this review is four-fold: (1 to provide clinicians with a background on the physiology of heart rate regulation in health and disease, (2 to describe how HeRO monitoring was developed, (3 to review results of the randomized clinical trial, and (4 to discuss use of the HeRO monitor for early detection of potentially catastrophic illness in preterm infants in the NICU.Keywords: heart rate variability, neonatal

  5. Food Handling Behaviors Observed in Consumers When Cooking Poultry and Eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Curtis; Chambers, Edgar; Godwin, Sandria; Chambers, Delores; Cates, Sheryl; Koppel, Kadri

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has shown that many consumers do not follow recommended food safety practices for cooking poultry and eggs, which can lead to exposure to Salmonella and Campylobacter. Past research has been done primarily through surveys and interviews, rather than observations. The objective of this project was to determine through observations whether consumers follow food safety guidelines. Consumers (n = 101) divided among three locations (Manhattan, KS; Kansas City, MO area; and Nashville, TN) were observed as they prepared a baked whole chicken breast, a pan-fried ground turkey patty, a fried egg, and scrambled eggs. The end point temperature for the cooked products was taken (outside the view of consumers) within 30 s after the consumers indicated they were finished cooking. Thermometer use while cooking was low, although marginally higher than that of some previous studies: only 37% of consumers used a thermometer for chicken breasts and only 22% for turkey patties. No one used a thermometer for fried or scrambled eggs. Only 77% of the chicken and 69% of the turkey was cooked to a safe temperature (165°F [74°C]), and 77% of scrambled and 49% of fried eggs reached a safe temperature (160°F [71°C]). Safe hand washing was noted in only 40% of respondents after handling the chicken breast and 44% after handling the ground turkey patty. This value decreased to 15% after handling raw eggs for fried eggs and to 17% for scrambled eggs. These results show that there is a high prevalence of unsafe behaviors (undercooking and poor hand washing technique) when cooking poultry and eggs and a great need for improvement in consumer behavior with poultry and eggs.

  6. Milnacipran for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

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    Michelle J Ormseth

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Michelle J Ormseth, Anne E Eyler, Cara L Hammonds, Chad S BoomershineDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a widespread pain condition associated with fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and stiffness. Milnacipran is one of three medications currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for the management of adult FMS patients. This review is the second in a three-part series reviewing each of the approved FMS drugs and serves as a primer on the use of milnacipran in FMS treatment including information on pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability. Milnacipran is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor thought to improve FMS symptoms by increasing neurotransmitter levels in descending central nervous system inhibitory pathways. Milnacipran has proven efficacy in managing global FMS symptoms and pain as well as improving symptoms of fatigue and cognitive dysfunction without affecting sleep. Due to its antidepressant activity, milnacipran can also be beneficial to FMS patients with coexisting depression. However, side effects can limit milnacipran tolerability in FMS patients due to its association with headache, nausea, tachycardia, hyper- and hypotension, and increased risk for bleeding and suicidality in at-risk patients. Tolerability can be maximized by starting at low dose and slowly up-titrating if needed. As with all medications used in FMS management, milnacipran works best when used as part of an individualized treatment regimen that includes resistance and aerobic exercise, patient education and behavioral therapies.Keywords: fibromyalgia, milnacipran, treatment

  7. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

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    Boomershine CS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Michelle J Ormseth, Beth A Sholz, Chad S BoomershineDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients.Keywords: duloxetine, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, review, treatment

  8. A guide for using social media in environmental science and a case study by the Students of SETAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Sarah R; Biermans, Geert; Hicks, Andrea; Jevtić, Dragan M; Rodriguez-Gil, Jose Luis; Brockmeier, Erica K

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, the use of social media has gradually become an important part of our daily lives. While some might see this as a threat to our productivity or as a source of procrastination, social media as a whole have unquestionably changed the way in which information and knowledge disseminate in our society. This article is meant to serve as a guide for scientists who would like to establish their online presence and includes an outline of the benefits of using social media as well as strategies for establishing and improving your presence in social media. Environmental scientists in particular can benefit enormously from this approach, since this field of science deals with topics that directly impact our daily lives. To highlight these approaches for our fellow scientists in the field of environmental science and toxicology and in order to better engage with our own peers, we describe the outreach methods used by the student advisory councils of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and how we have worked towards an improved social media presence. In this article we present our initiatives to increase social media usage and engagement within SETAC. This includes joint social media accounts organized by the SETAC student advisory councils from various SETAC geographical units. We also led a course on social media usage at the SETAC Nashville meeting in 2013 and are currently developing other outreach platforms, including high school student-oriented science education blogs. The Students of SETAC will continue to increase communication with and among SETAC students on a global level and promote the use of social media to communicate science to a wide variety of audiences.

  9. Development of a Community-Sensitive Strategy to Increase Availability of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables in Nashville’s Urban Food Deserts, 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haushalter, Alisa; Buck, Tracy; Campbell, David; Henderson, Trevor; Schlundt, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Food deserts, areas that lack full-service grocery stores, may contribute to rising rates of obesity and chronic diseases among low-income and racial/ethnic minority residents. Our corner store project, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Communities Putting Prevention to Work initiative, aimed to increase availability of healthful foods in food deserts in Nashville, Tennessee. Community Context We identified 4 food deserts in which most residents are low-income and racially and ethnically diverse. Our objectives were to develop an approach to increase availability of fresh fruits and vegetables, low-fat or nonfat milk, and 100% whole-wheat bread in Nashville’s food deserts and to engage community members to inform our strategy. Methods Five corner stores located in food deserts met inclusion criteria for our intervention. We then conducted community listening sessions, proprietor surveys, store audits, and customer-intercept surveys to identify needs, challenges to retailing the products, and potential intervention strategies. Outcome Few stores offered fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, low-fat or nonfat milk, or 100% whole-wheat bread, and none stocked items from all 4 categories. Major barriers to retailing healthful options identified by community members are mistrust of store owners, history of poor-quality produce, and limited familiarity with healthful options. Store owners identified neighborhood crime as the major barrier. We used community input to develop strategies. Interpretation Engaging community residents and understanding neighborhood context is critical to developing strategies that increase access to healthful foods in corner stores. PMID:23886044

  10. AST-120 for the management of progression of chronic kidney disease

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    Schulman G

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gerald Schulman,1 Raymond Vanholder,2 Toshimitsu Niwa31Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA; 2University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 3Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, JapanAbstract: Uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD by promoting glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis with loss of nephrons and vascular damage. AST-120, an orally administered intestinal sorbent, adsorbs indole, a precursor of indoxyl sulfate, thereby reducing serum and urinary concentrations of indoxyl sulfate. AST-120 has been available in Japan since 1991, and subsequently Korea (2005, and the Philippines (2010 as an agent to prolong the time to initiation of hemodialysis and for improvement of uremic symptoms in patients with CKD. A Medline search was performed to identify data supporting clinical experience with AST-120 for managing CKD. Prospective open-label and double-blind trials as well as retrospective analyses were included. In prospective trials and retrospective analyses, AST-120 has been shown to prolong the time to initiation of hemodialysis, and slow decline in glomerular filtration rate and the increase serum creatinine. In an initial randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in the United States, AST-120 was associated with a significant dose-dependent reduction in serum indoxyl sulfate levels and a decrease in uremia-related malaise. The Evaluating Prevention of Progression in CKD (EPPIC trials, two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials undertaken in North America/Latin America and Europe, are evaluating the efficacy of AST-120 for preventing the progression of CKD. The results of the EPPIC trials will further define the role of AST-120 in this debilitating condition.Keywords: AST-120, chronic kidney disease, hemodialysis, indoxyl sulfate, uremic toxin

  11. Drugs in development for prophylaxis of rejection in kidney-transplant recipients

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    Sanders ML

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marion Lee Sanders,1 Anthony James Langone2 1Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 2Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Transplantation is the preferred treatment option for individuals with end-stage renal disease. Individuals who undergo transplantation must chronically be maintained on an immunosuppression regimen for rejection prophylaxis to help ensure graft survival. Current rejection prophylaxis consists of using a combination of calcineurin inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, antimetabolite agents, and/or corticosteroids. These agents have collectively improved the short-term outcomes of renal transplantation, but improvements in late/chronic graft loss and recipient survival have lagged significantly behind challenging the field of transplantation to develop novel prophylactic agents. There have been several clinical trials conducted within the last 5 years in an attempt to bring such novel agents to the commercial market. These trials have resulted in the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of extended-release tacrolimus, as well as belatacept, which has the potential to replace calcineurin inhibitors for rejection prophylaxis. Other trials have focused on the development of novel calcineurin inhibitors (voclosporin, costimulation blockade (ASKP1240 and alefacept, kinase inhibitors (tofacitinib and sotrastaurin, and inhibitors of leukocyte migration (efalizumab. While these later agents have not been FDA-approved for use in transplantation, they remain noteworthy, as these agents explore pathways not previously targeted for allograft-rejection prophylaxis. The purpose of this review was to consolidate available clinical trial data with regard to the recent developments in rejection prophylaxis in kidney transplantation. Keywords: rejection, prophylaxis, immunosuppression

  12. On Rainfall Modification by Major Urban Areas. Part 1; Observations from Space-borne Rain Radar Aboard TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshell; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A novel approach is introduced to correlating urbanization and rainfall modification. This study represents one of the first published attempts (possibly the first) to identify and quantify rainfall modification by urban areas using satellite-based rainfall measurements. Previous investigations successfully used rain gauge networks and around-based radar to investigate this phenomenon but still encountered difficulties due to limited, specialized measurements and separation of topographic and other influences. Three years of mean monthly rainfall rates derived from the first space-based rainfall radar, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, are employed. Analysis of data at half-degree latitude resolution enables identification of rainfall patterns around major metropolitan areas of Atlanta, Montgomery, Nashville, San Antonio, Waco, and Dallas during the warm season. Preliminary results reveal an average increase of 5.6% in monthly rainfall rates (relative to a mean upwind CONTROL area) over the metropolis but an average increase of approx. 28%, in monthly rainfall rates within 30-60 kilometers downwind of the metropolis. Some portions of the downwind area exhibit increases as high as 51%. It was also found that maximum rainfall rates found in the downwind impact area exceeded the mean value in the upwind CONTROL area by 48%-116% and were generally found at an average distance of 39 km from the edge of the urban center or 64 km from the center of the city. These results are quite consistent studies of St. Louis (e.g' METROMEX) and Chicago almost two decades ago and more recent studies in the Atlanta and Mexico City areas.

  13. Distribution of cortical neurons projecting to the superior colliculus in macaque monkeys

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    Cerkevich CM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Cerkevich,1 David C Lyon,2 Pooja Balaram,3 Jon H Kaas3 1Department of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Systems Neuroscience Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: To better reveal the pattern of corticotectal projections to the superficial layers of the superior colliculus (SC, we made a total of ten retrograde tracer injections into the SC of three macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta. The majority of these injections were in the superficial layers of the SC, which process visual information. To isolate inputs to the purely visual layers in the superficial SC from those inputs to the motor and multisensory layers deeper in the SC, two injections were placed to include the intermediate and deep layers of the SC. In another case, an injection was placed in the medial pulvinar, a nucleus not known to be strongly connected with visual cortex, to identify possible projections from tracer spread past the lateral boundary of the SC. Four conclusions are supported by the results: 1 all early visual areas of cortex, including V1, V2, V3, and the middle temporal area, project to the superficial layers of the SC; 2 with the possible exception of the frontal eye field, few areas of cortex outside of the early visual areas project to the superficial SC, although many do, however, project to the intermediate and deep layers of the SC; 3 roughly matching retinotopy is conserved in the projections of visual areas to the SC; and 4 the projections from different visual areas are similarly dense, although projections from early visual areas appear somewhat denser than those of higher order visual areas in macaque cortex. Keywords: visual cortex, superior colliculus, frontal eye field, posterior parietal cortex, visual system

  14. Blood Magnesium, and the Interaction with Calcium, on the Risk of High-Grade Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motley, Saundra S.; Smith, Joseph A.; Concepcion, Raoul; Barocas, Daniel; Byerly, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background Ionized calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) compete as essential messengers to regulate cell proliferation and inflammation. We hypothesized that inadequate Mg levels, perhaps relative to Ca levels (e.g. a high Ca/Mg ratio) are associated with greater prostate cancer risk. Study Design In this biomarker sub-study of the Nashville Men's Health Study (NMHS), we included 494 NMHS participants, consisting of 98 high-grade (Gleason≥7) and 100 low-grade cancer cases, 133 prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) cases, and 163 controls without cancer or PIN at biopsy. Linear and logistic regression were used to determine associations between blood Ca, Mg, and the Ca/Mg ratio across controls and case groups while adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results Serum Mg levels were significantly lower, while the Ca/Mg ratio was significantly higher, among high-grade cases vs. controls (p = 0.04, p = 0.01, respectively). Elevated Mg was significantly associated with a lower risk of high-grade prostate cancer (OR = 0.26 (0.09, 0.85)). An elevated Ca/Mg ratio was also associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (OR = 2.81 (1.24, 6.36) adjusted for serum Ca and Mg). In contrast, blood Ca levels were not significantly associated with prostate cancer or PIN.Mg, Ca, or Ca/Mg levels were not associated with low-grade cancer, PIN, PSA levels, prostate volume, or BPH treatment. Conclusion Low blood Mg levels and a high Ca/Mg ratio were significantly associated with high-grade prostate cancer. These findings suggest Mg affects prostate cancer risk perhaps through interacting with Ca. PMID:21541018

  15. Cortical inputs to the middle temporal visual area in New World owl monkeys

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    Cerkevich CM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Cerkevich,1 Christine E Collins,2 Jon H Kaas2 1Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition and Systems Neuroscience Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: We made eight retrograde tracer injections into the middle temporal visual area (MT of three New World owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae. These injections were placed across the representation of the retina in MT to allow us to compare the locations of labeled cells in other areas in order to provide evidence for any retinotopic organization in those areas. Four regions projected to MT: 1 early visual areas, including V1, V2, V3, the dorsolateral visual area, and the dorsomedial visual area, provided topographically organized inputs to MT; 2 all areas in the MT complex (the middle temporal crescent, the middle superior temporal area, and the fundal areas of the superior temporal sulcus projected to MT. Somewhat variably across injections, neurons were labeled in other parts of the temporal lobe; 3 regions in the location of the medial visual area, the posterior parietal cortex, and the lateral sulcus provided other inputs to MT; 4 finally, projections from the frontal eye field, frontal visual field, and prefrontal cortex were also labeled by our injections. These results further establish the sources of input to MT, and provide direct evidence within and across cases for retinotopic patterns of projections from early visual areas to MT. Keywords: middle temporal area, visual cortex, parietal cortex

  16. SU-E-T-19: A Comparison of the Dosimetric Effects of Brass Mesh and Superflab Boluses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, JS; Gong, J; Pavord, D [Vassar Brothers Hospital, Poughkeepsie, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We compared the dosimetric effects of brass mesh (Whiting and Davis, Attleboro Falls, MA) and Superflab (CNMC, Nashville, TN) boluses to verify equivalence between the two. Brass mesh bolus may be a convenient alternative to traditional bolus as it better conforms to the skin surface. Methods: Measurements were taken using a 6MV 10×10cm field produced by an Infinity linear accelerator (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) in a solid water phantom using a parallel plate ion chamber (Model 96035, Keithley Instruments, Cleveland, OH). Measurements compared 0.5cm and 1cm of Superflab to one to six layers of brass bolus mesh. Measurements were performed at depths from 0cm (‘skin’) to 10cm. Oblique beams were not studied. Results: Four layers of brass mesh were equivalent to 0.5cm Superflab within 5% at all depths. Six layers of brass compares most favorably with 0.5cm Superflab, with doses at all depths within 3%. Six layers of brass were not fully equivalent to 1cm Superflab, although the agreement was within 5% for depths greater than 3mm. Surface dose was 12% lower than 1cm Superflab. Surface dose can be up to 34% different between Superflab and brass mesh, but is less than 5% different with 4–6 layers of brass when compared to 0.5cm Superflab. To achieve surface dose agreement better than 5% compared to 1cm Superflab, more than 6 layers would be needed. The attenuation at depth was a maximum of 0.17cm per layer. Conclusion: Between four and six layers of brass mesh can be equivalent to 0.5cm Superflab, depending on the level of agreement desired. Equivalence within 5% at all depths to 1cm Superflab was not achieved even with six layers. This data agrees with measurements taken by Utsunomiya et al. (2010). More point measurements at shallower depths should be taken prior to clinical implementation of brass bolus mesh.

  17. Drug use and receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in two U.S. clinic cohorts.

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    Catherine C McGowan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug use and receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART were assessed in HIV-infected persons from the Comprehensive Care Center (CCC; Nashville, TN and Johns Hopkins University HIV Clinic (JHU; Baltimore, MD between 1999 and 2005.Participants with and without injection drug use (IDU history in the CCC and JHU cohorts were evaluated. Additional analysis of persons with history of IDU, non-injection drug use (NIDU, and no drug use from CCC were performed. Activity of IDU and NIDU also was assessed for the CCC cohort. HAART use and time on HAART were analyzed according to drug use category and site of care.1745 persons were included from CCC: 268 (15% with IDU history and 796 (46% with NIDU history. 1977 persons were included from JHU: 731 (35% with IDU history. Overall, the cohorts differed in IDU risk factor rates, age, race, sex, and time in follow-up. In multivariate analyses, IDU was associated with decreased HAART receipt overall (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: [0.45-0.84] and OR = 0.58, 95% CI: [0.46-0.73], respectively for CCC and JHU and less time on HAART at JHU (0.70, [0.55-0.88], but not statistically associated with time on HAART at CCC (0.78, [0.56-1.09]. NIDU was independently associated with decreased HAART receipt (0.62, [0.47-0.81] and less time on HAART (0.66, [0.52-0.85] at CCC. These associations were not altered significantly whether patients at CCC were categorized according to historical drug use or drug use during the study period.Persons with IDU history from both clinic populations were less likely to receive HAART and tended to have less cumulative time on HAART. Effects of NIDU were similar to IDU at CCC. NIDU without IDU is an important contributor to HAART utilization.

  18. The impact of mobility assistive technology devices on participation for individuals with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Jordan; Ganus, Ashley; Ivey, Jon Mark; Plummer, Teresa; Eubank, Ann

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to address the gap in research and contribute to the body of knowledge on the perspectives assistive technology device users have toward their devices. Mixed methods were used to better understand the impact of mobility assistive technology devices (MATDs) on participation for individuals with disabilities. The Functional Mobility Assessment was administered in conjunction with two qualitative questions developed by the research team allowing participants to expound on the impact of their MATD experience. Participants were recruited online via the National Spinal Cord Injury Association website and in-person at Abilities Expo in Atlanta, Georgia, and the International Seating Symposium in Nashville, Tennessee. Results are consistent with findings from prior research regarding accessibility for individuals with disabilities. Corresponding findings were found in both the quantitative and qualitative data and are categorized into several major themes: environment (indoor and outdoor), surface heights, transportation, dependence, independence, quality of life and participation. Quantitative data from this study indicate that users of MATD are satisfied with the way in which their devices enable maneuvering indoors, while qualitative data suggest otherwise. Implications for healthcare practitioners are described and future recommendations are provided. Implications for Rehabilitation Healthcare professionals should advocate for proper mobility assistive technology devices (MATDs) for their patients in order to enable increased independence, safety and efficiency. Healthcare professionals must be cognizant of the impact of the environment and/or environmental barriers when prescribing MATD. Additional areas of interest for future research may include investigating the impact of MATD in association with date of onset of disability, according to diagnoses, or specific to length of time since acquiring the device.

  19. Targeting metastatic colorectal cancer – present and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciombor KK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kristen K Ciombor,1 Jordan Berlin21Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Metastatic colorectal cancer is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US and around the world. While several novel cytotoxic and biologic therapies have been developed and proven efficacious in the past two decades, their optimal use in terms of patient selection, drug combinations, and regimen sequences has yet to be defined. Recent investigations regarding anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapies include the comparison of single-agent panitumumab and cetuximab, the benefit of adding cetuximab to chemotherapy in the conversion therapy setting, the comparison of cetuximab and bevacizumab when added to first-line chemotherapy, and predictive biomarkers beyond KRAS exon 2 (codons 12 and 13 mutations. With respect to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies, new data on continuing bevacizumab beyond disease progression on a bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy regimen, the addition of bevacizumab to triplet chemotherapy in the first-line setting, maintenance therapy with bevacizumab plus either capecitabine or erlotinib, the addition of aflibercept to chemotherapy, and regorafenib as monotherapy have emerged. Recent scientific and technologic advances in the field of metastatic colorectal cancer promise to elucidate the biological underpinnings of this disease and its therapies for the goal of improving personalized treatments for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.Keywords: cetuximab, panitumumab, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, biomarker

  20. Hydropower Optimization Using Artificial Neural Network Surrogate Models of a High-Fidelity Hydrodynamics and Water Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Amelia R.; Smith Sawyer, Heather; LeBoeuf, Eugene J.; McDonald, Mark P.; Hadjerioua, Boualem

    2017-11-01

    Hydropower operations optimization subject to environmental constraints is limited by challenges associated with dimensionality and spatial and temporal resolution. The need for high-fidelity hydrodynamic and water quality models within optimization schemes is driven by improved computational capabilities, increased requirements to meet specific points of compliance with greater resolution, and the need to optimize operations of not just single reservoirs but systems of reservoirs. This study describes an important advancement for computing hourly power generation schemes for a hydropower reservoir using high-fidelity models, surrogate modeling techniques, and optimization methods. The predictive power of the high-fidelity hydrodynamic and water quality model CE-QUAL-W2 is successfully emulated by an artificial neural network, then integrated into a genetic algorithm optimization approach to maximize hydropower generation subject to constraints on dam operations and water quality. This methodology is applied to a multipurpose reservoir near Nashville, Tennessee, USA. The model successfully reproduced high-fidelity reservoir information while enabling 6.8% and 6.6% increases in hydropower production value relative to actual operations for dissolved oxygen (DO) limits of 5 and 6 mg/L, respectively, while witnessing an expected decrease in power generation at more restrictive DO constraints. Exploration of simultaneous temperature and DO constraints revealed capability to address multiple water quality constraints at specified locations. The reduced computational requirements of the new modeling approach demonstrated an ability to provide decision support for reservoir operations scheduling while maintaining high-fidelity hydrodynamic and water quality information as part of the optimization decision support routines.

  1. Maternal and Fetal Genetic Associations of PTGER3 and PON1 with Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryckman, Kelli K.; Morken, Nils-Halvdan; White, Marquitta J.; Velez, Digna R.; Menon, Ramkumar; Fortunato, Stephen J.; Magnus, Per; Williams, Scott M.; Jacobsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify associations between maternal and fetal genetic variants in candidate genes and spontaneous preterm birth (PTB) in a Norwegian population and to determine the effect size of those associations that corroborate a previous study of PTB. Methods DNA from 434 mother-baby dyads (214 cases and 220 controls) collected from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa) was examined for association between 1,430 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 143 genes and PTB. These results were compared to a previous study on European Americans (EA) from Centennial Women's Hospital in Nashville, TN, USA. Odds ratios for SNPs that corroborated the Cenntennial study were determined on the combined MoBa and Centennial studies. Results In maternal samples the strongest results that corroborated the Centennial study were in the prostaglandin E receptor 3 gene (PTGER3; rs977214) (combined genotype p = 3×10−4). The best model for rs977214 was the AG/GG genotypes relative to the AA genotype and resulted in an OR of 0.55 (95% CI = 0.37–0.82, p = 0.003), indicating a protective effect. In fetal samples the most significant association in the combined data was rs854552 in the paraoxonase 1 gene (PON1) (combined allele p = 8×10−4). The best model was the TT genotype relative to the CC/CT genotypes, and resulted in an OR of 1.32 (95% CI = 1.13–1.53, p = 4×10−4). Conclusions These studies identify single locus associations with preterm birth for both maternal and fetal genotypes in two populations of European ancestry. PMID:20140262

  2. Maternal and fetal genetic associations of PTGER3 and PON1 with preterm birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli K Ryckman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify associations between maternal and fetal genetic variants in candidate genes and spontaneous preterm birth (PTB in a Norwegian population and to determine the effect size of those associations that corroborate a previous study of PTB.DNA from 434 mother-baby dyads (214 cases and 220 controls collected from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa was examined for association between 1,430 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 143 genes and PTB. These results were compared to a previous study on European Americans (EA from Centennial Women's Hospital in Nashville, TN, USA. Odds ratios for SNPs that corroborated the Cenntennial study were determined on the combined MoBa and Centennial studies.In maternal samples the strongest results that corroborated the Centennial study were in the prostaglandin E receptor 3 gene (PTGER3; rs977214 (combined genotype p = 3x10(-4. The best model for rs977214 was the AG/GG genotypes relative to the AA genotype and resulted in an OR of 0.55 (95% CI = 0.37-0.82, p = 0.003, indicating a protective effect. In fetal samples the most significant association in the combined data was rs854552 in the paraoxonase 1 gene (PON1 (combined allele p = 8x10(-4. The best model was the TT genotype relative to the CC/CT genotypes, and resulted in an OR of 1.32 (95% CI = 1.13-1.53, p = 4x10(-4.These studies identify single locus associations with preterm birth for both maternal and fetal genotypes in two populations of European ancestry.

  3. Meeting report: Spontaneous lesions and diseases in wild, captive-bred, and zoo-housed nonhuman primates and in nonhuman primate species used in drug safety studies.

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    Sasseville, V G; Mansfield, K G; Mankowski, J L; Tremblay, C; Terio, K A; Mätz-Rensing, K; Gruber-Dujardin, E; Delaney, M A; Schmidt, L D; Liu, D; Markovits, J E; Owston, M; Harbison, C; Shanmukhappa, S; Miller, A D; Kaliyaperumal, S; Assaf, B T; Kattenhorn, L; Macri, S Cummings; Simmons, H A; Baldessari, A; Sharma, P; Courtney, C; Bradley, A; Cline, J M; Reindel, J F; Hutto, D L; Montali, R J; Lowenstine, L J

    2012-11-01

    The combination of loss of habitat, human population encroachment, and increased demand of select nonhuman primates for biomedical research has significantly affected populations. There remains a need for knowledge and expertise in understanding background findings as related to the age, source, strain, and disease status of nonhuman primates. In particular, for safety/biomedical studies, a broader understanding and documentation of lesions would help clarify background from drug-related findings. A workshop and a minisymposium on spontaneous lesions and diseases in nonhuman primates were sponsored by the concurrent Annual Meetings of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology held December 3-4, 2011, in Nashville, Tennessee. The first session had presentations from Drs Lowenstine and Montali, pathologists with extensive experience in wild and zoo populations of nonhuman primates, which was followed by presentations of 20 unique case reports of rare or newly observed spontaneous lesions in nonhuman primates (see online files for access to digital whole-slide images corresponding to each case report at http://www.scanscope.com/ACVP%20Slide%20Seminars/2011/Primate%20Pathology/view.apml). The minisymposium was composed of 5 nonhuman-primate researchers (Drs Bradley, Cline, Sasseville, Miller, Hutto) who concentrated on background and spontaneous lesions in nonhuman primates used in drug safety studies. Cynomolgus and rhesus macaques were emphasized, with some material presented on common marmosets. Congenital, acquired, inflammatory, and neoplastic changes were highlighed with a focus on clinical, macroscopic, and histopathologic findings that could confound the interpretation of drug safety studies.

  4. Effects of agricultural practices on greenhouse gas emissions (N2O, CH4 and CO2) from corn fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, D.; Wang, J.; Jima, T.; Dennis, S.; Stockert, C.; Smart, D.; Bhattarai, S.; Brown, K.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, C.

    2012-12-01

    The United States is, by far, the largest producer of corn (Zea mays L.) in the world. Recent increases in fertilizer cost and concerns over global climate change have farmers and others interested in more efficient fertilization management and greenhouse gas emissions reductions. To seek the best management practices, we conducted field experiments during the 2012 growing season at Tennessee State University Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. Six treatments were applied including regular URAN application [2 times], multiple URAN applications [4 times], denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application, and chicken litter plus regular URAN application in no-tilled plots, and URAN application plus bio-char in tilled plots, all compared to regular URAN application in conventional tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated six times (blocks). We measured N2O, CO2 and CH4 emissions using a closed chamber method after rainfall events, fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during the gas sampling. Plant physiology and growth were measured about every two weeks. While preliminary results indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the agricultural practices on some days, particularly after rainfall events, CH4 flux was not influenced by the treatments during most of the days. Plots with bio-char showed significantly lower N2O emissions. We also measured N2O flux in a commercial corn field using the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique to ground verify the chamber based N2O emissions at the field scale. Results obtained with the EC technique seem comparable with the chamber method.

  5. PREFACE: 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

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    Koch, R.; Lebedev, S.

    2003-12-01

    , Helsinki University, Finland B Sharkov, ITEP Moscow, Russian Federation V Smirnov, Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russian Federation W Suttrop, IPP Garching, Germany C Varandas, IST Lisbon, Portugal F Wagner, Chair EPS-PPD, IPP Greifswald, Germany H R Wilson, UKAEA Abingdon, UK This committee selected 30 invited talks, in which the speakers were asked to address the general audience of plasma physicists and to exert their didactic skills. Out of the contributed papers, in total, 92 oral presentations were selected and distributed over parallel topical sessions. The other contributed papers (743) were presented as posters. The conference was attended by more than 700 participants from 41 countries. A major event during the conference was the award of the Hannes Alfv\\'en Prize to Professor V E Fortov who gave a spectacular lecture on non-ideal plasmas. The associated paper is included in this special issue. Following the tradition of this conference series, four-page summaries of the contributed papers are published as the Europhysics Conference Abstracts series, volume 27A. The publication is in the form of a CD-ROM sent free of charge to all participants and is also accessible via the website: http://www.ioffe.ru/EPS2003/. This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion contains papers of the invited talks at this conference. These papers have been assessed according to the standards of the journal and examined by referees selected from or by the members of the International Programme Committee. We are proud to provide, in this special issue, an overview of the forefront research in all major fields of plasma physics, through a set of papers accessible to the general audience of plasma physicists. The selection of this set of papers has been the work of the Programme Committee, and we would like to express our gratitude to all of its members for this successful selection. We are grateful to all authors for their efforts in providing high quality papers combining

  6. Learning to research in first grade: Bridging the transition from narrative to expository texts and tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Richard

    Decades of research indicate that students at all academic grade and performance levels perform poorly with informational texts and tasks and particularly with locating assignment-relevant information in expository texts. Students have little understanding of the individual tasks required, the arc of the activity, the hierarchical structure of the information they seek, or how to reconstitute and interpret the information they extract. Poor performance begins with the introduction of textbooks and research assignments in fourth grade and continues into adulthood. However, to date, neither educators nor researchers have substantially addressed this problem. In this quasi-experimental study, we ask if first-grade children can perform essential tasks in identifying, extracting, and integrating assignment-relevant information and if instruction improves their performance. To answer this question, we conducted a 15-week, teacher-led, intervention in two first-grade classrooms in an inner-city Nashville elementary school. We created a computer learning environment (NoteTaker) to facilitate children's creation of a mental model of the research process and a narrative/expository bridge curriculum to support the children's transition from all narrative to all expository texts and tasks. We also created a new scaffolding taxonomy and a reading-to-research model to focus our research. Teachers participated in weekly professional development workshops. The results of this quasi-experimental study indicate that at-risk, first-grade children are able to (a) identify relevant information in an expository text, (b) categorize the information they identify, and (c) justify their choice of category. Children's performance in the first and last tasks significantly improved with instruction, and low-performing readers showed the greatest benefits from instruction. We find that the children's performance in categorizing information depended upon content-specific knowledge that was not

  7. Metformin for Treatment of Overweight Induced by Atypical Antipsychotic Medication in Young People With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Evdokia; Aman, Michael G; Handen, Benjamin L; Sanders, Kevin B; Shui, Amy; Hollway, Jill A; Brian, Jessica; Arnold, L Eugene; Capano, Lucia; Hellings, Jessica A; Butter, Eric; Mankad, Deepali; Tumuluru, Rameshwari; Kettel, Jessica; Newsom, Cassandra R; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Peleg, Naomi; Odrobina, Dina; McAuliffe-Bellin, Sarah; Zakroysky, Pearl; Marler, Sarah; Wagner, Alexis; Wong, Taylor; Macklin, Eric A; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2016-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotic medications are indicated for the treatment of irritability and agitation symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Unfortunately, these medications are associated with weight gain and metabolic complications that are especially troubling in children and with long-term use. To evaluate the efficacy of metformin for weight gain associated with atypical antipsychotic medications in children and adolescents with ASD (defined in the protocol as DSM-IV diagnosis of autistic disorder, Asperger disorder, or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified), aged 6 to 17 years. A 16-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was conducted at 4 centers in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Columbus, Ohio; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Nashville, Tennessee. In all, 209 potential participants were screened by telephone, 69 individuals provided consent, and 61 participants were randomized to receive metformin or placebo between April 26, 2013, and June 24, 2015. Metformin or matching placebo titrated up to 500 mg twice daily for children aged 6 to 9 years and 850 mg twice daily for those 10 to 17 years. The primary outcome measure was change in body mass index (BMI) z score during 16 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes included changes in additional body composition and metabolic variables. Safety, tolerability, and efficacy analyses all used a modified intent-to-treat sample comprising all participants who received at least 1 dose of medication. Of the 61 randomized participants, 60 participants initiated treatment (45 [75%] male; mean [SD] age, 12.8 [2.7] years). Metformin reduced BMI z scores from baseline to week 16 significantly more than placebo (difference in 16-week change scores vs placebo, -0.10 [95% CI, -0.16 to -0.04]; P = .003). Statistically significant improvements were also noted in secondary body composition measures (raw BMI, -0.95 [95% CI, -1.46 to -0.45] and raw weight, -2.73 [95% CI, -4

  8. Costs and effectiveness of the fast track intervention for antisocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E Michael

    2010-09-01

    Antisocial behavior is enormously costly to the youth involved, their families, victims, taxpayers and other members of society. These costs are generated by school failure, delinquency and involvement in the juvenile justice system, drug use, health services and other services. For prevention programs to be cost effective, they must reduce these costly behaviors and outcomes. The Fast Track intervention is a 10-year, multi-component prevention program targeting antisocial behavior. The intervention identified children at school entry and provided intervention services over a 10-year period. This study examined the intervention's impact on outcomes affecting societal costs using data through late adolescence. The intervention is being evaluated through a multi-cohort, multi-site, multi-year randomized control trial of program participants and comparable children and youth in similar schools, and that study provides the data for these analyses. Schools within four sites (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN; Seattle, WA; and rural central Pennsylvania) were selected as high-risk based on crime and poverty statistics of the neighborhoods they served. Within each site, schools were divided into multiple sets matched for demographics (size, percentage free/reduced lunch, ethnic composition); one set within each pair was randomly assigned to the intervention and one to the control condition. Within participating schools, high-risk children were identified using a multiple-gating procedure. For each of three annual cohorts, all kindergarteners (9,594 total) in 54 schools were screened for classroom conduct problems by teachers. Those children scoring in the top 40% within cohort and site were then solicited for the next stage of screening for home behavior problems by the parents, and 91% agreed (n = 3,274). The teacher and parent screening scores were then standardized within site and combined into a sum score. These summed scores represented a total severity-of-risk screen score

  9. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SK

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Susannah K Lee,1 Jill Dawson,2 Jack A Lee,3 Gizem Osman,4 Maria O Levitin,5 Refika Mine Guzel,5 Mustafa BA Djamgoz5,61Pomona College, Claremont, CA, USA; 2Healthcare Communications Consultancy, Danville, CA, USA; 3College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; 4Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK; 5Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Neuroscience Solutions to Cancer Research Group, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College London, London, UK; 6Cyprus International University, Biotechnology Research Centre, Haspolat, North Cyprus, Mersin, TurkeyAbstract: In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and GABA “mimetics” (eg, gabapentin appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can

  10. Ocular comfort assessment of lifitegrast ophthalmic solution 5.0% in OPUS-3, a Phase III randomized controlled trial

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    Nichols KK

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Kelly K Nichols,1 Edward Holland,2 Melissa M Toyos,3 James H Peace,4 Parag Majmudar,5 Aparna Raychaudhuri,6 Mohamed Hamdani,6 Monica Roy,6 Amir Shojaei6 1School of Optometry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 2Cincinnati Eye Institute, Edgewood, KY, 3Toyos Clinic, Nashville, TN, 4United Medical Research Institute, Inglewood, CA, 5Chicago Cornea Consultants, Ltd., Hoffman Estates, IL, 6Shire, Lexington, MA, USA Purpose: To evaluate ocular comfort of lifitegrast ophthalmic solution 5.0% among patients with dry eye disease (DED in the OPUS-3 trial. Methods: OPUS-3 was a multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study. Adults with DED and recent artificial tear use were randomized 1:1 (lifitegrast:placebo to ophthalmic drops twice daily for 84 days. On days 0 (baseline, 14, 42, and 84, drop comfort score (scale, 0–10; 0 = very comfortable, 10 = very uncomfortable was measured at 0, 1, 2, and 3 minutes postinstillation. If the score was >3 at 3 minutes, assessment was repeated at 5, 10, and 15 minutes until score ≤3. Ocular treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs were assessed. Results: Overall, 711 participants were randomized (n=357 received lifitegrast; n=354 received placebo. Drop comfort scores for lifitegrast-treated participants improved within 3 minutes of instillation (mean scores on day 84 for both study and fellow eyes: instillation: lifitegrast, 3.4, placebo, 1.0; 3 minutes: lifitegrast, 1.5, placebo, 0.7. The majority (64%–66% of participants had scores <3 within 3 minutes postinstillation on days 14, 42, and 84. In participants with scores >3 at 3 minutes, the mean score in the lifitegrast group was similar to or better than that in the placebo group at 5, 10, or 15 minutes postinstillation. Lifitegrast appeared to be well tolerated, with ocular TEAEs rarely leading to discontinuation. Conclusion: In OPUS-3, lifitegrast appeared to be well tolerated and drop comfort scores approached placebo

  11. Effectiveness of β-Lactam Monotherapy vs Macrolide Combination Therapy for Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Derek J; Edwards, Kathryn M; Self, Wesley H; Zhu, Yuwei; Arnold, Sandra R; McCullers, Jonathan A; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Anderson, Evan J; Hicks, Lauri A; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Grijalva, Carlos G

    2017-12-01

    β-Lactam monotherapy and β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy are both common empirical treatment strategies for children hospitalized with pneumonia, but few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these 2 treatment approaches. To compare the effectiveness of β-lactam monotherapy vs β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy among a cohort of children hospitalized with pneumonia. We analyzed data from the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study, a multicenter, prospective, population-based study of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations conducted from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, in 3 children's hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee; Memphis, Tennessee; and Salt Lake City, Utah. The study included all children (up to 18 years of age) who were hospitalized with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and who received β-lactam monotherapy or β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Data analysis was completed in April 2017. We defined the referent as β-lactam monotherapy, including exclusive use of an oral or parenteral second- or third-generation cephalosporin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin, or amoxicillin-clavulanate. Use of a β-lactam plus an oral or parenteral macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin) served as the comparison group. We modeled the association between these groups and patients' length of stay using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Covariates included demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables. We further evaluated length of stay in a cohort matched by propensity to receive combination therapy. Logistic regression was used to evaluate secondary outcomes in the unmatched cohort, including intensive care admission, rehospitalizations, and self-reported recovery at follow-up. Our study included 1418 children (693 girls and 725 boys) with a median age of 27 months (interquartile range, 12-69 months). This cohort was 60.1% of the 2358 children enrolled in the

  12. The social construction of disasters in the United States: A historical and cultural phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaves, Tonya T; Wachhaus, T Aaron; Royer, Grace A

    Societal risks from hazards are continually increasing. Each year, disasters cause thousands of deaths and cost billions of dollars. In the first half of 2011, the United States endured countless disasters-winter snowstorms in the Midwest and Northeast; severe tornadic weather in the Mississippi, Alabama, and Missouri; flash flooding in Nashville; flooding along the Mississippi River; an earthquake on the East Coast, wildfires in Texas, and Hurricane Irene. Fundamental disaster planning is regarded as an interdisciplinary approach to develop strategies and instituting policies concerned with phases of emergency management; as such, its needs are predicated on the identification of hazards and assessment of risks. Even if the probability or intensity of risks to disasters remains fairly constant, population growth, alongside economic and infrastructural development, will unavoidably result in a concomitant increase of places prone to such events. One of the greatest barriers to emergency management efforts is the failure to fully grasp the socially and politically constructed meaning of disasters. This article investigates the ways in which language has been used historically in the American lexicon to make sense of disasters in the United States in an effort to improve communal resiliency. Serving as both an idea and experience, the terminology used to convey our/the modern-day concept of disaster is a result of a cultural artifact, ie, a given time and specific place. Tools such as Google Ngram Viewer and CASOS AutoMap are used to explore the penetration, duration, and change in disaster terminology among American English literature for more than 200 years, from 1800 to 2008, by quantifying written culture. The language of disasters is an integral part of disaster response, as talking is the primary way that most people respond to and recover from disasters. The vast majority of people are not affected by any given disaster, and so it is through discussing a

  13. Walking in the high-rise city: a Health Enhancement and Pedometer-determined Ambulatory (HEPA program in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung AYM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Angela YM Leung,1,2 Mike KT Cheung,3 Michael A Tse,4 Wai Chuen Shum,5 BJ Lancaster,1,6 Cindy LK Lam7 1School of Nursing, 2Research Centre on Heart, Brain, Hormone and Healthy Aging, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, 3Centre on Research and Advocacy, Hong Kong Society for Rehabilitation, 4Institute of Human Performance, University of Hong Kong, 5Sheng Kung Hui Holy Carpenter Church Social Services, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People’s Republic of China; 6School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; 7Department of Family Medicine and Primary Care, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Due to the lack of good infrastructure in the public estates, many older adults in urban areas are sedentary. The Health Enhancement and Pedometer-Determined Ambulatory (HEPA program was developed to assist older adults with diabetes and/or hypertension to acquire walking exercise habits and to build social support, while engaged in regular physical activity. This study aimed to describe the HEPA program and to report changes in participants’ walking capacity and body strength after 10-week walking sessions. A pre- and postintervention design was used. Pedometers were used to measure the number of steps taken per day before and after the 10-week intervention. Upper and lower body strength, lower body flexibility, and quality of life were assessed. A total of 205 older adults completed the program and all health assessments. After the 10-week intervention, the average number of steps per day increased by 36%, from 6,591 to 8,934. Lower body strength, upper body strength, and aerobic fitness increased significantly after 10 weeks, along with improvement in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF™-12 physical and mental health component summary scores. A social support network was built in the neighborhood, and the local environment was

  14. Interaction between leucine and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition in modulating insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism

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    Fu L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lizhi Fu,1 Fenfen Li,1 Antje Bruckbauer,2 Qiang Cao,1 Xin Cui,1 Rui Wu,1 Hang Shi,1 Bingzhong Xue,1 Michael B Zemel21Department of Biology, Center for Obesity Reversal, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, 2NuSirt Biopharma Inc., Nashville, TN, USA Purpose: Leucine activates SIRT1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling and markedly potentiates the effects of other sirtuin and AMPK activators on insulin signaling and lipid metabolism. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition increases nitric oxide–cGMP signaling, which in turn exhibits a positive feedback loop with both SIRT1 and AMPK, thus amplifying peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator α (PGC1α-mediated effects. Methods: We evaluated potential synergy between leucine and PDE5i on insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism in vitro and in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. Results: Leucine (0.5 mM exhibited significant synergy with subtherapeutic doses (0.1–10 nM of PDE5-inhibitors (sildenafil and icariin on fat oxidation, nitric oxide production, and mitochondrial biogenesis in hepatocytes, adipocytes, and myotubes. Effects on insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and lipid metabolism were then assessed in DIO-mice. DIO-mice exhibited fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis, which were not affected by the addition of leucine (24 g/kg diet. However, the combination of leucine and a subtherapeutic dose of icariin (25 mg/kg diet for 6 weeks reduced fasting glucose (38%, P<0.002, insulin (37%, P<0.05, area under the glucose tolerance curve (20%, P<0.01, and fully restored glucose response to exogenous insulin challenge. The combination also inhibited hepatic lipogenesis, stimulated hepatic and muscle fatty acid oxidation, suppressed hepatic inflammation, and reversed high-fat diet-induced steatosis. Conclusion: These robust improvements in insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and lipid metabolism indicate therapeutic potential for

  15. The effect of post-traumatic-stress-disorder on intra-operative analgesia in a veteran population during cataract procedures carried out using retrobulbar or topical anesthesia: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Yuna; Wayman, Laura L; Chomsky, Amy S

    2017-06-07

    A growing proportion of veterans treated at the Veterans Health Administration (VA) have a history of post-traumatic-stress-disorder (PTSD), and there exists a higher rate of PTSD amongst veterans than the general population. The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between PTSD and intra-operative analgesia, intra-operative time, and anesthesia type for cataract surgery in a veteran population. Secondary objectives are to determine if patient age, and first or second eye surgery affect intra-operative pain control or are correlated with type of anesthesia modality. A retrospective study of 330 cataract surgeries performed by resident physicians between January and September 2012 at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville and Murfreesboro Campuses was completed. Three hundred and thirty veteran patients were selected if their cataract surgery was performed between January and September 2012. Combined cases were excluded. The primary outcome evaluated was intra-operative analgesia. Secondary outcomes included history of post-traumatic-stress-disorder, anesthesia type, first or second eye, pain control, intra-operative heart rate and blood pressure, age, and case complexity. Data was analyzed using an unpaired two-sample Welch's t-test assuming unequal variance and Z test of comparison of proportions. Patients with post-traumatic-stress-disorder reported higher pain scores, had longer operative times, and were more likely to have received a retrobulbar block. Operative time was not associated with an increased pain score, irrespective of anesthesia type, when controlled for PTSD. Complex cases had longer operative times, more sedation, and higher pain scores. P Post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety are more prevalent in the veteran population. Our data suggests that a history of post-traumatic-stress-disorder was correlated with higher pain scores, longer operative times, and with having received a

  16. S100 calcium binding protein B as a biomarker of delirium duration in the intensive care unit – an exploratory analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan BA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Babar A Khan,1–3 Mark O Farber,1 Noll Campbell,2–5 Anthony Perkins,2,3 Nagendra K Prasad,6 Siu L Hui,1–3 Douglas K Miller,1–3 Enrique Calvo-Ayala,1 John D Buckley,1 Ruxandra Ionescu,1 Anantha Shekhar,1 E Wesley Ely,7,8 Malaz A Boustani1–3 1Indiana University School of Medicine, 2Indiana University Center for Aging Research, 3Regenstrief Institute, Inc., 4Wishard Health Services, Indianapolis, 5Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, 6Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, 7Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 8VA Tennessee Valley Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center (GRECC, Nashville, TN, USA Background: Currently, there are no valid and reliable biomarkers to identify delirious patients predisposed to longer delirium duration. We investigated the hypothesis that elevated S100 calcium binding protein B (S100β levels will be associated with longer delirium duration in critically ill patients. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was performed in the medical, surgical, and progressive intensive care units (ICUs of a tertiary care, university affiliated, and urban hospital. Sixty-three delirious patients were selected for the analysis, with two samples of S100β collected on days 1 and 8 of enrollment. The main outcome measure was delirium duration. Using the cutoff of <0.1 ng/mL and $0.1 ng/mL as normal and abnormal levels of S100β, respectively, on day 1 and day 8, four exposure groups were created: Group A, normal S100β levels on day 1 and day 8; Group B, normal S100β level on day 1 and abnormal S100β level on day 8; Group C, abnormal S100β level on day 1 and normal on day 8; and Group D, abnormal S100β levels on both day 1 and day 8. Results: Patients with abnormal levels of S100β showed a trend towards higher delirium duration (P=0.076; Group B (standard deviation (7.0 [3.2] days, Group C (5.5 [6.3] days, and Group D

  17. Opportunities for inhaler device selection in elderly patients with asthma or COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrons R

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Robert Barrons,1 James Wheeler,2 J Andrew Woods1 1Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, NC, USA; 2University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: An anticipated surge in the elderly population will be accompanied by a rise in aging patients with asthma or COPD. Clinician selection of inhalers needs to address the unique challenges to elderly patients. These challenges to the use of inhalers include diminished physical and cognitive abilities, as well as cost reimbursement issues associated with polypharmacy and the Medicare gap. Clinicians should consider patient preferences for an inhaler device that provides ease of administration, and addresses conveniences such as portability, visual, and auditory indicators of dosing completion. The addition of spacer devices resolves hand-breath coordination difficulty with pressurized metered dose inhalers, but reduces overall inhaler convenience. Soft mist inhalers (Respimat® improve ease of administration, but use may be limited by cost and formulary availability. Multiple dose dry powder inhalers provide convenience and simplified use by requiring only one to two steps prior to administration, but concerns of peak inspiratory flow requirements remain among patients with advanced age and severity of COPD. If unaddressed, these challenges to inhaler selection contribute to inappropriate use of inhalers in 41% to 69% of patients, accompanied by at least 51% non-adherence to treatment. Clinicians must first avail themselves of reputable educational resources regarding new inhaler developments and administration, for competent patient instruction. Patient education should include a checklist of inhaler technique, with physical demonstration of each device by the patient and provider. Device demonstration significantly improves inhaler technique and identifies the need for nebulization therapy. Clinician and patient knowledge of available inhalers and their

  18. Activation of M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors as potential treatments for Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster DJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Foster, Derrick L Choi, P Jeffrey Conn, Jerri M RookDepartment of Pharmacology and Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD and schizophrenia (SZ are neurological disorders with overlapping symptomatology, including both cognitive deficits and behavioral disturbances. Current clinical treatments for both disorders have limited efficacy accompanied by dose-limiting side effects, and ultimately fail to adequately address the broad range of symptoms observed. Novel therapeutic options for AD and SZ are needed to better manage the spectrum of symptoms with reduced adverse-effect liability. Substantial evidence suggests that activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs has the potential to treat both cognitive and psychosis-related symptoms associated with numerous central nervous system (CNS disorders. However, use of nonselective modulators of mAChRs is hampered by dose-limiting peripheral side effects that limit their clinical utility. In order to maintain the clinical efficacy without the adverse-effect liability, efforts have been focused on the discovery of compounds that selectively modulate the centrally located M1 and M4 mAChR subtypes. Previous drug discovery attempts have been thwarted by the highly conserved nature of the acetylcholine site across mAChR subtypes. However, current efforts by our laboratory and others have now focused on modulators that bind to allosteric sites on mAChRs, allowing these compounds to display unprecedented subtype selectivity. Over the past couple of decades, the discovery of small molecules capable of selectively targeting the M1 or M4 mAChR subtypes has allowed researchers to elucidate the roles of these receptors in regulating cognitive and behavioral disturbances in preclinical animal models. Here, we provide an overview of these promising preclinical and clinical studies, which suggest

  19. Evaluating genome-wide association study-identified breast cancer risk variants in African-American women.

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    Jirong Long

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS, conducted mostly in European or Asian descendants, have identified approximately 67 genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Given the large differences in genetic architecture between the African-ancestry genome and genomes of Asians and Europeans, it is important to investigate these loci in African-ancestry populations. We evaluated index SNPs in all 67 breast cancer susceptibility loci identified to date in our study including up to 3,300 African-American women (1,231 cases and 2,069 controls, recruited in the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS and the Nashville Breast Health Study (NBHS. Seven SNPs were statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05 with the risk of overall breast cancer in the same direction as previously reported: rs10069690 (5p15/TERT, rs999737 (14q24/RAD51L1, rs13387042 (2q35/TNP1, rs1219648 (10q26/FGFR2, rs8170 (19p13/BABAM1, rs17817449 (16q12/FTO, and rs13329835 (16q23/DYL2. A marginally significant association (P<0.10 was found for three additional SNPs: rs1045485 (2q33/CASP8, rs4849887 (2q14/INHBB, and rs4808801 (19p13/ELL. Three additional SNPs, including rs1011970 (9p21/CDKN2A/2B, rs941764 (14q32/CCDC88C, and rs17529111 (6q14/FAM46A, showed a significant association in analyses conducted by breast cancer subtype. The risk of breast cancer was elevated with an increasing number of risk variants, as measured by quintile of the genetic risk score, from 1.00 (reference, to 1.75 (1.30-2.37, 1.56 (1.15-2.11, 2.02 (1.50-2.74 and 2.63 (1.96-3.52, respectively, (P = 7.8 × 10(-10. Results from this study highlight the need for large genetic studies in AAs to identify risk variants impacting this population.

  20. Treatment of cystoid macular edema with the new-generation NSAID nepafenac 0.1%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seenu M Hariprasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Seenu M Hariprasad1, Levent Akduman2, Joseph A Clever2, Michael Ober3,4, Franco M Recchia5, William F Mieler1,61Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Vitreoretinal Service; 6Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Vitreoretinal Service, Saint Louis University Eye Institute, Saint Louis, MO, USA; 3Vitreoretinal Service, Henry Ford Health Systems, West Bloomfield, MI, USA; 4Retinal Consultants of Michigan, Southfield, MI, USA; 5Vitreoretinal Service, Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Nashville, TN, USAPurpose: To describe the use of nepafenac 0.1% for cystoid macular edema (CME.Methods: This was a multicenter retrospective review of 22 CME cases (20 patients treated with nepafenac 0.1% (six with concomitant prednisolone acetate 1% from December 2005 to April 2008: three acute pseudophakic CME cases, 13 chronic/recalcitrant pseudophakic CME cases, and six cases of uveitic CME. Pre- and post-treatment retinal thickness and visual acuity were reported.Results: Following treatment for six weeks to six months, six eyes with uveitic CME showed a mean retinal thickness improvement of 227 ± 168.1 μm; mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA improvement was 0.36 ± 0.20 logMAR. All three cases of acute pseudophakic CME improved after four to 10 weeks of nepafenac, with a mean improvement in retinal thickness of 134 ± 111.0 μm. BCVA improved in two patients (0.16 and 0.22 logMAR but not in the third due to underlying retinal pigment epithelium changes. Thirteen eyes with chronic/recalcitrant pseudophakic CME demonstrated a mean improvement in retinal thickness of 178 ± 128.7 μm after nepafenac and mean BCVA improvement of 0.33 ± 0.19 logMAR.Conclusion: The positive outcomes of these 22 eyes strongly suggest that nepafenac 0.1% is a promising drug for the treatment of CME. Additional study under randomized controlled conditions is warranted.Keywords: macular edema, NSAID, nepafenac, cataract surgery

  1. Distinct patterns of corticogeniculate feedback to different layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus

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    Ichida JM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer M Ichida,1 Julia A Mavity-Hudson,2 Vivien A Casagrande1–3 1Department of Psychology, 2Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, 3Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: In primates, feedforward visual pathways from retina to lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN are segregated to different layers. These layers also receive strong reciprocal feedback pathways from cortex. The degree to which feedforward streams in primates are segregated from feedback streams remains unclear. Here, we asked whether corticogeniculate cells that innervate the magnocellular (M, parvocellular (P, and koniocellular (K layers of the LGN in the prosimian primate bush baby (Otolemur garnettii can be distinguished based on either the laminar distribution or morphological characteristics of their axons and synaptic contacts in LGN, or on their cell body position, size, and dendritic distribution in cortex. Corticogeniculate axons and synapses were labeled anterogradely with biotinylated dextran injections in layer 6 of cortex. Corticogeniculate cell bodies were first labeled with fluorescent dextran injections limited to individual M, P, or K LGN layers and then filled with biotinylated Lucifer yellow. Results showed that feedback to the M or P LGN layers arises from cells with dendrites primarily confined to cortical layer 6 and axons restricted to either M or P LGN layers, but not both. Feedback to K LGN layers arises from cells: 1 whose dendrites distribute rather evenly across cortical layers 5 and 6; 2 whose dendrites always extend into layer 4; and 3 whose axons are never confined to K layers but always overlap with either P or M layers. Corticogeniculate axons also showed distributions that were retinotopically precise based on known receptive field sizes of layer 6 cells, and these axons mainly made synapses with glutamatergic projection neurons in the LGN in all layers. Taken together with prior

  2. Chlorhexidine Bathing and Healthcare-Associated Infections: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Michael J.; Domenico, Henry J.; Byrne, Daniel W.; Talbot, Tom; Rice, Todd W.; Bernard, Gordon R.; Wheeler, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Daily bathing of critically ill patients with the broad spectrum, topical antimicrobial agent chlorhexidine is widely performed and may reduce healthcare-associated infections. Objective To determine if daily bathing of critically ill patients with chlorhexidine decreases the incidence of healthcare-associated infections. Design, setting, and participants A pragmatic cluster-randomized, cross-over study of 9,340 patients admitted to five adult intensive care units of a tertiary medical center in Nashville, Tennessee Intervention Units performed once-daily bathing of all patients with disposable cloths impregnated with 2% chlorhexidine or non-antimicrobial cloths as a control. Bathing treatments were performed for a 10-week period followed by a two-week washout period during which patients were bathed with non-antimicrobial disposable cloths, before crossover to the alternate bathing treatment for 10 weeks. Each unit crossed over between bathing assignments three times during the study Main Outcome and Measures The primary prespecified outcome was a composite of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and Clostridium difficile infections. Secondary outcomes included rates of clinical cultures positive for multi-drug resistant organisms, blood culture contamination, healthcare-associated bloodstream infections, and rates of the primary outcome by ICU. Results A total of 55 and 60 infections occurred during chlorhexidine and control bathing periods, respectively (4 and 4 CLABSI, 21 and 32 CAUTI, 17 and 8 VAP, 13 and 16 C. difficile infections, respectively, between chlorhexidine and control bathing periods). The primary outcome rate was 2.86 per 1000 patient-days and 2.90 per 1000 patient-days during chlorhexidine and control bathing periods, respectively (rate difference, −0.04; 95% CI, −1.09 to 1.01; P=0.95). After adjusting for baseline

  3. Balanced crystalloids versus saline in the intensive care unit: study protocol for a cluster-randomized, multiple-crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Matthew W; Self, Wesley H; Wang, Li; Byrne, Daniel W; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Stollings, Joanna L; Kumar, Avinash B; Hernandez, Antonio; Guillamondegui, Oscar D; May, Addison K; Siew, Edward D; Shaw, Andrew D; Bernard, Gordon R; Rice, Todd W

    2017-03-16

    Saline, the intravenous fluid most commonly administered to critically ill adults, contains a high chloride content, which may be associated with acute kidney injury and death. Whether using balanced crystalloids rather than saline decreases the risk of acute kidney injury and death among critically ill adults remains unknown. The Isotonic Solutions and Major Adverse Renal Events Trial (SMART) is a pragmatic, cluster-level allocation, cluster-level crossover trial being conducted between 1 June 2015 and 30 April 2017 in five intensive care units at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN, USA. SMART compares saline (0.9% sodium chloride) with balanced crystalloids (clinician's choice of lactated Ringer's solution or Plasma-Lyte A®). Each intensive care unit is assigned to provide either saline or balanced crystalloids each month, with the assigned crystalloid alternating monthly over the course of the trial. All adults admitted to participating intensive care units during the study period are enrolled and followed until hospital discharge or 30 days after enrollment. The anticipated enrollment is approximately 14,000 patients. The primary outcome is Major Adverse Kidney Events within 30 days-the composite of in-hospital death, receipt of new renal replacement therapy, or persistent renal dysfunction (discharge creatinine ≥200% of baseline creatinine). Secondary clinical outcomes include in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit-free days, ventilator-free days, vasopressor-free days, and renal replacement therapy-free days. Secondary renal outcomes include new renal replacement therapy receipt, persistent renal dysfunction, and incidence of stage 2 or higher acute kidney injury. This ongoing pragmatic trial will provide the largest and most comprehensive comparison to date of clinical outcomes with saline versus balanced crystalloids among critically ill adults. For logistical reasons, SMART was prospectively registered separately for the medical

  4. Epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors for renal cell cancer

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    Loren Lipworth

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Loren Lipworth1,2, Robert E Tarone1,2, Lars Lund2,3, Joseph K McLaughlin1,21International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Medicine (JKM, RET and Preventive Medicine (LL, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 3Department of Urology, Viborg Hospital, Viborg, DenmarkAbstract: Incidence rates of renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising in the United States and in most European countries for several decades. Family history is associated with a two- to four-fold increase in risk, but the major forms of inherited predisposition together account for less than 4% of renal cell cancers. Cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most consistently established risk factors. Analgesics have not been convincingly linked with renal cell cancer risk. A reduced risk of renal cell cancer among statin users has been hypothesized but has not been adequately studied. A possible protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption is the only moderately consistently reported dietary finding, and, with the exception of a positive association with parity, evidence for a role of hormonal or reproductive factors in the etiology of renal cell cancer in humans is limited. A recent hypothesis that moderate levels of alcohol consumption may be protective for renal cell cancer is not strongly supported by epidemiologic results, which are inconsistent with respect to the categories of alcohol consumption and the amount of alcohol intake reportedly associated with decreased risk. For occupational factors, the weight of the evidence does not provide consistent support for the hypotheses that renal cell cancer may be caused by asbestos, gasoline, or trichloroethylene exposure. The established determinants of renal cell cancer, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension, account for less than half of these cancers. Novel epidemiologic approaches

  5. Influence of socioeconomic lifestyle factors and genetic polymorphism on type 2 diabetes occurrences among Tunisian Arab and Berber groups of Djerba Island

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    Thouraya Baroudi Ouederni

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Thouraya Baroudi Ouederni1, Ahmed Fadiel2,3, Nejla Stambouli1, Trudy J Scalize3, Hedi Ben Maiz4, Hafaona Kammoun Abid1, Rim Bouhaha1, Jose Sanchez-Corona5, Adel Hamza1,6*, Amel Benammar-Elgaaied1,*1Laboratory of Genetics, Immunology and Human Pathology, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia; 2New York University School of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 3Biomedical Informatics, OBGYN Department, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN, USA; 4Charles Nicolle Hospital, Internal Medicine A, Tunis, Tunisia; 5División de Medecina Molecular, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente, Instituto Mexicano Del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México; 6Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA; *These authors contributed equally to this work and are the corresponding authorsAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is characterized by three major metabolic abnormalities: impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle and adipose tissues, alterations in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and increased hepatic glucose production. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to its development. The insulin gene (INS, insulin receptor gene (INSR, and insulin receptor substrate 1 gene (IRS1, identified by polymerase chain reaction and digestion with selected restriction enzymes PstI, NsiI, and BstnI, have been proposed as T2DM candidate genes. To determine the contribution of genetic and environmental factors on the occurrence of T2DM, we examined the frequency of T2DM among two ethnically diverse populations, Arabs and Berbers, who have shared the same environment, the island of Djerba, for thousands of years. Both populations have a high prevalence of obesity, T2DM, and a high consanguinity rate. A total of 162 T2DM men and women were matched to 110 healthy male and female controls. Results showed that the NsiI polymorphism in INSR and Bstn

  6. The effects of household management practices on the global warming potential of urban lawns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chuanhui; Crane, John; Hornberger, George; Carrico, Amanda

    2015-03-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are an important component of the greenhouse gas (GHG) budget for urban turfgrasses. A biogeochemical model DNDC successfully captured the magnitudes and patterns of N2O emissions observed at an urban turfgrass system at the Richland Creek Watershed in Nashville, TN. The model was then used to study the long-term (i.e. 75 years) impacts of lawn management practice (LMP) on soil organic carbon sequestration rate (dSOC), soil N2O emissions, and net Global Warming Potentials (net GWPs). The model simulated N2O emissions and net GWP from the three management intensity levels over 75 years ranged from 0.75 to 3.57 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1) and 697 to 2443 kg CO2-eq ha(-1)yr(-1), respectively, which suggested that turfgrasses act as a net carbon emitter. Reduction of fertilization is most effective to mitigate the global warming potentials of turfgrasses. Compared to the baseline scenario, halving fertilization rate and clipping recycle as an alternative to synthetic fertilizer can reduce net GWPs by 17% and 12%, respectively. In addition, reducing irrigation and mowing are also effective in lowering net GWPs. The minimum-maintenance LMP without irrigation and fertilization can reduce annual N2O emissions and net GWPs by approximately 53% and 70%, respectively, with the price of gradual depletion of soil organic carbon, when compared to the intensive-maintenance LMP. A lawn age-dependent best management practice is recommended: a high dose fertilizer input at the initial stage of lawn establishment to enhance SOC sequestration, followed by decreasing fertilization rate when the lawn ages to minimize N2O emissions. A minimum-maintained LMP with clipping recycling, and minimum irrigation and mowing, is recommended to mitigate global warming effects from urban turfgrass systems. Among all practices, clipping recycle may be a relatively malleable behavior and, therefore, a good target for interventions seeking to reduce the environmental impacts of lawn

  7. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

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    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  8. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  9. HIV and cancer: a comparative retrospective study of Brazilian and U.S. clinical cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Jessica L; Luz, Paula M; Shepherd, Bryan E; Turner, Megan; Ribeiro, Sayonara R; Bebawy, Sally S; Netto, Juliana S; McGowan, Catherine C; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Engels, Eric A; Sterling, Timothy R; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    With successful antiretroviral therapy, non-communicable diseases, including malignancies, are increasingly contributing to morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected persons. The epidemiology of AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs) and non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) in HIV-infected populations in Brazil has not been well described. It is not known if cancer trends in HIV-infected populations in Brazil are similar to those of other countries where antiretroviral therapy is also widely available. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical cohorts at Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas (INI) in Rio de Janeiro and Vanderbilt Comprehensive Care Clinic (VCCC) in Nashville from 1998 to 2010. We used Poisson regression and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) to examine incidence trends. Clinical and demographic predictors of ADCs and NADCs were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. This study included 2,925 patients at INI and 3,927 patients at VCCC. There were 57 ADCs at INI (65% Kaposi sarcoma), 47 at VCCC (40% Kaposi sarcoma), 45 NADCs at INI, and 82 at VCCC. From 1998 to 2004, incidence of ADCs remained statistically unchanged at both sites. From 2005 to 2010, ADC incidence decreased in both cohorts (INI incidence rate ratio per year = 0.74, p < 0.01; VCCC = 0.75, p < 0.01). Overall Kaposi sarcoma incidence was greater at INI than VCCC (3.0 vs. 1.2 cases per 1,000 person-years, p < 0.01). Incidence of NADCs remained constant throughout the study period (overall INI incidence 3.6 per 1,000 person-years and VCCC incidence 5.3 per 1,000 person-years). Compared to general populations, overall risk of NADCs was increased at both sites (INI SIR = 1.4 [95% CI 1.1-1.9] and VCCC SIR = 1.3 [1.0-1.7]). After non-melanoma skin cancers, the most frequent NADCs were anal cancer at INI (n = 7) and lung cancer at VCCC (n = 11). In multivariate models, risk of ADC was associated with male sex and immunosuppression. Risk of

  10. Thinking about thinking and emotion: the metacognitive approach to the medical humanities that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichbaum, Quentin G

    2014-01-01

    Medical knowledge in recent decades has grown prodigiously and has outstripped the capacity of the human brain to absorb and understand it all. This burgeoning of knowledge has created a dilemma for medical educators. We can no longer expect students to continue memorizing this large body of increasingly complex knowledge. Instead, our efforts should be redirected at developing in students a competency as flexible thinkers and agile learners so they can adeptly deal with new knowledge, complexity, and uncertainty in a rapidly changing world. Such a competency would entail not only cognitive but also emotional skills essential for the holistic development of their professional identity. This article will argue that metacognition--“thinking about thinking (and emotion)”--offers the most viable path toward developing this competency. The overwhelming volume of medical knowledge has driven some medical schools to reduce the time allocated in their curricula to the “soft-option” humanities as they tend to consider them an expendable “luxury.” Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, has moved away from the traditional conception of the medical humanities as “the arts,” composed of art, music, and literature, toward an approach that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences, based on metacognition. This metacognitive approach to the humanities, described in this article, has three goals: 1) to develop students as flexible thinkers and agile learners and to provide them with essential cognitive and emotional skills for navigating medical complexity and uncertainty; 2) to elicit in students empathy and tolerance by making them aware of the immense diversity in human cognition (and emotion); and 3) to integrate the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences. Through this metacognitive approach, students come to understand their patterns of cognition and emotions, and in the group setting, they learn to mindfully

  11. Cardiovascular comorbidity in patients with restless legs syndrome: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas-Pérez NJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Noel J Vargas-Pérez, Kanika Bagai, Arthur S Walters Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Introduction: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a sensorimotor neurological disorder associated with poor quality of life. Growing evidence links RLS and periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS with increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. This article reviews the association of RLS and PLMS with cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods: PubMed and Medline database (1990 to July 2016 were searched for the terms “restless legs,” “restless legs syndrome,” “periodic limb movements,” “periodic limb movements in sleep” cross-referenced with “cardiovascular disease,” “heart disease,” “coronary artery disease,” “coronary heart disease,” “heart arrhythmia,” “heart failure,” “congestive heart failure,” “echocardiogram,” “echocardiographic,” “hypertension,” “high blood pressure,” “cerebrovascular disease,” “stroke,” “autonomic nervous system,” “heart rate,” “heart rate variability,” “hypoxia,” “microcirculation,” “oxidative stress,” “inflammation,” “chronic kidney disease,” “end-stage renal disease,” “renal disease,” “hemodialysis,” “multiple sclerosis,” “Parkinson,” “Parkinson’s,” “iron deficiency anemia,” and “mortality.” Other relevant articles from the reference list of the above-matched manuscripts were also reviewed. Studies that did not specify the diagnostic criteria for RLS or manuscripts in languages other than English were excluded. Articles with emphasis in RLS secondary to pregnancy were not included in this manuscript.Results: Eighty-six original articles were included in this review. Although mixed results were found regarding the association of RLS and PLMS with CVD, hypertension, stroke and mortality, an informal review of the literature does suggest that the

  12. College Bound with the Office of Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Brittany D.

    2004-01-01

    The Educational Programs Office at NASA Glenn Research Center hosts a variety of programs that takes on the hard task of getting students of all ages interested in pursuing careers in science, mathematics, and engineering. To help assist students along the way there are many programs to participate in such as: the explorers, shadowing opportunities, and paid internships. The Educational Programs Office not only creates learning opportunities for students, they also host workshops to help educators enhance their knowledge these fields. This summer I assisted Marie Borowski in the Educational Programs Office with the Tennessee State University College Bound Program. The Tennessee state University College Bound Program is an intensive two-week summer academic workshop designed to introduce minority students to the profession of engineering. NASA Glenn Research Center sent forty dedicated students on a bus to Nashville, Tennessee to experience college life as a whole. At the college the students day consisted of a math class, aeronautics, ACT/SAT preparation, writing and research, African American Culture, computer science, and study sessions. The students also went on educational field trips to the Fisk Museum, the Space and Rocket Center, and the Parthenon Museum. On the last day of the program the students competed in an oratorical contest where the students made a Powerpoint presentation on the class that they enjoyed the most. There were many processes that had to be put into action for the college bound program to run smoothly. The process started in early January with the preparation of applications. Once prepared, the applications were then sent to schools and past participants in hopes of receiving a well-qualified pool of applicants. Once the applications were received, a prescreening is done which ensures all of the information is complete. Then, they are reviewed by a panel, using a rubric to evaluate them, and the semifinalists are then selected

  13. Thinking about Thinking and Emotion: The Metacognitive Approach to the Medical Humanities that Integrates the Humanities with the Basic and Clinical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichbaum, Quentin G

    2014-01-01

    Medical knowledge in recent decades has grown prodigiously and has outstripped the capacity of the human brain to absorb and understand it all. This burgeoning of knowledge has created a dilemma for medical educators. We can no longer expect students to continue memorizing this large body of increasingly complex knowledge. Instead, our efforts should be redirected at developing in students a competency as flexible thinkers and agile learners so they can adeptly deal with new knowledge, complexity, and uncertainty in a rapidly changing world. Such a competency would entail not only cognitive but also emotional skills essential for the holistic development of their professional identity. This article will argue that metacognition—“thinking about thinking (and emotion)”—offers the most viable path toward developing this competency. The overwhelming volume of medical knowledge has driven some medical schools to reduce the time allocated in their curricula to the “soft-option” humanities as they tend to consider them an expendable “luxury.” Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, has moved away from the traditional conception of the medical humanities as “the arts,” composed of art, music, and literature, toward an approach that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences, based on metacognition. This metacognitive approach to the humanities, described in this article, has three goals: 1) to develop students as flexible thinkers and agile learners and to provide them with essential cognitive and emotional skills for navigating medical complexity and uncertainty; 2) to elicit in students empathy and tolerance by making them aware of the immense diversity in human cognition (and emotion); and 3) to integrate the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences. Through this metacognitive approach, students come to understand their patterns of cognition and emotions, and in the group setting, they learn to mindfully

  14. Report on student participants at the 2003 Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julius Dollison, Michael Neuchatz

    2003-07-01

    The first meeting of African American physicists was held in 1973 at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, with around 50 Black physicists in attendance. In 1977, this organization was formally established as the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) out of a need to address many concerns of African American physicists. During the ensuing years the Conference began to grow and was hosted by different institutions at various geographic locations. This year, the 2003 Annual Conference of the National Society of Black Physicists and Black Physics Students was hosted by Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia during the weekend of February 12th-15th, 2003. This Conference brought together over 500 African American physics students and working physicists. Also attending were corporate and graduate school recruiters, administrators, professional society representatives and others concerned with the small representation of minorities in the field of physics. The organizers of the Conference contracted with the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics to conduct a formal evaluative study of the meeting, resulting in this report. The evaluation questionnaire was designed by the organizers of the NSBP conference with input from the Statistical Research Center's staff. It included questions on the students' backgrounds and demographic characteristics, physics research experience, career goals, challenges faced in their academic pursuits, and ratings of various aspects of the conference. The questionnaire was distributed at the conference when the students signed in. Of the 330 students who were registered, roughly 304 attended and were given the four-page questionnaire to complete. Responses were collected on the last night of the conference, with 172 (approximately 57%) returning completed questionnaires. This low response rate could be attributed in part to the fact that respondents were asked to provide possibly sensitive personal

  15. from editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Demiray

    2007-07-01

    Information Studies, Charles Sturt University. Prior to that he was Head of the Faculty of Computing and Information Technology, Martin College, the vocational education division of Australia’s largest private education provider, and national IT coordinator for the La Trobe University and Oxford Brookes University programs offered by the Australian Campus Network in Sydney, Brisbane and Perth. Mark’s research focuses on educational technology and e-learning, in particular pedagogical uses of ‘Web 2.0’, as well as in mobile learning and digital game-based learning. He formerly served on the executive of the Open & Distance Learning Association of Australia. Hakan Güray SENEL received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, in 1990, and the M. S. E. E. and Ph.D. degrees from Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, in 1993 and 1997, respectively. From 1991 to 1997, he was a Teaching Assistant with Vanderbilt University, studying image processing. Since August 1997, he has been on the faculty of the Electrical Engineering Department of Anadolu University, Eskisehir. He was promoted to manager of BAUM in 2006. His current interests are software engineering, high performance computing and image processing. In the other sections are again in the same format as usual as TOJDE’s presenting style. News and some announcements are placed in this issue too.Hope to stay in touch and meeting in our next Issue, in October 2007. Cordially, July, 2007 Prof. Dr. Ugur Demiray Editor-in-Chief Anadolu University Yunusemre Campus 26470-Eskisehir TURKEY Tel: +90 222 335 0581 ext. 2521 or GSM: +90 542 232 21 167 Fax: +90 222 320 4520 Emails: udemiray@anadolu.edu.tr or ugdemiray@hotmail.com URL: http://tojde.anadolu.edu.tr

  16. Medication regimen complexity in ambulatory older adults with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobretti MR

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Cobretti,1 Robert L Page II,2 Sunny A Linnebur,2 Kimberly M Deininger,1 Amrut V Ambardekar,3 JoAnn Lindenfeld,4 Christina L Aquilante1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, 3Division of Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, 4Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplant Program, Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute, Nashville, TN, USA Purpose: Heart failure prevalence is increasing in older adults, and polypharmacy is a major problem in this population. We compared medication regimen complexity using the validated patient-level Medication Regimen Complexity Index (pMRCI tool in “young-old” (60–74 years versus “old-old” (75–89 years patients with heart failure. We also compared pMRCI between patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ISCM versus nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NISCM.Patients and methods: Medication lists were retrospectively abstracted from the electronic medical records of ambulatory patients aged 60–89 years with heart failure. Medications were categorized into three types – heart failure prescription medications, other prescription medications, and over-the-counter (OTC medications – and scored using the pMRCI tool.Results: The study evaluated 145 patients (n=80 young-old, n=65 old-old, n=85 ISCM, n=60 NISCM, mean age 73±7 years, 64% men, 81% Caucasian. Mean total pMRCI scores (32.1±14.4, range 3–84 and total medication counts (13.3±4.8, range 2–30 were high for the entire cohort, of which 72% of patients were taking eleven or more total medications. Total and subtype pMRCI scores and medication counts did not differ significantly between the young-old and old-old groups, with the exception of OTC medication pMRCI score (6.2±4 young-old versus 7.8±5.8 old-old, P=0.04. With regard to heart failure etiology, total pMRCI scores and medication

  17. Impact of managed care on the economics of laboratory operation in an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benge, H; Bodor, G S; Younger, W A; Parl, F F

    1997-07-01

    Throughout the 1980s, the number of laboratory tests performed in the United States grew at an annual rate of over 10%, and laboratory costs accounted for approximately 10% of overall health care expenditures. Recently, the influence of capitation, emphasis on cost-effectiveness, and changing roles among specialists and primary care physicians have begun to affect the growth of laboratory testing. We examined the impact of managed care on the economics of the clinical chemistry laboratory at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn, to define the relative position of the clinical laboratory in the managed care environment of an academic medical center. The following data were prospectively collected between fiscal years 1984/1985 and 1995/1996: number of inpatients and outpatients, average length of stay, number of laboratory tests, total laboratory revenue, direct costs (consisting of salary and consumable costs), and number of full-time-equivalent (FTE) personnel. Using these data, we derived the following parameters: revenue and direct cost per patient, and revenue and productivity per FTE. Between 1984/1985 and 1995/1996 the number of inpatients and outpatients increased 33% and 155%, respectively. Laboratory utilization, expressed as tests per patient, increased from 17 to 22 for inpatients between 1984/1985 and 1991/1992, and then sharply declined to 14.5 tests by 1995/1996, a 34% decrease compared with the 1991/1992 level. Laboratory utilization for outpatients increased from 0.23 in 1984/1985 to 0.45 tests in 1991/1992, decreased to 0.38 in 1993/1994, but then rose again to 0.43 in 1995/1996. Total revenue more than doubled between 1984/1985 and 1991/1992, mostly owing to increased inpatient revenue. Since 1992/1993, inpatient revenue has steadily declined, leading to a decrease in total revenue, which was partially offset by a continuous increase in outpatient revenue. In 1995/1996, outpatient revenue accounted for 32.1% of total revenue

  18. A global survey of clinicians' awareness, accessibility, utilization of e-continuous education, and quality of clinical blood use: policy considerations

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    Smit Sibinga CT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th Smit Sibinga,1 Maruff A Oladejo,2 Olamide Hakeem Adejumo,3 Quentin Eichbaum,4 Midori Kumagawa,5 Shuichi Kino,5 Sima Zolfaghari,6 Silvano Wendel,7 Gordana Rasovic,8 Namjil Erdenebayar,9 Maya Makhmudova,10 Loyiso Mpuntsha,11 Charlotte Ingram,11 Bakyt B Kharabaev,12 Isaac Kajja,13 Zainab Mukhtar Hussain Sanji,14 Maria M M Satti15 1IQM Consulting for International Development of Quality Management in Transfusion Medicine, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands; 2Department of Educational Management, University of Lagos, Lagos, 3Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Nigeria; 4Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; 5Japanese Red Cross Hokkaido Block Blood Center, Japan; 6IBTO, Tehran, Iran; 7Blood Bank, Hospital Sirio Libanês, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 8Montenegro National Blood Transfusion Center, Podgorica, Montenegro; 9National Center for Transfusion Medicine, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; 10Consultant IQM Consulting, Tashkent, Uzbekistan; 11South Africa National Blood Transfusion Service, Johannesburg, South Africa; 12National Blood Transfusion Service, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan; 13Department of Orthopedics, Mulago Hospital, Makerere University, Uganda; 14Consultant, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan; 15National Blood Transfusion Service, Khartoum, Sudan Introduction: Clinical use of blood has shown the least developed part in the vein-to-vein transfusion chain. This global study was carried out in order to investigate the level of awareness, accessibility and utilization of continuous e-learning and education, and quality of blood use among blood prescribing clinicians and nurses.Approach: Descriptive ex post facto survey design.Methods: A total of 264 purposively selected blood prescribing clinicians and nurses from the four Human Development Index (HDI groups of countries (low, medium, high, and very high participated in this study

  19. Preoperative physical therapy treatment did not influence postoperative pain and disability outcomes in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy: a prospective study

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    Valencia C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Valencia,1 Rogelio A Coronado,2 Corey B Simon,3,4 Thomas W Wright,5 Michael W Moser,5 Kevin W Farmer,5 Steven Z George3,6,7 1Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 3Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 4Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville,FL, 5Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 6Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 7Brooks–PHHP Research Collaboration, Jacksonville, FL, USA Background: There is limited literature investigating preoperative physical therapy (pre-op PT treatment on pain intensity and disability after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of the present cohort study were to describe patient characteristics for those who had and did not have pre-op PT treatment and determine whether pre-op PT influenced the length of postoperative physical therapy (post-op PT treatment (number of sessions and 3-month and 6-month postsurgical outcomes, such as pain intensity and disability. Patients and methods: A total of 124 patients (mean age =43 years, 81 males with shoulder pain were observed before and after shoulder arthroscopic surgery. Demographic data, medical history, and validated self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Analysis of variance models were performed to identify differences across measures for patients who had pre-op PT treatment and those who did not and to examine outcome differences at 3 months and 6 months. Alpha was set at the 0.05 level for statistical significance. Results: Males had less participation in pre-op PT than females (P=0.01. In

  20. Two-year follow-up study of a group-based diabetes medical nutrition therapy and motivational interviewing intervention among African American women

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    Miller ST

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Stephania T Miller,1 Sylvie A Akohoue2 1Department of Surgery, 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN, USA Objectives: To assess the 2-year efficacy of a combined medical nutrition therapy and motivational interviewing (MI pilot study intervention and factors that influenced long-term dietary self-care.Research design and methods: Pilot study participants, African American women with type 2 diabetes, completed a 2-year follow-up study visit, including clinical assessments and completion of a dietary self-care questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to evaluate differences between baseline and 2-year follow-up clinical and dietary self-care outcomes. Hierarchical coding was used to analyze semi-structured interviews and categorize facilitator and barrier themes into subthemes. Subthemes were quantified based on the number of subtheme-related comments. Results: Among the 12 participants (mean age 57.1±5.7 years, improvements were observed for HbA1c (baseline: 10.25%; interquartile range [IQR]: 8.10, 11.72 and follow-up: 8.8%; IQR: 7.48,10.22, systolic blood pressure (baseline: 142 mm Hg; IQR: 134.25, 157.25 and follow-up: 127 mm Hg; IQR: 113.5, 143.25, frequency of eating high-fat foods (baseline: 3.5 days; IQR: 2.75, 4.25 and follow-up: 3 days; IQR: 2.5, 4.5, and of spacing carbohydrates throughout the day (baseline: 3 days; IQR: 3.0, 4.0 and follow-up: 4 days; IQR: 1.5, 4.5. There was a statistically significant decrease (p=0.04 in the frequency of fruit and vegetable intake (baseline: 4 days; IQR: 3.75, 7.0 and follow-up: 3.5 days; IQR: 2.75, 4.0. Dietary self-care barriers and facilitators included internal (eg, motivation and external factors (eg, social support. Motivation (70 comments and lack of motivation (67 comments were the most pervasive facilitator and barrier subthemes, respectively. Conclusion: Overall, diabetes-related clinical and dietary

  1. Seasonal Dynamics of N2O and CO2 Emissions from a Corn Production System measured with the Eddy covariance and Chamber techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwuozo, S. A.; Hui, D.; Dennis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural Practices play a major role in the global fluxes of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane. The use of fertilizer in Corn production has generated concerns about its contribution to global climate change. Thus, farmers and others concerned have become interested in more efficient fertilization management practice and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. To understand best management practices, in the 2012 and 2013 corn growing seasons, field experiments was conducted at Tennessee State University Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. The study examines the seasonal variations of (N2O) and (CO2) emissions from soil as a function of six treatment that include inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, chicken litter and biochar application. The combinations were: regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) no till, regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) conventional till, multiple URAN applications (4 times) no till, Denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application in no till, chicken litter with regular URAN application no till and URAN application with biochar in no tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated 6 times. N2O and CO2 emissions were measured using a closed chamber method after rainfall event(s), fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during gas sampling. Plant physiological and growth parameters were measured as appropriate and meteorological records were kept. N2O flux was also continuously measured in a commercial corn field using the eddy covariance (EC) technique fitted with a fast response N2O analyzer to check the N2O emissions at the large scale and compare it to the chamber method. Results obtained with the EC technique were comparable with the chamber methods. Preliminary data indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the agricultural

  2. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    : Heriot-Watt University 4 Nov: Strathclyde University 17 Nov: York University 24 Nov: Bristol University 1 Dec: Open University 7 Dec: Kent University 14 Dec: Cardiff University 15 Dec: University of Wales, Swansea 24 Jan: Reading University 10 Feb: Abingdon School 16 Feb: Plymouth University 2 Mar: Sheffield University 7 Mar: CLRC Daresbury Laboratory 8 Mar: Liverpool University 9 Mar: Manchester 10 Mar: Lancaster University 15 Mar: Surrey University 16 Mar: Brighton University 17 Mar: St Vincent College, Gosport 22 Mar: Leeds University 23 Mar: Loughborough Grammar School 24 Mar: Oakham School 30 Mar: St Peter's School, Wolverhampton 18 May: University of Hertfordshire 11 Jul: Science Museum 12 Jul: Royal Institution The assistance of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, CLRC Daresbury Laboratory and DERA Malvern is acknowledged in staging this year's events. Courses, lectures and competitions `Physics in perspective', the study course for sixth-formers and college students, will take place in London on 6 - 8 February 2000, offering insights into many different aspects of physics. The programme commences during the afternoon of Sunday 6 February at King's College London with a Balloon debate, followed by Brian O'Rourke's talk on the `Physics of Formula 1 cars'. On Monday 7 February at the Royal Institution, John Avison (former Honorary Editor of Physics Education) will develop the `Thinking physics' theme by presenting the audience with varied topics in an unusual and challenging way. The second talk of the afternoon, by Professor Roy Sambles, will cover `Lasers, light and liquid crystals'. On the final day (Tuesday 8 February), again at the Royal Institution, Sara Ellison will lead the audience in `Heavenly pursuits', whilst later Dr Colin Wright will entertain with `Juggling - theory and practice'. Futher information and bookings for the course can be made by contacting Mrs Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH

  3. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  4. Future Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adli Tıp Uzmanları Derneği ATUD

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available I.\tThe Changing Health Care Enviroment: Issues for the Future, March 7, 1997, Nashville, Tennessee. For further information: American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 765 Commonwealth Avenue, 16th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA. Tel: 617 262 4990, Fax: 617 437 7596, Email: aslme@bu.edu. II.\tII. Adli Bilimler Sempozyumu,Balistik, 4-5 Nisan 1997, İzmir. İletişim: Doç.Dr.İ.Hamit Hancı, Ege Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Adli Tıp Anabilim Dalı, 35100 Bornova İZMİR. Tel: 0232 388 2157, 0232 388 1920/3256 III.\tGender Studies, Date commencement: 5 March 1997-24 April 1997, Days and times: Wednesdays 18.00-20.00. 1. Women's rights, 2. Serhia & Women, 3. Women & Law, 4. Refuge Women, 5. Domestic violence & Women, 6. Working life & Women, 7. Women & Union, 8. Politics & Women. For further information: Aysel İşçi & Dr.Laurence Raw, The British Council, Kırlangıç sok. No: 9, 06700 GOP ANKARA. Tel: 0312 468 6192 Fax: 0312 427 6182. IV.\tForensic Science Society Spring Meeting, Suspicious Death?, 11-13 April 1997, Leeds, United Kingdom. Details from Anne Holds- worth, 18A Mount Parade, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UNITEN KINGDOM HGI IBX. An- ne@fscisoc.demon.co.uk. V.\tForensic Medicine and Drugs: Clinical and Scientific Aspects, 24-25 April 1997, Stakis Hydro, Dunblane, Scotland. Contact Dr DG Williams, Dept of Biochemistry, District General Hospital, Sunderland, UNITED KINGDOM. Tel: 0191 565 6256 ext 42800. VI.\tIV. Sosyal Psikiyatri Sempozyumu, 7-9 Mayıs 1997, Adana. Yazışma adresi: Prof.Dr.Yunus Emre Evlice, Çukurova Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Psikiyatri Anabilim Dalı, Balcalı 01330 ADANA. Tel: 0322 338 6857. VII.\tIII. Kadın Çalışmaları Toplantısı, 17-19 Mayıs 1997, Adana. İletişim: Çukurova Üniversitesi Kadın Sorunları Araştırma ve Uygulama Merkezi, Bakalı ADANA. VIII.\tThe 5th International Family Violence Research Conference, Family Research Laboratory, 29 June-2 July 1997, Durham United Kingdom

  5. Les relations du sculpteur américain George Julian Zolnay avec la Roumanie, son pays natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian-Silvan Ionescu

    2011-01-01

    hopes to come to Bucharest were given up.Zolnay’s following trip to Romania was in the spring of 1923. At that time, the sculptor was in Italy supervising the founding of his latest monument for Nashville, Tennessee, the War Memorial also called the Fallen Warrior, or the Soldier’s Mother or the Gold Star Monument. Taking a leave from the foundry, he undertook an exhausting and perilous train voyage to his native country, via Yugoslavia. He spent a few weeks in Bucharest where life was quite cheap. Consequently, the sculptor enjoyed luxury accommodation and lavishly meals in the Capital City. He was kindly received by Queen Marie who firstly chided him for having made America his home instead of devoting his life to the artistic and intellectual development of his country. Their conversation was undertaken in three languages because Zolnay was an accomplished polyglot. The artist showed the pictures of his monument to the Queen who expressed her wish to have the War Memorial placed in one of the central plazas. Afterwards, they talked about the United States for Queen Marie’s great desire was to visit that faraway country – a dream which was accomplished three years later in the triumphal journey from coast to coast. Queen Marie enjoyed their talking and asked him to visit her again but that opportunity was lost due to Her Majesty’s unexpected voyage to Belgrade, to see her daughter, young Queen Marioara of Yugoslavia.Back to Italy, Zolnay wrote a letter to his friend, the diplomat Vasile Stoica, asking his counsel and help for rising funds from the Romanian community in the United States. The money was needed for founding a bronze replica of the War Memorial. Unfortunately, neither money nor monument was rose in Bucharest. In spite of this failure, Zolnay kept good memories for his meeting with Queen Marie and her brilliant conversation.

  6. Bilimsel Toplantı Duyuruları

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adli Tıp Uzmanları Derneği ATUD

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available I.\tThe Changing Health Care Enviroment: Issues for the Future, March 7, 1997, Nashville, Tennessee. For further information: American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 765 Commonwealth Avenue, 16th Floor, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 USA. Tel: 617 262 4990, Fax: 617 437 7596, Email: aslme@bu.edu. II.\tII. Adli Bilimler Sempozyumu,Balistik, 4-5 Nisan 1997, İzmir. İletişim: Doç.Dr.İ.Hamit Hancı, Ege Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Adli Tıp Anabilim Dalı, 35100 Bornova İZMİR. Tel: 0232 388 2157, 0232 388 1920/3256 III.\tGender Studies, Date commencement: 5 March 1997-24 April 1997, Days and times: Wednesdays 18.00-20.00. 1. Women's rights, 2. Serhia & Women, 3. Women & Law, 4. Refuge Women, 5. Domestic violence & Women, 6. Working life & Women, 7. Women & Union, 8. Politics & Women. For further information: Aysel İşçi & Dr.Laurence Raw, The British Council, Kırlangıç sok. No: 9, 06700 GOP ANKARA. Tel: 0312 468 6192 Fax: 0312 427 6182. IV.\tForensic Science Society Spring Meeting, Suspicious Death?, 11-13 April 1997, Leeds, United Kingdom. Details from Anne Holds- worth, 18A Mount Parade, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UNITEN KINGDOM HGI IBX. An- ne@fscisoc.demon.co.uk. V.\tForensic Medicine and Drugs: Clinical and Scientific Aspects, 24-25 April 1997, Stakis Hydro, Dunblane, Scotland. Contact Dr DG Williams, Dept of Biochemistry, District General Hospital, Sunderland, UNITED KINGDOM. Tel: 0191 565 6256 ext 42800. VI.\tIV. Sosyal Psikiyatri Sempozyumu, 7-9 Mayıs 1997, Adana. Yazışma adresi: Prof.Dr.Yunus Emre Evlice, Çukurova Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Psikiyatri Anabilim Dalı, Balcalı 01330 ADANA. Tel: 0322 338 6857. VII.\tIII. Kadın Çalışmaları Toplantısı, 17-19 Mayıs 1997, Adana. İletişim: Çukurova Üniversitesi Kadın Sorunları Araştırma ve Uygulama Merkezi, Bakalı ADANA. VIII.\tThe 5th International Family Violence Research Conference, Family Research Laboratory, 29 June-2 July 1997, Durham United Kingdom