WorldWideScience

Sample records for cu-ni-au fr-4 printed

  1. Giant Peltier Effect in a Submicron-Sized Cu-Ni/Au Junction with Nanometer-Scale Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Atsushi; Kodzuka, Masaya; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Ando, Koji; Takanashi, Koki; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Hono, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Akio

    2010-06-01

    We observed a giant Peltier effect in a submicron Cu-Ni/Au junction. The Peltier coefficient was evaluated to be 480 mV at room temperature from the balance between Joule heating and the Peltier cooling effect in the junction, which is 40 times that expected from the Seebeck coefficients of bulk Au and Cu-Ni alloy. This giant cooling effect lowered the inner temperature of the junction by 160 K. Microstructure analysis with a three-dimensional atom probe suggested that the giant Peltier effect possibly originated from nanometer-scale phase separation in the Cu-Ni layer.

  2. Enrichment of the metallic components from waste printed circuit boards by a mechanical separation process using a stamp mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae-Min; Jeong, Jinki; Yoo, Kyoungkeun; Lee, Jae-Chun; Kim, Wonbaek

    2009-03-01

    Printed circuit boards incorporated in most electrical and electronic equipment contain valuable metals such as Cu, Ni, Au, Ag, Pd, Fe, Sn, and Pb. In order to employ a hydrometallurgical route for the recycling of valuable metals from printed circuit boards, a mechanical pre-treatment step is needed. In this study, the metallic components from waste printed circuit boards have been enriched using a mechanical separation process. Waste printed circuit boards shredded to milled using a stamp mill to liberate the various metallic components, and then the milled printed circuit boards were classified into fractions of 5.0mm. The fractions of milled printed circuit boards of size zig-zag classifier. The >5.0mm fraction and the heavy fraction were subjected to two-step magnetic separation. Through the first magnetic separation at 700 Gauss, 83% of the nickel and iron, based on the whole printed circuit boards, was recovered in the magnetic fraction, and 92% of the copper was recovered in the non-magnetic fraction. The cumulative recovery of nickel-iron concentrate was increased by a second magnetic separation at 3000 Gauss, but the grade of the concentrate decreased remarkably from 76% to 56%. The cumulative recovery of copper concentrate decreased, but the grade increased slightly from 71.6% to 75.4%. This study has demonstrated the feasibility of the mechanical separation process consisting of milling/size classification/gravity separation/two-step magnetic separation for enriching metallic components such as Cu, Ni, Al, and Fe from waste printed circuit boards.

  3. Long-lasting FR-4 surface hydrophilisation towards commercial PCB passive microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Moschou, Despina; Carta, Daniela; Morgan, Hywel; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-04-01

    Printed circuit boards (PCB) technologies are an attractive system for simple sensing and microfluidic systems. Controlling the surface properties of PCB material is an important part of this technology and to date there has been no study on long-term hydrophilisation stability of these materials. In this work, the effect of different oxygen plasma input power and treatment duration times on the wetting properties of FR-4 surfaces was investigated by sessile droplet contact angle measurements. Super and weakly hydrophilic behaviour was achieved and the retention time of these properties was studied, with the hydrophilic nature being retained for at least 26 days. To demonstrate the applicability of this treatment method, a commercially manufactured microfluidic structure made from a multilayer PCB (3-layer FR-4 stack) was exposed to oxygen plasma at the optimum conditions. The structures could be filled with deionised (DI) water under capillary flow unlike the virgin devices.

  4. Printed circuit board permittivity measurement using waveguide and resonator rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Op 't Land, Sjoerd; Tereshchenko, O.V.; Ramdani, Mohamed; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Perdriau, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the frequency dependent complex permittivity of Printed Circuit Board (PCB) substrates is important in modern electronics. In this paper, two methods for measuring the permittivity are applied to the same Flame Resistant (FR4) substrate and the results are compared. The reference measurement

  5. Leaf Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Charles W.

    1985-01-01

    Using many different media, students can turn leaves into images which can be used for study, bulletin boards, collections, and identification. The simple techniques described include pastel printing, smoke prints, ink or tempura printing, bleach printing on t-shirts, ditto machine printing using carbon paper, and making cutouts. (DH)

  6. Packaging Printing Today

    OpenAIRE

    Bolanča, Stanislav; Majnarić, Igor; Golubović, Kristijan

    2015-01-01

    Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid print...

  7. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  8. Digital printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotka, Werner K.

    1997-02-01

    Digital printing is described as a tool to replace conventional printing machines completely. Still this goal was not reached until now with any of the digital printing technologies to be described in the paper. Productivity and costs are still the main parameters and are not really solved until now. Quality in digital printing is no problem anymore. Definition of digital printing is to transfer digital datas directly on the paper surface. This step can be carried out directly or with the use of an intermediate image carrier. Keywords in digital printing are: computer- to-press; erasable image carrier; image carrier with memory. Digital printing is also the logical development of the new digital area as it is pointed out in Nicholas Negropotes book 'Being Digital' and also the answer to networking and Internet technologies. Creating images text and color in one country and publishing the datas in another country or continent is the main advantage. Printing on demand another big advantage and last but not least personalization the last big advantage. Costs and being able to coop with this new world of prepress technology is the biggest disadvantage. Therefore the very optimistic growth rates for the next few years are really nonexistent. The development of complete new markets is too slow and the replacing of old markets is too small.

  9. Advanced imaging with dynamic focus and extended depth using integrated FR4 platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikman, Serhan O; Varghese, Samuel; Abdullah, Fahd; Augustine, Robin; Sprague, Randy B; Andron, Voytek; Urey, Hakan

    2009-09-14

    A two-degrees-of-freedom scanned beam imaging system with large dynamic range and dynamic focusing is demonstrated. The laser diode, photo-detector and the optical components are integrated on a moving platform that is made of FR4 (Flame-Retardant 4), a common polymeric substrate used in printed circuit boards. A scan angle of 52 degrees is demonstrated at 60 Hz resonant frequency while the laser is moved 250 um in the out-of-plane direction to achieve dynamic focusing. The laser is scanned by physically rotating the laser diode and the collection optics to achieve high signal-to-noise ratio and good ambient light rejection. The collection optics is engineered such that the collection efficiency decreases when collecting light from close distances to avoid detector saturation. The detection range is extended from contact distance up to 600 mm while the collected power level varies only by a factor of 30 within this long range. Slight modifications will allow increasing the detection range up to one meter. This is the first demonstration of a laser scan engine with such a high degree of integration of electronics, optoelectronics, optics and micromechanics on the same platform.

  10. Printing Pioneer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Wang Xuan,inventor of a laser typesetting system for Chinese characters,ushers in a new age in the printing industry Anyone who reads a book or newspaper in Chinese is indebted to Wang Xuan, a pioneer in modem Chinese-language printing, just as one can thank Thomas Edison for inventing the electric light bulb. Wang invented a computerized laser photocomposition system for Chinese char-

  11. Characterization of inkjet-printing HF and UHF antennas for RFID applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapata, Grzegorz; Paczesny, Daniel; Kawecki, Krzysztof

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to perform a set of RFID antennas on flexible plastic substrates designed for range of HF and UHF band. The samples was fabricated using inkjet printing technology and conductive material base on silver nanopartilces ink. Fabricated antennas have been characterized, and the results were compared with the parameters of antennas made with usage of classical PCB technology on FR4 laminate with copper metallization. The paper presents studies on the impact of elastic substrates and conductive materials on antennas electrical parameters, as well as the communication range of the resulting RFID tags. During the experiment two patterns of HF and three patterns of UHF antennas was examined and the antennas was realized on different types of substrates, such as PET, Kapton® and FR4.

  12. CHINA PRINT 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Introduction CHINA PRINT 2009, the Seventh Beijing International Printing Technology Exhibition, will be held at New China International Exhibition Center from May 12 to 16, 2009.CHINA PRINT, known as the Olympics of China’s print-ing and printing related business, has been organized onceevery four years since 1984 by PEIAC and CIEC. It has be-come one of the

  13. Digital Inkjet Textile Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Meichun

    2017-01-01

    Digital inkjet textile printing is an emerging technology developed with the rise of the digital world. It offers a possibility to print high-resolution images with unlimited color selection on fabrics. Digital inkjet printing brings a revolutionary chance for the textile printing industry. The history of textile printing shows the law how new technology replaces the traditional way of printing. This indicates the future of digital inkjet textile printing is relatively positive. Differen...

  14. Digital Textile Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Moltchanova, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly evolving technology of digital printing opens new opportunities on many markets. One of them is the printed fabric market where printing companies as well as clients benefit from new printing methods. This thesis focuses on the digital textile printing technology and its implementation for fabric-on-demand printing service in Finland. The purpose of this project was to study the technology behind digital textile printing, areas of application of this technology, the requirements ...

  15. Packaging Printing Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Bolanča

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. The possibilities of particular printing techniques for optimal production of the determined packaging were studied in the paper. The problem was viewed from the technological and economical aspect. The possible printing quality and the time necessary for the printing realization were taken as key parameters. An important segment of the production and the way of life is alocation value and it had also found its place in this paper. The events in the field of packaging printing in the whole world were analyzed. The trends of technique developments and the printing technology for packaging printing in near future were also discussed.

  16. Thermally-induced shapes of rigid FR-4 electrical laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Phra Douglas

    In the process of a laminate cooling from the curing temperature to room temperature, a substantial level of thermal residual stresses develop. These residual thermal stresses arise due to the mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficient between lamina and between the reinforcing fibers and the matrix resin, generating warpage, or out of plane deformations, when the laminate is not symmetric about the midplane of the composite. Classical lamination theory has been used to predict the warped shape of an asymmetric laminate; this theory suggests that the cooled room temperature shape to be a stable anticlastic or saddle shape. In the 80s, nonlinear theories were developed in order to explain observations for (0/90) sbT cross-ply laminates that cool to a cylindrical shape and to predict the observed phenomena of an occasional "snap through" between two stable cylindrical shapes. Recently, the nonlinear approach has been successfully modified for the analysis of a square angle-ply laminate, allowing an even greater number of laminates to be evaluated. A rigid FR-4 electrical circuit board is a composite laminate that is designed to be symmetrical; however, after cooling from the press cycle or after cooling from other processing thermal excursions, warpage can occur. One potential cause for this warpage can be inadvertently introduced process or material nonuniformities. This investigation develops an FR-4 electrical laminate model that can transform selected material and process variations into input for the mechanical and thermal matrices required in the formulation of both classical lamination and the nonlinear theories. The output is the predicted warpage, for each theory, for each of the selected material and process variations. These warpage outputs are graphically displayed, quantified and compared for the classical lamination theory and for the four recent nonlinear theories. Also, the predicted warpage deformations are stack ranked in order to provide an

  17. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Two Printed Circular Arrays for Power-Based Vehicle Localization Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Sharawi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the performance characteristics of a printed 8-element V-shaped circular antenna array and an 8-element Yagi circular array operating at 2.45 GHz for vehicular direction finding applications is presented. Two operating modes are investigated; switched and phased modes. The arrays were fabricated on FR-4 substrates with 0.8 mm thickness. Measured and simulated results were compared. Radiation gain patterns were measured on a 1 m diameter ground plane that resembles the rooftop of a vehicle. The HPBW of the Yagi was found to be about 3° narrower than its V-shaped counterpart when measured above a reflecting ground plane and operated in switched mode. The printed V-shaped antenna array offers 2.5 dB extra gain compared to the printed Yagi array.

  18. Automation of printing machine

    OpenAIRE

    Sušil, David

    2016-01-01

    Bachelor thesis is focused on the automation of the printing machine and comparing the two types of printing machines. The first chapter deals with the history of printing, typesettings, printing techniques and various kinds of bookbinding. The second chapter describes the difference between sheet-fed printing machines and offset printing machines, the difference between two representatives of rotary machines, technological process of the products on these machines, the description of the mac...

  19. Influence of the pad printing plate‘ printing element depth on the quality of the printed product

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović, Živko; Dedijer, Sandra; Pál, Magdolna; Cigula, Tomislav

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in mass printing is repeatability and stability of the ink transfer from the printing plate onto the printing substrate. The pad printing is characterised by indirect ink transfer from a gravure printing plate. Beside area of the printing elements, on the pad printing plate one should take into account their depth as it is a factor which directly influences the printing ink quantity, i.e. overall quality of the printed product. The photopolymer pad printing...

  20. Processless offset printing plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Mahović Poljaček

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of platesetters in the offset printing plate making process, imaging of the printing plate became more stable and ensured increase of the printing plate quality. But as the chemical processing of the printing plates still highly influences the plate making process and the graphic reproduction workflow, development of printing plates that do not require chemical processing for offset printing technique has been one of the top interests in graphic technology in the last few years. The main reason for that came from the user experience, where majority of the problems with plate making process could be connected with the chemical processing of the printing plate. Furthermore, increased environmental standards lead to reducing of the chemicals used in the industrial processes. Considering these facts, different types of offset printing plates have been introduced to the market today. This paper presents some of the processless printing plates.

  1. Checking a printed board

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    An 'Interactive Printed Circuit Board Design System' has been developed by a company in a Member-State. Printed circuits are now produced at the SB's surface treatment workshop using a digitized photo-plotter.

  2. A 28 GHz FR-4 Compatible Phased Array Antenna for 5G Mobile Phone Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojaroudiparchin, Naser; Shen, Ming; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2015-01-01

    The design of a 28 GHz phased array antenna for future fifth generation (5G) mobile-phone applications has been presented in this paper. The proposed antenna can be implemented using low cost FR-4 substrates, while maintaining good performance in terms of gain and efficiency. This is achieved...

  3. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stepehen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2015-01-27

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print head further includes a first layer further comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  4. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen; McGraw, Gregory

    2016-02-02

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print head further includes a first layer further comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  5. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2013-12-24

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print header further includes a first layer comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  6. 3D Design & Simulation of Printed Dipole Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protap Mollick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents design of a printed dipole antenna with both lambda by 2 & half dipole. In this research paper the impedance increases with combined design on the FR-4 substrate and ground plane. The main feature of printed dipole antenna is there is a feeder between the radiant elements. Average impedance about 73 ohm, which is very large form other antenna. For vertical earth position impedance decreases about 36 ohm. Applied AC voltage forwarding bias dipole antenna gains are high but when reverse bias condition gains are low. Between ropes to station there is need extra insulator that abate high impedance current flow to dipole antenna. Feed lines are approximately 75 ohm and the main length between two poles are 143 meter. The radius of two pole line is very thin it’s about 2.06 meter. Transmission lines are added in the last portion of feed lines, which situated apposite of two poles. Designs are simulated by hfss and solving equations are done my matlab.

  7. Introduction to printed electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail modern technologies for printed electronics, explaining how nanotechnology and modern printing technology are merging to revolutionize electronics fabrication of thin, lightweight, large, and inexpensive products. Readers will benefit from the explanations of materials, devices and circuits used to design and implement the latest applications of printed electronics, such as thin flexible OLED displays, organic solar cells, OLED lighting, smart wallpaper, sensors, logic, memory and more.

  8. THE FUTURE OF PRINTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As China's economy has boomed, so has its printing industry, making the country one of the leaders in the field. Speaking at the International Printing Forum held in conjunction with the Second China (Shenzhen) International Cultural Industry Fair in May, Long Xinmin, Director of the General Administration of Press and Publication, said there are more than 180,000 printing plants in China with over 3.4 million workers. The total output value of the printing industry is 332.67 billion yuan, accounting for...

  9. Printed circuit board industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDou, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    The printed circuit board is the platform upon which microelectronic components such as semiconductor chips and capacitors are mounted. It provides the electrical interconnections between components and is found in virtually all electronics products. Once considered low technology, the printed circuit board is evolving into a high-technology product. Printed circuit board manufacturing is highly complicated, requiring large equipment investments and over 50 process steps. Many of the high-speed, miniaturized printed circuit boards are now manufactured in cleanrooms with the same health and safety problems posed by other microelectronics manufacturing. Asia produces three-fourths of the world's printed circuit boards. In Asian countries, glycol ethers are the major solvents used in the printed circuit board industry. Large quantities of hazardous chemicals such as formaldehyde, dimethylformamide, and lead are used by the printed circuit board industry. For decades, chemically intensive and often sloppy manufacturing processes exposed tens of thousands of workers to a large number of chemicals that are now known to be reproductive toxicants and carcinogens. The printed circuit board industry has exposed workers to high doses of toxic metals, solvents, acids, and photolithographic chemicals. Only recently has there been any serious effort to diminish the quantity of lead distributed worldwide by the printed circuit board industry. Billions of electronics products have been discarded in every region of the world. This paper summarizes recent regulatory and enforcement efforts.

  10. Printing Has a Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Georg Wenke

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing will also be done in the future. Printed items meet basic needs and are deeply anchored in people’s habits. Being able to handle and collect printed matter is highly attractive. And paper is now more alive than ever. It is therefore too shortsighted to disclaim the importance of one of the still large economic sectors just because of a few looming-recession instigated market shifts.The exciting aspect of drupa 2004 is: printing will be reinvented, so to speak. Much more printing will be done in the future than at present. On the one hand, people are concentrating on process optimization and automation to ensure this. Measuring and testing, process control and optimization, and linking up "office software" with printing technology will be very central topics at drupa 2004. Electronics and print are not rivals; a symbiosis exists. And printing is high-tech: hardly any other multifaceted sector which has been so successful for centuries is as computerized as the printing industry.A series of "new chapters" in the variety of printing possibilities will be opened at drupa. Talk will be generated by further technical developments, often the connection between paper/cardboard and electronics, the link between the office world and graphics industry, text databases and their link-up to graphic page production tools, and "on the fly" dynamic printing over networks.All of this and more belongs to future potentialities, which are so substantial overall, the outlook is by no means black for the "black art". Like its predecessors, drupa 2004 is also a product trade fair. However, more than ever before in its history, it is also an "information village". The exhibits are useful, because they occasionally make what this means visible.

  11. Inkjet-Printed Memristor: Printing Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelo, Mikko; Sloma, Marcin; Kelloniemi, Jaakko; Puustinen, Jarkko; Saikkonen, Teuvo; Juuti, Jari; Häkkinen, Juha; Jakubowska, Malgorzata; Jantunen, Heli

    2013-05-01

    In the last five years, research on memristive devices has been under ever increasing interest. Additionally, recent development in printed techniques provides new approaches to fabricate also memristive devices in inexpensive and flexible manner. Thus their research is an important effort towards fully printed electronics applications. In this work, an organometallic precursor solution for a memristive layer was synthesised and formulated for inkjet-printable form. Layers of the solution were determined with surface profilometry in order to find feasible layer thickness for memristive behaviour. Memristors were inkjet-printed on copper- and titanium-coated glass sheets, and various heat-treatments were carried out. The influence of the heat-treatments on the durability and resistance values of the memristors was evaluated. Microstructural and phase changes in the memristive layer were observed with X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Flexographic Prints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Grigaliūnienė

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of paper and flexographic prints madewith different anilox rollers were investigated experimentally.Flexographic prints roughness, breaking force and folding resistancevalues were determined. The results showed that foldingresistance is bigger for machine direction prints than for crossmachine direction prints. Flexographic prints on cardboardsfolding resistance values are different for machine direction andcross machine direction. It was determined that roughness offlexographic prints increases with the amount of ink on aniloxroller. Results were explained by the ink water influence.

  13. Printing Ancient Terracotta Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadecki, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    Standing in awe in Xian, China, at the Terra Cotta warrior archaeological site, the author thought of sharing this experience and excitement with her sixth-grade students. She decided to let her students carve patterns of the ancient soldiers to understand their place in Chinese history. They would make block prints and print multiple soldiers on…

  14. Print like an Egyptian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisensee, Marilyn

    1990-01-01

    Describes a relief printmaking unit for sixth graders with the objective of decorating the inside of a pyramid. Ancient Egyptian imagery was used to help students become familiar with the style. Students designed and printed linoleum prints in different colors. They then critiqued their work and made their selection for the pyramid. (KM)

  15. Inkjet printing of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arapov, K.; Abbel, R.; De With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e.; in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g.; as a replacement

  16. Inkjet printing of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arapov, K.; Abbel, R.; De With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e.; in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g.; as a replacement fo

  17. Offset Printing, Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, Ervin; Anderson, Floyd L.

    Prepared by an instructor and a curriculum development specialist, this course of study was designed to meet the individual needs of the dropout and/or hard-core unemployed youth by providing skill training, related information, and supportive services knowledge about offset printing. The course provides training in offset printing and related…

  18. Hybrid printed electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, M.; Smits, E.; Rubingh, E.; Teunissen, P.; Kusters, R.; Abbel, R.; Brand, J. van den

    2016-01-01

    Although many electronic functionalities can be realized by printed or organic electronics, short-term marketable products often require robust, reproducible, and nondisturbing technologies. In this chapter we show how hybrid electronics, a combination of printed circuitry, thin-film electronics,

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOLID INK DENSITY, PRINT CONTRAST AND PRINT GLOSS OF METALIZED BOARD PRINTED WITH SHEET FED OFFSET PRINTING PROCESS AND DRY TONER BASED DIGITAL PRINTING PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Aman Bhardwaj*, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Metalized boards are frequently used in the packaging industry. In our study, we compare the Print properties of metalized board printed with the primer coat on sheet fed offset and dry toner based digital printing process. Metalized boards are give good print properties when printed with digital printing process for short run jobs. Comparatively high contrast is found in less solid ink density in digital printing.  

  20. Bird Face Microstrip Printed Monopole Antenna Design for Ultra Wide Band Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Jakir; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Md. Moinul; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Rahman, Md. Atiqur

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a novel bird face microstrip printed monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna is investigated. The proposed compact antenna consists of a ring-shaped with additional slot and slotted ground plane on FR4 material. The overall electrical dimension of the proposed antenna is 0.25 λ×0.36 λ×0.016 λ and is energized by microstrip feed line. The Computer Simulation Technology (CST) and the High Frequency Structural Simulator (HFSS) is applied in this analysis. The impedance bandwidth of the monopole antenna cover 3.1-12.3 GHz (9.2 GHz, BW) frequency range. The messurement displayed that the designed antenna achieved excellent gain and stable omnidirectional radiation patterns within the UWB. The maximum gain of 6.8 dBi and omnidirectional radiation pattern makes the proposed antenna that is suitable for UWB systems.

  1. Printed circuit for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    A printed circuit board made by scientists in the ATLAS collaboration for the transition radiaton tracker (TRT). This will read data produced when a high energy particle crosses the boundary between two materials with different electrical properties.

  2. Designing Printed Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lucille; Pett, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of identifying the audience and determining specific objectives when designing printed instructional materials that will communicate effectively and provides detailed guidelines for dealing with such design factors as content, writing style, typography, illustrations, and page organization. (MBR)

  3. Printed Spacecraft Separation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmans, Walter [Planetary Systems Corporation, Silver Springs, MD (United States); Dehoff, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    In this project Planetary Systems Corporation proposed utilizing additive manufacturing (3D printing) to manufacture a titanium spacecraft separation system for commercial and US government customers to realize a 90% reduction in the cost and energy. These savings were demonstrated via “printing-in” many of the parts and sub-assemblies into one part, thus greatly reducing the labor associated with design, procurement, assembly and calibration of mechanisms. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned several of the components of the separation system based on additive manufacturing principles including geometric flexibility and the ability to fabricate complex designs, ability to combine multiple parts of an assembly into a single component, and the ability to optimize design for specific mechanical property targets. Shock absorption was specifically targeted and requirements were established to attenuate damage to the Lightband system from shock of initiation. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned components based on these requirements and sent the designs to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be printed. ORNL printed the parts using the Arcam electron beam melting technology based on the desire for the parts to be fabricated from Ti-6Al-4V based on the weight and mechanical performance of the material. A second set of components was fabricated from stainless steel material on the Renishaw laser powder bed technology due to the improved geometric accuracy, surface finish, and wear resistance of the material. Planetary Systems Corporation evaluated these components and determined that 3D printing is potentially a viable method for achieving significant cost and savings metrics.

  4. Printing at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Otto, R

    2007-01-01

    For many years CERN had a very sophisticated print server infrastructure which supported several different protocols (AppleTalk, IPX and TCP/IP) and many different printing standards. Today’s situation differs a lot: we have a much more homogenous network infrastructure, where TCP/IP is used everywhere and we have less printer models, which almost all work using current standards (i.e. they all provide PostScript drivers). This change gave us the possibility to review the printing architecture aiming at simplifying the infrastructure in order to achieve full automation of the service. The new infrastructure offers both: LPD service exposing print queues to Linux and Mac OS X computers and native printing for Windows based clients. The printer driver distribution is automatic and native on Windows and automated by custom mechanisms on Linux, where the appropriate Foomatic drivers are configured. Also the process of printer registration and queue creation is completely automated following the printer regis...

  5. Printed hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioja, Pentti; Mäkinen, Jukka-Tapani; Keränen, Kimmo; Aikio, Janne; Alajoki, Teemu; Jaakola, Tuomo; Koponen, Matti; Keränen, Antti; Heikkinen, Mikko; Tuomikoski, Markus; Suhonen, Riikka; Hakalahti, Leena; Kopola, Pälvi; Hast, Jukka; Liedert, Ralf; Hiltunen, Jussi; Masuda, Noriyuki; Kemppainen, Antti; Rönkä, Kari; Korhonen, Raimo

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents research activities carried out at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland in the field of hybrid integration of optics, electronics and mechanics. Main focus area in our research is the manufacturing of electronic modules and product structures with printed electronics, film-over-molding and polymer sheet lamination technologies and the goal is in the next generation of smart systems utilizing monolithic polymer packages. The combination of manufacturing technologies such as roll-to-roll -printing, injection molding and traditional component assembly is called Printed Hybrid Systems (PHS). Several demonstrator structures have been made, which show the potential of polymer packaging technology. One demonstrator example is a laminated structure with embedded LED chips. Element thickness is only 0.3mm and the flexible stack of foils can be bent in two directions after assembly process and was shaped curved using heat and pressure. The combination of printed flexible circuit boards and injection molding has also been demonstrated with several functional modules. The demonstrators illustrate the potential of origami electronics, which can be cut and folded to 3D shapes. It shows that several manufacturing process steps can be eliminated by Printed Hybrid Systems technology. The main benefits of this combination are small size, ruggedness and conformality. The devices are ideally suited for medical applications as the sensitive electronic components are well protected inside the plastic and the structures can be cleaned easily due to the fact that they have no joints or seams that can accumulate dirt or bacteria.

  6. BOK-Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    The use of printed electronics technologies (PETs), 2D or 3D printing approaches either by conventional electronic fabrication or by rapid graphic printing of organic or nonorganic electronic devices on various small or large rigid or flexible substrates, is projected to grow exponentially in commercial industry. This has provided an opportunity to determine whether or not PETs could be applicable for low volume and high-reliability applications. This report presents a summary of literature surveyed and provides a body of knowledge (BOK) gathered on the current status of organic and printed electronics technologies. It reviews three key industry roadmaps- on this subject-OE-A, ITRS, and iNEMI-each with a different name identification for this emerging technology. This followed by a brief review of the status of the industry on standard development for this technology, including IEEE and IPC specifications. The report concludes with key technologies and applications and provides a technology hierarchy similar to those of conventional microelectronics for electronics packaging. Understanding key technology roadmaps, parameters, and applications is important when judicially selecting and narrowing the follow-up of new and emerging applicable technologies for evaluation, as well as the low risk insertion of organic, large area, and printed electronics.

  7. Influence of the Print Run on Silver Halide Printing Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Cigula

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The most common printing technique today is lithography. The difference between printing and nonprinting areason a printing plate is accomplished by opposite physical and chemical properties of those areas (MacPhee, 1998.The printing areas are made of photoactive layer that attracts oil and chemical substances with oil solvent – printinginks. The nonprinting areas are made of aluminium-oxide which attracts water based substances – the fountainsolution.There are many of various types of photoactive layer which are used for production of offset printing plates, amongothers is silver halide layer. The usage of the silver halide technology in the graphic reproduction is not a novelty.The filmmaking phase is based on the usage of the silver halide as the photographically active ingredient, for instance,AgBr (silver bromide. The new, digital plate making technology (Computer to Plate, CtP eliminates thefilmmaking phase and therefore enables control of the printing plate’s exposure made by computer. CtP technologyeliminates the filmmaking phase, but it also results with the reduction of needed material quantities and requiredtime for the production (Limburg, 1994; Seydel, 1996.In this paper the basis of the graphic reproduction by using the silver halide digital printing plates was described.The changes of the AgX copying layer and the surface of the aluminium base in the printing process have beenobserved. The surface characteristics were determined by measuring the relevant surface roughness parameters. Inaddition, measurements of coverage values on the prints, detailed at smaller print run, were conducted.Results showed that surface changes on the printing plate are changing during printing process and that thesechanges influence transfer of the printing ink on the printing substrate. These measurements proved to be of greatinterest in the graphic reproduction as they enable us to determine consistency of the printing plates during theprinting

  8. Computer Security: Printing confidentially

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2015-01-01

    Have you ever hesitated to print a confidential document using CERN printers? Or perhaps you have rushed quickly to the printer after hitting the “print” button in order to avoid someone else getting hold of and reading your document? These times are over now with the new printing infrastructure!   Indeed, many of us regularly print out confidential documents like our salary slips, MARS forms, tendering documents and drafts of preliminary papers. The upcoming CERN data protection policy will require all of us to respect the confidentiality of such documents and, as the word “confidential” implies, access to “confidential” or sensitive documents will be tightly controlled. What can we do about the public printers located in many buildings, floors and shared spaces - accessible not only to CERN staff and users but also to visitors and guests? Some printers are located in the vicinity of restaurants, cafeterias or close to paths taken b...

  9. Using Environmental Print to Enhance Emergent Literacy and Print Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Michelle M.; Hood, Michelle; Ford, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    Given the ubiquitous and salient nature of environmental print, it has the potential to scaffold emergent literacy in young children. This randomised control study evaluated the effects of using environmental print compared to standard print (the same labels in manuscript form) in an 8-week intervention (30 min per week) to foster 3- to…

  10. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...... that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours...

  11. Primer printed circuit boards

    CERN Document Server

    Argyle, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Step-by-step instructions for making your own PCBs at home. Making your own printed circuit board (PCB) might seem a daunting task, but once you master the steps, it's easy to attain professional-looking results. Printed circuit boards, which connect chips and other components, are what make almost all modern electronic devices possible. PCBs are made from sheets of fiberglass clad with copper, usually in multiplelayers. Cut a computer motherboard in two, for instance, and you'll often see five or more differently patterned layers. Making boards at home is relatively easy

  12. Printed MIMO antenna engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sharawi, Mohammad S

    2014-01-01

    Wireless communications has made a huge leap during the past two decades. The multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) technology was proposed in the 1990's as a viable solution that can overcome the data rate limit experienced by single-input-single-output (SISO) systems. This resource is focused on printed MIMO antenna system design. Printed antennas are widely used in mobile and handheld terminals due to their conformity with the device, low cost, good integration within the device elements and mechanical parts, as well as ease of fabrication.A perfect design companion for practicing engineers

  13. Advances in Home Photo Printing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Lin; Brian Atkins; Huitao Luo

    2004-01-01

    With digital camera adoptions going main stream, consumers capture a record number of photos.Currently, the majority of the digital photos are printed at home. One of the key enablers of this transformation is the advancement of home photo printing technologies. In the past few years, inkjet printing technologies have continued to deliver smaller drop size, larger number of inks, and longer-lasting prints. In the mean time, advanced image processing automatically enhances captured digital photos while being printed. The combination of the above two forces has closed the gap between the home photo prints and AgX prints. It will give an overview of the home photo printing market and technology trends, and discuss major advancements in automatic image processing.

  14. [Characterization of pyrolysis of waste printed circuit boards by high-resolution pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhong; Huang, Hong; Xia, Zhengbin; Chen, Huanqin

    2008-07-01

    Thermal degradation of pyrolysis of waste circuit boards was investigated by high-resolution pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PyGC-MS) and thermogravimetry (TG). In helium atmosphere, the products of FR-4 waste printed circuit board were pyrolyzed at 350, 450, 550, 650, and 750 degrees degrees C, separately, and the pyrolysis products were identified by online MS. The results indicated that the pyrolysis products of the FR-4 waste circuit board were three kinds of substances, such as the low boiling point products, phenol, bisphenol and their related products. Moreover, under 300 degrees degrees C, only observed less pyrolysis products. As the increase of pyrolysis temperature, the relative content of the low boiling point products increased. In the range of 450-650 degrees degrees C, the qualitative analysis and character were similar, and the relative contents of phenol and bisphenol were higher. The influence of pyrolysis temperature on pyrolyzate yields was studied. On the basis of the pyrolyzate profile and the dependence of pyrolyzate yields on pyrolysis temperature, the thermal degradation mechanism of brominated epoxy resin was proposed.

  15. Printing and the Online Catalog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bennett J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses issues involved in offering printing for online library catalogs and weighs advantages and disadvantages of screen printing versus remote printing--speed, quality, privacy, convenience, noise, control, costs, accessibility and service. Additional technical issues discussed are buffered versus unbuffered asynchronous printer ports,…

  16. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhang, W.; Yang, J., E-mail: jyang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Western University, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Liu, Y.; Lau, W. [Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing Technology R& D Center, 355 Tengfei Road, 620107 Chengdu (China); Wang, X. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Western University, London N6A 3K7 (Canada); Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-03-07

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  17. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Liu, Y.; Guo, Q.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.; Lau, W.; Yang, J.

    2016-03-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  18. Print advertising : Vivid content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, B.M.; Das, E.H.H.J.; Fransen, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The present research examines the effects of vivid ad content in two types of appeal in print ads as a function of individual differences in chronically experienced vividness of visual imagery. For informational ads for a functional product, vivid ad content strongly affected individuals high in rep

  19. Print advertising: vivid content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, B.M.; Das, E.; Fransen, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The present research examines the effects of vivid ad content in two types of appeal in print ads as a function of individual differences in chronically experienced vividness of visual imagery. For informational ads for a functional product, vivid ad content strongly affected individuals high in rep

  20. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  1. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  2. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...

  3. Just press print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornes, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Patients requiring an organ transplant may one day no longer have to wait for a matching donor. As Stephen Ornes explains, researchers are making progress towards creating human organs with techniques such as 3D printing, using the patient's own cells for ink.

  4. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  5. Protection of Information in Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antun Koren

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing production in its basic purpose expands the information. The information processing begins with the information receiving, then the preparation for printing, then printing itself and finally finishing the processed information. Of course, during these four steps, specially some prints are imperilled and have to be protected. An investigation was performed to establish the state of information imperilling in printing, in 96 companies with 498 interviewed persons. The questionnaire comprised 26 questions and 130 variables.The poll has shown the state of imperilling, specially the information protection in printing, with the aim to improve the protection measures. The investigation results can be used as the model for organizing the protection in printing companies.

  6. Biomimetic 4D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydney Gladman, A.; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mahadevan, L.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies.

  7. Biomimetic 4D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladman, A Sydney; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mahadevan, L; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Shape-morphing systems can be found in many areas, including smart textiles, autonomous robotics, biomedical devices, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The natural analogues of such systems are exemplified by nastic plant motions, where a variety of organs such as tendrils, bracts, leaves and flowers respond to environmental stimuli (such as humidity, light or touch) by varying internal turgor, which leads to dynamic conformations governed by the tissue composition and microstructural anisotropy of cell walls. Inspired by these botanical systems, we printed composite hydrogel architectures that are encoded with localized, anisotropic swelling behaviour controlled by the alignment of cellulose fibrils along prescribed four-dimensional printing pathways. When combined with a minimal theoretical framework that allows us to solve the inverse problem of designing the alignment patterns for prescribed target shapes, we can programmably fabricate plant-inspired architectures that change shape on immersion in water, yielding complex three-dimensional morphologies.

  8. Electrohydrodynamic Printing and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Poon, Hak Fei (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An stable electrohydrodynamic filament is obtained by causing a straight electrohydrodynamic filament formed from a liquid to emerge from a Taylor cone, the filament having a diameter of from 10 nm to 100.mu.m. Such filaments are useful in electrohydrodynamic printing and manufacturing techniques and their application in liquid drop/particle and fiber production, colloidal deployment and assembly, and composite materials processing.

  9. Chemical deinking of prints obtained by non-impact printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Bolanca

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the results of efficiency investi-gation of chemical deinking of non-impact prints, where the principle of electrophotography is used for obtaining the latent image, on which the toner could adhere. The basis of scientific prepositions of deinking flotation and the mechanism for particle separation in the explanation of the results of experiment are given. The optical properties of hand-sheets in relation to the particle separation mechanism, their size, form and structure are discussed.The results obtained by deinking flotation of a mixed sample from the prints of non-impact printing and the conventional offset printing show clearly the influence of the specific characteristic of printing techniques and the chemical composition of toner, i.e. of printing inks on the quality of recycled fibers.

  10. A flexible high potential printed battery for powering printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Abhinav M.; Steingart, Daniel A.; Nga Ng, Tse; Schwartz, David E.; Whiting, Gregory L.

    2013-06-01

    Mechanically flexible arrays of alkaline electrochemical cells fabricated using stencil printing onto fibrous substrates are shown to provide the necessary performance characteristics for driving ink-jet printed circuits. Due to the dimensions and material set currently required for reliable low-temperature print processing of electronic devices, a battery potential greater than that sourced by single cells is typically needed. The developed battery is a series interconnected array of 10 low resistance Zn-MnO2 alkaline cells, giving an open circuit potential of 14 V. This flexible battery is used to power an ink-jet printed 5-stage complementary ring oscillator based on organic semiconductors.

  11. Cell filling in gravure printing for printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Jialiang; Kitsomboonloha, Rungrot; Subramanian, Vivek

    2014-11-18

    Highly scaled direct gravure is a promising printing technique for printed electronics due to its large throughput, high resolution, and simplicity. Gravure can print features in the single micron range at printing speeds of ∼1 m/s by using an optimized cell geometry and optimized printing conditions. The filling of the cells on the gravure cylinder is a critical process, since the amount of ink in the cells strongly impacts printed feature size and quality. Therefore, an understanding of cell filling is crucial to make highly scaled gravure printed electronics viable. In this work we report a novel experimental setup to investigate the filling process in real time, coupled with numerical simulations to gain insight into the experimental observations. By varying viscosity and filling speed, we ensure that the dimensionless capillary number is a good indicator of filling regime in real gravure printing. In addition, we also examine the effect of cell size on filling as this is important for increasing printing resolution. In the light of experimental and simulation results, we are able to rationalize the dominant failure in the filling process, i.e., air entrapment, which is caused by contact line pinning and interface deformation over the cell opening.

  12. Recent trends in print portals and Web2Print applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2009-01-01

    For quite some time now, the printing business has been under heavy pressure because of overcapacity, dropping prices and the delocalization of the production to low income countries. To survive in this competitive world, printers have to invest in tools that, on one hand, reduce the production costs and, on the other hand, create additional value for their customers (print buyers). The creation of customer portals on top of prepress production systems allowing print buyers to upload their content, approve the uploaded pages based on soft proofs (rendered by the underlying production system) and further follow-up the generation of the printed material, has been illustrative in this respect. These developments resulted in both automation for the printer and added value for the print buyer. Many traditional customer portals assume that the printed products have been identified before they are presented to the print buyer in the portal environment. The products are, in this case, typically entered by the printing organization in a so-called MISi system after the official purchase order has been received from the print buyer. Afterwards, the MIS system then submits the product to the customer portal. Some portals, however, also support the initiation of printed products by the print buyer directly. This workflow creates additional flexibility but also makes things much more complex. We here have to distinguish between special products that are defined ad-hoc by the print buyer and standardized products that are typically selected out of catalogs. Special products are most of the time defined once and the level of detail required in terms of production parameters is quite high. Systems that support such products typically have a built-in estimation module, or, at least, a direct connection to an MIS system that calculates the prices and adds a specific mark-up to calculate a quote. Often, the markup is added by an account manager on a customer by customer basis; in this

  13. Statistical data of Printing and Printing Equipment Industries and materials of China 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    According to statistics of Printing and Printing Equipment Industries Association of China (PEIAC), the total output value of printing industry of China in 2007 reached 440 billion RMB , the total output value of printing equipment was 17

  14. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  15. Quality Inspection of Printed Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Ballisager; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Inspecting the quality of printed texts has its own importance in many industrial applications. To do so, this paper proposes a grading system which evaluates the performance of the printing task using some quality measures for each character and symbols. The purpose of these grading system is two......-folded: for costumers of the printing and verification system, the overall grade used to verify if the text is of sufficient quality, while for printer's manufacturer, the detailed character/symbols grades and quality measurements are used for the improvement and optimization of the printing task. The proposed system...

  16. Printed electronic switch on flexible substrates using printed microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cate, A.T. ten; Gaspar, C.H.; Virtanen, H.L.K.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Olkkonen, J.T.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Smolander, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics, the manufacturing of electronic components on large, flexible, and low-cost substrates by printing techniques, can facilitate widespread, very low-cost electronics for consumer applications and disposable devices. New technologies are needed to create functional components in th

  17. Printed electronic switch on flexible substrates using printed microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cate, A.T. ten; Gaspar, C.H.; Virtanen, H.L.K.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Olkkonen, J.T.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Smolander, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics, the manufacturing of electronic components on large, flexible, and low-cost substrates by printing techniques, can facilitate widespread, very low-cost electronics for consumer applications and disposable devices. New technologies are needed to create functional components in

  18. The Art of Small Job Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, Millicent

    1978-01-01

    Presents guidelines for the design and production of printed promotional materials for library programs, lectures, movies, exhibits, and community events. Areas covered are typography, printing, production, costs, copyfitting and layout, printing stock, and binding. (VT)

  19. The best printing methods to print satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Yousif

    2011-12-01

    In this paper different printing systems were used to print an image of SPOT-4 satellite, caver part of Sharm Elshekh area, Sinai, Egypt, on the same type of paper as much as possible, especially in the photography. This step is followed by measuring the experimental data, and analyzed colors to determine the best printing systems for satellite image printing data. The laser system is the more printing system where produce a wider range of color and highest densities of ink and access much color detail. Followed by the offset system which it recorded the best dot gain. Moreover, the study shows that it can use the advantages of each method according to the satellite image color and quantity to be produced.

  20. Inkjet printed electronics using copper nanoparticle ink

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jin Sung; Kim, Hak Sung; Ryu, Jongeun; Thomas Hahn, H.; Jang, Seonhee; Joung, Jae Woo

    2010-01-01

    Inkjet printing of electrode using copper nanoparticle ink is presented. Electrode was printed on a flexible glass epoxy composite substrate using drop on demand piezoelectric dispenser and was sintered at 200 °C of low temperature in N2 gas condition. The printed electrodes were made with various widths and thickness. In order to control the thickness of the printed electrode, number of printing was varied. Resistivity of printed electrode was calculated from the cross-sectional area measure...

  1. Embellished String Prints. Cover Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Ruth

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on a printmaking activity in which students create embellished string prints using the relief process of string glued to chip board. Explains that string prints can easily be embellished with oil pastels. Provides a description of the procedure and a list of materials and methods. (CMK)

  2. Some Thoughts on Contemporary Graphic Print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Skiba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The production requirements of original graphic works of art have changed since 1980. The development of digital printing using lightfast colors now rivals traditional techniques such as wood cut, screen print, lithography, etching etc. Today, with respect to artistic legitimacy, original graphics using traditional printing techniques compete with original graphics produced by digital printing techniques on the art market. What criteria distinguish traditional printing techniques from those of digital printing in the production and acquisition of original graphics? What consequences is the serious artist faced with when deciding to implement digital print production? How does digital print change original graphic acquisition decisions?

  3. 废旧印刷线路板的热重分析及热解动力学模型%Thermogravimetric Analysis and Pyrolysis Kinetics Models of Waste Printed Circuit Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵跃; 薛勇; 黄强; 邓欣逸; 张义烽

    2011-01-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of waste FR4 type printed circuit board (PCB) was studied by thermogravimetric (TG) analysis method. The TG and differential thermogravimetry (DTG) curves of the waste PCB at different heating rate and their changing rules were explored. The activation energy (E) of the pyrolysis reaction was solved exactly by Starink method. The mechanism function and pre-exponential factor (A) were obtained by Malek method. The research results show that; The TG and DTG curves of waste FR4 type PCB move to the high-temperature zone progressively with the increase of heating rate; The initial pyrolysis temperature, the temperature corresponding to the maximum weight loss rate and the terminated pyrolysis temperature also increase with it; The E and A of the waste PCB are 105.75 kJ/mol and 7. 89 x 108 min-1 respectively.%采用热重(TG)分析法研究了废旧FR4型印刷线路板(PCB)的热解特性,探讨了不同升温速率下废旧PCB的TG和微分热重(DTG)曲线及变化规律,利用Starink法精确求解热解反应活化能(E),利用Malek法判断得出废旧PCB的热解动力学机理函数和指前因子(A).研究结果表明:废旧FR4型PCB的TG和DTG曲线随着升温速率的增大逐步向高温区移动;起始热解温度、最大失重速率对应温度以及终止热解温度也随着升温速率的增大而升高;废旧FR4型PCB的E和A分别为105.75 kJ/mol和7.89×108 min-1.

  4. Making Palm Print Matching Mobile

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Li; Chian, Cheng Shao

    2009-01-01

    With the growing importance of personal identification and authentication in todays highly advanced world where most business and personal tasks are being replaced by electronic means, the need for a technology that is able to uniquely identify an individual and has high fraud resistance see the rise of biometric technologies. Making biometric based solution mobile is a promising trend. A new RST invariant square based palm print ROI extraction method was successfully implemented and integrated into the current application suite. A new set of palm print image database captured using embedded cameras in mobile phone was created to test its robustness. Comparing to those extraction methods that are based on boundary tracking of the overall hand shape that has limitation of being unable to process palm print images that has one or more fingers closed, the system can now effectively handle the segmentation of palm print images with varying finger positioning. The high flexibility makes palm print matching mobile ...

  5. Masking mediated print defect visibility predictor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaochen; Nachlieli, Hila; Shaked, Doron; Shiffman, Smadar; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Banding is a well-known artifact produced by printing systems. It usually appears as lines perpendicular to the process direction of the print. Therefore, banding is an important print quality issue which has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers. However, little literature has focused on the study of the masking effect of content for this kind of print quality issue. Compared with other image and print quality research, our work is focused on the print quality of typical documents printed on a digital commercial printing press. In this paper, we propose a Masking Mediated Print Defect Visibility Predictor (MMPDVP) to predict the visibility of defects in the presence of customer content. The parameters of the algorithm are trained from ground-truth images that have been marked by subjects. The MMPDVP could help the press operator decide whether the print quality is acceptable for specific customer requirements. Ultimately, this model can be used to optimize the print-shop workflow.

  6. Design of roll-to-roll printing equipment with multiple printing methods for multi-layer printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chung Hwan; Jo, Jeongdai; Lee, Seung-Hyun

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, a novel design concept for roll-to-roll printing equipment used for manufacturing printed electronic devices by multi-layer printing is presented. The roll-to-roll printing system mainly consists of printing units for patterning the circuits, tension control components such as feeders, dancers, load cells, register measurement and control units, and the drying units. It has three printing units which allow switching among the gravure, gravure-offset, and flexo printing methods by changing the web path and the placements of the cylinders. Therefore, depending on the application devices and the corresponding inks used, each printing unit can be easily adjusted to the required printing method. The appropriate printing method can be chosen depending on the desired printing properties such as thickness, roughness, and printing quality. To provide an example of the application of the designed printing equipment, we present the results of printing tests showing the variations in the printing properties of the ink for different printing methods.

  7. Inkjet-printed graphene electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Felice; Hasan, Tawfique; Wu, Weiping; Sun, Zhipei; Lombardo, Antonio; Kulmala, Tero S; Hsieh, Gen-Wen; Jung, Sungjune; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Paul, Philip J; Chu, Daping; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2012-04-24

    We demonstrate inkjet printing as a viable method for large-area fabrication of graphene devices. We produce a graphene-based ink by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in N-methylpyrrolidone. We use it to print thin-film transistors, with mobilities up to ∼95 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), as well as transparent and conductive patterns, with ∼80% transmittance and ∼30 kΩ/□ sheet resistance. This paves the way to all-printed, flexible, and transparent graphene devices on arbitrary substrates.

  8. Conductive nanomaterials for printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyshny, Alexander; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-10

    This is a review on recent developments in the field of conductive nanomaterials and their application in printed electronics, with particular emphasis on inkjet printing of ink formulations based on metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene sheets. The review describes the basic properties of conductive nanomaterials suitable for printed electronics (metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene), their stabilization in dispersions, formulations of conductive inks, and obtaining conductive patterns by using various sintering methods. Applications of conductive nanomaterials for electronic devices (transparent electrodes, metallization of solar cells, RFID antennas, TFTs, and light emitting devices) are also briefly reviewed.

  9. Inkjet-Printed Graphene Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Torrisi, F.; Hasan, T.; Wu, W; Sun, Z.; Lombardo, A.; Kulmala, T. S.; Hsieh, G-W.; S. Jung; F. Bonaccorso; P. J. Paul; Chu, D.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate inkjet printing as a viable method for large-area fabrication of graphene devices. We produce a graphene-based ink by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in N-methylpyrrolidone. We use it to print thin-film transistors, with mobilities up to ∼95 cm2 V–1 s–1, as well as transparent and conductive patterns, with ∼80% transmittance and ∼30 kΩ/□ sheet resistance. This paves the way to all-printed, flexible, and transparent graphene devices on arbitrary substrates.

  10. Preparation and characterization of superconductor thin films for application in printed circuit boards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, G.A.; Carvalho, C.L.; Torsoni, G.B.; Rodrigues, V.D.; Souza, E.J.; Zadorosny, R. [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia. Grupo de Desenvolvimento e Aplicacoes de Materiais (GDAM)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Since the discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS) many studies have been performed, in terms to discover new materials with higher critical temperature and its potential applications. Technological advances have induced to use superconductor materials in the development of new devices that have higher processing speed, storage capacity and are miniaturized, what may imply in great evolution in the electronic area. Thinking about that advances and looking to supply some requirements, this work proposed to prepare a printed circuit board (PCB) with a superconductor thin film using an inexpensive and conventional photographic method. This work was divided in two steps: synthesis of the precursor solution and film preparation for superconductor printed circuit. In the preparation of superconductor thin film was considered to use the 2223 phase of the BSCCO system, which has been doped with Pb (BPSCCO) for stabilizing the same, and it presents a critical temperature around 110 K. This film was prepared from a precursor solution based on similar method developed by M. P. Pechini. The printed circuit was created by the photographic method of heat transfer which consisted of creation a circuit layout, with different dimensions and printed on photo paper (Epson S041140). The layout was transferred to the FR4 printed copper clad laminate was made with the household clothes iron. The precursor solution was deposited on Si substrate by spin-coating. The control of film thickness was performed by the deposition number that in this case was done five subsequent depositions to obtain an ideal thickness. Between each deposition the film was submitted to calcinations in order to eliminate organic matter. After that the film was submitted a heat treatment around 820 deg C / 5 minutes to obtain the expected superconducting phase and coupling and the grain growth. Film characterizations were made using optical microscopy, XRD and EDX, to check the dimensions and

  11. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  12. Print a Bed Bug Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sets of business card-sized lists of tips for prevention of bed bug infestations, one for general use around home, the other for travelers. Print a single card or a page of cards for distribution.

  13. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  14. Reviewing printed and electronic dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Dictionary reviewing is an integral part of the lexicographic universe. However, lexicographers have called for generally applicable principles embracing both printed and electronic dictionaries. I propose that scholarly reviews contain information that is useful to their intended audiences and a...

  15. Reviewing printed and electronic dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Dictionary reviewing is an integral part of the lexicographic universe. However, lexicographers have called for generally applicable principles embracing both printed and electronic dictionaries. I propose that scholarly reviews contain information that is useful to their intended audiences...

  16. 3D-Printed Millimeter Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    demonstrates the resolution of the printer with a 10 micron nozzle. Figure 2: Measured loss tangent of SEBS and SBS samples. 3D - Printed Millimeter... 3D printing of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) and styrene ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) is used to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D - printed ...Additionally, a dielectric lens is printed which improves the antenna gain of an open-ended WR-28 waveguide from 7 to 8.5 dBi. Keywords: 3D printing

  17. Nanoparticle Solutions for Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    PET film. Besides sensors and photovoltaic cells , other components which were printed included diodes (as the base system for solar cells and as...were tested by printing PEDOT:PSS and silicon nanoparticle inks on highly doped silicon wafers. Similarly photochemical cells were initially...structures. Both multilayer and planar, with interdigitated top or bottom contacts, architectures were investigated. In the former, attention had to be

  18. Occupational noise in printing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Grujic, Selena D; Kiurski, Jelena; Krstic, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Kovacevic, Ilija

    2011-10-01

    The extent of noise in five printing companies in Novi Sad, Serbia, was determined using TES-1358A Sound Analyzer with RS-232 Interface. The data on equivalent A-level (dBA), as well as, maximum and minimum sound pressure levels were collected. It was found that folders and offset printing units are the predominant noise sources, with the average L (eq) levels of 87.66 and 82.7 dBA, respectively. Forty percent of the machines produced noise levels above the limiting threshold level of 85 dBA, allowed by law. The noise in all printing companies was dominated by higher frequency noise, and the maximum level mostly appeared at 4,000 Hz. For offset printing machines and folders, the means of L (eq) levels exceeded the permissible levels given by NR-80 curve at higher frequencies. There are no published studies of occupational noise and hearing impairment of workers exposed to hazardous noise in printing industry in Serbia. More extensive studies are needed to determine the exact impact of noise on the workers. Technical and organizational measures in order to control noise and prevent noise exposure, and general hearing conservation program to protect workers, should be introduced in printing industry.

  19. Organ printing: promises and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

    2008-01-01

    Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications.

  20. Printed Notched Antenna with Long Meandered Line for Eight-Band LTE/GSM/UMTS Wireless USB Dongle Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Sun, S. C.; Ban, Y. L.; Tang, X. H.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a planar notched antenna with a long meandered line for wireless USB dongle applications. The printed notched structure is used as additional resonators to generate multiple bands operation for covering GSM1800/1900/UMTS2100/LTE2300/2500 bands. In addition, with the help of the long meandered line via hole to ground, a lower resonant mode is sufficiently generated at around 770 MHz and forms a wider lower operating bandwidth (LTE700/GSM850/900). Briefly printed on a 0.8 mm thick FR4 dielectric substrate of size 20×70 mm² and electrically connected (via hole) to the ground plane of the USB dongle, the proposed antenna can provide a wide operating bandwidth (3:1 VSWR) of larger than 120 % centered at 2,000 MHz, allowing it to cover 698-960 and 1,710-2,690 MHz bands. The proposed antenna also can be attached to laptop computer by the USB interface. Detailed design considerations of the proposed antenna are described, and obtained experimental and simulation results are also presented and discussed in this paper.

  1. Multicolor lasing prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Van Duong; Yang, Shancheng; Wang, Yue; Gao, Yuan; He, Tingchao; Chen, Rui; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Handong

    2015-11-01

    This work demonstrates mass production of printable multi-color lasing microarrays based on uniform hemispherical microcavities on a distributed Bragg reflector using inkjet technique. By embedding two different organic dyes into these prints, optically pumped whispering gallery mode microlasers with lasing wavelengths in green and red spectral ranges are realized. The spectral linewidth of the lasing modes is found as narrow as 0.11 nm. Interestingly, dual-color lasing emission in the ranges of 515-535 nm and 585-605 nm is simultaneously achieved by using two different dyes with certain ratios. Spectroscopic measurements elucidate the energy transfer process from the green dye (donor) to the red one (acceptor) with an energy transfer efficiency up to 80% in which the nonradiative Förster resonance energy transfer dominates. As such, the acceptor lasing in the presence of donor exhibits a significantly lower (˜2.5-fold) threshold compared with that of the pure acceptor lasing with the same concentration.

  2. 75 FR 41524 - Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, MA; Cranston Print Works Company...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, MA; Cranston Print Works Company, Corporate Offices, Cranston, RI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on February 6, 2009, applicable to workers of Cranston Print...

  3. WikiPrints: rendering enterprise Wiki content for printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkner, Kathrin

    2010-02-01

    Wikis have become a tool of choice for collaborative, informative communication. In contrast to the immense Wikipedia, that serves as a reference web site and typically covers only one topic per web page, enterprise wikis are often used as project management tools and contain several closely related pages authored by members of one project. In that scenario it is useful to print closely related content for review or teaching purposes. In this paper we propose a novel technique for rendering enterprise wiki content for printing called WikiPrints, that creates a linearized version of wiki content formatted as a mixture between web layout and conventional document layout suitable for printing. Compared to existing print options for wiki content, Wikiprints automatically selects content from different wiki pages given user preferences and usage scenarios. Meta data such as content authors or time of content editing are considered. A preview of the linearized content is shown to the user and an interface for making manual formatting changes provided.

  4. Integration of multimode waveguides and micromirror couplers in printed circuit boards using laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenberge, Geert; Geerinck, Peter; Van Put, Steven; Van Daele, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Integration of optical interconnections on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) is very challenging, as it should remain compatible with existing PCB manufacturing technology based on laminated FR4-substrates and making use of solder-reflow and well-known placement and assembly techniques. In this paper we will describe different technologies being used for integration of such optical interconnections in PCB's. As we will demonstrate, the use of laser ablation, already used in PCB manufacturing for microvia's, is a suitable technique for the fabrication of multimode waveguides and micromirrors to provide optical coupling. Laser ablation is a very flexible technology that is particularly well suited for structuring of polymers because of their excellent UV-absorption properties and highly non-thermal ablation behavior. One of the most critical problems on the integration of optical interconnections in PCB's is coupling the light in and out of the optical plane. Because in our set-up the excimer laser beam can be tilted, the 45 degrees micromirrors can be easily fabricated using laser ablation. The focus is on ablation of waveguides using a frequency tripled Nd-YAG laser and on ablation of 45 degrees facets using a KrF excimer laser. It is shown that these structures can be defined in one single processing step, resulting in a very accurate alignment.

  5. Numerical Design of Ultra-Wideband Printed Antenna for Surface Penetrating Radar Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Munir

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface penetrating radar (SPR is an imaging device of electromagnetic wave that works by emitting and transmitting a narrow period pulse through the antenna. Due to the use of narrow period pulse, according to the Fourier transform duality, therefore ultra-wideband (UWB antenna becomes one of the most important needs in SPR system. In this paper, a novel UWB printed antenna is proposed to be used for SPR application. Basically, the proposed antenna is developed from a rectangular microstrip antenna fed by symmetric T-shaped. Some investigation methods such as resistive loading, abrupt transition, and ground plane modification are attempted to achieve required characteristics of bandwidth, radiation efficiency, and compactness needed by the system. To obtain the optimum design, the characteristics of proposed antenna are numerically investigated through the physical parameters of antenna. It is shown that proposed antenna deployed on an FR-4 Epoxy substrate with permittivity of 4.3 and thickness of 1.6mm has a compact size of 72.8mm x 60.0mm and a large bandwidth of 50MHz-5GHz which is suitable for SPR application.

  6. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  7. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  8. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PRINT GLOSS OF METALIZED SHEETS PRINTED WITH SHEET FED OFFSET PRINTING PROCESS AND DRY TONER BASED DIGITAL PRINTING PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Mohit Kumar*, Aman Bhardwaj

    2016-01-01

    Printing metalized sheets with offset printing process requires it to be primer coated prior to the printing. This is complex, time consuming and incorporates some additional cost. Thus, it has not been known in view of the prior art to utilize digital printing methods to create sharp, high quality, complex, multi-color, foil-effect designs foil-covered surfaces at relatively high speed and low cost. it was observed that the sheets printed with Dry toner based  Digital printing process h...

  9. Print Finishing: From Manual to Automated Print Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Ward

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the demand for faster turnrounds and shorter print runs goes beyond making the printing press easier to set up and change. There is little point in producing plates and then sheets from a press if the post press area does not change to keep abreast of developments in prepress and the print room. The greatest impact is going to come from JDF, the end to end production data format which is finding wide spread acceptance in print areas. To date finishing equipment manufacturers are not as well represented within the CIP4 organisation as prepress and press vendors, but the major manufacturers are members. All are working to the goal of complete connectivity.The idea of JDF is that if the format of a print product like a magazine is known during the creation phases, the information can be used to preset machinery that is going to be used to produce it, so avoiding input errors and saving manufacturing time.A second aspect to JDF is that information about performance and progress is gathered and can be retrieved from a central point or made available to a customer. Production scheduling and costing becomes more accurate and customer relationships are deepened. However JDF to its fullest extent is not yet in use in connecting the finishing area to the rest of the printing plant. Around the world different companies are testing the idea of JDF to connect saddle stitchers, guillotines and binders with frantic work underway to be able to show results soon.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Planar Spring Based on FR4-PCB for Electrodynamics Vibration Energy Harvesting Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugandi, Gandi; Mambu, Grace A.; Mulyadi, Dadang; Mulyana, Edi

    2017-07-01

    Planar spring as a mechanical resonator is very important in designing an electrodynamic vibration energy harvesting application (EVEH) to generate output power with high efficiency. Generally, component of the mechanical resonator is a cantilever beam that is designed using one cantilever with an inertial mass placed cantilever tip. In this study, a planar spring which has four arms cantilever beam was designed and fabricated using an extra-thin FR4-PCB material with a total thickness of 130 µm. There are four types of planar spring that were designed and fabricated in this research to produce resonant frequencies at about 30, 40, 50 and 60 Hz with 1 mm width cantilever arm and various length of 13.5, 11.2, 9.8 and 8.7 mm, respectively. FR4 resonator is fabricated using technology LASER-cutting in order to obtain results precisely. The resonant frequency generated by the mechanical resonator is characterized using vibrator system with certain acceleration. The resonant frequency of the planar spring was obtained at a frequency where the maximum induced voltage occurs. The resonant frequency generated by each type of planar spring was obtained at 24.81, 34.24, 40.2, and 46.8 Hz with three conditions of acceleration of 0.02, 0.06, and 0,1g (g=9.8 m/s2).

  11. Balkan Print Forum – Dynamic Balkan Print Media Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossitza Velkova

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Founded in October 2006, the Balkan Print Forum is gradually becoming an important regional institution. Its main targets are to share experiences and know-how,to initiate and intensify contacts and to support joint projects in the Balkan region.Since drupa 2008 there are 11 member countries of the Balkan Print Forum:Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Hungary, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia and Turkey. Partners of BPF are some companies and universities from Russia and Ukraine.

  12. 3D Printing: Print the future of ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiulan

    2014-08-26

    The three-dimensional (3D) printer is a new technology that creates physical objects from digital files. Recent technological advances in 3D printing have resulted in increased use of this technology in the medical field, where it is beginning to revolutionize medical and surgical possibilities. It is already providing medicine with powerful tools that facilitate education, surgical planning, and organ transplantation research. A good understanding of this technology will be beneficial to ophthalmologists. The potential applications of 3D printing in ophthalmology, both current and future, are explored in this article. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  13. Case study on printed matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Introduction Existing product Life Cycle Assessments (LCA’s) on offset printed matter all point at paper as the overall dominating contributor to the impacts from the life-cycle of this category of products. This dominating role of paper is primarily founded in the energy-related impact categories...... of potential environmental impacts and consumption of resources along the life cycle of a generic printed matter produced on a model sheet feed offset printing industry in Europe. Main activities at all stages in the life cycle are covered. However special focus is on the production stage but upstream...... scope for the production stage 1990 – 2002 is chosen and as technological scope mainly modern technology (not state-of-the-art) used at least in Northern Europe is used. Marginal approaches are used for production of electricity (natural gas) and paper production (virgin fibres) as the main approach i...

  14. All-printed paper memory

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2016-08-11

    All-printed paper-based substrate memory devices are described. In an embodiment, a paper-based memory device is prepared by coating one or more areas of a paper substrate with a conductor material such as a carbon paste, to form a first electrode of a memory, depositing a layer of insulator material, such as titanium dioxide, over one or more areas of the conductor material, and depositing a layer of metal over one or more areas of the insulator material to form a second electrode of the memory. In an embodiment, the device can further include diodes printed between the insulator material and the second electrode, and the first electrode and the second electrodes can be formed as a crossbar structure to provide a WORM memory. The various layers and the diodes can be printed onto the paper substrate by, for example, an ink jet printer.

  15. Nanoparticle composites for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männl, U.; van den Berg, C.; Magunje, B.; Härting, M.; Britton, D. T.; Jones, S.; van Staden, M. J.; Scriba, M. R.

    2014-03-01

    Printed Electronics is a rapidly developing sector in the electronics industry, in which nanostructured materials are playing an increasingly important role. In particular, inks containing dispersions of semiconducting nanoparticles, can form nanocomposite materials with unique electronic properties when cured. In this study we have extended on our previous studies of functional nanoparticle electronic inks, with the development of a solvent-based silicon ink for printed electronics which is compatible with existing silver inks, and with the investigation of other metal nanoparticle based inks. It is shown that both solvent-based and water-based inks can be used for both silver conductors and semiconducting silicon, and that qualitatively there is no difference in the electronic properties of the materials printed with a soluble polymer binder to when an acrylic binder is used.

  16. Green printing and ecology. Sustainability in the printing industry; Green Printing and Oekologie. Nachhaltigkeit in der Druckindustrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherhag, Michael (comp.)

    2011-07-01

    Green Printing and ecologically based management now are current issues. Efforts are being done in order to conserve resources and to give benefits the environment and the company. The booklet under consideration presents a variety of companies, associations and manufacturers that support the way to the green printing and that already have realized the green printing.

  17. Exploration of 3D Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Zeyu

    2014-01-01

    3D printing technology is introduced and defined in this Thesis. Some methods of 3D printing are illustrated and their principles are explained with pictures. Most of the essential parts are presented with pictures and their effects are explained within the whole system. Problems on Up! Plus 3D printer are solved and a DIY product is made with this machine. The processes of making product are recorded and the items which need to be noticed during the process are the highlight in this th...

  18. 3D holographic printer: fast printing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexander V; Putilin, Andrey N; Kopenkin, Sergey S; Borodin, Yuriy P; Druzhin, Vladislav V; Dubynin, Sergey E; Dubinin, German B

    2014-02-10

    This article describes the general operation principles of devices for synthesized holographic images such as holographic printers. Special emphasis is placed on the printing speed. In addition, various methods to increase the printing process are described and compared.

  19. Bone tissue engineering using 3D printing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bose, Susmita; Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2013-01-01

    .... Among the different technology options, three dimensional printing (3DP) is becoming popular due to the ability to directly print porous scaffolds with designed shape, controlled chemistry and interconnected porosity...

  20. Transfer printing of DNA by "click" chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozkiewicz, D.I.; Gierlich, Johannes; Burley, Glenn A.; Gutschmiedl, Katrin; Carell, Thomas; Ravoo, B.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a straightforward procedure to immobilize oligonucleotides on glass substrates in well-defined micropatterns by microcontact printing with a dendrimer-modified stamp. The oligonucleotides are efficiently immobilized by click chemistry induced by microcontact printing.

  1. Intrinsic defects in 3D printed materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Christopher; Dagastine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the impact of bulk structural defects on the coherence, phase and polarisation of light passing through transparent 3D printed materials fabricated using a variety of commercial print technologies.

  2. 3D Printing Electrically Small Spherical Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2013-01-01

    3D printing is applied for rapid prototyping of an electrically small spherical wire antenna. The model is first printed in plastic and subsequently covered with several layers of conductive paint. Measured results are in good agreement with simulations.......3D printing is applied for rapid prototyping of an electrically small spherical wire antenna. The model is first printed in plastic and subsequently covered with several layers of conductive paint. Measured results are in good agreement with simulations....

  3. Digital Printing: Beyond the Image Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Rundle, Jamie Martin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The printing industry has experienced cyclical change throughout its history. Since the advent of early hand-operated printing presses to the introduction of mechanical, high-volume technology the industry has evolved, for the most part, incrementally. Printing firms have capitalised on developments with various degrees of success. The industry currently faces a radical shift with the advent of digital printing technology. When digital was introduced in 1993, predictions th...

  4. 3D Printing Electrically Small Spherical Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2013-01-01

    3D printing is applied for rapid prototyping of an electrically small spherical wire antenna. The model is first printed in plastic and subsequently covered with several layers of conductive paint. Measured results are in good agreement with simulations.......3D printing is applied for rapid prototyping of an electrically small spherical wire antenna. The model is first printed in plastic and subsequently covered with several layers of conductive paint. Measured results are in good agreement with simulations....

  5. The ceremony for promulgation of China Print Awards was held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The first China Print Awards, spon- sored by Printing and Printing Equipment Industries Association of China, The Hong Kong Printers Association, Taiwan Print- ing & Machinery, Material Industry Asso- ciation and Macao Printing Association, started since March 2006.The ceremony for promulgation of China Print Awards was held on 29th August,

  6. Image analysis of Renaissance copperplate prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, S. Blair

    2008-02-01

    From the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, prints were a common form of visual communication, analogous to photographs. Copperplate prints have many finely engraved black lines which were used to create the illusion of continuous tone. Line densities generally are 100-2000 lines per square centimeter and a print can contain more than a million total engraved lines 20-300 micrometers in width. Because hundreds to thousands of prints were made from a single copperplate over decades, variation among prints can have historical value. The largest variation is plate-related, which is the thinning of lines over successive editions as a result of plate polishing to remove time-accumulated corrosion. Thinning can be quantified with image analysis and used to date undated prints and books containing prints. Print-related variation, such as over-inking of the print, is a smaller but significant source. Image-related variation can introduce bias if images were differentially illuminated or not in focus, but improved imaging technology can limit this variation. The Print Index, the percentage of an area composed of lines, is proposed as a primary measure of variation. Statistical methods also are proposed for comparing and identifying prints in the context of a print database.

  7. Corporate Web Sites in Traditional Print Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardun, Carol J.; Lamb, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Web presence in print advertisements to determine how marketers are creating bridges between traditional advertising and the Internet. Content analysis showed Web addresses in print ads; categories of advertisers most likely to link print ads with Web sites; and whether the Web site attempts to develop a database of potential…

  8. 3D Printing for Bricks

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2015-01-01

    Building Bytes, by Brian Peters, is a project that uses desktop 3D printers to print bricks for architecture. Instead of using an expensive custom-made printer, it uses a normal standard 3D printer which is available for everyone and makes it more accessible and also easier for fabrication.

  9. Printing Silver Nanogrids on Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Wesley C.; Valcarce, Ron; Iles, Peter; Smith, James S.; Glass, Gabe; Gomez, Jesus; Johnson, Glen; Johnston, Dan; Morham, Maclaine; Befus, Elliot; Oz, Aimee; Tomaraei, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript describes a laboratory experiment that provides students with an opportunity to create conductive silver nanogrids using polymeric templates. A microcontact-printed polyvinylpyrrolidone grid directs the citrate-induced reduction of silver ions for the fabrication of silver nanogrids on glass substrates. In addition to…

  10. Printing in ubiquitous computing environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karapantelakis, Athanasios; Delvic, Alisa; Zarifi Eslami, Mohammad; Khamit, Saltanat

    2009-01-01

    Document printing has long been considered an indispensable part of the workspace. While this process is considered trivial and simple for environments where resources are ample (e.g. desktop computers connected to printers within a corporate network), it becomes complicated when applied in a mobile

  11. Printing Values In Interactive ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Perovic, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This project report summarizes the work I have been performing during the past twelve weeks as a Summer Student intern working on ROOT project in the SFT group, PH department, under the supervision of Axel Naumann and Danilo Piparo. One of the widely requested features for ROOT was improved interactive shell experience as well as improved printing of object values. Solving this issue was the goal of this project. Primarily, we have enabled printing of the collections. Secondly, we have unified the printing interface, making it much more robust and extendible. Thirdly, we have implemented printing of nested collections in a flexible and user-friendly manner. Finally, we have added an interactive mode, allowing for paginated output. At the beginning of the report, ROOT is presented with examples of where it is used and how important it is. Then, the motivation behind the project is elaborated, by presenting the previous state of the software package and its potential for improvement. Further, the process in wh...

  12. All-printed paper memory

    KAUST Repository

    Lien, Derhsien

    2014-08-26

    We report the memory device on paper by means of an all-printing approach. Using a sequence of inkjet and screen-printing techniques, a simple metal-insulator-metal device structure is fabricated on paper as a resistive random access memory with a potential to reach gigabyte capacities on an A4 paper. The printed-paper-based memory devices (PPMDs) exhibit reproducible switching endurance, reliable retention, tunable memory window, and the capability to operate under extreme bending conditions. In addition, the PBMD can be labeled on electronics or living objects for multifunctional, wearable, on-skin, and biocompatible applications. The disposability and the high-security data storage of the paper-based memory are also demonstrated to show the ease of data handling, which are not achievable for regular silicon-based electronic devices. We envision that the PPMDs manufactured by this cost-effective and time-efficient all-printing approach would be a key electronic component to fully activate a paper-based circuit and can be directly implemented in medical biosensors, multifunctional devices, and self-powered systems. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  13. The Power of the Print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The print has a long-standing tradition of carrying a political message. This can be seen in the works of artists from the German Expressionists, like Kathe Kollwitz and Emil Nolde, to Mexican printmakers like Jose Posada and Leopoldo Mendez. Whether it was during the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the War in Iraq, or the 2008 presidential election,…

  14. Catalytic microcontact printing without ink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Péter, M.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David

    2003-01-01

    A novel microcontact printing technique is described that does not require ink. Patterns were created by direct contact of oxidized PDMS stamps with silyl ether-derivatized, acid-labile SAMs on gold. The surface of the stamps was oxidized by oxygen plasma to give a layer of silicon oxide. These

  15. 3D Printing of Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential benefits that could be derived if the science and technology of 3D printing were to be established have been the crux behind monumental efforts by governments, in most countries, that invest billions of dollars to develop this manufacturing technology.[...

  16. Latin American Folk Art Prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navah, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Latin American customs and colors play an important role as second graders are introduced to multicultural experiences through food, music, dance, art, and craft. In this article, the author describes a printing project inspired by Guatemalan weavings and amate bark paintings. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  17. Negative printing by soft lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason Kee Yang; Moore, David; Kane, Jennifer; Saraf, Ravi F

    2014-08-27

    In inkless microcontact printing (IμCP) by soft lithography, the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp transfers uncured polymer to a substrate corresponding to its pattern. The spontaneous diffusion of PDMS oligomers to the surface of the stamp that gives rise to this deleterious side effect has been leveraged to fabricate a variety of devices, such as organic thin film transistors, single-electron devices, and biomolecular chips. Here we report an anomalous observation on a partially cured PDMS stamp where the transfer of oligomers onto Au occurred on regions that were not in contact with the stamp, while the surface in contact with the stamp was pristine with no polymer. On the SiO2 surface of the same chip, as expected, the transfer of PDMS occurred exclusively on regions in contact with the stamp. The printing on Au was quantified by a novel method where the submonolayer of PDMS transfer was measured by probing the local electrochemical passivation of the Au. The local transfer of polymer on SiO2 (and also Au) was measured by selective deposition of Au nanoparticle necklaces that exclusively deposited on PDMS at submonolayer sensitivity. It was discovered that the selectivity and sharpness of PDMS deposition on Au for inkless printing (i.e., negative) is significantly better than the traditional (positive) microcontact printing where the stamp is "inked" with low molecular weight PDMS.

  18. Heterogeneous catalysis through microcontact printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruell, Jason M.; Sheriff, Bonnie A.; Rozkiewicz, D.I.; Dichtel, William R.; Rohde, Rosemary D.; Reinhoudt, David; Stoddart, Fraser; Heath, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Minting a Stamp: The preparation of copper metal-coated elastomeric stamps and their use in catalyzing the Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction heterogeneously through microcontact printing is described. This StampCat process is compared to other conventional surface-functionalization te

  19. Microcontact printing: limitations and achievements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perl, A.; Reinhoudt, David; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2009-01-01

    Microcontact printing (µCP) offers a simple and low-cost surface patterning methodology with high versatility and sub-micrometer accuracy. The process has undergone a spectacular evolution since its invention, improving its capability to form sub-100 nm SAM patterns of various polar and apolar

  20. Latin American Folk Art Prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navah, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Latin American customs and colors play an important role as second graders are introduced to multicultural experiences through food, music, dance, art, and craft. In this article, the author describes a printing project inspired by Guatemalan weavings and amate bark paintings. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  1. Organic materials for printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, M; Nilsson, D; Robinson, N D

    2007-01-01

    Organic materials can offer a low-cost alternative for printed electronics and flexible displays. However, research in these systems must exploit the differences - via molecular-level control of functionality - compared with inorganic electronics if they are to become commercially viable.

  2. 3D printing PLGA: a quantitative examination of the effects of polymer composition and printing parameters on print resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Holzberg, Timothy R; Lim, Casey G; Gao, Feng; Gargava, Ankit; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2017-04-12

    In the past few decades, 3D printing has played a significant role in fabricating scaffolds with consistent, complex structure that meet patient-specific needs in future clinical applications. Although many studies have contributed to this emerging field of additive manufacturing, which includes material development and computer-aided scaffold design, current quantitative analyses do not correlate material properties, printing parameters, and printing outcomes to a great extent. A model that correlates these properties has tremendous potential to standardize 3D printing for tissue engineering and biomaterial science. In this study, we printed poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) utilizing a direct melt extrusion technique without additional ingredients. We investigated PLGA with various lactic acid:glycolic acid (LA:GA) molecular weight ratios and end caps to demonstrate the dependence of the extrusion process on the polymer composition. Micro-computed tomography was then used to evaluate printed scaffolds containing different LA:GA ratios, composed of different fiber patterns, and processed under different printing conditions. We built a statistical model to reveal the correlation and predominant factors that determine printing precision. Our model showed a strong linear relationship between the actual and predicted precision under different combinations of printing conditions and material compositions. This quantitative examination establishes a significant foreground to 3D print biomaterials following a systematic fabrication procedure. Additionally, our proposed statistical models can be applied to couple specific biomaterials and 3D printing applications for patient implants with particular requirements.

  3. The Development of Printing Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Printing products are one kind of information carder.Printing can be seen as a service,serving almost all fields from politics, economy,military,science & technology,culture and education,news & publication,to daily life of the people.Every one of the people needs the services of printing.In China,with the development of market economy,printing has become increasingly important and more dependent to the economy.It is proper to say,the printing industry is growing simultaneously with the economy. So firstly I introduce some data about China’s economy.

  4. Optimization of printing techniques for electrochemical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Ahmad Anwar; Mansor, Ahmad Fairuzabadi Mohd; Rahim, Rosminazuin Ab; Nordin, Anis Nurashikin

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical biosensors show great promise for point-of-care applications due to their low cost, portability and compatibility with microfluidics. The miniature size of these sensors provides advantages in terms of sensitivity, specificity and allows them to be mass produced in arrays. The most reliable fabrication technique for these sensors is lithography followed by metal deposition using sputtering or chemical vapor deposition techniques. This technique which is usually done in the cleanroom requires expensive masking followed by deposition. Recently, cheaper printing techniques such as screen-printing and ink-jet printing have become popular due to its low cost, ease of fabrication and mask-less method. In this paper, two different printing techniques namely inkjet and screen printing are demonstrated for an electrochemical biosensor. For ink-jet printing technique, optimization of key printing parameters, such as pulse voltages, drop spacing and waveform setting, in-house temperature and cure annealing for obtaining the high quality droplets, are discussed. These factors are compared with screen-printing parameters such as mesh size, emulsion thickness, minimum spacing of lines and curing times. The reliability and reproducibility of the sensors are evaluated using scotch tape test, resistivity and profile-meter measurements. It was found that inkjet printing is superior because it is mask-less, has minimum resolution of 100 µm compared to 200 µm for screen printing and higher reproducibility rate of 90% compared to 78% for screen printing.

  5. Multifrequency Printed Antennas Loaded with Metamaterial Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Segovia-Vargas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of printed antennas loaded with metamaterial particles. This novel technique allows developing printed antennas with interesting features such as multifrequency (simultaneous operation over two or more frequency bands and multifunctionality (e. g. radiation pattern diversity. Moreover, compactness is also achieved and the main advantages of conventional printed antennas (light weight, low profile, low cost ... are maintained. Different types of metamaterial-loaded printed antennas are reviewed: printed dipoles and patch antennas. Several prototypes are designed, manufactured and measured showing good results. Furthermore, simple but accurate equivalent models are proposed. These models allow an easy and quick design of metamaterial-loaded printed antennas. Finally, two interesting applications based on the proposed antennas are reviewed: the patch antennas are used as radiating elements of emerging active RFID systems in the microwave band and the metamaterial-loaded printed dipoles are employed to increase the performance of log-periodic arrays.

  6. Customizing digital printing for fine art practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraman, Carinna E.; Thirkell, Paul; Hoskins, Steve; Wang, Hong Qiang; Laidler, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The presentation will demonstrate how through alternative methods of digital print production the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) is developing methodologies for digital printing that attempt to move beyond standard reproductive print methods. Profiling is used for input and output hardware, along with bespoke profiling for fine art printmaking papers. Examples of artist's work, and examples from the Perpetual Portfolio are included - an artist in residence scheme for selected artists wanting to work at the Centre and to make a large-format digital print. Colour is an important issue: colour fidelity, colour density on paper, colour that can be achieved through multiple-pass printing. Research is also underway to test colour shortfalls in the current inkjet ink range, and to extend colour through the use of traditional printing inks.

  7. SOFTWARE FOR SPECTRAL ANALYSIS RIZOGRAF PRINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sulim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to develop a model rizograficheskoy based printing functions package IPT and automated profile selection rizograficheskoy printing. Work risograph for halftone printing consists of two stages – production of screen form (master film and printing. The master film is supplied and installed in the printing machine in the form of rolls of different sizes, depending on the print size and model of the device. The capacity of the roll is measured in squares – segments of the printing material. Master-film for risograph consists of three layers: a solid but porous layer such as a paper web neprokleennogo and without fillers; an adhesive layer bonding the paper web to the upper layer; upper, thin polymer layer.

  8. Millimeter Wave Antenna with Mounted Horn Integrated on FR4 for 60 GHz Gbps Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Tariq Sethi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact high gain and wideband millimeter wave (MMW antenna for 60 GHz communication systems is presented. The proposed antenna consists of a multilayer structure with an aperture coupled microstrip patch and a surface mounted horn integrated on FR4 substrate. The proposed antenna contributes impedance bandwidth of 8.3% (57.4–62.4 GHz. The overall antenna gain and directivity are about 11.65 dBi and 12.51 dBi, which make it suitable for MMW applications and short-range communications. The proposed antenna occupies an area of 7.14 mm × 7.14 mm × 4 mm. The estimated efficiency is 82%. The proposed antenna finds application in V-band communication systems.

  9. High Gain Rectangular Microstrip Patch Antenna Employing FR4 Substrate for Wi-MAX, LMDS and MMDS Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an antenna for WiMAX, LMDS and MMDS system applications. FR4 material has been used as substrate having dielectric constant of 4.4. The Patch, Ground and feedline are made of copper. The proposed antenna is rectangular in shape which resonate at 3.42 GHz with a bandwidth of 45MHz (3.40GHz- 3.44GHz and corresponding return loss of -32.39 dB. The performance of the antenna has been analyzed in terms of return loss (dB, gain (dB, directivity (dBi, VSWR and impedance (ohms. The proposed antenna has directivity and gain of 7.2 dBi and 7.28 dB respectively

  10. Mod silver metallization: Screen printing and ink-jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, R. W.; Vest, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Basic material efforts have proven to be very successful. Adherent and conductive films were achieved. A silver neodecanoate/bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate mixture has given the best results in both single and double layer applications. Another effort is continuing to examine the feasibility of applying metallo-organic deposition films by use of an ink jet printer. Direct line writing would result in a saving of process time and materials. So far, some well defined lines have been printed.

  11. Inkjet printing for pharmaceutical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D. Boehm

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Miconazole is an imidazole used for treatment of fungal infections that exhibits poor solubility in polar solvents (e.g., aqueous solutions. Microneedles, small-scale lancet-shaped devices that are commonly used for delivery of pharmacologic agents and vaccines, were made out of an acid anhydride copolymer using visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography/micromolding and loaded with miconazole using a piezoelectric inkjet printer. The miconazole-coated microneedles showed biodegradation and antifungal activity against the organism Candida albicans (ATCC 90028 on Sabouraud dextrose agar using an in vitro agar plating method. The results of this study demonstrate that piezoelectric inkjet printing may be used load microneedles and other drug delivery devices with pharmacologic agents. Miconazole-loaded microneedles prepared by the visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography–micromolding–piezoelectric inkjet printing approach have potential use in transdermal treatment of cutaneous fungal infections.

  12. 3D Printing an Octohedron

    OpenAIRE

    Aboufadel, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this short paper is to describe a project to manufacture a regular octohedron on a 3D printer. We assume that the reader is familiar with the basics of 3D printing. In the project, we use fundamental ideas to calculate the vertices and faces of an octohedron. Then, we utilize the OPENSCAD program to create a virtual 3D model and an STereoLithography (.stl) file that can be used by a 3D printer.

  13. Inkjet printed wireless smart bandage

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2016-12-19

    Chronic wounds affect millions of patients around the world and requires a major portion of health care budget for treatment. In this article, we present an unprecedented low cost continuous wireless monitoring system, realized through inkjet printing on a standard bandage strip, which can send early warnings as well as record long term wound progression data. The smart bandage can communicate upto a distance of 60 m when worn on the body.

  14. Microcontact Printing Techniques in Bioscience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xi-zeng; HOU Sun; CHAN Qi-lin; WANG Li-kai; QIN Ming; HAN Pei-dong

    2004-01-01

    The microcontact printing(μCP) technology available for patterning protein, DNA hybridization, immunoassay and cellular cocultures onto solid surface are reviewed. This review describes some of the techniques currently employed for creating two-dimensional biomolecular microarray, and the research results regarding their effectiveness. In addition, the applications of the impact of μCP technology in the field of biosciences are also presented.

  15. The connecting link! Lip prints and fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Negi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lip prints and fingerprints are considered to be unique to each individual. The study of fingerprints and lip prints is very popular in personal identification of the deceased and in criminal investigations. Aims: This study was done to find the predominant lip and fingerprint patterns in males and females in the North Indian population and also to find any correlation between lip print and fingerprint patterns within a gender. Materials and Methods: Two hundred students (100 males, 100 females were included in the study. Lip prints were recorded for each individual using a dark-colored lipstick and the right thumb impression was recorded using an ink pad. The lip prints and fingerprints were analyzed using a magnifying glass. The Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The branched pattern in males and the vertical pattern in females were the predominant lip print patterns. The predominant fingerprint pattern in both males and females was found to be the loop pattern, followed by the whorl pattern and then the arch pattern. No statistically significant correlation was found between lip prints and fingeprints. However, the arch type of fingerprint was found to be associated with different lip print patterns in males and females. Conclusion: Lip prints and fingerprints can be used for personal identification in a forensic scenario. Further correlative studies between lip prints and fingerprints could be useful in forensic science for gender identification.

  16. Biosurface engineering through ink jet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Fon, Deniece; Li, Xu; Tian, Junfei; Forsythe, John; Garnier, Gil; Shen, Wei

    2010-02-01

    The feasibility of thermal ink jet printing as a robust process for biosurface engineering was demonstrated. The strategy investigated was to reconstruct a commercial printer and take advantage of its colour management interface. High printing resolution was achieved by formulating bio-inks of viscosity and surface tension similar to those of commercial inks. Protein and enzyme denaturation during thermal ink jet printing was shown to be insignificant. This is because the time spent by the biomolecules in the heating zone of the printer is negligible; in addition, the air and substrate of high heat capacity absorb any residual heat from the droplet. Gradients of trophic/tropic factors can serve as driving force for cell growth or migration for tissue regeneration. Concentration gradients of proteins were printed on scaffolds to show the capability of ink jet printing. The printed proteins did not desorb upon prolonged immersion in aqueous solutions, thus allowing printed scaffold to be used under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Our group portrait was ink jet printed with a protein on paper, illustrating that complex biopatterns can be printed on large area. Finally, patterns of enzymes were ink jet printed within the detection and reaction zones of a paper diagnostic.

  17. Printed interconnects for photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, J. D.; Pach, G.; Horowitz, K. A. W.; Stockert, T. R.; Woodhouse, M.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Film-based photovoltaic modules employ monolithic interconnects to minimize resistance loss and enhance module voltage via series connection. Conventional interconnect construction occurs sequentially, with a scribing step following deposition of the bottom electrode, a second scribe after deposition of absorber and intermediate layers, and a third following deposition of the top electrode. This method produces interconnect widths of about 300 um, and the area comprised by interconnects within a module (generally about 3%) does not contribute to power generation. The present work reports on an increasingly popular strategy capable of reducing the interconnect width to less than 100 um: printing interconnects. Cost modeling projects a savings of about $0.02/watt for CdTe module production through the use of printed interconnects, with savings coming from both reduced capital expense and increased module power output. Printed interconnect demonstrations with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide and cadmium-telluride solar cells show successful voltage addition and miniaturization down to 250 um. Material selection guidelines and considerations for commercialization are discussed.

  18. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  19. 3D printed bionic ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  20. Impact Of Screen Ruling on the Formation of the Printing Elements on the Flexographic Printing Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Tomašegović

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Flexography is a printing technique widely used in the packaging production. The main feature of the flexography is the usage of the printing plate which is elastically deformed during the reproduction process. The printing plate is made of elastic material, rubber or nowadays mainly of different types of photopolymer. Elasticity of the plate enables printing on a wide range of printing substrates (papers, foils, board, magazines, hygienic papers etc., which is one of its advantages compared to other printing techniques. On the other hand, deformations of the printing plate in the printing process caused by the pressure between the printing plate and substrate present major limitation of the flexography. Beside functional properties of the printing plate in the printing process, the plate making process including photopolymerization highly influences the value of the halftones on the printing plate, and consequently on the final product.  The aim of this paper is to examine the influence of the screen ruling on the formation of the printing elements and the procedure of the printing plate making process adjustment in order to achieve optimal quality of the printing plate and, therefore, the final product. Results have shown that the usage of different screen ruling is of great significance in processes of printing plate curve adjustment. It was proven that the usage of different screen ruling highly influences the relief depth and a cross-section of the printing elements (3D analysis, which have a significant impact on the final product quality, but cannot be detected in 2D analysis.

  1. Impact Of Screen Ruling on the Formation of the Printing Elements on the Flexographic Printing Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Tomašegović

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Flexography is a printing technique widely used in the packaging production. The main feature of the flexography is the usage of the printing plate which is elastically deformed during the reproduction process. The printing plate is made of elastic material, rubber or nowadays mainly of different types of photopolymer. Elasticity of the plate enables printing on a wide range of printing substrates (papers, foils, board, magazines, hygienic papers etc., which is one of its advantages compared to other printing techniques. On the other hand, deformations of the printing plate in the printing process caused by the pressure between the printing plate and substrate present major limitation of the flexography. Beside functional properties of the printing plate in the printing process, the plate making process including photopolymerization highly influences the value of the halftones on the printing plate, and consequently on the final product. The aim of this paper is to examine the influence of the screen ruling on the formation of the printing elements and the procedure of the printing plate making process adjustment in order to achieve optimal quality of the printing plate and, therefore, the final product.Results have shown that the usage of different screen ruling is of great significance in processes of printing plate curve adjustment. It was proven that the usage of different screen ruling highly influences the relief depth and a cross-section of the printing elements (3D analysis, which have a significant impact on the final product quality, but cannot be detected in 2D analysis.

  2. New Approaches for Printed Electronics Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ankit

    In printed electronics, electronic inks are patterned onto flexible substrates using roll-to-roll (R2R) compatible graphic printing methods. For applications where large-area, conformal electronics are necessary, printed electronics holds a competitive advantage over rigid, semiconductor circuitry, which does not scale efficiently to large areas. However, in order to fully realize the true potential of printed electronics, several manufacturing hurdles need to be overcome. Firstly, minimum feature sizes produced by graphic printing methods are typically greater than 25 microm, which is at least an order of magnitude higher for dense, high performing electronics. In this thesis, conductive features down to 1.5 microm are demonstrated using a novel inkjet printing-based process. Secondly, high-resolution printed conductors usually have poor current-carrying capacity, especially for longer wires in large-area applications. This thesis explores the fundamentals of aerosol-jet printing and reveals the regime for printing high-resolution lines with excellent current carrying capacity. Additionally, a novel manufacturing process is demonstrated, which can process 2.5 microm wide conductive wires with linear resistances as small as 5 O mm -1. Another challenge for printed electronics manufacturing is to deal with topography produced on the substrate surface by printed features. Besides complicating the subsequent use of contact-printing methods, surface topography is a source of poor device yields as well. This thesis describes two novel methodologies of creating topography-free printed surfaces. In the first method, nanometer-level smooth, planarized silver lines are obtained using a transfer printing approach. In the second method, open microchannels, imprinted in plastic substrates, are filled with a controlled amount of metal using liquid-based additive processes, to obtain conductive wires flush with the substrate surface. Finally, this thesis addresses the issue of

  3. Aerosol printed carbon nanotube strain sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bradley; Yoon, Hwan-Sik

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, printed electronics have received attention as a method to produce low-cost macro electronics on flexible substrates. In this regard, inkjet and aerosol printing have been the primary printing methods for producing passive electrical components, transistors, and a number of sensors. In this research, a custom aerosol printer was utilized to create a strain sensor capable of measuring static and dynamic strain. The proposed sensor was created by aerosol printing a multiwall carbon nanotube solution onto an aluminum beam covered with an insulating layer. After printing the carbon nanotube-based sensor, the sensor was tested under quasi-static and vibration strain conditions, and the results are presented. The results show that the printed sensor could potentially serve as an effective method for measuring dynamic strain of structural components.

  4. Plasma jet printing for flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Singh, Eric; Diaz-Cartagena, Diana C.; Nordlund, Dennis; Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in flexible electronics and wearable devices has created a demand for fast and highly repeatable printing processes suitable for device manufacturing. Robust printing technology is critical for the integration of sensors and other devices on flexible substrates such as paper and textile. An atmospheric pressure plasma-based printing process has been developed to deposit different types of nanomaterials on flexible substrates. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were deposited on paper to demonstrate site-selective deposition as well as direct printing without any type of patterning. Plasma-printed nanotubes were compared with non-plasma-printed samples under similar gas flow and other experimental conditions and found to be denser with higher conductivity. The utility of the nanotubes on the paper substrate as a biosensor and chemical sensor was demonstrated by the detection of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and ammonia, respectively.

  5. High speed printing with polygon scan heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    To reduce and in many cases eliminate the costs associated with high volume printing of consumer and industrial products, this paper investigates and validates the use of the new generation of high speed pulse on demand (POD) lasers in concert with high speed (HS) polygon scan heads (PSH). Associated costs include consumables such as printing ink and nozzles, provisioning labor, maintenance and repair expense as well as reduction of printing lines due to high through put. Targets that are applicable and investigated include direct printing on plastics, printing on paper/cardboard as well as printing on labels. Market segments would include consumer products (CPG), medical and pharmaceutical products, universal ID (UID), and industrial products. In regards to the POD lasers employed, the wavelengths include UV(355nm), Green (532nm) and IR (1064nm) operating within the repetition range of 180 to 250 KHz.

  6. Study of lip prints: A forensic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although several studies have been done on lip prints for human identification in forensic science, there is a doubt about their use in gender determination. Aims: The present study was designed to study the lip groove patterns in all the quadrants of both male and female subjects to identify the sex, based on the patterns of the grooves of the lip prints. Study Design: 300 lip prints were collected from volunteers of D. J. College of Dental Sciences and Research, Modinagar (UP. Materials and Methods: Lip prints were recorded with lip stick and transferred on to a glass slide. Statistical Analysis: Pearson chi-square test was adopted for statistical analysis and probability value (P value was calculated. Conclusion: In our study, none of the lip prints were identical, thus confirming the role of lip prints in individual identification. According to Suzuki′s classification, Type I, II, III and IV patterns were significant in gender determination.

  7. Plasma jet printing for flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Singh, Eric; Diaz-Cartagena, Diana C.; Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M. [Center for Nanotechnology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Recent interest in flexible electronics and wearable devices has created a demand for fast and highly repeatable printing processes suitable for device manufacturing. Robust printing technology is critical for the integration of sensors and other devices on flexible substrates such as paper and textile. An atmospheric pressure plasma-based printing process has been developed to deposit different types of nanomaterials on flexible substrates. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were deposited on paper to demonstrate site-selective deposition as well as direct printing without any type of patterning. Plasma-printed nanotubes were compared with non-plasma-printed samples under similar gas flow and other experimental conditions and found to be denser with higher conductivity. The utility of the nanotubes on the paper substrate as a biosensor and chemical sensor was demonstrated by the detection of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and ammonia, respectively.

  8. On the degumming prints and out-of-print Taose woodcut symbol study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周凤鸣

    2012-01-01

      This article by carding the association between print chromatic woodcut printmaking language and unglued printmaking language to analyze the infuluence of Printmaking language to the development of the Print-making ,present contemporary print development free and bound of comparison.Not be copied out of print chro-matic the woodcut and unglued prints the breaking down of traditional printmaking understanding that it is the most important replication and expression in the form of more free, more rich texture. Print chromatic woodcut unglued in the form of ruined version, will make of the creative process reflect the strangeness of the ruined ver-sion, can be another way to understand the prints to try to figure out the prints.

  9. Impact Of Screen Ruling on the Formation of the Printing Elements on the Flexographic Printing Plate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamara Tomašegović; Sanja Mahović Poljaček; Tomislav Cigula

    2012-01-01

    Flexography is a printing technique widely used in the packaging production. The main feature of the flexography is the usage of the printing plate which is elastically deformed during the reproduction process...

  10. Impact Of Screen Ruling on the Formation of the Printing Elements on the Flexographic Printing Plate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamara Tomašegović; Sanja Mahović Poljaček; Tomislav Cigula

    2013-01-01

    Flexography is a printing technique widely used in the packaging production. The main feature of the flexography is the usage of the printing plate which is elastically deformed during the reproduction process...

  11. Wideband vibrational electromagnetic energy harvesters with nonlinear polyimide springs based on rigid-flex printed circuit boards technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi; Hong, Hao-Chiao; Hsu, Wei-Hung

    2016-12-01

    A wideband vibrational electromagnetic energy harvester employing nonlinear spring effects is proposed and demonstrated. The harvesters were designed and fabricated by commercial rigid-flex printed circuit boards technology. Rigid FR-4 boards were used for mechanical support and coil winding, whereas flexible polyimide films were patterned for mechanical springs and mass platforms. Two sets of coils were patterned and fabricated in the harvester with an internal coil resistance of about 16 Ω each. Two rare-earth magnets were attached to the central platform as shuttle mass. The total dimension of the harvester was 20 × 20 × 4 mm3. In vibration tests, nonlinearity could be observed even at 0.1 grms vibration level due to the spring hardening effect. The frequency for peak induced voltage increased from 187 Hz at low vibration to 382 Hz at 5 grms vibration. The effective half-power bandwidth increased from 8 Hz at 0.1 grms to 32 Hz at 1 grms and 52 Hz at 5 grms due to the hysteresis in frequency response. For a matched load and 1 grms vibration at 250 Hz, the maximum output power was 160 nW, corresponding to a power density of 100 nW cm-3.

  12. PP: A Lisp Pretty Printing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    level :length :lines :array :radix :circle :case : gensym This function is like PRIN1 except that it does not force ,PRINT-ESCAPE, to be T. The...PRINT-CASE, and ,PRINT- GENSYM , respectively. (’llhe last four of these variables are not supported by release 5 of the I isp Machine System...variables. PP:SET-INTERACTIVE-CONTROL-VARIABLES &key :escape :base :pretty :level :length :lines :array :radix :circle :case : gensym This function specifies

  13. ERP system for 3D printing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaky Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available GOCREATE is an original cloud-based production management and optimization service which helps 3D printing service providers to use their resources better. The proposed Enterprise Resource Planning system can significantly increase income through improved productivity. With GOCREATE, the 3D printing service providers get a much higher production efficiency at a much lower licensing cost, to increase their competitiveness in the fast growing 3D printing market.

  14. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  15. All-Printed Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed G; Kramer, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    A fully automated additive manufacturing process that produces all-printed flexible and stretchable electronics is demonstrated. The printing process combines soft silicone elastomer printing and liquid metal processing on a single high-precision 3D stage. The platform is capable of fabricating extremely complex conductive circuits, strain and pressure sensors, stretchable wires, and wearable circuits with high yield and repeatability. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Considerations for millimeter wave printed antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Calculated data are presented on the performance of printed antenna elements on substrates which may be electrically thick, as would be the case for printed antennas at millimeter wave frequencies. Printed dipoles and microstrip patch antennas on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), quartz, and gallium arsenide substrates are considered. Data are given for resonant length, resonant resistance, bandwidth, loss due to surface waves, loss due to dielectric heating, and mutual coupling. Also presented is an optimization procedure for maximizing or minimizing power launched into surface waves from a multielement printed antenna array. The data are calculated by a moment method solution.

  17. RELIABILITY OF PRINTED WIRING CORDWOOD MODULES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    MODULES (ELECTRONICS), *RELIABILITY(ELECTRONICS), RELIABILITY(ELECTRONICS), MODULES (ELECTRONICS), PRINTED CIRCUITS, ENVIRONMENTAL TESTS, LIFE EXPECTANCY(SERVICE LIFE), TEST METHODS, ENCAPSULATION, SOLDERED JOINTS.

  18. Environmental Data on Gravure and Offset Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Enroth

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents environmental data relating to gravure and offset printing. It focuses on the printing steps in the production chain of publication printed products. The other steps in the life-cycle of printed products have also been studied but they are not the subjects of this paper.The study is based on case studies, where almost twenty gravure printers and ten offset printers from around Europe and the United States have been involved.The general, significant environmental aspects of publication printed products have been identified as the following; use of paper, use of energy, consumption (loss of volatile organic compounds (VOC, including toluene, hazardous waste and environmental management. Transport has also been identified as a significant environmental aspect for printed products but, to a great extent, its magnitude depends on the particular product. The data collected from printers in different parts of the world were compared to environmental data provided by offset printers in Sweden, which were mainly taken from coldset printers.This paper presents significant environmental data for a fairly large number of companies representing a considerable part of the printing capacity, not only in Europe but also worldwide. These data can provide guidance for both printers and buyers of printed products working to achieve continualimprovements and striving towards more environmentally adapted printed products. To some extent, the data can also be used as reference values, since there are few compilations of data providing a general coverage of printers in different parts of the world.

  19. Active origami by 4D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qi; Dunn, Conner K.; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in three dimensional (3D) printing technology that allow multiple materials to be printed within each layer enable the creation of materials and components with precisely controlled heterogeneous microstructures. In addition, active materials, such as shape memory polymers, can be printed to create an active microstructure within a solid. These active materials can subsequently be activated in a controlled manner to change the shape or configuration of the solid in response to an environmental stimulus. This has been termed 4D printing, with the 4th dimension being the time-dependent shape change after the printing. In this paper, we advance the 4D printing concept to the design and fabrication of active origami, where a flat sheet automatically folds into a complicated 3D component. Here we print active composites with shape memory polymer fibers precisely printed in an elastomeric matrix and use them as intelligent active hinges to enable origami folding patterns. We develop a theoretical model to provide guidance in selecting design parameters such as fiber dimensions, hinge length, and programming strains and temperature. Using the model, we design and fabricate several active origami components that assemble from flat polymer sheets, including a box, a pyramid, and two origami airplanes. In addition, we directly print a 3D box with active composite hinges and program it to assume a temporary flat shape that subsequently recovers to the 3D box shape on demand.

  20. Banner Pages on the New Printing Infrastructure

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Changes to the printing service were announced in CERN Bulletin No. 37-38/2006. In the new infrastructure, the printing of the banner page has been disabled in order to reduce paper consumption. Statistics show that the average print job size is small and the paper savings by not printing the banner page could be up to 20 %. When each printer is moved onto the new infrastructure banner page printing will be disabled. In the case of corridor printers which are shared by several users, the Helpdesk can re-enable banner page printing upon request. We hope ultimately to arrive at a situation where banner page printing is enabled on fewer than 10% of printers registered on the network. You can still print banner pages on printers where it has been centrally disabled by using Linux. Simply add it to your print job on the client side by adding the -o job-sheets option to your lpr command. Detailed documentation is available on each SLC3/4 under the following link: http://localhost:631/sum.html#4_2 Please bea...

  1. Printed Electronic Devices in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, John B.

    2004-01-01

    The space environment requires robust sensing, control, and automation, whether in support of human spaceflight or of robotic exploration. Spaceflight embodies the known extremes of temperature, radiation, shock, vibration, and static loads, and demands high reliability at the lowest possible mass. Because printed electronic circuits fulfill all these requirements, printed circuit technology and the exploration of space have been closely coupled throughout their short histories. In this presentation, we will explore the space (and space launch) environments as drivers of printed circuit design, a brief history of NASA's use of printed electronic circuits, and we will examine future requirements for such circuits in our continued exploration of space.

  2. Evolutionary Aesthetics and Print Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Luczaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the extent to which predictions based on the theory of evolutionary aesthetics are utilized by the advertising industry. The purpose of a comprehensive content analysis of print advertising is to determine whether the items indicated by evolutionists such as animals, flowers, certain types of landscapes, beautiful humans, and some colors are part of real advertising strategies. This article has shown that many evolutionary hypotheses (although not all of them are supported by empirical data. Along with these hypotheses, some inferences from Bourdieu’s cultural capital theory were tested. It turned out that advertising uses both biological schemata and cultural patterns to make an image more likable.

  3. Mail2Print online tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Mail2print is a feature which allows you to send documents to a printer by mail. This tutorial (text attached to the event page) explains how to use this service. Content owner: Vincent Nicolas Bippus Presenter: Pedro Augusto de Freitas Batista Tell us what you think via e-learning.support at cern.ch More tutorials in the e-learning collection of the CERN Document Server (CDS) https://cds.cern.ch/collection/E-learning%20modules?ln=en All info about the CERN rapid e-learning project is linked from http://twiki.cern.ch/ELearning  

  4. Dramatic Advance in Quality in Flexographic Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Richter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The enormous changes in flexography printing in recent years concerning the printing quality achievable cannot generally be ascribed to a single revolutionary invention, but are the result of continuous developments to the complete system. Thus the direct drive technology in all machine types and its associated advantages in terms of printing length corrections has become established since drupa 2000. The race for ever finer raster rolls has also been completed to the benefit of improvements in bowl geometry and in ceramic surfaces. Clearly improved colour transfer behaviour has become feasible as a result. In a closely intermeshed system such as flexography printing this naturally has to have an effect on the printing colours used. Further improvements in bonding agents and pigment concentrations now allow users to print ever thinner colour layers while maintaining all of the required authenticities.Furthermore, it has become possible to reduce additional disturbing characteristics in the UV colour area, such as the unpleasant odour. While the digital imaging of printing plates has primarily been improved in terms of economic efficiency by the use of up to eight parallel laser beams, extreme improvements in the system are noticeable especially in the area of directly engraved printing moulds. Whereas many still dismissed directly engraved polymer plates at the last drupa as a laboratory system, the first installation was recently placed on the market a mere three years later. A further noteworthy innovation of recent years that has reached market maturity is thin sleeve technology, which combines the advantages of a photopolymer plate with a round imaged printing mould. There are no high sleeve costs for each printing mould, except for one-off cost for an adapter sleeve. To conclude, it can be said that although flexography printing has experienced many new features in the time between drupa 2000 and today, it still has enormous potential for

  5. Implementation of Palm Print Biometric Identification System Using Ordinal Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Narendira Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Personal identification is one of the most important requirements in all e-commerce and criminal detection applications. In this framework, a novel palm print representation method, namely orthogonal line ordinal features, is proposed. The palm print registration, feature extraction, palm print verification and palm print recognition modules are designed to manage the palm prints and the palm print database module is designed to store their palm prints and the person details in the database. The feature extraction module is proposed to extract the ordinal measurements for the palm prints. The verification module is designed to verify the palm print with the personal identification record. The recognition module is proposed to find out the relevant person associated with the palm print image. The proposed palm print recognition scheme uses the intensity and brightness to measure the ordinal measurement. The ordinal measures are estimated for the 4 x 4 regions of the palm print images.

  6. The Application of Digital Printing System in College Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung-Yu Hao

    2004-01-01

    Digital printing brings the tremendous impacts not only to the printing industry but also to the publishing industry. Colleges could establish a "Printing and Publishing Center" to adopt the development of digital printing technology. It is necessary to build up a printing and publishing system to apply the digital printing's characteristics to fulfill the functions of college education. This system must contain the functions of digital right management (DRM), Internet, and database management system (DBMS). It could print the partial chapters of one of more particular textbooks and publish the books by using the digital printing press in order to present the most updating information. It could fully use the benefits of print-on-demand, variable-data printing, and a short-run printing of digital printing. For the system, it could satisfy the needs of teachers and students in teaching and learning in college.

  7. 3D Printed Fluidic Hardware for DNA Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-10

    printed parts. The 3D printed parts were designed in SolidWorks and printed using the Makerbot Replicator 2X. The printed parts are modular, enabling...this study had multiple years of experience working with SolidWorks . Many biologists interested in designing fluidics will likely not have similar...Methods Designing & 3D printing fluidics All fluidic devices were designed using SolidWorks . STL files were generated in SolidWorks . For 3D printing

  8. Changes in the Printing Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The print servers at CERN are being replaced and all CERN printers will be gradually migrated to a new infrastructure. This will involve a few small changes for the users, which are highlighted in the following sections. Windows computers in the CERN domain (NICE XP/2000) The printer migration in the NICE environment is transparent and will be done automatically. The only significant change is that the 'CERN Printer Wizard' will be removed. To install a new printer and to monitor or manage its printing queue you should use the native windows interface, as explained at http://cern.ch/WinServices/Help/?kbid=070103 Linux SLC3, SLC4 The migration was transparent and has already been completed for Linux computers. If necessary, you can reconfigure your system again at any time by running the following command: /usr/bin/cern-config-printers -u The only significant change for Linux is the disappearance of the xprint command. Use the lpr command instead. Documentation for SLC3 is available at http://cern...

  9. Changes in the Printing Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The print servers at CERN are being replaced and all CERN printers will be gradually migrated to a new infrastructure. This will involve a few small changes for the users, which are highlighted in the following sections. Windows computers in the CERN domain (NICE XP/2000) The printer migration in the NICE environment is transparent and will be done automatically. The only significant change is that the 'CERN Printer Wizard'will be removed. To install a new printer and to monitor or manage its printing queue you should use the native windows interface, as explained at http://cern.ch/WinServices/Help/?kbid=070103 Linux SLC3, SLC4 The migration was transparent and has already been completed for Linux computers. If necessary, you can reconfigure your system again at any time by running the following command: /usr/bin/cern-config-printers -u The only significant change for Linux is the disappearance of the xprint command. Use the lpr command instead. Documentation for SLC3 is available at: h...

  10. Printing in three dimensions: Architectural designers manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, S.; Mirtsopoulos, I.; Papathanasiou, I.

    2014-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sutainability This guide has been written for architecture students with no or limited knowledge on 3D printing with the purpose of providing them with useful information prior to actually printing. This manual is separa

  11. Learning about Environmental Print through Picture Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Patricia; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes picture books that contain environmental print (print found in the natural environment of a child, such as logos, billboards, and road signs) and how they can be used in the classroom. Includes "ABC Drive!" by Naomi Howland (1994), "The Signmaker's Assistant" by Tedd Arnold (1992), and four others. Also provides a…

  12. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  13. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  14. 32 CFR 705.12 - Print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Print media. 705.12 Section 705.12 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.12 Print media. Requests for reprints of items published in national media will be addressed to the Chief of Information. Commands will be careful not...

  15. China Printing Industries(2002~2007)(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the development of market economy, printing industries in China have become increasingly important and more and more dependent on the economy. It is proper to say that the printing industries are growing simultaneously with the economy. So it is better to introduce some data about China,s economy first.

  16. Direct Printing of Graphene onto Plastic Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Daniel; Lock, Evgeniya; Walton, Scott; Baraket, Mira; Laskoski, Matthew; Mulvaney, Shawn; Sheehan, Paul; Lee, Woo; Robinson, Jeremy

    2011-03-01

    Graphene films have been synthesized on metal foils using CVD growth and have the potential to be compatible with roll-to-roll printing. To be usable in electronic devices, these films need to be removed from the metallic substrate. Currently this is accomplished by spin coating a polymer film over the graphene and chemically etching away the metal substrate. We have developed a direct printing method that allows graphene films to be printed off the metal substrate onto a polymer substrate. This printing process does not generate chemical waste, is compatible with roll-to-toll processing and renders the metal foil reusable. Adhesion of the graphene film to the polymer substrate is established by attaching perfluorophenylazides (PFPA) azide linker molecules to a plasma activated polymer surface. The transfer printing was performed by placing the PFPA treated polymer surface in contact with a graphene covered Cu foil and heating under pressure. Graphene films successfully printed onto a polystyrene substrate have been characterized by Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements revealed the presence of Gr on the polymer surface. Details of the printing process along with characteristics of the graphene film after printing will be presented.

  17. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-07

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  18. Patterned electrodeposition of interconnects using microcontact printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovestad, A.; Rendering, H.; Maijenburg, A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Microcontact printing combined with electroless deposition is a potential low cost technique to make electrical interconnects for opto-electronic devices. Microcontact printed inhibitors locally prevent electroless deposition resulting in a pre-defined pattern of metal tracks. The inhibition of elec

  19. Can lip prints provide biologic evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti; Sharma, Neeraj; Wadhwan, Vijay; Aggarwal, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lip prints are unique and can be used in personal identification. Very few studies are available which establish them as biological evidence in the court of law. Thus, the objective of this study was to attempt to isolate DNA and obtain full short tandem repeat (STR) loci of the individual from the lip prints on different surfaces. Materials and Methods: Twelve lip prints were procured on different surfaces such as tissue paper, cotton cloth, ceramic tile, and glass surface. Latent lip prints were developed using fingerprint black powder. Lipstick-coated lip prints were also collected on the same supporting items. DNA was isolated, quantified, and amplified using Identifiler™ kit to type 15 STR loci. Results: Ample quantity of DNA was extracted from all the lip print impressions and 15 loci were successfully located in seven samples. Fourteen loci were successfully typed in 3 lip impressions while 13 loci were typed in 2 samples. Conclusion: This study emphasizes the relevance of lip prints at the scene of crime. Extraction of DNA followed by typing of STR loci establishes the lip prints as biological evidence too. Tissue papers, napkins, cups, and glasses may have imprints of the suspect's lips. Thus, the full genetic profile is extremely useful for the forensic team. PMID:28123277

  20. Can lip prints provide biologic evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lip prints are unique and can be used in personal identification. Very few studies are available which establish them as biological evidence in the court of law. Thus, the objective of this study was to attempt to isolate DNA and obtain full short tandem repeat (STR loci of the individual from the lip prints on different surfaces. Materials and Methods: Twelve lip prints were procured on different surfaces such as tissue paper, cotton cloth, ceramic tile, and glass surface. Latent lip prints were developed using fingerprint black powder. Lipstick-coated lip prints were also collected on the same supporting items. DNA was isolated, quantified, and amplified using IdentifilerTM kit to type 15 STR loci. Results: Ample quantity of DNA was extracted from all the lip print impressions and 15 loci were successfully located in seven samples. Fourteen loci were successfully typed in 3 lip impressions while 13 loci were typed in 2 samples. Conclusion: This study emphasizes the relevance of lip prints at the scene of crime. Extraction of DNA followed by typing of STR loci establishes the lip prints as biological evidence too. Tissue papers, napkins, cups, and glasses may have imprints of the suspect's lips. Thus, the full genetic profile is extremely useful for the forensic team.

  1. 3D printing of functional structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The technology colloquial known as ‘3D printing’ has developed in such diversity in printing technologies and application fields that meanwhile it seems anything is possible. However, clearly the ideal 3D Printer, with high resolution, multi-material capability, fast printing, etc. is yet to be deve

  2. 3D printing of functional structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    The technology colloquial known as ‘3D printing’ has developed in such diversity in printing technologies and application fields that meanwhile it seems anything is possible. However, clearly the ideal 3D Printer, with high resolution, multi-material capability, fast printing, etc. is yet to be

  3. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  4. 3D printing of functional structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The technology colloquial known as ‘3D printing’ has developed in such diversity in printing technologies and application fields that meanwhile it seems anything is possible. However, clearly the ideal 3D Printer, with high resolution, multi-material capability, fast printing, etc. is yet to be deve

  5. New technology to realize printed radiating elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarot, A. C.; Sharaiha, A.; Terret, C.; Garnier, Y.

    1995-05-01

    A plating process for low-cost dielectric substrates (like polypropylene or foam) has been developed by the CNET (Centre National d'Etudes des Telecommunications) in collaboration with LAM (Laboratoire Antennes et Microelectronique). This process allows the realization of printed radiating elements like microstrip antennas. An example of a multilayered printed antenna realized with this technology is presented with its performance.

  6. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology.

  7. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  8. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  9. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  10. Learning about Environmental Print through Picture Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Patricia; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes picture books that contain environmental print (print found in the natural environment of a child, such as logos, billboards, and road signs) and how they can be used in the classroom. Includes "ABC Drive!" by Naomi Howland (1994), "The Signmaker's Assistant" by Tedd Arnold (1992), and four others. Also provides a bibliography of other…

  11. Friction Properties of Inkjet and Flexographic Prints on Different Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Grigaliūnienė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Friction between different papers, inkjet and flexographic prints has been experimentally investigated. Flexographic prints have been made using an anilox roller, and inkjet prints have been produced covering paper with one and four toner layers. Static (SCOF and kinetic (KCOF friction coefficients between paper and paper, paper and prints, prints and prints have been determined. Friction properties have been discovered to be different in flexographic and laser prints. The dependence of SCOF and KCOF on pressure (both decrease together with roughness measurements enables to conclude that the friction of prints is mainly governed by adhesion forces.

  12. Screen printed UHF antennas on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeczek, Kamil; Młożniak, Anna; Kozioł, Grażyna; Araźna, Aneta; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Bajurko, Paweł

    2010-09-01

    Printed electronics belongs to the most important developing electronics technologies. It provides new possibilities to produce low cost and large area devices. In its range several applications can be distinguished like printed batteries, OLED, biosensors, photovoltaic cells or RFID tags. In the presented investigation, antennas working in UHF frequency range were elaborated. It can be applied in the future for flexible RFID tags. To produce these antennas polymer paste with silver flakes was used. It was deposited on two flexible substrates (foil and photo paper) with screen printing techniques. After printing process surface profile, electrical and microwave parameters of performed antennas were measured using digital multimeter and network analyzer, relatively. Furthermore, a thickness of printed layers was measured.

  13. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1μm demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  14. Mechanism of reverse-offset printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Man; Lee, Eonseok; Lee, Taik-Min

    2015-07-01

    We propose a mechanism for reverse-offset printing based on a mathematical model. In reverse-offset printing, high resolution is achieved by patterning a coated, thin ink film with an intaglio-patterned cliché. By using the relationships among the ink blanket adhesion strength, the ink cliché adhesion strength, and the ink cohesion strength, a criterion for successful patterning is derived. We found that there is a printing window in the ink blanket adhesion strength that depends on the shear strength of the ink film and the dimensions of the pattern. The printing window diminishes as the line width decreases, resulting in a minimum printable line width. The proposed mechanism was verified by printing patterns with various shapes and dimensions.

  15. Designing Biomaterials for 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvendiren, Murat; Molde, Joseph; Soares, Rosane M D; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-10-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is becoming an increasingly common technique to fabricate scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering applications. This is due to the potential of 3D printing to provide patient-specific designs, high structural complexity, rapid on-demand fabrication at a low-cost. One of the major bottlenecks that limits the widespread acceptance of 3D printing in biomanufacturing is the lack of diversity in "biomaterial inks". Printability of a biomaterial is determined by the printing technique. Although a wide range of biomaterial inks including polymers, ceramics, hydrogels and composites have been developed, the field is still struggling with processing of these materials into self-supporting devices with tunable mechanics, degradation, and bioactivity. This review aims to highlight the past and recent advances in biomaterial ink development and design considerations moving forward. A brief overview of 3D printing technologies focusing on ink design parameters is also included.

  16. Simulation and Characterisation of Planar Spring Based on PCB-FR4 in Electromechanical System for Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuadah, A. N.; Maulanisa, N. F.; Ismardi, A.; Sugandi, G.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents comparison study of simulation and fabrication characterized two type planar springs at micro-fabricated electromagnetic power generator for an ambient vibration energy harvesting system. The power generator utilized a LASER-machined FR4-PCB planar spring, a copper coil, and NdFeB magnet. In order to change resonant frequency, we developed a gimbal suspension structure for the fabrication of spring. The NdFeB permanent magnet was applied as inertial mass. The system was specially designed to harvest low ambient vibrations from 20 to several hundred hertz and low acceleration. The dimension of fabricated energy harvester had 2.5 x 2.5 cm2 in size. In this study we present two different design of cantilever, which is has two and four cantilever, respectively. The different designed given different resonance frequency to the system. The result of simulation giving resonance frequency of two cantilever membrane 22.6 Hz and four cantilever membrane 110.3 Hz. The measurements result has generated 0.135 V with resonance frequency 39 Hz of two cantilever membrane appropriate for human motions, four cantilever membrane has generated 0.174 V with resonance frequency106 Hz appropriate for machine industries.

  17. Development of a precision reverse offset printing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunchang; Lee, Eonseok; Choi, Young-Man; Kwon, Sin; Lee, Seunghyun; Jo, Jeongdai; Lee, Taik-Min; Kang, Dongwoo, E-mail: dwkang@kimm.re.kr [Advanced Manufacturing Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In printed electronics technology, the overlay accuracy of printed patterns is a very important issue when applying printing technology to the production of electric devices. In order to achieve accurate positioning of the printed patterns, this study proposes a novel precision reverse offset printing system. Furthermore, the study evaluates the effects of synchronization and printing force on position errors of the printed patterns, and presents methods of controlling synchronization and printing force so as to eliminate positional errors caused by the above-mentioned reasons. Finally, the printing position repeatability of 0.40 μm and 0.32 μm (x and y direction, respectively) at a sigma level is obtained over the dimension of 100 mm under repeated printing tests with identical printing conditions.

  18. Development of a precision reverse offset printing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunchang; Lee, Eonseok; Choi, Young-Man; Kwon, Sin; Lee, Seunghyun; Jo, Jeongdai; Lee, Taik-Min; Kang, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    In printed electronics technology, the overlay accuracy of printed patterns is a very important issue when applying printing technology to the production of electric devices. In order to achieve accurate positioning of the printed patterns, this study proposes a novel precision reverse offset printing system. Furthermore, the study evaluates the effects of synchronization and printing force on position errors of the printed patterns, and presents methods of controlling synchronization and printing force so as to eliminate positional errors caused by the above-mentioned reasons. Finally, the printing position repeatability of 0.40 μm and 0.32 μm (x and y direction, respectively) at a sigma level is obtained over the dimension of 100 mm under repeated printing tests with identical printing conditions.

  19. Watermarking for the Printed Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIGang; YANGJie; ZHUYitan

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a new watermarking technique for printed images, using the texture synthesis method. In this aspect, a few techniques have been proposed, but those techniques are all based on FMS (Frequency modulated screening), which means high cost and additional difficulties in practice. On the other side the technique in this paper is based on AMS (Amplitude modulated screening). Ink dots are considered as texture patterns, and texture analysis is used to generate two corresponding texture patterns to describe ?A“1” and “0”. Another advantage of this technique is that the robustness and the unobtrusiveness of watermark can be easily controlled. Finally, the result of a simulation experiment is reported, which demonstrate that the method in this paper is effective and potential.

  20. Printing Technologies for Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Ashkan; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Over the past 15 years, printers have been increasingly utilized for biomedical applications in various areas of medicine and tissue engineering. This review discusses the current and future applications of 3D bioprinting. Several 3D printing tools with broad applications from surgical planning to 3D models are being created, such as liver replicas and intermediate splints. Numerous researchers are exploring this technique to pattern cells or fabricate several different tissues and organs, such as blood vessels or cardiac patches. Current investigations in bioprinting applications are yielding further advances. As one of the fastest areas of industry expansion, 3D additive manufacturing will change techniques across biomedical applications, from research and testing models to surgical planning, device manufacturing, and tissue or organ replacement.

  1. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  2. Advances and Future Challenges in Printed Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ricardo E; Costa, Carlos M; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in thin and flexible energy storage devices to meet modern society's needs for applications such as radio frequency sensing, interactive packaging, and other consumer products. Printed batteries comply with these requirements and are an excellent alternative to conventional batteries for many applications. Flexible and microbatteries are also included in the area of printed batteries when fabricated using printing technologies. The main characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, developments, and printing techniques of printed batteries are presented and discussed in this Review. The state-of-the-art takes into account both the research and industrial levels. On the academic level, the research progress of printed batteries is divided into lithium-ion and Zn-manganese dioxide batteries and other battery types, with emphasis on the different materials for anode, cathode, and separator as well as in the battery design. With respect to the industrial state-of-the-art, materials, device formulations, and manufacturing techniques are presented. Finally, the prospects and challenges of printed batteries are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  4. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  5. Marketing plan for Jingcai digital printing studio

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to draw up an efficient marketing plan for Jingcai digital printing studio, which plans to be set up in Tianjin, China. The studio takes up providing all kinds of printing products for business customers. The aim of this thesis was to assist start-up company to gain customers’ attention in the initial stage of company’s long term development and build a concrete base for progress and further expansion in order to become a digital printing company with strong com...

  6. Direct Laser Printing of Tailored Polymeric Microlenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Camilo; Piazza, Simonluca; Diaspro, Alberto; Serra, Pere; Duocastella, Martí

    2016-07-13

    We report a laser-based approach for the fast fabrication of high-optical-quality polymeric microlenses and microlens arrays with controllable geometry and size. Our strategy consists of the direct laser printing of microdroplets of a highly viscous UV prepolymer at targeted positions, followed by photocuring. We study the morphological characteristics and imaging performance of the microlenses as a function of the substrate and laser parameters and investigate optimal printing conditions and printing mechanisms. We show that the microlens size and focusing properties can be easily tuned by the laser pulse energy, with minimum volumes below 20 fL and focal lengths ranging from 7 to 50 μm.

  7. Printed Barium Strontium Titanate capacitors on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sette, Daniele [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology LIST, Materials Research and Technology Department, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Kovacova, Veronika [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Defay, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.defay@list.lu [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology LIST, Materials Research and Technology Department, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, we show that Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) films can be prepared by inkjet printing of sol–gel precursors on platinized silicon substrate. Moreover, a functional variable capacitor working in the GHz range has been made without any lithography or etching steps. Finally, this technology requires 40 times less precursors than the standard sol–gel spin-coating technique. - Highlights: • Inkjet printing of Barium Strontium Titanate films • Deposition on silicon substrate • Inkjet printed silver top electrode • First ever BST films thinner than 1 μm RF functional variable capacitor that has required no lithography.

  8. Print vs digital the future of coexistence

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sul H

    2013-01-01

    Libraries are currently confronted by the challenges of managing increasing amounts of electronic information. Print vs. Digital: The Future of Coexistence presents the expert perspectives of eight of America's leading library administrators on ways to effectively manage digital flow and offers strategies to provide a level of coexistence between digital and print information. This excellent overview explores how to best balance print and electronic resources, and explores important issues such as the selection of electronic resources, improving access to digital information for a larger user

  9. Aluminum plasmonic metamaterials for structural color printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei; Gao, Jie; Stan, Liliana; Rosenmann, Daniel; Czaplewski, David; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    We report a structural color printing platform based on aluminum plasmonic metamaterials supporting near perfect light absorption and narrow-band spectral response tunable across the visible spectrum to realize high-resolution, angle-insensitive color printing with high color purity and saturation. Additionally, the fabricated metamaterials can be protected by a transparent polymer thin layer for ambient use with further improved color performance. The demonstrated structural color printing with aluminum plasmonic metamaterials offers great potential for relevant applications such as security marking and information storage.

  10. Three-dimensional Printing in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Jose, Rod R; Rabie, Amr N; Gerstle, Theodore L; Lee, Bernard T; Lin, Samuel J

    2015-07-01

    The advent of 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology has facilitated the creation of customized objects. The lack of regulation in developing countries renders conventional means of addressing various healthcare issues challenging. 3D printing may provide a venue for addressing many of these concerns in an inexpensive and easily accessible fashion. These may potentially include the production of basic medical supplies, vaccination beads, laboratory equipment, and prosthetic limbs. As this technology continues to improve and prices are reduced, 3D printing has the potential ability to promote initiatives across the entire developing world, resulting in improved surgical care and providing a higher quality of healthcare to its residents.

  11. Three-dimensional metrology for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Vadim; Harding, Kevin

    2017-05-01

    Novel materials and printing technologies can enable rapid and low cost prototyping and manufacturing of electronic devices with increased flexibility and complexity. However, robust and on-demand printing of circuits will require accurate metrology methods that can measure micron level patterns to verify proper production. This paper presents an evaluation of a range of optical gaging tools ranging from confocal to area 3D systems to determine metrological capability for a range of key parameters from trace thickness to solder paste volumes. Finally, this paper will present a select set of optimized measurement tools detailing both capabilities and gaps in the available technologies needed to fully realize the potential of printed electronics.

  12. Ink-Jet Printed Graphene Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Torrisi, F.; Hasan, T.; Wu, W; Sun, Z.; Lombardo, A.; Kulmala, T; Hshieh, G. W.; S.J. Jung; F. Bonaccorso; P. J. Paul; Chu, D. P.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate ink-jet printing as a viable method for large area fabrication of graphene devices. We produce a graphene-based ink by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in N-Methylpyrrolidone. We use it to print thin-film transistors, with mobilities up to~95cm^2V^(-1)s(-1), as well as transparent and conductive patterns, with~80 % transmittance and~30kOhm/sq sheet resistance. This paves the way to all-printed, flexible and transparent graphene devices on arbitrary substrates

  13. Printed electronics for ubiquitous computing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Cláudia Brito da

    2013-01-01

    Dissertação para obtenção do Grau de Doutor em Química This Ph.D. project is focused on the synthesis of functional inorganic materials, their formulation into inks and their deposition using inkjet printing on non-conventional substrates, such as paper, with the ultimate goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the area of printed electrochromic displays. Other materials, inks,techniques and substrates were also explored. The first step in building a printed electrochromic display ...

  14. Printing Insecurity? The Security Implications of 3D-Printing of Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, the first gun printed out of plastic by a 3D-printer was successfully fired in the U.S. This event caused a major media hype about the dangers of being able to print a gun. Law enforcement agencies worldwide were concerned about this development and the potentially huge security implications of these functional plastic guns. As a result, politicians called for a ban of these weapons and a control of 3D-printing technology. This paper reviews the security implications of 3D-printing technology and 3D guns. It argues that current arms control and transfer policies are adequate to cover 3D-printed guns as well. However, while this analysis may hold up currently, progress in printing technology needs to be monitored to deal with future dangers pre-emptively.

  15. Influence of Parameters of a Printing Plate on Photoluminescence of Nanophotonic Printed Elements of Novel Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Olha Sarapulova; Valentyn Sherstiuk

    2015-01-01

    In order to produce nanophotonic elements for smart packaging, we investigated the influence of the parameters of screen and offset gravure printing plates on features of printed application of coatings with nanophotonic components and on parameters of their photoluminescence. To determine the dependence of luminescence intensity on the thickness of solid coating, we carried out the formation of nanophotonic solid surfaces by means of screen printing with different layer thickness on polyprop...

  16. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-04-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps.

  17. Influence of printing speed on production of embossing tools using FDM 3D printing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Žarko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of the embossing tools customary implies use of metals such as zinc, magnesium, copper, and brass. In the case of short run lengths, a conventional manufacturing process and the material itself represent a significant cost, not only in the terms of material costs and the need for using complex technological systems which are necessary for their production, but also in the terms of the production time. Alternatively, 3D printing can be used for manufacturing similar embossing tools with major savings in production time and costs. However, due to properties of materials used in the 3D printing technology, expected results of embossing by 3D printed tools cannot be identical to metal ones. This problem is emphasized in the case of long run lengths and high accuracy requirement for embossed elements. The objective of this paper is primarily focused on investigating the influence of the printing speed on reproduction quality of the embossing tools printed with FDM (Fused Deposition Modelling technology. The obtained results confirmed that printing speed as a process parameter affects the reproduction quality of the embossing tools printed with FDM technology: in the case of deposition rate of 90 mm/s was noted the poorest dimensional accuracy in relation to the 3D model, which is more emphasised in case of circular and square elements. Elements printed with the highest printing speed have a greater dimensional accuracy, but with evident cracks on the surface.

  18. The NIH 3D Print Exchange: A Public Resource for Bioscientific and Biomedical 3D Prints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Meghan F; Hurt, Darrell E; Weber, Nick; Mtingwa, Makazi; Fincher, Erin C; Alekseyev, Vsevelod; Chen, David T; Yun, Alvin; Gizaw, Metasebia; Swan, Jeremy; Yoo, Terry S; Huyen, Yentram

    2014-09-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, an online portal for discovering and creating bioscientifically relevant 3D models suitable for 3D printing, to provide both researchers and educators with a trusted source to discover accurate and informative models. There are a number of online resources for 3D prints, but there is a paucity of scientific models, and the expertise required to generate and validate such models remains a barrier. The NIH 3D Print Exchange fills this gap by providing novel, web-based tools that empower users with the ability to create ready-to-print 3D files from molecular structure data, microscopy image stacks, and computed tomography scan data. The NIH 3D Print Exchange facilitates open data sharing in a community-driven environment, and also includes various interactive features, as well as information and tutorials on 3D modeling software. As the first government-sponsored website dedicated to 3D printing, the NIH 3D Print Exchange is an important step forward to bringing 3D printing to the mainstream for scientific research and education.

  19. The NIH 3D Print Exchange: A Public Resource for Bioscientific and Biomedical 3D Prints

    OpenAIRE

    Coakley, Meghan F.; Hurt, Darrell E.; Weber, Nick; Mtingwa, Makazi; Fincher, Erin C.; Alekseyev, Vsevelod; Chen, David T.; Yun, Alvin; Gizaw, Metasebia; Swan, Jeremy; Yoo, Terry S.; Huyen, Yentram

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, an online portal for discovering and creating bioscientifically relevant 3D models suitable for 3D printing, to provide both researchers and educators with a trusted source to discover accurate and informative models. There are a number of online resources for 3D prints, but there is a paucity of scientific models, and the expertise required to generate and validate such models remains a barrier. The NIH 3D Print ...

  20. 3D-printed bioanalytical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Gregory W.; Satterwhite-Warden, Jennifer E.; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Rusling, James F.

    2016-07-01

    While 3D printing technologies first appeared in the 1980s, prohibitive costs, limited materials, and the relatively small number of commercially available printers confined applications mainly to prototyping for manufacturing purposes. As technologies, printer cost, materials, and accessibility continue to improve, 3D printing has found widespread implementation in research and development in many disciplines due to ease-of-use and relatively fast design-to-object workflow. Several 3D printing techniques have been used to prepare devices such as milli- and microfluidic flow cells for analyses of cells and biomolecules as well as interfaces that enable bioanalytical measurements using cellphones. This review focuses on preparation and applications of 3D-printed bioanalytical devices.

  1. Network Printing in a Heteregenous Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChristophBeyer; GerhardSchroth

    2001-01-01

    Mail and printing are often said to be the most visible services for the user in the network.Though many people talked about the paperless bureau a few years ago it seems that the more digital data is accessable,the more it gets printed.Print management in a heterogenous network environments is typically crossing all operating systems.Each of those brings its own requirements and different printing system implementations with individual user interfaces.The scope is to give the user the advantage and features of the native interface of their operating system while making administration tasks as easy as possible by following the general ideas of a centralised network service on the server side.

  2. Printing and Publishing Industry Training Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industrial Training International, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Accounted is the supervisory training program currently in operation in the printing and publishing industry. The purpose of the training program is to increase managerial efficiency and to better prepare new supervisors. (DS)

  3. DNA biosensing with 3D printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2017-01-16

    3D printing, an upcoming technology, has vast potential to transform conventional fabrication processes due to the numerous improvements it can offer to the current methods. To date, the employment of 3D printing technology has been examined for applications in the fields of engineering, manufacturing and biological sciences. In this study, we examined the potential of adopting 3D printing technology for a novel application, electrochemical DNA biosensing. Metal 3D printing was utilized to construct helical-shaped stainless steel electrodes which functioned as a transducing platform for the detection of DNA hybridization. The ability of electroactive methylene blue to intercalate into the double helix structure of double-stranded DNA was then exploited to monitor the DNA hybridization process, with its inherent reduction peak serving as an analytical signal. The designed biosensing approach was found to demonstrate superior selectivity against a non-complementary DNA target, with a detection range of 1-1000 nM.

  4. Inkjet Printing Meets Electrochemical Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesch, Andreas; Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Bassetto, Victor Costa; Amstutz, Véronique; Girault, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    Inkjet printing is a very powerful digital and mask-less microfabrication technique that has attracted the attention of several research groups working on electrochemical energy conversion concepts. In this short review, an overview is given about recent efforts to employ inkjet printing for the search of new electrocatalyst materials and for the preparation of catalyst layers for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications. Recent approaches of the Laboratory of Physical and Analytical Electrochemistry (LEPA) at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne for the inkjet printing of catalyst layers and membrane electrode assemblies are presented and future energy research directions of LEPA based on inkjet printing in the new Energypolis campus in the Canton of Valais are summarized.

  5. 3D-Printed Microfluidic Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony K.; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Chang, Tim C.; Folch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic automation – the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels – generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology’s use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer. PMID:25738695

  6. 48 CFR 3452.208-70 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... less than 5,000 production units of any one page, or less than 25,000 production units in the aggregate of multiple pages, shall not be deemed to be printing. A production unit is defined as one...

  7. The Ligatures of Early Printed Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H. Ingram

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Aldus’ decision (1490 to base his Greek font on the contemporary and more cursive hands rather than old manuscripts carried the day and set the pattern for early modern printing of Greek; the resulting ligatures are catalogued.

  8. 3D-printed microfluidic automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony K; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F; Chang, Tim C; Folch, Albert

    2015-04-21

    Microfluidic automation - the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels - generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology's use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer.

  9. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jodi L. Connell; Eric T. Ritschdorff; Marvin Whiteley; Jason B. Shear

    2013-01-01

    .... Here, we describe a microscopic threedimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating...

  10. EU Design Law and 3D Printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordberg, Ana; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen

    2017-01-01

    The article considers the implications for EU design law of 3D-printing. It first describes the 3D-printing technology and the e-ecosystem which is evolving around the technology and involves a number of new stakeholders who in different ways are engaged in the making and sharing of CAD-files and....../or printing. It is submitted that it is only a matter of time before 3D-printing equipment becomes ubiquitous. It is pointed out how the new technology and e-ecosystem at the same time represent threats and opportunities to design holders and to the societal interests in design and design law. EU design law...

  11. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  12. Device fabrication: Three-dimensional printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer A.; Ahn, Bok Y.

    2015-02-01

    Can three-dimensional printing enable the mass customization of electronic devices? A study that exploits this method to create light-emitting diodes based on 'quantum dots' provides a step towards this goal.

  13. Tung oil substitute for printing ink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitidandhaprabhas, O.

    1977-01-01

    The oil from the fruit of the Parinari anamense tree, indigenous to southeast Asia, chemically resembles tung oil, containing significant amounts of eleostearic acid and showing a similar UV spectrum. The oil forms a Diels-Alder adduct with fumaric acid which is useful as a binder for intaglio printing inks which can be washed from the plates of printing presses with dilute alkali solution.

  14. Three-Dimensional Printing in Zero Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    The 3D printing in zero-g (3D Print) technology demonstration project is a proof-of-concept test designed to assess the properties of melt deposition modeling additive manufacturing in the microgravity environment experienced on the International Space Station (ISS). This demonstration is the first step towards realizing a 'machine shop' in space, a critical enabling component of any deep space mission.

  15. Your Next Airplane: Just Hit Print

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    from custom chocolate sculptures, to firearms printed in your basement, to light-weight, fuel-efficient printed cars. University research grants...like nylon), and even candy or chocolate . 2 These machines typically have smaller production chambers and lower resolution. However, even these...existing objects. Industrial 3-D printer models typically retail for between $2000 and $1M, allowing more resolution, fabrication size, and a wider range

  16. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions.

  17. Contextual advertisement placement in printed media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sam; Joshi, Parag

    2010-02-01

    Advertisements today provide the necessary revenue model supporting the WWW ecosystem. Targeted or contextual ad insertion plays an important role in optimizing the financial return of this model. Nearly all the current ads that appear on web sites are geared for display purposes such as banner and "pay-per-click". Little attention, however, is focused on deriving additional ad revenues when the content is repurposed for alternative mean of presentation, e.g. being printed. Although more and more content is moving to the Web, there are still many occasions where printed output of web content is desirable, such as maps and articles; thus printed ad insertion can potentially be lucrative. In this paper, we describe a contextual ad insertion network aimed to realize new revenue for print service providers for web printing. We introduce a cloud print service that enables contextual ads insertion, with respect to the main web page content, when a printout of the page is requested. To encourage service utilization, it would provide higher quality printouts than what is possible from current browser print drivers, which generally produce poor outputs, e.g. ill formatted pages. At this juncture we will limit the scope to only article-related web pages although the concept can be extended to arbitrary web pages. The key components of this system include (1) the extraction of article from web pages, (2) the extraction of semantics from article, (3) querying the ad database for matching advertisement or coupon, and (4) joint content and ad layout for print outputs.

  18. Applications of 3D printing in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Dodziuk, Helena

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a relatively new, rapidly expanding method of manufacturing that found numerous applications in healthcare, automotive, aerospace and defense industries and in many other areas. In this review, applications in medicine that are revolutionizing the way surgeries are carried out, disrupting prosthesis and implant markets as well as dentistry will be presented. The relatively new field of bioprinting, that is printing with cells, will also be briefly discussed.

  19. Applications of 3D printing in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodziuk, Helena

    2016-09-01

    3D printing is a relatively new, rapidly expanding method of manufacturing that found numerous applications in healthcare, automotive, aerospace and defense industries and in many other areas. In this review, applications in medicine that are revolutionizing the way surgeries are carried out, disrupting prosthesis and implant markets as well as dentistry will be presented. The relatively new field of bioprinting, that is printing with cells, will also be briefly discussed.

  20. Flexible composite film for printed circuit board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, K.; Asakura, M.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, A.

    1982-01-01

    A flexible printed circuit for a printed circuit board in which layers of reaction product composed of a combination of phenoxy resin - polyisocyanate - brominated epoxy resin, and in which the equivalent ratio of those functional groups is hydroxyl group: isocyanate group: epoxy group - 1 : 0.2 to 2 : 0.5 to 3 are laminated on at least one side of saturated polyester film is discussed.

  1. Applications of 3D printing in healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a relatively new, rapidly expanding method of manufacturing that found numerous applications in healthcare, automotive, aerospace and defense industries and in many other areas. In this review, applications in medicine that are revolutionizing the way surgeries are carried out, disrupting prosthesis and implant markets as well as dentistry will be presented. The relatively new field of bioprinting, that is printing with cells, will also be briefly discussed. PMID:27785150

  2. EDMS based workflow for Printing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Prathap Nayak; Anuradha Rao; Ramakrishna Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Information is indispensable factor of any enterprise. It can be a record or a document generated for every transaction that is made, which is either a paper based or in electronic format for future reference. A Printing Industry is one such industry in which managing information of various formats, with latest workflows and technologies, could be a nightmare and a challenge for any operator or an user when each process from the least bit of information to a printed product are always depende...

  3. Third harmonic measurement in printed electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Samano, A; Xu, Y.; Harrison, D.; Hunt, C; Wickham, M; Thomas, O.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the defects detecting technique in printed electronics by the third harmonic measurements. Various types of defects were introduced on the samples and the third harmonic signal was measured using a component linearity tester (Radiometer CLT1). The relationship between the defects in the printed samples and the third harmonic signal and the third harmonic ratio was identified.

  4. Printed Multicolor High-Contrast Electrochromic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo-Han; Kao, Sheng-Yuan; Hu, Chih-Wei; Higuchi, Masayoshi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Liao, Ying-Chih

    2015-11-18

    In this study, electrochemical responses of inkjet-printed multicolored electrochromic devices (ECD) were studied to evaluate the feasibility of presenting multiple colors in one ECD. Metallo-supramolecular polymers (MEPE) solutions with two primary colors were inkjet-printed on flexible electrodes. By digitally controlling print dosages of each species, the colors of the printed EC thin film patterns can be adjusted directly without premixing or synthesizing new materials. The printed EC thin films were then laminated with a solid transparent thin film electrolyte and a transparent conductive thin film to form an ECD. After applying a dc voltage, the printed ECDs exhibited great contrast with a transmittance change (ΔT) of 40.1% and a high coloration efficiency of 445 cm(2) C(-1) within a short darkening time of 2 s. The flexible ECDs also showed the same darkening time of 2 s and still had a high ΔT of 30.1% under bending condition. This study demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate display devices with different color setups by an all-solution process and can be further extended to other types of displays.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of Cell Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Rui; He, Ping

    2010-11-01

    Structural cell printing, i.e., printing three dimensional (3D) structures of cells held in a tissue matrix, is gaining significant attention in the biomedical community. The key idea is to use desktop printer or similar devices to print cells into 3D patterns with a resolution comparable to the size of mammalian cells, similar to that in living organs. Achieving such a resolution in vitro can lead to breakthroughs in areas such as organ transplantation and understanding of cell-cell interactions in truly 3D spaces. Although the feasibility of cell printing has been demonstrated in the recent years, the printing resolution and cell viability remain to be improved. In this work, we investigate one of the unit operations in cell printing, namely, the impact of a cell-laden droplet into a pool of highly viscous liquids using direct numerical simulations. The dynamics of droplet impact (e.g., crater formation and droplet spreading and penetration) and the evolution of cell shape and internal stress are quantified in details.

  6. Cell Source for Tissue and Organ Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Yuan, Yuyu; Yoo, James J.

    Organ printing, a novel approach in tissue engineering, applies computer-driven deposition of cells, growth factors, biomaterials layer-by-layer to create complex 3D tissue or organ constructs. This emerging technology shows great promise in regenerative medicine, because it may help to address current crisis of tissue and organ shortage for transplantation. Organ printing is developing fast, and there are exciting new possibilities in this area. Successful cell and organ printing requires many key elements. Among these, the choice of appropriate cells for printing is vital. This chapter surveys available cell sources for cell and organ printing application and discusses factors that affect cell choice. Special emphasis is put on several important factors, including the proposed printing system and bioprinters, the assembling method, and the target tissues or organs, which need to be considered to select proper cell sources and cell types. In this chapter, characterizations of the selected cells to justify and/or refine the cell selection will also be discussed. Finally, future prospects in this field will be envisioned.

  7. A STUDY OF RELATIVE CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PATTERN OF FINGER PRINTS AND LIP PRINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The use of conventional methods such as dactylography (study of finger prints & cheiloscopy (study of lip prints is of paramount importance, since personal identification by other means such as DNA analysis is sophisticated and not available in rural and developing countries. Fingerprint in its narrow sense is an impression left by the friction ridges of human fingers. The second prints of interest are lip prints. Studies of association between finger print and lip prints are scanty in literature. The present study was aimed to analyze the predominant pattern of lip and finger prints and to identify whether there is any correlation between these two parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample included 300 college students. Brown/pink colored lip stick was applied on the lips and the subject was asked to spread it uniformly over the lips by gentle movement of the lips. The unglazed white paper was then pressed uniformly over the lips. After the fingers were cleaned with tissue paper, the subjects were instructed to roll the tip of their fingers across the surface of an already made ink-stained pad, ensuring that the ink covered the entire pattern area. The inked finger was then enrolled over a white paper to obtain the print and analyzed using magnified hand lens. These prints were examined using magnifying glass, classified, and analyzed. The data was statistically analyzed by using Chi-square test. RESULTS: The percentage distribution of lip print shows that the most frequent lip print pattern in the male is Type I (36.8% and in female it is type II (34.4%. There is no statistically significant association between the pattern of finger prints and lip prints (p value = 0.9. CONCLUSION: It is known that individual parameters, i.e., lip print and finger print patterns play an important role in forensic identification. Correlation of these two parameters in our study did not show any significant association, hence

  8. Interactive Print: The Design of Cognitive Tasks in Blended Augmented Reality and Print Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolny, Larysa

    2017-01-01

    The combination of print materials and augmented reality in education is increasingly accessible due to advances in mobile technologies. Using familiar paper-based activities overlaid with digital items, also known as interactive print, educators can create a custom learning experience for students. There is very little guidance on the design of…

  9. µPlasma printing of hydrophobic and hydrophilic patterns to improve wetting behaviour for printed electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, Martijn van; Bernards, Jan; Niewenhuis, Erik; Verkuijlen, Renee; Verbraeken, Lise

    2012-01-01

    Inkjet printing is a rapidly growing technology for depositing functional materials in the production of organic electronics. Challenges lie among others in the printing of high resolution patterns with high aspect ratio of functional materials to obtain the needed functionality like e.g. conductivi

  10. The Decline of Print: Ten Years of Print Serial Use in a Small Academic Medical Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Karen Thompson

    2006-01-01

    Tracking use of print journals over a ten-year period has allowed The University of South Carolina (USC) School of Medicine Library an essential tool for more accurate collection development, for both print and electronic selection. This lengthy study has provided usage statistics for purchasing decisions regarding electronic subscriptions still…

  11. An inktjet printing-based process chain for conductive structures on printed circuit board materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    A process chain to fabricate conductive structures on printed circuit board material is presented in this thesis. This process chain comprises four main steps: plasma treatment, inkjet printing, electroless plating and functional characterisation. It represents a drastic reduction in the number of

  12. Electrochemical Migration Behavior of Copper-Clad Laminate and Electroless Nickel/Immersion Gold Printed Circuit Boards under Thin Electrolyte Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Yi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical migration (ECM behavior of copper-clad laminate (PCB-Cu and electroless nickel/immersion gold printed circuit boards (PCB-ENIG under thin electrolyte layers of different thicknesses containing 0.1 M Na2SO4 was studied. Results showed that, under the bias voltage of 12 V, the reverse migration of ions occurred. For PCB-Cu, both copper dendrites and sulfate precipitates were found on the surface of FR-4 (board material between two plates. Moreover, the Cu dendrite was produced between the two plates and migrated toward cathode. Compared to PCB-Cu, PCB-ENIG exhibited a higher tendency of ECM failure and suffered from seriously short circuit failure under high relative humidity (RH environment. SKP results demonstrated that surface potentials of the anode plates were greater than those of the cathode plates, and those potentials of the two plates exhibited a descending trend as the RH increased. At the end of the paper, an electrochemical migration corrosion failure model of PCB was proposed.

  13. Investigation of Mesh Choosing Parameters in Screen Printing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet AKGÜL

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mesh, which is made by weaving of natural silk, plastic, or metal fibers, is basic material for screen-printing. Image is created on stretched on a frame in screen-printing. Mesh should be selected correctly for a high quality printing. Therefore, substrates, types of print job and mesh parameters have importance. Need to know more about to mesh, yarn type, yarn thickness, frequency of weaving, stretching tension, the kind of weaving, etc. In this study, for a high quality screen-printing, mesh variables examined in detail and optimum conditions indicated, with the aim of increase productivity, minimize to losses time, material and labor. As a result, this information’s for obtaining a high quality printing with screen-printing system have importance as a guide. Also resolution of the image, amount of print run and viscosity of the printing ink, factors affecting the selection of mesh.

  14. Demand for Skilled Workers in Commercial Printing as Perceived by Commercial Printers, Printing Educators, and Printing Trade Services Suppliers. A Summary Report of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jesus J.

    A study was conducted to determine if differences existed between and among the perceptions of commercial printers, printer educators, and printing trade services suppliers in Texas regarding current and future employment trends for skilled workers in commercial printing. A random sample of commercial printers, high school printing educators, and…

  15. Examination of printability parameters of IPA free offset printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ozcan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fountain solution system in offset printing system has significant impacts on the printing quality and fountain is the indispensable part of this system. The most important chemical added into the fountain solution is isopropyl alcohol. Fundamental features of isopropyl alcohol are reducing surface tension and adjusting and stabilizing pH. However, in the course of time, the disadvantages of using alcohol have emerged. In the present study, the quality levels of IPA-based and IPA-free offset prints were compared. Specially designed test scale printing was carried out after IPA-based and IPA-free fountain solutions were prepared with the same ink on matt-coated paper under optimal printing conditions. Densitometric and spectrophotometric measurements were carried out on the prints and it was ensured that they were printed in accordance with ISO-12647-2:2013 offset printing standards. Special test scales that were printed were read through scale readers and colour profiles were obtained. Comparisons were carried out on the obtained IPA-free and IPAbased printing colour gamut. Microscopic images of the smallest dots were taken and edge sharpening was examined. Print brightness measurements were carried out for the selected areas on the test scale. The study practically demonstrated that printing performed by using IPA-free fountain solution produced a better and wider colour gamut, edge sharpening was better in the IPA-free systems as the number of prints increased and the prints made by using IPA-free fountain solution were brighter.

  16. Using print focused collection development policies in digitally born libraries: dilemmas. Which dies first: the print or the print CDP?

    KAUST Repository

    Buck, Stephen

    2016-11-03

    Objectives: The King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST) library is a ‘born digital’ library. The core, and vast majority, of library resources was acquired in electronic form and a smaller print collection, which complemented the wider collection, was acquired contemporaneously. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether, in conjunction with our specific print collections development policy, we need a complementary E-Resources policy. The writing of such a policy utilizes valuable resources (both staff and time) and involves itself with the sometimes vaguely defined and complex concept of collection evaluation. Issues in e-resources are constantly changing and updates will be necessary to reflect this. How, and how often, do we update our E-Resources CDP? While Biblarz (2001) maintains that the main argument for the existence of a print CDP is to prevent the library from being driven by events or by individual enthusiasms and from purchasing a random set of resources, which may not support the mission of the library this paper explores issues in maintaining a joint print and ‘E’ CDP. Methodology: This case study of KAUST University Library discusses our print and E-collections in the context of the vision and mission of the university. While the research on crossover, between print and E-Resource CDPs is scarce, on studying a cross section of other university library CDPs it can be seen that the print CDP, which was formerly a main driver of library policy, is now overwhelmingly no more than a minor subsection of the overall CDPs of many libraries. Two IFLA documents were also compared in their approaches to dealing with print and ‘E’ CDPs. Key Issues for E-Resource Collection Development (Johnson, 2012) focuses on key aspects of the e-resource process in libraries. Crucially it is stated that the current document is simply a snapshot of best practices at this point in time. The 2001 IFLA Guidelines for a Collection Development

  17. COMPUTER- AIDED MODELING AND IMPROVING OF RISOGRAPH PRINTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sulim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The considered improvement of qualit y of the risofraph print based on a mathematical model in the environment Matlab by using the specialized algorithms and digital filter of the Image Processing Toolbox. Use the model of screen printing in Matlab environment for risograph provide an opportunit y to improve the qualit y of prints by adjusting profile risograph to a specific view and the t ype of digital image. The use of the proposed technology will reduce the flow of the film and the paint by eliminating printing test prints and reducing the time spent printing.

  18. Flexible Circuits and Soft Actuators by Printing Assembly of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbo; Li, Fengyu; Li, Huizeng; Su, Meng; Gao, Meng; Li, Yanan; Su, Dan; Zhang, Xingye; Song, Yanlin

    2016-05-18

    An effective way to improve the electrical conductivity of printed graphene patterns was demonstrated by realizing the assembly of giant graphene oxide sheets during the printing process. The synergetic effect of printing-induced orientation and evaporation-induced interfacial assembly facilitated the formation of laminar-structured patterns. The resulting patterns after chemical reduction showed excellent electrical conductivity in printed graphene electronics. Because of their high conductivity, mechanical flexibility, and advantage in pattern design, printed graphene electrodes were applied in electrical-driven soft actuators, which can realize controllable deformation with low driving voltage. Such achievements will be of great significance for the development of graphene-based flexible and printed electronics.

  19. Study on Finite Element Analysis of Fine Solid Lines by Flexographic Printing in Printed Antennas for RFID Transponder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Maksud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing is offering the feasibility of producing mass quantities of a wide variety of electronic components and devices quickly and at lower cost. Flexography is mainly used for packaging applications, but is also poses a potential method for the micro manufacture of electronic devices, smart packaging and RFID. The flexographic printing process poses as an attractive candidate for printing electronics for its high speed printing capabilities where such volume and large active areas need to be printed. Therefore an investigation for its potential usage in printing electronics are highly in demand hence a research for suitable conductive ink related to this process is vital. Multiple fine solid lines of high quality are essential to enable printing of ink tracks for electronic applications. A step by step approach by printing multiple solid lines, measurements of printing plates and printed images and finite element analysis (FEA need to be carried out in advance to help comprehending this process that is influenced by many interacting parameters. Plate characteristics are among a number of process parameters that will influence print line quality, which will affect the electrical performance of printed tracks. Printing trials have also been carried out in comparison various ink to check the compatibility and the suitability of the ink developed for printing RFID antennas.

  20. 3D printed orodispersible films with Aripiprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamróz, Witold; Kurek, Mateusz; Łyszczarz, Ewelina; Szafraniec, Joanna; Knapik-Kowalczuk, Justyna; Syrek, Karolina; Paluch, Marian; Jachowicz, Renata

    2017-05-24

    Three dimensional printing technology is gaining in importance because of its increasing availability and wide applications. One of the three dimensional printing techniques is Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) which works on the basis of hot melt extrusion-well known in the pharmaceutical technology. Combination of fused deposition modelling with preparation of the orodispersible film with poorly water soluble substance such as aripiprazole seems to be extra advantageous in terms of dissolution rate. 3D printed as well as casted films were compared in terms of physicochemical and mechanical properties. Moreover, drug-free films were prepared to evaluate the impact of the extrusion process and aripiprazole presence on the film properties. X-ray diffractometry and thermal analyses confirmed transition of aripiprazole into amorphous state during film preparation using 3D printing technique. Amorphization of the aripiprazole and porous structure of printed film led to increased dissolution rate in comparison to casted films, which, however have slightly better mechanical properties due to their continuous structure. It can be concluded that fused deposition modelling is suitable technique and polyvinyl alcohol is applicable polymer for orodispersible films preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. THE DISTRIBUTION NETWORK DEVELOPEMENT IN PRINT MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Iordache

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we identify the characteristics of the distribution networks in print media and the features ofmarketing in mass media, emphasising the attempts initiated by the press in the context of the financial crisis. Theresearch was conducted through a case study on regional newspaper,, Gazeta de Sud'' The main problems analyzedwere decreasing newspaper circulation and advertising. The research taken into account trends and developmentsworldwide print media as well as print media particularities of Romania, with a focus on identifying factors thatcontributed to the closure of a significant number of newspapers, or their transition from printed version online format.The paper is mainly focused on some practical issues related to the way of organizing the print media sales networks,the authors elaborating proposals for the implementation of certain measures to increase the circulation, on the onehand, and on the hand, to increase the sale of ad space in the newspaper. Compared with other products, thenewspaper has unique characteristics caused by daily changing content, and therefore the product itself. Having ahighly perishable, the content of media products should always seen in relation to time, which requires more rapiddistribution and continuous production.

  2. Three-Dimensional Printed Graphene Foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Junwei; Li, Yilun; Villegas Salvatierra, Rodrigo; Wang, Tuo; Dong, Pei; Ji, Yongsung; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Zhang, Chenhao; Zhang, Jibo; Smith, Robert H; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun; Zhao, Naiqin; Tour, James M

    2017-07-25

    An automated metal powder three-dimensional (3D) printing method for in situ synthesis of free-standing 3D graphene foams (GFs) was successfully modeled by manually placing a mixture of Ni and sucrose onto a platform and then using a commercial CO2 laser to convert the Ni/sucrose mixture into 3D GFs. The sucrose acted as the solid carbon source for graphene, and the sintered Ni metal acted as the catalyst and template for graphene growth. This simple and efficient method combines powder metallurgy templating with 3D printing techniques and enables direct in situ 3D printing of GFs with no high-temperature furnace or lengthy growth process required. The 3D printed GFs show high-porosity (∼99.3%), low-density (∼0.015g cm(-3)), high-quality, and multilayered graphene features. The GFs have an electrical conductivity of ∼8.7 S cm(-1), a remarkable storage modulus of ∼11 kPa, and a high damping capacity of ∼0.06. These excellent physical properties of 3D printed GFs indicate potential applications in fields requiring rapid design and manufacturing of 3D carbon materials, for example, energy storage devices, damping materials, and sound absorption.

  3. Inorganic nanomaterials for printed electronics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    2017-06-08

    Owing to their capability of bypassing conventional high-priced and inflexible silicon based electronics to manufacture a variety of devices on flexible substrates by using large-scale and high-volume printing techniques, printed electronics (PE) have attracted increasing attention in the field of manufacturing industry for electronic devices. This simple and cost-effective approach could enhance current methods of constructing a patterned surface for nanomaterials and offer opportunities for developing fully-printed functional devices, especially offering the possibility of ubiquitous low-cost and flexible devices. This review presents a summary of work to date on the inorganic nanomaterials involved in PE applications, focused on the utilization of inorganic nanomaterials-based inks in the successful preparation of printed conductive patterns, electrodes, sensors, thin film transistors (TFTs) and other micro-/nanoscale devices. The printing techniques, sintering methods and printability of functional inks with their associated challenges are discussed, and we look forward so you can glimpse the future of PE applications.

  4. Printed Arabic Character Recognition Using HMM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbas H.Hassin; Xiang-Long Tang; Jia-Feng Liu; Wei Zhao

    2004-01-01

    The Arabic Language has a very rich vocabulary.More than 200 million people speak this language as their native speaking,and over 1 billion people use it in several religion-related activities.In this paper a new technique is presented for recognizing printed Arabic characters.After a word is segmented,each character/word is entirely transformed into a feature vector.The features of printed Arabic characters include strokes and bays in various directions,endpoints,intersection points,loops,dots and zigzags.The word skeleton is decomposed into a number of links in orthographic order,and then it is transferred into a sequence of symbols using vector quantization.Single hidden Markov model has been used for recognizing the printed Arabic characters.Experimental results show that the high recognition rate depends on the number of states in each sample.

  5. 3D-printed microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Reza; Knowlton, Stephanie; Hart, Alexander; Yenilmez, Bekir; Ghaderinezhad, Fariba; Katebifar, Sara; Messina, Michael; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-20

    Microfluidics is a flourishing field, enabling a wide range of biochemical and clinical applications such as cancer screening, micro-physiological system engineering, high-throughput drug testing, and point-of-care diagnostics. However, fabrication of microfluidic devices is often complicated, time consuming, and requires expensive equipment and sophisticated cleanroom facilities. Three-dimensional (3D) printing presents a promising alternative to traditional techniques such as lithography and PDMS-glass bonding, not only by enabling rapid design iterations in the development stage, but also by reducing the costs associated with institutional infrastructure, equipment installation, maintenance, and physical space. With the recent advancements in 3D printing technologies, highly complex microfluidic devices can be fabricated via single-step, rapid, and cost-effective protocols, making microfluidics more accessible to users. In this review, we discuss a broad range of approaches for the application of 3D printing technology to fabrication of micro-scale lab-on-a-chip devices.

  6. Condition monitoring of multistage printing presses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Golnaraghi, F.; Ismail, F.

    2004-03-01

    The main concern in printing quality in multistage presses is doubling. Doubling is caused by imperfections either within stages (units) or in links connecting different stages, mainly resulting from machine vibration, gear damage, and excessive run-out. In this paper, we propose new means for printing quality control via geared system health condition monitoring. The diagnosis is based on the signals acquired from inexpensive magnetic pickups. A new technique is developed to monitor the gear rotation synchronization among different stages in order to isolate possible sources of the doubling problem. A new approach is proposed to determine the gear run-out. Moreover, gear tooth damage detection is conducted using the beta kurtosis and the continuous wavelet transform based on the overall residual signal. The beta kurtosis of original signal average is also shown here to be useful in detecting excessive gear run-out. Test results from printing presses demonstrated the viability of the proposed methods.

  7. Print, Newspapers and Audiences in Colonial Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Bodil Folke

    2011-01-01

    The article addresses African and Indian newspaper networks in Kenya in the late 1940s in an Indian Ocean perspective. Newspapers were important parts of a printing culture that was sustained by Indian and African nationalist politics and economic enterprise. In this period new intermediary groups...... of African and Indian entrepreneurs, activists and publicists, collaborating around newspaper production, captured fairly large and significant non-European audiences (some papers had print runs of around ten thousand) and engaged them in new ways, incorporating their aspirations, writings and points of view...... in newspapers. They depended on voluntary and political associations and anti-colonial struggles in Kenya and on links to nationalists in India and the passive resistance movement in South Africa. They sidestepped the European-dominated print culture and created an anti-colonial counter-voice. Editors insisted...

  8. Lip prints: Role in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Ganapathi, Nalliappan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanaykanpalayam Ragunathan; Maheswaran, Thangadurai; Kumar, Muniapillai Siva; Aravindhan, Ravi

    2013-06-01

    Identification plays a major role in any crime investigation. The pattern of wrinkles on the lips has individual characteristics like fingerprints. Cheiloscopy is a forensic investigation technique that deals with identification of humans based on lips traces. In the past decades, lip-print studies attracted the attention of many scientists as a new tool for human identification in both civil and criminal issues. The lip crease pattern is on the vermilion border of the lip, which is quite mobile and lip prints may vary in appearance according to the pressure, direction and method used in making the print. It concludes by enlightening the readers with the fact that the possibilities to use the red part of lips to identify a human being are wider than it is commonly thought.

  9. Lip prints: Role in forensic odontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janardhanam Dineshshankar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification plays a major role in any crime investigation. The pattern of wrinkles on the lips has individual characteristics like fingerprints. Cheiloscopy is a forensic investigation technique that deals with identification of humans based on lips traces. In the past decades, lip-print studies attracted the attention of many scientists as a new tool for human identification in both civil and criminal issues. The lip crease pattern is on the vermilion border of the lip, which is quite mobile and lip prints may vary in appearance according to the pressure, direction and method used in making the print. It concludes by enlightening the readers with the fact that the possibilities to use the red part of lips to identify a human being are wider than it is commonly thought.

  10. Three-dimensional printing of biological matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Munaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing of human tissues and organ has been an exciting research topic in the past three decades. However, existing technological and biological challenges still require a significant amount of research. The present review highlights these challenges and discusses their potential solutions such as mapping and converting a human organ onto a 3D virtual design, synchronizing the virtual design with the printing hardware. Moreover, the paper discusses in details recent advances in formulating bio-inks and challenges in tissue construction with or without scaffold. Next, the paper reviews fusion processes effecting vascular cells and tissues. Finally, the paper deliberates the feasibility of organ printing with state-of-the-art technologies.

  11. A screen-printed flexible flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, A.; Syrovy, T.; Syrova, L.; Kaltsas, G.

    2017-04-01

    A thermal flow sensor was printed on a flexible plastic substrate using exclusively screen-printing techniques. The presented device was implemented with custom made screen-printed thermistors, which allows simple, cost-efficient production on a variety of flexible substrates while maintaining the typical advantages of thermal flow sensors. Evaluation was performed for both static (zero flow) and dynamic conditions using a combination of electrical measurements and IR imaging techniques in order to determine important characteristics, such as temperature response, output repeatability, etc. The flow sensor was characterized utilizing the hot-wire and calorimetric principles of operation, while the preliminary results appear to be very promising, since the sensor was successfully evaluated and displayed adequate sensitivity in a relatively wide flow range.

  12. Bone tissue engineering using 3D printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Bose

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of additive manufacturing technologies in the mid 1980s, many applications benefited from the faster processing of products without the need for specific tooling or dies. However, the application of such techniques in the area of biomedical devices has been slow due to the stringent performance criteria and concerns related to reproducibility and part quality, when new technologies are in their infancy. However, the use of additive manufacturing technologies in bone tissue engineering has been growing in recent years. Among the different technology options, three dimensional printing (3DP is becoming popular due to the ability to directly print porous scaffolds with designed shape, controlled chemistry and interconnected porosity. Some of these inorganic scaffolds are biodegradable and have proven ideal for bone tissue engineering, sometimes even with site specific growth factor/drug delivery abilities. This review article focuses on recent advances in 3D printed bone tissue engineering scaffolds along with current challenges and future directions.

  13. Inkjet Printed Radio Frequency Passive Components

    KAUST Repository

    McKerricher, Garret

    2015-12-01

    Inkjet printing is a mature technique for colourful graphic arts. It excels at customized, large area, high resolution, and small volume production. With the developments in conductive, and dielectric inks, there is potential for large area inkjet electronics fabrication. Passive radio frequency devices can benefit greatly from a printing process, since the size of these devices is defined by the frequency of operation. The large size of radio frequency passives means that they either take up expensive space “on chip” or that they are fabricated on a separate lower cost substrate and somehow bonded to the chips. This has hindered cost-sensitive high volume applications such as radio frequency identification tags. Substantial work has been undertaken on inkjet-printed conductors for passive antennas on microwave substrates and even paper, yet there has been little work on the printing of the dielectric materials aimed at radio frequency passives. Both the conductor and dielectric need to be integrated to create a multilayer inkjet printing process that is capable of making quality passives such as capacitors and inductors. Three inkjet printed dielectrics are investigated in this thesis: a ceramic (alumina), a thermal-cured polymer (poly 4 vinyl phenol), and a UV-cured polymer (acrylic based). For the conductor, both a silver nanoparticle ink as well as a custom in-house formulated particle-free silver ink are explored. The focus is on passives, mainly capacitors and inductors. Compared to low frequency electronics, radio frequency components have additional sensitivity regarding skin depth of the conductor and surface roughness, as well as dielectric constant and loss tangent of the dielectric. These concerns are investigated with the aim of making the highest quality components possible and to understand the current limitations of inkjet-fabricated radio frequency devices. An inkjet-printed alumina dielectric that provides quality factors of 200 and high

  14. Printed Carbon Nanotube Electronics and Sensor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin; Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Kiriya, Daisuke; Ota, Hiroki; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Printing technologies offer large-area, high-throughput production capabilities for electronics and sensors on mechanically flexible substrates that can conformally cover different surfaces. These capabilities enable a wide range of new applications such as low-cost disposable electronics for health monitoring and wearables, extremely large format electronic displays, interactive wallpapers, and sensing arrays. Solution-processed carbon nanotubes have been shown to be a promising candidate for such printing processes, offering stable devices with high performance. Here, recent progress made in printed carbon nanotube electronics is discussed in terms of materials, processing, devices, and applications. Research challenges and opportunities moving forward from processing and system-level integration points of view are also discussed for enabling practical applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Direct printing of anisotropic wetting patterns using aerodynamically focused nanoparticle (AFN) printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hae-Sung; Lee, Hyun-Taek; Kim, Eun-Seob; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Micro- and nanoscale structures are of interest in various engineering fields due to their unique properties, such as hydrophobicity. In particular, micro/nano hierarchical structures have been investigated to promote surface hydrophobicity. Here, aerodynamically focused nanoparticle (AFN) printing was used for direct printing of superhydrophobic patterns. As AFN printing is a room-temperature direct printing technique, printed features have a hierarchical structure of two levels; nanoscale porous surface and microscale-printed patterns in three-dimensional structures. Moreover, because it is an additive fabrication technique, the printed pattern is repairable and can be reconfigured as desired. In this study, silver nanoparticles were used to implement a superhydrophobic pattern with a minimum width of tens of microns. The contact angle of water droplets was measured for various patterns, and the effects of nanoscale porosity and pattern interval were investigated. In addition, patterns were designed and fabricated to have anisotropic superhydrophobicity. The experimental results were analyzed and explained with the classical Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models.

  16. Influence of Parameters of a Printing Plate on Photoluminescence of Nanophotonic Printed Elements of Novel Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Sarapulova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to produce nanophotonic elements for smart packaging, we investigated the influence of the parameters of screen and offset gravure printing plates on features of printed application of coatings with nanophotonic components and on parameters of their photoluminescence. To determine the dependence of luminescence intensity on the thickness of solid coating, we carried out the formation of nanophotonic solid surfaces by means of screen printing with different layer thickness on polypropylene film. The obtained analytical dependencies were used to confirm the explanation of the processes that occur during the fabrication of nanophotonic coverings with offset gravure printing plates. As a result of experimental studies, it was determined that the different character of the dependency of total luminescence intensity of nanophotonic elements from the percentage of a pad is explained by the use of different types of offset gravure printing plates, where the size of raster points remains constant in one case and changes in the other case, while the depth of the printing elements accordingly changes or remains constant. To obtain nanophotonic areas with predetermined photoluminescent properties, the influence of investigated factors on changes of photoluminescent properties of nanophotonic printed surfaces should be taken into consideration.

  17. Fluid mechanical proximity effects in high-resolution gravure printing for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Gerd; Scheideler, William J.; Subramanian, Vivek

    2016-11-01

    Gravure printing is a very promising method for printed electronics because it combines high throughput with high resolution. Recently, printed lines with 2 micrometer resolution have been demonstrated at printing speeds on the order of 1m/s. In order to build realistic circuits, the fluid dynamics of complex pattern formation needs to be studied. Recently, we showed that highly-scaled lines printed in close succession exhibit proximity effects that can either improve or deteriorate print quality depending on a number of parameters. It was found that this effect occurs if cells are connected by a thin fluid film. Here, we present further experimental and modeling results explaining the mechanism by which this thin fluid film affects pattern formation. During the transfer of ink from the roll to the substrate, ink can flow in between connected cells. Asymmetry in the fluid distribution created by the preceding doctor blade wiping process results in net fluid flow from cells that transfer first to cells that transfer subsequently. The proximity of these cells thus affects the final ink distribution on the substrate, which is critically important to understand and design optimally when printing highly-scaled patterns of electronic materials. This work is based upon work supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement No. EEC-1160494.

  18. Print mass media: territory of survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny V. Akhmadulin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of the survival of the print media in the information market in the conditions of intense competition with online journalism and the whole information flow on the Internet. Despite the predictions of the impending death of print periodicals, more than half of the world adult population read a daily newspaper. At the same time, the trends taking place in the media market, confirm the reduction of print media segment in favor of the Internet. According to TNS-Russia data, only in 2013 the Internet audience has grown by 6 %. At the same time the circulation of print media in the US fell by 15 % in 2008- 2014, in Western Europe – by a quarter. In Russia, subscription circulation periodicals in the second half of 2014 fell by 20.2 %, and on the basis of subscription for the first half of 2015, the national average – 22 % (data of Federal State Unitary Enterprise “Russian Post”. Finding ways to stabilize the fall of the print media, many US publishing houses see the transition from advertcentric business model to consumcentric model. It is necessary to use the specifics and advantages of newspapers and magazines (comfort, media planning logic, analytic, continuity and consistency of the content of individual and hypertext editions, and others to maintain the intellectual elite. Print media targeting to an elite audience (willing to pay for exclusiveness allows publishers to offset the rising cost of issuing paperbased, and consumers (subscribers will give a sense of communion to a certain social community, receiving verified and thorough information. In this case, the subscription to a newspaper or magazine (no retail outlet and online will be fashionable factor of association of elite communities and acquire new qualitative features in the development of civil society.

  19. Cardiothoracic Applications of 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Steigner, Michael L.; George, Elizabeth; Barile, Maria; Hunsaker, Andetta R.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mitsouras, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medical 3D printing is emerging as a clinically relevant imaging tool in directing preoperative and intraoperative planning in many surgical specialties and will therefore likely lead to interdisciplinary collaboration between engineers, radiologists, and surgeons. Data from standard imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, echocardiography and rotational angiography can be used to fabricate life-sized models of human anatomy and pathology, as well as patient-specific implants and surgical guides. Cardiovascular 3D printed models can improve diagnosis and allow for advanced pre-operative planning. The majority of applications reported involve congenital heart diseases, valvular and great vessels pathologies. Printed models are suitable for planning both surgical and minimally invasive procedures. Added value has been reported toward improving outcomes, minimizing peri-operative risk, and developing new procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacements. Similarly, thoracic surgeons are using 3D printing to assess invasion of vital structures by tumors and to assist in diagnosis and treatment of upper and lower airway diseases. Anatomic models enable surgeons to assimilate information more quickly than image review, choose the optimal surgical approach, and achieve surgery in a shorter time. Patient-specific 3D-printed implants are beginning to appear and may have significant impact on cosmetic and life-saving procedures in the future. In summary, cardiothoracic 3D printing is rapidly evolving and may be a potential game-changer for surgeons. The imager who is equipped with the tools to apply this new imaging science to cardiothoracic care is thus ideally positioned to innovate in this new emerging imaging modality. PMID:27149367

  20. Inkjet printing of single-crystal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemawari, Hiromi; Yamada, Toshikazu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Haas, Simon; Chiba, Ryosuke; Kumai, Reiji; Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of single crystals has been fundamental to the development of semiconductor microelectronics and solid-state science. Whether based on inorganic or organic materials, the devices that show the highest performance rely on single-crystal interfaces, with their nearly perfect translational symmetry and exceptionally high chemical purity. Attention has recently been focused on developing simple ways of producing electronic devices by means of printing technologies. `Printed electronics' is being explored for the manufacture of large-area and flexible electronic devices by the patterned application of functional inks containing soluble or dispersed semiconducting materials. However, because of the strong self-organizing tendency of the deposited materials, the production of semiconducting thin films of high crystallinity (indispensable for realizing high carrier mobility) may be incompatible with conventional printing processes. Here we develop a method that combines the technique of antisolvent crystallization with inkjet printing to produce organic semiconducting thin films of high crystallinity. Specifically, we show that mixing fine droplets of an antisolvent and a solution of an active semiconducting component within a confined area on an amorphous substrate can trigger the controlled formation of exceptionally uniform single-crystal or polycrystalline thin films that grow at the liquid-air interfaces. Using this approach, we have printed single crystals of the organic semiconductor 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) (ref. 15), yielding thin-film transistors with average carrier mobilities as high as 16.4cm2V-1s-1. This printing technique constitutes a major step towards the use of high-performance single-crystal semiconductor devices for large-area and flexible electronics applications.

  1. Cardiothoracic Applications of 3-dimensional Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Steigner, Michael L; George, Elizabeth; Barile, Maria; Hunsaker, Andetta R; Rybicki, Frank J; Mitsouras, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    Medical 3-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically relevant imaging tool in directing preoperative and intraoperative planning in many surgical specialties and will therefore likely lead to interdisciplinary collaboration between engineers, radiologists, and surgeons. Data from standard imaging modalities such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and rotational angiography can be used to fabricate life-sized models of human anatomy and pathology, as well as patient-specific implants and surgical guides. Cardiovascular 3D-printed models can improve diagnosis and allow for advanced preoperative planning. The majority of applications reported involve congenital heart diseases and valvular and great vessels pathologies. Printed models are suitable for planning both surgical and minimally invasive procedures. Added value has been reported toward improving outcomes, minimizing perioperative risk, and developing new procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacements. Similarly, thoracic surgeons are using 3D printing to assess invasion of vital structures by tumors and to assist in diagnosis and treatment of upper and lower airway diseases. Anatomic models enable surgeons to assimilate information more quickly than image review, choose the optimal surgical approach, and achieve surgery in a shorter time. Patient-specific 3D-printed implants are beginning to appear and may have significant impact on cosmetic and life-saving procedures in the future. In summary, cardiothoracic 3D printing is rapidly evolving and may be a potential game-changer for surgeons. The imager who is equipped with the tools to apply this new imaging science to cardiothoracic care is thus ideally positioned to innovate in this new emerging imaging modality.

  2. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  3. Applications of laser printing for organic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Ainsebaa, A.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Benetti, M.; Boutopoulos, C.; Cannata, D.; Di Pietrantonio, F.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.; Dutroncy, J.; Eason, R.; Feinaugle, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J.-M.; Grisel, A.; Kaur, K.; Lehmann, U.; Lippert, T.; Loussert, C.; Makrygianni, M.; Manfredonia, I.; Mattle, T.; Morenza, J.-L.; Nagel, M.; Nüesch, F.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rapp, L.; Rizvi, N.; Rodio, G.; Sanaur, S.; Serra, P.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Sones, C. L.; Verona, E.; Zergioti, I.

    2013-03-01

    The development of organic electronic requires a non contact digital printing process. The European funded e-LIFT project investigated the possibility of using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique to address this field of applications. This process has been optimized for the deposition of functional organic and inorganic materials in liquid and solid phase, and a set of polymer dynamic release layer (DRL) has been developed to allow a safe transfer of a large range of thin films. Then, some specific applications related to the development of heterogeneous integration in organic electronics have been addressed. We demonstrated the ability of LIFT process to print thin film of organic semiconductor and to realize Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) with mobilities as high as 4 10-2 cm2.V-1.s-1 and Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.8 105. Polymer Light Emitting Diodes (PLED) have been laser printed by transferring in a single step process a stack of thin films, leading to the fabrication of red, blue green PLEDs with luminance ranging from 145 cd.m-2 to 540 cd.m-2. Then, chemical sensors and biosensors have been fabricated by printing polymers and proteins on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices. The ability of LIFT to transfer several sensing elements on a same device with high resolution allows improving the selectivity of these sensors and biosensors. Gas sensors based on the deposition of semiconducting oxide (SnO2) and biosensors for the detection of herbicides relying on the printing of proteins have also been realized and their performances overcome those of commercial devices. At last, we successfully laser-printed thermoelectric materials and realized microgenerators for energy harvesting applications.

  4. Color management: printing processes - opportunities and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Samuel T.

    2002-06-01

    Digital tools have impacted traditional methods employed to reproduce color images during the past decade. The shift from a purely photomechanical process in color reproduction to colorimetric reproduction offers tremendous opportunity in the graphic arts industry. But good things do not necessarily come to all in the same package. Printing processes possess different reproduction attributes: tone reproduction, gray balance and color correction requirements are as different as the ingredient sets selected for color reproduction. This paper will provide insight toward understanding advantages and limitations offered by the new digital technologies in printing, publishing and packaging. For the past five years the Clemson University Graphic Communications Department has conducted numerous color projects using the new digital colorimetric tools during the previous decade. Several approaches have been used including experimental research and typical production workflows. The use of colorimetric data in color reproduction has given an opportunity to realize real gains in color use, predictability and consistency. Meeting an image's separation and reproduction requirements for a specified printing process can involve disruption of the anticipated workflow. Understanding the printing process requirements and the fit within the specifications of a colorimetric workflow are critical to the successful adoption of a color managed workflow. The paper will also provide an insight into the issues and challenges experienced with a color managed workflow. The printing processes used include offset litho, narrow and wide-web flexography (paper, liner board, corrugated and film), screen printing (paper board and polycarbonates), and digital imaging with toner, ink and inkjet systems. A proposal for technology integration will be the focus of the presentation drawn from documented experiences in over 300 applications of color management tools. Discussion will include the structure of

  5. 3D-PRINTING OF BUILD OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAVYTSKYI M. V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Today, in all spheres of our life we can constate the permanent search for new, modern methods and technologies that meet the principles of sustainable development. New approaches need to be, on the one hand more effective in terms of conservation of exhaustible resources of our planet, have minimal impact on the environment and on the other hand to ensure a higher quality of the final product. Construction is not exception. One of the new promising technology is the technology of 3D -printing of individual structures and buildings in general. 3Dprinting - is the process of real object recreating on the model of 3D. Unlike conventional printer which prints information on a sheet of paper, 3D-printer allows you to display three-dimensional information, i.e. creates certain physical objects. Currently, 3D-printer finds its application in many areas of production: machine building elements, a variety of layouts, interior elements, various items. But due to the fact that this technology is fairly new, it requires the creation of detailed and accurate technologies, efficient equipment and materials, and development of common vocabulary and regulatory framework in this field. Research Aim. The analysis of existing methods of creating physical objects using 3D-printing and the improvement of technology and equipment for the printing of buildings and structures. Conclusion. 3D-printers building is a new generation of equipment for the construction of buildings, structures, and structural elements. A variety of building printing technics opens up wide range of opportunities in the construction industry. At this stage, printers design allows to create low-rise buildings of different configurations with different mortars. The scientific novelty of this work is to develop proposals to improve the thermal insulation properties of constructed 3D-printing objects and technological equipment. The list of key terms and notions of construction

  6. Nozzle geometry for organic vapor jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2015-01-13

    A first device is provided. The device includes a print head. The print head further includes a first nozzle hermetically sealed to a first source of gas. The first nozzle has an aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns in a direction perpendicular to a flow direction of the first nozzle. At a distance from the aperture into the first nozzle that is 5 times the smallest dimension of the aperture of the first nozzle, the smallest dimension perpendicular to the flow direction is at least twice the smallest dimension of the aperture of the first nozzle.

  7. A guide to printed circuit board design

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Charles

    1984-01-01

    A Guide to Printed Circuit Board Design discusses the basic design principles of printed circuit board (PCB). The book consists of nine chapters; each chapter provides both text discussion and illustration relevant to the topic being discussed. Chapter 1 talks about understanding the circuit diagram, and Chapter 2 covers how to compile component information file. Chapter 3 deals with the design layout, while Chapter 4 talks about preparing the master artworks. The book also covers generating computer aided design (CAD) master patterns, and then discusses how to prepare the production drawing a

  8. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  9. Modification of microneedles using inkjet printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R D Boehm

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, biodegradable acid anhydride copolymer microneedles containing quantum dots were fabricated by means of visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography-micromolding and inkjet printing. Nanoindentation was performed to obtain the hardness and the Young's modulus of the biodegradable acid anhydride copolymer. Imaging of quantum dots within porcine skin was accomplished by means of multiphoton microscopy. Our results suggest that the combination of visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography-micromolding and inkjet printing enables fabrication of solid biodegradable microneedles with a wide range of geometries as well as a wide range of pharmacologic agent compositions.

  10. Pyrolysis of Waste Printed Circuit Board Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Şule Atasever; Pınar A. Bozkurt; Muammer Canel

    2015-01-01

    Electrical and electronic apparatus and instruments which are obsolete value in use or completion of the life can be defined as e-waste. E-waste is one of the fastest growing types of hazardous waste. Printed circuit boards a major component of this waste. In this study, printed circuit board particles of mobile phone (MPCB) were used as electronic waste. MPCB waste was obtained from a local electronic waste factory. The elemental analysis and ICP-MS analysis were performed on these electroni...

  11. Generation of Protein Nanogradients by Microcontact Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaab, Daniel; Zentis, Peter; Winter, Silke; Meffert, Simone; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Mayer, Dirk

    2013-05-01

    High resolution lithography combined with microcontact printing (µCP) by means of polyolefine polymer (POP) stamps enabled to create protein gradient patterns. By this means, discrete purely biochemical gradients of extracellular matrix proteins were fabricated. It was possible to adjust independently both the size of elements of a protein pattern and the distance between them with sub 100 nm resolution. Adhesion of primary neurons and directed neuronal outgrowth were observed on these protein patterns. Cellular constituents such as filopodia adhere to different printed protein elements of the discontinuous gradient including features as small as 75 nm.

  12. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste print circuit board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Ge; CHEN Lie-qiang; PENG Shao-hong; CAI Ming-zhao

    2005-01-01

    Waste print circuit board containing 11.38% Br was pyrolyzed in vacuum.Thermal stability of waste print circuit board was studied under vacuum condition by thermo-gravimetry(TG). Vacuum pyrolysis of WPCB was studied emphasizing on the kinetics of WPCB pyrolysis reactions. Based on the TG results, a kinetic model was proposed. Kinetic parameters were calculated for reaction with this model including all stages of decomposition. The average activation energy is 68 k J/mol with reaction order 3. These findings provide new insights into the WPCB thermal decomposition and useful data for rational design and operation of pyrolysis.

  13. Printing versus coating - What will be the future production technology for printed electronics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glawe, Andrea; Eggerath, Daniel; Schäfer, Frank [KROENERT GmbH and Co KG, Schuetzenstrasse 105, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-17

    The market of Large Area Organic Printed Electronics is developing rapidly to increase efficiency and quality as well as to lower costs further. Applications for OPV, OLED, RFID and compact Printed Electronic systems are increasing. In order to make the final products more affordable, but at the same time highly accurate, Roll to Roll (R2R) production on flexible transparent polymer substrates is the way forward. There are numerous printing and coating technologies suitable depending on the design, the product application and the chemical process technology. Mainly the product design (size, pattern, repeatability) defines the application technology.

  14. Printing versus coating - What will be the future production technology for printed electronics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glawe, Andrea; Eggerath, Daniel; Schäfer, Frank

    2015-02-01

    The market of Large Area Organic Printed Electronics is developing rapidly to increase efficiency and quality as well as to lower costs further. Applications for OPV, OLED, RFID and compact Printed Electronic systems are increasing. In order to make the final products more affordable, but at the same time highly accurate, Roll to Roll (R2R) production on flexible transparent polymer substrates is the way forward. There are numerous printing and coating technologies suitable depending on the design, the product application and the chemical process technology. Mainly the product design (size, pattern, repeatability) defines the application technology.

  15. Gas cushion control of OVJP print head position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2014-10-07

    An OVJP apparatus and method for applying organic vapor or other flowable material to a substrate using a printing head mechanism in which the print head spacing from the substrate is controllable using a cushion of air or other gas applied between the print head and substrate. The print head is mounted for translational movement towards and away from the substrate and is biased toward the substrate by springs or other means. A gas cushion feed assembly supplies a gas under pressure between the print head and substrate which opposes the biasing of the print head toward the substrate so as to form a space between the print head and substrate. By controlling the pressure of gas supplied, the print head separation from the substrate can be precisely controlled.

  16. Reflectance and transmittance model for recto-verso halftone prints

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, M.; R. D. Hersch

    2006-01-01

    We propose a spectral prediction model for predicting the reflectance and transmittance of recto-verso halftone prints. A recto-verso halftone print is modeled as a diffusing substrate surrounded by two inked interfaces in contact with air (or with another medium). The interaction of light with the print comprises three components: (a) the attenuation of the incident light penetrating the print across the inked interface, (b) the internal reflectance and internal transmittance that accounts f...

  17. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  18. The future of 3D printing technology in biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Iraj Nabipour

    2015-01-01

    3D printing, one of the hottest cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, is projected to have revenue of $8.4 billion in 2020. #D printing technology will implement the concept of personalized medicine in medical healthcare industry and pharmaceutical fabrication. Organ printing, which it is defined as computer-aided, jet based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, is an interesting and challengeable field for 3D printing. Customized implants and prostheses can be produced in any ...

  19. Printing Processes Used to Manufacture Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rardin, Tina E.; Xu, Renmei

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing need for renewable energy sources, and solar power is a good option in many instances. Photovoltaic solar panels are now being manufactured via various methods, and different printing processes are being incorporated into the manufacturing process. Screen printing has been used most prevalently in the printing process to make…

  20. Evaluation of Photocrosslinked Lutrol Hydrogel for Tissue Printing Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorovich, Natalja E.; Swennen, Ives; Girones, Jordi; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.; Schacht, Etienne; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Application of hydrogels in tissue engineering and innovative strategies such as organ printing, which is based on layered 3D deposition of cell-laden hydrogels, requires design of novel hydrogel matrices. Hydrogel demands for 3D printing include: 1) preservation of the printed shape after the depos

  1. Improving Heat Transfer Performance of Printed Circuit Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzel, Donald V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will explore the ability of printed circuit boards laminated with a Carbon Core Laminate to transfer heat vs. standard printed circuit boards that use only thick layers of copper. The paper will compare the differences in heat transfer performance of printed circuit boards with and without CCL.

  2. The excitement of Google Scholar, the worry of Google Print

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, Marcus A.

    2005-01-01

    In late 2004 Google announced two major projects, the unveiling of Google Scholar and a major expansion of the Google Print digitization program. Both projects have generated discussion within the library and research communities, and Google Print has received significant media attention. This commentary describes exciting educational possibilities stimulated by Google Scholar, and argues for caution regarding the Google Print project.

  3. The excitement of Google Scholar, the worry of Google Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Marcus A

    2005-03-22

    In late 2004 Google announced two major projects, the unveiling of Google Scholar and a major expansion of the Google Print digitization program. Both projects have generated discussion within the library and research communities, and Google Print has received significant media attention.This commentary describes exciting educational possibilities stimulated by Google Scholar, and argues for caution regarding the Google Print project.

  4. 7 CFR 58.340 - Printing and packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Printing and packaging. 58.340 Section 58.340... Procedures § 58.340 Printing and packaging. Printing and packaging of consumer size containers of butter... packaging equipment should be provided. The outside cartons should be removed from bulk butter in a...

  5. Future of printing: changes and challenges, technologies and markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipphan, Helmut

    1998-01-01

    Digitalization within the graphic arts industry is described and it is explained how it is improving and changing the print production strategies and which new kinds of print production systems are developed or can be expected. The relationship of printed media and electronic media is analyzed and a positioning for the next century is given. The state of the art of conventional printing technologies, especially using direct imagine techniques, and their position within the digital workflow are shortly described. Non-impact printing multicolor printing systems are explained, based on general design criteria and linked to existing and newly announced equipment. The use of high-tech components for building up successful systems with high reliability, high quality and low production costs is included with some examples. Digital printing systems open many opportunities in print production: distributed printing, personalization, print and book on demand are explained as examples. The overview of the several printing technologies and their positioning regarding quality and productivity leads to the scenario about the important position of printed media, also in the distant future.

  6. E-prints and the Open Archives Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Simeon

    2003-01-01

    Presents a brief survey of Open Archives Initiative (OAI) e-print repositories, and of services using metadata harvested from e-print repositories using the OAI protocol for metadata harvesting (OAI-PMH). Discusses several situations where metadata harvesting may be used to further improve the utility of e-print archives as a component of the…

  7. 3D Printing by Multiphase Silicone/Water Capillary Inks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roh, Sangchul; Parekh, Dishit P.; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2017-01-01

    3D printing of polymers is accomplished easily with thermoplastics as the extruded hot melt solidifies rapidly during the printing process. Printing with liquid polymer precursors is more challenging due to their longer curing times. One curable liquid polymer of specific interest is polydimethylsil

  8. Inkjet Printing of 3D Metallic Silver Complex Microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Sridhar, Ashok; Dimitrov, D.

    2010-01-01

    To broaden the scope of inkjet printing, this paper focuses on printing of an organic silver complex ink on glass substrates towards the fabrication of metallic 3D microstructures. The droplet formation sequence of the inkjet printer is optimised to print continuous layers of metal. A brief discussi

  9. The 11th Beijing International Printing Information Conference was held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    INFOPRINT 2008,The 11th Beijing International Printing Information Conference was held on November 28, 2008 in Beijing Friendship Hotel,which is sponsored by PEIAC,Printing and Printing Equipment Industries Association of China.Xu Jinfeng,vice chairman & secretary general of PEIAC and Tan Junqiao,advisor of PEIAC

  10. Evaluation of Photocrosslinked Lutrol Hydrogel for Tissue Printing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorovich, Natalja E.; Swennen, Ives; Girones, Jordi; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Schacht, Etienne; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Application of hydrogels in tissue engineering and innovative strategies such as organ printing, which is based on layered 3D deposition of cell-laden hydrogels, requires design of novel hydrogel matrices. Hydrogel demands for 3D printing include: 1) preservation of the printed shape after the

  11. 3D Printing by Multiphase Silicone/Water Capillary Inks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roh, Sangchul; Parekh, Dishit P.; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2017-01-01

    3D printing of polymers is accomplished easily with thermoplastics as the extruded hot melt solidifies rapidly during the printing process. Printing with liquid polymer precursors is more challenging due to their longer curing times. One curable liquid polymer of specific interest is

  12. Inkjet Printing of 3D Metallic Silver Complex Microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Sridhar, Ashok; Dimitrov, D.

    2010-01-01

    To broaden the scope of inkjet printing, this paper focuses on printing of an organic silver complex ink on glass substrates towards the fabrication of metallic 3D microstructures. The droplet formation sequence of the inkjet printer is optimised to print continuous layers of metal. A brief

  13. Improving Heat Transfer Performance of Printed Circuit Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzel, Donald V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will explore the ability of printed circuit boards laminated with a Carbon Core Laminate to transfer heat vs. standard printed circuit boards that use only thick layers of copper. The paper will compare the differences in heat transfer performance of printed circuit boards with and without CCL.

  14. Inkjet printing of 3D metallic silver complex microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel W.; Sridhar, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    To broaden the scope of inkjet printing, this paper focuses on printing of an organic silver complex ink on glass substrates towards the fabrication of metallic 3D microstructures. The droplet formation sequence of the inkjet printer is optimised to print continuous layers of metal. A brief discussi

  15. Special Issue: 3D Printing for Biomedical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chee Kai; Yeong, Wai Yee; An, Jia

    2017-02-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has a long history of applications in biomedical engineering. The development and expansion of traditional biomedical applications are being advanced and enriched by new printing technologies. New biomedical applications such as bioprinting are highly attractive and trendy. This Special Issue aims to provide readers with a glimpse of the recent profile of 3D printing in biomedical research.

  16. Evaluation of 3D printed materials used to print WR10 horn antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Elof; Rahiminejad, Sofia; Enoksson, Peter

    2016-10-01

    A WR10 waveguide horn antenna is 3D printed with three different materials. The antennas are printed on a fusion deposition modeling delta 3D printer built in house at Chalmers University of Technology. The different plastic materials used are an electrically conductive Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), a thermally conductive polylactic acid containing 35% copper, and a tough Amphora polymer containing at least 20% carbon fiber. The antennas are all printed with a 0.25 mm nozzle and 100 μm layer thickness and the software settings are tuned to give maximum quality for each material. The three 3D printed horn antennas are compared when it comes to cost, time and material properties.

  17. The forensic analysis of thermal transfer printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPorte, Gerald M; Wilson, Jeffrey D; Mancke, S Amanda; Payne, Jeffrey A; Ramotowski, Robert S; Fortunato, Susan L

    2003-09-01

    Thermal transfer printing refers to printing processes that utilize heat to produce an image by either physical or chemical means or by a combination of both. As the technology has improved and the supplies have become less expensive, the use of thermal printing in the personal and business markets has increased significantly. Specifically, dye diffusion thermal transfer and thermal mass transfer have become predominant in the production of counterfeit credit cards, drivers' licenses, and other types of documents produced on plastic media. Chemical analysis by means of thin layer chromatography (TLC) has proven to be useful in characterizing various types of inks (e.g., writing and inkjet inks). In this study, the authors examined 81 different samples that included a total of 54 printer samples (43 photographic prints on paper and eleven plastic card samples) and 27 printer ribbons. A new TLC method was developed and tested utilizing a solvent system (80% n-hexane, 3% methyl ethyl ketone, and 17% ethyl acetate) that is capable of producing excellent resolution.

  18. No-infill 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Ran; Zhang, Yu-He; Geng, Guo-Hua

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examined how printing the hollow objects without infill via fused deposition modeling, one of the most widely used 3D-printing technologies, by partitioning the objects to shell parts. More specifically, we linked the partition to the exact cover problem. Given an input watertight mesh shape S, we developed region growing schemes to derive a set of surfaces that had inside surfaces that were printable without support on the mesh for the candidate parts. We then employed Monte Carlo tree search over the candidate parts to obtain the optimal set cover. All possible candidate subsets of exact cover from the optimal set cover were then obtained and the bounded tree was used to search the optimal exact cover. We oriented each shell part to the optimal position to guarantee the inside surface was printed without support, while the outside surface was printed with minimum support. Our solution can be applied to a variety of models, closed-hollowed or semi-closed, with or without holes, as evidenced by experiments and performance evaluation on our proposed algorithm.

  19. Unit: Plants, Inspection Pack, National Trial Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This is a National Trial Print of a unit on plants produced as a part of the Australian Science Education Project. The unit consists of an information booklet for students, a booklet for recording student data, and a teacher's guide. The material, designed for use with students in the upper elementary grades, takes from 15 to 20 forty-minute…

  20. 3D Printed Terahertz Focusing Grating Couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, David; Weidenbach, Marcel; Lehr, Jannik; Becker, Leonard; Beltrán-Mejía, Felipe; Busch, Stefan F.; Balzer, Jan C.; Koch, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We have designed, constructed and characterized a grating that focuses electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies out of a dielectric waveguide. A simple theoretical model predicts the focusing behaviour of these chirped gratings, along with numerical results that support our assumptions and improved the grating geometry. The leaky waveguide was 3D printed and characterized at 120 GHz demonstrating its potential for manipulating terahertz waves.

  1. Complex light in 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Christophe; Delrot, Paul; Loterie, Damien; Morales Delgado, Edgar; Modestino, Miguel; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-03-01

    3D printing as a tool to generate complicated shapes from CAD files, on demand, with different materials from plastics to metals, is shortening product development cycles, enabling new design possibilities and can provide a mean to manufacture small volumes cost effectively. There are many technologies for 3D printing and the majority uses light in the process. In one process (Multi-jet modeling, polyjet, printoptical©), a printhead prints layers of ultra-violet curable liquid plastic. Here, each nozzle deposits the material, which is then flooded by a UV curing lamp to harden it. In another process (Stereolithography), a focused UV laser beam provides both the spatial localization and the photo-hardening of the resin. Similarly, laser sintering works with metal powders by locally melting the material point by point and layer by layer. When the laser delivers ultra-fast focused pulses, nonlinear effects polymerize the material with high spatial resolution. In these processes, light is either focused in one spot and the part is made by scanning it or the light is expanded and covers a wide area for photopolymerization. Hence a fairly "simple" light field is used in both cases. Here, we give examples of how "complex light" brings additional level of complexity in 3D printing.

  2. ENZYMATIC DEINKING OF NONIMPACT PRINTED WASTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Xu; Shulan Shi; Menghua Qin

    2004-01-01

    Cellulase deinking process of non-impact printed wastes was studied. The optimized conditions were:cellulase charge 0.3%, temperature 50℃, pulping consistency 10%, enzyme treatment time 30 min,agitating speed 400 rpm. Qquality of the deinking pulp was assessed by measuring the number, average diameter, percent coverage of residual ink using Paperican ink scanner.

  3. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  4. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  5. International Standards on stability of digital prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, Peter Z.

    2010-06-01

    The International Standards Organization (ISO) is a worldwide recognized standardizing body which has responsibility for standards on permanence of digital prints. This paper is an update on the progress made to date by ISO in writing test methods in this area. Three technologies are involved, namely ink jet, dye diffusion thermal transfer (dye-sublimation) and electrophotography. Two types of test methods are possible, namely comparative tests and predictive tests. To date a comparative test on water fastness has been published and final balloting is underway on a comparative test on humidity fastness. Predictive tests are being finalized on thermal stability and pollution susceptibility. The test method on thermal stability is intended to predict the print life during normal aging. One of the testing concerns is that some prints do not show significant image change in practical testing times. The test method on pollution susceptibility only deals with ozone and assumes that the reciprocity law applies. This law assumes that a long time under a low pollutant concentration is equivalent to a short time under the high concentration used in the test procedure. Longer term studies include a predictive test for light stability and the preparation of a material specification. The latter requires a decision about the proper colour target to be used and what constitutes an unacceptable colour change. Moreover, a specification which gives a predictive life is very dependent upon the conditions the print encounters and will only apply to specific levels of temperature, ozone and light.

  6. Adhesion Characterisation of Inkjet Printed Silver Tracks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, A.; Dijk, van D.J.; Akkerman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The ever-growing need for fast prototypes and reduced manufacturing throughput times in the electronics industry has lead to worldwide research aimed at developing novel techniques and process chains. Inkjet Printing is a versatile, flexible and relatively simple process that might fit

  7. Prints Charles toetab talunike innovatsiooni / Merit Mikk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mikk, Merit, 1969-

    2015-01-01

    Mahe- ja tavatootjatele suunatud uuenduslike tehnoloogiate arendamise ja jätkusuutlike lahenduste leidmise programmist Duchy Future Farming. Programmi veavad prints Charlesi fond, maheorganisatsioon Soil Association, Waitrose kaubandusketi juhtiv mahebränd Duchy Organics ja mahepõllumajanduse uurimiskeskus (Organic Research Centre)

  8. Inkjet printing technology for OPV applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, M.; Sweelssen, J.; Grossiord, N.; Gorter, H.; Eggenhuisen, T.M.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale production of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) at low cost is, still, a future concept thought to promote the market share of solar energy. Working towards the roll-to-roll production of OPVs, different compatible deposition techniques are investigated. Inkjet printing is a promising candida

  9. Numerical models for printing and coating flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gethin, DT

    2002-01-01

    This issue brings together a number of papers under the theme of thin filmflows that are generic to printing and a wide range of coating applications.These processes require the deposition of a thin layer of fluid (or polymer) ontoa substrate. The simulation of these processes presents a number of numericalchallenges.

  10. Constructing Arguments with 3-D Printed Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, William; Dickerson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a fourth-grade lesson where 3-D printing technologies were not only a stimulus for engagement but also served as a modeling tool providing meaningful learning opportunities. Specifically, fourth-grade students construct an argument that animals' external structures function to support survival in a particular…

  11. Supramolecular approach to new inkjet printing inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Lewis R; Harries, Josephine L; Greenland, Barnaby W; Colquhoun, Howard M; Hayes, Wayne

    2015-04-29

    Electronically complementary, low molecular weight polymers that self-assemble through tunable π-π stacking interactions to form extended supramolecular polymer networks have been developed for inkjet printing applications and successfully deposited using three different printing techniques. Sequential overprinting of the complementary components results in supramolecular network formation through complexation of π-electron rich pyrenyl or perylenyl chain-ends in one component with π-electron deficient naphthalene diimide residues in a chain-folding polyimide. The complementary π-π stacked polymer blends generate strongly colored materials as a result of charge-transfer absorption bands in the visible spectrum, potentially negating the need for pigments or dyes in the ink formulation. Indeed, the final color of the deposited material can be tailored by varying the end-groups of the π-electron rich polymer component. Piezoelectric printing techniques were employed in a proof of concept study to allow characterization of the materials deposited, and a thermal inkjet printer adapted with imaging software enabled in situ analysis of the ink drops as they formed and of their physical properties. Finally, continuous inkjet printing allowed greater volumes of material to be deposited, on a variety of different substrate surfaces, and demonstrated the utility and versatility of this novel type of ink for industrial applications.

  12. Unit: Petroleum, Inspection Pack, National Trial Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This is a National Trial Print of a unit on petroleum developed for the Australian Science Education Project. The package contains the teacher's edition of the written material and a script for a film entitled "The Extraordinary Experience of Nicholas Nodwell" emphasizing the uses of petroleum and petroleum products in daily life and…

  13. Drafting. Advanced Print Reading--Electrical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document is a workbook for drafting students learning advanced print reading for electricity applications. The workbook contains seven units covering the following material: architectural working drawings; architectural symbols and dimensions; basic architectural electrical symbols; wiring symbols; riser diagrams; schematic diagrams; and…

  14. Metrics for Offset Printing Press Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of offset printing press operation students, this instructional package is one of six for the communication media occupations cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  15. Platemaking; Printing 2: 9755.04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course is one of a group which provides 11th grade students with the general information, technical knowledge, basic skills, attitudes, and values required for job entry level in the printing industry. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, orientation, types of lithographic plates, surface plates for offset, wipe-on plates,…

  16. Chemically patterned flat stamps for microcontact printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharpe, Ruben B.A.; Burdinski, Dirk; Huskens, Jurriaan; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Poelsema, Bene

    2005-01-01

    Locally oxidized patterns on flat poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamps for microcontact printing were used as a platform for the transfer of a hydrophilic fluorescent ink to a glass substrate. The contrast was found to be limited. These locally oxidized patterns were conversely used as barriers for the tra

  17. Print Readers' Perceptions of Various Advertising Formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Charles W., Jr.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The findings of a study of print readers' perceptions of the believability and interest of various advertising formats fail to support increasing either the frequency or specificity of comparative messages. The findings suggest that advertisers should consider the dimensions of intensity and directionality in their message development. (GT)

  18. 78 FR 22795 - EPAAR Clause for Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... city, county, town, school district or special district with a population of less than 50,000; and (3... plate or image to be used in the production of printing or microform. ``Camera copy'' (or ``camera-ready... produced in a miniaturized image format, for mass or general distribution and as a substitute...

  19. Slow light on a printed circuit board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A; Voronin, Aleksandr A; Sokolov, Viktor I; Fedotov, Ilya V; Fedotov, Andrei B; Akhmanov, Aleksandr S; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2011-05-15

    Slow-light effects induced by stimulated Raman scattering in polymer waveguides on a printed circuit board are shown to enable a widely tunable delay of broadband optical signals, suggesting an advantageous platform for optical information processing and ultrafast optical waveform transformation. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Screen printed interdigitated back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, C. R.; Mazaris, G. A.; Chai, A. T.

    1984-10-01

    Interdigitated back contact solar cells are made by screen printing dopant materials onto the back surface of a semiconductor substrate in a pair of interdigitated patterns. These dopant materials are then diffused into the substrate to form junctions having configurations corresponding to these patterns. Contacts having configurations which match the patterns are then applied over the junctions.

  1. Screen printed interdigitated back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, C. R.; Mazaris, G. A.; Chai, A. T. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Interdigitated back contact solar cells are made by screen printing dopant materials onto the back surface of a semiconductor substrate in a pair of interdigitated patterns. These dopant materials are then diffused into the substrate to form junctions having configurations corresponding to these patterns. Contacts having configurations which match the patterns are then applied over the junctions.

  2. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Patrick

    Full Text Available The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology.

  3. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  4. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  5. Lip prints: The barcode of skeletal malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Raghav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontics, apart from essential diagnostic aids, there are so many soft tissue analyses in which lips are major part of concern. However, lip prints have never been used in orthodontics as diagnostic aid or forensic tool. Therefore, this study was designed to explore the possible association of lip prints with skeletal malocclusion. Materials and Methods: A sample of 114 subjects in the age group of 18-30 years, from North Indian adult population were selected on the basis of skeletal class I, class II and class III malocclusion, each comprising of 38 subjects with equal number of males and females. Lip prints of all the individuals were recorded and digital soft copies of lateral cephalograms were taken. Lip prints were compared between different skeletal malocclusions. Results: It was found that branched lip pattern was most common in North Indian adult population with no sexual dimorphism. The Z-test for proportion showed that the prevalence of vertical lip pattern was significantly higher in subjects having skeletal class III malocclusion. Conclusion: A definite co-relation of vertical lip patterns with skeletal class III malocclusion was revealed.

  6. Spectrophotometric Examination of Rough Print Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet Novotny

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess the impact of the surface texture of individual creative paper types (coated or patternedon the quality of printing and to identify to what extent the various creative paper types require specific types ofspectrophotometers. We used stereomicroscopic images to illustrate unprinted and printed surfaces of creative papertypes. Surface roughness was measured to obtain data on the unevenness of surfaces. Spectrophotometric tests wereused to select the most suitable spectrophotometer from meters with different illumination setup for testing anygiven print. For the purpose of testing, we used spectrophotometers which are commonly available generally used totest print products for colour accuracy. With the improvement of measuring geometries, illumination setup, colourmeasurement becomes more and more capable of producing reliable results unaffected by surface textures. Our testshave proved this fact by showing that the GretagMacbeth Spectrolino with annular illumination is less sensitive tosurface texture than the X-Rite Spetrodensitometer and the Techkon SpetroDens with directional illumination. Furthertests have brought us to the conclusion that there is a difference even between the two devices with directionalillumination. While the X-Rite 530 Spectrodensitometer is more suitable for testing coated surfaces, the TechkonSpectroDens can come close to ΔE*ab values produced by the annular illuminated device for textured surfaces.

  7. Dyeing and Printing Sector Develops Steadily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ With the rapid growth of the economy,the dyeing and printing sector in China developed considerably in 2006. Highlights of the year include a rapid increase of output levels, considerable growth of profits, a reduction of imports and an expansion of exports.

  8. Prints Charles toetab talunike innovatsiooni / Merit Mikk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mikk, Merit, 1969-

    2015-01-01

    Mahe- ja tavatootjatele suunatud uuenduslike tehnoloogiate arendamise ja jätkusuutlike lahenduste leidmise programmist Duchy Future Farming. Programmi veavad prints Charlesi fond, maheorganisatsioon Soil Association, Waitrose kaubandusketi juhtiv mahebränd Duchy Organics ja mahepõllumajanduse uurimiskeskus (Organic Research Centre)

  9. EDMS based workflow for Printing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathap Nayak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Information is indispensable factor of any enterprise. It can be a record or a document generated for every transaction that is made, which is either a paper based or in electronic format for future reference. A Printing Industry is one such industry in which managing information of various formats, with latest workflows and technologies, could be a nightmare and a challenge for any operator or an user when each process from the least bit of information to a printed product are always dependendent on each other. Hence the information has to be harmonized artistically in order to avoid production downtime or employees pointing fingers at each other. This paper analyses how the implementation of Electronic Document Management System (EDMS could contribute to the Printing Industry for immediate access to stored documents within and across departments irrespective of geographical boundaries. The paper outlines initially with a brief history, contemporary EDMS system and some illustrated examples with a study done by choosing Library as a pilot area for evaluating EDMS. The paper ends with an imitative proposal that maps several document management based activities for implementation of EDMS for a Printing Industry.

  10. Migration from Print to Online Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubkin, Leone

    1980-01-01

    Examines the economic effects on information-producing companies of user migration from print to online information services. Three reasons are cited for the transition to online: (1) inflation, (2) new technology, and (3) database enhancement. Cost graphs and responses to questionnaires supplement the discussion. (SW)

  11. Adhesion Characterisation of Inkjet Printed Silver Tracks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, Ashok; van Dijk, D.J.; Akkerman, Remko

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The ever-growing need for fast prototypes and reduced manufacturing throughput times in the electronics industry has lead to worldwide research aimed at developing novel techniques and process chains. Inkjet Printing is a versatile, flexible and relatively simple process that might fit

  12. Optimizing aerosol jet printing process of silver ink for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, S.; Goh, G. L.; Yeong, W. Y.

    2017-04-01

    Aerosol jet is an additive manufacturing technique that writes electronic inks directly onto the surface. The process has great potential for printed electronics as it is non-contact method that works well with variety of materials- metals, insulators, semiconductors, epoxy and encapsulation materials for conformal writing. This paper explores the effect of some parameters like ultrasonic power and atomizer flow on overall print quality, thus establishing a process window.

  13. Microcontact printing of proteins inside microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Jennifer; Schmid, Heinz; Stutz, Richard; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2005-11-22

    Microfluidic devices are well suited for the miniaturization of biological assays, in particular when only small volumes of samples and reagents are available, short time to results is desirable, and multiple analytes are to be detected. Microfluidic networks (MFNs), which fill by means of capillary forces, have already been used to detect important biological analytes with high sensitivity and in a combinatorial fashion. These MFNs were coated with Au, onto which a hydrophilic, protein-repellent monolayer of thiolated poly(ethyleneglycol) (HS-PEG) was self-assembled, and the binding sites for analytes were present on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealing cover. We report here a set of simple methods to extend previous work on MFNs by integrating binding sites for analytes inside the microstructures of MFNs using microcontact printing (muCP). First, fluorescently labeled antibodies (Abs) were microcontact-printed from stamps onto planar model surfaces such as glass, Si, Si/SiO2, Au, and Au derivatized with HS-PEG to investigate how much candidate materials for MFNs would quench the fluorescence of printed, labeled Abs. Au coated with HS-PEG led to a fluorescence signal that was approximately 65% weaker than that of glass but provided a convenient surface for printing Abs and for rendering the microstructures of the MFNs wettable. Then, proteins were inked from solution onto the surface of PDMS (Sylgard 184) stamps having continuous or discontinuous micropatterns or locally inked onto planar stamps to investigate how the aspect ratio (depth:width) of microstructures and the printing conditions affected the transfer of protein and the accuracy of the resulting patterns. By applying a controlled pressure to the back of the stamp, Abs were accurately microcontact-printed into the recessed regions of MFNs if the aspect ratio of the MFN microstructures was lower than approximately 1:6. Finally, the realization of a simple assay between Abs (used as antigens

  14. Characterization of Bile Salt Hydrolase from Lactobacillus gasseri FR4 and Demonstration of Its Substrate Specificity and Inhibitory Mechanism Using Molecular Docking Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwana Parveen Rani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria are beneficial to the health of poultry animals, thus are used as alternative candidates for antibiotics used as growth promoters (AGPs. However, they also reduce the body weight gain due to innate bile salt hydrolase (BSH activity. Hence, the addition of a suitable BSH inhibitor along with the probiotic feed can decrease the BSH activity. In this study, a BSH gene (981 bp encoding 326-amino acids was identified from the genome of Lactobacillus gasseri FR4 (LgBSH. The LgBSH-encoding gene was cloned and purified using an Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 expression system, and its molecular weight (37 kDa was confirmed by SDS–PAGE and a Western blot analysis. LgBSH exhibited greater hydrolysis toward glyco-conjugated bile salts compared to tauro-conjugated bile salts. LgBSH displayed optimal activity at 52°C at a pH of 5.5, and activity was further increased by several reducing agents (DTT, surfactants (Triton X-100 and Tween 80, and organic solvents (isopropanol, butanol, and acetone. Riboflavin and penicillin V, respectively, inhibited LgBSH activity by 98.31 and 97.84%. A homology model of LgBSH was predicted using EfBSH (4WL3 as a template. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the glycocholic acid had lowest binding energy of -8.46 kcal/mol; on the other hand, inhibitors, i.e., riboflavin and penicillin V, had relatively higher binding energies of -6.25 and -7.38 kcal/mol, respectively. Our results suggest that L. gasseri FR4 along with riboflavin might be a potential alternative to AGPs for poultry animals.

  15. Flow-Directed Crystallization for Printed Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ge; Kwok, Justin J; Diao, Ying

    2016-12-20

    The solution printability of organic semiconductors (OSCs) represents a distinct advantage for materials processing, enabling low-cost, high-throughput, and energy-efficient manufacturing with new form factors that are flexible, stretchable, and transparent. While the electronic performance of OSCs is not comparable to that of crystalline silicon, the solution processability of OSCs allows them to complement silicon by tackling challenging aspects for conventional photolithography, such as large-area electronics manufacturing. Despite this, controlling the highly nonequilibrium morphology evolution during OSC printing remains a challenge, hindering the achievement of high electronic device performance and the elucidation of structure-property relationships. Many elegant morphological control methodologies have been developed in recent years including molecular design and novel processing approaches, but few have utilized fluid flow to control morphology in OSC thin films. In this Account, we discuss flow-directed crystallization as an effective strategy for controlling the crystallization kinetics during printing of small molecule and polymer semiconductors. Introducing the concept of flow-directed crystallization to the field of printed electronics is inspired by recent advances in pharmaceutical manufacturing and flow processing of flexible-chain polymers. Although flow-induced crystallization is well studied in these areas, previous findings may not apply directly to the field of printed electronics where the molecular structures (i.e., rigid π-conjugated backbone decorated with flexible side chains) and the intermolecular interactions (i.e., π-π interactions, quadrupole interactions) of OSCs differ substantially from those of pharmaceuticals or flexible-chain polymers. Another critical difference is the important role of solvent evaporation in open systems, which defines the flow characteristics and determines the crystallization kinetics and pathways. In

  16. Origins of Print Concepts at Home: Print Referencing during Joint Book-Reading Interactions in Taiwanese Mothers and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chien-ju; Luo, Ya-hui; Wu, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examines the amount of attention to print paid by Taiwanese mothers and children during joint book reading over time and the relationship between the use of print referencing by Taiwanese mothers and the print concepts skills of their children measured at age 3;0. A total of 42 Taiwanese mother-child pairs from…

  17. Green Printing: Colorimetric and Densitometric Analysis of Solvent-Based and Vegetable Oil-Based Inks of Multicolor Offset Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharavath, H. Naik; Hahn, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in the measurable print attributes (Print Contrast and Dot Gain) and color gamut of solvent-based (SB) inks vs. vegetable oil-based (VO) inks of multicolor offset printing. The literature review revealed a lack of published research on this subject. VO inks tend to perform (color…

  18. The public lecture on 30 years’reform and opening up in China’s printing,printing equipment and material industries was held ceremoniously

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The public lecture on 30 years’reform and opening up in China’s printing, printing equipment and material industries was held ceremoniously on November 29, 2008 in Beijing Friendship Hotel.The lecture is sponsored by Printing and Printing Equipment Industries Association of China,Guangdong Printing and Replicating

  19. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  20. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D printing and two-dimensional (2D printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  1. Design of 3D-Printed Titanium Compliant Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Ezekiel G.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Howell, Larry L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes 3D-printed titanium compliant mechanisms for aerospace applications. It is meant as a primer to help engineers design compliant, multi-axis, printed parts that exhibit high performance. Topics covered include brief introductions to both compliant mechanism design and 3D printing in titanium, material and geometry considerations for 3D printing, modeling techniques, and case studies of both successful and unsuccessful part geometries. Key findings include recommended flexure geometries, minimum thicknesses, and general design guidelines for compliant printed parts that may not be obvious to the first time designer.

  2. Latent lip print development and its role in suspect identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Dwivedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: The study aims to develop latent lip prints on glass surface using fingerprint black powder and its comparison with standard lipstick prints and also determines the effectiveness of the technique. Materials and Methods: This study included a total of 100 subjects, comprising of 50 males and 50 females with age ranging from 17 to 38 years. Latent lipprint was developed by pressing the lips against a glass slab with lips together and the print formed was developed by sprinkling the black finger print powder and transferred to a bond sheet. Subsequently, standard lipstick print was developed from the same subject. All the samples were coded and graded according to the patterns suggested in the literature. Results: Out of 100 latent prints only 29 prints showed lip patterns in all four quadrants. The percentage matching with self lipstick print of good latent prints ranged from 25% to 100% and those of random prints ranged from 8% to 92%. Quadrant wise matching ranged from 52.67% to 57.67%. Statistically significant difference was observed between males and females. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the usefulness of latent lip print in personal identification.

  3. Forensic print extraction using 3D technology and its processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, Srijith; Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos S.

    2017-05-01

    Biometric evidence plays a crucial role in criminal scene analysis. Forensic prints can be extracted from any solid surface such as firearms, doorknobs, carpets and mugs. Prints such as fingerprints, palm prints, footprints and lip-prints can be classified into patent, latent, and three-dimensional plastic prints. Traditionally, law enforcement officers capture these forensic traits using an electronic device or extract them manually, and save the data electronically using special scanners. The reliability and accuracy of the method depends on the ability of the officer or the electronic device to extract and analyze the data. Furthermore, the 2-D acquisition and processing system is laborious and cumbersome. This can lead to the increase in false positive and true negative rates in print matching. In this paper, a method and system to extract forensic prints from any surface, irrespective of its shape, is presented. First, a suitable 3-D camera is used to capture images of the forensic print, and then the 3-D image is processed and unwrapped to obtain 2-D equivalent biometric prints. Computer simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of using 3-D technology for biometric matching of fingerprints, palm prints, and lip-prints. This system can be further extended to other biometric and non-biometric modalities.

  4. Experiments and Analysis of Drop on Demand Cell Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell printing is a promising technology in tissue engineering, with which the complex threedimensional tissue constructs can be formed by sequentially printing the cells layer-by-layer. Though some cell printing experiments with commercial ink-jet printer show the possibility of this idea, there is a long way to implement cell printing in engineering. To get a better understanding of drop on demand piezoelectric cell printing, a cell printing experiment system with commercial piezoelectric ink jet printing head and configurable drive circuit is developed. And a series of cell printing experiment with yeast cell is performed to study the influence of drive parameters, cell solution density and viscosity of the solution on cell survival rate, droplet density and orifice status. The experimental results show that the cell solution density and its viscosity are key issue for cell printing with commercial printing head, and a large drive pulse width is helpful for printing the cell solution with a high cell density and viscosit.

  5. REAL TIME QUALITY CONTROL OF THE HEATSET OFFSET PRINTING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan-George RĂCHERU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Offset lithography is one of the most common ways of creating printed materials. Compared to other printing methods, offset printing is best suited for economically producing large volumes of high quality prints in a manner that requires little maintenance. Because of the high speed and the high volume of the printing press, we have to rely on automation for press control and not just to the printer’s eye. When printing an image that has more than one color, it is necessary to print each color separately and ensure each color overlaps the others precisely. If this is not done, the finished image will look fuzzy, blurred or "out of register". To help line the colors up correctly, a system of registration is necessary. Therefore, the use of an automated real time quality control system will result in a more consistent color for the customer and less waste for the printer.

  6. Future enhancements to 3D printing and real time production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Joseph; Jenkins, Jeffery; Wu, Jerry; Szu, Harold

    2014-05-01

    The cost and scope of additive printing machines range from several hundred to hundreds of thousands of dollars. For the extra money, one can get improvements in build size, selection of material properties, resolution, and consistency. However, temperature control during build and fusing predicts outcome and protects the IP by large high cost machines. Support material options determine geometries that can be accomplished which drives cost and complexity of printing heads. Historically, 3D printers have been used for design and prototyping efforts. Recent advances and cost reduction sparked new interest in developing printed products and consumables such as NASA who is printing food, printing consumer parts (e.g. cell phone cases, novelty toys), making tools and fixtures in manufacturing, and recursively print a self-similar printer (c.f. makerbot). There is a near term promise of the capability to print on demand products at the home or office... directly from the printer to use.

  7. The future of 3D printing technology in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Nabipour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing, one of the hottest cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, is projected to have revenue of $8.4 billion in 2020. #D printing technology will implement the concept of personalized medicine in medical healthcare industry and pharmaceutical fabrication. Organ printing, which it is defined as computer-aided, jet based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, is an interesting and challengeable field for 3D printing. Customized implants and prostheses can be produced in any imaginable geometry through the translation of radiological images of patients into digital.stl 3D print files. The creation of anatomical models based on the patient’s pathological conditions using 3D printing technologies would provide good models for training and to design surgical approaches. Hence, 3D printing not only will transform medical healthcare industry but also promises new converging technologies in the field of regenerative medicine.

  8. 3D Printing of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Microsupercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Zhou, Han; Li, Ben Q; Ding, Shujiang

    2017-02-08

    A novel 3D printing procedure is presented for fabricating carbon-nanotubes (CNTs)-based microsupercapacitors. The 3D printer uses a CNTs ink slurry with a moderate solid content and prints a stream of continuous droplets. Appropriate control of a heated base is applied to facilitate the solvent removal and adhesion between printed layers and to improve the structure integrity without structure delamination or distortion upon drying. The 3D-printed electrodes for microsupercapacitors are characterized by SEM, laser scanning confocal microscope, and step profiler. Effect of process parameters on 3D printing is also studied. The final solid-state microsupercapacitors are assembled with the printed multilayer CNTs structures and poly(vinyl alcohol)-H3PO4 gel as the interdigitated microelectrodes and electrolyte. The electrochemical performance of 3D printed microsupercapacitors is also tested, showing a significant areal capacitance and excellent cycle stability.

  9. Scale Control and Quality Management of Printed Image Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselskaya, O. A.; Kolesnikov, V. L.; Solov'eva, T. V.; Nagornova, I. V.; Babluyk, E. B.; Trapeznikova, O. V.

    2017-06-01

    The article provides a comparison of the main valuation techniques for a regulated parameter of printability of the offset paper by current standards GOST 24356 and ISO 3783: 2006. The results of development and implementation of a complex test scale for management and control the quality of printed production are represented. The estimation scale is introduced. It includes normalized parameters of print optical density, print uniformity, picking out speed, the value of dot gain, print contrast with the added criteria of minimizing microtexts, a paper slip, resolution threshold and effusing ability of paper surface. The results of analysis allow directionally form surface properties of the substrate to facilitate achieving the required quality of the printed image parameters, i. e. optical density of a print at a predetermined level not less than 1.3, the print uniformity with minimal deviation of dot gain about the order of 10 per cents.

  10. Direct Desktop Printed-Circuits-on-Paper Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhizhu; Gao, Yunxia; Liu, Jing

    2013-05-01

    There currently lacks of a way to directly write out electronics, just like printing pictures on paper by an office printer. Here we show a desktop printing of flexible circuits on paper via developing liquid metal ink and related working mechanisms. Through modifying adhesion of the ink, overcoming its high surface tension by dispensing machine and designing a brush like porous pinhead for printing alloy and identifying matched substrate materials among different papers, the slightly oxidized alloy ink was demonstrated to be flexibly printed on coated paper, which could compose various functional electronics and the concept of Printed-Circuits-on-Paper was thus presented. Further, RTV silicone rubber was adopted as isolating inks and packaging material to guarantee the functional stability of the circuit, which suggests an approach for printing 3D hybrid electro-mechanical device. The present work paved the way for a low cost and easygoing method in directly printing paper electronics.

  11. Quality Of Electrophotographic Prints On Foil Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozália Szentgyörgyvölgyi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrophotographic printing uses many types of substrates, our study focuses on plastic substrates. Six types ofregular and self-adhesive foil substrates were chosen to be printed using two electrophotographic presses: XeroxColour 1000 Press and Canon imagePress C7000VP. A test chart containing tone value scales and a set of samplesfor profiling was created, spectrophotomety and densitometry was applied to obtain the optical and colorimetricproperties of the substrates investigated. Xerox Color 1000 Press produced larger densities and tone value increaseon every type of substrate. The largest TVI values and reproducible colour gamut was observed on the smoothestfoil in case of both presses. Large colour differences were found between patches of full tone process colors on thedifferent substrates investigated.

  12. Screening for digital printing: a multiparameter task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daels, Katrien; Delabastita, Paul A.

    1997-02-01

    Changing demands in advertising and printing business has made the digital press systems valid competitors to offset technology for specific markets. Whereas offset is still superior in quality and high volume printing, the time consuming and costly prepress activities, as well as the need for huge investments in the press, make the all-in-one formula very attractive. How to link a fast/cheap machine with decent output-quality, making use of electrophotography? We use electrophotography as a pretext for making a stability analysis of several halftoning systems. As shown in a previous article (Ref. 3) we use the Fourier characteristics to figure out its dependence. In a first introduction we point out why electrophotography brings us to this matter. The further outline of the article scans through a list of opposite screening systems where we focus on the color stability in function of registration.

  13. Screen-printed flexible MRI receive coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Joseph R; Flynn, Anita M; Lechêne, Balthazar; Scott, Greig; Reed, Galen D; Shin, Peter J; Lustig, Michael; Arias, Ana C

    2016-03-10

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an inherently signal-to-noise-starved technique that limits the spatial resolution, diagnostic image quality and results in typically long acquisition times that are prone to motion artefacts. This limitation is exacerbated when receive coils have poor fit due to lack of flexibility or need for padding for patient comfort. Here, we report a new approach that uses printing for fabricating receive coils. Our approach enables highly flexible, extremely lightweight conforming devices. We show that these devices exhibit similar to higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional ones, in clinical scenarios when coils could be displaced more than 18 mm away from the body. In addition, we provide detailed material properties and components performance analysis. Prototype arrays are incorporated within infant blankets for in vivo studies. This work presents the first fully functional, printed coils for 1.5- and 3-T clinical scanners.

  14. Optical pattern recognition for printed music notation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homenda, Wladyslaw

    1995-03-01

    The paper presents problems related to automated recognition of printed music notation. Music notation recognition is a challenging problem in both fields: pattern recognition and knowledge representation. Music notation symbols, though well characterized by their features, are arranged in elaborated way in real music notation, which makes recognition task very difficult and still open for new ideas. On the other hand, the aim of the system, i.e. application of acquired printed music into further processing requires special representation of music data. Due to complexity of music nature and music notation, music representation is one of the key issue in music notation recognition and music processing. The problems of pattern recognition and knowledge representation in context or music processing are discussed in this paper. MIDISCAN, the computer system for music notation recognition and music processing, is presented.

  15. Organ printing: the future of bone regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Alblas, Jacqueline; Hennink, Wim E; Oner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2011-12-01

    In engineered bone grafts, the combined actions of bone-forming cells, matrix and bioactive stimuli determine the eventual performance of the implant. The current notion is that well-built 3D constructs include the biological elements that recapitulate native bone tissue structure to achieve bone formation once implanted. The relatively new technology of organ/tissue printing now enables the accurate 3D organization of the components that are important for bone formation and also addresses issues, such as graft porosity and vascularization. Bone printing is seen as a great promise, because it combines rapid prototyping technology to produce a scaffold of the desired shape and internal structure with incorporation of multiple living cell types that can form the bone tissue once implanted.

  16. Spatially modulated laser pulses for printing electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott; Piqué, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is reviewed. Combining this technique with high-viscosity donor ink (silver nanopaste) results in laser-printed features that are highly congruent in shape and size to the incident laser beam spatial profile. The DMD empowers LIFT to become a highly parallel, rapidly reconfigurable direct-write technology. By adapting half-toning techniques to the DMD bitmap image, the laser transfer threshold fluence for 10 μm features can be reduced using an edge-enhanced beam profile. The integration of LIFT with this beam-shaping technique allows the printing of complex large-area patterns with a single laser pulse.

  17. Printed electronic on flexible and glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futera, Konrad; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Kozioł, Grażyna

    2010-09-01

    Organic electronics is a platform technology that enables multiple applications based on organic electronics but varied in specifications. Organic electronics is based on the combination of new materials and cost-effective, large area production processes that provide new fields of application. Organic electronic by its size, weight, flexibility and environmental friendliness electronics enables low cost production of numerous electrical components and provides for such promising fields of application as: intelligent packaging, low cost RFID, flexible solar cells, disposable diagnostic devices or games, and printed batteries [1]. The paper presents results of inkjetted electronics elements on flexible and glass substrates. The investigations was target on characterizing shape, surface and geometry of printed structures. Variety of substrates were investigated, within some, low cost, non specialized substrate, design for other purposes than organic electronic.

  18. China Printing Industries(2002~2007)(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Printing Material Diagram 18-1.The Annual Production and Consumption of Plate.In 2007 the production of plate was 241.55 million m~2 while the plate consumption was 162.94 million m~2. Diagram 18-2.The Import and Export of PS Plate.In 2007 the volume of plate for export was 65.46 Million m~2,while that for import was 0.45 Million m~2.The export greatly exceeded the import.

  19. Remote Collaborative 3D Printing - Process Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    such products. 9.1. Additive Manufacturing Hardware Wish List • Multi-axis FDM machine capable of complex layups: An FDM system with a 4th and...transferring, receiving, manipulating, and printing a digital 3D model into an additively manufactured component. Several digital models were...into an additively manufactured component. Several digital models were exchanged, and the steps, barriers, workarounds, and results have been

  20. Promising Products for Printing and Publishing Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Činčikaitė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article surveys printing and publishing market and its strong and weak aspects. The concept of a new product is described as well as its lifetime and the necessity of its introduction to the market. The enterprise X operating on the market is analyzed, its strong and weak characteristics are presented. The segmentation of the company consumers is performed. On the basis of the performed analysis the potential promising company products are defined.Article in Lithuanian

  1. Heavyweight Dendritic Inks for Positive Microcontact Printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perl, András; Peter, Mária; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Reinhoudt, David N.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2006-01-01

    Poly(propylene imine) dendrimers with dialkyl sulfide end groups were prepared and developed as inks for positive microcontact printing ((+)uCP) on gold. Long (C10H21-S-C10H20-), medium (C3H7-S-C4H8-), and short (CH3-S-CH2-) dialkyl sulfide end groups were attached to second- and third-generation PP

  2. Electronic marketplaces for printed matters in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till-J. Fassold

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To bring together supplier and consumer of printed matters, different marketplaces exist on the Internet. In the following survey the di fferent kinds of market places are highlighted as well as their way of conducting their role as intermediators. In this connection, a central result is the finding that only fe w marketplace operators provide a process to secure the suppliers’ reputation

  3. Printed Circuit Board Design with HDL Designer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkert, Thomas K.; LaFourcade, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Staying up to date with the latest CAD tools both from a cost and time perspective is difficult. Within a given organization there may be experts in Printed Circuit Board Design tools and experts in FPGA/VHDL tools. Wouldn't it be great to have someone familiar with HDL Designer be able to design PCBs without having to learn another tool? This paper describes a limited experiment to do this.

  4. Modification of microneedles using inkjet printing

    OpenAIRE

    R D Boehm; Miller, P.R.; S L Hayes; Monteiro-Riviere, N.A.; Narayan, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, biodegradable acid anhydride copolymer microneedles containing quantum dots were fabricated by means of visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography-micromolding and inkjet printing. Nanoindentation was performed to obtain the hardness and the Young's modulus of the biodegradable acid anhydride copolymer. Imaging of quantum dots within porcine skin was accomplished by means of multiphoton microscopy. Our results suggest that the combination of visible light dynamic mask m...

  5. Print-to-print: printer-enabled out-of-cleanroom multiobject microprinting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Siyuan; Zhao, Siwei; Pan, Tingrui

    2014-01-01

    Micropatterning techniques have gained growing interests from a broad range of engineering and biology researches as it realizes the high-throughput and highly quantitative investigations on miniature biological objects (e.g., cells and bacteria) by spatially defined micropatterns. However, most of the existing techniques rely on expensive instruments or intensive cleanroom access which may not be easy to be utilized in a regular biological laboratory. Here, we present the detailed procedures of a simple versatile microprinting process, referred to as Print-to-Print (P2P), to form multiobject micropatterns for potential biological applications. Only a solid-phase printer and custom-made superhydrophobic (SH) films are utilized for the printing and no thermal or chemical treatment is involved during the entire printing process. Moreover, the noncontact nature of droplet transferring and printing steps can be highly advantageous for sensitive biological uses. By the P2P process, a minimal feature resolution of 229 ± 17 μm has been successfully achieved. What's more, this approach has been applied to form micropatterning on various commonly used substrates in biology as well as multiobject co-patterns. In addition, the SH substrates have also been demonstrated to be reusable.

  6. Piezoelectric Drop-on-Demand Inkjet Printing of Rat Fibroblast Cells: Survivability Study and Pattern Printing

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur Tryggvi

    2013-01-01

    A novel piezoelectric, drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet system has been developed and used to print L929 rat fibroblast cells. We investigate the survivability of the cells subjected to the large stresses during the printing process. These stresses are varied by changing the diameter of the orifice (36 to 119 microns) through which the cells are dispensed, as well as changing the electrical pulse used to drive the piezoelectric element. It is shown that for the smallest 36 microns diameter orifice, cell survival rates fall from 95% to approximately 76% when the ejection velocity is increased from 2 to 16 m/s. This decrease in survival rates is less significant when the larger orifice diameters of 81 microns and 119 microns are used. Analysis shows that there is a clear inverse relationship between cell survival rates and the mean shear rates during drop formation. By using the same printing set-up, fibroblast cells are printed onto alginate and collagen into patterns. Printed cells are cultured over a period of da...

  7. Color-managed 3D printing with highly translucent printing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Can Ates; Brunton, Alan; Tanksale, Tejas Madan; Urban, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    Many 3D printing applications require the reproduction of an object's color in addition to its shape. One 3D printing technology, called multi-jetting (or poly-jetting), allows full color 3D reproductions by arranging multiple colored materials (UV curing photo-polymers) on a droplet level in a single object. One property of such printing materials is their high translucency posing new challenges for characterizing such 3D printers to create ICC profiles. In this paper, we will first describe the whole color-managed 3D printing workflow and will then focus on measuring the colors of highly translucent printing materials. We will show that measurements made by spectrophotometers used in the graphic arts industry are systematically biased towards lower reflection. We will then propose a trichromatic camera-based approach for measuring such colors. Error rates obtained in comparison with spectroradiometric measurements for the same viewing conditions are within the interinstrument-variability of hand-held spectrophotometers used in graphic arts.

  8. Patterned surface with controllable wettability for inkjet printing of flexible printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Q M; Yeo, Lip-Pin; Lok, Boon-Keng; Lam, Yee-Cheong

    2014-03-26

    Appropriate control of substrate surface properties prior to inkjet printing could be employed to improve the printing quality of fine resolution structures. In this paper, novel methods to fabricate patterned surfaces with a combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties are investigated. The results of inkjet printing of PEDOT/PSS conductive ink on these modified surfaces are presented. Selective wetting was achieved via a two-step hydrophilic-hydrophobic coating of 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) and 3M electronic grade chemical respectively on PET surfaces; this was followed by a selective hydrophilic treatment (either atmospheric O2/Ar plasma or UV/ozone surface treatment) with the aid of a Nickel stencil. Hydrophobic regions with water contact angle (WCA) of 105° and superhydrophilic regions with WCA <5° can be achieved on a single surface. During inkjet printing of the treated surfaces, PEDOT/PSS ink spread spontaneously along the hydrophilic areas while avoiding the hydrophobic regions. Fine features smaller than the inkjet droplet size (approximately 55 μm in diameter) can be successfully printed on the patterned surface with high wettability contrast.

  9. High-Resolution Transfer Printing of Graphene Lines for Fully Printed, Flexible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Donghoon; Mahajan, Ankit; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Francis, Lorraine F; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2017-07-25

    Pristine graphene inks show great promise for flexible printed electronics due to their high electrical conductivity and robust mechanical, chemical, and environmental stability. While traditional liquid-phase printing methods can produce graphene patterns with a resolution of ∼30 μm, more precise techniques are required for improved device performance and integration density. A high-resolution transfer printing method is developed here capable of printing conductive graphene patterns on plastic with line width and spacing as small as 3.2 and 1 μm, respectively. The core of this method lies in the design of a graphene ink and its integration with a thermally robust mold that enables annealing at up to ∼250 °C for precise, high-performance graphene patterns. These patterns exhibit excellent electrical and mechanical properties, enabling favorable operation as electrodes in fully printed electrolyte-gated transistors and inverters with stable performance even following cyclic bending to a strain of 1%. The high resolution coupled with excellent control over the line edge roughness to below 25 nm enables aggressive scaling of transistor dimensions, offering a compelling route for the scalable manufacturing of flexible nanoelectronic devices.

  10. Variable-data Printing Serves - Niches Here, There & Everywhere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Ynostroza

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A milestone focus on high-end digital color presses capable of variable-data imaging - a technology that was introduced ten years ago and is just now at the beginning of wider, more successful implementation in commercial printing-tends to overshadow some real achievements on other variable-data fronts. Those activities involve ink-jet and electrophotographic imaging for high-volume transactional printing, print-on-demand books and catalogs, wide-format proofing and imaging, label production, and printing of text and coding of printed packaging.The capabilities of digital production color presses intrigue commercial printers the most, especially new units referred to by manufacturers as "Series II" or "third-generation" systems. Besides having more press-like characteristics, from offset-caliber quality, image consistency, and high output rates to sturdy construction, reliability, and stock choice, the units seem to represent a way to produce printing that’s beyond the norm.Some users are producing hybrid printed products (offset printing a quantity of "shells" that are later personalized by digital presses, while others are utilizing clients’ "dynamic" databases to personalize marketing materials that drive response rates up to 15%, even 35%. Finally, digital color systems prompt the creation of high-margin Internet-based print providers offering easy-to-design and easy-toorder print materials. Printers may do well to adopt the high-value communications capability that digital imaging offers.

  11. 3D inkjet printed radio frequency inductors and capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Vaseem, Mohammad

    2016-12-08

    Inkjet printing has emerged as an ideal method for the fabrication of low cost and efficient electronic systems. However, most of the printed designs at present utilize 2D inkjet printing of metallic inks on conventional substrates. In order to have fully printed RF components, the substrate must also be printed. 3D printing of polymers can be an ideal mechanism for printing substrates, however typically such materials cannot handle high sintering temperatures (>150 0C) required for nanoparticles based metallic inks. In this work, an all-inkjet printed process is demonstrated that utilizes 3D inkjet printing of a UV-cured dielectric material in combination with the printing of a particle free conductive silver organo-complex (SOC) ink for realization of inductors and capacitors. The processing temperature does not exceed 80 0C and still state of the art conductivity of 1×107 S/m is achieved. Both the conductive ink and dielectric have roughness values under 500 nm. The inductor and capacitor exhibit quality factors of 8 and 20 respectively in the high MHz and GHz regime.

  12. A Preliminary Study of 3D Printing on Rock Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Gao-Feng

    2015-05-01

    3D printing is an innovative manufacturing technology that enables the printing of objects through the accumulation of successive layers. This study explores the potential application of this 3D printing technology for rock mechanics. Polylactic acid (PLA) was used as the printing material, and the specimens were constructed with a "3D Touch" printer that employs fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests and direct tensile strength (DTS) tests were performed to determine the Young's modulus ( E) and Poisson's ratio ( υ) for these specimens. The experimental results revealed that the PLA specimens exhibited elastic to brittle behaviour in the DTS tests and exhibited elastic to plastic behaviour in the UCS tests. The influence of structural changes in the mechanical response of the printed specimen was investigated; the results indicated that the mechanical response is highly influenced by the input structures, e.g., granular structure, and lattice structure. Unfortunately, our study has demonstrated that the FDM 3D printing with PLA is unsuitable for the direct simulation of rock. However, the ability for 3D printing on manufactured rock remains appealing for researchers of rock mechanics. Additional studies should focus on the development of an appropriate substitution for the printing material (brittle and stiff) and modification of the printing technology (to print 3D grains with arbitrary shapes).

  13. All-printed capacitors with continuous solution dispensing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Plötner, Matthias; Berndt, Andreas; Kumar, Amit; Voit, Brigitte; Pospiech, Doris; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Printed electronics have been introduced into the commercial markets in recent years. Various printing technologies have emerged aiming to process printed electronic devices with low cost, environmental friendliness, and compatibility with large areas and flexible substrates. The aim of this study is to propose a continuous solution dispensing technology for processing all-printed thin-film capacitors on glass substrates using a leading-edge printing instrument. Among all printing technologies, this study provides concrete proof of the following outstanding advantages of this technology: high tolerance to inks, high throughput, low cost, and precise pattern transfers. Ag nanoparticle ink based on glycol ethers was used to print the electrodes. To obtain dielectric ink, a copolymer powder of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-benzoylphenyl methacrylate) containing crosslinkable side groups was dissolved in anisole. Various layouts were designed to support multiple electronic applications. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to investigate the all-printed capacitor layers formed using the proposed process. Additionally, the printed capacitors were electrically characterized under direct current and alternating current. The measured electrical properties of the printed capacitors were consistent with the theoretical results.

  14. Inkjet 3D printed check microvalve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Rafał; Adamski, Krzysztof; Lizanets, Danylo

    2017-04-01

    3D printing enables fast and relatively easy fabrication of various microfluidic structures including microvalves. A check microvalve is the simplest valve enabling control of the fluid flow in microchannels. Proper operation of the check valve is ensured by a movable element that tightens the valve seat during backward flow and enables free flow for forward pressure. Thus, knowledge of the mechanical properties of the movable element is crucial for optimal design and operation of the valve. In this paper, we present for the first time the results of investigations on basic mechanical properties of the building material used in multijet 3D printing. Specified mechanical properties were used in the design and fabrication of two types of check microvalve—with deflecting or hinge-fixed microflap—with 200 µm and 300 µm thickness. Results of numerical simulation and experimental data of the microflap deflection were obtained and compared. The valves were successfully 3D printed and characterised. Opening/closing characteristics of the microvalve for forward and backward pressures were determined. Thus, proper operation of the check microvalve so developed was confirmed.

  15. Fully inkjet-printed microwave passive electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Mckerricher, Garret

    2017-01-30

    Fully inkjet-printed three-dimensional (3D) objects with integrated metal provide exciting possibilities for on-demand fabrication of radio frequency electronics such as inductors, capacitors, and filters. To date, there have been several reports of printed radio frequency components metallized via the use of plating solutions, sputtering, and low-conductivity pastes. These metallization techniques require rather complex fabrication, and do not provide an easily integrated or versatile process. This work utilizes a novel silver ink cured with a low-cost infrared lamp at only 80 °C, and achieves a high conductivity of 1×107 S m−1. By inkjet printing the infrared-cured silver together with a commercial 3D inkjet ultraviolet-cured acrylic dielectric, a multilayer process is demonstrated. By using a smoothing technique, both the conductive ink and dielectric provide surface roughness values of <500 nm. A radio frequency inductor and capacitor exhibit state-of-the-art quality factors of 8 and 20, respectively, and match well with electromagnetic simulations. These components are implemented in a lumped element radio frequency filter with an impressive insertion loss of 0.8 dB at 1 GHz, proving the utility of the process for sensitive radio frequency applications.

  16. 3-D Printed High Power Microwave Magnetrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nicholas; Greening, Geoffrey; Exelby, Steven; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, Brad

    2015-11-01

    The size, weight, and power requirements of HPM systems are critical constraints on their viability, and can potentially be improved through the use of additive manufacturing techniques, which are rapidly increasing in capability and affordability. Recent experiments on the UM Recirculating Planar Magnetron (RPM), have explored the use of 3-D printed components in a HPM system. The system was driven by MELBA-C, a Marx-Abramyan system which delivers a -300 kV voltage pulse for 0.3-1.0 us, with a 0.15-0.3 T axial magnetic field applied by a pair of electromagnets. Anode blocks were printed from Water Shed XC 11122 photopolymer using a stereolithography process, and prepared with either a spray-coated or electroplated finish. Both manufacturing processes were compared against baseline data for a machined aluminum anode, noting any differences in power output, oscillation frequency, and mode stability. Evolution and durability of the 3-D printed structures were noted both visually and by tracking vacuum inventories via a residual gas analyzer. Research supported by AFOSR (grant #FA9550-15-1-0097) and AFRL.

  17. Biocompatible 3D printed magnetic micro needles

    KAUST Repository

    Kavaldzhiev, Mincho

    2017-01-30

    Biocompatible functional materials play a significant role in drug delivery, tissue engineering and single cell analysis. We utilized 3D printing to produce high aspect ratio polymer resist microneedles on a silicon substrate and functionalized them by iron coating. Two-photon polymerization lithography has been used for printing cylindrical, pyramidal, and conical needles from a drop cast IP-DIP resist. Experiments with cells were conducted with cylindrical microneedles with 630 ± 15 nm in diameter with an aspect ratio of 1:10 and pitch of 12 μm. The needles have been arranged in square shaped arrays with various dimensions. The iron coating of the needles was 120 ± 15 nm thick and has isotropic magnetic behavior. The chemical composition and oxidation state were determined using energy electron loss spectroscopy, revealing a mixture of iron and Fe3O4 clusters. A biocompatibility assessment was performed through fluorescence microscopy using calcein/EthD-1 live/dead assay. The results show a very high biocompatibility of the iron coated needle arrays. This study provides a strategy to obtain electromagnetically functional microneedles that benefit from the flexibility in terms of geometry and shape of 3D printing. Potential applications are in areas like tissue engineering, single cell analysis or drug delivery.

  18. Modelling Polymer Deformation during 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    Three-dimensional printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The fused deposition modelling technique involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion to fabricate an object. The key to ensuring strength at the weld between layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, prior to welding, both the extrusion process and the cooling temperature profile can significantly deform the polymer micro-structure and, consequently, how well the polymers are able to ``re-entangle'' across the weld. In particular, polymer alignment in the flow can cause de-bonding of the layers and create defects. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal extrusion process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and material rheology have on the conformation of a polymer melt. In particular, we incorporate both stretch and orientation using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine the melt structure as it flows through the nozzle, the subsequent alignment with the build plate and the resulting deformation due to the fixed nozzle height, which is typically less than the nozzle radius.

  19. Laser printed interconnects for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pique, Alberto; Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott; Charipar, Nicholas

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) can be used to generate microscale 3D structures for interconnect applications non-lithographically. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or dispersed metallic nanoparticles. However, the resulting 3D structures do not achieve the bulk conductivity of metal interconnects of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. It is possible, however, to laser transfer entire structures using a LIFT technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place allows whole components and parts to be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This talk will present the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding solid metal interconnects to connect individual devices into functional circuits. Furthermore, the same laser can bend or fold the thin metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief due to flexing or thermal mismatch. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation flexible electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research Program.

  20. Inkjet printing of carbon black electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Samuel; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2017-04-01

    Inkjet printing is an appealing technique to print electrodes for Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs). Here we present the preparation and ink-jet printing of a carbon black electrode mixture and characterise its properties. Carbon black has been used extensively in the past because it is very compliant; however, it has a high resistance and can be very dirty to work with. In this paper we show that carbon black remains an appropriate electrode material, and when inkjet printed can be used to fabricate devices meeting today's demanding requirements. DEAs are becoming thinner to decrease actuation voltages and are shrinking in size to match the scale of the devices in the biomedical field, tuneable optics, and microfluidics. Inkjet printing addresses both of these problems. Firstly, Inkjet printing is a non-contact technique and can print on very thin freestanding membranes. Secondly, the high precision of inkjet printers makes it possible to print complex electrode geometries in the millimetre scale. We demonstrate the advantages of inkjet printing and carbon black electrodes by conducting a full characterisation of the printed electrodes. The printed carbon black electrodes have resistances as low as 13kΩ/□, an elastic modulus of approximately 1MPa, and a cyclic resistance swing which increases by 7% over 1500 cycles at 50% stretch. We also demonstrate a DEA with printed carbon black electrodes with a diametral stretch of 8.8% at an electric field of approximately 94V/μm. Finally a qualitative test is conducted to show that the printed carbon black electrode is extremely hardwearing.

  1. 3D printing technologies for electrochemical energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Wei, Min; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Swart, Benjamin; Shao, Yuyan; Wu, Gang; Zhou, Chi

    2017-10-01

    Fabrication of electrodes and electrolytes play an important role in promoting the performance of electrochemical energy storage (EES) devices such as batteries and supercapacitors. Traditional fabrication techniques have limited capability in controlling the geometry and architecture of the electrode and solid-state electrolytes, which would otherwise compromise the performance. 3D printing, a disruptive manufacturing technology, has emerged as an innovative approach to fabricating EES devices from nanoscale to macroscale and from nanowatt to megawatt, providing great opportunities to accurately control device geometry (e.g., dimension, porosity, morphology) and structure with enhanced specific energy and power densities. Moreover, the additive manufacturing nature of 3D printing provides excellent controllability of the electrode thickness with much simplified process in a cost effective manner. With the unique spatial and temporal material manipulation capability, 3D printing can integrate multiple nanomaterials in the same print, and multi-functional EES devices (including functional gradient devices) can be fabricated. Herein, we review recent advances in 3D printing of EES devices. We focused on two major 3D printing technologies including direct writing and inkjet printing. The direct material deposition characteristics of these two processes enable them to print on a variety of flat substrates, even a conformal one, well suiting them to applications such as wearable devices and on-chip integrations. Other potential 3D printing techniques such as freeze nano-printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, binder jetting, laminated object manufacturing, and metal 3D printing are also introduced. The advantages and limitations of each 3D printing technology are extensively discussed. More importantly, we provide a perspective on how to integrate the emerging 3D printing with existing technologies to create structures over multiple length scale from

  2. High-resolution direct 3D printed PLGA scaffolds: print and shrink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2014-12-17

    Direct three-dimensional printing (3DP) produces the final part composed of the powder and binder used in fabrication. An advantage of direct 3DP is control over both the microarchitecture and macroarchitecture. Prints which use porogen incorporated in the powder result in high pore interconnectivity, uniform porosity, and defined pore size after leaching. The main limitations of direct 3DP for synthetic polymers are the use of organic solvents which can dissolve polymers used in most printheads and limited resolution due to unavoidable spreading of the binder droplet after contact with the powder. This study describes a materials processing strategy to eliminate the use of organic solvent during the printing process and to improve 3DP resolution by shrinking with a non-solvent plasticizer. Briefly, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) powder was prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation to form polymer microparticles. The printing powder was composed of polymer microparticles dry mixed with sucrose particles. After printing with a water-based liquid binder, the polymer microparticles were fused together to form a network by solvent vapor in an enclosed vessel. The sucrose is removed by leaching and the resulting scaffold is placed in a solution of methanol. The methanol acts as a non-solvent plasticizer and allows for polymer chain rearrangement and efficient packing of polymer chains. The resulting volumetric shrinkage is ∼80% at 90% methanol. A complex shape (honey-comb) was designed, printed, and shrunken to demonstrate isotropic shrinking with the ability to reach a final resolution of ∼400 μm. The effect of type of alcohol (i.e. methanol or ethanol), concentration of alcohol, and temperature on volumetric shrinking was studied. This study presents a novel materials processing strategy to overcome the main limitations of direct 3DP to produce high resolution PLGA scaffolds.

  3. Materials and Technological Developement of Screen Printing in Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Horvath

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Screen printing is a widely used technology in electronic technology. Even though there were many developments in the technology, it is still being under improvement. This paper deals with the automotive industry related screen printing processes. The processes associated with layer deposition and the manufacturing process parameters, which affect the quality of the prints. As the repair of electronic control unit (ECU used in road vehicles is nearly impossible the quality of printing therefore unquestionable. It is very important that the accidents caused by mechanical failure must be kept as low as possible therefore the avoidanceof failure in screen printing is not only economical question but in case of transportation it is also question of road safety. Finally, an overview is given of the typical failure effect and possible causes appearing in screen printing.

  4. Direct 3D printed shadow mask on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiminejad, S.; Köhler, E.; Enoksson, P.

    2016-10-01

    A 3D printed shadow mask method is presented. The 3D printer prints ABS plastic directly on the wafer, thus avoiding gaps between the wafer and the shadow mask, and deformation during the process. The wafer together with the 3D printed shadow mask was sputtered with Ti and Au. The shadow mask was released by immersion in acetone. The sputtered patches through the shadow mask were compared to the opening of the 3D printed shadow mask and the design dimensions. The patterned Au patches were larger than the printed apertures, however they were smaller than the design widths. The mask was printed in 4 min, the cost is less than one euro cent, and the process is a low temperature process suitable for temperature sensitive components.

  5. 3D-printing technologies for electrochemical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2016-05-21

    Since its conception during the 80s, 3D-printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has been receiving unprecedented levels of attention and interest from industry and research laboratories. This is in addition to end users, who have benefited from the pervasiveness of desktop-size and relatively cheap printing machines available. 3D-printing enables almost infinite possibilities for rapid prototyping. Therefore, it has been considered for applications in numerous research fields, ranging from mechanical engineering, medicine, and materials science to chemistry. Electrochemistry is another branch of science that can certainly benefit from 3D-printing technologies, paving the way for the design and fabrication of cheaper, higher performing, and ubiquitously available electrochemical devices. Here, we aim to provide a general overview of the most commonly available 3D-printing methods along with a review of recent electrochemistry related studies adopting 3D-printing as a possible rapid prototyping fabrication tool.

  6. Investigation into digital print hard copy quality, longevity and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazlauciunas, Algy; Zhang Mingyu [Department of Colour Science, School of Chemistry, University of Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ball, Jeff, E-mail: ccdak@leeds.ac.u [Nazdar Limited, Heaton Mersey, Stockport, Cheshire SK4 3EG (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    The main purpose of the research project was to investigate whether deskjet ink jet printing could produce A-4 size images on a par with conventional silver halide continuous tone photographic media prints. To this end, equivalent images were produced using both dye-based and pigment-based deskjet ink jet prints. To assist the research project, a multi-cultured array of observers were enlisted to give individual responses to a range of specific questions appertaining to the image characteristics of the A-4 size images produced. In addition, in order to assess the image stability and print durability of both the conventional silver halide prints and the ink jet prints, a range of laboratory tests were undertaken in the areas of light fastness, water fastness and both dry and wet rub fastness.

  7. Evaluation of different substrates for inkjet printing of rasagiline mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Janßen, Eva Maria; Breitenbach, Armin;

    2013-01-01

    ) was used as a low-dose active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Flexible doses of the drug in a single unit were obtained by printing several subsequent layers on top of the already printed ones, using an off-the-shelf consumer thermal inkjet (TIJ) printer. The produced drug-delivery systems were subjected...... paper due to absorption of the ink into the matrix of the substrate. The best linear correlation between the dose of the drug and the number of the printing layers was obtained for the porous copy paper. The other two substrates showed poor linearity and unacceptable standard deviations of the printed...... drug substance due to limited absorption of the API ink into the carrier. The shear stress between the substrate, the print head, and the paper feeding rollers caused smearing of the drug that had been surface-deposited during the earlier printing cycles. In conclusion, this study indicates...

  8. 3D printing in chemistry: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatford, Ryan; Karanassios, Vassili

    2016-05-01

    During the last years, 3d printing for rapid prototyping using additive manufacturing has been receiving increased attention in the technical and scientific literature including some Chemistry-related journals. Furthermore, 3D printing technology (defining size and resolution of 3D objects) and properties of printed materials (e.g., strength, resistance to chemical attack, electrical insulation) proved to be important for chemistry-related applications. In this paper these are discussed in detail. In addition, application of 3D printing for development of Micro Plasma Devices (MPDs) is discussed and 2d-profilometry data of a 3D printed surfaces is reported. And, past and present chemistry and bio-related applications of 3D printing are reviewed and possible future directions are postulated.

  9. Grey Balance Colorimetry of the Automatically Guided Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Zjakic

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Apart from visual control, it is possible to controll the ink on a print by means of auxilliary instruments - densitometer, colorimeter and spectral photometer.One of the problems in offset printing reproduction is the inconstancy of theink flow and ink consumption during the run printing. This problem appears because of the change of ink viscosity, the change of ink temperature, the change of fountain solution quantity in ink, the change of printing speed etc.This article shows the measurements of the chromatic values performed by spectral photometer on the control - signal strip from the very beginning of the run printing till 20000th print. Gray balance (CMY by means of CIE L*a*b* system has been investigated. Densitometric values of the solid area, the growth of the screen values and doubling-shear have been determined. The results of the spectrophotometric measurements of gray balance and the densitometric measurements of the solid tint have been analyzed.

  10. Identifying positioning-based attacks against 3D printed objects and the 3D printing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    Zeltmann, et al. demonstrated that structural integrity and other quality damage to objects can be caused by changing its position on a 3D printer's build plate. On some printers, for example, object surfaces and support members may be stronger when oriented parallel to the X or Y axis. The challenge presented by the need to assure 3D printed object orientation is that this can be altered in numerous places throughout the system. This paper considers attack scenarios and discusses where attacks that change printing orientation can occur in the process. An imaging-based solution to combat this problem is presented.

  11. Gravure printing of graphene for large-area flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Ethan B; Lim, Sooman; Zhang, Heng; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F; Hersam, Mark C

    2014-07-09

    Gravure printing of graphene is demonstrated for the rapid production of conductive patterns on flexible substrates. Development of suitable inks and printing parameters enables the fabrication of patterns with a resolution down to 30 μm. A mild annealing step yields conductive lines with high reliability and uniformity, providing an efficient method for the integration of graphene into large-area printed and flexible electronics.

  12. Printed organic thin-film transistor-based integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Saumen; Noh, Yong-Young

    2015-06-01

    Organic electronics is moving ahead on its journey towards reality. However, this technology will only be possible when it is able to meet specific criteria including flexibility, transparency, disposability and low cost. Printing is one of the conventional techniques to deposit thin films from solution-based ink. It is used worldwide for visual modes of information, and it is now poised to enter into the manufacturing processes of various consumer electronics. The continuous progress made in the field of functional organic semiconductors has achieved high solubility in common solvents as well as high charge carrier mobility, which offers ample opportunity for organic-based printed integrated circuits. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of all-printed organic thin-film transistor-based integrated circuits, mainly ring oscillators. First, the necessity of all-printed organic integrated circuits is discussed; we consider how the gap between printed electronics and real applications can be bridged. Next, various materials for printed organic integrated circuits are discussed. The features of these circuits and their suitability for electronics using different printing and coating techniques follow. Interconnection technology is equally important to make this product industrially viable; much attention in this review is placed here. For high-frequency operation, channel length should be sufficiently small; this could be achievable with a combination of surface treatment-assisted printing or laser writing. Registration is also an important issue related to printing; the printed gate should be perfectly aligned with the source and drain to minimize parasitic capacitances. All-printed organic inverters and ring oscillators are discussed here, along with their importance. Finally, future applications of all-printed organic integrated circuits are highlighted.

  13. Networked Print Production: Does JDF Provide a Perfect Workflow?

    OpenAIRE

    Bernd Zipper

    2004-01-01

    The "networked printing works" is a well-worn slogan used by many providers in the graphics industry and for the past number of years printing-works manufacturers have been working on the goal of achieving the "networked printing works". A turning point from the concept to real implementation can now be expected at drupa 2004: JDF (Job Definition Format) and thus "networked production" will form the center of interest here. The first approaches towards a complete, networked workflow between p...

  14. Black Twin Colors on Topographics Maps in Digital Print

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Matas; Vilko Žiljak

    2014-01-01

    Spot dyes join the double feature of the INFRAREDESIGN® theory. A large number of planned colors in graphics of topographic maps, are simulated in the press with only four process colorants. Achieved are seperated infromation for the visible and infrared spectrum. This introduces the protection of printed matter, protection of property, reduces the cost of spot printing of large numbers of layers. For the digital print technology simulation of the merge of "topographical colors" is extended t...

  15. Pigment Ink Formulation for Inkjet Printing of Different Textile Materials

    OpenAIRE

    M.M. Marie; Y.H. El-Hamaky; D. Maamoun; D.F. Ibrahim; Abbas, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Cotton, polyester, and cotton polyester blended woven fabrics were printed using an ink jet print using by means of a prepared pigment ink. Literature indicated that the development of insoluble pigment-based inks presents enormous challenges to the ink formulator. Meanwhile, pigments face several application problems in terms of their dispersion stability within the ink formulation, and consequently blocking the nozzles within the inkjet print head. Upon this, Two pigment colors : M.D. Blue ...

  16. Screen printed nanosized ZnO thick film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bindu Krishnan; V P N Nampoori

    2005-06-01

    Nanosized ZnO was prepared by polyol synthesis. Fluorescence spectrum of the ZnO colloid at varying pump intensities was studied. The powder was extracted and characterized by XRD and BET. The extracted powder was screen printed on glass substrates using ethyl cellulose as binder and turpinol as solvent. Coherent back scattering studies were performed on the screen printed sample which showed evidence of weak localization. The screen printed pattern showed strong UV emission.

  17. Effectiveness of 3D Printing in Small Scale Production

    OpenAIRE

    Huttunen, Jani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to estimate the effectiveness of two 3D printing methods (fused deposition modeling and stereolithography) for prototyping and small-scale production at a 3D printing laboratory at Metropolia University of Applied Sciences. The 3D printing technology is currently developing, so not much literature is available yet. That is the reason why before actual production a thorough analysis is needed of the advantages and disadvantages and of the effectiveness of the...

  18. Special Issue: 3D Printing for Biomedical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kai Chua

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing has a long history of applications in biomedical engineering. The development and expansion of traditional biomedical applications are being advanced and enriched by new printing technologies. New biomedical applications such as bioprinting are highly attractive and trendy. This Special Issue aims to provide readers with a glimpse of the recent profile of 3D printing in biomedical research.

  19. Inference for deformation and interference in 3D printing

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbaghi, Arman; Dasgupta, Tirthankar; Huang, Qiang; Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is a promising manufacturing technique marred by product deformation due to material solidification in the printing process. Control of printed product deformation can be achieved by a compensation plan. However, little attention has been paid to interference in compensation, which is thought to result from the inevitable discretization of a compensation plan. We investigate interference with an experiment involving the application of discretized compen...

  20. Printing technologies in fabrication of drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Viitala, Tapani; Ihalainen, Petri

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There has been increased activity in the field recently regarding the development and research on various printing techniques in fabrication of dosage forms and drug delivery systems. These technologies may offer benefits and flexibility in manufacturing, potentially paving the way...... recent literature where printing techniques are used in fabrication of drug delivery systems. The future perspectives and possible impacts on formulation strategies, flexible dosing and personalized medication of using printing techniques for fabrication of drug delivery systems are discussed.......\

  1. Embedded Linux based demonstration device for printed electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Saud, M. (Muhammad)

    2014-01-01

    As use of printed electronics is going towards expansion in near future, researchers are studying methods for development of printed components, and also procedures for driving them. Few low speed but low cost, and flexible stand alone systems e.g., some sensor systems and displays; have already made their way to market after competing conventional, high speed, high cost, and rigid silicon electronics. At present, there are different type of printed sensors and display matrices, which have be...

  2. Post processing of 3D models for 3D printing

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    According to the opinion of some experts the additive manufacturing or 3D printing will change manufacturing industry, because any individual could print their own model according to his or her wishes. In this graduation thesis some of the additive manufacturing technologies are presented. Furthermore in the production of house scale model in 1:100 is presented, starting from modeling to printing. Special attention is given to postprocessing of the building model elements us...

  3. Cyto-3D-print to attach mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroagudin, Michelle R; Zhai, Yujia; Li, Zhi; Marnell, Michael G; Glavy, Joseph S

    2016-08-01

    The Cyto-3D-print is an adapter that adds cytospin capability to a standard centrifuge. Like standard cytospinning, Cyto-3D-print increases the surface attachment of mitotic cells while giving a higher degree of adaptability to other slide chambers than available commercial devices. The use of Cyto-3D-print is cost effective, safe, and applicable to many slide designs. It is durable enough for repeated use and made of biodegradable materials for environment-friendly disposal.

  4. The Cambrian Explosion of Popular 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Chulilla Cano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The unexpected appearance of 3D printing has caught many of technology analyst by surprise. In this paper we aim to provide a social context to the feedback loops that have generated this rapid evolution of technologies and skills involved in 3D printing, as well as and online communities related with 3D printing and the impact of this evolution on media an popular imaginary… and our near future.

  5. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Christine Bold, ed. US Popular Print Culture: 1860-1920.

    OpenAIRE

    Feleki, Despoina

    2015-01-01

    US Popular Print Culture 1860-1920 is the sixth volume in The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture series. Edited by Christine Bold, it records as well as critically and historically assesses the most important aspects of popular print culture, spanning from Antebellum America until World War I. This great publishing endeavor follows an encyclopedic approach, without proposing one encompassing cultural theory on which to ground all these essays about the popular. It accepts that “popular c...

  7. High yield, single droplet electrode arrays for nanoscale printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caironi, Mario; Gili, Enrico; Sakanoue, Tomo; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2010-03-23

    In this work we demonstrate two building blocks of a scalable manufacturing technology for nanoscale electronic devices based on direct-write printing: an architecture for high-yield printing of electrode gaps with 100 nm dimension and a low-temperature silver complex ink for integration of organic materials with high conductivity metal interconnects. We use single printed droplets that are made to dewet slowly from each other to allow reliable, high yield patterning even in the presence of certain surface defects.

  8. Direct Desktop Printed-Circuits-on-Paper Flexible Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Zheng; Zhizhu He; Yunxia Gao; Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    There currently lacks of a way to directly write out electronics, just like printing pictures on paper by an office printer. Here we show a desktop printing of flexible circuits on paper via developing liquid metal ink and related working mechanisms. Through modifying adhesion of the ink, overcoming its high surface tension by dispensing machine and designing a brush like porous pinhead for printing alloy and identifying matched substrate materials among different papers, the slightly oxidize...

  9. The effect of lead content and surface roughness on wetting and spreading of low-lead and no-lead solders on copper-clad FR-4 laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Roberts, J.L.; Davidson, R.N.; Yost, F.G.; Hosking, F.M.

    1997-02-01

    Environmental and health concerns pertaining to lead have encouraged research into low-lead alloys for electronic soldering. The development of solder alloys containing lower amounts of lead than Sn/Pb eutectic (37 wt.% lead), but possessing similar properties, is an industry-wide goal. To determine the wettability of low-lead solders, 21 alloys each of Sn/Ag and Sn/Cu eutectic (containing 0 to 10 wt.% lead and/or indium) were tested on as-received copper-clad FR-4. Contact angles for the alloys ranged from 12.5 to 38.9{degrees} and area of spread measurements ranged from 5.2 to 17.3 mm{sup 2} compared with 5 to 150 and {approximately}19 mm{sup 2}, respectively, for Sn/Pb eutectic. Alloys with 8 to 10 wt.% lead showed contact angles and areas of spread similar to Sn/Pb eutectic under similar conditions. The best results on the as-received substrates, compared to the Sn/Pb eutectic, were obtained from the Sn/Ag eutectic with 10 wt.% lead. The very low-lead (less than 10 wt.% lead) and lead-free alloys, however, failed to achieve the performance level of eutectic Sn/Pb solders. A desire to improve the spreading of very low-lead and lead-free solders provided the impetus for these efforts to produce {open_quotes}engineered{close_quotes} rough surfaces. In an attempt to improve the wettability and spreading behavior of very low-lead and lead-free alloys, the very low-lead and lead-free members of the Sn/Ag system were tested on roughened copper-clad FR-4. Every alloy in the test suite demonstrated improvement in area of spread on the roughened substrates. The best results on the roughened substrates, compared to the Sn/Pb eutectic, were obtained from the Sn/Ag eutectic with 8 wt.% lead. The effects of surface roughness on the wettability and flow behavior of solder alloys has provided insight into surface morphologies that lead to improved solderability.

  10. Use of nanocellulose in printed electronics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeng, Fanny; Denneulin, Aurore; Bras, Julien

    2016-07-21

    Since the last decade, interest in cellulose nanomaterials known as nanocellulose has been growing. Nanocellulose has various applications ranging from composite reinforcement to rheological modifiers. Recently, nanocellulose has been shown to have great potential in flexible printed electronics applications. The property of nanocellulose to form self-standing thermally stable films has been exploited for producing transparent and smooth substrates for printed electronics. However, other than substrates, the field of printed electronics involves the use of inks, various processing methods and the production of flexible electronic devices. This review aims at providing an overview of the use and potential of nanocellulose throughout the printed electronics field.

  11. Characterizing Digital Light Processing (DLP) 3D Printed Primitives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyge, Emil; Pallisgaard, Jens J.; Lillethorup, Morten

    2015-01-01

    The resolution and repeatability of 3D printing processes depends on a number of factors including the software, hardware, and material used. When printing parts with features that are near or below the nominal printing resolution, it is important to understand how the printer works. For example......, what is the smallest unit shape that can be produced? And what is the reproducibility of that process? This paper presents a method for automatically detecting and characterizing the height, width, and length of micro scale geometric primitives produced via a digital light processing (DLP) 3D printing...

  12. Printed products for digital cameras and mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fageth, Reiner; Schmidt-Sacht, Wulf

    2005-01-01

    Digital photography is no longer simply a successor to film. The digital market is now driven by additional devices such as mobile phones with camera and video functions (camphones) as well as innovative products derived from digital files. A large number of consumers do not print their images and non-printing has become the major enemy of wholesale printers, home printing suppliers and retailers. This paper addresses the challenge facing our industry, namely how to encourage the consumer to print images easily and conveniently from all types of digital media.

  13. The analysis of ink jet printed eco-font efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastko Milošević

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of eco-font for office printing is one of sustainable, “green” printing concepts, which besides obvious economic benefits, as a result has a certain effect on environmental sustainability as well. The fundamental problem that this practice faces is decreased quality of text printed using eco-fonts comparing to those printed with regular fonts. The aim of this research is eco-font efficiency estimation, i.e. determination of toner usage reduction level of ink jet printed documents typed with this font type, as well as estimation of the extent humans perceive differences between text printed with eco-font and the one printed by its „non-eco“ equivalent. Combining instrumental measuring method and digital image analysis, it was found that this simple principle (eco-font utilization enables substantial toner usage reduction for an ink jet printing system, while visual test showed that visual experience of text printed using eco-font is sufficient. In addition, awareness of benefits that eco-font utilization brings, change users’ attitude towards eco-font quality.

  14. A self-sensing structure with printed sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bradley; Yoon, Hwan-Sik

    2011-04-01

    Recently, printed electronics have received growing attention as a new method to produce low-cost large-area electronics on flexible substrates. Much of the current research relies mainly on an inkjet printing technique to deposit electrically functional material solutions onto plastic substrates in order to fabricate various electronic components such as resistors, capacitors and transistors. In this paper, we propose to apply the printed electronics technology to the development of strain sensors for the purpose of measuring structural vibration. To accomplish this, we have developed an aerosol printing system that exhibits better performance in printing on various types of substrates. The system consists of a moving platform, an ultrasonic atomizer, and a shutter to control the flow of the aerosol. Using the system, we demonstrate that a functional strain sensor can be printed directly on the surface of a nonmetallic structure. To form a strain sensor, a water-based conductive polymer, PEDOT-PSS, was deposited on a plastic substrate using the aerosol printer. Then, the piezoresistive response of the printed strain sensor was measured for three different low frequency dynamic strain loadings. The results showed that this type of printed strain sensor can be used to measure the vibration of the host structure. The result of this research will serve as a critical step toward the fabrication of self-sensing structures with printed sensors and accompanying electronics.

  15. Planar and three-dimensional printing of conductive inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Bok Yeop; Walker, Steven B; Slimmer, Scott C; Russo, Analisa; Gupta, Ashley; Kranz, Steve; Duoss, Eric B; Malkowski, Thomas F; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2011-12-09

    Printed electronics rely on low-cost, large-area fabrication routes to create flexible or multidimensional electronic, optoelectronic, and biomedical devices. In this paper, we focus on one- (1D), two- (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) printing of conductive metallic inks in the form of flexible, stretchable, and spanning microelectrodes. Direct-write assembly is a 1-to-3D printing technique that enables the fabrication of features ranging from simple lines to complex structures by the deposition of concentrated inks through fine nozzles (~0.1 - 250 μm). This printing method consists of a computer-controlled 3-axis translation stage, an ink reservoir and nozzle, and 10x telescopic lens for visualization. Unlike inkjet printing, a droplet-based process, direct-write assembly involves the extrusion of ink filaments either in- or out-of-plane. The printed filaments typically conform to the nozzle size. Hence, microscale features (< 1 μm) can be patterned and assembled into larger arrays and multidimensional architectures. In this paper, we first synthesize a highly concentrated silver nanoparticle ink for planar and 3D printing via direct-write assembly. Next, a standard protocol for printing microelectrodes in multidimensional motifs is demonstrated. Finally, applications of printed microelectrodes for electrically small antennas, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes are highlighted.

  16. Inkjet Printing of High Conductivity, Flexible Graphene Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Ethan B; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L; Puntambekar, Kanan; Geier, Michael L; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-04-18

    The ability to print high conductivity, conformal, and flexible electrodes is an important technological challenge in printed electronics, especially for large-area formats with low cost considerations. In this Letter, we demonstrate inkjet-printed, high conductivity graphene patterns that are suitable for flexible electronics. The ink is prepared by solution-phase exfoliation of graphene using an environmentally benign solvent, ethanol, and a stabilizing polymer, ethyl cellulose. The inkjet-printed graphene features attain low resistivity of 4 mΩ·cm after a thermal anneal at 250 °C for 30 min while showing uniform morphology, compatibility with flexible substrates, and excellent tolerance to bending stresses.

  17. Printed circuits and their applications: Which way forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantatore, E.

    2015-09-01

    The continuous advancements in printed electronics make nowadays feasible the design of printed circuits which enable meaningful applications. Examples include ultra-low cost sensors embedded in food packaging, large-area sensing surfaces and biomedical assays. This paper offers an overview of state-of-the-art digital and analog circuit blocks, manufactured with a printed complementary organic TFT technology. An analog to digital converter and an RFID tag implemented exploiting these building blocks are also described. The main remaining drawbacks of the printed technology described are identified, and new approaches to further improve the state of the art, enabling more innovative applications are discussed.

  18. Personalized development of human organs using 3D printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of organ transplantation created by the lack of organ donors and life-long immunosuppression. We hypothesized a precision medicine approach to human organ fabrication using 3D printed technology, in which the digital volumetric data would be collected by imaging of a patient, i.e. CT or MRI images followed by mathematical modeling to create a digital 3D image. Then a suitable biocompatible material, with an optimal resolution for cells seeding and maintenance of cell viability during the printing process, would be printed with a compatible printer type and finally implanted into the patient. Life-saving operations with 3D printed implants were already performed in patients. However, several issues need to be addressed before translational application of 3D printing into clinical medicine. These are vascularization, innervation, and financial cost of 3D printing and safety of biomaterials used for the construct.

  19. Ink-jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the ink-jet printing program at Purdue University is described. The drop-on-demand printing system was modified to use metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) inks. Also, an IBM AT computer was integrated into the ink-jet printer system to provide operational functions and contact pattern configuration. The integration of the ink-jet printing system, problems encountered, and solutions derived were described in detail. The status of ink-jet printing using a MOD ink was discussed. The ink contained silver neodecanate and bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in toluene; the MOD ink decomposition products being 99 wt% AG, and 1 wt% Bi.

  20. Genotoxicity study in lymphocytes of offset printing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Hüseyin; Yilmaz, Serkan; Celik, Mustafa; Yüzbaşioglu, Deniz; Unal, Fatma

    2006-01-01

    The potential cytogenetic damage in offset printing workers was evaluated using sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), chromosome aberrations (CAs) and micronuclei (MN) as biomarkers in peripheral lymphocytes of 26 volunteers (14 workers, 12 controls). The CA, SCE and MN frequency of offset printing workers was significantly higher than in their controls. The replication index (RI) was not affected while the mitotic index (MI) was affected most in the workers. It can be concluded from this study that chronic occupational exposure to printing dyes and thinner may lead to a slightly increased risk of genetic damage among offset printing workers.

  1. Inkjet-printed multi-parameter measuring sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Chiang, Yu-Hsin; Wu, Chun-Wei; Estroff, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Printed organic sensors on flexible substrates have generated great interest due to their flexibility and low cost manufacturing. Methods such as inkjet printing, screen printing, etching or flexography are among many that have been used for the production process. In this paper, we report the fabrication and characterization of a free-standing, high aspect ratio PEDOT:PSS micro cylinder (20 um in diameter and 1 mm height) multi-parameter sensor printed by an inkjet process. Calibration fabrication and preliminary sensor measurement results from the fabricated sensor will be presented and future applications are discussed.

  2. A combined system for 3D printing cybersecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2017-06-01

    Previous work has discussed the impact of cybersecurity breaches on 3D printed objects. Multiple attack types that could weaken objects, make them unsuitable for certain applications and even create safety hazards have been presented. This paper considers a visible light sensing-based verification system's efficacy as a means of thwarting cybersecurity threats to 3D printing. This system detects discrepancies between expected and actual printed objects (based on an independent pristine CAD model). Whether reliance on an independent CAD model is appropriate is also considered. The future of 3D printing is projected and the importance of cybersecurity in this future is discussed.

  3. 3D printing: making things at the library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    3D printers are a new technology that creates physical objects from digital files. Uses for these printers include printing models, parts, and toys. 3D printers are also being developed for medical applications, including printed bone, skin, and even complete organs. Although medical printing lags behind other uses for 3D printing, it has the potential to radically change the practice of medicine over the next decade. Falling costs for hardware have made 3D printers an inexpensive technology that libraries can offer their patrons. Medical librarians will want to be familiar with this technology, as it is sure to have wide-reaching effects on the practice of medicine.

  4. 3D Printing the Complete CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kief, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The 3D Printing the Complete CubeSat project is designed to advance the state-of-the-art in 3D printing for CubeSat applications. Printing in 3D has the potential to increase reliability, reduce design iteration time and provide greater design flexibility in the areas of radiation mitigation, communications, propulsion, and wiring, among others. This project is investigating the possibility of including propulsion systems into the design of printed CubeSat components. One such concept, an embedded micro pulsed plasma thruster (mPPT), could provide auxiliary reaction control propulsion for a spacecraft as a means to desaturate momentum wheels.

  5. 3D Printing by Multiphase Silicone/Water Capillary Inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Sangchul; Parekh, Dishit P; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Velev, Orlin D

    2017-08-01

    3D printing of polymers is accomplished easily with thermoplastics as the extruded hot melt solidifies rapidly during the printing process. Printing with liquid polymer precursors is more challenging due to their longer curing times. One curable liquid polymer of specific interest is polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This study demonstrates a new efficient technique for 3D printing with PDMS by using a capillary suspension ink containing PDMS in the form of both precured microbeads and uncured liquid precursor, dispersed in water as continuous medium. The PDMS microbeads are held together in thixotropic granular paste by capillary attraction induced by the liquid precursor. These capillary suspensions possess high storage moduli and yield stresses that are needed for direct ink writing. They could be 3D printed and cured both in air and under water. The resulting PDMS structures are remarkably elastic, flexible, and extensible. As the ink is made of porous, biocompatible silicone that can be printed directly inside aqueous medium, it can be used in 3D printed biomedical products, or in applications such as direct printing of bioscaffolds on live tissue. This study demonstrates a number of examples using the high softness, elasticity, and resilience of these 3D printed structures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Geng-Hsi; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue engineering. There are advantages and limitations for each method. Future areas of interest and progress are the development of new 3D printing platforms, scaffold design software, and materials for tissue engineering applications.

  7. Inkjet patterning of multiline intersections for wirings in printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Elkin; Ramon, Eloi; Carrabina, Jordi

    2013-10-08

    Inkjet printed electronics using thermo-curable liquid inks exhibit particular geometrical characteristics in terms of regularity. This article presents a morphological analysis for inkjet printed multi line intersections that are critical structures for building circuits. We studied thin-film structures of silver conductive ink and printed by inkjet technology. Instability of the ink during printing causes the thickness irregularity of vertex, normally with peaks at these areas. We propose the usage of specific patterns for intersections as thickness regularity compensations. The results show that some patterns help to reduce this instability and improve the thickness regularity of intersections morphology.

  8. Exposure assessment of workers in printed electronics workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Sohn, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Jin Soo; Ahn, Kangho; Kim, Keun Soo; Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Taik Min; Yu, Il Je

    2013-07-01

    Printed electronics uses converging technologies, such as printing, fine mechanics, nanotechnology, electronics and other new technologies. Consequently, printed electronics raises additional health and safety concerns to those experienced in the traditional printing industry. This study investigated two printed electronics workplaces based on a walk-through survey and personal and area sampling. All the printed electronics operations were conducted in a cleanroom. No indication of exposure to excess silver nanoparticles or carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was found. While the organic solvents were lower than current occupational exposure limits, there was a lack of engineering controls, such as local exhaust ventilation, correct enclosure and duct connections. There was also an insufficient quantity of personal protective equipment, and some organic solvents not described in the safety data sheets (SDSs) were detected in the air samples. Plus, the cleaning work, a major emissions operation, was not conducted within a hood, and the cleaning waste was not properly disposed of. Therefore, the present exposure assessment results from two printed electronics workplaces suggest that the printed electronics industry needs to take note of the occupational safety and health risks and hazards already established by the traditional printing industry, along with new risks and hazards originating from converging technologies such as nanotechnology.

  9. Use of nanocellulose in printed electronics: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeng, Fanny; Denneulin, Aurore; Bras, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Since the last decade, interest in cellulose nanomaterials known as nanocellulose has been growing. Nanocellulose has various applications ranging from composite reinforcement to rheological modifiers. Recently, nanocellulose has been shown to have great potential in flexible printed electronics applications. The property of nanocellulose to form self-standing thermally stable films has been exploited for producing transparent and smooth substrates for printed electronics. However, other than substrates, the field of printed electronics involves the use of inks, various processing methods and the production of flexible electronic devices. This review aims at providing an overview of the use and potential of nanocellulose throughout the printed electronics field.

  10. The influence of printing substrate on macro non-uniformity and line reproduction quality of imprints printed with electrophotographic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđe Vujčić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Print quality is very important for every printing technique. It depends on many different quality attributes. This research included analysis of macro non-uniformities and line reproduction. 16 different paper substrates printed by electrophotographic process were analyzed. They were separated in two groups: coated and uncoated papers. Analysis of macro non-uniformity showed that print mottle has lower values when printed on coated papers than on uncoated papers. Line reproduction analysis showed that the toner spreaded, during melting and fixation, on line edges for both types of paper. According to these results it can be concluded that paper substrate affects the macro non-uniformity and line reproduction, thus overall print quality.

  11. The compromises of printing organic electronics: a case study of gravure-printed light-emitting electrochemical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo; Tekoglu, Serpil; Stolz, Sebastian; Eckstein, Ralph; Teusch, Claudia; Trapp, Jannik; Lemmer, Uli; Hamburger, Manuel; Mechau, Norman

    2014-05-28

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) are fabricated by gravure printing. The compromise between device performance and printing quality is correlated to the ink formulation and the printing process. It is shown that the rheological properties of the ink formulations of LECs can be tailored without changing the chemical composition of the material blend. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. 3D Printed Programmable Release Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Maneesh K; Meng, Fanben; Johnson, Blake N; Kong, Yong Lin; Tian, Limei; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Masters, Nina; Singamaneni, Srikanth; McAlpine, Michael C

    2015-08-12

    The development of methods for achieving precise spatiotemporal control over chemical and biomolecular gradients could enable significant advances in areas such as synthetic tissue engineering, biotic-abiotic interfaces, and bionanotechnology. Living organisms guide tissue development through highly orchestrated gradients of biomolecules that direct cell growth, migration, and differentiation. While numerous methods have been developed to manipulate and implement biomolecular gradients, integrating gradients into multiplexed, three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains a critical challenge. Here we present a method to 3D print stimuli-responsive core/shell capsules for programmable release of multiplexed gradients within hydrogel matrices. These capsules are composed of an aqueous core, which can be formulated to maintain the activity of payload biomolecules, and a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, an FDA approved polymer) shell. Importantly, the shell can be loaded with plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs), which permits selective rupturing of the capsule when irradiated with a laser wavelength specifically determined by the lengths of the nanorods. This precise control over space, time, and selectivity allows for the ability to pattern 2D and 3D multiplexed arrays of enzyme-loaded capsules along with tunable laser-triggered rupture and release of active enzymes into a hydrogel ambient. The advantages of this 3D printing-based method include (1) highly monodisperse capsules, (2) efficient encapsulation of biomolecular payloads, (3) precise spatial patterning of capsule arrays, (4) "on the fly" programmable reconfiguration of gradients, and (5) versatility for incorporation in hierarchical architectures. Indeed, 3D printing of programmable release capsules may represent a powerful new tool to enable spatiotemporal control over biomolecular gradients.

  13. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J.; Zhao, Huaying

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation. PMID:27525659

  14. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation.

  15. Print-to-print: a facile multi-object micro-patterning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Siyuan; Zhao, Siwei; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, micropatterning techniques have gained increasing popularity from a broad range of engineering and biology communities for the promise to establish highly quantitative investigations on miniature biological objects (e.g., cells and bacteria) with spatially defined microenvironments. However, majority of the existing techniques rely on cleanroom-based microfabrication and cannot be easily extended to a regular biological laboratory. In this paper, we present a simple versatile printing-based method, referred to as Print-to-Print (P2P), to form multi-object micropatterns for potential biological applications, along with our recent efforts to deliver out-of-cleanroom microfabrication solutions to the general public (Zhao et al. 2009), (Xing et al. 2011), (Wang et al. 2009), (Pan and Wang 2011), (Zhao et al. 2011). The P2P method employs only a commercially available solid-phase printer and custom-made superhydrophobic films. The entire patterning process does not involve any thermal or chemical treatment. Moreover, the non-contact nature of droplet transferring and printing steps can be highly advantageous for sensitive biological uses. Using the P2P process, a minimal feature resolution of 229 ± 17 μm has been successfully demonstrated. In addition, this approach has been applied to form biological micropatterning on various substrates as well as multi-object co-patterns on the commonly used surfaces. Finally, the reusability of superhydrophobic substrates has also been illustrated.

  16. Jaak Prints: näitleja hirmud on üldinimlikud / Jaak Prints ; intervjueerinud Tiiu Laks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Prints, Jaak, 1981-

    2010-01-01

    Teatri NO99 näitleja Jaak Prints endast, näitlejaks olemisest, mõistest "mõtlev teater", koduteatrist, NO99 aktsioonist "Ühtne Eesti suurkogu", lavastamise soovist jm. Loetletud Jaak Printsi rollid ja tööd lavastajana

  17. Formatting and paratextual elements in Croatian books printed in Divald’s print house by 1800

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Velagić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to investigate formatting and use of paratextual elements in books printed in Croatian in Ivan Martin Divald’s print house in Osijek from 1779 to the end of the 18th century. The corpus included Divald’s books from the Essekiana Collection of the library in The Museum of Slavonia in Osijek. The research was conducted by correlating the format, genre, presence or absence of paratextual elements and formatting, looking in particular at paragraph and chapter organization and use of notes. The research results show that a standardized format as well as formatting was used (textual organization, use of notes, but that the paratextual elements were not used in a systematic fashion. By focusing on a shorter time-span and one print house only, we excluded the possible influence of different print styles and practices, which made the formatting independent of different designer approaches. This is also the major limitation of this research, as a small corpus does not allow for generalizations.

  18. Inkjet printing and adhesion characterisation of conductive tracks on a commercial printed circuit board material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, A.; Dijk, van D.J.; Akkerman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle-based conductive tracks were inkjet printed using a piezoelectric drop-on-demand inkjet printer on a commercially available electronics grade fibre glass (E-glass) reinforced substrate material, and the experimental results have been summarised. Ink jetting was done on two varian

  19. Inkjet printing and adhesion characterisation of conductive tracks on a commercial printed circuit board material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, Ashok; van Dijk, D.J.; Akkerman, Remko

    2009-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle-based conductive tracks were inkjet printed using a piezoelectric drop-on-demand inkjet printer on a commercially available electronics grade fibre glass (E-glass) reinforced substrate material, and the experimental results have been summarised. Ink jetting was done on two

  20. Dyed and Printed Textiles: Javanese Batik [and] Dutch Wax Prints [and] West African Adire. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sue

    Three booklets focusing on dyed and printed textile techniques of Java, West Africa, and the Netherlands describe historical and ethnographic materials as well as the development of particular technical traditions. Each section may be used alone or with either or both of the others. When used together, these booklets illustrate the…

  1. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop AntennaPrinted Slot Loop Antenna (invited)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel verticall A novel vertically polarized dpolarize , omnidirection omnidirectional l , printed slot loop antenna h sprinted slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated, and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform...

  2. Printing soft matter in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truby, Ryan L.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-12-01

    Light- and ink-based three-dimensional (3D) printing methods allow the rapid design and fabrication of materials without the need for expensive tooling, dies or lithographic masks. They have led to an era of manufacturing in which computers can control the fabrication of soft matter that has tunable mechanical, electrical and other functional properties. The expanding range of printable materials, coupled with the ability to programmably control their composition and architecture across various length scales, is driving innovation in myriad applications. This is illustrated by examples of biologically inspired composites, shape-morphing systems, soft sensors and robotics that only additive manufacturing can produce.

  3. Printing and Prototyping of Tissues and Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Brian

    2012-11-01

    New manufacturing technologies under the banner of rapid prototyping enable the fabrication of structures close in architecture to biological tissue. In their simplest form, these technologies allow the manufacture of scaffolds upon which cells can grow for later implantation into the body. A more exciting prospect is the printing and patterning in three dimensions of all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) to generate structures analogous to tissues; this has been termed bioprinting. Such techniques have opened new areas of research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  4. Communicating cancer risk in print journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, J E

    1999-01-01

    The current barrage of information about real and potential cancer risks has created undue fears and misplaced concerns about cancer hazards faced by Americans. Most members of the general public are far more worried about minuscule, hypothetical risks presented by environmental contaminants than about the far greater well-established hazards that they inflict on themselves, for example, through smoking, dietary imbalance, and inactivity. It is the job of the print media to help set the record straight and to help place in perspective the myriad cancer risks that are aired almost weekly in 30-second radio and television broadcasts.

  5. 3D Printing and Global Value Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehnberg, Märtha; Ponte, Stefano

    From the birth of industrialization, access to new technology has been a decisive factor in how value added is created and distributed across networks of global production. This article provides a balanced assessment of the potential impact that one of these technologies (3D printing, or 3DP) may......-produced using traditional technology and organization; and a substitution scenario, where 3DP partially replaces traditional manufacturing. These two are likely to co-exist for a period of time, but each has distinctive implications in terms of distribution of value added along GVCs and geographically....

  6. 3D Printing and Global Value Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehnberg, Märtha; Ponte, Stefano

    From the birth of industrialization, access to new technology has been a decisive factor in how value added is created and distributed across networks of global production. This article provides a balanced assessment of the potential impact that one of these technologies (3D printing, or 3DP) may......-produced using traditional technology and organization; and a substitution scenario, where 3DP partially replaces traditional manufacturing. These two are likely to co-exist for a period of time, but each has distinctive implications in terms of distribution of value added along GVCs and geographically....

  7. Plasmonic laser printing for functional metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Carstensen, M. S.; Vannahme, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances can be created. This technology creates a laser printer capable of producing color images with a resolution up to 127,000 DPI. With tailored trains of laser pulses, multiple optical states are flatiron onto the metasurface film with a nanoscale......Recently, we show a method of color printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures [1]. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface...

  8. Printed shadow masks for organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yoshiaki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2007-09-01

    We have manufactured organic field-effect transistors by using shadow masks that are patterned by a screen printing system. The 50-nm-thick pentacene layer is sublimed as a channel in the vacuum system through the shadow mask on the base film with a multilayer patterned by ink-jet. After the deposition of the pentacene layer, the shadow mask is peeled off from the base film without any mechanical damages to the lower structures. The mobility in the saturation regime is 0.4cm2/Vs and the on-off ratio exceeds 105.

  9. All-printed paper-based memory

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2016-06-16

    All-printed paper-based substrate memory devices are described which can be prepared by a process that includes coating, using a screen printer, one or more areas of a paper substrate (102) with a conductor material (104), such as a carbon paste, to form a first electrode, depositing, with an ink jet printer, a layer of resistance switching insulator material (106), such as titanium dioxide, over one or more areas of the conductor material, and depositing, with an ink jet printer, a layer of metal (108), such as silver, over one or more areas of the titanium dioxide to form a second electrode.

  10. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren H.; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...... pattern. The antenna is designed for the 2.45 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band. Applications of the antenna are many. One is for on-body applications since it is ideal for launching a creeping waves due to the polarization....

  11. Recent Progress in the Development of Printed Thin-Film Transistors and Circuits with High-Resolution Printing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Kenjiro; Someya, Takao

    2016-11-28

    Printed electronics enable the fabrication of large-scale, low-cost electronic devices and systems, and thus offer significant possibilities in terms of developing new electronics/optics applications in various fields. Almost all electronic applications require information processing using logic circuits. Hence, realizing the high-speed operation of logic circuits is also important for printed devices. This report summarizes recent progress in the development of printed thin-film transistors (TFTs) and integrated circuits in terms of materials, printing technologies, and applications. The first part of this report gives an overview of the development of functional inks such as semiconductors, electrodes, and dielectrics. The second part discusses high-resolution printing technologies and strategies to enable high-resolution patterning. The main focus of this report is on obtaining printed electrodes with high-resolution patterning and the electrical performance of printed TFTs using such printed electrodes. In the final part, some applications of printed electronics are introduced to exemplify their potential.

  12. Embedding objects during 3D printing to add new functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2016-07-01

    A novel method for integrating and embedding objects to add new functionalities during 3D printing based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) (also known as fused filament fabrication or molten polymer deposition) is presented. Unlike typical 3D printing, FDM-based 3D printing could allow objects to be integrated and embedded during 3D printing and the FDM-based 3D printed devices do not typically require any post-processing and finishing. Thus, various fluidic devices with integrated glass cover slips or polystyrene films with and without an embedded porous membrane, and optical devices with embedded Corning(®) Fibrance™ Light-Diffusing Fiber were 3D printed to demonstrate the versatility of the FDM-based 3D printing and embedding method. Fluid perfusion flow experiments with a blue colored food dye solution were used to visually confirm fluid flow and/or fluid perfusion through the embedded porous membrane in the 3D printed fluidic devices. Similar to typical 3D printed devices, FDM-based 3D printed devices are translucent at best unless post-polishing is performed and optical transparency is highly desirable in any fluidic devices; integrated glass cover slips or polystyrene films would provide a perfect optical transparent window for observation and visualization. In addition, they also provide a compatible flat smooth surface for biological or biomolecular applications. The 3D printed fluidic devices with an embedded porous membrane are applicable to biological or chemical applications such as continuous perfusion cell culture or biocatalytic synthesis but without the need for any post-device assembly and finishing. The 3D printed devices with embedded Corning(®) Fibrance™ Light-Diffusing Fiber would have applications in display, illumination, or optical applications. Furthermore, the FDM-based 3D printing and embedding method could also be utilized to print casting molds with an integrated glass bottom for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device replication

  13. Influence of the surface roughness of coated and uncoated papers on the digital print mottle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Jurič

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many factors influence the occurrence of print mottle in prints. In printing process three main components are involved: printing press, substrate and toner. They can be considered as separate components, but in most cases their interaction influences the quality of the print. The goal of this work was to examine the influence of surface roughness of different types of paper (coated and uncoated on print mottle of electrophotographic digital prints. We set up a hypothesis that print mottle will be more apparent on rougher surfaces. In the experimental part we printed four different substrates with different surface properties on electrophotographic printing press. Morphology of the papers surface was analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM from which surface properties were calculated. For print mottle characterization Gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM method was used. Based on the measurements and results we can conclude, contrary to the initial hypothesis, that uncoated papers with rougher surfaces produce smaller print mottle values.

  14. Decal Electronics: Printable Packaged with 3D Printing High-Performance Flexible CMOS Electronic Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-10-14

    High-performance complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics are flexed, packaged using 3D printing as decal electronics, and then printed in roll-to-roll fashion for highly manufacturable printed flexible high-performance electronic systems.

  15. Advances in digital printing and quality considerations of digitally printed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waes, Walter C.

    1997-02-01

    The traditional 'graphic arts' market has changed very rapidly. It has been only ten years now since Aldus introduced its 'PageMaker' software for text and layout. The platform used was Apple-Mac, which became also the standard for many other graphic applications. The so-called high-end workstations disappeared. This was the start for what later was called: the desk top publishing revolution. At the same time, image scanning became also user-friendly and heavy duty scanners were reduced to desktop-size. Color- reproduction became a commodity product. Since then, the pre-press industry has been going through a technical nightmare, trying to keep up with the digital explosion. One after another, tasks and crafts of pre-press were being transformed by digital technologies. New technologies in this field came almost too fast for many people to adapt. The next digital revolution will be for the commercial printers. All the reasons are explained later in this document. There is now a definite need for a different business-strategy and a new positioning in the electronic media-world. Niches have to be located for new graphic arts- applications. Electronic services to-and-from originators' and executors environments became a requirement. Data can now flow on-line between the printer and the originator of the job. It is no longer the pre-press shop who is controlling this. In many cases, electronic data goes between the print-buyer or agency and the printer. High power communication-systems with accepted standard color- management are transforming the printer, and more particularly, the pre-press shop fatally. The new digital printing market, now in the beginning of its expected full expansion, has to do with growing requests coming from agencies and other print-buyers for: (1) short-run printing; (2) print-on-demand approximately in-time; (3) personalization or other forms of customization; (4) quick turnaround.

  16. Dual Band Print Antenna for Wireless Applications with Enhanced Isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajinkya Vekhande,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a PIFA type MIMO antenna for wireless applications. The MIMO antenna consists of two identical PIFA antennas on both ends of an FR4 substrate and operates over a frequency band of 2-4 GHz. The proposed antenna is suitable for IEEE 801.11n and PCS applications. A vertical conducting line along with the T-shaped element extended from patch is inserted between two PIFAs in order to increase the isolation. Also implementation of neutral line connected with 2 PIFAs helps to enhance isolation. A partial ground plane is used to feed the antennas. The isolation mechanism will be discussed in this article. The MIMO antenna occupies complete dimensions of antenna. The overall dimension of 15 mm × 55 mm can be easily applied in the dongle element.

  17. Fluorinated graphene suspension for inkjet printed technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebogatikova, N. A.; Antonova, I. V.; Kurkina, I. I.; Soots, R. A.; Vdovin, V. I.; Timofeev, V. B.; Smagulova, S. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2016-05-01

    The possibility to control the size of the flakes of graphene suspension in the course of their fluorination in an aqueous hydrofluoric acid solution was demonstrated. The effect of the suspension composition, the fluorination time, temperature and thermal stress on the fragmentation process was investigated. The corrugation of suspension flakes, which occurs at fluorination due to a difference in the constants of graphene and fluorographene lattices, leads to the appearance of nonuniform mechanical stresses. The fact that the flake size after fragmentation is determined by the size of corrugation allows the assumption that the driving force of fragmentation is this mechanical stress. This assumption is confirmed by the break of the corrugated layers from flakes under thermal stress. Moreover, fluorination treatment at elevated temperatures (˜70 °C) significantly accelerates the fragmentation process. Suspensions of fluorinated graphene with nanometer size flakes are of interest for the development of 2D ink-jet printing technologies and production of thermally and chemically stable dielectric films for nanoelectronics. The printed fluorinated graphene films on silicon and flexible substrates have been demonstrated and the charges in metal-insulator-semiconductor structures have been estimated as the ultra low values of (0.5-2) × 1010 cm-2.

  18. Fully printed flexible carbon nanotube photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Miao, Jinshui; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report fully printed flexible photodetectors based on single-wall carbon nanotubes and the study of their electrical characteristics under laser illumination. Due to the photothermal effect and the use of high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes, the devices exhibit gate-voltage-dependent photoresponse with the positive photocurrent or semiconductor-like behavior (conductivity increases at elevated temperatures) under positive gate biases and the negative photocurrent or metal-like behavior (conductivity decreases at elevated temperatures) under negative gate biases. Mechanism for such photoresponse is attributed to the different temperature dependencies of carrier concentration and carrier mobility, which are two competing factors that ultimately determine the photothermal effect-based photoresponse. The photodetectors built on the polyimide substrate also exhibit superior mechanical compliance and stable photoresponse after thousands of bending cycles down to a curvature radius as small as 3 mm. Furthermore, due to the low thermal conductivity of the plastic substrate, the devices show up to 6.5 fold improvement in responsivity compared to the devices built on the silicon substrate. The results presented here provide a viable path to low cost and high performance flexible photodetectors fabricated entirely by the printing process.

  19. Automatic recognition of printed Oriya script

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Chaudhuri; U Pal; M Mitra

    2002-02-01

    This paper deals with an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) system for printed Oriya script. The development of OCR for this script is difficult because a large number of character shapes in the script have to be recognized. In the proposed system, the document image is first captured using a flat-bed scanner and then passed through different preprocessing modules like skew correction, line segmentation, zone detection, word and character segmentation etc. These modules have been developed by combining some conventional techniques with some newly proposed ones. Next, individual characters are recognized using a combination of stroke and run-number based features, along with features obtained from the concept of water overflow from a reservoir. The feature detection methods are simple and robust, and do not require preprocessing steps like thinning and pruning. A prototype of the system has been tested on a variety of printed Oriya material, and currently achieves 96.3% character level accuracy on average.

  20. Comparing laser printing and barcode scanning designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Thomas D.

    1991-02-01

    A comparison of requirements and designs for barcode and non-impact printer scanners reveals similarities and differences that may be useful in leading to new solutions for barcode scanner problems. The non-impact printer scanner has been in volume production for over 10 years successfully achieving low cost high performance and high quality targets. Where requirements are found to overlap solutions already implemented and proven for printer applications may fmd further application in bar code scanners. Typical technologies used for printing include flying spot scanners liquid crystal shutters scophony scanners and LED arrays. Of primary concern in measuring figure of merit are such critical parameters as cost lifetime reliability conformance to regulatory standards environmental ruggedness power consumption compactness insensitivity to orientation acoustic noise produced modularity spot size depth of field exposure level and uniformity data rate scan length and uniformity and many more. A comparison of printing technologies their capabilities and their limitations with those used in barcode scanners may reveal common problems where we can take advantage of work already completed in similar application where requirements are found to overlap.